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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THIRTY-THIRD REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING EIGHTEENTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1930

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIRTY-THIRD REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
EIGHTEENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF
SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1929
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chaih.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1929.
To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Provincial Board of Health
for the year ended June 30th, 1929.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1929.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Thirty-third Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended June 30th, 1929.
In the reports issued by the Provincial Board of Health during the past eight years we have
commented on the establishment of various branches of the Department to meet the advances
in the application of the principles of prevention as applied to health-work, and have been able,
from time to time, to report advances as shown by results which we have described. While we
recognize that this was evidence of close application to the principles, yet the story as a whole
lacked that co-ordination of the different branches of our work at which we were aiming.
This year we feel that we can submit such evidence as will have justified all expenditures and
effort that has been made.
The success of the work, as we have always recognized and said, must depend upon an
awakened public mind. To all who are engaged in health-work, I need not say that public
education is the haMest, most onerous, and, at times, most discouraging aspect of our efforts.
We can only in the practical application of our teachings keep just a step or two ahead of
public opinion, and unless we can continue to stimulate this and to adduce convincing arguments,
progress is slow, but we have reached the point now where we can show such results as to
convince even a doubting Thomas.
We have had occasion during the past year to meet in conference the governing bodies of
local organizations, particularly amongst the women, and also met the school trustees assembled
in annual convention. The results were such as to convince us that we have made not only solid
but remarkable progress. To the school trustees we were able to demonstrate the saving in
money, which to these gentlemen who are spending the taxes is the crucial and only argument
that carries weight.
We were very much struck indeed in addressing the different meetings with the attention
that was paid to us, and particularly gratified with the fact that, after closing the address and
throwing the meeting open to discussion, we were bombarded with questions which showed on
the part of the questioners every evidence that they had studied the subject and were not only
alive to its importance, but determined that the work should be extended as rapidly as possible.
There will be included in this Report reports from medical officers and nurses outlining
the plan of their work and giving the results obtained.
The general work of the Provincial Board of Health envisages the health of the community
as a whole, the allocation of affections to particular causes, and a determination of the means
of prevention.
Each one of the departments seems to be of major importance, and the difficulty is very
often to prevent the attention of the staff from being focused on some particular interest to the
apparent neglect of the object to be obtained by a thorough eo-operation as between all branches.
We have to demonstrate results in all these branches in order to ensure the attention of the
public and to demonstrate to them the fact that our general plan is not to cure particular
diseases, but to so regulate the conduct of the people as to convince them that many of the ills,
for. which they are vainly seeking cures, can be prevented.
As we have progressed, we have in our teachings iterated and reiterated to the public the
basic idea of prevention. While expression from the medical profession on this point has been
delayed, yet advances being made now and given effect to in our universities show that the
profession are recognizing their common interest with the health authorities, and both are now
less interested in cures than in maintaining the general health of the community. Full and free
co-operation as between the health authorities and the medical profession would serve the
common ends of humanity, and it is becoming more apparent as we dig deeper and deeper into
the problems of public health that there is a great lack of knowledge which only the medical
profession could remedy. There remains much to be learned, and, when it has been learned,
much to be applied. U 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TUBERCULOSIS.
Press dispatches have shown that the death-rate in British Columbia from tuberculosis is
the second highest in the Dominion of Canada. The news item as reported in the lay press
places us, on the face of it, in an unenviable position, but we would beg leave to point out that,
while British Columbia has a death-rate of 108.2 per 100,000 population for 1928, 35.2 per cent,
of this is due to North American Indians. The Province is not responsible for their care or
supervision, and the balance of the population, including the Chinese, Japanese, and East Indians
with a tuberculosis death-rate of twice that of the whites, has a death-rate per 100,000 population
of 70 in round numbers.    Therefore it compares fairly well with the average for Canada.
In addition to being obliged to include the deaths from tuberculosis amongst the Indians,
we have also to face the fact that many cases are sent to British Columbia on account of climatic
conditions. In addition to which, you must add the fact that in the Tranquille Sanatorium
400 cases of returned men, who demobilized in British Columbia, were treated, not one of them
originating in British Columbia.
The Province is not responsible for the care of the Indian population, and it is becoming
more and more evident that the Federal Department of Indian Affairs w-ill have to devote
particular attention to the tuberculosis conditions amongst the Indians in British Columbia.
While the Federal Indian Department is devoting much time and money to the care of sickness
amongst the Indians, they have not as yet considered nor adopted means whereby preventive .
measures may be instituted.
The Provincial Government, on the other hand, is endeavouring to deal with the question
in as practical a way as possible. An additional wing of 100 beds has been added to the Tranquille Sanatorium, making a total of 346 beds, and there are in the Cities of Vancouver and
Victoria beds provided for 124 cases. Institutional care we consider as decidedly helpful and
an economic procedure in so far as the State is concerned.
In a recent pamphlet issued by the Canadian Tuberculosis Association figures are given for
the different Provinces, and the question as to the efficiency in results as between State institutions and those under Provincial committee control does not prove predominate benefit from
either one. It is hardly fair to compare the results as between British Columbia and Saskatchewan when you take into consideration the fact that British Columbia has not developed the
number of tuberculosis cases that has been developed in Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan is not
considered a health resort; British Columbia is. In British Columbia not only the deaths
amongst the Indians, over whom we have no control, are charged against us, but we have to
add to this the large number of cases that come to British Columbia, as is evidenced by the
figures mentioned above in connection with the returned men.
We are carrying on an active campaign under our Tuberculosis Officer, and through the
Public Health Nursing Service, in an endeavour to discover the incipient cases, which brings us
to a realization that more beds will have to be provided for tuberculosis cases.
On the other hand, Provincial control provides for removing from the population as a whole,
with a consequent decrease in infective foci, all people who are not financially able to procure
treatment.
In a recent criticism by one competent to speak on the subject, the statement is made that
the rate of deaths has been increasing since 1922. The official figures published do not bear out
this statement. For six years, including 1922, the highest point was 0.96 per thousand, the
lowest 0.93. In 1928 it was 1.08, and this increase was due to a larger death-rate amongst the
Indians.
VENEREAL CLINICS.
Our venereal clinics are carrying on their work in a most satisfactory manner. Their real
purport is being better understood by the public, and without very much effort on our part the
attendance is increasing and we are working our clinics to capacity. We have had to enlarge
the accommodation in the clinic in Vancouver three different times.
Educational work is also being carried on through different agencies, and we are satisfied
that there has been an appreciable control of the disease established—that is, on the curative
side—and these results are being shown by the decrease in the number of patients in our mental
hospitals due to this cause since the inception of our work.
The preventive side is a problem which requires very earnest work to bring about appreciable results.    The control of the infected person, especially in our cities, is a problem to which BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29. U 7
no satisfactory solution has been offered, other than the hope, by education through meetings
and literature, of impressing upon the rising generation the real dangers of venereal disease.
One striking result, as we gather from our reports, is the account given by the drug trade of
the great decrease in requests for " quack" remedies and the increase in the demand for
prophylactic packages. We take it that this is one of the best indications of advance in the
education of the public.
LABORATORIES.
I have to report increased activity in our laboratories, and this brings us to a consideration
of a question which will have to be faced in the not-far future, of the establishment of a Provincial Laboratory.
We already have the nucleus of such in Victoria. This has not been used owing to the
adoption of the policy of subsidizing existing laboratories in the larger centres, but with the
increase in our work, necessitating larger grants, we are coming to the point where there must
necessarily be demanded of the laboratories subsidized an increase in space and an increase
in personnel.
The increase in the laboratory-work is not confined to the public-health side. The clinical
side is, through the medical profession and hospital authorities, demanding greater consideration.
We are going through a period of change that has come to other Provinces and States,
where it is difficult to preserve a balance. The amount of work per capita carried on in our
laboratories is amongst the highest on the continent.
There is at present sitting a Commission to investigate our largest hospital, and on receipt
of their report we expect that this question will be dealt with. While we cannot forecast, still
we feel that the representations made will show the difficulties that we are contending with, and
possibly the recommendation will be for the establishment of a Provincial Laboratory dealing
purely with the public-health work.
We will recommend this, and we feel that the question of the cost will have to be faced
within the next year. The work as carried on is efficient, but the public demand, more
especially in regard to the question of water, milk, and foods, is difficult to meet under present
conditions.
In connection with the laboratory-work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out free on
request, and for the year ended June 30th, 3929, the following have been furnished: 16,171
points smallpox vaccine, 9,936,000 units diphtheria antitoxin, 1,212 doses diphtheria toxoid,
4 packages Schick test for diphtheria, 234 packages 2 cc. (prophylactic) scarlet fever antitoxin, 262 packages 15 cc. (curative) scarlet fever antitoxin, 10 packages Dick test for scarlet
fever, 12 doses scarlet fever toxin (for active immunization), 347 doses typhoid vaccine, 38,000
units tetanus antitoxin, 12 packages pertussis (whooping-cough) serum, and 95 packages 20 cc
anti-meningococcus serum.
SANITATION.
Under the general head of sanitation, we are concerned with the larger problems in regard
to water-supplies, sewerage, transportation, public buildings, and more especially with the
logging and mining camps and the inspection of fruit and fish canneries.
The work in regard to the conservation of water-supplies in our two principal cities is being
carried out in a remarkable manner. The conservation of the water-supply is being provided
for, and the present plans, which have been given effect to, will provide water-supplies under
any climatic conditions far in excess of the needs of the population to be served.
These water-supplies are under constant supervision. No one is allowed on the watersheds,
which have been reserved from all other uses, unless they are subjected to tests to show the
absence of possibility of contamination.
Nature has been very kind to British Columbia in this respect, and we have, fortunately,
in charge of these departments men who have realized their obligations and have proved themselves to be peculiarly situated, both from temperament and knowledge, to handle this very
important question.
We have not, in British Columbia, been obliged to install a chlorinating plant. The majority
of the supplies are obtained from mountain streams which are tapped at points above possible
contamination, and the future in this respect is assured.
Cemetery-sites approved.—Peachland (extension), Campbell River, Swift Creek, near Armstrong (private), Longbeach, and Fort St. John. U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Sewage-disposal Systems approved.—South Vancouver (extensions), Delta Municipality,
Nelson (extension), Prince Rupert (extensions), North Vancouver City (extension), Vernon
(remodelling disposal-works and extensions), Vancouver (extension), and Chilliwack Municipality (extension).
Water-supply Systems approved.—Burnaby Municipality (extension), South Vancouver
(extensions), New Westminster District (Amiens Farm, Soldier Settlement Board), Summer-
land (renewal), Saanich Municipality (extension), Trail (new reservoir and renewals), Prince
Rupert (extensions), Courtenay (extension), Richmond Municipality (renewals), Vancouver
(extensions), Delta Municipality (renewals), Cranbrook (extensions), Vernon (replacements
and extensions), Revelstoke  (renewals), and Rossland  (renewals).
Water-supplies approved for Mineral-trading Purposes.—Ainsworth Hot Springs.
PUBLIC-HEALTH NURSING.
The advances made in this department of the Board have been most gratifying.
In my opening remarks I referred to some meetings which had been held in connection
with voluntary organizations and pointed out the great interest that is being taken in the work.
I have also stressed the fact that the success of our work depends upon educating the public
to an understanding of our policy and of demonstrating to them from its application that the
claims we make are justified. We have succeeded in doing this to an extent that we find
difficulty in meeting the request for trained Public Health Nurses.
The one great advance that has occurred, in the public mind, is the fact that they are
considering our nurses as teachers—teachers of health—and not bedside nurses, and they are
realizing that the responsibility of providing for the people proper methods of teaching and the
instillation of ideas that would tend to prevent disease and conserve health is the basic principle
upon which they must work.
Our progress along these lines is shown by the fact that we have adopted the ideas that are
now recommended highly by such men as President Hoover of the United States and Sir Henry
Thornton of the Canadian National Railway, and illustrates the fact that the public are being
educated.
In an article by Sir Henry Thornton, appearing in the press over his own signature, amongst
other things he says :—
" Man-power—that's the secret of industrial success. Electricity, in its elemental qualities,
is an absolutely standard thing, but companies succeed or go broke in the way they serve it to
the public. My greatest concern and my greatest asset in my job has been my men. Yet that
angle has been neglected by industry more than any other element.
" For instance, in the railroad business we creosote ties and paint bridges and oil engines.
They are materials. We conserve them : the successful business is the one that does the same
for its men. It is an unlimited field because it is so fallow. Nine months ago, for instance, the
Canadian National started a clinic, operating among 10,000 employees. The actual saving in
dollars for that time was $15,400, which was saved in fees. We cannot estimate what the saving
will be in arrested diseases, time that might otherwise have been lost, increased efficiency, and
happiness. Nobody knows, for instance, how much headaches cost a big company, until he finds
the work stepping up in a certain department because a few persons procured glasses. Nobody
likes to be ill, but many persons draw sick benefits when they would be happier and more
prosperous at work.
" I admit to an obsession in that regard—to apply the same rules to human materials as to
inanimate ones; if a tie can be given longer life by creosote, then a human piece of material
can be enhanced the same way by diagnosis, by justice, by a feeling of equality, and by
industrial and personal happiness."
President Hoover, in speaking on the subject of the nation's health, a Federal matter,
says:—
" The advance in scientific discovery as to disease and health imposes new considerations
upon us. The nation as a whole is vitally interested in the health of all the people; in protection from spread of contagious diseases; in the relation of physical and mental disabilities
to criminality and in the economic and moral advancement which is fundamentally associated
with sound body and mind. The organization of preventive measures and health education in
its personal application is the province of public-health service. Such organization should be as
universal as public education.    Its support is a proper burden upon the taxpayer.    It cannot be BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29. U 9
organized with success either in its sanitary or educational phases except under public authority.
It should be based upon local and State responsibility, but I consider that the Federal Government has an obligation of contribution to the establishment of such agencies. In the practical
working-out of organization, exhaustive experiment and trial have demonstrated that the base
should be competent organization of the municipality or other local unit."
I will not enter into the detail of our public-health nursing here, but later on in this Report,
under the section dealing with the schools, I will publish reports which will give in detail the
plans of our work.
HEALTH UNITS.
The suggestion offered by President Hoover, in regard to a competent organization of the
municipality or other local unit, has been demonstrated in British Columbia.
The first unit to be established was in the Municipality of Saanich. AVe had begun there
with a Nursing Service, consisting of one nurse. We built this up until we had four nurses, and
in addition a $25,000 building was put up by the municipality, to be known as the War Memorial
Health Centre. Much opposition- was experienced, but perseverance won, and in September,
1927, we established the full-time health unit, with a full-time Medical Health Officer, four
Public Health Nurses, Sanitary Inspector, and some clerical assistance.
In the school-year of 1925-26 the municipality had paid out for isolation hospital charges
to the City of Victoria for infectious cases, $5,600; in the following year this was reduced to
$1,100;   and in the school-year of 1927-28 the cost had been reduced to $100.
In addition to the above saving, the school report for 1928-29 shows in the report of the
Municipal Inspector of Schools as follows: " While retardation has cost Saanich over $17,000
in 1927-28, for the last year the cost of repeaters has been kept down to $11,000." In other
words, with the saving of isolation hospital charges and the saving in regard to repeaters in
the schools, the full-time health unit has saved the municipality $12,000 in two years—an argument that should convince any one without having to appeal to the humanitarian side.
A full account of the work done in Saanich will be found in this Report in an article
written by Dr. Berman, the Medical Officer in charge.    It is well worth reading.
In addition to Saanich, we have established, beginning in August, 1929, a full-time health
unit in Kelowna, with a full-time Medical Health Officer in charge, together with two Public
Health Nurses. We are rapidly following in the steps, in regard to improvement, that has been
noted in Saanich, and I am including a full report of the nursing-work under the head of the
school-work in the Province.
Those who are interested will find that all the arguments we have been advancing for the
establishment of the public-health work in British Columbia are fully substantiated in the
results we are obtaining in these two health units.
There are other units which have full-time men in charge, but have not been rounded out
yet in regard to the additions to the staff, but we hope during the next year to have these with
a complete personnel.
In all of the units the work of immunization against diphtheria has been carried on with
surprisingly good results.
INFECTIOUS DISEASES.
We have not as favourable a report to make in regard to infectious diseases as last year.
There have been a large number of cases of measles and mumps.
As regards these two affections, the numbers for the past year might be regarded as being
a peak-load, and for the next three or four years there will be a great diminution in the
number under this head.
We regret, however, to record a large increase in our diphtheria cases. We have to report
985 cases, as against 578 for the previous year, an increase of 407. Of these 985 cases, 747 were
reported from Greater Vancouver, and it is to be regretted that our commercial capital should
be the largest contributor to the infectious diseases. It is to be regretted the more when we
consider the fact that a very simple procedure will prevent diphtheria. We are demonstrating
in other parts of the Province the effectiveness of this treatment, and when you consider the
seriousness of diphtheria as a disease, and particularly as to the after-effects, it would appear
to us that those in authority in the cities and municipalities should assume the responsibility of allowing the menace to our children to continue. Diphtheria more than any other infectious
disease leaves weakness in its train, particularly in regard to the effects on the heart, and as
the deaths from heart-trouble in middle and advanced age are increasing from year to year, to
say the least it would be advisable to try and prevent the attacks of diphtheria.
In regard to smallpox, we have, as usual, the largest per capita, number of cases of any
Province in the Dominion, and the same arguments as regards prevention, as mentioned above
in regard to diphtheria, apply to smallpox. There is no reason to have to report, as we have
had to in the past two years, increases in the number of cases. It is gradually creeping up; in
1926-27 there were 252 cases; in 1927-28, 368; and in 1928-29, 738. If this increase continues
it will mean that other countries will place us under a ban, which means an enormous cost to
business in British Columbia. The responsibility of this must rest upon the governing bodies
in the cities and municipalities. Under the "Health Act" the officials of these places are the
Local Board of Health, and the enforcement of the health rules and regulations rests upon them.
During the year we have engaged the services of Dr. Alexander R. Chisholm. His duties
are primarily that of an Epidemiologist, which means that he will have charge of all infectious
diseases. He is ready to leave at any time an outbreak is reported and co-operate with the
local authorities in enforcing the health rules and regulations. Dr. Chisholm is specially trained
in this work, having selected public-health work as his specialty, and has a remarkably good
record of his work already done. He has had three years' experience in large centres in this
work.
During the past year it appeared that we might have a serious epidemic of poliomyelitis
(infantile paralysis). Poliomyelitis appeared first in epidemic form in 1916 in New York.
Previous to that it had been very rare in North America, but since then it has gradually crept
over the country, and durng the past year a large number of cases have been reported from
the different States, nearly every State in the Union being affected. A very severe epidemic
broke out in Manitoba, centring in Winnipeg, and while we have to report 116 cases in British
Columbia during the year, yet at no time did it assume an epidemic form, as these cases were
distributed throughout the Province. Following the epidemic in the Okanagan in 1927, we collected blood serum from as many cases as we could reach who had survived but who had
developed paralytic symptoms, and were in a better position this year with the serum on hand
to combat the outbreak.
There was an increase in the number of scarlet fever cases, going from 401 the previous
year to 600. Our treatment of scarlet fever has improved greatly, and fortunately the epidemic
was of a mild character. The use of scarlet fever- antitoxin cuts the cases short, and has been
very helpful indeed in preventing the after-effects, which are usually severe, particularly in
infections of the kidneys and of the hearing.
The following is an account of the location of the epidemics, such as they were, during the
past year:—
Chicken-pox.—Lytton, Michel and District, Nelson, and Revelstoke.
Measles.—Alberni, Burnaby Municipality, Chase, Field, Kamloops, Merritt and District,
Nanaimo and District, Oliver, Port Alberni, Saanich Municipality, Summerland, and Woodfibre.
Mumps.—Alberni, Cumberland and District, Delta Municipality, Enderby District, Michel
and District, Nanaimo and District, Nelson, Port Alberni, Revelstoke, Saanich Municipality, and
Trail.
Whooping-cough.—Coalmont and District and Ocean Falls.
We are carrying out as active a health compaign as we can. We have distributed from this
office during the past year 238,815 pamphlets and bulletins on various subjects. We have distributed these at the fall fairs, through various organizations, etc. We are pleased to note that our
school-teachers are becoming much more alive to this question of epidemics in their schools. We
have had many requests for literature from them.
I have to repeat a request made last year; that is, for consideration on your part for
increased accommodation for our Department. Each branch of our Department is showing a
wonderful growth, and particularly so in the Vital Statistics Branch.
We are appending a full report of the Medical Inspection of Schools, and I think any one
reading it will find it very interesting in the demonstration that we are able to give of the
effectiveness of our plans, and, more especially, interesting in the results we are obtaining. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29. U 11
The work has grown to such proportions that it is taxing the limits of the staff and
emphasizing the necessity for increased accommodations. We can truly say that we have
accomplished the main purpose of our work—that is, educating the public—and my request for
increased facilities is based on the demands from the public for expansion of our work, and
these demands are becoming very insistent.
I would like, Sir, to express, for myself and staff, appreciation of the co-operation which
we receive from yourself, and I may say that the staff and myself appreciate the active interest
you are taking in our work—an interest which is based upon the idea of understanding the
policies and details of the Department and lending to our success your help and encouragement.
I would particularly like to express my appreciation of the splendid co-operation that I
receive from the staff. The fact that we have been able to make such satisfactory progress is
due to their co-operation and to the cheerful help that I am receiving from them.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG, M.D.,
Provincial Health Officer. U 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1929.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Nineteenth Annual Report for the Sanitary Division
of your Department.
With the increasing population and expanding industrial activity more noticeable than ever,
comes increasing problems and work for this Department.
The year just closed has been the busiest ou record, and yet remarkably free from the
necessity of drastically enforcing any of our regulations in order to obtain the desired results.
Thus it seems that we are reaping the harvest of patient yet insistent health propaganda covering
about a quarter of a century. Our citizens are more than ever showing a spirit of co-operation
in conforming to the laws of health and consideration for the general public welfare.
The Province is absolutely free from industrial strife or social unrest, due in a great measure
to the generally improved living conditions provided for our industrial population, and the
captains of industry are certainly entitled to a full measure of credit. Without their cheery
co-operation the writer could not make such statements.
Of the industrial growth and activity, probably the mining development is dominant, and
with marked success. Logging runs a close second. Camp conditions in the logging and mining
industries are much alike and conform to the same sanitary laws.
The technique of logging and mining has undergone wonderful changes in the last quarter
of a century, and the same may be said of the living conditions provided for the employees.
The food provided is equal to that of first-class hotels, only more bountiful. The utensils and
tableware are just as clean, but not so refined. The sleeping accommodation is also much
improved during the past few years. Bathing and laundry facilities are provided, and the
larger camps have well-patronized reading and recreation rooms.
Every camp has several radio sets, which seem to radiate a better atmosphere among the
men, who formerly felt in some ways cut off from the world.
Your Inspector is always welcomed to camp by both men and boss. Compare this with a
visit twenty years ago, when the men were grouchy about living conditions, and the employers
viewed the visiting Inspector as " static " or interference.
The work of your Inspector is not all " beer and skittles." Mines are often located in almost
inaccessible places, and logging-camp visits often entail several miles rough walking from shoreline or road.
The protection of water sources for public use is demanding more attention from this
Department, and so far without serious difficulty.
Nuisances are becoming more numerous owing to some of our vacant spaces being settled
upon for purposes of industrial expansion, sometimes carried out without provision for control
of obnoxious odours or gases.    These are being attended to and rectification anticipated.
Among some of the new forms of nuisances are those from fish-reduction plants. Our coastal
waters teem with fish which were formerly considered useless, but now found to contain valuable
oil and by-products.
The salmon season has been a profitable one for fishermen and canners alike, owing to
several late surprise runs. British Columbia shell-fish growers also report expanding business
with demand beyond production.
The canned salmon put up in British Columbia is absolutely wholesome. The sanitary
conditions and methods of canning ensure a pure food product of which every British Columbian
may be proud. Mechanical devices in the canneries are being so improved and perfected that
the fish is scarcely touched by human hands from the time it leaves the sea until canned and
cooked. TY'PICAL SUMMER CAMP, PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY.
ii.
\
§mm^MiWi:MM^&::
FISHERMAN   DELIVERING   HIS   CATCH   TO  CANNERY,   ERASER RIVER.  BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29. U 13
WATERSHEDS.
The " Sanitary Regulations Governing Watersheds" are in force for the protection of
municipal water-supply systems, the principal areas being on the north shore of Burrard Inlet,
locally known as Capilano, Lynn Creek, and Seymour Creek. These watersheds supply pure
water to more than one-half of our population. Each area is protected by full-time resident
sanitary officers, supplemented by unannounced visits by the local Medical Health Officers and
the writer. A weekly analysis of the water is made and the absence of any water-borne disease
is evidence that the regulations are being faithfully observed.
It is a remarkable fact that during the past two years the Greater Vancouver Water Board
has harnessed lakes, cleaned out lake-beds, bored tunnels, built dams, intake-basins, screen-
chambers, employees' residences, and roads in the. Seymour watershed, employing sometimes
300 or 400 men with teams and general contracting machinery ; but so insistent have those
responsible been in their demands for sanitary precautions from their employees that at no time
has the purity of the water been affected, and thus British Columbia's greatest city is assured
of ample and pure water, an asset which cannot be measured in terms of cash.
The general public now recognizes the value of water-protection. Your Inspector has
travelled thousands of miles in recent years to investigate alleged pollution of water sources.
SUMMER RESORTS.
British Columbians in general seem to incline towards an open-air life, and our seaside
resorts never appear to be quite deserted, but the summer holiday term brings the city dwellers
in thousands to all the beaches within reasonable distance.
On the Lower Mainland the larger camps or resorts are controlled and operated by responsible parties and transportation companies. The sanitary conditions at these places are ideal,
but the smaller camps are often a problem and present a nuisance and often a menace.
On the shores of Vancouver Island summer camps are very numerous. Most of them are
under experienced management and we have no trouble from them. Others, which include many
transient auto tourists, are scattered, and in many cases produce a dangerous menace to the
public health. These are the type qf summer visitors which call for extra vigilance on the part
of municipal and Provincial sanitary officials.
During the year just ended, visits to summer resorts and camps were approximately 90;
logging and mining camps inspected, 180; fish-canneries. and fish-reduction works, 65; fruit-
canneries and packing-houses, 25;  and inspections for nuisance abatements, 50.
I could not conclude this report without expressing appreciation for the valuable assistance
rendered by Major J. A. Motherwell and his deputies, of the Federal Fisheries Department, and
also to the Provincial Police throughout the Province.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGhey,
Chief Sanitary Inspector. U 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMBINED EEPOET OP TRAVELLING MEDICAL HEALTH OFFICER
AND INSPECTOR OF HOSPITALS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1929.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Sixth Annual Report as Travelling Medical
Health Officer and Inspector of Hospitals for the Province.
While the work is conducted along similar lines from year to year, there is usually one or
more outstanding events or occasions that distinguish one year from another. The past year
has been no exception to this general rule, 'only in that ,; The Sun Life Assurance Company of
Canada Scholarship Tour for Doctors of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association" to Europe
seems, to the writer, of such importance, not only to British Columbia but to Canada as a whole,
as to call for special consideration in this report.
The personnel of this tour consisted of some thirty medical men representative of all the
Provinces of Canada, for the most part being Sanatorium Superintendents or Travelling
Clinicians, also the President and Secretary of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association; British
Columbia being represented by Dr. A. D. Lapp, Superintendent of Tranquille Sanatorium, and
the writer.
This tour was financed by a stated amount for each member from the Sun Life Assurance
Company of Canada and a like or similar amount from our employers; in the case of British
Columbia, the Provincial Government.
The prime object of the tour was to attend the biennial meeting of " The International
Tuberculosis Association " in Rome. This was extended to include a general survey of tuberculous and public-health conditions in other European countries, including Great Britain, France,
Switzerland, and Italy.
The tour officially began, then, on embarkation at Montreal by White Star Line S.S.
" Regina " on Saturday, August 25th, 1928. Beginning Monday and continuing until Friday,
daily conferences from 10 a.m. to 12 noon were held on board, a special room being assigned
for this purpose. These conferences considered the following subjects, namely: Sanatorium
construction, sanatorium costs and administration, travelling clinics, tuberculosis in children;
and, fifthly, a review by Dr. Dobbie, of Toronto, of "Antituberculosis measures and progress in
Canada."
From the time of our arrival in Liverpool on the morning of September 2nd until our
departure from London for Paris on the 14th, every facility was placed at our disposal for
seeing and studying conditions in England and Wales. Many sanatoria and hospitals for
crippled children were visited—these latter being for the most part crippling from the non-
pulmonary form of tuberculosis. Different methods of caring for these cases, both in hospital
construction and in treatment, were freely shown to us. We found each head of department,
who might be carrying out some special treatment, ready and willing to explain his method and
to account for the faith that was in him.
In some sanatoria we found a tendency to the " work cure " or graduated exercise much
more freely used than in this country. In others, however, exercise was confined to graduated
walking or light work. All advised careful discrimination in its use. Where work cure was
used the economic question seemed to be one of the determining factors.
Amongst crippled children's hospitals visited were Leasowe, near Liverpool, the Wingfield
Orthopedic Hospital at Oxford, and Lord Mayor Treloar's Hospital at Alton, Hants, with its
branch at Hayling Island. The latter institution probably had the greatest interest for Canadians, as Sir Henry Gauvain, the Chief of this institution, was well known to most of us, having
toured Canada in 1926 under the auspices of the Canadian Medical Association and Canadian
Tuberculosis Association. He is also well known to the medical profession in general for his
methods of treatment and for his so-called " college," where patients are taught trades best
suited to their disability, and thus become self-supporting.    Goods are sold in open market, etc.
In England, as well as in Scotland at a later date, we were much impressed with the
number of cases of non-pulmonary or surgical form of tuberculosis—especially of bones and
joints that account for the crippling—and lupus or skin tuberculosis, in comparison to the
number of cases in this country.    A large percentage of these cases are of bovine origin, we were ... g^MW.
ty?'*;:
I
"I
I
RAILWAY LOGGING CAMP, MAPLE RIDGE DISTRICT.
LOGGING CAMP,  SHOWING DINING-ROOM CREW,  COURTENAY DISTRICT.  BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29. U 15
told, and is transmitted through milk, unpasteurized, from tuberculous cows. Sir Henry
Gauvain, mentioned above, stated that approximately 50 per cent, of spinal and 30 per cent, of
hip, knee, and lupus cases were of bovine origin. Nor is this to be wondered at when we know
that bovine tuberculosis is very common amongst the dairy herds and a considerable percentage
of milk products contain tubercle bacilli. Pasteurization of milk is not compulsory, consequently
not subject to inspection. About 90 per cent, of the milk-supply of London was pasteurized by
the milk companies, we were told, for economic reasons.
The better housing schemes of Great Britain also received attention from us and impressed
us greatly. By this system hundreds of thousands of new houses have been built by municipal
and city councils, 50 per cent, of the cost of same being advanced from the Central Government.
At some places these houses have been built to replace slum areas that have been condemned
and torn down, and in others, more urgent where they have been used to relieve the congestion
only in these poorer sections and thus improve living conditions. As an illustration,, at the
time of our visit Birmingham had constructed 27,000 new houses and had 15,000 more under
construction or planned for. In the London area 56,000 new houses have been built; 65 acres
of city slums have been cleared and replaced by modern apartment-houses with courtyards.
In Great Britain something like 2,000,000 houses have been built in the last ten years.
In France, previous to the war, very little of a practical nature had been done in combating
tuberculosis, although a great deal of scientific work had been carried on. During the last
ten years great strides have been made, especially in provision for care of children in preven-
toria and otherwise. Two subjects of special study by us were the placement of children and
the B.C.G, vaccine of Calmette-Gueron. Amongst children bom of tubercular parents, when
left in these homes, the death-rate has been very high. By this " placement " system children
so born are removed by consent from parents and placed with foster-mothers in some of the
rural villages near Paris. Many foster-mothers are obtained in one village. A dispensary is
established in the village in charge of nurses specially trained for this work at Laennec Hospital
in Paris. To this dispensary the foster-mothers must come each morning for their feedings
for the child during the day, the feeding being put up in six or more bottles, one for each feeding,
all pasteurized, and ready for use except for warming to proper temperature. They are even
supplied with two sterile nipples for each day. Children are brought in to the clinic every
week for inspection for first three months, and less frequently later. In case the child becomes
ill, it is brought into the dispensary for treatment until recovery, also for protection if sickness
develops in other members of the family. The physician of the village looks after the medical
care of the cases, but has to fit himself for this work by taking a special course in Paris. They
are kept by foster-parents until 3 or 4 years old unless the source of infection is sooner removed
from the home. There were some 600 babies being cared for in this way at the time of our
visit, and about 4,000 had been so cared for since the inception of the system some eight years
ago. Amongst these 4,000 children, only one died of tuberculosis, and the death-rate from all
causes was only slightly over half that of the general population of the same age. This seems
an excellent demonstration of the non-hereditary nature of tuberculosis, but that infection is
all-important.
The B.C.G. vaccine is produced from a greatly attenuated non-virulent type of bacillus so
obtained by repeated culturing over years. It is given by mouth in three doses at two-day
intervals in first few days of life, usually the third, fifth, and seventh, or the fifth, seventh, and
ninth days. It had been used in some 110,000 cases at that time without any untowTard effects,
it was claimed, and had greatly lessened the incidence of tuberculosis amongst these children.
It has been used by other countries to a less extent, some having been used in Canada, but
without producing the enthusiasm of the French for it. Research-work is still going on, and
all that can be said at present is that it gives promise of being very useful amongst exposed
children, and that at least it has not yet been condemned as most so-called cures have been.
It is not, however, a cure at all, but a preventive.
In Switzerland we did not have time to make a study of the general tuberculosis situation,
but had the great privilege of visiting Dr. Rollier's clinic at Leysin, where 1,200 beds are provided
for the care of surgical or non-pulmonary forms of tuberculosis. Dr. Rollier is the great
exponent of heliotherapy, but even he makes the point that it is not a great cure-all, but is a
great aid to other means of treatment. It was very noticeable that none of these other aids,
such as rest, fixation, etc., were being neglected. Heliotherapy in pulmonary cases is used with
great caution. U 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
At the Grand Hotel Sanatorium, at a height of 4,500 feet, conducted by Dr. Jacquerod, a
short distance removed, we were told of his methods of treating pulmonary cases. Dr. Jacquerod
is a great exponent of rest (absolute rest) and air and diffuse light baths, in contradistinction
to direct sunlight.
Italy. This year's meeting of the International Union against Tuberculosis was rather
disappointing, but it gave us an opportunity of seeing and meeting many of the outstanding men
in the public-health field of the world. Poor arrangement of the programme and the multiplicity
of languages was rather confusing. When we learn, however, that Italy has an insurance scheme
against tuberculosis and is spending about $15,000,000 annually in combating this disease, one is
impressed with the fact that they are alive to its menace.
On returning to England we attended meetings of the British National Association for the
Prevention of Tuberculosis in London. This meeting' had been postponed for three months for
the convenience of the Canadian doctors, and on the programme of which Canadians were given
a prominent place.
A week spent in Scotland, mostly in Edinburgh and Glasgow, was all too short to absorb
all the good things available to us. When I state that Sir Robert Philip was largely responsible
for our programme in the former city, medical men at least will appreciate that it was well
arranged.
The way in which Glasgow is grappling with public-health problems, especially tuberculosis,
in the crowded industrial areas was well worth making the trip for.
The study of after-care settlement schemes, as demonstrated at Papworth near Cambridge
in England and Hairmyres Colony and Industrial School near Glasgow, as well as visits to
Oxford and Cambridge, must be passed over, not because unimportant, but that this report must
have limitations of space and time. The same must be said of our entertainment throughout our
trip, especially in Great Britain.
Conferences were again instituted on the return journey, as soon as the elements would
permit of more than a quorum being present, at which our impressions of conditions studied were
discussed and co-ordinated.
In summing up, then, we were very much impressed with the importance attached to public-
health programmes in all countries visited and the amount of money being expended on this
work. In Britain especially were we impressed with their complete organization, beginning as
it does at the National Ministry of Health, controlled from there by the central body. Control
is possible because of a contribution of 50 per cent, of the cost from the central organization.
The removal of slum areas and provision of better housing- seemed to us to be striking at the
root of the matter. The care of the children here, but more particularly in France, seemed to
be the first consideration. Education of the public in health matters seemed to be considered
of prime importance. While organizations were controlled by Governments, voluntary effort was
very much in evidence and is encouraged.
Our sanatoria may possibly be said to be of higher type of construction in most cases than
those seem abroad. Many of theirs would not be suitable to our conditions. We may learn much
from them in organization at least. But it is much easier than in our country of such vast
distances. On the whole, it was an inspiration to each of us. The trip was wonderful in its
conception, lacked nothing in its execution, and I feel that the Canadian Tuberculosis Association, and probably Canada, owe a hearty vote of thanks to our genial Secretary, Dr. R. E.
Wodehouse, who planned it, and to the Sun Life Assurance Company, whose generosity made
it possible.
NURSING AND X-RAY SERVICE.
The appointment of a nurse, Miss J. B. Peters, to assist at the clinics, to co-operate with the
Tublic Health Nurses or others in bringing contacts to the clinics, has been of great assistance
to me during the last year. This appointment was made by the Tranquille Publishing Society,
and was made financially possible through the Christmas-seal sale.
Out of similar funds a portable X-ray machine was purchased and this has been a great aid
in diagnosis. It has several advantages over using machines provided by hospitals visited.
The films are more uniform in type and are thus more easily and more correctly interpreted.
The technical part of the X-ray work is done almost entirely by the nurse. She is also of
great assistance in making out reports on cases, so that our records must of necessity be much
improved over former ones. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29. U 17
DETAILS OF CLINICAL WORK.
Once more I am pleased to report an increase in the number of cases examined, a much
greater increase than in other years, as will be seen from the statistical tables following. This
fact does not indicate an increased incidence of tuberculosis, but an increased interest in
tuberculosis as a problem, not only by the doctors but by the people, as many of these cases
come to me through their physicians at their own request. The increased number that have
come to the clinics from the School and Public Health Nurses, with the consent of family doctors
in most cases so that report of examination can be sent them, is most gratifying.
While the total number of examinations far exceeds previous years, the number of new cases
of pulmonary tuberculosis was considerably less than last year. The number of cases examined
also increases from year to year.
From conversations with other travelling clinicians throughout Canada, I believe that my
work includes more follow-up of cases that have been diagnosed than most of them, and is not
purely a diagnostic service as many others are. This service is very much appreciated by the
medical fraternity, as well as by the patients and their families.
Due to absence for practically three months in Europe, I have not been able to visit some
parts of the Province as often as usual, but have managed to cover the whole Province within
the year and to carry on the larger clinics, such as Victoria and Nanaimo, practically on
schedule. In addition, two clinics have been held at the Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster. This service has in the past been left to be looked after by the Rotary Clinic in
Vancouver. It was felt that this was not entirely satisfactory, as, to get free examination,
consent of the Health Officer must be obtained. It also served to give an extra service to doctors
in the Lower Fraser Valley.    This service will be continued as time and circumstances permit.
Practically all clinics were held at hospitals this year in place of at individual doctor's
offices. This was made necessary on account of the X-ray service, and I would here like to
express my appreciation of the hearty co-operation of the hospital staffs in our work.
The total number of examinations made during the year was 991. Of these, 701 were new
cases and 200 were re-examinations. Out of the total patients examined, 247 have been classified
as positively suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis, 11 of tuberculosis of other organs, 152 as
suspects, 254 as various non-tuberculous findings (the most important of which are pneumonia,
bronchopneumonia, mixed infection, asthma, pleurisy, empyema, emphysema, bronchiectasis,
glandular infections, etc.), and 327 as negative.
Further classifying the 701 new cases, we have 117 as positively pulmonary tuberculosis,
10 non-pulmonary tuberculosis, 95 as suspects, and 479 as non-tubercular.
Classifying the new positive cases according to birthplace, 'both pulmonary and non-
pulmonary, making 127 in all, gives us the following: Bom in British Columbia, 42, of whom
24 were white, 1 Japanese, 1 Chinese, and 16 Indians ; other Canadian Provinces, 29 ; Newfoundland, 1; United States of America, 7; British Isles, 34; other European countries, 12; Hindu,
1;  and New Zealand, 1.
Of the cases examined giving a definite history of contact, there were 248 eases, of which
195 were new cases and 53 were re-examinations. Of the new cases there were 22 of pulmonary
tuberculosis, 3 of tuberculosis of other organs, 33 suspects, and 116 negative. Included in the
cases re-examined were 5 of pulmonary tuberculosis, 13 suspects, and 25 negative. In addition
to these there were 31 cases which were classified as various non-tuberculous findings, including
both new cases and re-examinations.
The total number of X-ray pictures taken was 447. There were also numerous fluoroscopic
examinations, including nurses in training at two hospitals.
Of the cases referred to the clinic on account of contact only, 5 positive pulmonary cases
were found, 30 suspects, 1 cervical adenitis, and 5 cases of mediastinitis. This illustrates very
forcibly the necessity of clinics and followring-up work of contact cases.
You will notice both in the above paragraph and in figures above that there is a large
number classed as suspects. This is accounted for in many ways. We might say that in a
goodly number we " suspect" they are not tubercular. Any case that it was felt should
be followed up and returned for future examination was put in this category, to assure that
they would not be overlooked. Again most of the cases of pleurisy were so classed. Of these
there were a particularly large number, more than the year previous, and in 1928 I made special
mention of it.    These, with the large number of cases classed as mixed infection, for want of
2 U 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
a better name, cases which show peribronchial irritation on X-ray films and a history of a good
deal of disability extending over long periods of time, seem to be an ever-increasing number.
At times it is very difficult to distinguish these cases from tuberculous disease.
In 1927 I wras pleased to report a steady decline in our death-rate from tuberculosis over a
number of years, especially amongst the white population, the decrease in 1926 in British
Columbia differing from that of the other Provinces (except Ontario), where there was a
decided increase.
In 1928 there was a slight increase in our death-rate both amongst whites and Indians, but
not of sufficient extent to attach much importance thereto.
This year, however, we have to regretfully report a very marked increase in our mortality
rate, similar to the increase of 1926 in some of the other Provinces. A large percentage of this
increase, however, is to be found amongst the Indian population, although there was a marked
increase also amongst the whites.
At the present time, while we may theorize about this, there are no specific facts upon which
to base an opinion. It may be a passing phase of a temporary nature. If not, it will provide an
opportunity for the Epidemiologist.
The following analysis of deaths from tuberculosis is of interest:—
Chinese, British Columbia.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate per
Cent.,
all Deaths.
Chinese
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921	
49
64
44
40
44
59
50
45
220
232
228
211
195
224
211
224
22.26
27.58
19.29
18.95
22.56
26.34
23.69
20.08
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
2.08
1922            	
2.72
1923                                     	
1.87
1924 	
1.70
1925 	
1.87
1926    	
2.55
1927            	
2.12
1928	
1.91
British Columbia Indians.
Year.
Deaths from
"Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes:
T.B. Rate per
Cent.
all Deaths.
Indian
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921      	
104
99
133
125
155
145
151
175
364
370
432
457
436
416
524
497
28.57
26.76
30.79
27.35
35.55
34.85
28.81
35.21
25,694
24,744
25,694
25,694
24,316
24,316
24,316
24,316
4.05
1922	
1923	
1924	
4.00
5.18
4.86
1925             	
6.37
1926	
5.96
1927                  ..               	
6.20
1928	
7.19
Japanese, British Columbia.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate pel-
Cent.
all Deaths.
Japanese
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921	
33
22
24
23
33
28
35
27
142
190
158
150
195
161
209
170
23.24
11.58
15.19
15.33
16.92
17.39
16.74
15.88
15,006
15,806
16,004
17,418
18,226
19.048
19.048
19,048
2.19
1922	
1.38
1923                    	
1.49
1924	
1.32
1925	
1.81
1926	
1.47
1927	
1.83
1928	
1.41 Races other than Chinese, Japanese, and British Columbia Indians.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate per
Cent.,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921     	
326
322
324
339
306
300
315
386
3,846
4,115
4,179
4,186
4,119
4,673
4,806
5,019
8.47
7.82
7.75
8.09
7.42
6.42
6.55
7.69
460,349
474,917
478,769
486,355
494,925
501,103
508,103
516,103
0.70
1922    	
0.67
1923    	
0.67
1924    	
0.69
1925     	
0.61
1926    	
0.59
1927    .            	
0.61
1928    	
0.74
British Columbia, all Races included.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate per
Cent.,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921	
512
507
525
527
538
532
551
633
4,572
4,907
4,997
5,004
4,945
5,474
5,750
5,910
11.19
10.33
10.50
10.53
10.87
9.72
9.58
10.79
524,582
539,000
544,000
553,000
561,000
568,000
575,000
583,000
0.97
1922	
1923	
0.94
0.96
1924	
0.95
1925	
1926	
0.95
0.93
1927	
0.95
1928	
1.08
THE EDUCATIONAL PART OF THE WORK.
This part of the work was carried on more actively than last year. For service organizations and others, our European trip was a talking-point of interest. Addresses were given before
three Rotary Clubs; two meetings, Health Bureau of the Board of Trade; two Medical
Societies; Nanaimo Public Health Nursing Council; public meeting at Merritt; Women's
Benefit Association, Vancouver; one Masonic Lodge ; Doctors and Nursing Staff of the Nanaimo
Hospital; Public Health Nursing class at the University; lectures to six classes of nurses
in training; and six short talks to entrance and high-school pupils in our schools.
HOSPITAL INSPECTION.
As Llospital Inspector, I have inspected thirty-two public hospitals and seventeen private
ones, in a few cases making several visits. I held meetings with Hospital Boards or committees of same of twenty-four hospitals ; attended sessions of the B.C. Hospital Association;
also sessions of Hospital Section of the American College of Surgeons, Pacific North West
Division; staff meetings at Jubilee Hospital, Victoria; also interviewed the Mayor and Medical
Health Officer of Victoria in regard to the admission of cases to Tranquille; attended the
opening of the North Vancouver Hospital; and multiple interviews with Miss Randal, the
Registrar of Nurses.
Important additions to our hospital accommodation have been made. The extension of the
Vancouver General Hospital by new maternity and private-ward wings; new modern and
up-to-the-minute sixty-bed hospital in North Vancouver; a new wing to St. Joseph's Hospital,
Victoria, of which any institution or community may well be proud; and a new Nurses' Home
now under construction. Less pretentious, but no less important additions have been made at
Kelowna, Armstrong, and Alberni. A new addition at Campbell River is in course of construction. A new Nurses' Home at the Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria; many repairs and
minor additions at Vernon ; Penticton is planning a new wing and Princeton a new hospital for
next year. Bums Lake hopes to have a new hospital late this year. Smithers is very much in
need of a complete new unit and this is being actively discussed.
No questions of sufficient importance for a formal meeting of the Board of Arbitration were
submitted. U 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Once again I would like to express to you my keen appreciation of your cordial co-operation
and helpful assistance at all times in this particular line of health-work; also for much timely
advice in connection with hospital-work. I would also like to express my sincere thanks to the
doctors and nurses, and especially to nursing and clinical staffs of the many hospitals in which
clinics were held, for their ever-ready and willing co-operation.
I have, etc.,
A. S. Lamb, M.D.,
Travelling Medical Health Officer and Hospital Inspector.
REPORT OF EPIDEMIOLOGIST.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 6th, 1929.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith a tentative programme of the epidemiological
work to be followed for the ensuing year.
STANDARDIZED REPORTING SYSTEM OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES.
Every effort has been made to facilitate the reporting of infectious diseases by the physicians
throughout the Province. A card system has been inaugurated, the cards franked, stamped with
the return address, and .sent to the physicians of the Province every week. They in turn will
enter any infectious diseases experienced in their clientele for the past week and return.
Compilation of morbidity rates that will accurately reflect the infectious-disease incidents
throughout the Province from these reports can be expected. In this way infectious diseases
can be geographically located; so that in the event of any particular disease arriving at such
proportions that it would menace the public safety, the Department will be in a position to
immediately inaugurate a means of defence.
The accurate accumulation of morbidity rates will be constantly aimed for. By the use of
graphs and further analysis of these statistics the rise or fall of the infectious-disease incidence,
collectively and by individual diseases, can be recorded for every month or year. The seasonal
variations will also be shown, and by close association with the Department of Vital Statistics
the fatalities of these diseases can be clearly demonstrated. All of which will provide the
'Department with a general view of the health conditions, a numerical valuation of the communicable and associated diseases throughout the Province.
INVESTIGATION OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES THAT ASSUME EPIDEMIC
PROPORTIONS.
The Epidemiologist will be required to investigate such conditions that in the opinion of the
Health Officer menace public health, and he will at all times be prepared to leave immediately
to conduct such investigations, and while there if necessary establish immunization clinics or
conduct such investigations into sanitary conditions of the district that may influence the
epidemic. Not long ago there was a slight epidemic of smallpox in a small town in the Interior,
and on investigation it was found that thirteen cases of smallpox existed, the first case occurring
about three weeks previous to the date of investigation. Vaccination clinics were established
in the schools and 209 pupils vaccinated. The common school was reopened for all pupils who
were immuned. The high school, however, had been allowed to continue its sessions all through
the epidemic. Following these activities the physicians of the district have not reported any
new cases of smallpox.
With the inauguration of the card system of reporting, it is expected that the morbidity
rates for the Province will be of value in estimating the true infectious-disease incidence and
providing the Health Department with an instrument that shall enable it to institute an
efficient system of control.
I have, etc.,
A. R. Chisholm, M.D.,
Epidemiologist. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 21
TABLE  SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES  IN THE
PROVINCE, JULY, 1928, TO JUNE, 1929.
'rt
C j
'Is
o "So
&a
9 fl
a
fl
at
1
jcj
at
.fl
ft
5
3
ft
p
il
fl  =3
Mp
o
n
p
3
p.
g
o
at c ui
■g g 1
p
a>
at
o
VX
'a a
a> o
mm
O
ft
|
CQ
o
o
at
>t3
a £
HP
bo
ft  .
2 b°
1^ w
1
3      27
11
1
180
10
5
2
200
2
1
	
1
1
1
1
3
1
17
2
4
15
1
43
14
14
237
12
4
72
6
Blubber   Bay ,	
.  .....
8
53
2
3
	
34
141
4
17
10
1
20
28
5
1
2
6
6
12
1
7
l
1
5
1
2
1
2
1
1
15
4
	
1
25
31
2
4
16
1
1
5
62
1
1
3
1
8
1
2
 1	
61
Cobble Hill and District	
4
4
20
2
18
3
2
44
12
27
2
28
1
2
3
5
1
3
3
7
1
1
29
1
21	
.
1
1
63
4
2
96
57
198
8
1
30
5
29
.t.	
18
	
2
1
3
78
4
5
5
4
12
5
50
16
9
	
25
S
1
l
0
3
1
2|        1
61
6
2
1 1     ss
9
3
3
1
2
2
1
7
6
21
2
3
2
10
Field	
4
1
24
3
 1	
1
6
1
1
1
1
2
74
3
20
7
12
6
252
54
12
4
2
1
1
I
5
15
11
1
T|	
BI         1
2
2
1
2
14
1
3
	
2
	
	
9
26
12
50
20
 1 1
10
18
2
2
3
5
24
	
1
24
2i        2
 1     . .
2
1
4
	
3
1
4
40
3
3
6
5
3
35
6
4
15
2
108
3
12
9
1
22
17
75
1
1
2
3
32
3
4
4
75
50
7
5
 1 1          1
1
1
12
...J	
2
.   ...
 1         21          2
47
210
200
2
R
146
200
39
8
	
24
1
14
2
2
1
14
7
	
6
97
4
 |	
	
2
4
6
20
0
4
 |	
4
1
1
1
28
4
1
1
31
24
4
4
16
118
12
145
13
5
5
4
4
92
23
10
20
5
4
100
1
7
   1	
	
1
..:	
 |	
	
5
2
	
|
21	
•1 1	
	
	
	
63
4
16
1
1
39
14
90
2
141 t        7
11 1        1
1
	
 1	
4
i
 ..1	
::::::::::::::::
	
1
|
Port Coquitlam	
 1     14|	
 i   i
 1	
81   733
200
lfil      70
1
2247
1983
331   244
6
184
44
22
251 U 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES  IN THE
PROVINCE, JULY, 1928, TO JUNE, 1929— Continued.
"3
If
If
B £
US
o
ft
S3
2H
V
A
ft
a
>.
H
9) «
a d
o
ft
at
p
tt
ft
a
i
o
= 8 <B
at fl it
nt £ a
c a, oj
p
m
bfl   W
mm
o
ft
m
o
xt
tt
23
'S ^
HP
bfl
fl
'ft   .
o ,c
O  fcj
8
733
200
16
70
1
2247
28
5
1
2
1983
33
1
2441        6
i
184
44
22
251
1
9
15
2
1
H	
931
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
 1	
8
5
273
13
 I	
6
150
1
3
 1	
8
9
2
1
3
Rolla	
1
1
182
53
14
79
8
8
	
4
299
4
12
7
6
31 [
12
	
4
	
20
6
21
9
2
14
73
2
2
18
8
13
1
1
1
7
2
	
1
	
	
...
	
3
1
	
2
1
9
209
4
30
3
41
3
34
29
	
1
	
1
.   '   1    .. .
1
3
1
3
20
4
5
150
439
3
1
5
303
266
9
2
162
3
H	
 1	
1
2
88
8
1
120
889
55
2
4
4
1
8
7
38
62
19
4
8
55
112
3
3
4
15
17
5
48
	
134
276
55
25
18
2
	
74
88
1
12
10
47
 11463
51
10
10
2
23
	
3
52
*6
22
1
2
31	
11	
64
42
8
 1	
6
419
16
444
11
1
2
2
2
	
	
90
3
12
1
71	
26
1
28
3
10
IB
 1	
.
	
 1	
	
.. .... !    1
....
 1 1	
Totals	
32
2011
985
122
116|        11483414202
62
600|        8|   738
260
89|   393
17
704
747
101
1
271
1
147R11112
1           1
1RKI             I   435
170
■
1
231       98
* Former Point Grey Municipality from July to December,  192S, only.
t Former City of Vancouver from July to December,  1928, only.
X Greater Vancouver, including the former Municipalities of Point Grey and South Vancouver, from January to June,
1929, only.
§ Former South Vancouver Municipality from July to December,  1928, only.
[| Total figures for Greater Vancouver, including former Municipalities of Point Grey and South Vancouver, from July,
1928, to June, 1929. REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1929.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg leave to hand you the Eighteenth Annual Report of the Medical
Inspection of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
As the work develops from year to year, it is gratifying to be able to report to you of the
greater efficiency, better results, and a greater understanding on the part of the public of the
real objects of the work.
I had the honour of addressing the yearly meeting of the representatives of all the School
Boards in British Columbia at their convention, and I was struck by the reception with which
the report I gave of the work and the views was received.
There is, howeyer, a latent feeling, stimulated by people entirely ignorant of the subject, in
regard to prevention of disease through the recognized scientific procedures. In spite of this,
however, conversions are being made amongst the school officials, and this is particularly shown
by the increase of the work we are carrying on along these lines. Vaccination from smallpox,
immunization from diphtheria, treatment of scarlet fever, has shown such results that there is
no gainsaying the truth of the claims that we have made and of the representations that have
been laid before the people.
Yet in spite of our efforts we have unfortunately, as I pointed out in my general Report, to
report a marked increase in the number of cases of diphtheria, scarlet fever, smallpox, and more
particularly in the number of cases of mumps and measles.
As regards the mumps and measles, while the numbers are large, yet it is not affecting the
school attendance to anything like the same degree as in previous years, as under our Nursing
Service we are able to watch the development of the disease in the classes and do not keep at
home members of the class or members of the family, as we did previously. We do not think of
closing our schools unless the epidemic has affected so many that the attendance is seriously
affected.
This is the procedure in the districts where we have Public Health Nurses who give their
attention.
A child developing mumps in the school is immediately sent home. The other children who
have been in contact, if they have got the disease, will not show any symptoms until the twelfth
day. They are kept under observation, and on the twelfth day are sent home for twelve days;
that is, saving more than half the time for which the pupil was formerly excluded from school.
In regard to smallpox, there is no danger of persons taking smallpox once they have been
vaccinated.
The establishment of full-time health units in British Columbia is showing that a trained
personnel in charge of the health-work in a district is the most satisfactory means of attaining
our object, and the results during the past year are such as to fully justify all our representations in regard to what we expected from the establishment of such units.
I am appending reports from the full-time health units in Saanich Municipality and at
Kelowna. I would particularly call attention to the Saanich report. The saving of $12,000 in
two years is something that, I think, should attract the attention of officials in Municipal
Councils and School Boards, added to which is the account of lessened sickness in the district,
the correction of 50 per cent, of the defects in the school-children, and of 40 per cent, of the
defects corrected in the entering class.
These reports follow :—
SAANICH HEALTH UNIT.
Report by Dr. D. Berman, Medical Health Officer.
Royal Oak, B.C., November 30th, 1929.
The purpose of this article is to give a brief account of what may be accomplished in a
community of about 15,000 by an organized health unit conducted along modern lines and adapted
to the particular needs of that community. U 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Saanich is a suburban and rural district about 55 square miles in area. The population in
the parts nearest the City of Victoria are mostly wage-earners. The rural areas are intensely
farmed, the main crops being small fruits. There are also several dairies. Industries are conspicuous by their absence. Therefore the public-health programme has been mainly directed to
schools, control of communicable diseases, child-welfare, and education.
In 1919 public-health work in Saanich was begun with the employment of the nurses to carry
out district and school nursing. There were also a part-time Medical Health Officer and School
Medical Officer who worked independently of each other and under separate governing bodies,
and, as frequently occurs, the health-work was inefficiently and incompletely carried out.
Gradually, however, through education and the untiring efforts of the Provincial Health
Officer, appreciation of public-health work was brought to such a stage that the value of a full-
time health unit as opposed to the inefficiency of part-time work resulted in the demand for
reorganization.
In 1927 the School Board and the Municipal Council pooled their health activities under a
single control, and in September the full-time health unit under the direction of the present
Health Officer began to function, with a staff consisting of Medical Officer, two School Nurses,
and two Public Health Nurses also doing district nursing.
After a comprehensive survey the present programme was decided upon as the one best
meeting the needs of the community.
Our first attention was directed to the schools, numbering fifteen, and with a population of
approximately 1,900.
Errors in lighting, heating, and sanitation were pointed out and corrected.
From examination of the children's health-cards we were struck by their remarkable freedom
from defects. This was due to the fact that under the part-time system the children were merely
glanced at at the rate of about 250 per morning.
Now, however, each child is given as thorough an examination as possible.
Instead of sending practically every parent a clean bill of health for the child as a result
of a perfunctory examination, defects were now found, and, due to notification given, followed
nearly in every case by five or six visits by the School Nurses.
In our first year we found 1,977 defects, of which we secured the correction of 989, or 50
per cent. At least one-half of these defects were found in the first four grades, in whom the
common trend of defective teeth, tonsils, and glands is met with so frequently. Defects in the
higher grades are becoming conspicuous by their absence.
In fact, this year's beginners show 40 per cent, less correctable defects than any beginners'
class in previous years.    This is no doubt due to pre-school attention given by the staff.
We next directed our efforts to the control of communicable 'diseases. Formerly schools
were closed for epidemics and the municipality's bills for hospital isolation ran to almost $6,000
in the year before the inception of the full-time health unit.
Due to the fact that we do district nursing and school nursing, it is practically impossible
to miss a case of infectious disease.
In addition to this, every child absent from school two days or longer must be visited by a
nurse and then present a certificate signed by the Medical Health Officer before readmission.
In this manner we have as complete knowledge and control of infection as is possible.
Furthermore, on account of our rigid school inspection, we are enabled, when one school-
child is ill with infection, to allow other pupils from the family to attend during the incubation
period.
The results from this system have shown themselves thus:—
(«.) Reduction of controllable cases of infection.
(6.) Reduction of isolation costs to the municipality from about $6,000 to $100 to $200 per
annum.
(c.) Marked improvement in attendance as shown in this chart, despite an epidemic of
measles and mumps in April, May, and June, 1929. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 25
Percentage of Attendance of Enrolled Pltpils,
Saanich Schools.
School-year.
a
it
T12
02
o
>
o
25
02
il
a
B
d
l-s
to
HH
02
U
d
>>
d
rH
tj
a
B
l-s
If
< d
1924-23	
93.08
94.3
93.3
93.5
94.7
89.1
89.7
91.3
91.6
93.9
88.1
90.3
87.2
93.2
92.5
85.3
88.7
84.2
89.2
93.3
84.3
80.2
78.4
91.2
88.6f
79.7
77.8
79.9
92.4
90.5
76.8
76.7
81.7
92.9
94.-01
74.7
79.4
77.7
92.8
93.6J
74.02
76.8
79.2
95.8
90.8J
74.1
75.9
76.9
92.2
92.9J
81.94
1925-26                    	
83.98
1926-27	
82^98
1927-28  (full-time unit)
1928-29 (full-time unit)
93.48
92.48
Flu.
t Measles and mumps   (other members  of family  kept
Receiving class this year (1929)  40 per cent, less defects
* Winter colds,  measles,  etc.
in school).
Fifty per cent, of defects corrected of pupils,
than any previous Receiving class.
{d.) Reduction of retardation and a raising of scholastic achievement as reported by the
Municipal Inspector of Schools. " While retardation had cost Saanich over $17,000 in 1928, the
last year the cost of ' repeaters ' had been kept down to $11,000."
The efforts of the staff directed at education and child-welfare has resulted in a gradual
decrease of sickness throughout the community, and the work necessary to accomplish these ends
is shown in the following table:—
Year.
Nursing
Visits.
Child-welfare
Visits.
Home School
Visits.
1927	
2,966
2,325
1,356
1,360
1,979
1,495
148
1928	
1,314
1929 (first 8 months)	
1,976
The figures for nursing visits show the gradual reduction in the need for such attention, due
to the betterment of the municipality's health.
While comparisons are odious, it is, however, interesting to compare the incidence of sickness
and the amount of educational work done under unified control of health as in Saanich with an
area where there is no such control as in the neighbouring city, whose population is three times
that of ours.
Month of November. Saanich. City.
Nursing visits       114 564
Educational visits     675 460
Judging by visits, we have 33 per cent, less sickness, and this is due in great part to giving
five times as much attention to education and instruction.
The above results mean a considerable saving to the municipality and shows that money
wisely and generously spent in health-work will return dividends which at present it is difficult
to estimate.
D. Berman, M.D., D.P.H.,
Medical Health Officer, Saanich Municipality.
THE FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING
SERVICE FOR THE KELOWNA RURAL DISTRICT, JULY, 1928, TO JUNE, 1929.
I have much pleasure in presenting for the approval of the Kelowna Rural Schools Health
Association the First Annual Report of the Provincial Public Health Nursing Service for the
Kelowna Rural Districts. U 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The report embraces various phases of school-work, child-hygiene, and public-health organization in the Rural Districts of Okanagan Centre, Winfield, Ellison, Rutland, East Kelowna,
South-east Kelowna, Okanagan Mission, Mission Creek, Benvoulin, Ewing's Landing, Westbank
Ferry, and Westbank Townsite, an area of approximately 100 square miles.
Section 1.—School-work.
The objects aimed at in school health-work are: (a) Detection and correction of defects;
(6) prevention of the spread of communicable diseases;   (c) health education.
"Twelve rural schools with a registration of 640 children were regularly inspected during
the year.
Number of visits to schools, 205.
Number of examinations of children by School Medical Officer, 1,553.
Number of reinspections by School Nurse, 5,334.
Number of children weighed and measured, 631.
Number of weighings and measurings, 1,716.
Number of children 5 to 10 per cent, underweight, 119.
Number of children over 10 per cent, underweight, 98 (at end of June, 1929, 58).
Number of children gaining in weight, 616.
Of the 119 children who were 5 to 10 per cent, underweight, 25 children have now gained
their correct weight;  11 children lost weight during the year;  6 children did not gain in weight.
The following causes were noted as probable reasons for loss of weight or lack of gain:—
5 children have much-diseased tonsils which should be taken out.
9 children have goitre.
3 children have had mumps.
2 children had measles.
1 child very bad carious teeth.
1 child suffers from a heart condition.
2 children have diabetes.
Proper gain in weight and proper weight for age and height is strongly emphasized in health-
teaching. The children themselves and many parents are much interested and do their best to
carry out instructions given by the Health Nurse.
Two examinations to look for defects of nearly every child have been made by Dr. G. A.
Ootmar, School Medical Officer, with the School Nurse in attendance; also special inspections
at various periods when communicable diseases broke out in the schools.
New defects found, 564; old defects improved, 412 ; old defects not improved, 218; children
excluded with communicable diseases, 115; children excluded as contacts or suspects, 214;
children excluded for skin-disease, 37; exclusions of children suffering from skin-diseases, ringworm, scabies, pediculosis, impetigo, 48.
Number of exclusions, 366; referred to Medical Health Officer, skin-diseases, communicable
diseases, suspects, contacts, 306; referred to own physician, 148; interviews with teachers and
others, 417; home school visits, 309; children and others transported, 83; health talks in
schools, 94;  notices to parents re defects, etc., 481.
In connection with defects found improved, it is interesting and encouraging to note that:
20 children had diseased tonsils removed; 106 children with enlarged tonsils were improved;
128 children under treatment for goitre were improved ; 18 children goitre was cured; 19 children
obtained glasses for defective eyesight; 23 children with spinal curvature (scoliosis) were found
to be improved after taking corrective exercises; 9 children with small chest-expansion were
found to be improved after taking corrective exercises.
In connection with physical drill and corrective exercises, excellent work is being done at
Rutland, Ellison, and South-east Kelowna Schools. Sixty-four children have received dental
care, but there are at least 286 children in the rural schools who have carious teeth. We shall
be glad when the dental surgeons have completed a dental survey in the rural schools, so that
definite plans may be made for proper care of the children's teeth. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 27
Report on Communicable Diseases in the Rural Districts.—One hundred and forty-two
cases of communicable diseases have been reported by the Rural Health Nurse to the Medical
Officer, Dr. G. Ootmar.
Disease and Date.
District.
No. of
Cases.
School
Children
affected.
Mumps—
December, January
December, January
February,  March  ....
Measles—■
January	
First outbreak, April, May 	
Second outbreak, May, June 	
April 	
May    Westbank Ferry
June     Winfield	
Westbank	
Mission Creek..
East Kelowna..
Okanagan Mission.
Rutland	
Rutland	
Westbank Town	
Whooping-cough—
February,  March  .■   Mission Creek	
February,  March     Rutland	
March     South Okanagan..
May       Benvoulin	
Scarlet fever—
April 6th     Westbank	
10
27
28
10
22
26
65
58
3
1
4
3
16
12
21
16
4
4
2
1
50
37
11
5
7
7
3
3
2
2
22
17
3
3
To June 24th, 1929.
I
The spread of infection and numerous cases of mumps in the Mission Creek and East
Kelowna Districts were due to a very great extent to a milkman who delivered milk while
suffering from the disease.
Four outbreaks of measles in different localities were traced to children who had been
exposed to the disease in Arancouver, returned to the district, developed the rash of the disease
within fourteen days after exposure, and infected other children.
The importance of the isolation of children who have been exposed to infection, and who are
very infectious to others for at least six days (and probably longer) before they develop the
rash of measles, is unfortunately not understood by many parents. If every one understood this
danger of infecting others in the pre-eruptive stage and would co-operate with the health
authorities in isolating the exposed child, measles would not spread. Especially is it unwise
to allow other school-children to visit in the home, a child sick with an undiagnosed complaint.
Two separate outbreaks of measles have occurred in Rutland School, but by very careful
inspection of school-children, and excellent co-operation with the health authorities by teachers,
school trustees, parents, and children, the disease was limited to six families in a school of some
160 children. It has not been possible to obtain this understanding co-operation from all parents
in all the districts. Our thanks are due to all physicians, teachers, school trustees, and parents
who have co-operated with the health authorities and obeyed the law in immediately reporting
any case of communicable disease directly to the health authorities. Only by the sympathetic
co-operation of all concerned is it possible in any way to prevent the spread of communicable
diseases and protect the children.
Section 2.—Child-welfare Clinics.
Thirty babies and pre-school children were registered during the year; 108 home visits
were made. Many of these children have attended the well-baby and pre-school clinics in the
different districts. These free clinics are organized under the auspices of the Women's Institute
and Club, in conjunction with the Medical Health Officer and Provincial Health Nurse. The
members of the institutes assist in the actual work of the clinics, weighing and measuring the
children, taking records, and serving refreshments to all. The babies and pre-school children
and others are given a complete physical examination, advice as to feeding and general hygiene,
and careful case histories are kept.    It is encouraging to note the improvement in some of the U 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
children. No actual treatment is given, but sick children are referred to their own doctors. We
should like to extend this service to include free health examination in the rural districts for
any one who wished for advice, and thus detect at an early stage many troubles about which
people do not consult their family physician until the disease is well advanced. We would also
like to care for the expectant mother in this way, referring her to her own physician, if found
necessary, with a record of the findings of the health examination.
Well-baby and Pre-school Clinics.—Twenty-one clinics have been held in the Winfield, Rutland, East Kelowna, and Benvoulin Districts. Number of registrations, 90 children; examination of babies (2 years), 59; examination of pre-school children (2 to 6 years), 54; other
children examined, 9;   total number of attendance, 122.
The well-baby and pre-school clinics arranged with the Westbank Women's Institute had to
be postponed owing to the prevalence of measles and three cases of scarlet fever in the district.
Chest Clinics.—Three chest clinics were held with Dr. Lamb, Government Chest Specialist—
25 attendances.    All were subjected to fluoroscopic examination and in addition eight X-ray
plates were taken.
The condition of the school-child found with incipient T.B. of lungs in April, 1928, was found
- to be very much improved.    All cases negative as to T.B., but to be watched and return in one
year's time or earlier, if necessary, for re-examination.
Three active immunization  clinics  against  diphtheria—38 attendances.    One  Schick  test
clinic to test for susceptibility to diphtheria—8 attendances.
Summary.—Total number of clinics, 28.
No. Attendances.
Well-baby and pre-school      21 122
Chest         3 25
Active immunization        3 38
Schick test        1 8
Totals        28 193
Section 3.—Public Health Organization.
In this phase of the work is included all activities which stimulate interest in the public-
health programme, such as attending and addressing public meetings, lectures, letters written,
interviews, health exhibits, reception, of visitors from other cities interested in local health
measures, etc.; campaigns for vaccination against smallpox; immunization against diphtheria ;
development of new phases of health-work in new districts, etc.
Meetings addressed.
.(1.) July, 1928. Ellison ratepayers re school nursing and public-health organization (explanation).
(2.) September, 1928. East Kelowna AV omen's Institute re child-welfare, international,
national, and local;   well-baby clinics.
(3.) October, 1928. Rutland School Trustees on methods of school medical examinations
(explanation).
(4.) January, 1929. Westbank Women's Institute on nutrition in relation to health; also
State health insurance.
(5.) Kelowna Rural Schools Health Association: Report on nine months' work, March,
1928, to December, 1928.
(6.)  Rutland Women's Institute, on State health insurance and diet in relation to health.
(7.) Kelowna Rural Schools Health Association: Rural dental clinics, especially with reference to local needs.
(8.)  Winfield Women's Institute:   The problem of cancer, its prevention and cure.
(9.) Westbank public meeting re organization of Victorian Order of Nurses.
(10.)  Peachland public meeting re organization of Victorian Order of Nurses.
(11.) Kelowna Rural Schools Health Association, first annual meeting: Annual report of
all health activities.
Instructional consultation with parents, 229; health literature distributed in schools,
homes, clinics, and at Fall Fair, 1928, 1,903 pieces; letters and reports re different phases of
work, 143. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29. U 29
Public Health Exhibit at Kelowna Fall Fair.
A health exhibit was planned by Miss Frances Lyne, R.N., Kelowna School Nurse, and Mrs.
A. F. Grindon, R.N., Public Health Nurse, Kelowna Rural Districts, for the Kelowna Fall Fair.
The need for a school dental clinic for Kelowna and surrounding rural districts and active immunization of children against diphtheria were the points especially emphasized.
The nurses were in attendance during the fair, answered innumerable questions, and distributed 1,200 pieces of literature dealing with these questions and all phases of hygiene.
We are grateful to Kelowna Board of School Trustees, Rutland Women's Institute, and
Kelowna Women's Institute, who contributed towards the necessary expenses; also the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (Calgary Western Division), which supplied, free, splendid
literature for distribution.
The Provincial Health Officer was much pleased with this effort and' expressed his approval
in very appreciative terms.
The school dental clinic has not yet materialized and is a pressing need for the surrounding
rural districts.
Prenatal Hygiene.
Cases opened, 9;   cases dismissed, 7;   cases carried, 2;   home visits, 21.
Other Activities.
Item 1.—The mother's pension was obtained for a mother with five children.
Item 2.—In co-operation with a local Women's Institute and Provincial Police Department,
it was found possible to place three children with the Children's Aid Society of Vancouver, and
also to obtain financial help from the Provincial Department of Child-welfare to help to provide
for other small children in the family. Our thanks are due to the Convener of Child-welfare in
this institute, who personally interviewed the head of the Department in Victoria on behalf of
this family.
Item 3.—In co-operation. with the Rutland AVomen's Institute, which generously donated
$50 for the purpose, it was found possible to place a child of 10 years, suffering from tubercular
glands, in the Queen Alexandra Solarium, Vancouver Island. Our thanks are also due to the
C.P.R., which donated a free train ticket; to the Rutland Anglican Church Guild, which donated
money for the berth; and to Mrs. Wallace, of Rutland, who very kindly took the child to the
Solarium.
ArISITORS TO THE DISTRICT.
The Provincial Health Officer visited Kelowna in April, 1929, and expressed himself in
appreciative terms of the development of public-health work both in the city and the surrounding
districts during the past year. My grateful thanks are clue to the Provincial Board of Health
and to the executive of the Kelowna Rural Schools Health Association, who consulted together
and so kindly provided a new car for the Rural Nursing Service.
Miss Evelyn Anderton, student nurse, taking her final year in the Public Health Course at
the University of British Columbia, was sent by the Director of Public Health Nursing to study
methods employed in health-work iu the Kelowna schools and surrounding rural districts. She
stayed with the Provincial Health Nurses for a period of four weeks during the months of March
and April, then returned to A^ancouver to graduate for her degree of Bachelor of the Science of
Nursing.
Miss Hodge, R.N., Director of Junior Red Cross for British Columbia, arrived here, visiting
Kelowna and the rural districts, and organized new branches in many of the schools.
Miss McMann, AVestern Supervisor of the Victorian Order of Nurses, visited the Peachland
and Westbank Districts with the Provincial Health Nurse, in an endeavour to form a local
branch of the V.O.N, ion the west side of the lake, with the idea of giving a localized nursing
service to the Indians and others in these districts.
To conclude, my appreciative thanks are due to the local physicians; to the members of
the AATomen's Institutes and Club; to the members and especially to the executive of the Kelowna
Rural Schools Health Association;  to Dr. G. Ootmar, Medical Health Officer and School Medical U 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Officer for the Rural Districts; and to all others who by their good-will and co-operation have
helped to promote the growth of public-health nursing in the Kelowna Rural Districts during the
first year of organization, July, 1928, to June, 1929.
Anne Frances Grindon, R.N.,
Provincial Health Nurse in Charge, Kcloivna Rural Districts.
Much interest is being shown in regard to the dental work. This is a field that has hardly
been touched, although we are very much satisfied with the results that we are obtaining. The
difficulty is to get the dentists to do the work. Many men in active practice do not wish to leave
their offices to undertake the dental care of the school-children; consequently the progress is
slower than we would like, but still we are making decided advances. The correction of the
defects in the teeth is something that appeals particularly to the child, and also to the parents,
and means very much in the after-life of the child. Bad teeth ai'e the cause of more diseases
of the system probably than any other agency. AVe hope next year to be able to further extend
the work.
Details for the examination for each school follow.
I have, etc.,
H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial Health Officer.
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors:  163.
Reports from Medical Inspectors:  161.
High Schools.
High schools. 1927-28, 79: Reported, 53; not reported, 26.' 1928-29, 76: Reported, 48;
not reported, 28.
Pupils inspected, 1927-28, 11.783;   1928-29, 9,725, a decrease, of 2,058.
Junior High Schools.
Junior high schools.    1927-28, not segregated.    1928-29, 7:   Reported, 5;   not   reported, 2.
Pupils inspected, 1927-28, not segregated;  1928-29, 3,065.
Graded City Schools.
Cities.   1927-28, 33 : Reported, 33 ;  all reported.    1928-29, 33 :  Reported, 32; not reported, 1.
Pupils inspected, 1927-28, 39,387;   1928-29, 48,898. an increase of 9,511.
(City  schools  now  include  former  Municipalities  of  Point Grey  and   South  Vancouver
schools.)
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities.    1927-28, 26:   Reported, 26.    1928-29, 24:   Reported, 23;  not reported, 1.
Pupils inspected, 1927-28, 29,696;   1928-29, 16,030, a decrease of 13,666.
(Former Municipalities of Point Grey and South A'ancouver included in city schools.)
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected :  1927-28. 661, at a cost of $15,396.90; 1928-29, 654, at a cost of $15,255.65.
Schools not inspected :   1927-28, 84;   1928-29. 71.
Pupils inspected:  1927-28, 18,140;   1928-29, 18,318, an increase of 178.
Cost of inspection per pupil:  1927-28, 85 cents;  1928-29, 83 cents.
Percentage of defects :   1927-28, 105.47;  1928-29, 103.13, a decrease of 2.34. STATISTICAL TABLES. U 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NORMAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"3.
Pi    .
. o
ll
'£
O  -ti
a
° S
to 8
o
0   t^
CD   OJ
p
tS-ca
aa
-3
a
to
si
qj  ,_
AM
if
'3
a
a>
H
G>    rA
I a
r     O
SB
s
OH
t3
at n:
•n  tt
at fi
HO
at
0
O
174
150
177
150
1
8
36
1
1
6
8
23
5
18
10
4
11
10
Victoria	
HIGH
65
65
147
346
267
73
155
50
87
108
94
130
30
72
150
15C
14
25
69
94
23
49
73
209
272
386
29
58
181
150
125
74
95
32
81
168
721
357
670
37S
56
65
137
329
264
66
147
49
70
90
94
130
30
72
140
152
14
25
69
91
20
47
70
200
257
386
29
56
170
145
115
65
82
32
77
168
752
394
639
364
1
9
6
9
12
1
17
1
2
1
5
1
1
1
22
6
3
14
3
6
22
10
5
6
4
6
4
7
7
36
40
107
14
8
13
11
2
3
1
9
6
9
47
5
25
81
7
4
3
6
Miss P. Charlton..
Burnaby:
Chilliwack	
i
l
3
G. E. L. McKinnon
G. K. MacNaughton.
2
9
3
1
4
1
....
5
17
Duncan	
H. P. Swan	
J. S. McCallum	
Miss M.   Claxton..
Miss E. Morrison..
Miss W. Seymour..
Mrs. EdAvard Yard.
30
1
3
50
7
6
22
5
9
1
3
5
1
31
2
10
4
1
16
13
1
12
9
7
6
4
Fernie	
D. Corsan	
10
5
14
6
3
39
4
2
10
8
8
1
6
8
7
39
24
2
6
27
8
3
1
8
1
1
2
8
11
7
4
Miss 0. M. Garrood.
36
W. J. Knox	
1
1
Kitsumgalhim	
3
12
8
1
1
5
1
1
H. B. Maxwell	
B. B. Marr	
Miss H. Peters
10
6
Matsqui:
R. H. Tort	
2
7
22
38
76
62
1
5
2
2
6
2
19
6
10
8
13
54
9
7
2
15
23
39
10
2
4
27
9
5
3
14
11
2
79
55
3
44
8
1
10
15
7
1
4
1
9
1
1
32
9
6
1
20
1
2
4
5
4
2
1
5
4
1
12
W. F. Drysdale
E. C. Arthur	
Miss N. Armstrong
New Westminster:
Duke of Connaught....
Ocean Falls	
Prince George	
D. A. Clark	
Miss A. Stark	
3
1
4
52
	
A. E. H. Bennett	
C. Ewert	
1
1
2
1
6
1
1
12
1
Richmond:
W. K. Hall	
2
1
2
E. E. Toplifle	
1
2
1
S. E. and Alan Beech.
F. D. Sinclair	
1
6
	
2
12
8
42
24
12
2
F. S. Eaton	
14
162
57
105
106
	
1
2
3
	
Vancouver:
H. White  	
Miss M. McLellan
Miss G. Jeeves	
Mrs. Bellamy	
Miss H. Jukes	
1
H. White	
H. White	
	
	
^ BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 33
SCHOOLS.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
a
I
9
IS
a
02
d
be
a
§
rH
5
p
1
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Heating, ventilation,
and    accommodation good
Yes.
ma, 1
1
Yes.
SCHOOLS.
1
1
2
Building   brick   and
frame; rather difficult to heat and
ventilate     during
the severe weather
Good
nal curvature,  1; cystic goitre,  1
Good
Good
Boys' lavatory
good; girls' lavatory good, but
not adequate.
2
O.K. ...
Good
Clean; adequate.
aritis,  1; anaemia, 2; orthopasdic, 1
Good	
1
Clean;  adequate.
0 K.
2
1
1
Diphtheria,  1; mumps,  1; pinkeye,  1
O.K	
Good	
Good..         	
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
7
5
1
Measles;     chicken-pox;     scarlet
fever
Good	
36
Excellent;   modern..
O.K	
diac, 2; flat feet, 4
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
Good	
Good	
ter to flush.
Slight epidemic of measles	
1
1
Mumps,     15;    chicken-pox,     7;
measles, 4; scarlet fever, 1
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
2; cardiac,  1
Good excepting basement of new part,
which   is   unsanitary, due to water-
seepa.ge
•
2;  nervous,  1; pulmonary,   1
Good	
Clean; adequate.
I
2
12
Good	
anaemia, 2
Diphtheria;    mumps;    chicken-
pox
Good	
Splendid	
Well heated and ventilated
O.K.
Good.
.. .
Clean; adequate.
	
.
Good	
	
Adequate	
Diphtheria,    1;   diphtheria   carriers, 3; smallpox, 2
Measles, 6; mumps, 10; chicken-
pox, 2
Scarlet fever,   1; diphtheria, 2;
mumps, 1; smallpox, 1
	
 !
1
	
! U 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"ft
3
■a
. o
o g
a
<m a
°1
6 S
A at
o
\n
ft
OS
QJ
Ir
op
■£ a
O --4
CM
*d
d
'A
t- -
on
3
s
«4
•a
QJ     rA
bag
il
a o
a> Tj
oS
^   HI
Sa
HO
'o
O
Vancouver—Continued.
H. White	
Miss M. Campbell-
319
731
967
288
586
726
390
113
148
396
632
877
167
431
812
2
76
44
28
16
9
3
17
36
4
16
10
82
114
259
25
117
302
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
4
124
Miss E. Edwards...
Miss M. Ewart
Mrs. Bellamy	
Miss I.  Smith   ....
30
W. Dykes	
34
H. White	
..
1
1
13
..
6
H. Dyer	
..      .
A. 0. Nash	
104
148
	
9
1
6
1
19
2
7
10
H. G. Williams	
Mrs.  S.  Martin
..
1
1
Examination not made.
JUNIOR HIGH
E.  0.  Arthur	
H. White	
Mrs. Bellamy	
Miss M.  Campbell
Miss M.  Ewart
Miss V.   Stevens...
264]   237
1
1
175|   123
131411226
1
1
768|   342
1286|1137
1
35
7
50
30
65
2
	
13
3
6
24
1
37
15
48
83
31
307
54
426
1
9
6
8
99
Vancouver;
1
2
175
20
205
23
W. Dykes	
1
17
1
4
51
H. White	
91
GRADED CITY
119
502
390
272
538
14
62
435
433
131
79
549
61
288
299
367
111
502
374
250
518
14
52
428
377
116
79
549
61
286
298
352
1
40
3
4
26
1
2
40
16
30
2
23
2
15
54
32
19
190
69
60
59
6
17
101
68
25
15
76
12
40
73
83
44
234
81
64
33
2
32
301
31
50
452
43
60
55
63
3
41
4
19
Armstrong and Spallumcheen
Chilliwack;
Miss P.  Charlton..
48
3
1
5
2
2
1
21
2
2
18
1
10
82
53
34
179
68
14
Cranbrook:
11
Kootenay Orchards....
G. E. L. MacKinnon..
6
22
2
4
1
1
1
1
6
36
8
5
5
16
5
24
2
1
8
11
10
6
7
12
5
10
2
	
70
27
2
25
70
20
2
55
99
4
1
2
2
1
6
2
155
1
6
20
10
16
43
49
8
II. P. Swan	
Miss M.  Claxton..
	
H. W. Keith	
7
Fernie:
Miss W. Seymour.
Miss W. Seymour.
Miss W. Seymour.
4
75
7
3
Kamloops;
Miss O. M. Garrood.
Miss-O. M. Garrood
34
41 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 35
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pu!monary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
ri
1
a
02
d
bO
a>
ft
a
I
o
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Diphtheria,   1;   diphtheria   carriers,  1; mumps,  3 ; chicken-
pox,   1; smallpox,   1
bella, 1;  mumps, 11; chicken-
pox,  2
Diphtheria,   5;   diphtheria   carriers, 2; mumps, 4
Smallpox, 5; mumps, 2; whooping-cough,   1
1
Good	
Fair	
Both.
1
SCHOOLS.
Nervous,   1;   cardiac,   1;   cleft  palate
1; asthma, 1
No.   vaccinated,   6S	
No. vaccinated, 762; cardiac, 3	
No.  vaccinated,   195;  cardiac,   5	
No. vaccinated, 614; cardiac, 2 ,
Varicella;  parotitis
Diphtheria, 1; measles, 4
mumps, 23; smallpox, 1
chicken-pox,  5
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 7
measles, 1; chicken-pox, 18
mumps, 2; smallpox, 30
Good but crowded..
Good.
SCHOOLS.
1
3
2
Good	
Congenital    dislocation    of    hips,     1;
stammering, 2 ; cleft palate, 1; asthma, 2 ; tuberculosis, 2; heart-lesion,
2;  hay-fever,  2;  operations  for  appendicitis,   3;  fractured  patella,   1;
fractured   arm,    2;   fractured   septum, 1
11
7
1
17
23
1
2
3
Endocarditis,     1;     chorea,     1;
chicken-pox, 23; scarlet fever,
2;    mumps,    47;    whooping-
cough,  39; pneumonia,  1
Chicken-pox,  15; mumps,  37....
Well heated and ventilated
Poorly ventilated
Poor ventilation	
Excellent.
quate.
O.K.
cardiac, 1
Good	
Good	
Clean.
2
2
2
1
4
1
2
6
3
2
3
Measles;  chicken-pox;  smallpox;
mumps;  whooping-cough
Good	
vous,   1;  blepharitis,   10; cleft palate, 2; stammering, 1; anremia, 35;
cardiac,   1; pulmonary, 2
yngitis,     10;    enlarged    turbinates,
12; fatigue posture,  132
fever, 4 ;   mumps, 6;   measles,
2; chicken-pox, 34
Good	
Yes.
3
6
2
9
5
3
1
O.K	
0 K.
Pinkeye,     45;     diphtheria,     9 ;
mumps,  13; scarlet fever,  1;
chicken-pox,   4
Mumps,    1;   measles,    3;   diphtheria, 2; pinkeye, 3
O.K	
0 K.
O.K	
Building    not    overcrowded; ventilating    system    not
very   good;   heating     only     fairly
adequate  in   cold
weather
Brick building, good
repair; well ventilated and heated
D'espine, 2; partial cleft palate,  1
Bronchitis,  3; heart,  2; D'espine, 4;
3
sufficient;   they
are   kept   clean
and sanitary.
endocarditis,  1; lordosis,  1; narrow
chests, 2 U 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
.  O
> i
ft
H
6 g
r?4     (U
a
o
q
cu at
OS
at
u a
h to
£ a
la
ow
at
to
S§
o +>
ai et
OP3
n2
'3
a
tt
■<
tt
at Hi
ai22
■2 a
a o
HH
<p
at .d
OB
tt
a> „'
S3
at a
02
'3
O
Kaslo
108
770
284
297
22
159
139
607
73
568
178
839
809
512
140
436
341
166
104
214
365
483
304
63
23
297
299
406
187
71
907
322
59
445
561
383
292
102
770
284
277
22
159
137
606
73
551
173
839
809
512
140
436
334
104
102
207
348
471
298
59
21
291
294
365
138
69
907
322
59
478
593
346
323
1
25
8
1
2
6
6
97
6
2
1
9
1
1
3
2
3
3
7
64
27
10
1
16
16
49
3
44
18
19
19
9
2
8
16
2
5
2
2
1
1
7
1
1
1
2
3
1
3
5
1
11
76
8
6
2
17
11
51
10
5
2
8
16
8
4
8
34
	
11
76
8
6
2
17
11
51
10
4
2
121
125
95
30
77
65
12
6
5
27
63
41
12
2
3
12
23
11
6
20
11
3
3
36
65
94
68
2
19
10
50
6
96
29
156
167
113
34
96
134
48
36
25
52
179
117
23
6
17
27
45
31
14
10
16
4
36
48
10
11
38
686
93
99
2
42
17
250
10
335
106
	
119
36
12
21
162
94
66
6
3
25
18
122
31
210
64
10
137
124
40
59
6
64
57
3
23
7
31
29
4
2
192
192
133
34
85
7
3
10
107
74
18
i
	
	
7
3
8
12
1
14
1
2
76
W. J. Knox	
Miss F. Lyne	
Miss H.  Peters—
93
Ladysmith:
H. B. Maxwell     . ..
G.  H.  Tutill	
8
10
Nanaimo:
Middle Ward	
W. F. Drysdale ....
W. F. Drysdale   ...
W. F. Drysdale	
W. F. Drysdale  ...
W. F. Drysdale
E. C. Arthur	
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
3
8
77
1
Nelson:
146
30
New Westminster:
D.  A.   Clark	
Miss A.  Stark
Miss A. Stark
Miss A. Stark	
Miss A. Stark     . .
Miss A. Stark	
Miss M. E. Grierson
103
98
75
23
44
27
2
1
3
11
115
95
6
5
	
4
5
140
26
2
79
122
60
66
2
4
1
83
72
63
11
44
43
D.   A.   Clark	
Richard McBride	
D.  A.   Clark	
Herbert  Spencer	
D.   A.   Clark	
A.  R.  Wilson	
Port Coquitlam:
4
2
4
25
22
1
1
1
1
6
17
103
65
24
3
12
7
7
24
1
80
32
8
17
9
2
3
7
13
6
3
3
16
12
2
2
2
1
2
e
27
25
30
3
	
3
12
3
3
26
11
3
Prince Rupert:
Booth  Memorial	
12
2
Revelstoke:
Rossland:
14
5
206
31
5
12
25
10
7
Trail-Tadanac:
F S Eaton	
Vancouver:
H. White	
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss D. Shields
Miss F. Innes	
Miss I. Smith	
W. Dykes	
|
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 37
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
{Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
6
i
it
o
&
ta
n
tH
rH
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Ana?mia, 1; paralysis, 1	
Nervous, 16; cardiac, 6; pulmonary, 28
T.B., 3; bronchial catarrh, 25; cho
rea, 16; curvature of spino1—posture,  11; flat feet,  5
Orthopaedic, 14; cardiac, 5; anaemia..
3; hernia,  1
Appendicitis, 1; nervous, 1; cardiac,
1; pulmonary, 1; blepharitis, 2
conjunctivitis,  2; hip-disease,  2
Blepharitis,  3; nervous,   1	
Erysipelas, 1; eczema, 1; asthma, 2;
cardiac, 3; pulmonary, 2; nervous,
1; blepharitis, 3; conjunctivitis, 8;
fractures,   3
Eczema,   1; nervous,  1; blepharitis,   1
Cardiac, 1; nervous, 1; leg paralysis, 1
Orthopaedic, 14; cardiac, 13; anEemic,
2; nervous, 2; pulmonary,  1
Orthopaedic,  19; cardiac, 14; anaemic,
3 ; nervous, 3 ; pulmonary, 4
Orthopaedic, 7; cardiac, 4; anaemic, 3;
nervous,  1; pulmonary,  1
Orthopaedic,   4;   cardiac,   2;   anaemic,
2; pulmonary,   1
Orthopaedic,   11;  cardiac,   6;  anaemic,
2; nervous, 2
Pulmonary,  1; cardiac,  2; renal,  1....
Cardiac,   9   	
Cai'diac,   6   	
Cardiac, 2; mumps, 6; infantile paralysis, 2; measles, 24; chicken-pox, 10
Blepharitis,   15   	
Heart. 32; pulmonary, 4; orthopaedic,
4; kidney,  2; anemia,  12
Heart, 15; kidney, 2; pulmonary, 9;
anaemia,  4; orthopedic,  7
Heart,   1	
Nervous,  2; heart,   1; orthopaedic,   1.
Cardiac,   6;  nervous,   2	
Orthopaedic,  1; cardiac,  2..
Cardiac,  1; blepharitis,  1..
Cardiac, 4; nervous, 5; pulmonary, 2..
Cardiac, 8; chorea, 2; plant-poisoning,
12;  eczema,  8
Cardiac, 1	
No.  vaccinated,  200; cardiac,  1; pulmonary, 1
No.   vaccinated,   224;  pulmonary,   1..
No. vaccinated, 170; cardiac, 1	
No.  vaccinated,   129..
2
4
I
I
I
Typhoid fever, 1; measles, 56:
mumps, 6 0; whooping-cough.
22; pinkeye,   18
Slight epidemic of measles..
Mumps, 9; measles, 1; chicken-
pox,   1
Mumps, 38; scarlet fever, 1;
measles, 30
Measles,    4 6;    chicken-pox,    5;
scarlet fever,  1; mumps, 4 6
Measles,    35;    chicken-pox,    3;
mumps, 118; scarlet fever, 5
Mumps,  31; measles,  15; diphtheria,  1
Varicella; mumps..
Mumps, 97; diphtheria, 4;
scarlet-fever, 3; chicken-pox,
18; measles, 48; pertussis, 8
Scarlet fever, 1; measles, 27:
rubella, 29; mumps, 31; diphtheria, 3
Measles;   chicken-pox .
Measles;  chicken-pox .
Chicken-pox; measles .
Chicken-pox; measles .
Chicken-pox   	
Chicken-pox;   measles..
Mumps;   scarlet  fever..
Mumps;   scarlet  fever..
Mumps,    30	
Measles; mumps..
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps, 23;
chicken-pox,   6;   measles,   12
Mumps, 12; measles, 6; chicken-
pox, 2
Diphtheria, 1; measles, 22;
mumps, 24; chicken-pox, 1;
smallpox,   1;  poliomyelitis,   1
Chicken-pox,  2	
Scarlet fever, 3; measles, 15;
mumps, 8; whooping-cough,
10;  chicken-pox,   22
Diphtheria, 1; diphtheria carriers,   10; mumps,  1
Excellent; overcrowding being arranged for by new
building
Good	
Satisfactory..
Good	
Good	
Good	
Very good..
Good..
Rooms are crowded;
without forced ventilation, for which
building is piped
Building good, but
all rooms much
overcrowded, excepting Div. 2
Satisfactory..
Satisfactory..
Excellent	
Good..
Good-
Good..
Good-
Good..
Good..
Good-
Good	
Satisfactory-
Good	
Adequate..
Adequate..
Adequate..
Clean; well kept;
adequate; modern; sanitary.
Yes.
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Good.
Clean,
adequate
Clean;
Clean;
Good.
adequate
adequate
Clean,
adequate
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Clean ;
Clean;
adequate,
adequate. U 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
Pi  .
. o
5 a
f. at
ft
a  .
w tt
at
.~ a
8 J
to at
a
p
a
a
"c3
at t.
■3 §
OS
at
>
1 a
at,°
n  bi
lit
to
?%
'£'£
at at
*& u
OH
'3
a
02
t2
H
tt
11
a o
01
at r2
at ®
OH
tt
at „•
BO
'3
Vancouver—Continued.
Miss I. Smith	
Miss E. Bell	
103
448
952
293
462
780
688
239
463
401
586
766
461
16
866
553
704
539
310
444
459
594
73
359
797
363
480
743
692
199
405
466
565
691
478
51
773
486
729
598
274
443
436
537
i
10
55
241
23
'65
152
126
62
167
71
83
117
51
2
143
88
43
38
39
26
78
23
i
i
3
3
3
49
1
2
2
11
24
9
1
1
1
2
6
5
2
19
51
2
10
5
15
17
25
12
7
3
4
2
29
7
4
2
2
4
9
9
8
92
92
21
73
84
72
27
54
48
72
36
68
14
116
50
46
40
30
23
57
49
7
100
162
77
113
157
113
48
112
96
71
70
87
8
117
101
80
85
53
41
57
121
1
10
13
5
12
5
1
4
5
10
14
6
1
1
25
6
13
13
5
7
12
2
4
5
23
20
47
19
13
Miss E. Edwards...
Miss M. Ewart	
Miss V. Stevens-
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss D. Shields-
Miss D. Olmstead..
Miss D. Olmstead..
9
58
32
H  White	
33
44
10
1	
8
16
22
24
44
7
26
5
26
26
o
16
17
26
2
4
2
2
3
5
4
2
1
1
6
1
7
9
FL White	
10
Miss L. Drysdale....
Miss F. Innes	
Miss 0. Kilpatrick.
34
15
H. White	
18
Grenfell
H. White	
6
H. White	
13
W. Dykes	
16
W- Dykes	
Miss G. Jeeves	
Miss G. Jeeves
Miss F. Innes	
Miss G- Jeeves
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss M. Ewart	
23
W. Dykes	
27
W. Dykes	
8
W. Dykes	
8
8
W. Dykes	
17 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 39
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
d
s
fl
0)
s
a
3
ft
3
o
a
"
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
No.   vaccinated,   26-
No. vaccinated, 100; cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 2
No.  vaccinated,  229; cardiac,   6	
No. vaccinated,  121; cardiac,  8-
No. vaccinated,  311; cardiac, 4..
No.  vaccinated,  221; cardiac,  3; pulmonary, 3
No.   vaccinated,   309;  cardiac,   1.,
No.   vaccinated,   44;  cardiac,   3..
No.  vaccinated,   111;  cardiac,   1..
No. vaccinated,  207; pulmonary, 2..
No.   vaccinated,   298; cardiac,  8-
No. vaccinated,  334; pulmonary,  1—
No. vaccinated,  189; pulmonary,  2_.
No.   vaccinated,   38   	
No. vaccinated,  332; cardiac,  2; pulmonary,   8
No.  vaccinated,  269; cardiac,  3; pulmonary,   3
No.  vaccinated,  34 6; cardiac, 4; pulmonary,  3
No. vaccinated, 191; cardiac, 9; pulmonary, 3
No.  vaccinated,  193	
No.  vaccinated,  192; cardiac,  1; pulmonary. 1
No.  vaccinated,  216; cardiac,  1; pulmonary,   2
No. vaccinated, 247; cardiac, 3; pulmonary, 2
Scarlet fever, 2 ; chicken-pox, 4 ;
measles, 7; mumps, 1; smallpox, 1; whooping-cough, 2;
diphtheria,  1
Diphtheria, 5; diphtheria carriers, 3; measles, 30; mumps,
119; chicken-pox,  4
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 3;
measles, 23; diphtheria carriers, 1; rubella, 1; mumps,
69; chicken-pox, 1; smallpox,   1
Diphtheria, 20; diphtheria carriers, 4; measles, 53; rubella,
1;  mumps,   12
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 6;
measles, 4; diphtheria carriers, 5; mumps, 42; chicken-
pox, 4
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 1;
measles, 25; diphtheria carriers, 1; mumps, 86; whooping-cough, 8; chicken-pox, 3;
smallpox,   1
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 2;
measles, 34; mumps, 1; smallpox, 2
Measles, 18; mumps, 5; rubella,  1
Diphtheria, 11; measles, 18;
diphtheria carriers, 14; rubella, 2; mumps, 34; chicken-
pox, 8; smallpox, 2
Scarlet fever, 1; measles, 22;
diphtheria, 4; diphtheria carriers, 3, rubella, 1; mumps,
53; chicken-pox, 1; smallpox,  1
Scarlet fever, 1; measles, 28;
■diphtheria, 24; diphtheria
carriers, 25; mumps. 21;
chicken-pox,   34;   smallpox, 6
Scarlet fever, 3; measles, 5;
diphtheria, 7; diphtheria carriers, 6; mumps, 12; chicken-
pox,   70
Scarlet fever, 2; measles, 22;
diphtheria, 5; diphtheria carriers, 1; mumps, 1; whooping-cough, 2; chicken-pox, 73
Measles,   1	
Scarlet fever, 4; measles, 18;
diphtheria, 10; diphtheria carriers, 8; rubella, 1; mumps,
7; chicken-pox, 49; whooping-cough,  1; smallpox, 2
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 1;
measles, 6; mumps, 11;
whooping-cough,    3;   chicken-
.  pox, 10
Scarlet fever, 3; mumps, 88;
measles, 59; whooping-cough,
2; chicken-pox, 28; smallpox,   1
Scarlet feyer, 1; mumps, 17;
measles,  25; chicken-pox,  17
Scarlet fever, 2; mumps, 21;
measles,  3; chicken-pox, 2
Scarlet fever, 2; measles, 6;
diphtheria, 1; diphtheria carriers, 2; mumps, 10; chicken-
pox,   15
Scarlet fever, 3; diphtheria, 2;
diphtheria carriers, 2; measles, 3 7 ; mumps, 7; whoop
ing-cough, 1; chicken-pox, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 4
measles, 11; rubella, 1; chicken-pox,  3; mumps,  110 U 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
2? H
oa
ot>
OK
11
a o
KH
at
t>
o A
at Jj
tit at
at q,
Oh
tt
a> .2
t. tt
at  fl
aS
HO
24
61
11
98
81
6
31
98
' 4
48
112
5
63
122
9
84
95
10
111
147
7
39
162
12
52
108
11
110
144
10
8
11
5
7
19
8
17
33
3
33
81
14
13
21
2
10
72
3
41
100
3
52
166
7
51
130
199
151
21
43
68
111
117
3
105
237
11
Vancouver—Continued.
Magee	
Moberley and Annex..
Model	
Mount Pleasant	
McBride	
Macdonald	
Mackenzie	
Nelson	
Florence Nightingale..
NorQuay and Annex...
Oak Street	
Open Air	
Prince of Wales,	
Queen Mary	
Quilchena	
Renfrew	
Cecil Rhodes	
Lord Roberts	
Laura Secord	
Lord Selkirk	
Sexsmith -
Seymour	
Strathcona	
W. Dykes..
G. Lamont..
G. Lamont..
G. Lamont..
G. Lamont..
W. Dykes  Miss M. Ewart
Miss M. Ewart..
Miss D. Olmstead..
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss D. Olmstead..
Mrs. Schultz	
Miss E. Bell-
Miss I. Smith..
Miss D. Shields..
Miss E. Edwards...
H. White  Miss D. Shields..
W. Dykes  Miss M. Ewart...
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes....
G. Lamont..
II. White..
II. White-
Miss G. Jeeves..
Miss M. Ewart..
Miss I. Smith-
Mrs. Bellamy...
Miss H. Jukes..
Miss O. Kilpatrick
Miss E. Edwards...
Miss E. Bell-
Miss O. Kilpatrick.
Miss M. McLellan.
534
529
025
676
395
511
604
527
106
95
142
180
105
623
54
355
681
295| 215
300 329
579
850
889
1232
510
755
630
351
98
157
193
74
156
24
29
05
38
34
11
33
13
14
29
•I   4
70
13
30
44
22
2
15
19
43 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
TJ 41
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate-
No.  vaccinated,  221; cardiac,  5; pulmonary,  2
No. vaccinated,  90; cardiac,  2..
No. vaccinated, 304	
No. vaccinated,  285; pulmonary,  1.,
No. vaccinated, 97; cardiac, 3..
No.  vaccinated,  277; cardiac,  2; pulmonary, 1
No. vaccinated,  191; cardiac,  2..
No. vaccinated, 354; pulmonary, 2..
No.  vaccinated,
No. vaccinated,  156; cardiac,  2..
No.   vaccinated,   55;  cardiac,   1;  pulmonary,   1
No. vaccinated,  21; pulmonary,  6	
No. vaccinated, 144; cardiac, 37	
No. vaccinated, 242; cardiac, 9-
No. vaccinated,  86; cardiac,  5..
No.   vaccinated,   134 ,
No.  vaccinated,  281	
No. vaccinated, 448; cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 2
No.  vaccinated,  250; pulmonary, 4..
No.  vaccinated,  151; cardiac, 4..
No. vaccinated, 168; cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 1
No. vaccinated,  544; cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 2
No. vaccinated,  1,096; pulmonary,  2
Diphtheria, 1; measles, 101
mumps, 57; whooping-cough
12; chicken-pox, 2; small
pox, 2
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 4
measles, 25; whooping-cough
2; mumps, 6; chicken-pox, 3
smallpox,   18
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 1
measles, 32; chicken-pox, 3
mumps,  73
Scarlet fever, 3; diphtheria, 4
diphtheria carriers, 1; measles, 37; mumps, 10; chicken-
pox, 7; smallpox, 6
Diphtheria, 6; diphtheria carriers, 2; measles, 35; mumps,
37; whooping-cough, 2; smallpox,  1
Diphtheria, 1; diphtheria carriers, 4; measles, 6; mumps,
45; chicken-pox, 9; smallpox,
5
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 4;
diphtheria carriers, 2; measles, 76; mumps, 27; whooping-cough, 2; chicken-pox, 33
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 5;
measles, 47; whooping-cough,
5; rubella, 1; mumps, 5;
chicken-pox, 33; smallpox, 4;
poliomyelitis,   1
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 2;
diphtheria carriers, 2; measles, 13; mumps, 3; chicken-
pox,  1
Diphtheria,   14;  diphtheria  carriers,  10; mumps,  54; meas
les,     75;    chicken-pox,    28
small-pox,  4
Measles, 20; mumps, 9; chicken-
pox,  4
Diphtheria, 1; measles, 25;
mumps, 8 ; whooping-cough, 2 ;
chicken-pox, 36
Scarlet fever, 3 ; diphtheria, 1;
measles, 4 ; mumps, 2; chicken-pox,   32
Scarlet fever, 4; measles, .40;
mumps, 3; chicken-pox, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 8;
diphtheria carriers, 10; measles, 2 ; whooping-cough, 14;
chicken-pox,  3
Scarlet fever, 2; mumps, 22;
chicken-pox, 19 ; smallpox, 3
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 1;
measles, 24; mumps, 132;
chicken-pox, 17; poliomyelitis,  1
Diphtheria, 7; diphtheria carriers, 1; measles, 26; mumps,
1; chicken-pox, 10; smallpox,   7
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 9;
diphtheria carriers, 2; measles, 49; mumps, 24; chicken-
pox, 40; smallpox, 3
Diphtheria, 2; diphtheria carriers, 1; mumps, 69; measles, 62; chicken-pox, 5; smallpox, 5
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 9;
diphtheria carriers, 4; measles, 11; mumps, 30; chicken-
pox, 24; smallpox, 2
Diphtheria, 12; diphtheria carriers, 5; measles, 33; mumps,
73; chicken-pox, 13; poliomyelitis,  1 U 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
fit*
OK
■3 fl
s o
HH
Vancouver—Continued.
Teeumseh	
Tennyson	
Van Home	
Wolfe	
Vancouver, North:
Lonsdale	
Queen Mary	
Ridgeway	
Vernon:
Central	
Victoria:
Bank Street	
Beacon Hill	
Boys' Central	
Burnside	
Sir James Douglas....
George Jay	
Girls' Central	
Margaret Jenkins	
King's Road	
Kingston Street	
North Ward	
Oaklands	
Quadra Street	
Quadra Primary	
Railway Street	
South Park	
Spring Ridge	
Victoria West	
G. Lamont	
I* White	
G. Lamont	
G. Lamont	
H. Dyer	
II. Dyer	
H. Dyer	
H. G. Williams.
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
Miss D. Olmstead.
Mrs. Bellamy	
Miss E. Bell	
Miss E. Bell	
Miss E. Lowther..
Miss E. Lowther..
Miss E. Lowther..
Mrs. S. Martin....
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams-
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss I. E. Adams-
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss C
Miss I.
Miss C.
Miss C.
Miss C.
Miss C.
Miss C
Miss I.
Miss I.
Mowbray.. .
E. Adams..
Mowbray...
Mowbray...
Mowbray...
Mowbray...
Mowbray...
E. Adams..
E. Adams..
417
634
407
492
Miss I. E. Adams..
153
367
229
455
47S
350
332
44
152
377
542
250
219
47
322
158
318
418
501
153
367
229
455
476
350
44
152
377
542
250
219
47
322
158
84
130
34
39
19
71
49
72
120
128
90
115
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Burnaby:
48
36
237
207
630
713
22
187
43
36
228
197
608
673
22
182
1
1
3
24
21
77
79
1
17
21
23
122
92
311
335
11
87
6
1
41
27
71
91
1
21
1
Capitol Hill	
1
6
6
15
27
1
9
1
3
2
7
5
11
12
8
10
17
18
5
2
1
1
1
Hamilton Kyad	
1
"i
4
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 43
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
a
1
cd
u
m
d
a
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Diphtheria,    5;   diphtheria   carriers, 6; measles, 21; mumps,
42; chicken-pox, 19
Scarlet fever,   1; diphtheria,   7;
diphtheria   carriers,   3;  measles,   32;  rubella,   1;  mumps,
40; whooping-cough, 1; chicken-pox,   5
Diphtheria,   17; diphtheria  carriers,  18; mumps,  16; measles, 41; chicken-pox, 1
Scarlet fever,   1;  diphtheria,   2;
diphtheria  carriers,   3;   measles,   6 5 ;  rubella,   1; mumps,
27;   chicken-pox,    7;   smallpox,  2
Smallpox,   22;  whooping-cough,
5; measles,  46; mumps,  20
Smallpox,   12;   whooping-cough,
3; measles,   35; mumps,   30;
chicken-pox,   3
Smallpox,    2;   chicken-pox,    4;
measles, 5; mumps, 13
Pneumonia,   9;  whooping-cough,
28;   mumps,    138;   chicken-
pox,  3; scarlet fever,   6; rubella, 24; influenza, 10
Chicken-pox, 1; mumps, 6; scarlet fever, 1; measles, 4
Mumps,    9;    scarlet   fever,    1;
measles,   18
Mumps, 15; measles, 3; whooping-cough,  3
Measles,  4; mumps,   15; scarlet
fever,   1; smallpox,   3
Chicken-pox,   42;   mumps,   45;
measles, 11
Mumps, 20; measles, 6; scarlet
fever,   1; chicken-pox,   1
Chicken-pox,    3;    mumps,    23;
diphtheria,     1;    measles,    4 ;
scarlet fever,   1
Chicken-pox,   1;  diphtheria,   1;
mumps, 7; measles, 4
monary,  1
No. vaccinated,  386; cardiac,  2; pulmonary,   1
Cardiac, 14; nervous, 2; respiratory, 6
Cardiac,  20; nervous, 4; respiratory,
5; orthopaedic, 1
Cardiac,   13;  nervous,   1;  respiratory,
4; orthopaedic,  2
Cleft palate,  1; asthma,  1; stammering,  2; cardiac,  2
2
3
6
2
2
1
2
4
4
1
2
3
1
8
11
10
17
11
15
5
i
7
2
20
14
5
4
10
Good	
Good.
Good	
1
Good	
Good	
Good	
3
Good	
Good	
Good	
4
5
9
8
4
3
5
Scarlet   fever,   1;   measles,   15;
mumps, 26; chicken-pox, 1
Measles, 98; mumps, 34; scarlet
fever,  1
Measles,    5;   scarlet   fever,    1;
diphtheria,  1; smallpox, 1
Measles,   30;   scarlet   fever,   1;
mumps, 50; chicken-pox, 1
psedic,  1
Good	
Adequate.
Adequate.
1
3
10
10
1
1
2
Mumps,   19; measles,  8; scarlet
fever,   2; chicken-pox,   1
Mumps,    20;   scarlet   fever,    4;
measles,  43; diphtheria,  1
Adequate.
SCHOOLS.
Corrected   vision,   1	
Good	
Yes.
Orthopaedic, 1; corrected vision, 2....
1
Good	
Orthopaedic, 1; corrected vision, 4	
1
Good	
Good 	
Yes.
Heart, 1; orthopaedic, 1; stammer, 1;
5
2
2
1
1
Good	
corrected vision, 26
Good               	
Good	
Yes.
rected vision, 3 U 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
1
'3.
■  . o
•?*
*H  at
'a
f, at
c
o
'a
o"eS
Sa
at 01
oa
*
at .2
fit*
02    .
■i, oi
2n a
£ a
a> at
OK
d
to
si
S3
O  HI
at at
at f.
on
.-a
'S
a
0J
■a
H
Is
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at
tr
at 2i
at m
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H ti
at a
ai.
BO
ai
'o
Burnaby—Continued.
Kingsway, West	
608
283
453
91
36
89
28
120
47
249
99
23
68
83
56
17
84
27
158
194
15
214
55
51
16
85
29
40
72
20
125
9
160
33
17
13
19
27
274
25
16
62
52
24
26
531
157
34
52
32
72
23
39
22
86
138
66
109
121
65
20
583
266
431
89
34
88
28
115
44
236
99
22
68
83
56
17
84
27
157
193
15
212
55
51
15
82
28
33
65
19
116
9
156
33
17
13
15
24
248
20
13
52
50
20
26
531
140
33
50
30
64
23
26
22
81
129
66
90
120
64
19
4
i
11
12
12
5
1
8
1
1
1
n
5
12
1
1
3
1
14
9
19
1
1
1
2
53
28
61
•  4
6
13
5
12
4
25
33
9
6
10
3
4
31
12
19
30
8
24
9
5
4
6
3
2
14
299
140
199
37
18
52
14
67
25
111
16
3
7
12
12
3
4
8
16
39
4
45
12
9
2
6
2
4
3
22
2
60
15
7
3
5
13
15
8
6
8
11
2
10
81
15
5
14
6
10
72
40
53
7
17
1
15
3
39
1
2
1
15
4
10
Schou Street	
1
1
3
1
4
7
Sperling Avenue	
1
3
20
4
3
2
2
15
7
10
16
5
15
3
2
2
1
2
1
2
7
10
24
7
4
7
4
2
21
9
12
22
5
19
4
4
2
6
3
2
3
4
7
6
3
Chilliwack:
Atchelitz	
Camp Slough	
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson	
W. E. Henderson	
W. E. Henderson
W. E. Henderson	
Miss W. Green
Miss \V. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss \V. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss "W. Green
Miss W. Green	
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss AV. g-reen
3
1
2
8
2
2
2
4
2
9
2
2
3
1
2
5
2
3
2
2
8
6
1
1
1
2
12
1
2
1
2
1
Fairfield Island	
Mennonite	
5
1
2
2
3
14
4
2
7
3
3
2
3
6
Coldstream:
Coldstream	
Lavington	
Coquitlam:
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
16
5
3
S. G. Baldwin	
2
Maillardville	
3
1
16
1
Cowichan, North:
H. B. Rogers	
Miss A. Xates	
Miss A. Yates	
Miss A. Yates	
11
4
11
11
2
1
o
1
6
3
3
3
3
1
11
25
80
19
5
9
1
1
5
4
6
22
4
4
5
7
1
12
31
80
19
1
59
9
6
8
4
10
53
5
5
98
18
2
16
85
80
19
o
3
5
1
2
1
1
3
1
Delta:
2
2
3
7
2
1
12
1
2
11
3
1
3
1
5
8
2
10
3
o
1
11
5
3
1
3
4
10
2
1
1
3
2
2
3
1
15
1
6
17
2
1
2
6
2
Esquimalt:
J. S. McCallum
Miss E. Morrison...
4
Kent:
26
5
3
Langley:
Belmont	
	
1
1
2
Glen Valley	
1
Glenwood	
6
o
13
23
11
15
18
11
2
B. B. Marr
2
o
3
9
9
4
9
10
10
3
2
B. B   Marr     .
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
Otter	
1
o
Otter, South	
B. B. Marr     	 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 45
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
1
OJ
>
2
6
at
ft
a
tt
U
3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
1
Good	
Yes.
1
4
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
1
Good	
Yes,
4
Yes.
2
Good	
Good	
Yes.
3
1
Good	
Yes.
3
i
Mumps, 4; measles,  1; chicken-
pox,  19
Good	
Good	
Good.
Pulmonary, 1; orthopaedic, 1	
3
1
1
1
i
i
Mumps,  2; chicken-pox,  4	
Mumps,  2; chicken-pox,   12
Good	
Good.
Good	
Fair.
Septic  throats,   2	
Good	
Good.
4
3
3
4
1
1
Good	
Good.
Pulmonary,  2 ; corrected vision,  1
4
Good.
16
2
Good	
Good.
Fair;  ventilation
poor
Good
Good.
Nervous,   1;  stammering,  1;  corrected
vision, 1
3
2
2
1
1
1
Mumps,  2;  chicken-pox,   3	
Fair	
Fair.
Good	
2
1
Mumps,   36   	
One room crowded...
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
1
	
New school building..
Clean;  adequate.
impediment,   1
2
Mumps,     IS;     diphtheria,     2;
chicken-pox,   1
disease of heart,  1; pigeon-chest,  1
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
1
Satisfactory	
Good     repair;     not
crowded;     poorly
heated
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
No drinking-water
Good	
Cardiac,  9; nervous,  1; pulmonary,  1
1
3
Measles,    2;   mumps,    2;   varicella,   1
Clean;  adequate.
1
2
2
German   measles,   1   	
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Good	
Good.
Meningitis,    1;    mumps,     105;
measles,  32
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
3
6
Good.
Good	
Good.
1
4
3
Good	
Good.
Cardiac,    3;    infantile    paralysis,    1;
kyphosis,  1; diabetic,  1
Mumps,   20;   measles,   12;   epidemic catarrhal cold, 200
Good	
Good.
Good.
Good	
to flush toilets.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Mumps, 4 	
Good	
Good	
Good;  poor  ventilation
Good	
Good...	
Good;  east room
dark
Good	
Eight; flush.
Eight;  flush.
1 U 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
'S
■SJJ
. o
;z;g
ft
s   .
nttl
6 g
to at
ri
a
s
eg
02
'•§ s
at .n
fit*
01
■" %!
a> H
at at
OK
at
to
* .5
+33
at at
oa
'3
a
ti
Ti
13   .A
baS
Is
WH
at
O   n
ft
Oh
tt
M A
In -u
03 fl
= .2
B9
ai
'o
O
Langley—Continued.
B. B. Marr	
35
33
1
1
1
2
3
2
8
6
9
5
3
8
4
1
4
3
28
18
123
11
4
11
5
7
35
54
10
104
46
57
37
2
3
10
1
34
54
23
9
16
13
33
4
3
31
6
11
31
73
87
5
6
4
7
4
7
3
3
13
3
1
B. B. Marr	
38       37
B. B. Marr	
23
47
67
05
32
21
151
60
32
42
54
03
42
374
25
18
31
11
11
318
276
06
617
133
435
503
32
23
114
17
155
261
102
49
09
70
145
80
36
88
36
57
107
288
299
18
43
05
03
31
19
137
56
32
39
54
59
40
361
19
17
30
10
10
293
258
64
617
125
409
450
25
19
109
13
141
253
93
45
67
66
137
83
37
80
32
49
100
2S2
286
Matsqui:
R. H. Port	
0
6
1
1
o
R. H. Port	
1
•
1
R. H. Port	
1
1
1
2
R. H. Port	
1
R. H. Port	
1
3
6
1
4
1
9
3
89
3
5
1
1
1
R. H. Port  	
14
R. H. Port	
2
1
2
R. H. Port	
R. H. Port	
5
5
10
11
65
6
4
9
1
4
21
16
6
100
78
27
81
15
6
50
8
1
9
3
3
4
1
36
57
1
10
10
8
48
3
1
1
1
3
6
1
1
1
3
3
17
2
3
2
1
10
7
111
8
2
7
5
7
21
18
,     1
3
10
7
111
11
2
7
5
7
12
15
1
60
4
25
30
6
5
Mission:
AV. H. Mclntyre	
W. H. Mclntyre	
AV. H. Mclntyre	
2
4
4
1
5
2
3
17
9
6
34
25
15"
9
29
8
3
7
Oak Bay:
J. N. Taylor    	
Miss Bradshaw
14
Peachland:
52
62
29
9
3
Penticton:
25
12
Pitt Meadows:
Richmond:
AV. K. Hall	
10
10
1
2
AV. K. Hall	
AV. K. Hall	
2
2
1
7
9
3
3
2
1
6
6
10
4
49
89
24
4
9
25
59
5
8
19
8
18
22
103
92
5
1
1
10
1
36
72
20
13
15
23
36
5
Trites	
AV. K. Hall	
Saanich:
Cedar Hill	
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden    ....
Miss E. Naden	
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
1
11
2
2
2
7
3
17
7
1
11
2
6
3
0
7
12
27
4
5
18
3
2
1
Gordon Head	
D. Berman	
D. Berman	
Keating	
4
3
2
Lake Hill	
D. Berman	
1
18
Model School	
J. P. Vye	
D. Berman	
Miss M. Harvey	
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden.
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Prospect Lake	
3
1
2
3
1
2
13
2
2
2
3
4
16
20
15
21
7
14
30
62
71
8
15
4
4
20
31
29
Royal Oak	
D. Berman	
4
2
4
6
2
7
5
1
11
10
4
Saanichton	
D. Berman.	
1
Strawberry Vale	
D. Berman	
3
5
3
1
Tolmie	 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 47
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
.9
CD
03
a
d
!
a
3
8
bn
fl
3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Two;
Two;
Two;
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Clean
Clean
Clean
Clean
Yes.
O.K.
O.K.
O.K.
O.K.
O.K.
O.K.
earth; poor,
earth; poor.
Chicken-pox,  10; mumps,  4
Good	
5
4
i
2
6
V.D.H.,  1  	
Measles;  mumps; whooping-
cough
Measles; mumps;  whooping-
cough
AA'ell   heated   and
ventilated
ATell   heated   and
ventilated
adequate,
adequate.
adequate,
adequate.
4; pulmonary,  4; nervous,  3
2
1; cardiac,  1; orthopaedic, 1
16
37
Measles,     188;    mumps,    204;
chicken-pox, 22
Measles,  4 ; mumps, 2 ; chicken-
pox,   1;   whooping-cough,   3;
infanile paralysis, 1
Measles,  3; mumps,  1; chicken-
pox, 9; smallpox, 2
Fair; rather crowded
Measles,   15   	
Cardiac, 2 ; scoliosis, 1; conjunctivitis, 3
1
4
3
5
Mumps, 45; scarlet fever, 3	
Smallpox,   5;   scarlet   fever,   8;
mumps,     84;    measles,     12;
whooping-cough,   1;   diphtheria,   5; chicken-pox,   14
Scarlet  fever,   1;   measles,   21;
mumps,   2;  chicken-pox,   6
Mumps, 2; whooping-cough, 4..
Cardiac, 8; pulmonary, 6; scoliosis, 4;
Good.
Impro
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
No con
sarj
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
■
stammering,  1; conjunctivitis, 8
Cardiac, 1; umbilical hernia,  1	
 5
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
Greatly improved	
Good	
perly located.
Cardiac, 2; scoliosis, 1; umbilical her
nia,  1
scoliosis,  2; strabismus,   1
Congenital lues, 2; pulmonary, 2; car
Measles, 2; mumps, 2; chicken-
pox,  2
diac, 7; scoliosis, 3; cong. dislocation of hips, 1; umbilical hernia, 2
No comment necessary
mient neces-
1
2
osis,  1; stammering,  1
Scarlet fever, 4; mumps, 1	
Scarlet   fever,    1;   measles,    7;
mumps,  1
Chicken-pox,   21; measles,   1....
Chicken-pox,    1;   measles,    13;
mumps, 2
Measles,   47;   mumps,   21;  rubella,   1
Chicken-pox, 2; measles, 27; rubella,  2; mumps,  59
umbilical hernia,   1
3
1
1
1; strabismus,   1; xeroderma,  1
Somewhat overcrowded
Good	
Pulmonary, 9 ; cardiac, 14; strabismus,
3
2
1
4
4
4 ;  nervous,   1; blepharitis,   1; umbilical hernia,   1;  conjunctivitis 3
Cardiac,   12;  anaemia,   1;  pulmonary,
5 ; inflam. rheumatism,  1; epilepsy,
1; scoliosis,  5 ; strabismus,  3 ; umbilical hernia,  3; conjunctivitis, 2
Good	 U 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
rH     .
ft
fl   .
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to S
ri
o
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3
fl
It
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as
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u a
ot .ES
0>
If
||
BK
:2
at Oh
S a
'££
ot +J
"cB SI
oa
<3
'3
c
tt
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at .2
oo2S
il
IS
P
" .fl'
at 5n
"S! QJ
OS
tt
at m
Si
fl.2
BC5
ai
*o
C5
Salmon Arm:
S. E. Beech	
31
70
20
27
24
35
33
36
21
306
17
87
224
26
36
25
28
88
23
55
41
46
119
65
41
47
26
52
161
179
37
122
111
287
200
43
7
60
340
380
23
55
20
24
10
33
33
34
19
262
16
80
206
25
35
21
28
82
23
38
40
39
111
51
39
45
22
51
150
161
35
90
91
257
160
35
7
49
323
311
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
3
2
5
2
42
2
1
4
4
5
5
2
5
2
44
2
13
6
5
7
8
8
8
2
75
3
6
18
3
3
1
2
5
3
5
4
1
9
6
4
5
4
9
3
21
4
16
5
10
4
8
10
6
2
129
1
3
2
2
3
2
3
69
1
8
3
1
3
4
4
2
7
5
2
23
1
2
1
1
6
5
1
2
87
2
1
2
2
1
16
i
i
6
1
4
Salmon Arm, AVest...
Sumas:
Summerland:
Surrey:
4
11
2
2
6
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
2
4
F. D. Sinclair	
1
2
3
2
3
4
4
3
4
6
1
'    2
2
5
13
1
2
3
2
1
F. D. Sinclair	
5
1
2
6
8
F. D. Sinclair	
F. D. Sinclair	
1
2
2
1
4
2
2
4
F. D. Sinclair	
2
1
1
5
3
4
10
14
41
25
7
4
25
146
122
2
1
7
5
3
1
8
6
17
11
1
8
3
8
9
1
1
13
46
45
F. D. Sinclair	
o
2
3
2
F. D. Sinclair	
F. D. Sinclair	
F. D. Sinclair	
5
F. I). Sinclair	
	
	
2
1
4
1
1
10
4
2
5
3
15
9
2
1
1
2
5
4
1
1
5
F. D. Sinclair	
F. D. Sinclair	
Vancouver, North:
R. V. McCarley	
2
1
2
2
8
8
10
14
3
6
8
12
10
3
10
10
27
24
2
2
1
7
4
R. Y. McCarley	
R. V. McCarley	
R. AT. McCarley	
Vancouver, AVest:
A. C. Nash	
A. C. Nash	
8
46
67
A. C. Nash	
2
5
3
5
1
2
1
1
RURAL AND
224
18
21
15
10
9
49
15
10
24
187
16
20
15
10
8
47
15
10
22
10
14
10
3
4
10
'3
2
34
3
8
24
10
6
6
33
15
1
1
7
It. W. Irving	
D. J. Barclay	
1
3
Miss H. Kelly
.
1
1
1
2
7
25
6
1
8
2
P. H. Stringer	
1
9
11
5
1
5
11
5
1
5
14
6
G. A. Charter	
4
2
1
1
11
2 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT. 1928-29.
U 49
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
ri
a
it
.0
ei
o
V2
d
ft
a
s
N
0
rk
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Crowded  and poorly
ventilated
i
Anaemia, 4; cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 1
Chicken-pox; measles; whooping-
cough
D.A.H.,  1 	
Inadequate	
Ana;mia,   1; chronic paralysis,   1;  en-
3
Good	
Strabismus,   1;   endocarditis,   1;  anae
mia,  1; bronchitis,  1
Room dark; painting
needed
Satisfactory;     room
dingy
Impediment in speech,  1; D.A.H.,  1;
defective palate,  1
2
Satisfactory	
Good	
Fair.
Endocarditis, 1; pigeon-chest, 1	
Fair.
Satisfactory ,
Good	
Fair.
toid operation, 1
1
Dark;   needs   painting
Impediment  in   speech,   1;  congenital
Filthy.
malformation,   1; D.A.H.,   1
Marginal blepharitis,  2; D.A.H.,  1....
ing
Satisfactory	
Inadequate	
Mumps;  measles;  poliomyelitis-
Spinal deformity,   1; thymus,   1; cleft
1
Satisfactory	
Good	
palate,  1; D.A.H., 2; strabismus, 1
Endocarditis,   1;  spinal  deformity,   1;
1
urinal.
defective palate,  1; bifid uvula,  1
Satisfactory.....	
Satisfactory	
5
8
6
15
10
2
3
1
Nervous,   1;   pulmonary,   1;   orthopae-
dic, 1
3
Smallpox; diphtheria; poliomyelitis; measles
Smallpox; measles; diphtheria....
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory ,
Satisfactory	
Good
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Both.
Scarlet fever;  mumps; measles..
Mumps; measles 	
Mumps; measles 	
Both.
3
2
Good
Both.
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
Epidemic of measles, mumps, and
varicella; scarlet fever, 1;
anterior poliomyelitis, 1;
epidemic  meningitis,   1
AVhooping-cough	
Good
1; strabismus, 1; asthma, 1; chronic
bronchitis,   2;   scoliosis,   1;   acute
tonsillitis,   1
Too small	
Poor ventilation and
hard to heat
Fair	
Lighting poor	
In good condition
Good	
3
Good.
1
	
Mumps, 3 	
	
	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Building not crowded ; heating and
ventilation fair
♦
good condition. U 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
p
. o
o £
ft
3    .
rHtl
at
«h a
11
ri
o
fl
?!
M
V
?§
% .tt
fit*
at   .
II
QJ   U
at ot
OK
§
to
at ti
> 5
'-3 la
CJ Hn
at at
QiS
3
'3
fl
tt
H
S o
CD
ll
OH
tt
at „.
S3
rt  fl
'r d
S3
6
.17
23
54
12
15
11
14
19
17
8
12
12
10
96
18
92
24
8
8
10
9
16
32
13
23
10
33
7
12
25
22
15
17
7
13
17
57
24
13
7
46
IS
10
.8
19
20
10
13
9
25
93
14
11
20
30
8
22
~6
21
20
10
12
17
12
19
20
23
145
15
10
17
21
50
7
11
9
14
16
16
8
11
12
8
94
18
85
24
8
8
19
9
16
32
13
22
7
33
7
12
21
18
15
17
7
13
15
57
23
13
7
42
18
2
8
19
18
9
13
8
14
80
11
10
20
30
8
21
6
1
3
9
1
7
4
5
5
15
1
3
1
i
1
2
1
1
1
4
3
4
R. B. White	
AV  H. Wood	
2
1
1
M  G. Archibald	
1
1
3
5
7
0
3
1
3
2
21
5
23
17
6
2
5
W. Scatchard	
5
4
4
3
1
24
3
7
16
2
3
2
4
2
8
1
9
2
4
1
3
1
1
13
o
1
1
3
3
1
Arrow Park, AVest	
1
31
3
1
2
2
2
H. AV. Keith	
F. E. Coy	
4
7
9
7
9
2
H. H. Boucher	
7
3
1
M. G. Archibald	
o
1
5
2
10
3
1
5
1
14
2
1
5
13
3
2
5
2
6
15
6
5
2
13
2
2
6
1
■ 4
0
2
4
Miss M. Claxton.—
2
2
1
1
3
1
3
4
4
2
1
5
o
H. A. Christie	
3
1
1
5
2
1
Beales Quarries	
G. E. Darby	
1
8
9
10
1
3
10
i
2
2
1
3
3
1
AV. H. AVood	
3
Beaver River	
1
3
J. H. Hamilton	
o
1
1
1
7
2
5
18
4
9
4
2
3
3
1
6
3
1
F. T. Stanier	
Miss M. Claxton....
M. G. Archibald	
 1	
2
'   1
2
6
4
9
4
J. T. Steele    	
/   3
3
3
1
3
1
2
1
10
1
1
3
1
3
1
11
5
2
57
3
5
1
2
2
3
1
9
2
7
4
2
2
7
5
28
9
2
N. J. Paul	
1
1
10
5
1
1
Blakeburn	
3
4
9
14
3
53
3
6
1
1
AV. Scatchard	
R. Elder	
2
1
1
1
T. H. Lougheed	
2
4
1
1
2
10
1
10
13
2
5
7
4
4
10
39
6
3
1
1
1
7
2
21
16
15
12
6
1
1
1
A. E. Kydd	
1
2
AV. H. AA7ood	
2
4
1
3
1
7
13
12
17
17
23
118
15
10
2
1
2
3
2
Miss M. Griffin
2
7
2
6
1
3
N. J. Paul
2
5
2
2
2
10
2
2
2
10
2
1
1
1
12
7
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 51
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Slight scoliosis, 1 	
Synovitis of knee,  1 .
Cardiac murmur, 1
Tuberculosis,  1 .
Bronchitis,  1 ...
Partial control, lower limbs, 1„
Cardiac, 2   ,	
Cardiac rheumatic,  1..
Chronic   appendicitis
Pulmonary  T.B.,   1.
Mitral regurgitation,   1 .
Deformed arm, 1..
Eczema,   1;  defective  speech  due to
harelip,   1
One inguinal hernia (female), requires
operation or at least
Cardiac,  1; eczema,  1..
Mumps; chicken-pox
Satisfactory..
Good.	
Good	
No	
Satisfactory..
Poor repair...
Satisfactory--
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
La grippe and  cough of whooping-cough nature
Mumps	
Scarlet   fever,   2   	
Influenza,   12
Good..
Good-
Good..
Good-
Clean.
Good.
Clean;
Fair.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Clean;
adequate.
idequate.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good spacing; heating adequate but
very dry; ventilation poor
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Good..
Satisfactory..
Good.
Good.
Clean.
Chicken-pox; mumps .
Minimum cubic space
No	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
O.K	
Good	
Good	
Poor lighting	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Smallpox,   1
Intestinal flu  .
Chicken-pox; mumps 	
Influenza; tonsillitis; bronchitis.
Measles,   10
Influenza    epidemic;    whooping-
cough
Measles,  2; scarlet fever,  6..
Measles	
Mumps; chicken-pox
Chicken-pox	
Mumps; measles
Yes.
Yes,
Clean.
Two; clean.
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Adequate.
Chloride of lime.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
In.good repair..
Good	
Crowded	
Good;   adequate	
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated and
heated
Good	
O.K	
Good	
Good	
Good	
O.K	
Good....a	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good;  adequate-
Excellent	
Poor ventilation;
school untidy
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Excellent!	
Room   over-seated;
seats too near and
too far from stove
Good	
Good	
Good \	
Satisfactory	
Good;  adequate	
Clean;  adequate.
Closets in poor
condition.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;" adequate.
Clean.
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Fair.
Good.
Clean;  adequate.
Two;  clean.
O.K.
Not very clean.
Clean.
Good.
O.K.
Satisfactory.
Two;  clean.
Should be changed.
Clean.
Flush-toilets.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Inadequate; unsanitary seats in
boys' closet.
Fair condition.
Good.
Clean.
Yes.
Two;  sanitary. U 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
&
Ph    .
. o
f. at
fl   .
°l
tool,
o
a
2a
<i
a  r\
£ c
OS
at
t> fl
at .2
a>
QJ
B a
§•3
.22  at
at QJ
ow
'rt
at
to
si
'.3 la
CJ -f
at at
'qj f.
aa
'o
fl
QJ
tt
at   ■
■^ fl
2t ©
at
"is
QJ    Q)
fit"
Ti
S>-§
^ fl
fl.2
WO
oj
'o
0
12
16
123
17
62
114
19
12
50
12
82
35
8
7
9
11
55
19
18
62
7
15
33
24
16
68
8
05
42
11
49
20
11
19
17
27
18
77
19
05
7
14
14
20
11
9
17
10
17
15
10
40
74
44
27
11
17
49
129
12
11
11
40
78
56
58
n
13
104
16
60
105
19
12
48
12
i
1
1
1
2
11
6
3
6
1
i
56
2
31
38
7
3
28
3
6
7
3
11
20
35
4
1
F. E. Coy	
1
5
3
1
3
4
8
3
e
l
l
3
3
0
1
1
3
10
16
2
2
8
2
12
4
3
3
5
11
3
8
5
12
2
G. H. Tutill	
1
1
4
3
1
H. A. Christie	
E. M. Sutherland	
82
31
8
7
8
10
55
10
17
61
5
10
32
24
16
65
8
64
42
9
43
20
11
19
15
27
18
73
13
63
4
13
14
20
11
7
16
9
16
14
10
40
74
44
26
11
14
47
127
11
5
11
40
78
56
50
2
3
6
1
2
10
10
1
8
2
1
6
1
R. Gibson ...
Cahilty ....            	
1
5
1
5
1
1
5
6
3
11
2
4
5
8
6
9
2
1
Campbell Ranch _	
1
6
6
1
3
6
8
1
7
3
■ 1
1
1
1
7
2
1
16
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
6
3
2
2
1
7
26
1
1
1
2
2
6
o
10
12
1
1
4
1
3S
4
15
14
5
4
10
11
8
43
9
16
2
8
2
8
10
34
1
1
4
16
2
9
Miss K. Snowden...
1
2
2
2
2
3
2
10
6
4
1
7
5
20
2
1
3
4
3
20
3
5
1
1
4
2
3
11
1
6
1
2
1
2
1
1
3
4
4
Chase Creek, Lower	
2
1
1
1
3
1
3
5
17
2
1
1
4
5
1
4
	
4
1
5
5
1
1
AV. R. Stone —
Chilliwack River	
1
Chimney Creek	
A. K. Connolly	
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
9
2
5
AV. H. AVood	
1
2
1
1
3
3
4
2
1
1
2
•   1
11
5
13
1
7
1
2
1
20
9
28
7
6
4
8
35
4
1
5
12
10
27
8
1
4
6
	
5
15
16
22
11
4
9
o
36
1
2
5
28
20
26
20
4
1
3
4
3
8
2
1
4
5
1
Chu Chua	
S. A. AVallace	
i
R. Gibson	
4
2
E.  Sheffield	
Cobble Hill	
F. T. Stanier	
Miss M. Claxton....
1
4
3
	
2
7
3
4
5
1
J. H. Palmer	
1
3
6
4
6
21
1
2
35
4
Miss H. Kelly
3
4
10
3
4
5
8
8
7
4
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
7
3
6
2
5
18
2
3
9
R. Elliot....
Miss A. Yates	
Miss M. Claxton....
F. T. Stanier	
* BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 53
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
1
1
Mumps,    1;   anterior   poliomyelitis,   1
Measles;  scarlet fever; chicken-
pox
Good	
tering, 1; entra systole, 1
Satisfactory	
Good	
Influenza 	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Chicken-pox	
Good	
Two;  clean.
O.K	
3
O.K.
One case infantile paralysis, left leg....
Poor and very damp..
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
Ichthyosis,  1   	
Good	
Need new pits.
Measles	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Chicken-pox; mumps; diphtheria
Good	
Good.
1
Good.
2
Bad	
Good	
Orthopaedic, 1; nervous,  1	
O.K	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Clean.
Mumps; measles 	
Good	
Clean.
New and good	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean.
Fair.
A'ery fair	
Yes.
6
1
Dukes,    14;    scarlet   fever,    2;
pertussis,  1; measles,  52
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean.
Clean.
Mumps; measles 	
Clean.
O.K	
Good	
Yes.
Good.
One pupil is a dwarf with congenital
dislocation of hips
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated and
heated
Good	
Scarlet fever 	
quate.
1
1
Good	
Good.
Good	
Bad accommodation..
Good.
Two; clean.
Measles,   7   	
Yes.
Good	
Poor.
Acute catarrh throat, 1	
Not   crowded;    well
heated and ventilated
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
	
Scarlet    fever,    3;    mumps,    4;
pneumonia,   1
Not    crowded;    fair
heating   and  ventilation
Good	
Four; fair.
Good	
Good	
acne,   1;   flat  foot,   1;   Meibomian
cyst,  1
2
zema,    1;   St.   Vitus's   dance,    1;
V.D.H.,  1
Good
Good.
Not fit for a school
building
Good
Good
Measles,  3; mumps,  25; scarlet
fever, 3; influenza, 27
Good. ..
1 U 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
•3
ft
P^    .
Ti
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27
10
219
7
10
12
11
14
11
11
26
9
19
20
36
9
10
43
11
70
27
19
12
14
12
24
9
7
12
16
15
11
11
16
25
19
32
10
14
13
20
30
20
20
17
9
27
11
54
4
26
20
17
77
13
30
48
8
69
20
12
7
11
12
8
10
58
32
56
13
40
19
48
10
16
27
10
211
7
8
12
10
11
10
11
25
9
19
20
36
9
10
43
11
69
26
19
11
10
10
24
9
6
11
16
12
11
11
16
25
10
32
9
13
13
18
30
20
20
17
9
.23
9
50
4
22
20
17
76
13
30
47
7
66
20
12
7
11
12
8
6
58
32
52
13
33
19
48
10
3
1
1
2
8
8
8
12
J. H. Hamilton	
-    1
1
n
28
2
2
1
1
3
2
2
5
1
1
3
3
1
17
1
2
1
3
35
4
3
3
1
3
30
4
3
3
2
5
2
6
R. Elliot	
1
i
3
1
1
1
J. T. Steele	
i
3
5
1
4
3
1
7
1
3
R. AV. Irving	
AV. A. AVatson	
7
2
4
2
12
1
3
16
26
12
3
4
2
8
10
2
6
8
10
4
3
11
2
17
14
10
2
1
10
5
4
4
5
9
3
1
5
9
6
2
5
1
9
5
12
15
6
AV. A. AVatson	
Dawsoij Creek, South	
W. A. AVatson	
S. E. M. Hoops	
1
3
2
6
2
1
1
2
H. AV. Keith	
3
2
2
1
6
3
2
2
3
1
1
2
1
6
3
2
3
1
J. E. H. Kelso	
3
R. H. Mason	
3
1
1
10
AV. H. Mclntyre	
12
2
7
2
2
2
27
H. B. Maxwell	
Miss H. Peters	
E. M. Sutherland	
A. K. Connolly	
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
J. A. Howard	
V. Ardagh	
1
4
4
2
2
2
7
1
1
2
2
4
1
2
1
1
H. A. Christie	
2
4
o
1
1
1
1
T. A. Briggs	
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
S. A. AVallace	
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
E. Buckell	
F. E. Coy	
1
J. E. H. Kelso	
2
1
7
1
9
17
3
3
10
3
8
2
17
Edith Lake	
S. A. Wallace	
1
4
1
Elk Bridge	
G. F. Young	
2
Elko	
2
2
Ellison	
Mrs. A. F. Grindon.
7
1
1
2
2
17
3
1
1
3
4
1
8
H. AV. Keith	
4
1
5
5
5
1
3
4
7
7
14
1
15
AV. R. Stone	
F. H. Stringer	
12
2
11
2
Miss M. Griffin
5
1
5
6
3
29
4
25
6
9
7
2
39
2
15
13
1
28
6
2
1
7
2
1
4
3
6
13
C. H. Hankiuson	
2
3
6
4
1
2
5
1
3
Mrs. A. F. Grindon
Miss H. Peters	
Miss M. Twiddy....
2
7
3
9
H. B. Maxwell	
4
1
G. H. Kearney	
P. D. Van Kleeck	
1
Falkland	
5
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
16
2
22
2
11
J. E. H. Kelso	
Field	
7
3
4
1
1
3
4
Fife	
3
2
4
M. G. Archibald	
1
1
2
1
Foch	
2
2
5
2
1
20
2
6
6
8
3
7
2
J. T. Steele	
1
1
2
2
1
A. K. Connolly     .
1
4
2
4
4
1
2
1
3
2
2
6
7
2
10
2
2
6
6
1
1
2
C. Ewert...
14
22
7
9
5
14
5
2
2
1
2
6
Fort St. John	
AV. A: AVatson	
4
Fort Steele	
F. AV. Green	
1
1
14
[
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 55
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
1
QJ
'£
at
T/2
6
tan
tn
a
a
o
tu
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Measles; chicken-pox 	
Good	
Good.
T.B. knee,  1	
Good.
Mumps; chicken-pox 	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good.
osis, 1
Measles; mumps 	
Good.
Good.
Crowded	
Very good	
Yes.
*
Yes.
Yes.
Crowded	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good.
Mumps; measles 	
quate.
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
2
Good	
Satisfactory	
Fairly satisfactory....
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
1
Measles; mumps  	
Good.
Good.
Good.
action,   1
1
Yes.
Good	
3
Yes.
sis, 1
Good	
1
AVell ventilated  and
heated   but   more
desks in Division
2   required
Good	
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Fair	
Yes.
....	
Clean; adequate.
0 K.
0 E
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Scarlet  fever,   4   	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Temporary	
Good	 U 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
&  .
^ "2
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J. T. Steele	
7
14
22
11
44
88
49
10
13
9
14
8
10
22
9
67
14
26
7
59
11
43
9
35
14
13
117
14
6
8.
148
24
8
14
9
10
23
9
19
77
19
42
10
250
20
12
8
29
27
20
31
1G
55
19
6
12
20
10
23
27
12
6
69
16
14
36
18
84
11
8
19
7
14
22
11
39
84
49
9
11
9
13
8
15
20
9
67
13
25
7
58
11
41
9
32
14
13
109
14
6
8
148
21
8
14
9
9
21
9
19
71
18
42
9
249
18
10
6
27
27
19
30
16
53
19
6
11
20
8
23
27
12
6
69
10
14
36
18
84
11
8
18
i
i
i
2
i
-
1
2
2
?
5
!
26
9
7
2
2
1
5
2
1
2
1
1
Miss M. Griffin	
2
7
6
2
18
8
28
8
4
3
1
1
5
4
1
17
9
11
6
9
4
1
Fruitlands	
i
1
2
4
20
1
2
Gabriola, East	
2
4
1
1
6
o
1
1
Gabriola, North	
0. G. Ingham	
Galena	
3
1
Galena Bay	
Galiano, North	
E. M. Sutherland	
2
2
2
C. H. AVest	
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
8
7
9
1
26
is
5
1
Gilford Island	
8
Gill	
4
Gillies Bay	
1
13
13
7
9
3
1
1
2
2
2
8
31
1
15
4
4
9
Glacier	
Glade	
7
4
2
1
1
7
2
3
8
2
14
7
12
3
4
21
2
4
1
3
Miss M. Claxton....
3
11
Glentanna	
	
1
2
7
ii"
19
4
2
3
2
Golden	
4
1
6
1
Goldstream	
Gowland Harbour	
R. E. Ziegler ....
Graham's Siding	
J. C. Stuart	
1
1
3
12
13
4
3
4
9
1
3
30
1
7
2
43
7
5
22
12
4
8
2
4
11
2
Granby Bay	
Mrs. Edward Yard.
1
7
1
20
1
1
2
15
Grandview Bench	
2
4
5
Granite Bay	
R. Elder	
2
Grasmere	
2
3
2
1
Grassy-Plains	
J. T. Steele	
1
Gray Creek	
9
Great Central Lake	
6
Green Lake	
1
2
18
1
■at
3
2
3
Greenslide	
Grindrod	
H. AV. Keith	
4
30
6
2
3
95
10
1
1
Hall's Landing	
Happy Valley ....
Miss H. Kelly
1
2
3
1
1
1
3
Hardwicke Island	
R. Elder	
Harewood	
1
9
2
8
7
1
15
2
36
Harewood, South	
Harpers Camp	
Harrogate ■.	
1
1
1
2
1
Harrop	
4|        1
6
2
6
5
6
12
11
7
5
6
9
5
10
18
4
6
1
5
4
8
5
5
Hatzic Prairie	
Hazelton	
L. B. AVrinch	
2
2
1
Hazelton, New	
L. B. Wrinch	
3
5
3
7
Headquarters	
T. A. Briggs	
1
1
2
36
Heffley Creek	
2
Heflley Creek, Upper	
Hendon	
1
2
5
3
3
2
6
3
4
3
5
2
1
18
8
4
10
3
17
5
1
4
1
4
4
3
10
4
2
15
5
2
8
8
30
3
2
5
2
1
Heriot Bay	
R. E. Ziegler	
2
1
5
3
2
1
Hillcrest	
H. AV. Keith	
Hilliers	
Miss M. Griffin
4
1
Hilltop	
1
1
18
1
2
Hilton	
Hope	
5
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
4
2
1
Hornby Island	
Horse Creek	
Hosmer	
3
2
11
3
2
3
3
Houston	
C   H   Hankinson
2
2
2
22
2
1
Howe Sound	
F. Inglis	
o
Hulatt	
AV. R. Stone	
1
Hupel	
H. AV. Keith	
Huscroft	
1
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 57
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
'rQ
6
•S
at
a
a
s
a
k
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Blepharitis,     2;    anaemia,    2;    otitis
media,  1
Pinkeye	
Anaemia, 2; overweight,  1; cardiac,  2
Deformed ankles,  1..
Orthopaedic,  1; bradycardiac,  1..
Deep sup. clav. fos., 1; tachycardia, 1
Eczema,   3; epilepsy,   1	
Anaemia, 2; dysmenorrhosa,   1	
Slight tachycardia,  1; kyphosis,  1..
Orthopaedic,  1; warts,  1; squint,  1..
Diabetes,   1; cardiac,  2	
Cardiac,   3; anaemia,   1..
Pulmonary systolic murmur, 1; chronic
torticollis,  1
Cardiac, 1; anaemia, 1 	
Tachycardia,  3; tremor,  2
Orthopaedic,  2  	
Chicken-pox
Chicken-pox; scarlet fever-
Chicken-pox .
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Not crowded; well
ventilated; cold in
winter
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good..	
Good	
School too small	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good;  not crowded;
well ventilated
and heated
Good	
Satisfactory	
Draughty ventilation; poor lighting
Good	
Satisfactory	
New building in
course of construction
Good	
Good	
Mumps	
Smallpox;   measles;   chicken-pox
Mumps..
Chicken-pox; mumps
Mumps	
Mumps; chicken-pox .
Scarlet fever; mumps; measles..
Mumps;  measles 	
Measles;  coryza;  tonsillitis-
Measles;  tonsillitis  	
Diphtheria,   2;  measles,   6;  appendix,  2
Good	
Satisfactory. __
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory....
Good	
Satisfactory...
Good	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory-
Crowded	
Hard to heat-
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Overcrowded-
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
O.K	
Good..
Good..
A.dequate..
Good..
Chieken-pox
Mumps
Good	
Poorly kept; ventilation good
Good...	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Crowded; poor ventilation
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean.
Clean.
Clean;  adequate.
Two;  clean.
Good.
Clean.
Clean.
Clean.
Clean.
Good.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Clean.
Adequate.
Good.
Good.
Satisfactory.
Outside  toilets  in
good condition.
Good.
Not clean.
Clean.
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Clean.
Fair.
O.K.
Satisfactory.
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Fair.
Good.
Two; sanitary.
Good.
Yes.
Good.
Clean.
Good.
Clean.
Clean.
Good.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
Two;  clean.
Two;  clean.
O.K.
Yes.
Inadequate;  only
one small closet.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Clean.
Two; clean.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Clean; adequate. U 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Jesmond	
Joe Rich	
Jordan River	
Juliet	
' Jura	
Kaleden	
Kaleva	
Keefers	
Kelly Creek	
Kelowna, East....
Kelowna, South..
Keremeos	
Kettle  Valley....
Kidd	
Kildonan	
Killarney	
Kimberley	
Kincolith	
Kingcome Inlet..
Kingfisher	
Kingsgate	
Kinnaird	
Kispiox	
Kitchener	
Kitsumgallum....
Kitwanga	
Kleindale	
Knutsford	
Koksilah	
Krestova	
Lac la Hache...
Lakelse Valley..
Landry	
Lakes District...
Lang Bay	
Langford	
Lantzville...
LarchwoocL.
Lawn Hill...
Lazo	
Lee Creek	
Lillooet	
Lister	
Little Fort...
Lone Butte...
Long Beach..
Longworth...
Longworth, South..
Loos	
Louis Creek	
Lower Nicola	
Lvimberton	
Lumby	
Lund	
Lytton	
Mable Lake	
Magna Bay	
Malakwa	
Malcolm Island	
Mamette Lake	
Manson's Landing..
\V. E. Laishley..
Ingersoll Mountain	
Ingram Mountain	
Inonoaklin Valley	
loco	
Irving's Landing	
Isabella Point	
Jaffray	
James Island	
J. M. Jackson	
W. II. Wood	
J. E. II. Kelso	
C. R. Symmes	
A. Henderson	
E. M. Sutherland..
II. A. Christie	
H. G. Burden	
R. H. Mason....
G. A. Ootmar...
I. B. Hudson....
G. H. Tutill	
R. S. Manson...
R. B. White	
F. H. Stringer..
A. E. Kydd	
A. Henderson...
G. A. Ootmar...
G. A. Ootmar...
A. Francis	
W. H. Wood....
M. F. Lucas	
A. D. Morgan...
R. S. Manson...
J. F. Haszard...
D. J. McDonald...
F. H. Stringer	
H. W. Keith	
G. B. Henderson..
J. H. Palmer	
L. B. Wrinch	
G. B. Henderson..
R. B. Brummitt...
V. Ardagh	
J. A. Howard	
S. A. Wallace	
E. L. Garner	
H. H. MacKenzie..
A. K. Connolly	
R. B. Brummitt....
W. A. Watson	
W. R. Stone	
A. Henderson	
I. B. Hudson	
O. G. Ingham	
F. W. Green	
G. A. C. Roberts..
T. A. Briggs	
W. Scatchard	
J. 0. Stuart	
G. B. Henderson...
R. W. Irving	
R. H. Mason	
H. H. MacKenzie..
W. E. Laishley	
W. E. Laishley..
M. F. Lucas	
R. W. Irving	
G. H. Tutill	
F. W. Green	
O. Morris	
R. E. Ziegier	
A. E. Kydd	
O. Morris	
W. Scatchard	
J. H. Hamilton...
F. H. Stringer	
M. G. Archibald..
R. E. Ziegler	
Mrs. A. F. Grindon.
Mrs. A. F. Grindon
Miss K. Snowden..
Miss B. Mitchell..
Miss H. Kelly..
14
11
14
113
14
18
28
40
8
14
14
19
12
26
11
12
12
60
22
74
20
12
14
7
515
l.'i
9
6
19
ICO
14
10
11
25
27
10
14
20
9
20
55
29
12
7
14
10
14
113
9
18
23
33
14
14
18
11
13
11
12
12
60
22
74
20
12
14
7
482
12
8
8
13
9
6
19
160
9
10
11
22
22
8
14
20
9
19
53
11
17
1
2
4
4
1
6
5
5
1
21
6
16
13
2
1
1
160
2
1
2
2
4
4
5
78
1
3
1
4
8
3
0
4
1
6
12
7
1
2
23
11
1
4
8
3
3
133
1
2
3
5
4
2
93
6 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 192&-29.
U 59
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Contained.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
1
at
>
QJ
3
rt
CJ
V2
p
a
a
a
o
&
.5
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Heating and ventilation   fair;   building not crowded
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
good condition.
Good.
Yes.
Yes.
4
2
2
Satisfactory	
1
2
Chicken-pox 	
Good	
Good.
improved, 1
Good             ..  .
Good ...
Good....
Satisfactory	
Good
Yes.
No	
Poor light	
Poor ventilation	
0 K
Good.
Chicken-pox, 2 	
O.K.
Mumps,  26  	
3
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
•
1; cleft palate, 1; granulated lids, 3
Satisfactory _	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory.
1
Poorly   lighted;   too
much ventilation
Too small; poor	
Fairly good.
2
3
Scarlet fever  ■	
Cardiac,   1;   dysmenorrhcea,   1;   back
0
Measles,  2  	
Scarlet fever; measles	
ward,   1;  enuresis,   1
1
1
Frame building; adequate ventilation,
heating, and lighting
1
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory	
Good
Good;  sanitary	
Good
Building not crowded ;   heating   and
ventilation fair
good condition.
Ditto.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory	
Cardiac,  2 	
1
Adequate.
Poor ventilation	
O.K.
Yes.
Infantile   paralysis,   2;   chicken-
pox,   10
Poor posture, 2  	 U 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
Ph    .
Ut *S
ll
c
3    .
rt ^
QJ
«n   S
°B
o S
toot
p
3
C
'at
13
£ a
ait
QJ
I O
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'£ c
CJ 'a.
'qj qj
CK
*e3
at
to
si
S e3
OJ   u
aa
'3
a
at
-3
t)
at .2
bog
|1
£ o
QJ
OH
^ ti
at a
so
ai
'o
AV. It. Stone	
21
13
50
8
21
22
21
21
30
10
11
11
9
8
14
10
7
24
365
45
28
60
8
0
83
17
4
22
"e
il
9
14
52
17
7
7
60
17
8
14
0
86
72
14
51
15
71
10
12
10
13
35
17
9
85
46
13
20
168
33
26
38
61
7
17
99
8
11
10
7
21
13
40
8
20
20
21
18
29
17
11
10
9
8
14
8
7
24
353
45
27
50
7
9
83
10
3
14
6
11
9
12
52
16
7
6
59
16
8
12
0
86
71
14
45
15
70
10
12
14
13
33
17
9
84
46
13
16
168
33
26
32
61
7
16
89
6
7
10
i
2
5
2
3
5
2
4
1
6
5
2
18
2
6
5
1
5
6
0
4
3
2
1
14
3
12
3
9
3
1
1
1
H. AV. Keith	
i
i
2
o
5
1
2
AV. R. Stone	
2
i
J. C. Dunn	
C. H. AVest	
2
1
5
14
10
3
7
4
2
1
Miss A. Yates	
1
o
Mayook	
H. A. Christie	
2
1
1
2
AV. Scatchard	
3
2
1
1
G. A. Charter	
1
1
1
1
1
R. E. Ziegler	
3
8
8
3
5
4
67
25
3
14
2
4
49
3
3
2
5
138
7
13
38
1
3
28
2
11
14
2
o
2
10
AV. H. Wood	
21
Mill Bay	
F. T. Stanier	
Miss M. Claxton.-..
1
1
6
E. R. Hicks	
16
D.J. Barclay	
3
6
•  1
1
5
Mrs. A. F. Grindon.
13
1
32
2
4
1
4
5
83
3
3
3
o
R. AV. Irving	
2
2
S. A. Wallace	
1
Miss M. Griffin
Morrissey Mines	
1
1
1
1
3
F. W. Green	
1
6
3
4
2
16
11
F. AV. Green	
9
6
2
1
27
6
1
1
1
1
AV. H. AVood	
7
2
4
5
3
5
5
5
5
3
W H Mclntyre
1
P. Ewert	
1
1
2
1
13
19
1
17
3
15
5
3
6
2
16
9
3
9
12
10
7
59
19
6
8
29
2
13
22
2
1
2
2
1
J. T. Steele	
3
4
2
4
5
15
10
6
25
17
9
17
Miss M. Griffin
Naramata	
4
1
3
2
5
1
1
5
' 2
4
23
1
5
2
5
2
7
5
4
2
6
6
4
12
20
7
10
19
15
15
3
19
1
6
12
2
2
1
5
4
3
2
13
1
6
2
8
4
7
1
8
1
11
1
1
5
11
3
1
3
2
12
2
1
2
6
15
Miss A. Yates	
1
A E. Kydd 	
1
1
2
1
2
4
7
13
Ocean Falls	
Okanagan	
Mrs. A. F. Grindon.
Mrs. A. F. Grindon.
24
4
4
2
7
2
3
3
1
1
1
2
1
24
5
3
9
10
1
3
6
3
4
13
G. A. Ootmar	
R. B. White     	
13
2
4
6
7
Mrs. A. F. Grindon.
37
R. E. Ziegler	
2
2
14
36
12
G. H. Kearney	
A. K. Connolly	
Miss M. Twiddy	
12
3
1
1
1
2
1
15
1
1
7
2
' 5
1 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 61
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
ri
1
QJ
>
at
6
bD
'2n
at
ft
a
a
p
u
g
(3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc*
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1                  1
Good	
Yes.
Mumps;  measles 	
Excellent	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Excellent	
3
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Chicken-pox,  9; mumps,  1	
Chicken-pox,  60; mumps,  65—
Clean;  adequate.
15
7
Lower   rooms   need
more  light;
crowded
1
Room overcrowded.—
Eight  dry closets;
adequate.
Good.
Not clean.
1
2
2
Mumps,   22; whooping-cough,   5
Not well cleaned	
Two;  clean.
Clean;  adequate.
Not  crowded;  well
ventilated  and
heated
.   ..
Chicken-pox; mumps 	
Good	
Good.
Clean.
Clean.
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
Fair.
Clean;  adequate.
Eczema,   1; cardiac,   1; pulmonary,   1
Satisfactory	
Acute bronchitis,   1  	
1
Smallpox	
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Eight; flush ; clean.
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Outside   toilets   in
good condition.
Yes.
Mumps; measles  	
Not    crowded;    well
heated and ventilated
Eczema,   1;  impetigo,   1;  anaemia,  1„.
Q          ,-         O                  .
Building not crowded ; heating and
ventilation fair
O.K	
Yes.
Adequate; well heated and ventilated
Clean;  adequate.
Mumps; measles 	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Measles.  3 	
 1.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good -
Not well heated and
ventilated; church
used as a school
.1	
1
Measles,  1; whooping-cough, 3 .
1    ■    -
|
O.K	
Good	
Good	
1   	
Rheumatic fever,  1  	
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
 |.     .          |	
 ].                |   	
 I |	
Scarlet fever,  4  	
 !.          1 	
Satisfactory   Clean;  adequate.
	 U 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
II
Q
fl   .
Ph tt
at
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to 8
fl
fl
fl
S
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Ifl
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QJ  QJ
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02 "On
tt at
tl
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SO
'o
0
G. H. Kearney	
Miss M. Twiddy....
12
8
14
26
68
43
8
24
10
9
9
21
85
19
14
21
8
21
56
7
10
25
8
10
11
21
52
17
37
18
19
9
17
38
11
20
472
15
225
10
41
82
20
32
28
6
92
25
11
11
10
25
o
23
17
12
10
16
30
14
33
7
9
10
11
8*
10
12
11
7
n
8
12
24
68
36
S
24
10
6
9
21
82
19
14
21
8
21
56
7
10
24
8
10
11
16
47
17
34
18
19
9
10
20
11
20
400
15
212
14
40
7S
18
30
27
6
84
20
10
10
10
25
2
22
12
12
8
10
30
14
33
6
9
10
11
84
10
12
9
7
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
19
1
9
1
2
2
o
10
rt
3
o
1
4
7
1
1
1
6
4
24
1
16
7
3
14
33
2
3
10
4
Othello	
Otter Point	
1
4
1
2
1
1
4
AV. Truax	
10
H. B. Maxwell	
T. A. Briggs	
Miss H. Peters	
3
i
2
1
1
Oyster River	
Oyster, South	
H. B. Maxwell
Miss H. Peters	
1
1
1
V. E. R. Ardagh	
J. T. Steele   	
i
2
1
3
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
4
4
1
Miss M. Griffin
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
i
2
1
1
1
1
R. AV. Irving	
3
1
3
13
2
9
9
E. M. Sutherland	
4
E. M. Sutherland	
1
1
7
1
1
5
9
2
2
2
4
21
14
4
3
3
7
6
5
1
49
3
44
4
9
16
7
13
3
1
7
7
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
4
9
1
10
2
5
1
1
8
1
10
2
2
7
4
16
5
1
5
J. C. Stuart	
16
4
3
5
8
4
1
4
1
28
6
10
1
10
9
5
17
8
61
2
13
22
17
17
8
20
3
1
2
1
3
1
1
5
6
5
1
10
1
1
5
7
4
1
15
1
17
4
1
6
Pouce Coupe, Central....
Pouce Coupe, East	
1
13
1
2
1
2
35
5
4
6
7
0
4
3
32
2
1
1
2
9
1
5
3
Qualicum Beach	
Miss M. Griffin	
G. A. Lawson.
1
7
7
2
Queen Charlotte City	
3
1
2
5
4
3
4
10
2
1
8
F. E. Coy	
1
1
4
5
R. E. Ziegler	
Red Gap	
Miss M. Griffin
2
6
13
4
T. O'Hagan	
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
6
2
2
7
3
1
3
2
23
2
6
3
1
18
5
1
3
4
4
4
9
14
2
3
2
4
20
4
5
1
1
7
W. H. Wood
1
2
1
1
1
Roberts Creek, East	
F. Inglis	
1
11
2
1
5
3
4
1
1
J.
	
1
7
1
4
1
1
J. E. H. Kelso	
S. G. Mills
1
1
1
1
AV. H. AVood   	
W. H. AVood  ..
AV. H. AVood	
1
1
2
1
5
Rolla.    .              	
16
11
H. A. Christie	
A. E. Kydd	
0
2
5
2
1
2
1
Rose Hill       	
K. Terry	
3
5
1
1 BOARD  OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.                                           TJ 63
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
ri
o
m
o"
.£?
1
o
s
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State.              #
if clean and
adequate.
1       1       1
Good     	
Good     	
Good     	
Yes.
Orthopaedic,   2;  anaemia,  2;  pityriasis
rosea,   1
One   boy   with   loss   of   arm   at   right
shoulder
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Ventilation fair	
Good     	
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
2
Conjunctivitis,  1; cardiac,  1	
Whooping-cough suspect,   1
Well  ventilated  not
crowded
Clean;  adequate.
New pits required.
Clean.
Chicken-pox	
Chicken-pox	
Poorly ventilated
Good     ....:	
1
2
1
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Crowded	
Diff.  impulse,   1; tachycardia,  3	
Cardiac,  1  	
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory .-
Satisfactory.
Very good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
2
2
2
Crowded	
Cardiac,  2; nervous, 4; orthopaedic, 3
Cardiac, 1  	
Scarlet fever 	
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Cardiac, 2  	
Not    crowded;    well
ventilated and
heated
Well  ventilated;
cold in winter
Crowded;  heating
not uniform
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Measles 	
Anaemia,   2   	
Very   small  and
crowded
Very   small   and
crowded
Very small and
crowded
Not   crowded;    well
ventilated and
heated
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Wooden  seats  in
boys' closets
unsanitary.
Chicken-pox,  2; tonsillitis,  3 —
Pulmonary tuberculosis,  1	
I
Good |Yes.
Anaemia,   1   	
Good.
Clean;  adequate.
O.K.
Yes.
Good	
 !	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Yes.
Adequate.
Two;  sanitary.
Good;  adequate	
Very   good	
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
0 K
1
1
'
* U 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
g
i-H
Ut ^
0          .
:s
1* 33
0)
«M a
s
"S ^
. O
8
S
.2 0
as
0 _o
0I>
CM
5
qj rt
OH
Round Lake..
Round Top..
Roy	
Royston	
Rutland	
Saanich, North...
Sahtlam	
Saint Elmo	
Salmo	
Salmon Bench....
Salmon River	
Salmon Valley.-.
Sand Creek	
Sand Creek, Big..
Sandon..
Sandspit..
Sandwick 	
Saskatoon Creek..
Savona	
Savona Road	
Sayward	
Sayward, Upper...
Seaford	
Sechelt	
Shalalth	
Shawnigan Lake..
Shelley	
Sheraton	
Shirley	
Shoreacres	
Shuswap	
Shuswap Falls..
Shutty Bench...
Sicamous	
Sidney	
Silver Creek	
Silverton	
Sinclair Mills...
Sirdar	
Skidegate..
Slocan Park....
Slocan, South..
Slnithcrs..
Snowshoe....
Soda Creek..
Solsq.ua	
Sooke	
Sooke, East	
Sooke, North	
Sorenson	
Sorrento	
South Bank	
Spencer	
Spences Bridge..
Springbend	
Springhouse	
Squam Bay	
Squamish	
Squirrel Cove	
Stewart	
Stillwater	
Streatham	
Stuart	
Stuart Station...
Sugar Lake	
F. V. Agnew..
R. W. Irving—
F. H. Stringer..
E. R. Hicks	
G. A. Ootmar	
S. E. M. Hoops	
E. L. Garner...	
W. E. Henderson...
J. H. Palmer	
P. D. Van Kleeck..
C. Ewert	
P. D. Van Kleeek..
W. Truax	
H. A. Christie	
Mrs. A. F. Grindon
Miss A. Yates..
W. Graham..
G. A. C. Roberts..
T. A. Briggs	
W. A. Watson	
M. G. Archibald..
K. Terry	
F. H. Stringer	
F. H. Stringer	
R. E. Ziegler	
F. Inglis	
J. C. Stuart	
F. T. Stanier	
W. E. Laishley....
Mrs. E. M. Walls...
Mrs. E. M. Walls..
J. T. Steele	
I. B. Hudson	
H. H. MacKenzie..
W. Scatchard	
O. Morris	
D. J. Barclay	
E. Buckell	
S. E. M. Hoops	
E. Buckell	
W. E. Gomm	
W. E. Laishley	
G. B. Henderson..
G. A. C. Roberts..
H. H. MacKenzie..
H. H. MacKenzie..
C. H. Ilankinson..
M. F. Lucas	
A. K. Connolly..
J. H. Hamilton..
I. B. Hudson	
I. B. Hudson	
I. B. Hudson	
W. E. Bavis	
W, Scatchard.-.
J. T. Steele	
W. Truax	
G. H. Tutill	
H. W. Keith	
A. K. Connolly..
R. W. Irving	
N. J. Paul	
R. E. Ziegler	
H. A. Whillans-
A. Henderson—
.1. T. Steele	
W. R. Stone	
W. R. Stone	
O. Morris	
Miss B. Mitchell...
10
9
31
191
101
34
17
37
15
8
11
7
16
9
14
48
7
14
10
18
132
24
77
18
11
12
18
64
10
12
13
16
13
40
14
19
11
25
122
15
60
20
8
11
9
10
9
22
191
93
34
14
37
15
7
10
7
15
9
14
39
6
9
10
12
126
20
75
18
29
27
204
11
11
18
64
10
12
13
16
12
38
14
15
9
22
122
14
50
20
8
11
9
13 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 65
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
ri
>
3
'2
at
V2
p
bo
P.
a
a
u
o
fe
be
a
tf
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Good	
tion;  one good.
Good.
Good; not crowded.
Good	
6
8
2
Measles,  15; whooping-cough,  7
adequate.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
2
5
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Crowded; poorly ventilated
Ample    room;    very
well   heated   and
ventilated
Poorly  heated;  adequate   ventilation
from building
Good	
Yes.
Good	
0 K
Good ,
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.
Cardiac,  2 	
1
Building not crowded;   heating   and
ventilation fair
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Satisfactory	
good condition.
Clean;  adequate.
Torticollis,  1  	
Cardiac,   1; eczema,  1	
Clean; adequate.
Not clean.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Cardiac,  1  	
Satisfactory	
Cardiac, 2 	
ed;   heating    and
ventilation fair
good condition.
Clean;   adequate.
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Good.
Unpainted frame
building; heating
and   ventilation
adequate
Basement room
crowded
Obscure first sound, 2; tachycardia, 2;
1
tremor, 1
Good	
Good	
Greatly improved
Mumps	
Mumps,   2;  measles,   1;  scarlet
fever,  6
Cardiac,  2; backward,   1; anaemia,  3;
1
stammer, 1; kyphosis, 1
Cardiac,  1; dysmenorrhea a,  1	
Building unsuitable-
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Fair.
Fair.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Clean.
Yes.
Measles,   2	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Poor	
Good	
Good.
Two; clean.
Good.
Chicken-pox; measles	
Clean;  adequate.
O.K.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Good	
Not good	
Good.
1 U 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
3
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9
2
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3
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5
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2
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1
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2
E. Buckell	
l
3
1
3
2
1
3
1
3
2
6
1
1
1
W. A. Watson	
1
1
1
1
2
1
F. T. Stanier	
Miss M. Claxton....
1
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
6
21
1
3
G. A. Charter	
2
W. A. Watson	
J. T. Steele	
11
59
19
8
9
51
6
7
7
47
20
27
7
15
10
8
178
12
22
32
27
7
70
60
22
29
23
29
10
125
8
28
15
10
48
40
-    60
54
S
8
73
50
138
13
49
10
11
71
20
10
15
65
5S
9
35
11
56
17
8
9
41
6
7
7
46
18
27
5
14
10
8
171
11
22
31
25
7
69
60
22
29
23
29
1
1
1
2
2
6
1
3
10
3
3
1
10
5
4
2
7
2
1
29
5
2
1
19
3
7
1
21
5
1
2
1
5
1
2
7
2
2
1
1
3
9
1
2
2
6
2
2
1
1
2
3
11
2
J. T. Steele	
1
1
1
1
3
9
8
3
3
4
1
2
6
1
4
6
5
3
6
6
1
3
H. W. Keith	
1
1
12
1
9
48
3
60
4
3
5
7
2
1
60
9
3
5
7
2
16
11
11
6
3
4
31
7
5
10
4
1
40
30
12
2
13
6
2
68
2
14
5
1
32
10
36
18
3
5
34
12
20
4
8
2
1
E. Sheffield	
21
1
5
3
7
2
1
1
13
8
4
1
H. W. Hill	
Mrs. C.A. Lucas....
2
2
1
5
6
4
2
10
125
8
28
14
9
44
35
59
52
8
8
49
48
135
13
40
11
70
10
10
15
65
54
9
34
1
1
2
29
3
15
2
15
1
32
1
3
2
5
13
13
20
8
1
3
19
10
19
7
6
2
1
3
2
1
3
2
1
2
10
3
4
H. A. Christie	
9
9
7
7
3
2
H. A. Christie	
2
1
7
2
1
1
1
1
7
W. R. Stone	
1
8
1
5
3
10
4
7
1
1
2
11
10
4
5
1
2
1
8
1
1
2
13
Mrs. A. Grindon...
Mis. A. Grindon...
7
Wm. Buchanan	
W. H. Wood	
24
4
2
3
2
5
4
10
1
13
4
5
4
2
R. E. Zeigler	
E. Buckell	
1
1
14
5
2
8
6
2
9
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
A. K. Connolly	
4
2
6
1
Willow Point	
3
1
1
1
: School closed on account of measles. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 67
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
c
a
rt
>
9
1
m
6
.£?
ft
a
a
o
p
S
tf
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Poor heating	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
i
Good	
O.K.
Fair	
Yes.
i
2
Good             	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated and
heated
Fair	
Measles	
Yes.
Good     	
Good
Fair	
Good          	
Good.
Clean;  adequate.
Good ...
Ventilation poor	
1
Fairly   clean   and
adequate.
heated and ventilated
Good	
Good	
O.K	
0 K
Good	
Yes.
Good	
V.D.H.,  2; hip-joint disease,  1; anaemic,  2
Good	
Clean.
Fairly clean.
5
Neither	
Badly kept.
Diphtheria   	
Satisfactory ,
Good; not crowded..
Good	
O.K.
Good condition; hut
a little small
Satisfactory	
New frame;  ventilation poor
Good	
*
2
Scarlet fever 	
Yes.
Not    fit    for    school
purposes
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good;  adequate	
Good	
Good.
Orthopaedic,  1  	
Clean.
Yes.
Mumps; measles	
Mumps; measles	
Good .
Mumps; measles	
Good	
Good	
2
Outbreak of mumps and measles,
for    which    the    school    was
closed  for ten days
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Fair	
Good	
O.K.
Two; clean.
Good	
O.K.
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Poor building; overcrowded
Good;  adequate	
Good	
Yes.
O.K.
Good.
Two; sanitary.
Chicken-pox, 3; scarlet fever, 1 U 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"ft
Ph   .
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18
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25
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94
27
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12
26
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21
21
64
42
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6
89
18
7
24
49
83
27
32
12
i
4
2
5
1
3
2
2
2
4
4
7
10
9
2
7
35
20
4
18
4
5
3
13
20
2
27
10
7
F. E. Coy     	
1
1
2
10
1
i
F. E. Coy	
i
6
1
1
Winfield :	
Mrs. A. Grindon....
21
22
4
32
3
1
3
12
2
V. E. R. Ardagh	
2
C. G. G. Maclean ....
2
1
2
13
3
1
4
1
8
17
4
3
3
12
13
12
9
6
1
C. Ewert	
1
Wycliffe	
F. W. Green	
1
1
3
5
8
1
7
4
3
4
2
2
12
2
6
7
12
3
2
Yahk	
2
1
Yale	
P. S. McCaffrey	
9
5
1
W. A. Coburn	
Miss A. Yates
1 BOARD ~OF HEALTH REPORT, 1928-29.
U 69
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc. 1.
ri
1
>
CJ
CO
d
ft
a
a
p
bH
.5
tf
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Heating   and   ventilation fair; building not crowded
Good     	
good condition.
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good     	
Clean;  adequate.
6
1
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
i
Not   crowded;   well
heated   and   ventilated
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good.
chest,  1; nervous,  1; undersize, 2
Good	
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's" Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.
825-1229-8290

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