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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1930

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
EIGHTH ANNEAL REPORT
OF
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 33ST, 1929
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.  .
■:: :\&fi;\,is'.'■]■.:■;
:
■ >*■ ''.JV'VU
;•.'.. '.0.##  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Medical Superintendent of Tranquille Sanatorium for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1929.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. 	
DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. S. L. Howe, Provincial Secretary. P. Walker, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM STAFF.
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent.
H. G. Chisholm, M.D., Assistant Medical Superintendent.
M. McQuitty, M.B., Assistant Physician. H. A. Jones, M.D., Assistant Physician.
A. Hakstian, M.B., Assistant Physician.
W. G. Lothian, Radiologist. G. Darling, Laboratory Technician.
G. J. Cameron, D.D.S., Dentist.
Miss B. Bibby, Matron. Miss L. Weight, Dietitian.
H. Jefferis, Bursar.
J. G. Simmonds, Cleric. Miss M. L. Hayceoft, Stenographer.
J. R. Mathieson, Clerk of Works.
A. N. Low, Steward. J. L. Stephenson, Chief Engineer.
J. Trevors, Laundry Manager.
Rev. E. D. McLaren, Presbyterian. Rev. E. R. Bartlett, Church of England.
Rev. F. Pfotenhauer, Lutheran. Rev. Fr. F. Salles, Roman Catholic.
SANATORIUM FARM. STAFF.
W. Jackson, Farm Manager. T. G. Kingscote, Book-keeper. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
KEPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1929.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Eigth Annual Report of Tranquille
Sanatorium, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1928, to March 31st, 1929.
There were 434 patients treated during the year. The average daily population was 214,
there being 215 admissions and 165 discharges, showing an increase of 60 in the patient population at the end of the year.
Our results have been quite satisfactory when one takes into consideration the fact that
65 per cent, of our discharged patients were classed as far advanced on admission. Of the 165
discharges, 3.6 per cent, were apparently arrested, 30 per cent, were quiescent, and 22 per cent,
definitely improved.    The number of deaths was 12.5 per cent, of the number of patients treated.
The chief difficulty in combating tuberculosis at the present time, as in the past, is the
failure to have the disease diagnosed in its early stages. It is difficult to fix the responsibility
for this failure. Tuberculosis can become far advanced before it disables its victim, and so
many patients never consult a doctor in the early stages. However, there are usually warnings
that all is not well, fairly early. A more intensive educational campaign should be helpful.
Tuberculosis is one of the most curable diseases if taken in hand in the early stages. The only
method of finding all cases would appear to be the periodic examination of the whole population.
This would be a tremendous task. If X-ray facilities were provided free in various centres
throughout the Province to all who had any suspicious symptoms or had lived or worked with
a consumptive, many who will not consent to a medical examination would take advantage of
them. The X-ray is the most reliable single diagnostic agent and its evidence is convincing to
the layman. The Travelling Health Officer is providing this Service to the best of his ability,
but there is far too much territory for one man and one X-ray outfit to cover.
Last autumn the writer, with thirty other Canadian physicians engaged in sanatorium
and tuberculosis clinic work, attended the meetings of the International Union Against Tuberculosis, which were held in Rome. In addition to this conference we attended the annual
meeting of the National Tuberculosis Association in London. The whole trip, which occupied
three months, was devoted to the study of problems confronting those engaged in tuberculosis
and public-health work in Great Britain, France, Switzerland, and Italy. Over sixty institutions were visited, as well as the Ministry of Health at London and the Health Section of the
League of Nations at Geneva. Housing schemes of tremendous proportions for replacing slum
areas were studied in Birmingham, London, and Glasgow. We were impressed by the wholehearted manner in which the Governments of these countries are now assisting with the antituberculosis work.
FINANCIAL.
The steady expansion of the institution and grounds and the improvements which have been
made in the services have all tended to make our costs high. A steady decline in the revenue
has raised the net cost. With the addition of the new infirmary and the end of our expansion
in sight, we hope to be able to present a much better financial statement and at the same time
improve our services. At the time of writing there is sufficient evidence to quite safely predict
a marked decrease in the per capita, cost for the next fiscal year and a still greater one the
following year. The decrease in revenue is due to fewer D.S.C.R. patients being treated each
year. The D.S.C.R. pays full per capita cost for its patients. Seven years ago we had over one
hundred of their patients in residence, now we have about fifteen. X 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SURGICAL.
Surgical measures have come to occupy a very important position in the treatemnt of
pulmonary tuberculosis. These measures as practised here consist of artificial pneumothorax,
extra-pleural thoracoplasty and phrenicotomy, and are all intended to give local rest to the
affected part by their splinting effect. Many otherwise hopeless cases are restored to health
each year through these measures.
There were forty-four patients receiving pneumothorax treatment at the beginning of the
year. This treatment was attempted in twenty-three new cases. It was not possible to find a
free space in four of these. During the year three cases were admitted with pneumothorax
already established. At the end of the year forty-seven cases were being given this treatment.
During the year a total of 1,193 refills were given.
A total of thirty-two patients have now had thoracoplasty done here. During the year just
ended there was one case only, but there are three who have had the preliminary phrenocotomy
done this winter. We 'are well satisfied with the results, as practically every case was considered hopeless without the operation. Phrenicotomy was performed in each case as a
preliminary operation.
X-RAY.
This department is producing excellent work considering its antiquated equipment. We do
not wish to install new equipment until our future building programme has been definitely
decided. New quarters for this department should be provided and new equipment installed at
that time. During the past year 798 pairs of stereoscopic chest films, 67 miscellaneous, and
2,035 dental films were taken. A considerable number of X-ray treatments were given and the
fluroscope was used freely in examining our patients and checking up on our pneumothorax
cases.
There are now five quartz lamps in almost constant use and we will have two more operating
next year.
LABORATORY AND DENTAL SERVICES.
Detailed reports of these services are given elsewhere in this report. A great deal of work
is being accomplished in the laboratory, as will be seen from the appended tables. In addition
to the tabulated work, two or three lines of research are always under way. Quarters less
cramped would be a great aid in carrying out this work.
The dental service continues to prove its value, and, indeed, it is now indispensable in an
institution such as this.
LAUNDRY.
The work of this department will be greatly increased by our additional beds and a large
addition has been built. Estimates have been passed for the installation of the latest equipment
in order that operating expenses may be kept as low as possible and the high standard of work,
which is now being turned out, maintained.
SANATORIUM FARM.
The farm is necessary to the Sanatorium to supply milk. There is no other source within
reasonable distance. Our dairy herd has a very high average production, with a very good
percentage of butter-fat. Bacteriological tests are done in the laboratory twice per week, and
for the past few months we have been able to keep the count down to the requirements for
certified milk. There is no reason why this standard cannot be maintained. It is worth a
great deal to know that our patients are getting milk of this high quality. The figures in the
cost-accounting sheets would indicate that the dairy herd is the best-paying branch on the farm,
although all produce consumed by it is charged at market prices. In spite of this the farm as
a whole is operated at quite a loss, and some means of making other branches more profitable
should be sought.
BUILDING OPERATIONS.
By far the most important addition to the Sanatorium for many years is the new 100-bed
infirmary building, which was officially opened by the Honourable Dr. Tolmie in March. This
building is to be known as the Greaves Building in memory of J. B. Greaves, who bequeathed
a large sum of money to the Sanatorium just before it was taken over by the Government.    The TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29. X 7
building is designed along lines which our experience here has suggested as most suitable to
our needs. It is to be used as an admitting building. The equipment is the most up-to-date
available. A portion of the building has been occupied for the past two months and we have
found it to be very satisfactory for both patients and employees.
Another building which has proven a great asset to the Sanatorium is the male employees'
residence, which was opened last fall. It enables our employees to get entirely away from the
patients' buildings when they are off duty and provides them with more comfortable and
healthier quarters. The benefit of this is reflected in the better spirit which prevails and in
the fewer changes in our staff.
Staff residences were completed for two of the doctors, the dentist, the X-ray technician,
and the laboratory technician. These officers will now be more permanent and the Sanatorium
will be benefited thereby.
The laundry was enlarged to take care of the extra work which will come with the occupation of the new infirmary.
RECOMMENDATIONS.
When the laying-out of the grounds is completed, hard-surfacing of the driveways and spaces
around the buildings not in lawns should be considered. This would make it much easier to
keep our buildings clean by keeping down the dust, which is very troublesome except at midwinter.    It would also give the grounds a more finished appearance.
For a number of years we have foreseen the approaching necessity for a new power plant.
The new buildings have increased the load to such an extent that the plant is taxed to the limit
during the winter months. A modern plant capable of taking cheaper fuel would probably prove
far more economical to operate. This is something which should not be put off too long, as a
forced shut-down would be very serious.
A new auditorium is strongly recommended and with the increased population has become
a necessity. The administration building is too small and a new auditorium and administration
building might be combined. This would enable us to centralize services which are now scattered and which are in need of new quarters, such as the laboratory, the X-ray, and the dental
clinic. The canteen, the shoe-repair shop, and the barber-shop could be brought under the same
roof.    One building would be cheaper to construct and more economical to operate.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
I wish to thank all those who have in any way contributed to the comfort and welfare of
our patients, including the Red Cross, the I.O.D.E., those who made donations at Christmas,
organizations which provided entertainment, the consulting surgeons, and visiting clergymen.
I would like to express my appreciation to all members of the staff, who have co-operated
so well during the past year.
I wish to thank you, Sir, for the support and assistance which I have had at all times from
the members of your Department.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP,
Medical Superintendent. —
X 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
STATISTICAL TABLES.
TABLE No. 1.—GENERAL STATISTICS FOR YEAR 1928-29.
Movement of Population.
Civil.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1928	
Number of patients admitted, 1928-29	
124
112
84
236
148
19
15
22
34
15
76
88
5"9
164
106
219
215
Number of patients discharged,  1928—29	
Number of patients treated, 1928-29	
165
434
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1929 	
269
TABLE No. 2.—CLASSIFICATION OF 215 CASES ADMITTED TO SANATORIUM
DURING YEAR 1928-29.
Classification.
Civil.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Percentage.
9
19
77
7
2
3
9
1
7
23
52
6
18
45
138
14
8.4
20.9
Far advanced	
64.2
6.5
Totals	
112
"15
88
215
100.0
TABLE No. 2a.—CLASSIFICATION
OF 14 CASES ADMITTED AS MISCELLANEOUS.
Classification.
Male.
Female.
Total.
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
Debility        _     	
3
Totals       ..     ....         	
8
6
14
TABLE No. 3.—SHOWING CIVIL STATE OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1928, TO MARCH 31st, 1929.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
50
76
1
35
50
3
85
126
4
Totals	
127
88
215
TABLE No. 4.—SHOWING RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS OF PATIENTS ADMITTED
FROM APRIL 1st, 1928, TO MARCH 31st, 1929.
Religious Denominations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
100
20
2
1
4
76
7
1
1
1
1
1
176
27
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
Totals           	
127
88
215 THE OPENING OF THE GREAVES BUILDING   BY  THE  HONOURABLE DR,   TOLMIE,   TRANQUILLE.
*^V?3
B^tv   ^.2^!^k
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....    .  ■■  ...
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VIEW OF GROUNDS,  TRANQUILLE.  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29.
X 9
TABLE No. 5.—SHOWING THE NATIONALITY OF PATIENTS ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1928, TO MARCH 31st, 1929.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
54
1
32
2
1
5
2
2
1
1
15
2
3
6
1
47
17
2
3
10
2
2
4
1
101
1
49
2
1
I   7
Italy	
2
5
1
1
25
2
2
5
10
Totals	
127
88
215
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING AVHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1928, TO MARCH 31st, 1929.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Abbotsford	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
"i    '
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
Bickle	
1
1
Bloedel                    ,            	
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
Field                                  	
1
Gifford. ..                      	
1
1
1
8
5
1
1
1
Moricetown	
1
2
1
3
1
36
26
62 X 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS—Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
36
o
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
59
6
1
1
1
26
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
42
1
7
62
New Westminster	
9
1
1
1
Okanagan Centre	
1
1
Ontario	
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
South  Bendj  Wash.           	
1
1
Trail      .      ..	
2
4
101
7
8
1
Williams Lake	
1
Totals	
127
88
215
TABLE No. 7.—SHOWING THE OCCUPATIONS OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1928, TO MARCH 31st, 1929.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
o
1
6
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
3
1
1
9
1
1
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
Clerk	
9
1
1
2
1
Cook                         .  	
3
C.P.R. shops            	
1
1
1
1
1
33
11
44 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29.
X 11
TABLE No. 7.—SHOWING THE OCCUPATIONS OF THOSE ADMITTED—Continued.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
33
3
5
4
3
1
1
1
2
1
11
1
1
6
1
2
1
1
6
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
11
1
33
5
2
12
1
1
1
7
1
7
1
3
1
44
3
5
4
3
1
1
1
1
33
2
1
11
1
1
6
1
2
1
1
6
2
1
2
12
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
Prison guard	
1
1
1
9
1
1
9
12
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
7
2
1
1
1
2
3
4
2
1
Totals :	
127
88
2ir> X 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 8.—SHOWING THE AGES OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st,
1928, TO MARCH 31st, 1929.
Age.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
9
19
22
15
21
20
12
3
1
3
4
16
28
14
14
6
3
1
2
6
15 to 20       „    	
25
21   „   25       „     	
47
26  „   30      „                           	
36
31   „   35      ,	
29
36  „   40      „                             	
27
41   „   45      ,,    	
23
46  ,.   50       „	
13
' 5
56  „   60      „         	
1
61   „   65       „         	
66  „   70      „    	
3
Over    70       „           	
127
88
215
TABLE No. 9.—SHOWING ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, AND DEATHS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1928, TO MARCH 31st, 1929.
Month.
Admissions.
DlSCHAEGES.
Deaths.
Male.
Ifemale.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1928.
3
10
13
12
8
6
8
11
6
4
32
14
6
9
5
4
6
4
5
7
1
4
26
11
9
19
18
16
14
10
13
18
7
8
58
25
4
11
10
7
6
5
4
8
2
3
4
7
7
8
7
4
1
2
3
2
2
1
3
11
19
17
11
7
7
7
10
2
5
5
10
4
1
4
3
1
3
2
2
3
4
3
6
2
2
1
1
1
2
3
1
2
2
2
6
May	
3
4
July	
4
2
4
4
5
4
1929.
6
5
8
Totals      	
127
88
215
71
40
111
36
19
55
TABLE No. 10.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 165 DISCHARGES DURING 1928-29.
Results.
Classification on Admission.
Apparently
arrestel.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Died.
Total.
6
4
16
30
1
5
20
11
2
11
4
1
52
2
11
24
113
17
Totals    	
0
50
37
17
55
165 I'
*
•.t* r'ss
■I
■mffi  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29.
X 13
TABLE No. 10a.—AVERAGE LENGTH OF RESIDENCE OF 93 DISCHARGED PATIENTS.
Condition.
Male.
Apparently arrested
Quiescent	
Improved	
Days.
366.5
556.1
401.5
Days.
433.70
604.70
495.14
TABLE No. 10b.—SHOWING LONGEST AND  SHORTEST PERIODS  OF RESIDENCE
IN 93 DISCHARGES.
Condition.
Longest Period.
Shortest Period.
Apparently arrested
Quiescent	
Improved	
Days.
1,002
2,777
2,627
Days.
171
28
TABLE No. 11.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 17 CASES   (MISCELLANEOUS)
DISCHARGED.
Classification.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
9
1
1
2
1
1
Bronchiectasis	
2
Totals	
13
4
17
TABLE No. 12.—SHOWING CAUSES OF 55 DEATHS.
Cause of Death.
Male.
Female.
Total.
General exhaustion	
Myocardial weakness	
T.B. meningitis	
Nephritis	
Pulmonary haemorrhage	
Hemorrhagic pneumonia...
Miners' phthisis	
Lung abscess and diabetes
Totals	
29
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
19
46
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
TABLE No. 13.
Daily average population   214
Per cent, of discharges on admission (not including deaths)   51.2
Per cent, of fair recoveries on admission   43.2
Per cent, of deaths on whole number under treatment  12.6
Total number of patient-days   78,225 X 14 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 14.—SHOWING WORK COMPLETED BY PATIENTS IN OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY CLASSES DURING THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31sr, 1929.
Reed-work—
Trays, size 14 by 20  98
Trays, size 12 by 18  67
Trays, size 10 by 18  42
Trays, size 12 by 12  „ 36
Fruit-dishes, 9 by 9   23
Doll-cradles  16
Flower-baskets     48
Pin-trays,  small    62
Sewing-baskets     16
Table-lamps  4
Dresser-lamps, small  6
Flower-vases     62
Pine-needle work—
Sewing-baskets     17
Trays, 10 by 18  7
Fruit-dishes    14
Sandwich-trays   9
Woodwork—
Picture-frames  68
Cribbage-boards  14
Flower-stands, small   6
Parrots,  pine-cone   18
Storks,  pine-cone   76
Bead-work—
Bead-bags   76
Necklaces  34
Beaded garters  :  64
Watch-fobs  *  23
Bead butterflies    56
Bead flowers   96
Embroidery—
Tray-cloths   6
Table-centres    5
Table-runners :  5
Shopping-bags  6
Hand-painted handkerchiefs   300
Hand-painted scarfs    43
Hand-painted  flower-vases    26
Passe-partout work—Pictures framed   98
Note.—About 120 patients have taken part in the above work.    The show-case has proved a
great boon and many articles have been sold from it.    A sale of work at the Kamloops Fair
netted $97, and another in December in Tranquille brought in $110 for the patients. This work
is invaluable in several ways, giving patients instruction in useful work, which keeps their
minds as well as hands occupied. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29. X 15
DENTAL EEPOET.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1929.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sib,—The general plan for the treatment of infected mouths in the Dental Clinic has not
changed materially during the last three years. Examinations and histories have been entered
into more fully, with satisfactory results.
All patients, on admission, receive a complete roentgenologic examination, regardless of the
condition of the mouth. This brings to light many concealed areas of infection and enables the
Clinic to examine and diagnose more fully. In cases of prolonged treatment these early films
are invaluable for comparison with post-operative ones. However, it is realized that this
examination is only one link in the chain of dental diagnosis, as teeth must be tested for
vitality and the history and clinical data considered. Qualifying this statement is the fact
that many pulpless teeth, shown by the roentgen ray to be negative, give cultures of streptococci
from their apices after extraction
In the Dental Clinic we are fortunate in being able to do all our work at the Sanatorium,
with every opportunity of carrying out technic and routine. A great factor is the post-operative
care that is available to the patient under hospital conditions, following any work done in the
Clinic. It is, of course, impractical for the average dentist to extract teeth or do minor oral
surgery in a hospital, but undoubtedly better results would be obtained if the more difficult
operations were done under hospital conditions, as well as extractions of all types for patients
who are ill.
There can be no fixed ruling regarding the extent of operative procedures at one time. The
condition of the patient and the nature of the operation governs the length of an appointment.
This is usually half an hour, and operations are done slowly and without any show of hurry or
excitement. By doing so the patient remains more comfortable during the operation and postoperative reactions are reduced to a minimum.
Block anaesthesia  continues to be used in a large percentage of cases,  giving  a  better
anaesthetic than the infiltration method and allowing the operator to do better work over a
longer period of time.    No general anaesthetics were administered during the past year.
Following is a statement of work completed at the Clinic:—
Fillings     728
Extractions  339
Dentures  ■.     74
Denture repairs     29
Inlays   (gold)        33
Bridges     21
Devitalizations          2
Treatments   318
Root fillings        6
Prophylaxis     139
Special cases      11
All of which is respectfully submitted.
G. J. Cameron, D.D.S.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1929.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report of work completed in this
Laboratory during the year ended March 31st, 1929.
A perusal of the technical figures reveals an increase in almost all types of tests over previous years.    An analysis of sputa records presents interesting comparisons.    Of the 219 patients X 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
in residence on March 31st, 71.3 per cent, had tubercle bacilli demonstrated in direct smear in
sputa, and of this number 25.9 per cent, became negative during treatment. Of the 76 patients,
or 28.7 per cent, who were persistently negative, 13 were diagnosed as non-tuberculous. These
figures represent a high average, which is maintained by our present method of sputum examination. Our experience with the following routine procedure—receiving sputa into small glass
vials containing 5 per cent, carbolic acid, and agitating in an electrical shaker for 20 minutes—
has demonstrated that if tubercle bacilli are present they will be identified. Except in special
cases, we rarely revert to methods of sputum concentration.
The number of patients in whom acid-fast bacilli were microscopically in evidence in urine
is greater. In such cases catheter specimens are,obtained, and more than half, particularly in
female patients, were found to be due to the presence of the non-pathogenic smegma bacillus.
In doubtful cases animal inoculation is resorted to for confirmatory diagnosis. The occurrence
of albuminuria remains on an average with past years.
Complete blood-counts are taken on every new admission. We have endeavoured to secure
similar counts on discharge, but, either through failure of notification or from pressure of work,
this has not always been possible. For the purpose of ensuring complete records this discrepancy will have to be rectified.
In the performance of the Kahn precipitation test for syphilis we have had gratifying
results. During the past three years we have been doing this test in conjunction with the
Wassermann. Due to the fact that the blood sera had to be sent to the laboratories of the
Vancouver General Hospital for the latter test, by which time the sera had become contaminated
or was anti-complimentary, we have not had any great success in correlating results. Every
Kahn test with a positive 4 plus reaction has after investigation proved to be clinically positive.
For this reason we have now superseded the Wassermann with the Kahn and will continue to
use it in future as our sole diagnostic test for syphilis. A Kahn test is observed on every admission as standard routine.
Our research into the carbohydrate metabolism in tuberculosis has terminated as far as
the technical work is concerned. All our data have been referred to Dr. R. E. Coleman, who has
been directing this study.
During the year a survey of Kamloops Lake was undertaken by Dr. A. G. Naismith at the
instigation of the Provincial Board of Health. This Laboratory co-operated with him in carrying out the technical procedures in connection with this survey. A map recording our observations and prepared by the Provincial Water Rights Department is now in the Laboratory and
can be used for future records.
Every year during the spring thaw the creek-water becomes murky and remains turbid after
passing through the filter. Bacteriological tests show that the water is comparatively free from
bacterial invasion, the monthly count remaining well within the latitude allowable for good
water. Lactose fermentation tests are annually positive at this time, and heretofore have
been regarded as probably due to animal washings. This year we attempted to classify the gas-
forming organism. After isolating we referred it to the bacteriologist at the Vancouver General
Hospital. The following quotation is an abstract from the report: " It is evident that by one
authority (the sugar fermentation) this organism is B. communior, while by another (Standard
methods) it is not, the main point of departure in the latter being that it shows a heavy growth
in sodium citrate solution, which we consider our most reliable test." As the American Public
Health Association is the authority for " Standard Methods in Water Analysis," we have decided
to disregard the annual appearance of this organism as one of the pathogenic types of colon
bacilli.
In connection with the weekly examination of the butter-fat content and bacterial count in
milk, a thorough check is maintained on the purity of our milk-supply. These tests show that
the bacterial counts are almost within the limits of certified milk. In some instances our counts
have been as low as 2,000 colonies per cubic .centimetre of milk, but a most rigid scrutiny would
be required to keep it there. During the latter part of February and the first of March the
bacterial count took a sudden sharp rise. Immediate investigation revealed the cause of the
contamination and it was eliminated.
We have lately adopted as routine blood-sedimentation tests on all patients, and at this
early date it is evident that we may expect valuable information from it as to the prognosis of :,'B:'
VIEW OF LAUNDRY BUILDINGS, TRANQUILLE.
(
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RESIDENCES OF MEDICAL AND OTHER OFFICERS, TRANQUILLE.  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29.                                              X 17
patients with tuberculosis.    The phenomenon of erythrocyte stability is not specific and will be
of no aid in diagnosis.    We hope within the next few months to be able to present a tabulated
report covering our investigations.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation of your interest and encouragement, and
to thank the Assistant Laboratory Technician for his efficient co-operation throughout the year.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
G. Darling,
Laboratory Technician.
GENERAL WORK DONE IN LABORATORY.
Material examined.
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Sputum	
90
105
140
120
106
88
112
115
90
116
153
181
1,416
42
56
55
28
59
42
39
66
48
42
77
48
602
48
32
49
242
15
85
33
92
18
1
47
227
4
46
31
3
73
37
6
49
242
21
42
16
1
74
22
o
76
284
14
133
42
1
814
1,226
Tubercle bacilli, total....
69
4
6
9
18
1
'2
2
2
30
1
1
2
Q
3
1
5
4
1
7
14
28
1
3
3
1
5
9
19
1
2
2
23
46
104
Renal functional test	
7
Blood-counts—
19
19
26
26
25
25
22
23
18
18
24
23
25
25
16
16
13
13
17
17
30
30
55
55
290
290
20
28
26
23
19
21
26
15
13
16
31
56
294
Differential     	
20
32
27
20
23
2
19
21
25
1
15
13
16
31
57
1
299
24
Coagulation time	
1
1
1
3
Kahn precipitin test	
7
16
29
24
34
14
22
13
24
8
18
36
245
5
1
10
2
29
1
21
2S
27
10
22
49
13
9
24
8
18
17
33
35
220
Fasting blood sugar	
142
Non-protein nitrogen	
1
1
1
1
4
Blood sedimentation	
49
12
18
38
117
1
1
2
2
1
7
37
1
3
23
40
1
23
49
22
1
48
1
24
1
106
12
12
408
Autogenous vaccine	
5
Bacteriological smears...
29
23
11
31
15
28
18
13
18
42
24
4
256
2
2
3
1
1
9
Guinea-pig inoculation...
1
1
3
1
2
1
3
2
14
Guinea-pig autopsies	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
13
1
1
1
2
4
3
4
16
Water analysis—
Chemical	
16
18
34
2
29
1
28
19
1
3
1
1
1
1
87
Milk analysis—
Bacteriological	
4
4
4
3
5
3
5
3
4
4
0
4
48
12
13
8
10
8
1
1
6
10
1
3
6
10
7
8
8
8
1
8
101
21
3
Widal reaction	
4
9
( X 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
SUMMARY  OF METEOROLOGICAL  OBSERVATIONS  FOR  YEAR  ENDED
MARCH 31st, 1929.
Month.
Maximum
Temp.
Minimum
Temp.
Averagi
Temp.
Average
Humidity.
Snow.
Rain.
Sunshine,
Bright.
1928
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1929
January	
February	
March	
Deg. F.
76.0
89.0
93.0
97.0
92.0
86.0
66.0
56.0
47.0
37.0
43.0
61.0
Deg. F.
25.0
33.0
42.0
51.0
41.0
36.0
23.0
20.0
1.0
^27.0
-18.0
23.0
Deg. F.
48.13
62.90
65.50
71.12
66.46
57.98
47.87
39.06
26.26
18.38
18.03
41.77
59.30
53.00
65.16
55.58
56.77
58.38
81.32
78.18
t
81.15
68.28
72.96
Inches.
3.00
25.00
2.50
Inches.
0.47
0.18
0.83
0.54
0.12
0.30
0.17
0.20
0.66
Hours.
221.6
291.9
220.9
295.4
277.1
248.8
151.4
71.7
54.1
44.1
122.8
162.9
t Broken wet bulb.
BURSAR'S REPORT.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1929.
Assets.
Land   $6,109.93
Buildings  680,746.25
Plant and equipment  133,818.21
Furniture and fixtures   50,343.42
Inventories  11,531.76
Petty Cash Account   1,000.00
Accounts receivable   1,632.70
$885,182.27
Deficit (cost of operations, 1928-29)  273,583.39
$1,158,765.66
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia ..-  $1,158,765.66 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29. X 19
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Depreciation—
Buildings  '.  $22,665.89
Plant and equipment  7,064.73
Furniture and fixtures   1,205.73
Salaries  129,152.07
Office supplies   2,066.48
Travelling and transportation   2,695.88
Fuel, light, and water  '.  40,827.30
Maintenance, etc  17,713.15
Furniture and fixtures  5,278.18
Provisions  90,284.91
Medical and surgical   9,191.17
Incidentals  2,412.65
By Revenue, receipts from maintenance of patients       $56,974.75
Balance  —      273,583.39
$330,558.14    $330,558.14
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31st, 1929.
Operating Expense Accounts.
Expenditure by voucher (less amounts credited to vote for supplies sold) —
Salaries—
Medical and clerical staff  ,  $21,622.46
Sundry employees   107,529.61
Office supplies—       • $129,152.07
Books and journals   $138.17
Stationery   1,092.07
Telephone and telegraph   516.21
Travelling and transportation— l,74b.45
Travelling expenses   $1,226.65
Transportation     1,744.60
Fuel, water, and light— 2,971.25
Fuel    $43,283.09
Plant supplies  1,007.82
Plant repairs  611.73
Maintenance of buildings, grounds, etc.— 44.J02.64
Janitors' supplies   $4,131.91
Equipment renewals   13,179.69
Gardens and grounds   2,012.33
Sundries  592.69
Furniture and fixtures— '       19,916.62
Linen   $2,531.73
Beds and bedding   216.86
Equipment     374.52
D      . .   3,123.11
Provisions— '
Groceries   $32,702.17
Meats  30,933.84
Fish    3,400.97
Milk and eggs   25,692.26
         92,729.24
Carried forward      $294,541.38 X 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA-
EXPENSE and Revenue Statement—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought forward      $294,541.38
Expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Incidentals—
Laundry       $2,178.31
Freight and cartage  .'.  678.13
Clothing, etc  858.03
Occupational     202.23
  3,916.70
Medical and surgical supplies—
Medicines,  etc      $3,403.81
Consultants' fees         2,862.20
X-ray and dental         3,472.60
  9,738.61
Total operating expense by voucher     $308,196.69
Inventories as at March 31st, 1928—
Oflice supplies   $456.38
Travelling and transportation  35.88
Maintenance, etc '.  6,043.49
Furniture and fixtures   2,479.59
Provisions   2,299.28
Medical and surgical   138.40
Incidentals  . 61.90
11,514.92
$319,711.61
Less inventories as at March 31st, 1929—
Office supplies   $136.35
Travelling and transportation   11.25
Fuel, etc  4,075.34
Maintenance, etc  4,229.39
Furniture and fixtures  324.52
Provisions   1,864.34
Medical and surgical supplies  152.14
Incidentals   738.43
        11,531.76
$308,179.85
Less equipment transferred to Asset Account  4,372.57
$303,807.28
Le»s sundry collections—
Provisions   $1,762.47
Board   1,116.80
Post-office   300.00
Medical and surgical   178.70
Sundries     827.52
4,185.49
Gross cost of operating for year     $299,021.79 .
:.'-^&t-   4,-tHt
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WEST PAVILION,   TRANQUILLE.
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GROUNDS IN  REAR OF BUILDINGS, TRANQUILLE.  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 192S-29. X 21
»
Expense and Revenue Statement—Continued.
Brought forward     $299,621.79
Revenue.
By Receipts, Department of Pensions and Health      $18,240.23
Receipts, municipalities       26,428.40
Receipts, sundry patients       12,308.12
        56,974.75
Net cost of operating for year      $242,647.04
To Depreciation written off—
Buildings        $22,665.89
Plant and equipment        7,064.73
Furniture and fixtures          1,205.73
  30,936.35
$273,583.39
Summary of Profit and Loss Account.
Yearly
Per Capita.
Salaries  :  $129,152.07 $603.51
Office supplies  2.066.4S 9.67
Travelling and transportation   2,695.88 12.60
Fuel, water, light, and power  40,827.30 190.78
Maintenance and  repairs :  17,713.15 82.77
Furniture and fixtures  5,278.18 24.66
Provisions  90,284.91 421.89
Medical and surgical supplies   9,191.17 42.95
Incidentals  2,412.65 11.27
$299,621.79       $1,400.10
Less revenue (maintenance)       56,974.75 266.23
Net cost of operating  $242,647.04       $1,133.87
Depreciation  (buildings, plant, fixtures)         30,936.35 144.56
$273,583.39       $1,278.43
Remarks.
Number of days' treatment given during year 1928-29   78,225
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1929   269
Daily average population for year ended March 31st   214
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  $1,400.10
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day   3.83
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  1,133.86
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  2.84 	
X 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showino the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year, the Total
Amounts spent for Maintenance, and the Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
Average Number
in Residence.
Maintenance
Expenses.
Per Capita
Cost.
1921-22	
190.04
194.46
207.15
221.21
224.00
223.00
216.00
214.31
$271,730.08
284,019.31
312,065.72
300,350.00
293,980.72
30S.194.82
294,674.82
299,621.79
$1,429.85
1922-23	
1,460.55
1923-24 	
1,506.46
1924-25 	
1,357.75
1925-26	
1,312.44
1926-27	
1,382.04
1927-28	
1,364.24
1928-29	
1,400.10
Table B.—Showing Analysis of Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
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1921-22	
1922-23	
$439.59
482.22
479.85
467.52
479.75
501.57
554.98
603.51
$9.01
8.09
7.46
6.01
8.97
9.51
10.32
9.67
$20.56
11.32
9.42
11.93
8.09
14.81
11. S9
12.60
$225.14
232.81
243.48
211.11
189.92
173.22
169.48
190.78
$138.43
133.03
85.77
70.55
68.62
65.85
64.20
82.77
$57.79
66.89
13.70
25.78
6.62
33.96
34.93
24.66
$421.96
472.17
441.26
2S8.86
392.98
426.23
448.96
421.89
$28.37
13.07
39.95
26.17
34.68
39.32
53.82
42.95
$72.06
28.46
65.76
33.05
19.31
12.36
15.65
11.27
1
$1,429.85
1,460.55
1923-24	
1,506.46
1924-25 	
1,357.75
1925-26	
1,312.44
1926-27	
1,382.04
1927-28	
1,364.24
1928-29	
1,400.10
1 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29.
X 23
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' X 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table E.—Showing Number of Days' Treatment given each Month.
Year.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.      Feb.     Mar.
Total
tor Year.
1921 22
6,102
5,566
6,548
6,701
6,982
6,787
6,595
6,261
6,059
5,343
6,329
6,575
6,982
6,936
6,601
6,489
5,439
4,961
5,740
5,965
6.638
6,582
5,987
6,056
5,359
4,523
5,567
5,815
6,543
6,549
5,850
6,107
5,680
5,022
5.981
6,312
6,182
6,587
5,928
6,226
5,160
5,334
5,786
6,457
6,581
6,619
6,374
6,274
5,547
6,346
6,191
7,101
6,951
7,033
6,825
6,565
5,641
6,513
6,527
7,133
6,714
6,896
6,852
6,461
6,078
6,662
6,543
7,243
7,002
6,947
6,827
6,534
6,405
7,061
6,600
7,382
7,269
7,027
6,695
6,615
5,809
6.554
6,703
6,686
6,592
6,458
6,343
6,394
6,086
7,093
7,304
7,383
7.319
69,365
1922-23	
70,978
1923-24	
1924-25	
1925-26	
75,819
80,753
81.775
1926-27	
7,0031    81,422
1927-28
1928-29	
6,8931     77,770
8.2431    78.225
-
Table F.—Showing Laundry-work.
Number of Pieces from April 1st, 1921.
Year.
Flat-work.
Personal.
Total.
1921 22                  ..                   	
159,393
181.399
196,011
212,508
230,653
256,067
291,859
326,951
123,875
140,447
147,060
146,694
145,438
133,862
141,522
153,761
283,26S
1922-23                  	
321,846
1923-24                                                  	
343,071
1924-25        ...	
359.202
1925-26	
376,091
1926-27	
389,929
1927-28                                       	
433,381
1928-29	
480,712
Number of Pieces during Year ended March 31st, 1929.
Month.
Flat-work.
Personal.
Total.
25,063
28,244
26,298
25,616
27,014
25,451
28,913
26.934
26,183
27,382
26,380
33,473
13,551
12,880
12,036
13,112
11,293
11,528
14,222
12,654
12,582
13,612
12,336
13,958
38,614
Mav	
41,124
38,334
July	
38,728
38,307
36,979
October	
November	
43,135
39,588
38,765
40,994
38,716
47,431
February	
Totals	
326,951
153,764
480,715
27.246
12,813
40,059
SANATORIUM FARM REPORT.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1929.
Assets.
Buildings and improvements   $95,392.25
Equipment  1,988.44
Land Account  70,405.88
Automobile Account   400.00
Accounts receivable  5,696.50
Dam Account   '.  421.72
D. W. Strachan (petty cash advance)  500.00
Carried forward   $174,804.79 ■TH"
'■   "   ' ■'      '"-       '        '"■:      :. ■
IIIi f i ■
1:
l
T)
TWO-BED WARD, GREAVES BUILDING.
1
'
'"-"
Sr
FOUR-BED   WARD,   GREAVES   BUILDING.  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29.
X 25
Balance-sheet—Cont inued.
Assets—Continued.
Brought forward       $174,804.79
Inventories (live stock) —
Dairy herd      $20,275.00
Bulls        2,235.00
Range stock      18,980.00
Horses        6,540.00
Unissued  stores          6,789.45
Machinery and plant        6,382.70
Tools     559.70
Harness  494.00
      62,255.85
Canadian Bank of Commerce (Trading Account)    499.90
Deficit          15,411.51
$252,972.05
Liabilities.
D. W. Strachan  (petty cash advance)    $500.00
D. W. Strachan (Stock Trading Account)  1,500.00
Capital    250,972.05
$252,972.05
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Salary,   Superintendent    $2,520.00
Salaries, employees   13,213.67
Fuel, light, and water   1,618.40
Feed Account  10,094.42
Provisions   3,637.05
Blacksmith's supplies   558.18
Drugs and veterinary   556.52
Implements and harness i  3,786.43
Incidentals and contingencies   2,475.16
Travelling and transportation  :  1,398.08
Janitors' supplies, maintenance, etc  982.49
New sires   1,002.90
Sundry live-stock purchases  2,203.35
Stock on hand, April 1st, 1929  50,647.01
    $94,693.66
Profit on—
Live-stock sales    $5,387.54
Hide-sales   398.01
Farm produce, sundry   250.09
Milk-sales  20,955.25
Beef and pork sales   8,953.00
Teaming     123.40
Board Account   3.50
Horse-hire     7.00
Stock on hand, March 31st, 1929   48,250.00
      84,327.79
Loss on Operating Account      $10,365.87
Depreciation on automobile  $25.00
Depreciation on farm buildings         5,020.64
        5,045.64
Deficit for year ,     $15,411.51 X 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Dairy- Herd—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Receipts.
Milk supplied to Sanatorium, 58,299 gallons   $20,648.60
Milk supplied to boarding-house, 2,318 gallons   811.30
Milk for calves, 5,464 gallons   1,912.40
Milk-sales, 606 gallons  303.00
Skim-milk sold   3.65
Skim-milk for pigs   315.00
Stock sold  1,970.80
Beef sold, 30,114 lb  731.34
Manure produced, 430 tons   645.00
Inventory, live stock, 1928-29  '.  20,275.00
Inventory, feed, 1928-29 !  5,823.57
Hides sold    16.80
$53,456.46
Expenditure.
Milk for calves  $1,912.40
Inventory, live stock, 1927-28   19,585.00
Inventory, feed, 1927-28  ,. 2,440.92
Wages   4,459.47
Board of employees   ,  2,160.00
Equipment   196.30
Electricity  369.45
Sundries -  125.00
Hay (alfalfa), 170 tons  3,400.00
Mangels, 40 tons  200.00
Beet-pulp   16.00
Flax-seed  10.50
Bone-meal  13.80
Barley    2,138.80
Bran  :  584.15
Distillers' grains  1,376.80
Oats    2,062.00
Cotton-seed meal ■.  43.30
Soya beans   72.00
Potatoes  200.04
Oilcake   988.50
Salt  23.00
Straw   771.00
Green feed, 340 tons  1,700.00
Silage, 414 tons   2,070.00
Laundry  129.45
Veterinary and drugs   531.52
Horse-labour  511.00
Tractor-labour   45.00
• ■     48,135.46
Profit, 1928-29      $5,321.06 Dairy Herd—Production and Cost Account, March 31st, 1929.
Salaries   $4,459.47
Board of employees  2,160.00
Feed   12,828.89
Sundry expenses  623.90
Equipment  196.30
Silage  2,070.00
Bedding   771.00
Veterinary and drugs '. - 531.52
Horse-labour     511.00
Tractor-labour   45.00
Inventory, feed, 1927-28   2,440.00
    $26,638.00
Less allowance for manure   645.00
$25,993.00
Less cost of feed and care of young growing non-producing dairy stock         4,737.74
$21,255.26
Less inventory, feed, 1928-29          5,823.57
$15,431.69
Milk production for year, 666,876.1 lb., or 66,687.61 gallons.    Average cost of production,
23.14 cents per gallon.
Milk Production, March 31st, 1929.
1928. Milk, Lb. 1928. Milk, Lb.
April     58,631.4 December  46,208.7
May     63,216.4
1QOQ
J«ne   64'7612 January   51,058.3
July     61'244-7 February   48,761.5
Au«ust   63'259'8 March  57,798.4
September   59,710.6
October     50,782.1
November     41,443.0
666,876.1
List of Record of Performances produced by the Tranquille Sanatorium Farm
Herd for the Year 1928-29.
Milk Production. Butter.
Name. Lb.                        Lb.
Alexandra Verona May  (77144)    24,397 941.25
Mina Posch Pontiac (86568)   19,177 918.75
Uneeda Peach DeKol  (42717)    17,893 722.50
Stella Korndyke Butter Girl (50616)   17,253 785.00
Alexandra Ormsby Birdie (101010)    17,009 768.75
Lucy DeKol Pontiac (81160)   .*.  16,502 690.00
Kathryn Fayne Ormsby (174752)  15,582 667.50
Fairy Sylvia Echo  (100836)     15,616 693.75
Alexandra Cinderella Echo (122543)   15,065 653.75
Alexandra Queen Hengerveld (68112)   14,803 722.50
Alexandra Tranquille Korndyke (45S07)    14,725 720.00
Inka Darkness Hengerveld (41208)    14,537 637.50
Excellency Hengerveld Echo (100835)   13,466 535.00
Alexandra Ormsby Rose  (126709)  13,331 500.00
Alexandra Peach DeKol (127176)   13,185 561.25 X 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Range Cattle—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Receipts.
Inventory, 1928-29   $21,215.00
Beef sold to Sanatorium, 41,229 lb  7,009.03
Liver sold to Sanatorium  62.76
Hides sold  381.21
Beef sold to boarding-house, 8,437 lb  1,434.29
Beef sold, sundry   210.80
Service of bull  2.00
Offal sold  69.55
Manure allowance   300.00
     $30,684.64
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1927-28   $20,735.00
Bulls bought n.  1,625.00
Drugs   25.00
Salt  23.00
Mill-feeds, etc  828.25
Leased ranges   477.73
Wages  799.32
Board  465.00
Hay (alfalfa), 100 tons   2,000.00
Hay (swamp), 200 tons   600.00
Horse-labour     230.00
      27,808.30
Profit,  1928-29        $2,876.34
Horses—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1927-28   $7,480.00
Wages  279.66
Electricity  44.79
Oats    528.00
Hay, 160 tons   3,200.00
Board of employees   165.00
Equipment  75.00
Straw   29.75
     $11,802.20
Receipts.
Inventory, 1928-29   $6,540.00
Teaming   91.90
Manure produced,  156 tons   234.00
Horse-labour—
Grounds  '.. 70.00
Garden   45.00
Beef  •  230.00
Swine  57.00
Potatoes  27.50
Silage  -  115.50
Hay '.  1,885.00
Fencing   70.00
Mangels   49.00
        9,414.90
Loss, 1928-29       $2,387.30 Akm^^^.*- "■
MESH
JAPANESE GARDENS, TRANQUILLE.
«
SITTING-ROOM, NURSES' HOME, TRANQUILLE.  Swine—Profit and Loss Account. March 31st, 1929.
Expenditure.
Inventory, live stock, 1927-28  $2,561.00
Horse-labour .,  57.00
Wages, employees   694.98
Board of employees   420.00
Boars purchased   102.95
Mill-feed  794.75
Garbage-cans   109.66
Straw   59.50
Electricity     44.79
Hay for bedding  30.00
       $4,874.63
Receipts.
Pork sold to Sanatorium, 3,886 lb         $524.04
Pork to boarding-house, 1,620 lb  226.80
Pork sold, sundry         1,686.55
Pigs sold          1,935.90
Inventory, feed, 1928-29   157.50
         4,530.79
Loss, 1928-29   $343.84
-—i
Hay Department—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Receipts.
Inventory, 1928-29   $3,500.00
Hay (alfalfa), dairy, 170 tons ,  3,400.00
Hay (alfalfa), beef, 100 tons   2,000.00
Hay (alfalfa), horses, 160 tons   3,200.00
Hay (swamp), beef, 200 tons  600.00
Hay  (swamp), swine, 10 tons  30.00
     $12,730.00
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1927-28   $2,740.00
Wages, cutting, etc  1,795.83
Board,  labourers    1,080.00
Board, irrigators  450.00
Manure   '.  1,179.00
Salt  23.00
Horse-labour  1,885.00
Tractor-labour   130.00
         9,283.83
Profit, 1928-29        $3,446.17
Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Receipts.
Vegetables sold to Sanatorium— •
Lettuce, 52 lb.; turnips, 1,064 lb.; peas, 360 lb.; Swiss chard, 787
lb.; vegetable marrow, 1,383 lb.; carrots, 4,115 lb.; beets, 515
lb.;   tomatoes,  1,200 lb.;   corn,  40 doz.;   cucumbers,  12  doz.;
squash, 1,988 lb.;  parsnips, 270 lb         $250.09
Vegetables, boarding-house   200.00
Apples, boarding-house   100.00
         $550.09
Carried forward          $550.09 X 30                                                           BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account—Continued.
Brought forward 	
Expenditure.
Seeds                                                 $37.70
$550.09
445.97
Board                                                        100 00
Horse-labour                                                  45 00
Profit, 1928-29 	
$104.12
■
Ensilage—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Receipts.
Inventory, 75 tons, 1928-29                             $375.00
Dairy, 414 tons  .'.                          2,070.00
$2,445.00
1,871.15
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1927-28, 50 tons  '.                           $250 00
Seed purchased                              335.78
Board, employees                                            320 00
Horse-labour                                           115 50
Tractor-labour                                 140 00
Profit, 1928-29 	
$573.85
Grounds—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
To Expenses—
$45.00
369.69
225.00
4.32
26.17
168.89
Plants   	
Hose 	
Fuel, Light, and Water—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1927-28  '	
$839.07
$232.00
169.37
100.00
1,024.70
Wages, emplovees 	
Board, emplovees 	
$1,526.07
301.00
$1,225.07 DAIRY'-BABNS,  TRANQUILLE.
■
"•". if1 *
.fee. M
H
;:-*....     ■.■■
INTERIOR OF DAIRY-BARN",   TRANQUILLE.  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1928-29. X 31
Fencing—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
To Material   $179.22
Wages  *.... 331.76
Board    195.00
Horse-labour   70.00
Loss, 1928-29          $775.98
:—i
Automobile and Motor Machinery—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Gas and oil     .   $511.07
Repairs to motors, etc  775.23
Inventory, 1927-28  ,  425.00
$1,711.35
Inventory, 1928-29   400.00
Loss, 1928-29       $1,311.35
Blacksmithing—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Expenditure.
Wages  $309.53
Board  120.00
Electricity '.  44.79
Supplies   562.59
Loss, 1928-29      $1,036.90
—i
Machinery, Harness, and Tools—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1929.
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1927-28—
Harness          $550.00
Machinery and plant        3,733.00
Tools          1,078.26
New equipment         3,725.43
       $9,086.69
Receipts.
Inventory, 1928-29—
Harness  $494.00
Machinery and plant          6,267.70
Tools  559.70
        7,321.40
Loss, 1928-29        $1,765.29
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Chables F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.
525-1229-8705 

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