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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1932

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
FOE   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31ST, 1930
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1931.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commissioner
for the year ended December 31st, 1930.
R. H. POOLEY,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1931. Office of the Game Commissioner,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1931.
Honourable R. H. Pooley, K.C, M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game Commissioner for
the year ended December 31st, 1930.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. BRYAN AVILLIAMS,
Game Commissioner. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
1930.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
During the year very many important improvements have been made in the reorganization
of the Game Department, with such satisfactory results that many expressions of approval of
the present method of administration have been made in various parts of the Province. It is
also noticeable that even those who favoured a Game Board instead of a single salaried official
have had to confess that matters are progressing more favourably than they expected.
It is most pleasing to be able to state that the harmony and co-operation which was soon
established between the Game Department and the Provincial Police Department continues to
exist. In fact, if it were possible, an improvement has been made. Any difficulties that have
occurred have been of a very minor nature and have soon been settled to the satisfaction of
both Forces. Undoubtedly, the efficiency of both Forces has been increased on this account.
The Game Department wishes to extend to the Provincial Police Commissioner its most sincere
thanks for the valuable assistance received from his officers and constables, and to assure him
that we greatly appreciate the work that has been done by his constables in those districts where
our finances will not permit a Game AVarden to be stationed.
The work done by the Game Wardens this year has been highly commendable. While every
force of men is bound to have one or two who are not as energetic or as efficient as they might
be, nevertheless the Game Department really has a remarkably fine lot of men whose physique
and devotion to duty regardless of danger, exposure to rain, frost, and snow, and often long
hours of night-work, has been a great credit to the Department.
The general idea seems to be that any man who is fond of sport can make a good Game
AVarden. It is not realized what a number of qualifications a man must have, nor is it realized
what a strenuous life most of them lead and how many risks they must take if they do their
work as they should.
This year we have had one Game Warden killed, several have been injured, others laid up
through exposure, and Game Warden Clark, of Fort Nelson, escaped death by drowning by the
narrowest of margins.
Game Warden Clark was travelling homeward on the Nelson River with a man named
George Beatton, who had been a witness in some prosecutions which had just been held, and
they were travelling in a canoe propelled by an outboard motor. At a critical time the propeller
struck a small piece of driftwood and broke a shear-pin. Before paddles could be put out to
control the canoe, a bad whirlpool caught it and turned it over. The unfortunate witness, George
Beatton, was never seen again. Clark was thrown up on a small island in a semi-conscious
condition. Eventually, he made a precarious raft out of dead willow-sticks which, without the
aid of an axe, was all he could get. On this raft he travelled down-stream over 25 miles and
was fortunately picked up by some Indians.
IN MEMORIAM.
During this year the death of Game Warden Dennis Greenwood has to be reported.
Game Warden Greenwood, who was stationed at Canal Flats, was shot to death in cold
blood by a man whom he was about to prosecute for an infraction of the " Game Act."
The man who was responsible for his death was subsequently arrested and tried for
murder, but was pronounced insane.
Dennis Greenwood was a returned soldier with a very good war record. He had been
a Game Warden for five years. His whole heart and soul were in his work, and he had
developed into a very reliable and efficient officer and had all the qualifications for
promotion. He was most highly respected and liked throughout his district and his
lamentable death is most deeply deplored. D 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
During the year a great number of trap-lines have been registered, and from all indications
it would appear that the system of registration is proving very beneficial in affording protection
to fur-bearing animals.
OPEN SEASONS.
For the  first time in many  years,  the Game Regulations for  the season  1930-31 have
apparently been entirely satisfactory, as very few complaints or recommendations for changes
were received after the regulations were printed.
..   (Attention is drawn to the section under the heading "Fur-bearing Animals.")
FUR-BEARING ANIMALS.
During the year there has been a considerable agitation to have the seasons for beaver and
muskrats in the Interior altered so as to allow fall trapping. This agitation has been principally
confined to the Coast fur-traders, whose main arguments in favour of the change are that early
winter pelts fetch a higher price than those taken in the present open season, and that we are
endangering our stock by allowing trapping to continue close up to the breeding season.
The Interior trappers, especially those who make their headquarters at Prince George, seem
to be unanimous in their approval of the present seasons, and, as far as can be learned, most
of the northern fur-traders agree with them.
There has also been an agitation for a close season for beaver, which, it must be acknowledged, would be an excellent thing in many districts if it were possible to put it on and, above
all, to enforce it. Before going into the matter of a close season for beaver, it is first of all
advisable to consider the proposed alterations in the beaver and muskrat seasons.
If shortening the season in the spring months would help conservation, it certainly should
receive most earnest consideration, but judging by the returns of royalty which has been collected
on furs during the past year, this does not appear to be the case. In the first place, approximately 2,350 more beaver were trapped this year than last year, and, in addition, royalty was
collected on over 84,000 muskrats, which is just about 32,000 more than the previous year.
Unquestionably, a good deal of the increase in the number of beaver and muskrats trapped
must be placed to the credit of our system of trap-line registration, which is evidently just
beginning to produce beneficial results. The increase in beaver and muskrats is especially satisfactory when consideration is given to the fact that quite a number of our trappers did not take
a full catch owing to the price of furs having fallen to its present low level. Notwithstanding
the fact that there has been an increased number of beaver-pelts marketed, there is no denying
the fact that the stock of this valuable fur-bearer is at a low ebb in many districts, particularly
throughout the country to the south of the 52nd parallel of latitude.
The enormous prices that were paid for beaver-pelts before the general financial depression
commenced were, of course, responsible for a far too extensive slaughter, which unfortunately
took place not only in season, but out of season also. With the inducements which were offered
to trappers, particularly Indians, by a few irresponsible traders, it would have taken a small army
of Game AVardens to enforce the close season, and had it not been for the system of trap-line
registration and the careful conservation of fur by the better class of trappers, the situation
to-day with regard to beaver would have been a very serious one. As it is, while we still have
quite a large stock of beaver in some districts, there are others which have very few and where
a close season could be put on with advantage. The question then arises," If a close season
were declared, what effect would it have on trappers who have been conserving their beaver, and
to what extent could it be enforced? "
Let us first of all consider how it would affect the trappers. Even to the south of the main
line of the Canadian Pacific Railway there are still a number of trappers who can, without
danger of depletion, take yearly a fair number of beaver. Between the main line of the Canadian
Pacific Railway and the main line of the Canadian National Railway there are a larger number
of trappers who have good stocks of beaver on their lines. In this area there are probably a few
who have as many beaver as their lines, will hold. North of the main line of the Canadian
National Railway there are even more trappers with fine stocks of heaver. Many of these,
particularly some of the Indians of the extreme north, would be deprived of their living by a
close season. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 7
It must also be remembered that these trappers who have their lines fully stocked would
lose the whole of their increase, which would migrate, for the benefit of those who have not been
conserving their fur so carefully. Closing the season would, to men such as those mentioned,
be just as great an injustice as to deprive the fur-farmer of his surplus stock.
To sum up, the situation as far as the trapper is concerned is this: AVe have given them
their trap-lines and have encouraged them to preserve them and consider them in the nature of
fur-farms. Many of them have taken advantage of the opportunity offered to them. How can
we, then, now declare a close season without losing the confidence of the best trappers?
Presuming, however, that a number of trappers would not have an injustice done to them
by a close season, it is now necessary to consider to what extent it could be enforced. .Last year
the Yukon Territory and Alaska prohibited the trapping of beaver entirely. We have positive
knowledge of quite a number of pelts being smuggled into this Province, and there is little doubt
that, notwithstanding their best efforts, the law was not respected by the poachers, and in
consequence the best class of trappers were made to suffer.
We can also judge by the experience we had in British Columbia when there was a close
season a few years ago. It is a known fact that hundreds of beaver were taken out of the
country. They were smuggled out as personal effects in trunks and valises and in every
conceivable way that could be devised to evade a seizure. It is also a known fact that hundreds
of pelts were bought and carefully hidden away until another open season allowed their being
placed on the market. With beaver worth the enormous prices that were then prevailing, the
temptation was too great and a close season simply hurt the law-abiding trapper for the benefit
of those who would evade it.
It is true that last year we did have a close season for beaver on Vancouver Island. This
close season probably was fairly well enforced, but conditions on Vancouver Island are so entirely
different from the Mainland that there is no comparison between the two. Beaver are down to
a very low ebb on Vancouver Island and it was a comparatively easy matter to prevent any
trapping wholesale.
Conditions to-day are, however, very different to what they were during the last close season.
Prices of pelts have fallen to such an extent that there is not, at present, the same inducement
to do illegal trapping, and were it possible to have the whole of the Province closed up, it might
be possible to really enforce it with a certain degree of success; but a close season is not really
necessary everywhere, and as it has already been explained, it would be an injustice to a large
number of the trappers.
Supposing, then, that it was decided to close up a certain area. The question then arises,
"Where could we draw the line?" It would be necessary either to take one of the railway
main lines as a boundary or else have a line which nobody would know the exact location of.
In addition, no matter what boundaries were set, there would be sure to be numbers of trap-lines
crossing that boundary, so that some of the trappers would be in a position where they could trap
beaver on one part of their line and not on another. To close up any particular area made by
the electoral districts would be out of the question, as its enforcement would be a mere farce.
Altogether, the whole problem of making a close season presents endless difficulties, though
it may seem a very simple matter to the ordinary person who has nothing to do with the enforcement of it. It is easy to say: " Declare a close season. Even if it is not possible to enforce it
absolutely, it will result in the saving of some beaver." Those who say this sort of thing do not
realize that by doing as they suggest much more harm than good might be done.
As matters now stand, the solution of the problem must rest entirely in the hands of the
trappers. We have given them their trap-lines under most advantageous conditions and we are
doing our best to give them protection from poachers. If they will not conserve their beaver
and other fur-bearing animals under our system of registration, the prospects for the future of
all our fur-bearers are not at all bright: but if the present increase in the number of beaver
and muskrats is a true criterion of the efforts of the trappers, we can live in hopes that they will
conserve their beaver and that from now on the general stock will improve yearly.
To further the conservation of beaver and other fur-bearers, a circular is now being prepared
which will be sent to every holder of a registered trap-line, Indians included, pointing out to
them the absolute necessity of careful conservation of their lines, and particularly of the beaver
on them, and that continued failure to do this will eventually result in the cancellation of their
lines. D 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
FUR-FARMING.
A gradual increase is shown in the number of fur-farms in the Province. A statement
covering the returns of licensed fur-farmers will be found on pages 48-59.
Considerable difficulty has been encountered in obtaining returns from fur-farmers, but
it is hoped that next year returns will come in immediately they are requested.
The Department is doing everything possible to encourage the fur-farming industry.
EXPENDITURE.
A statement is contained on page 30 showing the amount of money voted for game-protection
purposes during the fiscal year 1930-31.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.
Prosecutions.
Revenue derived
from Sale of
Game Licences,
Fees, and Fnrs.
Calendar
Year.
Informations
laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
Eevenae
derived from
Fur Trade.
1913	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
VALUE OF WILD LIFE TO BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Mr. W. L. McAtee, of the United States Department of Agriculture, has lately issued a
bulletin on the value of wild life in the United States. In this bulletin he places the value at
one billion dollars yearly. This may seem an incredible amount to us, but it must be remembered
that there are close to seven million men in the United States who take out hunting licences
annually, and there are far more who indulge in the sport of fishing. Presuming, however, that
an estimate of a billion is twice as large as it should be, we in British Columbia can rest assured
that the value of our wild life runs up to a very large figure, and that it is a mere nothing now
to what it will be in years to come if its conservation is properly carried on. We also have the
advantage over the States in that we still have the greatest fish and game country on the whole
of the continent.
To such an extent has the value of fish and game been realized in the United States that
during the past few years its conservation has been one of paramount importance to them.
Practically every State has been striving to improve its sporting possibilities. Millions of dollars
have been spent in employing Game AVardens, breeding game birds, building up-to-date hatcheries,
creating public shooting-grounds and bird sanctuaries, and often reflooding thousands of acres
of reclaimed marsh lands. In addition to what has been done by the States out of their own
funds, Congress has voted $9,975,000 since 1924 for the protection of wild life.
Many of the States have found it necessary to increase the price of their hunting and fishing
licences. They argue that those who fish or shoot spend an average of $50 per year on guns,
rods, ammunition, clothes, travelling expenses, etc., and that the matter of an extra dollar or
two for a licence is not worth mentioning. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 9
British Columbia has an enormous advantage over all the rest of the continent in that it
still has almost every species of game and fur-bearing animal" indigenous to the continent.
Moreover, almost every species of game still exists in goodly numbers, while its sport in fishing
is unsurpassed anywhere in the world.
We have not, however, a large enough revenue coming in to do many other things that we
should do if we are to keep up-to-date. Our trappers in the north need more protection from
poachers and altogether there is a crying need for fifteen or twenty more Game Wardens. We
also need more equipment, more launches, boats, and motor-cars, and we could, with enormous
advantage, use a seaplane.    Above all, a really up-to-date game farm is practically a necessity.
AVe have made some very beneficial improvements during the past few years, but the
conservation of game is the same as any other business—you must keep up-to-date or lose what
you have gained. If we let our stock of game and fur-bearing animals lack the protection they
need, licence fees, royalties, and all receipts will soon commence to decrease, the country will
lose its greatest attraction, and we shall eventually arrive at the same condition that some of
the States are in, where doves, rabbits, and coots are the main source of their sport, and where
they are now spending millions in attempts to bring back what they have lost.
DESTRUCTION OF PREDATORY ANIMALS AND NOXIOUS BIRDS.
During the present year bounties have not been paid by the Game Department, but have been
paid through the Department of Agriculture. A statement showing the amount of money spent
for the destruction of predatory animals and noxious birds and for the employment of trained
hunters can be found on page 36.
GAME-BIRD FARMING.
Many inquiries have been received in regard to the farming of game birds for market
purposes, and a number of permits have been issued to persons wishing to engage in this business.
Some of these game-bird farmers now have a fairly good stock of birds on hand.
IMPORTATION OF GAME BIRDS.
From time to time questions are asked as to the importation of game birds into the Province,
and as the subject is one of general interest, full particulars are now being given.
The Game Department is indebted to Mr. F. M. Chaldecott, in conjunction with the late
Mr. Sidney Williams, who were two of the principal figures in furthering game-conservation in
this Province, and they kept records of all birds Imported. All those who are interested in bird-
shooting should remember what a debt of gratitude they owe to the public-spirited men who in
years gone by gave their time and money for the importation of the various game birds which
have done so much to furnish sport. They should also remember that it is their duty not only
to help conserve our present stock of game, but to make sure that there is a sufficient supply left
for those who come after them.
Pheasants (Vancouver Island).
1882.—Mr. C. W. R. Thompson, of Victoria, imported twenty pheasants (P. colchicus) from
England, all of which died.
1883.—Mr. C. AV. R. Thompson, of A7ictoria, imported twenty-five pheasants (P. torquatus)
from China, and was successful in rearing a number of birds which were liberated near Esquimalt.
1886.—Mr. Edward Musgrave, of Saltspring Island, imported twelve birds (P. torquatus)
from China, which were liberated on Saltspring Island and became well established there
before 1889.
1890.—Messrs. H. Abbott, D. M. Eberts, and Colonel Peters imported twenty birds (P. torquatus) from China and put them down on Prevost Island.
From these few importations the pheasants spread throughout the southerly part of Vancouver Island and many of the adjacent islands and became firmly established.
Pheasants  (Mainland).
1890.—The Mainland Game Protective Association (organized by Messrs. Sidney Williams
and David Simpson in January, 1890)  imported twenty-one birds  (P. torquatus)  from China, which were put down in November, 1890, on the Magee Farm, Point Grey (land adjoining Point
Grey Golf Course).
1891.—The Mainland Game Protective Association imported twenty-three birds (P. torquatus) from China, which were put down at Ladner.
1892-93.—Mr. R. G. Tatlow (then Park Commissioner) imported six birds (P. torquatus)
from China, and under the care of Mr. G. Eldon a number of birds were raised and given their
liberty in Stanley Park, most of which migrated to the AATest End residential section of the city.
1895.—Captain P. N. Thompson, A. F. Beasley, James Adamson, and Sidney Williams
imported five Japanese bronze pheasants (P. versicolor) and liberated them on Jedidiah Island.
1896.—First open season on the Mainland, November 1st, 1896.
1898.—Mr. James Adamson imported fifteen birds (P. torquatus) from China and liberated
them on the Pretty Farm, on the west bank of Harrison River.
1898.—Mr. AV. H. de AVolf put down a few birds (P. torquatus) at Chilliwack.
1890-1900.—Seven birds (P. torquatus) were sent to the Squamish Landing. (Mr. Mashiter
took care of and liberated them.) Four of these birds were imported by Mr. Adamson and
three were bred locally in Vancouver.
1890-1900.—The total number of birds (P. torquatus) imported to the Mainland during the
period 1890-1900 can be estimated at not more than eighty-two.
Mongolian Pheasants.
In 1908 sufficient money was collected by private subscription to enable Mr. Bryan Williams,
who was then the Provincial Game AA7arden, to purchase forty-five pure-bred Mongolian pheasants
from Lord Ernest Hamilton, of England.
Owing to the birds being crated without regard to sex, there was considerable mortality
among them on their journey here and only twenty-eight birds arrived alive, eight of which were
sent to Mr. Challoner, of Victoria. Subsequently, Mr. Hincks, of Dulverton, England, presented
Mr. Williams with six three-quarter-bred Mongolians. All of these birds were placed in pens
at Sardis, near Chilliwack. The pens were built by the Chilliwack Game Association and the
money for breeding the birds was collected by private subscription.
In 1909, 275 birds were bred, all of which were liberated in the Chilliwack District. In
addition, 186 eggs were given to private individuals, who also succeeded in raising eighty birds.
In 1910 the birds were taken over by the Game Department, and so the history of the
breeding of pheasants commenced in this Province.
European Partridge  (Perdrix cinerea).
1904-—The first European partridges were purchased by public subscription and imported
to the Mainland in March, 1904, when fifty-seven birds were distributed as follows: Sea Island,
29;  East Delta (LeFroys), 14;  Langley (Bowker),14.
1905.—Thirty-two birds were imported and distributed as follows: Chilliwack (Evans), 16;
Ladner  (Pemberton), 16.
1907-08.—Mr. A. E. Todd and Dr. J. L. Todd imported and released 167 birds at different
points on Vancouver Island and Sidney Island.
1909.—Mr. James Dunsmuir purchased a large number of birds, the shipment being managed
by Mr. A. E. Todd and Dr. J. L. Todd, who released 277 birds on the south end of Vancouver
Island and some on Saltspring Island and South Pender Island.
1909.—The Chilliwack Game Association put down thirty birds at Sardis.
1909.—The Game Department imported sixty-three birds and liberated twenty-four at
Agassiz in the autumn. The remainder were kept in confinement until the spring of 1910,
when twenty-nine were released at Agassiz.
1910.—The Game Department liberated forty birds at Ladner and thirty-four on the Government Colony Farm at Coquitlam.
1915.—The first open season was in the Delta District on November 12th and 13th, 1915.
Black Game (Tetrao tetrix).
1906.—Thirty-five birds imported from Copenhagen in October, 1906, were liberated as
follows: A'ancouver Island and adjacent islands, 19; and on the Mainland 16 were liberated
near Nicomen. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 11
Capercailzie (Tetrao urugallus).
1906.—Fourteen capercailzie were put down on Vancouver Island at Cowichan Lake and
eight birds on the Mainland at Lake Beautiful (renamed Lake Buntzen).
QirAiL.
A number of quail were imported to Vancouver Island in quite early days and the California
quail became firmly established, but no dates or other particulars are available.
In the early nineties a number of California quail (Lophortyx californica) were imported
to the Mainland by AAr. H. Ladner, John Dooley, Charles Doering, and the Commissioners of
Stanley Park.
1908.—Mr. W. Munro liberated a few birds on the Pooley Ranch, in the Nicola Valley.
1910.—Mr. H. Abbott put down twenty-four birds on his ranch at Dot, Nicola Valley.
Bob-white Quail  (Colinus virginianus).
1899.—The first importation of bob-white quail to the Mainland was made by the B.C. Forest
and Stream Club in February, 1899, which club liberated 156 birds at different points on the
Mainland.
1900.—At Ashcroft in 1900 Messrs. Marcus Baily, F. V. Cornwall, and Ernest Leslie imported
and liberated 130 birds near Ashcroft and Cache Creek.
1905.—At Shuswap in March, 1905, thirty-two birds were liberated on the farm of Mr. J. P.
Shaw.
1907.—On the Coldstream Estate, near Vernon, thirty-five birds were put down in April,
1907, by the Coldstream Gun Club.
THE GOVERNMENT GAME FARM.
The operations of the Game Farm at Elk Lake during the year 1930 were not nearly as
satisfactory as during the previous year. This was entirely due to weather conditions. Just at
a critical period in the breeding season we were most unfortunate in having a terrible wind-storm
accompanied by torrents of rain during the night. Numbers of coops were blown all over the
field and the casualties in that gale approximated 800 birds. Consequently the number reared
this season was not so great as that of the year before.
It may be remarked that had the rearing-field been in closer proximity to the farm, and had
additional help been available, a considerable number of the birds killed by the storm might have
been saved. This year we are fortunate enough to be able to rent a rearing-field much closer to
the farm.
For the first time in the history of the Province, an experiment was made in rearing
pheasants by means of an incubator and electric brooders. Owing to the electrical appliances
for heating the brooders not being obtainable as soon as required, we were not able to commence
operations until rather late in the season. It may be here remarked that the brooder was built
on the most approved methods which are being used by the California State Game Farm near
San Francisco. We are indebted to Mr. Bade, the Superintendent of the farm, for plans and
specifications of his brooders, for the formula of the feed that he uses, and for considerable
information as to his experience in rearing pheasants in this way.
The pheasants placed in the electric brooder were raised entirely on dry feed, and considering
that it was our first experience in raising pheasants in this way, the success which we attained
was highly satisfactory. About seventy-five birds were raised in this way, and these birds at
four weeks of age were a third larger than birds hatched out under hens and raised in the
ordinary way. It is a little too soon to be able to say that this method is going to be a complete
success, but we certainly did well enough to be encouraged to further attempts. Should it
prove the success that we hope it to be, it will mean a complete revolution in the breeding of
pheasants.
For the first time in the history of British Columbia, some young partridges were raised
under hens. A nest of nineteen eggs was picked up in Saanich, thirteen of which were hatched
out, and there are now eleven young birds in the pens. AA7e have constructed several new pens
for these partridges to be placed in, and we hope to be able to raise a larger number this year. D 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
While the question of wild turkeys doing well in this Province is still in a very doubtful
stage, it is infinitely more hopeful than it was thought to be. The birds which we liberated on
Sidney Island raised broods and there now appears to be quite a number of them. They are
extremely wild, even wilder than pheasants, and fly at a tremendous speed when disturbed.
Some of these birds have been caught in traps, and four were liberated on South Pender Island,
two on Prevost Island, and three more were sent to the vicinity of Alberni. We are also sending
a pair of birds to Kelowna, where they will be kept in captivity and any birds raised will be
liberated. We are also sending a pair of birds to the vicinity of Golden and another pair to
Nakusp.
AVAPITI IN THE OKANAGAN AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE ISLANDS.
The wapiti at Penticton were again troublesome during the past winter, but owing to the
lack of snow and the abundance of feed their depredations were not as serious as the year before.
An effort was made to capture them, but, though eight head were secured, further attempts
failed. The failures were entirely due to the animals being in such good condition that they
were wild and hard to corral.
There is no doubt that these animals are causing serious annoyance to the orchards in that
vicinity and they will have to be got rid of. Another attempt will be made next year, and should
this be unsuccessful it is probable that a short open season will have to be declared.
A shipment of wapiti from AVainwright Park, Alberta, was released on Queen Charlotte
Islands last spring. Two bulls and six cows were released, but unfortunately one of the cows
got separated from the rest and swam over to an island, where she subsequently died of
exhaustion. Reports received indicate that the other five cows all had calves. Since then the
eight wapiti caught at Penticton were also released on the islands. All of the latter group were
cows. One was injured in transit and subsequently died, but the others all appear to be in fine
shape.    With the addition of these animals we now have the nucleus of quite a nice herd.
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF FUR-TRADE COLLECTIONS.
The statement of furs taken during the past ten years is extremely interesting, as it shows
that while we have not the stock of fur that we should have, at the same time, in view of the
extensive trapping that has been carried on for many years past, the situation is not as serious
as it might easily have been.
First of all, take the case of beaver. The average catch for the past ten years is 19,737.
The catch this year, while only 17,137—that is, 2,600 below the average—is not such a bad
showing considering the fact that a great many trappers, owing to the fall in the price of fur,
either did not trap beaver at all or else trapped only a limited number. Also, in spite of this
light trapping, the catch of beaver this year exceeded that of the previous year by 2,350. You
must also remember that the average for the ten years was considerably augmented by the large
totals of 1922-23-24, which followed a number of years' close season.
AVith regard to marten, these fur-bearers have held their own fairly well. This year's
catch was short of the average, but the unusually heavy snowfall coming at the best part of the
trapping season was in a great measure responsible for this. Next year the catch is likely to
again be short on account of too little snow, and, in addition, many trappers are leaving their
marten alone entirely. These small catches will not indicate that marten are decreasing, but
rather that they are being given better protection.
From all over the Province reports have been received of an increase in muskrats. This
year's catch of 84,500 is an increase of 31,904 over last year. Provided that the price for these
fur-bearers is sufficient to induce trapping, the indications are that the catch next year will be
considerably larger.
In 1929 we had a catch of 67,619 weasels, which is about double that of nearly any other year
of the past ten years. This year there has been a considerable decrease, but even so the catch
is far above the average. The advent of weasels in such numbers was undoubtedly due to the
general plague of mice, voles, and other small mammals.
If you will compare the catches of fisher, fox, and lynx, it will be seen that the prevalence
of each of these species, and lynx in particular, is periodical. In 1921 the catch of lynx was
only 1,240. From then on it increased until in 1926 it reached the peak of 8,250. The catch
then began to fall until this year it is down to 1,584. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 13
In the same way fisher and fox increased and decreased. Undoubtedly the supply of these
animals depends on the amount of food available for them; therefore their scarcity or otherwise
depends on matters over which we have not much control.
The most serious loss of fur-bearers which we have had has been that of mink. There has
been a very steady decrease, though this year the catch was a little larger than that of the
previous year. The decrease of mink is more or less general all over Canada. There is no
possible explanation for it, except that their pelts have been in such demand that they have been
heavily overtrapped.
Refer to statement on page 35.
BIRD-BANDING.
During the year 1930 a trap has been operated on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve for
the purpose of catching migratory game birds for the purpose of banding. This work has been
carried on in conjunction with the Canadian National Parks Branch, Ottawa, and information
in regard to the number and kind of birds banded is contained in the statement on page 60.
GAME RESERVES.
AVe have a number of game reserves in various parts of the Province, some of which, though
possibly useful for the protection and safety of human life, are not of any great practical value
from a game-conservation point of view. There are, however, three big-game reserves and one
or two wild-fowl sanctuaries which are of inestimable value.
The big-game reserves referred to are the Elk River Reserve in East Kootenay, the Yalakom
Reserve in the Lillooet District, and the Bowron Lake Reserve in Cariboo.
The Elk River Reserve is undoubtedly the finest piece of big-game country on the continent.
AVithin its boundaries are immense numbers of mountain-goats, numerous wapiti, a few moose,
mule and white-tail deer, and now we have in addition a really fine stock of bighorn sheep.
There are also as many grizzly and black bears on the reserve as it is desirable to have.
AVhen this reserve was first created, apart from mountain-goats, a few grizzly bear, and an
odd sheep or two, there was very little game on it. To-day, owing to the attention it has received,
there is a constant overflow of big game from its boundaries.
While big game on the reserve has received sufficient protection to allow a large increase,
the same cannot be said of fur-bearing animals. There is nothing like the stock that there should
be. The reserve is capable of holding a good many beaver, as well as marten and other fur-
bearers, but there are very few of them left.
There is no question but that illegal trapping has been responsible for this depletion. It will
receive a good deal of attention in the future, and already something has been done. An unexpected winter patrol was carried out by two Game AArardens and resulted in the conviction of
one of the offenders.
It is particularly pleasing to find that the success of this reserve has been acknowledged by
the chiefs of the Indians who live in the vicinity of Cranbrook. At the time that the reserve was
first established these Indians were bitterly opposed to it, but only last winter they acknowledged
that the reserve has been a wonderful success, and that they could now kill game outside the
reserve in areas where formerly there was none at all.
The Yalakom Reserve in the Lillooet District is essentially a mule-deer and brown-sheep
reserve. The sheep on this reserve are reported to have made a good increase in the last year
or two, and mule-deer are again becoming very abundant there.
The Bowron Lake Reserve is in a magnificent moose country, and there are also a few
caribou within its boundaries, but its greatest value lies in its stock of fur-bearing animals.
Four years ago, beaver were very scarce on the reserve. Now it is possible to see numbers of
their houses and signs of their activities. The results of the increase have already become
apparent, as a number of trappers whose trap-lines are in the vicinity of the reserve, and from
which all beaver had been exterminated, now claim that the beaver are coming back again.
They emphatically declare that these beaver are the overflow from the reserve.
The wild-fowl sanctuary at Sumas has done a wonderful amount of good. That there is
any wild-fowl shooting at all in that district, now that the lake has been drained and put under
cultivation, is entirely due to the sanctuary and the careful preservation it has had. D 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
This sanctuary has also been of benefit in that it has made it possible for us to capture
about 500 ducks during the fall for the purpose of banding them and determining their migration.
THE LEIPZIG EXHIBIT.
AVhile the fame of British Columbia as a big-game and fur-bearing animal country has been
pretty well known for some years past, it is probable that nothing has ever been done hitherto
which has brought this Province so great an advertisement as the magnificent exhibit of trophies
of big game and choice furs which were sent to Leipzig this year.
The exhibit was not only the means of bringing attention to our great sporting possibilities
and the valuable furs that can be secured in this Province, but it also brought all the resources
of the Province to the attention of the whole of Europe. That this could hardly fail to be the
case is amply proved by the fact that thousands of visitors, including Royalty and all sorts of
distinguished personages, were specially attracted to our exhibit, and articles appeared in nearly
all of the Continental newspapers commenting very favourably on the display we had sent over.
British Columbia took first prize, the gold medal, and the highest diploma for its big-game
trophies, and also a high diploma for its furs. In addition, the first prize and gold medal were
given for the record goat-head which was included in our exhibit.
The Province in general and the Game Department in particular owes a debt of gratitude
to Mr. G. L. Pop, through whose enterprise and public-spiritedness the exhibit was sent. While
the Game Department assisted Mr. Pop financially to the extent of $1,600 and secured free transportation across the continent for the trophies, etc., the great bulk of the expenditure was borne
by him and he is entitled to the very greatest credit for the wonderful success of the exhibit.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE MAINLAND COAST).
By J. AV. Graham, District Game AVarden.
I beg to submit herewith my annual game report covering game conditions in this Division
for the year 1930.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear are still fairly numerous on Vancouver Island and in some districts,
particularly the Qualicum, have been reported killing domestic stock. In the Comox area,
although many bears have been killed by hunters, very little stock has been molested. Black
and grizzly bear are plentiful in Knight and Seymour Inlets.
Wapiti (Elk).—From reports received during the year wapiti on Vancouver Island are
holding their own and in some districts are slightly on the increase. The Nitinat band, which
ranges in winter over the Shaw Creek Game Reserve, is doing very well. Several calves have
been seen in this band during the summer and fall. There is no question that cougar kill many
of the calves in the spring of the year. On the west coast the bands on the Zeballos River,
Nootka Sound, and at the head of Neroutsos Arm, Quatsino Sound, are reported increasing.
Another small band on Kyuquot Sound on the Kauwinch River does not appear to be increasing.
Deer.—These animals are plentiful on Arancouver Island and most hunters reported securing
their bag limit during the past open season. Many complaints have been received from farmers
to the effect that deer have been doing damage to their crops and in every complaint received
steps have been immediately taken to prevent any further damage taking place. The disease
reported last year in deer in certain parts of the district has not been very noticeable during the
past year. A few deer suffering from what is locally called " liver-fluke " have been taken in
the Comox area.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Reports received indicate that beaver are not increasing very rapidly, although no
open season has been allowed for the trapping of these animals on Vancouver Island during the
past three years.    Cougar in the interior of the Island undoubtedly destroy a number of beaver.
Marten.—Marten are reported as being very scarce throughout the whole of Vancouver
Island.
Mink.—On the west coast fairly good catches of mink have been reported. As most of the
trapping is done oh the beaches in this district, mink-pelts are only in good condition or prime
for about two months of the year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 15
Racoon.—These animals have been fairly plentiful and trappers report good catches.
Muskrats.—Muskrats are increasing rapidly and many complaints have been received during
the past year in regard to damage done by these animals. In several cases permits have been
issued to farmers to trap muskrats on their own property where it has been found that damage
has been done to land and crops.
Otter.—A few otter have been taken from the north end of Vancouver Island, but these
animals have been very scarce throughout the Division, and other fur-bearing animals are more
or less to be found in only small numbers.
Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue and Ruffed).—In the Courtenay and Alberni areas blue grouse have been
fairly plentiful, while throughout the remainder of the Division these birds have been scarce.
Ruffed grouse are not on the increase.
Pheasants.—Pheasants have not been very plentiful, but fairly good shooting was to be
obtained in the Cowichan area. In the Saanich District these birds were scarce, while in the
Comox District good bags were secured. Owing to heavy snow during the winter it was necessary
to put out feed.
Quail.—In the southern part of Vancouver Island large coveys were seen, but generally
throughout the district these birds could not be considered as being plentiful.
European Partridge.—These birds have not been as numerous as in previous years, although
they were fairly plentiful in the Saanich and Cowichan Districts.
Ptarmigan.—Ptarmigan are very scarce on A'ancouver Island, only one report having reached
this office in regard to these birds having been seen.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—Owing to the mild weather conditions very few ducks were killed during the present
season. On the west coast and northern portion of Vancouver Island ducks have been reported
as being plentiful.
Brant.—Large numbers of brant have been reported, but they have not as yet been found in
any large numbers in their usual haunts, and as a result very few of these birds have been killed.
Geese.—A number of geese breed in the small lakes in the interior of Vancouver Island and
it is surmised that these local-bred birds do not migrate, but winter on the west coast. Geese
have been fairly plentiful during the present open season.
Swans.—A few whistling and trumpeter swans have been reported in the Campbell River
District.   A small flock of swans was seen in the vicinity of the Nanaimo Lakes last February.
Vermin.
Cougar seem to be on the increase in spite of the fact that bounty was paid on about 360
cougar during the year in this Division. A few wolves have been reported, but no large bands
have been seen, and very few bounties have been paid for the destruction of wolves on Vancouver
Island.
Other vermin, such as cats, hawks, and owls, have been destroyed during the year by Game
Wardens throughout the Division.
Game-protection.
This Division has been constantly patrolled by Game Wardens and the provisions of the
" Game Act " and regulations strictly enforced. Approximately 106 convictions were obtained
during the year. The Game AVardens have co-operated with the Fishery Officers and thirteen
of these convictions were obtained under the British Columbia Special Fishery Regulations.
Four convictions were obtained under section 11 of the " Game Act," resulting in prison sentences
being imposed.
A good deal of co-operation has been received from the Provincial Police Force and members
of this Force have been willing to give every possible assistance in the enforcement of the
" Game Act." D 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Propagation.
One thousand two hundred and eleven pheasants have been liberated on Arancouver Island
from the Elk Lake Game Farm and great care has been taken to put these birds down in suitable
places, and each part of the Division has received an equal distribution.
Game Reserves.
There are five game reserves on ATancouver Island—namely, Mount Douglas Park, Little
Saanich Mountain, Shaw Creek, Strathcona Park, including the Forbidden Plateau, and Elk Lake.
These reserves are wonderful game-breeding areas and provide excellent shooting in the
adjoining districts.
Fur Trade.
The majority of the fur trade is carried on along the west coast and the fur trapped is
generally shipped to Victoria or Vancouver.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming is on the increase on Arancouver Island. Many new applications have been
received and permits issued during the past year. From reports these fur-farms seem to be
progressing favourably.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The system of registration of trap-lines has been carried out in this Division to a greater
extent than in past years and the system is working very satisfactorily. A number of new
applications have been received through the aid of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Company,
and other companies who have co-operated with the Department and, when necessary, given
letters to trappers permitting them to register their trap-lines on the property of these companies.
There are now approximately 460 trap-lines registered in this Division. Of course there are
a number of trappers operating on the islands adjacent to Arancouver Island and on private
property who do not require to register their trap-lines, but a check is kept on these trappers.
There are a few guides in this Division, but I cannot give any definite information in regard
to their guiding operations as their reports generally are forwarded direct to the Game Commissioner in Vancouver.
Special Patrols.
Several special patrols were made throughout the year, some of these patrols taking in the
Forbiden Plateau, Strathcona Park, Sayward, Kennedy Lake, and the Shaw Creek District.
Five mountain-goats were seen in the Shaw Creek Game Reserve, these animals having been
liberated in this reserve a few years ago.
The Provincial Police aided in some of these special patrols by placing at the disposal of the
Game AVardens a police launch.
Hunting Accidents.
I regret to have to report that there has been nine fatal hunting accidents in this Division
during the year. The number of fatal accidents, some of which were evidently caused by carelessness, has caused much comment among the general public, and many suggestions have been
made with a view of preventing such accidents occurring in another year.
As a detailed statement is generally contained in the Game Commissioner's Annual Report
in regard to hunting accidents, I am not giving particulars in regard to these accidents.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
The general game conditions throughout the whole of this Division are considered very
good. A great many non-resident hunters have visited Vancouver Island during the year and
the majority of them obtained good sport.
Night-hunting or pit-lamping is carried on in this Division to a certain extent, but I am
pleased to report that the Game AVardens in all parts of the Division have paid particular
attention to this illegal practice, and while it is very difficult to secure evidence of these violations, six arrests were made during the year.
I would like to express my appreciation of the support given me by the Game Wardens as
well as by the members of the Provincial Police Force. "B" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Game Wardens in " B " Division.
Game Animals.
Bear (Grizzly and Black).—Throughout the Division grizzly and black bear are to be found
in fairly large numbers, especially black bear. -Black bear in some districts have done considerable damage to private property, and it has been necessary in the Nelson District to employ a
trained hunter for the purpose of preventing damage.
Caribou.—These animals are to be found in certain parts of the Division, but not in any large
numbers.
Moose.—Although moose have not been found in the Nelson District in the past years, it is
now reported that several of these animals have been seen in the vicinity of the head of Lockhart
Creek, on the east side of Kootenay Lake. In the Golden and AVindermere Districts moose are
slowly increasing, and this also applies to the Fernie District.
Deer.—In most parts of the district deer are on the increase. Excellent hunting was
obtained during the past season and the deer killed were found to be in excellent condition.
Although the loss from depredations of predatory animals has continued, still the loss has not
been as great as in past years.
Mountain-goat.—In the Boundary District these animals have not been plentiful, but in the
East Kootenay area they have been plentiful.
Mountain-sheep.—A few of these animals are to be found in the Golden District, but are
more plentiful farther south. The Game Warden at Canal Flats states that in one day in the
vicinity of Lamb Creek he counted seventy-two sheep. It is reported that eagles are responsible
for the destruction of lambs.
Wapiti (Elk).—A few elk were killed during the past open season and some very good heads
were obtained. The Game Warden at Fernie reports that elk are very plentiful and are on the
increase and appear to be spreading farther south.
Fur-bearing Animals.
It is reported that beaver have been heavily trapped in some parts of the Division, while in
other parts they have been conserved and are slowly increasing. Marten and lynx have been
trapped in fair numbers in the Fernie District, and this also applies to weasel and mink. Fair
trapping was obtained in the Boundary District.
Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue, Ruffed, and Franklin).—Blue and ruffed grouse have increased in most parts
of the Division. The Game Warden at Canal Flats reports that ruffed grouse were very plentiful
during the past season and appear to have wintered very well. The reason for the increase in
grouse is in view of the fact of very excellent breeding season and the scarcity of forest fires.
Ptarmigan and Prairie-chicken.—These birds are not very plentiful in any part of the
Division, although ptarmigan are found in good numbers on the higher ranges in the Fernie
District.
Pheasants.—A slight increase was noted in the number of birds in the Nelson District.
In the Boundary area pheasants were fairly plentiful and special arrangements have been made
for feeding these birds during the winter months.
Quail.—These birds are to be found in fair numbers north of Penticton, but cannot be
considered as being plentiful in any part of the Division.
Migratory Game Birds.
Better shooting was obtained on ducks and geese in the Nelson District, but the northern
flight of birds in this area is still almost negligible in comparison to the flight a few years ago.
In the Fernie and Cranbrook Districts migratory game birds of all kinds have been very scarce.
The Game Warden at Penticton reports that ducks were very scarce, but that Canada geese
continued to increase in numbers in the south end of Okanagan Valley.
2 Vermin.
Cougar are increasing slightly in the Nelson, Revelstoke, and Windermere Districts. Coyotes
have been very plentiful in the Kootenay Aralley, near Kootenay Park, and are on the increase
in the Fernie District.
Hawks, owls, and other noxious birds have been hunted regularly by the Game Wardens in
the Division. In the Fernie District crows are increasing, while in the Boundary area, especially
near the vicinity of Oliver, they are also on the increase and have been doing damage to crops.
Game-protection.
Regular patrols have been carried on throughout the Division and this has resulted in a
few prosecutions for violation of the " Game Act." A number of lengthy patrols have been made
in various parts of the Division and everything possible done to protect game throughout the
various districts. The members of the British Columbia Police Force have furnished a good deal
of co-operation in the enforcement of the " Game Act."
Game Reserves.
The Elk River Game Reserve has been patrolled regularly. This reserve is undoubtedly
responsible for the increase in game of all kinds in the surrounding districts. The Vaseaux Lake
Bird Sanctuary in the Boundary District affords excellent protection to migratory game birds,
principally Canada geese. Geese have increased in this sanctuary during the past few years
and this has resulted in much better shooting in the surrounding districts. The Dominion parks
throughout the Division are all well stocked with game and undoubtedly these parks act as
feeders for the surrounding districts.
Fur Trade.
Most of the fur trapped in the Division is shipped to Vancouver or is purchased by travelling
fur-buyers.
Fur-farms.
A number of new fur-farms commenced operations during the year. There apparently has
been no outstanding success in fur-farming in this Division, although a number of farmers have
been fairly successful.    A large muskrat and beaver farm is located near Edgewater.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The system of registration of trap-lines is undoubtedly proving successful and the majority
of trappers are now protecting the fur-bearing animals on their respective trap-lines.
Registration of Guides.
']       There are a number of very capable guides registered in the Division.
Special Patrols.
A special patrol was made into the Ashnola District during the month of May by Game
Warden Robertson and Predatory-animal Hunter C. Shuttleworth. A number of sheep were seen
on this patrol. Special patrols were made from time to time in other'parts of the Division,
especially in the Elk River Game Reserve.
Hunting Accidents.
Two fatal accidents occurred in the Nelson District, one hunter being accidentally killed by
the discharge of his companion's shotgun, and another hunter was drowned while out hunting
deer.
Summary.
Big-game hunting has been excellent during the past year. Owing to the mild weather
during the breeding season for game birds an increase has been noted in the stand of game
birds throughout the Division.
Fur-bearing animals, especially beaver, are on the decrease, but it is felt that in a few years'
time an increase will have been noted, as it is expected that as a result of the registration regulations trappers will now pay more attention to conserving the fur on their trap-lines. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 19
" C " DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND CHILCOTIN
DISTRICTS).
By District Game Warden R. D. Sulivan.
I have the honour to submit my annual game report covering game conditions for the
year 1930.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear have increased throughout the Division and in a number of cases have
done considerable damage to domestic stock. In the Horsefly District a predatory-animal hunter
was employed and he killed fourteen black bear doing damage to sheep, and a number of bear
were killed near Kamloops doing damage to sheep and cattle.
Grizzly bear are reported as plentiful at the head of the North Arm of Quesnel Lake and
Upper Horsefly. A few grizzly are to be found near Cayoosh Creek, in the Lillooet District,
and they are also reported as holding their own in the vicinity of Barkerville. On the plateaus
at the headwaters of Mission Creek, which is the divide between the Kettle River and Okanagan,
they are increasing and have been quite a menace to sheep which are being herded in that district.
Moose.—These animals have shown up very well throughout the Nazko, Quesnel Lakes, and
Bowron Lake Districts and a number of fine heads were secured. In the vicinity of Tranquille
Creek and Deadmans Creek these animals are increasing and a few have been seen east of the
Thompson River.
Caribou.—Very plentiful in the Quesnel Lake and Upper Horsefly District and also along the
Clearwater River. There were not many of these animals killed during the past season owing to
the scarcity of hunting-parties.
Sheep.—These animals are reported as being fairly plentiful in the Lillooet District and a
few are to be found in the vicinity of the mouth of the Chilcotin River. There is a band of about
eighty sheep on Shorts Creek, near Okanagan Lake. At Squilax, where fifty sheep were liberated
in 1927, they have been doing exceptionally well, and may be seen from the road almost at any
time owing to the fact that a salt-lick was made for them there, and the sheep liberated at
Spences Bridge in 1927 have been reported as doing very well and have drifted back towards
the Fraser River.
Wapiti (Elk).—In the Lillooet District elk are reported as doing fairly well and are spreading to Gun Creek and the main Bridge River, also to Gaspard Creek, in the Chilcotin District.
A band of twenty elk liberated near Adra a few years ago have done exceedingly well and have
caused considerable damage in that district, and steps have had to be taken to corral a number
of these animals for the purpose of liberating them in some other district in the Province.
Mountain-goat.—There are a number of these animals in the higher mountains near Mitchell
Lake and the Upper Horsefly River, at the head of the Clearwater River, and in the mountains
north of Azure Lake.
Deer.—Deer have been reported as being very plentiful throughout the Division. There
has been a very noticeable increase during the last two years, which can be attributed to the
light snowfall, which has to a great extent protected them from predatory animals. The deer
came down to the lower levels earlier than usual in the past season, but it is felt that no more
were killed than in past years.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Throughout the Division beaver are very scarce, except in some districts where they had
been protected by trappers. Fisher have also been scarce, except in the Clearwater River
District. Foxes are increasing in the Horsefly, Clearwater, and North Thompson areas, but in
other parts of the Division are scarce. Mink are reported as holding their own, but cannot be
considered as plentiful, and this also applies to marten. Lynx and otter are scarce, while weasel
have been very plentiful. Muskrats appear to be holding their own, and there has only been a
small catch of these animals owing to the fact that a number of trappers do not intend to take
muskrats on their trap-lines owing to the low prices for muskrat-pelts.
Upland Game Birds.
Grouse.—Blue and ruffed grouse were plentiful in most parts of the Division, but both blue
and ruffed grouse were scarce in the North and South Okanagan areas, while Franklin were
scarce throughout the Division. D 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prairie-chicken.—In the Chilcotin and Caribou Districts these birds were quite plentiful and
a slight increase was noted in the Kamloops District. In the North and South Okanagan there
are very few of these birds left.
Partridge.—These birds were to be found in large numbers in the Okanagan and there was
quite a number in the Kamloops District. At the time of writing this report the birds in the
Kamloops District apparently have migrated, as very few have been observed recently.
Pheasants.—In the North and South Okanagan a slight increase was noted, while in the
Kamloops District there was a large increase and the short open season provided did very little
harm.
Migratory Game Birds.
There was a very heavy migration of geese and ducks during the spring in the Kamloops,
Nicola, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts, but owing to the dry season a large number of small
lakes dried up and the birds flew south earlier than usual. There did not appear to be much
difference in the number of birds this season in comparison with previous years.
ArERMIN.
There has been very little decrease in the number of coyotes, although there have been very
few complaints of damage being done to domestic stock by these animals in comparison with
previous years.
On a few occasions wolves have been reported being seen in the Bowron Lake Game Reserve,
but generally throughout the district these animals have been scarce.
Cougars are on the decrease, due no doubt to the fact of a large bounty being paid for the
destruction of these animals.
Big-horned owls are still very numerous and undoubtedly cause considerable damage to
grouse and muskrats. Hawks appear to be on the decrease, while crows and magpies are still
plentiful, notwithstanding the fact that large numbers have been killed by Game Wardens in
this Division.
Game-protection.
A considerable increase will be noted in the number of prosecutions for violations of the
" Game Act" this year over the cases conducted in previous years. There has been 172 cases
tried in this Division during the year 1930, which is 23 per cent, over last year. In addition
to the Game Wardens in this district, it is very gratifying to note the splendid co-operation given
to the Department by Inspector W. L. Fernie and all members of the British Columbia Police
Force in this Division.
Game Propagation.
The pheasants shipped from the Elk Lake Game Farm to Kelowna, Vernon, Salmon Arm,
and Kamloops have done very well. It might be mentioned that owing to the mild weather it
has not been necessary to purchase grain to feed pheasants in this Division.
Game Reserves.
In the Yalakom Game Reserve mountain-sheep and mountain-goat are fairly plentiful. The
elk liberated in this reserve several years ago have increased, but it is very difficult to estimate
to what extent, as they have spread out over a considerable area from the point of liberation.
Black bear are plentiful, and this also applies to deer. A few grizzly bear are to be found
on this reserve.
In the Bowron Lake Reserve it is reported that moose are slightly on the decrease, but as
this is a small reserve it is hard to estimate the number of moose, as they are continually
spreading out over the surrounding country and at certain seasons they are far more plentiful
in the reserve than at other times. Caribou are about in the same numbers as in previous years,
while black and grizzly bear are quite plentiful. Without a doubt fur-bearing animals on the
reserve and in the adjacent territory have increased. This especially applies to beaver. I am
informed a movement was on foot some time ago to do away with this reserve. This, in my
opinion, would be a very great mistake, as the reserve has proven to be a wonderful breeding-
ground, especially in regard to fur-bearing animals. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 21
Fur Trade.
The trading in fur has been exceptionally light, due to the condition of the fur market.
The trappers have in the majority of cases caught very little fur as a result of the low prices
obtainable.
Fur-farms.
There has been quite a number of fur-farms started during the year and these farms are
scattered throughout the Division. The majority of these farms are engaged in the farming of
mink. As all applications for fur-farming permits have to be investigated before the permit is
granted, and as this sometimes necessitates incurring considerable expense, it is recommended
that the Department should charge a fee for each fur-farming permit issued. If this were done
a great deal of expense would be saved and the Department would then be able to have literature
published in regard to fur-farming in general.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
A great improvement has been noted during the year in the registration of trap-lines. Several
important adjustments have been made between the Indian and Game Departments in connection
with the registration of Indian trap-lines.
The system of registration of guides is working very satisfactorily. It is noticed from the
reports received from guides during the year that there were not as many big-game hunters in
the field as in past years.
Special Patrols.
A number of special patrols have been made during the year, resulting in a number of
prosecutions and also in obtaining more knowledge in regard to game conditions in the various
districts patrolled.
Hunting Accidents.
There were five hunting accidents in this Division during the year, as will be noted in the
statement of hunting accidents contained in this report.
Summary.
Game conditions during the year have been very satisfactory, except perhaps the flight of
migratory game birds. Large numbers of these birds, which generally stay on their way south,
did not do so this year on account of the continual dry season. A large number of small lakes
generally frequented by these birds each year were dried up.
Pheasants in the Kamloops District have greatly increased.
It is again pointed out that the Provincial Police in this Division and the various Game
Associations have co-operated to the fullest extent in protecting the game in this Division.
"D" DIVISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIVER,
AND YUKON BOUNDARY  DISTRICTS).
By District Game Warden T. Van Dyk.
Game Animals.
Moose.—These animals continue to increase. The westward movement, noticed during the
last two or three seasons, is still in progress; specimens of both sexes have been observed in the
vicinity of Shames, on the Skeena River.
Caribou.—Excepting in the area situate to the south of the Canadian National Railway,
Prince Rupert line, and west of the Fraser River, which should again be covered by a close
season, caribou may be found throughout the Division. AVolves are held responsible for a slight
decrease in their numbers in the Cassiar District, but, on the whole, the animals are on the
increase and in no danger of extinction.
Wapiti (Elk).—Reports that wapiti are very numerous in the Peace River District have
been confirmed by trappers and guides, who state they have seen a number of these animals at
the headwaters and along the Musquah River basin, situated in the 58th degree of north latitude
and the 123rd degree of west longitude. A close season north of the Canadian National Railway
should be maintained for a number of years and strictly enforced. D 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The elk liberated by the Department on Graham Island during the month of March, 1930,
are in first-class condition. The Game Warden at Prince Rupert reports an increase of 100 per
cent., bringing the total of the herd up to twelve.
Sheep.—A greater number of Rocky Mountain sheep is reported in the Sheep Creek-Wapiti
River area. Stone and Fannin sheep have been seen in great numbers by guides and trappers
north of the Peace River, in the Ottertail River, Musquah River, and Chesterfield Lake area.
These species are also reported as increasing in the Cassiar District.
Dahl sheep have been seen in the Liard River District in the vicinity of the British Columbia-
Yukon-North AVest Territories boundary-line.
From the above it is obvious that sheep are quite numerous in this Division and in no
danger of extermination. To further protect the species and increase their numbers a reduced
bag limit of one only is recommended.
Goat.—Mountain-goat are very numerous throughout the Division. The bag limit could very
safely be increased to three.
Deer.—These animals are increasing very rapidly, mule-deer and Coast deer predominating
in their respective haunts. A few white-tailed deer are reported in southern portions of the
Fort George area.
Bear.—Black bear are very numerous and grizzly bear are increasing in number. In regard
to grizzly bear, I would again suggest a bag limit of one only.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Land-animals, such as fox, mink, marten, and fisher, are reported as being scarce in this
Division. The mild weather and light snowfall may safely be given as the main reason for this
scarcity. During favourable weather conditions wild animals find, without trouble, an ample
supply of natural food and do not readily take the bait, no matter how cunningly it may be
camouflaged by the trapper, resulting in a very light fur-catch and leaving most trappers with
the impression that there is a scarcity of fur-bearing animals.
Water-animals—beaver and muskrats—are becoming scarce in the settled areas of the
Division, but this loss will be compensated by the careful trap-line management now carried out
by the majority of trap-line holders.
In view of the low prices paid for pelts, many of the registered trap-line holders are not
trapping, while others are only trapping lightly. The general tendency is to conserve the fur-
bearing animals until better prices are obtainable for their pelts. The future is very promising
and a substantial increase in the number of our fur-bearing animals may be anticipated. The
regulations as enacted for the season 1930-31 have met with the approval of all of the northern
trappers and similar regulations are recommended for the coming season.
Upland Game Birds.
I am very pleased to be able to report a substantial increase in the grouse, especially ruffed
grouse. The short season and small bag limit as enacted in last year's regulations should be
maintained. Pintail grouse and prairie-chicken have been scarce west of the Rocky Mountains,
but are to be found in great numbers east of these mountains. A shorter open season and a
smaller bag limit is suggested for the area east and a close season for the area west of the Rocky
Mountains.
Migratory Game Birds.
In the eastern part of this Division ducks and other migratory game birds have not been very
numerous except during the migration period. Numerous requests have been received suggesting
that the season on these birds be set from September 1st to November 15th, and I respectfully
recommend that this suggestion be given every consideration.
The western portion of the Division is recognized as being the best migratory-bird district.
Birds of all species are to be found at all times, but in greater numbers during the spring and
fall migrations.
Vermin.
No complaints have been received regarding coyotes, although they are to be found everywhere in the Division.    The present bounty is satisfactory. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 23
Numerous trappers and guides report that wolves are increasing throughout the northern
districts, and suggestions have been made that an increase in the bounty from $15 to $40 would
be very desirable, the pelt to be surrendered on receipt of bounty.
Owls and hawks are to be found in every part of the Division, while eagles are to be found
in great numbers in certain areas, especially on Graham Island and at the lower end of the
Skeena River and in the vicinity of Port Essington.
Game-protection.
A feature of this year's work in protecting the game in the Division has been by continuous
patrols being made into the various districts, and I am pleased to say that the general public
is taking a greater interest in our work than in the past. In many instances we have been
assured of the co-operation of many worthy citizens. The Provincial Police Constables have
been found very keen and willing to help in the enforcement of the " Game Act," and considering the various other duties they have to attend to it is a pleasure to note that 40 per cent, of
the prosecutions launched in this Division were the result of informations laid by officers of
the Provincial Police. This spirit of co-operation undoubtedly added to the interest the public
is taking in our work.
Game Propagation.
Very pleasing reports have been received regarding the pheasants on Queen Charlotte Islands,
where a number of birds were liberated for restocking purposes. In order to keep the stock of
birds up to a good standard it has been suggested that a few cock birds be liberated in the vicinity
of Tlell, where the pheasants are most numerous. Pheasants have also been noticed in the
vicinity of Skeena Crossing and Kitwanga. The general opinion is that these birds have
migrated from Hazelton, where a few birds were liberated a few years ago.
A request has been received from Vanderhoof that European partridge be introduced in
that district.    I respectfully suggest that this request be given consideration.
Of the eight elk liberated on Graham Island, one female wTas drowned when crossing from
Graham Island to Maud Island, while the remaining five females are reported in good condition
and have given birth to one calf each, bringing the total of elk up to twelve.
Moose could also be introduced in Graham Island at very little cost to the Department by
gathering all motherless calves during two or three seasons and liberating them in the vicinity
of Port Clements.
Game Reserves.
The Kaien Island, Lake Kathlyn, and Prince George Game Reserves, being very accessible,
have been patrolled a number of times during the past year. They are well defined as to
boundaries and are fulfilling the purpose for which they were created: Kain Island as a refuge
for deer, Lake Kathlyn and Prince George as refuges for migratory birds.
The fourth game reserve, Kunghit Island, established as a refuge for deer, has never been
patrolled owing to its remoteness. In order to make this reserve effective regular patrols should
be made, but in order to do this a seaworthy launch would be required.
Fue Trade.
No accurate data on the fur trade are obtainable as the bulk of the fur caught in this
Division is now being shipped to Arancouver.
Numerous suggestions have been received that the fur-tax or royalty should be collected
locally and from the trappers, making it illegal for fur-traders to have unmarked pelts in their
possession. The marking of the pelts to be done by means of small perforated tin disks of
various denominations, corresponding to the tax collectable. The disks would be attached to
the pelts by means of the wire lead seal now in use. These disks would be punched by the
collector by means of individual punches supplied for this purpose. Pelts on which the tax is
not collectable could be marked with a special disk. When shipping fur out of the Province
a permit to export would be issued as at present; at the same time all markers (disks) would
be removed.
Exceptions to the above rule would have to be made for fur-traders having trading-posts
in the north of the Province. These fur-traders would be allowed, under the suggested scheme,
to purchase from the trapper, but would be required to pay the fur-tax to the nearest Game D 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Warden or Provincial Constable. Under this proposed system each district would be able to
have accurate data as to the number of pelts caught and would give information as to the
decrease or increase in the catch. The system outlined is recommended and I trust that it
will receive kind consideration.
Fur-farming.
The number of fur-farms is steadily increasing in this Division, but I am sorry to say that
the majority of the farmers are only experimenting and learning the business and paying dearly
for their mistakes. Regular inspections of the farms should be made and special attention
should be paid to cleanliness of pens, nests, etc. All data obtained during these inspections
should be carefully compiled with a view to giving beginners the benefit of the experiments and
mistakes made by others; thereby creating greater interest in a very promising industry,
minimizing the losses all beginners sustain by experimental work.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The work of registration is progressing very slowly. Registrations have increased by
7 per cent., a total of 1,946 registered applications for the year 1930, as against 1,520 for the
year 1929. Numerous requests have been received for certificates of registration. The receipt
of such a certificate will create a feeling of security in the possession of the trap-line and induce
the trapper to greater efforts in conserving the fur-bearers. The issuance of the certificate
(permanent) should therefore be given consideration.
One hundred and seventy-eight guides are registered in this Division. Fifty-nine took out
their licences for the current season. Eighty-six big-game hunters have been reported. The
following trophies were reported killed :—
Caribou   52 Black bear   27
Mountain-sheep   28 Mountain-goat   40
Mule-deer  .'.    8 Grizzly bear  18
Moose  30
The question of non-resident outfitters was again brought up for discussion and numerous
suggestions received. The consensus of opinion is that the " Game Act " and regulations should
be amended giving the resident outfitters proper status for which they are willing to pay a
licence fee. The following is therefore suggested: The creation of a guide-outfitter's licence
at a fee of $25; the guide's licence, $5, to remain as at present. Guide-outfitters' licences to be
issued to outfitters having proper equipment of a value of at least $3,000. Guides' licences to
be issued only at the request and in the name of the outfitter for use of a specified guide. Such
licence to become null and void should the guide quit or his services not be required. In addition
to the above, a form of examination for guides should be adopted by which Game AVardens
could ascertain the knowledge of the applicants in the matter of woodcraft, hunting, habits of
the animals, care of trophies, etc. The introducing of more strict regulations, as outlined above,
would meet with the support of all bona-flde guides and the big-game hunters in general, a's
only qualified guides would be employed by the outfitters, who would supply adequate equipment
inspected by the Department to the great benefit of all concerned.
Special Patrols.
During the year a number of very difficult patrols were undertaken by Game AArardens in
this Division.
Game Wardens A. J. Jank and H. P. Thompson, of Prince George, patrolled the Sheep Creek
Pass District, north of Mount Robson, from July 20th to September 25th, covering approximately
600 miles by saddle-horse.
The patrol of the Ootsa-AA7hitesail-Tetachuk Lakes by Game Wardens C. D. Muirhead and
D. Roumieu, using boat and inboard motor, took fourteen days, and some 450 miles were covered.
Another patrol worthy of mention was undertaken by Game AArarden J. S. Clark, of Fort
Nelson, accompanied by Special Game Warden B. Arillenieuve. He visited the Kantah and
Sikanni Rivers with dog-team and toboggan, covering some 400 miles or so. This patrol has
had a very good moral effect on the Indian and white trappers in that district.
A number of other patrols have been made throughout the Division, but only the most
important ones have been mentioned.    Patrolling has been found to be the best method  of REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 25
enforcing the " Game Act " and a greater number of patrols are to be a feature of next year's
programme.
Hunting Accidents.
Four accidents have been reported as occurring in this Division, and information as to these
accidents can be obtained from the statement contained in this report.
Summary and General Game Conditions.
On the whole, game conditions have been very satisfactory during the past year. Weather
conditions have been ideal, especially during the months of October, November, and December,
when exceptionally mild weather and light snowfall was experienced, which is highly desirable
from a point of game-conservation, as a light snowfall ensures an abundant food-supply for
all animals.
Before concluding, I wish to express my appreciation for the manner in which the Game
Wardens and Provincial Constables of " D " and " F" Divisions carried out their work in
connection with the registration of trap-lines, and also in connection with the enforcement of
the " Game Act " and regulations in general.
"E"  DIVISION   (VANCOUVER,   COAST,  AND  FRASER  VALLEY  DISTRICT).
By District Game Warden J. G. Cunningham.
Game Animals.
Deer.—These animals continue to be very plentiful. Harrison Lake, Howe Sound, the
various inlets on the coast, and the Squamish and Pemberton Districts afforded excellent shooting
and many deer were obtained toward the latter part of the season. The islands in Howe Sound,
so far as hunting of deer was concerned, produced very poor sport. Bowen and Gambier Islands
were logged and large tracts burned off some years ago, with the result that these logged and
burned-off areas are now covered with dense undergrowth, much too thick to allow good hunting,
and this undergrowth affords wonderful cover for deer.
The disease amongst deer on Bowen and Gambier Islands has entirely disappeared.
It would appear that many hunters are in favour of a short open season on does, but I would
not care to recommend such an open season.
Goat.—Goat are not hunted extensively in this Division, although they are very plentiful in
Powell Lake and Toba Inlet.
Bear.—Black bear are very numerous, but notwithstanding this fact very few complaints
have been received of their doing damage. Several grizzly bear were seen and some obtained
in the Squamish area, although these animals are not plentiful in the Division except at the
heads of some of the inlets along the coast.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver are not plentiful in this Division, although some of the registered trap-line holders
have a stock of beaver on their trap-lines, and in some cases they are conserving such stock and
doing very little trapping owing to the poor prices for fur. Marten are not plentiful and they-
are being trapped but very little. Mink are holding their own. These animals are taken in this
Division principally along the beaches. Muskrats are very plentiful. These animals are
increasing on the Seechelt Peninsula and are spreading out into all the small lakes in that area.
They are also doing well in the vicinity of the Gordon Pasha Lakes, where several of these
animals were liberated by a trapper. Due to the developments by the Powell River Pump
Company in flooding this area, many of the muskrats have left the district, which is very suitable
for their propagation.    Muskrats are very plentiful in the Burnaby Lake Game Reserve.
Otter are very scarce in the district, while a number of racoon have been trapped. Skunks
still continue to increase and are a source of nuisance, especially on the Lower Mainland.
Upland Game Birds.
During the past season the shooting of pheasants has been very disappointing, although
these birds appeared to be very plentiful prior to the open season, and after the open season
expired were to be seen in fair numbers.    During the early spring prospects were very bright, D 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
but owing to June being such an extremely wet month a great percentage of the young pheasants
were destroyed. If the mild weather this winter continues, pheasants should be very plentiful
next season. The season set for the hunting of pheasants appears to be suitable to the majority
of sportsmen, although some complain that no open season is allowed for the hunting of hen birds.
I do not recommend such an open season as there is a sufficient number of hens destroyed by
vermin and by other means.
The season on partridge in the Delta Municipality was more or less a failure. These birds
were very scarce and wild and consequently very poor bags were obtained. These birds were
more plentiful on the Serpentine Flats, but as the majority of the land is owned by private clubs
the average hunter obtained very few partridge.
Reports from Sumas Prairie, where a close season was in effect, indicate that partridge were
fairly plentiful, but not in sufficient numbers to warrant an open season. There are a few birds
on Lulu Island and in the Pitt Meadows-Maple Ridge area, but in order to ensure their increase
new blood will necessarily have to be introduced.
Quail are not increasing in the Division, although there will be an apparent increase next
fall owing to the mild winter. Owing to the weather conditions on the Lower Mainland I do
not think these birds will ever increase to any great number.
Blue-grouse shooting was fair during the past open season. A number of sportsmen obtained
the daily bag limit during the first two days of the season, but a great majority only obtained
one or two birds.
On the afternoon of the opening day, after the weather had cleared up, many blue grouse
were to be seen on Gambier Island.
A short open season was provided this year on ruffed grouse, but very few birds were killed.
There are a fair number of ruffed grouse throughout the Division. Unless breeding conditions
are unfavourable this spring it is expected there will be an increase in these birds, and no harm
will be done in declaring a short open season next fall.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—AVith the exception of some of the private clubs, the sportsmen on the Lower Mainland were very disappointed with the season on ducks. The weather was exceptionally mild,
with practically no rain or water in the fields and no storms to drive the birds down from the
north or off the gulf. Birds could be seen in countless thousands some distance offshore,
especially in the Boundary Bay area. A few private clubs have been very fortunate in obtaining
bag limits on practically every week-end, but this has been due no doubt to the fact that most
of these clubs put out a large amount of feed. One club alone bought 10 tons of grain for the
purpose of feeding ducks, and it was only by this means that the ducks were encouraged to stay
around in the district. Another factor is that these private clubs only shoot on the week-ends
and allow the birds to remain unmolested for five days of the week. If these clubs did not
put out this feed, I am afraid only a small percentage of ducks would be held in the district.
Some sportsmen are advocating the opening of the season on ducks to commence September
15th instead of October 15th, and I am of the opinion that this would be a mistake, as, with
the exception of a few mallard and teal, the northern birds do not arrive in this district until
later in the season. If the season was for the period November 1st to February 15th, better
shooting would be obtained. A separate opening date on pheasants and ducks is not recommended, as September 15th or even October 1st is too early an opening date for pheasants.
Taking everything into consideration, the present season, October 15th to January 31st, is
probably the most suitable and seems to satisfy the majority of the hunters.
Wood-ducks were again very plentiful throughout the Fraser A^alley and quite a number of
these birds were killed in flight on the opening week-end, some by mistake and others deliberately.
Geese and Brant.—Snow-geese and brant were very plentiful and several bag limits were
obtained on brant at Boundary Bay, but very few geese were shot owing to the mild weather.
With the exception of Pitt Lake, where there are a few Canada geese, there are no other geese,
except snow-geese, to be found in the Division. The season on geese and ducks should not be
opened at the same time in this Division, due to the fact that geese do not arrive here until about
November 10th, while ducks arrive much earlier. The present season on geese and brant appears
to be satisfactory . REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 27
Swans.—A few swans have been seen and reports of one having been shot in the Ladner
District resulted in a prosecution and a conviction.
Snipe.—Wilson snipe were scarce throughout the Division during the past season.
Band-tailed Pigeons.—These birds were fairly numerous, although only a few were killed
along the coast. Sumas Prairie and Pitt Meadows District afforded some good shooting on these
birds during the early part of the open season. Pigeons are more plentiful during the spring
migration period than they are during the open season in the fall. It is recommended that an
open season be provided this coming fall.
Vermin.
Coyotes are not plentiful in this Division, although a few complaints have been received
from the Peardonville District, near Abbotsford, where they have been doing damage to domestic
stock.    During the year only thirteen coyotes were submitted for bounty in this Division.
Wolves are not numerous along the coast. Forty-one wolf-pelts were presented for bounty
in this Division, against 149 in the year 1929 and 132 in the year 1928.
Cougar have decreased in numbers during the year.
Red foxes, skunk, and ermine should be classed as vermin on the Lower Mainland. During
the winter 1929-30 reports were received of at least fifty red foxes being taken between Ladner
and Chilliwack on the south side of the Fraser River.
Big-horned owls and snowy owls have not been plentiful, while crows have been found in
large numbers. It is very difficult to reduce the number of crows, although the Game Wardens
and a number of sportsmen have done good work in destroying crows.
Game-protection.
From an enforcement standpoint, if prosecutions conducted is a criterion, then we have had
the most successful year in this Division since the Game Department was formed. Informations
laid under the various Acts and regulations pertaining to the protection of game and game fish
amounted to 274, against the previous high year of 1929, when informations were laid in 239
cases. The increase in prosecutions is not due to the public having less regard for the laws,
but due to the system of placing strange Game Wardens in districts where they are not known.
We have had the whole-hearted support of members of the British Columbia Police Force in
protecting the game in the Division during the year 1930.
Special mention might be made of the splendid co-operation and assistance rendered by
Provincial Constable J. D. H. Stewart, who has been untiring in his efforts in assisting the
Game Department. Mr. Butler and the staff at headquarters have also given their time and
their whole-hearted support, and a great deal of the success during the past season has been due
to Mr. Butler's efforts. The members of the various Game Associations throughout the Division
have given the officers of this Department their support and in many cases prosecutions were
obtained through informations received from these associations.
Game Propagation.
Seven hundred and sixty-two pheasants were received from the Elk Lake Game Farm and
liberated on the Lower Mainland during the year 1930.
During the period January 1st to January 28th, 1930, it was found necessary to feed
pheasants at several places on account of the severe weather, but so far as can be ascertained
pheasants survived this severe weather very nicely. I wish to thank the Matsqui and Upper
Sumas Game Associations for their assistance in feeding pheasants during the severe weather.
Game Reserves.
The game reserves throughout the Division have been constantly patrolled. The Burnaby
Lake and the McGillivray Creek Reserves are no doubt the most important in the Division from
a game-bird standpoint. Great numbers of ducks and pheasants can be found on these reserves
throughout the whole of the open season.
Burnaby Lake affords splendid protection for muskrats and beaver. This lake is well stocked
with these animals and a number are taken outside the boundaries of this reserve. McGillivray Creek Reserve is valuable as it affords protection to migratory birds, and it is
here that we have a bird-banding station, and it is interesting to note that 473 ducks were banded
in this reserve during the last two months of this year.
AVe also have in this Division the following game reserves: Goat Island, North Vancouver,
Trout Lake, and Deer Lake.
Fur Trade.
The fur trade has suffered severely during the past season. Prices have fallen and in a
number of cases fur-dealers have had to dispose of furs at a price far below cost. Furs being
a luxury, naturally the fur trade was one of the first to suffer at a time of depression. Muskrats
remain steady, but prices on other fur have been very unsettled.
Trappers are feeling the depression in the fur market and in a great many cases are allowing
their trap-lines a rest until better prices can be obtained.
Fur-farms.
The money market and hard times have affected this industry. The small fur-farmer can
no doubt survive the low market, but from reports and information received the situation of
some of the larger farms is very grave. Prices for live stock, especially mink, have fallen considerably, and a large number of fur-farmed mink have been pelted recently, whereas if the
market prices were high these animals would never have been pelted, but would have been sold
as breeding stock.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The registration of trap-lines in this Division is now on a solid footing. The majority of
trappers, both white and Indian, have established claims, and it is only a short time now when
it will be safe for the Department to issue certificates of registration.
Each season there are a few relinquishments and new registration. This winter, owing to
lack of employment, a great many new applications were received from prospective trappers for
available territory, but very few applications could be accepted as nearly all the territory in
this Division is taken up by registered lines. At the time of writing this report there is not a
disputed trap-line in the Division.
I have again received the whole-hearted support of the Indian Agents at Vancouver, New
Westminster, and Lytton in the matter of registration of trap-lines of the Indians in their
agencies. As a result of this co-operation there is harmony between the white and Indian
trappers in the Division. Mr. R. P. Ponder, at headquarters, has been untiring in his efforts in
recording trap-lines and has done his utmost in seeing that trap-lines in this Division are in order.
There are a few guides in this Division and one or two of them only operate on the coast,
while the remainder do their guiding in the interior of the Province.
Special Patrols.
Patrols have been made regularly into many outlying districts in the Division.
Hunting Accidents.
There were two fatal and three minor hunting accidents in this Division during the year,
and particulars of these accidents can be found in the statement contained in this report. The
two fatal accidents were caused through self-inflicted wounds.
Summary of Game Conditions.
Conditions in regard to game have not during the present season been what was expected.
Pheasants were plentiful on private reserves, where they were only hunted once or twice a week,
but the hunter who did not have the privilege of hunting over these private reserves did not
enjoy very good pheasant-shooting.
Ducks have been in fair numbers, but owing to weather conditions the shooting was not as
could be expected.
The question of providing private shooting-grounds is still an issue. Each year more land
is taken up by private interests for shooting purposes, thereby leaving less territory for the REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 29
average hunter. There are several small newly formed islands in the main Fraser River that
will be bought up some day by private interests, if the money is not forthcoming shortly from
the sportsmen to allow for the purchase of these islands by the Department for use as public
shooting-grounds. These islands are very small, but would afford good shooting at times and
would be sadly missed by the sportsmen should they be acquired by private interests.
The sportsmen seem to be of the opinion that more pheasants should be liberated. In order
to breed and liberate a greater number of pheasants it will be necessary for the Department
to be in receipt of a greater revenue, and it is therefore suggested that licence fees be increased.
There is very little more that I can add, except to again express my appreciation of the
co-operation of the officers and men of the British Columbia Police Force, the Game Wardens
and the Game Associations of the Lower Mainland, particularly the B.C. Fish and Game
Protective Association, for their whole-hearted support.
REPORT ON OPERATIONS OF THE ELK LAKE GAME FARM.
By Game Warden J. AAT. Jones.
I respectfully submit my annual report dealing with the operations of the Elk Lake Game
Farm and the propagation of birds thereon during the past year.
Conditions during the year were not so good as in former years owing1 to the very cold
weather and high wind experienced during the month of June, when the majority of the young
birds were hatched.
Particulars of the birds raised, distributed, etc., are as follows:—
Pheasants in pens, December 31st, 1930       900
Breeding stock to extent of (approximately)      400
Hen pheasants  (approximately)       320
Cock pheasants (approximately)         80
Strayed from breeding-pens during the year        12
Number of eggs laid (approximately)      5,000
Set under hens  4,000
Small late eggs used for feeding      100
Eggs hatched (approximately)   3,400
Eggs distributed      828
Young pheasants reared     2,500
Now in pens (approximately)       500
Casualties owing to poor weather     800
Strayed from rearing-field       100
Liberated in British Columbia    2,010
Partridge-eggs set under hens       19
Partridge-eggs hatched        13
Number of birds in pens  11
Wild turkeys in pens, December 31st, 1930  9
Stock birds   3
Young birds  .':  6
Eggs laid         40
Eggs hatched        19
Unfertile eggs       21
Birds died        10
Birds liberated         3
Geese (two settings obtained from Penticton) —
Geese hatched and liberated at Elk Lake  1
(Rest of eggs unfertile.)
Quail in pens, December 31st, 1930       200
Vermin destroyed.—Domestic cats, 50; hawks, 20.
As well as the various duties attended to at the farm, every effort has been made to maintain
game patrols, and special attention has been paid to all complaints regarding game birds and
dogs doing damage, and also taking care of complaints in regard to cougar appearing in certain
parts of the Victoria District. D 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX.
Page.
Statement showing estimated expenditure, fiscal year 1930-31   30
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms licences, 1930  31
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences, 1930  32
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from fur royalties,
1930 -  33
Statement showing particulars of various pelts of fur-bearing animals on which royalty has
been paid, 1930   34
Comparative statement showing number and kind of pelts of fur-bearing animals on which
royalty has been collected during the period 1921-30  35
Total collections from fur trade, 1921 to 1930  36
Bounties paid, 1930  36
Comparative statement of bounties paid, 1922-30   37
Statement showing vermin killed by Game Wardens, 1930   37
List of fur confiscated or surrendered for bounty, 1930   37
List of firearms confiscated, 1930  38
List of guides, 1930  39
Hunting accidents, 1930  41
Statement showing big-game trophy fees paid, 1930  42
Prosecutions, 1930  45
Returns of 1,822 holders of special (trapping) firearms licences, season 1929-30  47
Fur-farm returns, 1930 (Statement No. 1)   48
Fur-farm returns, 1930 (Statement No. 2)   59
Statement of migratory game birds banded by members of Game Department, 1930  60
Personnel of Game Department, 1930  68
Statement of Estimated Expenditure, Fiscal Year 1930-31.
Game Department—
Salaries and expenses   $201,000.00
Bounties and employment of predatory-animal hunters, Department
of Agriculture vote      37,000.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 31
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Q D 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Non-resident Licences, January 1st, 1930,
to December 31st, 1930.
Government
Agents.
General
Firearms
and Anglers.
Weekly Bird.
Seaso
n Anglers.
Daily Anglers.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
5
3
3
2
1
11
4
18
10
3
24
22
91
11
11
10
42
12
4
2
7
37
1
30
0
5
1
5
3
$5.00
5.00
25.00
15.00
6
1
2
2
28
3
3
4
4
5
2
35
2
97
14
11
2
2
27
8
56
3
$60.00
27
1
68
16
90
401
26
401
2
5
283
1
30
15
5
1
40
92
723
193
25
5
1
4
2
3
15
2
1
39
22
34
1
71
$52.00
$112.00
$200.00
10.00
1.00
79.00
29.00
127.00
696.00
50.00
447.00
3.00
5.00
375.00
1.00
49.00
39.00
11.00
1.00
101.00
127.00
1,338.00
347.00
211.00
Atlin	
70 00
75.00
75.00
50.00
25.00
275.00
100.00
450.00
20.00
20.00
280.00
30.00
30.00
40.00
124 00
222 00
1,026.00
105.00
752 00
Duncan	
Fort Fraser	
143.00
455 00
40.00
415.00
1 00
250.00
75.00
50.00
354 00
114.00
Lillooet	
20.00
350.00
20.00
970.00
140.00
11.00
21 00
Nanaimo	
600.00
530.00
2,275.00
275.00
650.00
250.00
1,500.00
1,051.00
New Westminster...
4,583.00
762.00
650.00
46.00
13.00
10.00
11.00
2.00
4.00
20.00
2.00
1.00
296.00
Prince George	
110.00
20.00
1,623.00
30.00
11.00
300.00
100.00
20.00
322.00
104.00
20.00
2.00
50.00
625.00
1,300.00
25.00
'      750.00
150.00
125.00
51 00
Telegraph Creek	
625.00
270.00
80.00
560.00
30.00
79.00
52.00
146.00
1.00
99.00
1,654.00
182.00
1,456.00
181.00
239.00
Williams Lake	
Wilmer	
Totals	
375
$11,100.00
10
$50.00
317
$3,170.00
2,645
$4,364.00
$18,684.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 33
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and from Royalty
or Tax on Fur, January 1st, 1930, to December 31st, 1930.
Government
Agents.
Eesident
Fur-traders.
Non-resident
Fur-traders.
Fur-tax.
Taxidermists.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
9
1
3
2
3
24
5
1
1
16
11
17
9
10
9
43
3
3
15
$225.00
54
1
11
24
11
18
4
4
24
48
S
o
51
6
4
1
17
12
2
67
109
36
27
11
3
3
13
34
515
19
78
33
14
$270.99
2.50
47.75
581.36
34.07
120.88
13.00
9.40
288.75
1,215.98
97.46
2.00
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
2
$10.00
$505.99
2.50
25.00
75.00
50.00
75.00
72.75
Atlin	
656.36
84.07
10.00
205 88
13.00
9.40
5.00
293.75
600.00
1,815.98
107 46
10.00
2.00
125.00
329.50
5.81
5.00
459.50
5.81
Lillooet	
25.00
7.89
1.10
309.85
94.92
3.21
3,567.81
32.89
1.10
25.00
334 85
94.92
3 21
400.00
3,967.81
Prince George	
275.00
425.00
5,101.63
920.59
5.00
5.00
5,381.63
1,350 59
Quesnel	
225.00
442.89
60.80
5.51
4.90
20.76
1,078.41
25,100.55
141.74
128.01
407.55
13.54
5.00
672 89
Kevelstoke	
60 80
5.00
10 51
Salmon Arm	
4 90
Smithers	
250.00
225.00
1,075.00
75.00
75.00
375.00
270 76
Telegraph Creek	
1,303.41
26,205.55
221 74
30.00
5.00
10.00
Vernon	
Victoria	
213.01
Williams Lake	
782.55
13 54
Totals	
186
$4,625.00
1,204
$40,431.11
21
$105.00
$45,161.11 D 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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D 35
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1930.
Year.
Fur Royalty.
Licences.
Total.
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6.090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
$30,790.80
57,458.89
67,524.18
•62,446.68
1925	
1926	
1927	
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
1028	
58,823.07
1929	
1930	
47,329.89
45,161.11
Totals   	
$491,817.49
$67,865.00
$559,682.49
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1930.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Big-horned
Owls.
Total.
2
4
5
1
75
46
24
2   '
2
103
41
74
5
5
4
165
52
1
3
29
3
1
28
11
1
3
6
8
12
2
12
43
7
16
37
4
89
74
41
110
49
245
4
11
97
33
1
6
2
203
108
87
2
4
16
11
12
93
205
1
41
12
2
14
7
65
4
27
20
1
32
13
40
5
37
15
67
$2,990.50
Ashcroft	
Atlin.   ..                	
477.50
90.00
888.00
721.00
6,676.00
2,080.00
347.50
847.00
491.00
3,030.00
150.00
84.50
781.00
1,120.00
697.50
New Westminster -	
48.00
1,290.00
705.00
1,767.25
1,490.50
1,182.50
15.00
30.00
232.50
1,627.50
480.00
2,443.50
985.00
2,316.00
Totals	
312
491
1,544
403
$36,090.25
Note.—The sum of $4,686.75 was paid to predatory-animal hunters employed by the Game Department
during the year 1930.
Note.—Bounty paid as follows: 312 wolves, $15 each; 491 cougars, $40 each; 1,541 coyotes, $7.50
each ;   3 coyotes, $3.75 each;   big-horned owls, 50 cents each. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 37
Comparative Statement op Bounties paid from 1922 to 1930.
Calendar Sear.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Totals.
1922	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923	
14,840.00
1924	
172
20,398.40
1925	
24,397.00
1926	
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927	
65,377.95
1928	
1,025
1,389
403
50,709.25
1929	
42,122.00
1930	
36,090.25
Totals	
2,806
2,897
56,589
69,431
4,803
7,204
20,614
$355,506.65
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds destroyed by Game Wardens during
the Year 1930.
Cougar  4
Coyotes            54
Wolves 	
Crows   4,247
Owls       144
Magpies   1,249
Hawks and eagles      308
Cats        861
Dogs       109
Black bear        19
List of Fur confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1930.
to December 31st, 1930.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Game
Division.
Kind of Fur confiscated.
Jan.
Feb.
16
22
4
15
19
27
March    3
3
5
21
22
April    11
19
May
June
July
10
26
18
23
2
Dec.
Sept.    30
Nov.     21
26
6
8
15
15
19
27
27
Marshall, M	
Richmond, A. J	
Ray, S. H	
Osachotf, W	
Curevich, I	
Scott, W	
Symonds, L. G	
Choate, F	
McKenzie Trading Co..
Ashley, E	
Louiax, J	
Allaire, W	
Chartrand, A	
Barn, G	
White, W	
Fong, C	
Dawson, J. E	
Seebach, A. H	
Oliver, J	
Jack, H	
Spencer, M	
Cote, E	
Tymich, J	
Carman, E	
Brlandson, C	
Bergsvik, E. M	
Duncan, W	
Cukr, B	
Anderson, W	
Kelowna	
Prince Rupert	
Lily Lake	
Edgewood.,	
Vancouver	
Stave Lake	
Mission	
Vedder Crossing..
Vancouver	
Pitt Meadows	
Nootka	
Ocean Falls	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Fanny Bay	
Quesnel	
Rivers Inlet	
Prince George	
Cloverdale	
Victoria	
Kitkatlah	
Oliver	
Kamloops	
Charlie Lake	
Abbotsford	
Matsqui	
Ahousat	
Dome Creek	
Dome Creek	
Totals..
C"
D"
D "
3
B "
E"
E"
1
E "
E "
E"
3
E "
A "
D"
C"
C "
1
A"
C"
2
D"
1
D "
E"
A"
D"
B "
C"
D"
E"
E "
A "
D"
D"
14
11
11
23
25 1135
15
30
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of surrendered coyote-pelts and confiscated fur during 1930, $1,464.92. D 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1930,
to December 31st, 1930.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Game
Division.
Kind
confiscated.
Jan.
Feb.
July
Aug.
• Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
25
17
2
4
25
4
5
17
22
23
25
26
o
4
6
7
15
20
27
27
27
29
31
13
25
2
3
3
6
10
12
28
29
Irving, C	
Wyzisk, J	
Aikens, J. W	
Coe, J	
Smith, H. H	
Tomich, V	
Lee, G	
Kozalanko, M	
Lapsnsky, P	
Richardson, E..~.
Lee. W	
Salk, M	
Douglas, M	
Mutter, E	
Brown, R. B	
Northway, L	
Neff, E	
Nishi, M	
Calvin, A	
Ludovek, S	
Tompkins, C. E..
Dowling, H	
Gunderson, H	
Gee, L	
Tamai, K	
Bagshaw, W	
Falborg, N	
Madson, I..	
Frisk, L	
Nesbitt, K	
Woodward, C. D
Snider, S	
Welch, P. R	
Canal Flats	
Vernon	
Alberni	
Winfield	
Cloverdale	
Langley	
Vancouver	
Ruskin	
Chilliwack	
Chilliwack	
Popcum	
Halston	
Kelowna	
Matsqui	
Cloverdale	
Revelstoke	
Abbotsford	
Alberni	
Nanaimo	
Port Moody	
Chilliwack	
Queensborough	
Kamloops	
Port Coquitlam	
Galiano Island	
Frince Rupert	
Progress	
Progress	
Chilliwack	
Prince Rupert	
Alberni	
Victoria	
Okanagan Landing
"B '
"C
"A'
"C
"E'
"E'
"E'
"E'
"E'
"E'
"E'
"C
"C
"E'
"E'
"C
"E'
"A'
"A '
"E '
"E'
"E'
"C
"E'
"A'
"D'
"D'
"D'
"E'
"D'
"A'
"A'
"C
.22 rifle.
rifle.
air-rifle.
.32 auto, pistol.
.22 rifle.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
rifle.
auto, shotgun.
.22 revolver.
.22 rifle.
shotgun;  1 rifle.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
pump  shotgun.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
shotgun.
shotgun.
shotgun.
auto,  shotgun.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
shotgun.
,22 rifle.
shotgun. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 39
List of Guides, 1930.
Barkerville District.
Brown, A. F Barkerville.
Brown, H. G  „
Cochrane, J. D  „
Duffy, J. C	
House, J. S  „
Houser, W. L  „
Kelly, R. A	
McCall, M. A Barkerville.
Porteous, M. E  „
Reed, F. de W	
Thompson, N  „
Thompson, R  „
Thompson, W  „
Wendle, J	
Cassiar District.
Adsit, G. E Telegraph Creek.
Ball, G. B	
Carlick, L. D	
Creyke, J Telegraph Creek.
Fox, C	
McClosky, P	
Fort George District.
Allan, A Mount Robson.
Cochrane, A	
Crate, H	
Hargreaves, G. E	
Hargreaves, R. F	
Saladano, J	
Schive, T	
Beirnes, G. M , Hazelton.
Jack, T	
Britton, H Red Pass.
Dennison, G. M         „
Smith, J. M	
Carr, S. J Tete Juane Cache.
Colebank, G Hixon.
Colebank, G. A     „
Dale, J Woodpecker.
Dayton, M Dome Creek.
Haynes, E. B  „
Hooker, J. B  „
Hooker, L. J  „
Jensen, E. H Dome Creek.
Goodell, W. R McBride.
Johnson, L. M         „
Hamilton, G. G Rose Lake.
Harrison, C Wistaria.
Henson, C. F Ootsa Lake.
McNeill, J. W	
Morgan, J. E  „
Hughes, C. H Mud River.
LeBeck, O Swift Creek.
Lonsdale, F. E Snowshoe.
Lyngos, H Punchaw.
McAvoy, J. N , Lucerne.
McGaghran, J Salmon Valley.
McKill, J Kleena Kleene.
Miller, R Longworth.
Millspaugh, C Prince George.
Muir, H	
Scherk, K	
Minaker, G Taylor.
Kamloops District.
Anderson, D Clearwater Station.   Ray, J. B Clearwater Station.
Cariboo and Lillooet Districts.
Archie, G .Canim Lake.
Archie, T  „
Eagle, C Lac la Hache.
Ogden, P  „
Fletcher, J Pavilion.
Stewart, J. W	
Hansen, L Bridge Lake.
Higgins, E Bridge Lake.
James, J Lillooet.
Mahan, G Pemberton Meadows.
Rioux, E Fawn.
Renshow, J. H Blue River.
Walters, 1 150-Mile House.
Ashman, L Corbin.
Baker, M. C Natal.
Boiven, W     „
Couillard, H     „
Krivensky, J     „
Nordstrom, C     „
Kootenay District.
Valasak, J Natal.
Butwell, F. H Golden.
Fuez, W      „
Lawrence, O. G      „
Phillips, C. E      „
Canning, R. F Skookumchuck. D 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Kootenay District—Continued.
Foley, D Cranbrook. Stevens, C Wasa.
McGinnes, E. C  „ Thomas, G. A Castledale.
Galbraith, F. E Galena. Weideman, O. W Leanchoil.
Kain, C Wilmer. White, J Fort Steele.
Richter, F Radium Hot Springs. Woodrow, F Rosebery.
Peace River District.
Brady, B. C Fort St. John.
Callio, Joe Hudson Hope.
Callio, Patrick	
Callio, Peter	
Garbitt, T	
Kiely, W. S	
Ross, J. A	
Wallace, S Hudson Hope.
Cameron, P South Pine River.
Cassie, F. C Arras.
Cochrane, W. T Rolla.
Dopp, E Grand Haven.
Noske, N Rio Grande, Alta.
Armstrong, T. B Quesnel.
Cooper, J       „
Olson, A       „
Rawling, A. L	
Turner, G. F.., I	
Brammer, C Likely.
Dickson, F	
Hamilton, R. R..        „
Johnson, J. W        „
Maxwell, T	
Parminter, R	
Quesnel District.
St. Denis, P Likely.
Stephenson, A        „
Walters, G.	
Collins, J. M Keithley Creek.
Hooker, F. O Horsefly.
Hooker, T. O	
McLeese, P	
Patenaude, B	
Walters, G	
Walters, L. E.:	
Vancouver District.
Hubbard, I. H Vancouver.
Miller, F Harrison Hot Sp.
Roake, F. P	
Phillips, F. A North Vancouver.
Stanton, J. R Knight Inlet.
Victoria and Islands Districts.
Moore, S Coombs. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 41
©
03
OS
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o a D 42                                                            BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1930, to December 31st, 1930.
Species.
Amount.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
>.
a.2
QJ U
mo
V    .
a a
ca £
M 0
a«
Mo
a
o
A
*E
a
01
o
S
c
QJ
QJ
a
rn
a
o
O
u
Sj
fl
a
+j
a .
a-S
o a
>H  O
QJ
W
O
©
•
A
QJ
111
'3,
a
is
Barkerville—
l
l
l
l
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
2
2
3
2
3
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
i
i
i
i
1
1
1
1
>     1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
80.00
25.00
45.00
15.00
10.00
15.00
55.00
15.00
25.00
40.00
65.00
15.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
80.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
70.00
15.00
30.00
45.00
25.00
45.00
5.00
5.00
15.00
5.00
10.00
5.00
20.00
15.00
15.00
5.00
75.00
5.00
5.00
Cranbrook—
Clinton—
Frazer, W. D., Seattle, Wash	
Hinehley, W. R., Seattle, Wash	
Cumberland—
Arnold, L. M., Seattle, Wash.	
Ward, R., Seattle, Wash	
Fernie—
McKie, J. A., Oakland, Cal.. _      	
Oliver, C, Pittsburgh, Pa	
Hart, Dr. 0., Gull Lake, Sask	
Golden—
Hird, S. T., Chicago, 111.                	
Gunther, E. J.,  Whithington, England	
Mudge, E. W., Jr., Pittsburgh, Pa	
Mudge, L. S., Pittsburgh, Pa	
Egan, R. M., Pittsburgh, Pa	
Hodgson, H. J., Montreal, Que	
Greenwood—
Bauers,  E.,  Seattle, Wash	
Fairbanks, F., Seattle, Wash	
Kamloops—
Kaslo—
Colpe, C. H., San Francisco, Cal	
Nanaimo—
Schuchart, C. W., Everett, Wash	
Sutherland, G. W., Seattle, Wash	
Brachvogel, Dr. M. N., Aberdeen, Wash	
Garhart, Dr. M. N., Seattle, Wash	
New Westminster—
Phelan, W., Stillwater   	 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.                       D 43
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1930, to December 31st, 1930—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
Amount.
a.2
QJ ■-
MO
QJ    .
a a
Si*
-p
|«
Wo
a
o
—
'E
a
o
QJ
3
P.
U
QJ
QJ
a
+J
X
ci
o
O
fcT
$8
fl
'a
fl    .
a a
& o
rt 6c
QJ
VI
©
O
it
&
QJ
QJ
m
a
fe
New Westminster—Continued.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
l
l
l
l
l
l
1
1
2
1
$5.00
25.00
10.00
25.00
10.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
25.0.0
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
40.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
65.00
65.00
50.00
140.00
55.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
75.00
50.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
55.00
25.00
55.00
55.00
50.00
65.00
40.00
70.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
Weaver, F. 0., Seattle, Wash	
Whitcomb, C. M., Seattle, Wash	
Hobblett, C. E., Portland, Ore	
Alderson, T., Seattle, Wash	
Harris, G. 1 , Bakersfleld, Cal	
King, B. T., Seattle  Wash	
Yates, W. V., Seattle, Wash	
Edwards, E. V., Holtsville, Cal	
Prince Rupert—-
Pouce Coupe—
Drinker, H. S., 3rd, Philadelphia, Pa	
Drinker, H. S„ Jr., Philadelphia, Pa	
Walvker, W. D., Meadville, Pa    	
Fahr,  C.  R.,  Meadville,  Pa	
Pa ,e, V. L , Rockford   111	
Hance, W. B., Freeport, 111	
Watt, M. H., Rockford, 111	
Colehour, F. E., Rockford, 111	
Powell River—
Arnold, L. M., Seattle, Wash	
Penticton—
Jilg, J. H., Seattle, Wash	
Prince George—
Schaffer, Mrs. S. C, Spokane, Wash	
Schaffer, S. C, Spokane, Wash	
Schaffer, R. H., Spokane,  Wash	
Hite, W., Pond Creek, Okla	
Neal, L. C, Belfontaine, Ohio	
Midgley, D., Pond Creek, Okla	
Midgley, Mrs. D., Pond Creek, Okla	
Berthold, G. E., Nebraska	
Hood, J. Jr., Haddonfleld, N.J	
Bartlett, A. G., Louisville, Ky	
Flesher, E. J., Pittsburgh, Pa	
Prescott, W. H., Jr., Cleveland, Ohio	
Koach, A.,  Garfield, N.H	
Beacher, C. B., New York	
Terxa, J. W., Blackie, Alta	
McPherson, 0. C, Jackson, Mich	
. D 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1930, to December 31st, 1930—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
a a
M o
J QJ
a§
Amount.
Prince George—Continued.
Bingham, J., Toledo, Ohio	
McKay, W. O., Seattle, Wash	
Savidge, G. L., Seattle, Wash	
Wellman, W. A„ Hollywood, Cal	
Zanuck, D., Hollywood, Cal	
Quesnel—
Grenier, W. J., Bellingham, Wash	
Davies, F. O., Seattle, Wash	
Smithers—
Hoiles, C. E., Grenville, 111	
Greer, M., Vandalia, 111	
Victoria—
Kinmont, R. F., Los Angeles, Cal	
Melby, C. E., Seattle, Wash	
Marks, W. H., Seattle, Wash	
Bull, S. L., Seattle, Wash	
Vancouver—
Huber, W., Philadelphia, Pa	
Cobb, C. F., Santa Barbara, Cal	
Barton, Dr. J. F., Longview, Wash	
Baumert, J. A., Antwerp, N.Y	
Fleming, A. S., Portland, Ore	
Strathearn, D. L., Limi, Cal	
Strathearn, G. P., Limi, Cal	
Montgomery, M. L., Limi, Cal	
Montgomery, W. W., Limi, Cal	
Montgomery, R. R., Long Beach, Cal	
Gravitt, V. A., Ardmore, Okla	
Button, W. S., Riverside,  Cal	
Fisher, J. H., Kittman, Ohio	
Gibbs, E. B., Midenea, Ohio	
Low, R. P., San Diego, Cal	
Loving, M. W., Chicago, III	
Armstrong, Dr. R. W., Vancouver, Wash...
Webb, R. R., Los Angeles, Cal	
Cobbs, T. F., Danville, W.V	
Hollingsworth, O. R., Bellingham, Wash...
Martin, J., Bellingham, Wash	
Firstinberg, T. (Prince), New York	
Raynor, J. M., Pasadena, Cal	
Hook, A., Bellingham, Wash	
Hood, Dr. C. S., Ferndale, Wash	
Matson, E., Bellingham, Wash	
Bondread, Mr. and Mrs. W., Pennsylvania
Williams Lake—
Houser, P. W., Seattle, Wash	
Fletcher, J., Portland, Ore	
Hodge, F. M., Palis Verdes, Cal	
Hodge, A. F., Palis Verdes, Cal	
Krish, J. B., Palis Verdes, Cal	
... Porter, M. E., Mountain View, Cal	
Hilderbrand, B., Mallott, Wash	
Kostelin, H., Detroit, Mich	
Wilmer—
Everett, R. W., Brevard, N.C	
Everett, R. E., Brevard, N.C	
Carpenter, R. E., Newsport, Wash	
Richter, K., Overstdorf, Bavaria	
Totals	
30      37
37
23
1
2
"56"
48
4!)
IS
13
$30.00
75.00
50.00
50.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
145.00
200.00
10.00
5.00
10.00
10.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
55.00
50.00
65.00
40.00
55.00
55.00
25.00
50.00
90.00
40.00
70.00
15.00
80.00
65.00
15.00
25.00
5.00
5.00
25.00
10.00
5.00
10.00
5.00
95.00
25.00
15.00
65.00
65.00
65.00
80.00
25.00
95.00
70.00
75.00
55.00
40.00
$5,575.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 45
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1930, to December 31st, 1930.
See Foot-note.
vj
Description of Offence,
0
o
-  'ui
= a
fl
"   VJ
ffl 2
: Q
fl
.2
birt
: a
"D"
Division.
"E"
Division.
GQ
'I
5
QJ
a
©
5»
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
1
1
1
$10.00
2
2
2
20.00
i
1
2
9
9
200.00
4
4
4
40.00
Hunting or in possession of game on a game
4
4
Killing or having in possession game animals
of the female sex	
3
1
4
3
1
12
12
335.00
Killing,  hunting, or having game animals  in
13
5
17
2
7
6
44
50
852.75
Possession of deer under 1 year of age	
1
1
2
2
1
7
7
265.00
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals dur-
2
3
1
5
1
7
5
2
20
4
22
4
470.00
55.00
Removal   of   evidence  as   to   sex  of  a  game
2
4
1
1
7
1
7
1
70.00
10.00
Game Birds.
Allowing   dogs   to   hunt   game   birds   between
April 15th and August 15th	
11
11
22
22
225.00
1
4
5
285.00
Game birds on premises of a shop, etc	
2
1
3
3
80.00
1
5
2
6
8
70.00
Hunting or molesting game birds in a prohibi-
1
1
1
1
1
1
20.00
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle	
10.00
Hunting or  in   possession  of  migratory  non-
game birds during close season	
2
1
4
7
7
90.00
Hunting   upland   game   birds   between   sunset
3
3
3
6
Hunting upland game birds when snow is on
3
3
3
30.00
Killing,    hunting,    or   in    possession   of   game
9
3
11
1
16
2
39
1
41
1
705.00
10.00
Licences.
20
5
1
38
3
10
49
2
5
4
122
6
127
200.00
1,325.00
Failing   to   produce   a   licence   on   request   of
2
1
3
3
30.00
Minor carrying firearms without being accom-
3
1
1
1
2
1
5
3
5
4
50.00
Making false application for a licence	
30.00
Non-resident    carrying    firearms    without    a
1
1
1
3
1
6
7
260.00
Non-resident carrying fishing-tackle or angling
2
1
15
18
18
182.00
Non-British subject carrying firearms without
3
1
3
4
30.00
Shooting big game without required licence	
1
1
1
25.00
Using another person's licence	
1
1
1
2
50.00
Firearms.
Carrying   loaded   firearms   in   or   discharging
5
7
8
14
2
34
36
330.00
Carrying   or   in   possession   of   an   unplugged
pump shotgun or an automatic shotgun
2
4
1
7
1
1
14
15
135.00 D 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions  (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1930, to December 31st, 1930
—Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
fl
a
fl
o
o
^.a
ffl.5
o.£
s «
: Q
i a
i a
So
-.C'-H
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Fire-arms—Continued.
Carrying firearms or traps in a game reserve...
Discharging firearms on or across a highway
in a municipality	
Trapping.
Allowing traps to remain set after end of open
season	
Interfering with licensed trapper's trap-line	
Setting out poisoned bait	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence
Trapping during the close season -	
Trapping on other than a registered trap-line
Miscellaneous.
Buying pelts of fur-bearing animals taken during close  season	
Carrying firearms in automobile, etc., during
close season without a permit—	
Destroying beaver or muskrat houses	
Exporting pelts of fur-bearing animals without
permit or payment of royalty	
Failing to keep record-book or make returns of
furs purchased	
Obstructing or furnishing false information to
a Game Warden	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals
without a permit during the close seasons...
Trespassing	
B.C. Special Fishery Laws.
Exceeding daily bag limit on trout	
Buying fish from Indians	
Fishing with salmon-roe	
Fishing for trout through the ice -	
Fishing during the close season	
Fishing for salmon with a gill-net	
Jigging fish	
Polluting streams	
Possession of sturgeon less than 3 ft. in length
Taking oysters from a prohibited area	
Taking trout under 8 inches in length	
Gaol Sentences.
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Hunting in a game reserve	
Killing game of the female sex	
Killing or selling game animals or birds illegally	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a
licence	
Pit-lamping	
Possession of game during close season-
Possession of an automatic shotgun	
1
1
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1
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1
25
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$65.00
87.50
30.00
260.00
10.00
320.00
925.00
90.00
150,00
35.00
20.00
10.00
150.00
70.00
10.00
165.00
5.00
32.50
51.00
5.00
177.50
50.00
9.50
5.00
10.00
20.00
310.00
',572.75
7 days to 2 mos.
15 days.
15 days to 3 mos.
7 to 30 days.
30 days each.
2, 45 days each ;
2, 30 days each.
2, 10 days each;
1, 15 days.
30 days. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 4T
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1930, to December 31st, 1930
—Continued.
See Foot-
NOTE.
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fl
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Penalties
imposed.
Gaol Sentences—Continued.
....
3
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3
1
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3
2
2
678~
7 days.
2, 30 days each ;
1, 3 days.
2, 30 days each;
1, 10 days.
Selling fish illegally	
Trapping on other than a registered trap-line
30 days.
3 months each.
Totals	
109
51
153
65
258
42
636
Note.—" A " Division : Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division : Kootenay and
Boundary areas. " C " Division : Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division :
Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division : Vancouver,
Coast, and Lower Mainland areas.
Returns from 1,822 Holders of Trappers' Licences, showing Big Game, Fur-bearing
and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1929-30.
Big Game.
Bear    _  468
Moose    364
Goat  137
Sheep  14
Caribou  88
Deer '.  876
Elk  5
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver   4,639
Fox    453
Fisher   326
Lynx   755
Marten    4,947
Mink   3,143
Muskrat   29,057
Otter   219
Racoon    1,877
Skunk   200
Weasel :  30,997
Wildcat  117
Wolverine     122
Predatory Animals.
Coyotes  764
Cougar   69
Wolves    46
Badger   :  13 D 48
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D 53
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' s y *>- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 55
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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D 57
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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fc   fe. fc >   O   X w REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 59
Fub-fakm Returns, 1930 (Statement No. 2).
Name and Address.
Otheb Kinds of Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.   Fisher.    Lynx.    Racoon.   Skunk.   Weasel,
Baity, E. A., Quesnel	
Bang, H., McMurphy	
Bernard, G. St., Parksville	
Bland, C. L., Quatsino	
Bubar, B. W., Beaverdell	
Capilano Fur Animal Farm (F. Eoclion), Capilano	
Christensen, T., and Nielson, P., Prince George	
Christofferson, J., Lower Nicola	
Columbia Valley Fur Farms, Ltd., Edgewater	
Copeland, F. C, Okanagan Centre	
Deer Creek Fur Farm (F. and A. Kirkendall), Quesnel
Edwards,  R. A., Atnarko	
Godbout, A. Lt., Albas.	
Gustafson, A. C. and A. A., Matsqui •.	
Hendrix,  J.,  Canim Lake	
Hoppe, F., Locbdale P.O	
Hughes, W., Royal Oak, V.I	
Jacobsen, J., Gillies Bay	
James, M. L. and J. H., Burnaby	
Jenkins, Mrs. L. M., Black Pool	
Jones, Mrs. I., Waiatt Bay	
Johnston, R., West Summerland s	
Kirkland, G. H. and J. W., and Ray, S. H., Lily Lake-
Ladoucer, E., Forest  Grove	
Landers, J. W., Read Island	
Latta, R., Vancouver	
Lawson, Dr. E. H., Saltspring Island	
Logan, A. W., Clo-oose	
Loger, C, and Nelson, R., Kyuquot	
Ludlow, M. W„ Eholt	
McCay, L., Simoom Sound	
McParland, J. A., Raush Valley	
Mundy, R. F., Matsqui	
Nesbitt, F. A., Edgewood ...	
Nicholas,  A.,   Clayburn	
Nord, O. A., McMurphy	
Peel, M. A., Pinantan Lake	
Piton, N. M., Shawnigan Lake	
Porteous,  S. D.,  Needles	
Purver, C. A., Clayburn	
Shaw, A. G., Saanich	
Shields,  S. L.,  Sooke	
Shortreed, Mrs. A. A., Vanderhoof	
Silvey, Mrs. J. and Mr. D., Kuper Island	
Smale, H. W., Fort Fraser	
Solloway,  O., Burnaby	
Stearns, R. G., Tintagel	
Stewart, C. W., Galena	
Tereschuk, L., Prince George	
Tindill, T. W., and Baird, A. M., Blue River	
Wallis, T. and S. B., Sidney	
Widen, E. P., Houston	
Wilde, J. E„ Lund	
Totals	
18
125
10
1
15
1
12
2
11
2
7
4
10
3
2
1
7
2
16
3
3
4
11
3
3
2
10
2
222
40
125
Note.—Thirty-seven fur-farms not listed above submitted nil returns, while thirteen permits were
cancelled. The following fur-farmers could not give an estimate of the number of animals on hand in view
of the fact that the animals were being farmed at large : Bambrick, C. J., Big Creek P.O. (beaver) ; Clarke, D.,
Alberni (beaver) ; Edwards, G. W., Golden (beaver) ; Manring, S. E., Mazama (beaver) ; Musquash Farms,
Ltd., Vancouver (beaver) ;   Nord, O., McMurphy (beaver). D 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department during the Year 1930, and Returns of
Birds killed or retrapped.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624153
Oct.   21
„     21
,,     21
„     21
„     21
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
,      24
,.     24
„     24
„     24
»      24
„     24
„     24
„     24
»     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
„     24
Mallard	
Female	
A624154
A624155
Coot                  ...   .
A624156
A624157
Coot           	
A624158
Female	
A624159
A624160
Male	
A624161
A624162
Female	
Male	
Female	
Male	
A624163
A624164
A624165
A624166
A624167
Female	
A624168
A624169
A624170
A624171
A624172
A624173
A624174
A624175
A624176
A624177
A624178
Male	
A624179
A624180
A624181
A624182
Female	
A624183
A624184
A624185
A624186
A624187
Male	
A624188
Female	
Male	
Female	
A624189
A624190
A624191
A624192
A624193
A624194
A624195
Male	
A624196
A624197
Female	
A624198
A624199
A624200
Male	
Female	
Male	
A624201
A624202
A624203
Nov. 15
A624203
Agassiz.
A624204
A624205
Male	
Female	
A624206
......    1      	
A624207
A624208
Female	
A624209
A624210
A624211
Male	
|     	
A624212   .
Female	
......    |     	
1 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 61
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Band.
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624213
A624214
A624215
A624216
A624217
A624218
A624219
A624220
A624221
A624222
A624223
A624224
A624225
A624226
A624227
537083
537084
A624228
A624229
A624230
A624231
A624232
A624233
A624234
A624235
A624236
A624237
A624238
A624239
A624240
A624241
A624242
A624243
A624244
A624245
A624246
A624247
A624248
A624249
A024250
A624251
A624252
A624253
A624254
A624255
A624256
A624257
A624258
A624259
A624260
A624261
A624262
A624263
A624264
A624265
A624266
A624267
A624268
A624269
A624270
A624271
A624272
Oct. 24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
Mallard..
Green-wing teal..
Coot	
Mallard	
Female..
Male	
Female-
Male	
Female-
Male	
Female-
Male
Nov.    3
A624219
Retrapped. D 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
' Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
Returns.
Band.
banded.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624273
Oct. 25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  25
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„ 26
„  26
,,  26
,,  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
,,  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
„  26
Ma
Fe
Ma
Fe
Ms
Fe
le	
A624274
A624275
A624276
A624277
A624278
A624279
A624280
A624281
A624282
A624283
A624284
A624285
A624286
A624287
A624288
A624289
A624290
A624291
nale	
A624292
A624293
le. .   	
A624294
A624295
A624296
A624297
A624298
A624299
A624300
A624301
A624303
'
A624307
A. 624308
le
A624310
A624312
'
A624317
A624318
A624319
.
A624322
A624323
A624325
A624328
A624330
A624331
A624332
A624333
A624334 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 63
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.
banded.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624335
Oct. 27
„ 27
„  27
„ 27
„  27
„  27
„  27
„ 27
Nov. 3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
Ma
Hard	
A624336
A624337
A624338
A624339
A624340
A624341
A624342
A624343
Male	
A624344
A624345
Dec. 22
A624345
Retrapped.
A624346
A624347
A624348
A624349
A624350
A624351
A624352
A624353
A624354
A624355
A624356
A624357
A624358
A624359
A624360
Female	
A624361
A624362
A624363
A624364
A624365
A624366
A624367
A624368
A624369
A624370
A624371
A624372
A624373
A624374
A624375
A624376
A624377
A624378
A624379
A624380
A624381
A624382
A624383
A624384
A624385
A624386
A624387
A624388
A624389
A624390
A624391
A624392
A624393
	
A624394
A624395
Male	
A624396*
* Band missing in series. D 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Band.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624397
Nov. 4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
„   4
4
4
4
4
„  4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4-
4
4
4
4
Mallard	
Male	
A624398
A624399
A624400
A624401
A624402
A624403
A624404
A624405
"
A624406
A624407
"
Nov. 12
A624407
Retrapped.
A624408
"
A624409
"
A624410
"
A624411
A624412
A624413
"
A624414
Nov. 10
A624414
Chilliwack.
A624415
"
A624416
"
A624417
"
A624418
A624419
A624420
A624421
"
A624422
A624423
Female	
A624424
A624425
"
A624426
A624427
A624428
4624429
A624430
"
A624431
A624432
A624433
A624434
A624435
A624436
"
A624437
A624438
A624439
A624440
A624441
A624442
"
A624443
A624444
A624445
"
A624446
"
A624447
"
A624449
"
A624450
A624452
"
"
4624454
"
"
"
A624457
A624458
" REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.
D 65
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members or the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Band.
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed or
recaptured at.
A624459
A624460
A624461
A624462
A624463
A624464
A624465
A624466
A624467
A624468
A624469
A624470
A624471
A624472
A624473
A624474
A624475
A624476
A624477
A624478
A624479
A624480
A624481
A624482
A624483
A624484
A624485
A624486
A624487
A624488
A624489
A624490
A624491
A624492
A624493
A624494
A624495
A624496
A624497
A624498
A624499
A624500
A624501
A624502
A624503
A624504
A624505
A624506
A624507
A624508
A624509
A624510
A624511
A624512
A624513
A624514
A624515
A624516
A624517
A624518
A624519
A624520
Nov.
10
10
10
10
10
10
12
12
12
12
12
12
Mallard-
Female. .
Male
Female-
Male	
Female.. D 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement
showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
No. of
Band.
Date of
Banding,
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
No. of                 Killed or
Band.           recaptured at.
A624521
A624522
A624523
A624524
A624525
A624526
A624527
A624528
A624529
A624530
A624531
A624532
537443
A624533
A624534
A624535
A624536
A624537
A624538
A624539
A624540
A624541
A624542
A624543
A624544
A624545
A624546
A624547
A624548
A624549
A624550
A624551
A624552
A624553
A624554
A624555
A624556
A624557
A624558
A624559
A624560
A624561
A624562
A624563
A624564
A624565
A624566
A624567
A624568
A624569
A624570
A624571
A624572
A624573
A624474
A624575
A624576
A624577
A624578
A624579
A624580
A624581
Nov. 12
„     12
„     12
„     12
„     12
„     12
,,     12
„     12
„     12
„     12
„     12
„     12
7
„     18
„     18
„     18
„     18
„     18
„     18
Dec.    4
»      4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Mallard	
Female	
Dec.    4
A624521
Retrapped.
Ladner.
"
"
Male	
Jan.    8
A624527
"
"
"
Green-wing teal
Female	
"
"
Female	
Male	
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
■
"
"
"
1 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930.                       D 67
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded on the McGillivray Creek Game Reserve
by Members of the Game Department—Continued.
Returns.
No. of
Band.
Date of
Banding.
Kind of Bird
banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Date.
No. of
Killed or
Band.
recaptured at.
A624582
A624583
A624584
A624585
A624586
A624587
A624588
A624589
A624590
A624591
A624592
A624593
A624594
A624595
Dec.    4
4
Mallard	
Female	
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
,       5
A624596
A624597
A624598
A624599
5
5
5
5
A624600
A624601
A624602
A624603
A624604
A624605
5
5
5
5
5
,       5
..    -»	
A624606
5
A624607
5
A624608
5
A624609
A624610
A624611
5
5
5
•
A624612
5
A624613
5
A624614
5
A624615
A624616
5
A624617
5
Male	
A624618
5
A624619
5
A624620
5
A624621
5
"
A624622
5
A624623
S
Note.—Where the words " retrapped or recaptured " occur this signifies that the banded bird was again
taken in the
aan
ling-trs
ip and released.
•
, D 68       • BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1930.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General (Minister) R. H. Pooley, K.C Victoria.
Provincial Game Commissioner A. Bryan "Williams Vancouver.
Chief Clerk F. R. Butler Vancouver.
Game Warden-Clerk T. H. M. Conly Vancouver.
Game Warden-Clerk R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Junior Clerk J. B. Smith Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss L. Kelly Vancouver.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portion of Mainland Coast).
District Game "Warden J. W. Graham Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Cowichan Lake.
Game Warden R. Marshall Duncan.
Game Warden O. Mottishaw Alert Bay.
Game Warden A. Monks Alberni.
Game "Warden R. Gidley Victoria.
Game "Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Thompson Nanaimo.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Game "Warden R. M. Robertson Penticton.
Game Warden N. Cameron .• Cranbrook.
Game Warden I. J. Brown Natal.
Game "Warden H. J. Broley Fernie.
Game "Warden A. F. Sinclair Canal Flats.
Game Warden AV. J. Nixon " Invermere.
Game Warden A. S. Cochran Windermere.
Game Warden (Probationer) L. F. Washburn Golden.
Game Warden H. H. Creese Nelson.
Game Warden (Special).. M. B. Ewart Penticton.
Game Warden (Probationer) J. H. Cummins Creston.
"C" Division (Kamloops, 'Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
District Game "Warden R. D. Sulivan Kamloops.
Game Warden W. O. Quesnel Clinton.
Game Warden F. E. Aiken Williams Lake.
Probationer F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson '. Kelowna.
Game Warden 0. F. Kearns Salmon Arm.
Game Warden A. E. Farey Lillooet.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Game AVarden (Probationer) Leon Jobin Kamloops.
Game Warden (Probationer) G. L. Hilborn Kamloops.
Game Warden N. L. Robinson Quesnel.
Game AVarden J. F. Ritchie Merritt.
Game Warden (Probationer) W. A. Broughton Williams Lake.
Clerk D. AV. Rowlands Kamloops.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
District Game Warden T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Telkwa.
Game AVarden J. S. Clark Fort Nelson. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1930. D 69
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts)—Continued.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Finlay Forks.
Game AVarden J. A. Graham Fort St. John.
Game Warden (Probationer) H. P. Thomson Prince George.
Game AVarden (Probationer) S. F. Faherty Vanderhoof.
Game AVarden (Probationer) D. Romieu Burns Lake.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Smyth Prince George.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
District Game AVarden J. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Game AA^arden AV. Clark Vancouver.
Game AA7arden T. D. Sutherland Sechelt.
Game Warden A. P. Cummins Vancouver.
Game Warden L. H. AA7alker Arancouver.
Game Warden H. C. Pyke Cloverdale.
Game Warden J. A. Stuart Mission City.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game AVarden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden Frank Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game AVarden George Williams Abbotsford.
Game AVarden R. E. Allan Powell River.
Game Warden G. C. Stevenson Vancouver.
Game AVarden E. AV. Baker Vancouver.
Elk Lake Game Farm.
Game AVarden J. AV. Jones Victoria.
Game AVarden E. Boorman Victoria.
Probationer .G. Cuthbert Victoria.
Probationer W. Mudge Victoria.
Predatory-animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
Special Game AVarden J. C. Smith Comox.
Special Game Warden C. Shuttleworth Penticton.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1931.
825-631-5416

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