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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1923

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL  EEPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR  THE
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31ST
1922
printed by
authority op the legislative assembly.
■VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1923.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year
1922 is herewith respectfully submitted.
A. M. MANSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
May, 1923. The Honourable A. M. Manson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my fifth Annual Report on the work
of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1922.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. D. McNIVEN,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour, Victoria, B.C.,
May, 1923. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR
FOR 1922.
The best that can be said of industrial conditions in the Province during 1922 is that they
were a distinct improvement upon those of 1921. The period of depression which descended
upon us like a heavy cloud in the fall of 1920 remained with us for the whole of the two following years, but during 1922 there were welcome signs that the cloud was lifting, and at the
beginning of 1923 the business weather chart is pointing very definitely towards a revival. It has
been a long and trying period not only for ourselves, but for almost every country in the world.
The Claims of the Unemployed.
In the circumstances the unemployment problem could not but be with us for the greater
part of the year, and the record of the Department of Labour for 1922 is, in the main, a story
of efforts which have been put forward to deal with one phase or another of the .situation.
At the beginning of the year the trouble was very acute, many thousands of unemployed persons
being congregated especially in Araneouver and Victoria. The Dominion Government had laid
down the lines on which assistance should be given to enable needy applicants to tide over the
unemployment period. They agreed to contribute one-third of any sums of money which were
handed out in the form of relief, but made it a condition that the Provincial Government should
provide another third and the local authority the remainder. In addition to this form of assistance, which was regarded as a " dole " pure and simple, the Dominion Government encouraged
local authorities to proceed with such necessary public works as could be undertaken during the
winter months. Where the cost of carrying out the work exceeded the normal by reason of its
being undertaken at such period of the year, the Dominion Government stipulated that the normal
cost should be paid in full by the municipality, and that the excess cost over and above normal
should be shared equally by the Dominion Government, the Provincial Government, and the local
authority. Later, on January 25th, the Dominion Government increased its contribution to one-
half of the " cost over normal," thus reducing the contribution of the local authority to one-
sixth, while that of the Provincial Government remained at one-third.
The position of the Provincial Government in relation to these schemes was this: that it had
either to accept or reject proposals of which it had no hand in the making, nor any choice of
the manner in which they should be carried out. The Dominion Government drew up the broad
outlines of the schemes, and the cities and municipalities decided as to their local application and
spent the money. The Provincial Government, however, recognizing that there was a real need
to be met, and that it was a case of joint responsibility of all the three authorities, loyally met
its one-third share of the bill, and supplemented this contribution by putting in hand works of
its own so as to take care of an additional number of unemployed. These works were referred
to in detail in our last annual report, and their operation, begun in 1921, was carried over into
the opening months of 1922.
Government Contributions for Relief.
The plans for assisting the unemployed remained in force until the end of April. In these
first four months of the year the Provincial Government's one-third contribution for relief purposes amounted to $149,624.75, which was paid to various cities and municipalities as follows:
Burnaby, $4,513.68; Kamloops, §535.84; New AVestminster, $1,570.66; North Vancouver (City),
$5,582.41; North Vancouver (District), $2,874.14; Oak Bay, $427.70; Prince Rupert, $5,523.21;
Rossland, $223.99 ; South Vancouver, $43,456.85; Arancouver, $66,841.17; Victoria, $18,175.77; West
Vancouver, $99.33.
Payments coming under the head of one-third " cost over normal" were not so large an
item, as comparatively few local authorities found themselves in a position to take advantage of
the scheme. The following sums were paid out by- the Provincial Government: Burnaby,
$1,346.04; Kamloops, $72.50; Nanaimo, $233.67; Penticton, $475.30; Saanich, $202.66; South Y&n-
eouver, $8,155.40;  Arancouver Sewerage Board, $3,501.49;  a total of $13,987.06. S 6
Department of Labour.
1923
Differences of East and AVest.
It may be mentioned that payments for unemployment relief and assistance were proportionately heavier in this Province than in most of the other Provinces of the Dominion, and
recent discussions have brought out some rather sharp differences of opinion as to the proper
method of approaching the unemployed question.
The older Provinces in the East are inclined to look askance at public expenditure under
this head. In older communities, and under more long-established social systems, private charity
plays a larger part than public aid in helping the distressed. Consequently, while they had
their own unemployed situation on their hands, many of the Provincial Governments and cities
in the east did not choose to make payments on their own account which would qualify them
to receive the contribution offered by the Dominion Government. This probably explains a disposition which was shown on their part to be critical of expenditure which the Dominion
Government sanctioned for aid to the unemployed in the Western Provinces.
The Case for and against " Doles."
Differences of opinion also developed with respect to the policy of giving " doles "; that
is, paying out money in relief to persons who are not expected to give any return for it
in the way of work. This policy, after being tried for two years in this Province, met with all-
round condemnation, and everybody agreed that it should be stopped and that the recipients of
Government assistance should be required to perform some labour for what they received. In
our Coast cities it is feasible to insist upon this condition. Practically all the work available
for the unemployed is outdoor labour, and in the Coast region such work need never be suspended
for more than from four to six weeks during the winter season; and so the condition that work
must be done in exchange for assistance given presents no special difficulty. But in the Prairie
Provinces and in the interior of our own Province outdoor work in midwinter is plainly impossible, and if the people there are to receive any assistance at all it can apparently be given in no
other way than that of the much-debated " doles." AVe can therefore see that, for one reason
or another, an unemployment relief scheme which would very well suit conditions in the Coast
area of our own Province would not be acceptable to other parts of the Dominion.
The objections of our own people to the policy of giving doles was unanimously expressed
at a meeting of representatives from the municipalities of Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland, held on August 24th in Alctoria. The meeting was addressed by the Honourable John
Oliver, Premier, and the Honourable A. M. Manson, Minister of Labour. After a discussion in
which a large number of the delegates took part, the meeting declared itself unanimously against
the giving of doles, and in favour of appealing to employers to give the first preference in
employment to (1) the disabled veterans; (2) to married returned men with families; and (3)
to married men who are not returned soldiers. An opinion was also expressed in favour of
establishing an intermunicipal Board to act as an advisory body on employment questions. The
meeting served the purpose of making clear the feeling prevalent in the Province, preparatory to the discussions upon the unemployment question which took place at Ottawa early in
September at a conference attended by representatives of the Dominion and Provincial
Governments.
Decisions of Ottawa Conference.
The Ottawa Conference brought out some differences of opinion on various aspects of the
problem as already indicated, but it showed the existence of a general agreement that the worst
period of unemployment had been passed, and that the winter of 1922-23 was not likely to
witness such a serious situation as the two previous winters. So far as the Province was concerned, this expectation was borne out by events, as our leading industries were more active in
providing employment during the closing months of the year than they had been in the corresponding periods of other recent years. This appealed to the Ottawa Conference as a favourable
time to recede somewhat from the position that had been taken up in previous years, and a
change of attitude is apparent from the resolutions adopted, and which were in the following
terms:—
Resolution 1.—" In connection with the attention which has been given by this Conference to
the subject of unemployment and the measures which may be deemed necessary by the public
authorities in Canada to provide for the relief of unemployed persons, the Conference hereby 13 Geo. 5 Report op the Deputy Minister.
places on record, as an expression of its view, that the problem of unemployment is primarily
one of industry and that every effort should be made in industry to prevent the occurrence of
unemployment.
"It is recognized that the causes of unemployment in some cases may be outside of particular
industries and in part due to causes which are international. This Conference, however, urges
upon those engaged in industry the necessity of regulating employment in the interests alike of
employer and employee."
Resolution 2.—" That this Conference, after considering the representations made by municipalities, Provincial Governments, and the Federal Government, is of the opinion that at the
present time no acute unemployment problem exists throughout the Dominion; and, further, that
if during the approaching winter abnormal unemployment should materialize it will be less in
extent than during the past winter.
" That the Conference is further of the opinion that the practice of handing out unemployment doles is wrong in principle and often harmful in effect and should not be resorted to until
all other measures have failed.
" This Conference is of the opinion that if abnormal unemployment should exist during the
approaching winter the Provincial and Federal Governments should jointly meet the situation
in the following manner:—
" First:  All physically fit single men shall be expected to provide for themselves.
" Second: On the receipt of requests from municipalities for assistance the Federal and
Provincial Governments shall jointly investigate same, and if after investigation they are satisfied
that the situation warrants their attention any assistance given shall be undertaken on the
following basis:—
"(a.) That the municipalities provide such emergency relief-work as is possible, and that
the Provincial and Federal Governments should each bear a proportion of the
additional cost over normal cost for winter construction in the execution of such
work:
"(6.) That where sufficient relief-work cannot be created direct relief be given in a
manner similar to that carried out during the past winter.
'■ Third: That the Federal Government through the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment continue to bear the responsibility of looking after the disabled ex-service men."
Resolution 3.—" Whereas in departments of Government, both Federal and local, there are
avenues open for employment:
" And whereas the Canadian National Railway Board is the manager and operator of the
Canadian National Railway and the Canadian Government system:
" And whereas there are Boards administering, under legislative authority, special departments of public works in the various Provinces:
" And whereas there are recurring periods of unemployment:
" Therefore this Conference recommends that the respective Governments, the National Railway Board, and the Boards administering the special departments of public works in the various
Provinces should regulate and carry on their public work and railway operation so as to distribute the work in such a manner as to relieve unemployment to the greatest possible extent
throughout Canada."
Dominion Government's Change of Policy.
The second resolution, while thus condemning the policy of giving doles as harmful, admitted
the possibility of giving them as a last resort after other ways of treating the unemployment
problem had failed. In point of fact, the necessity for the Government to take this course did
not arise. With the industries of the Province absorbing a larger amount of labour, the ordinary
channels for giving out relief to necessitous cases did not require, up to the end of the year, to
be supplemented by Government aid. Moreover, the Dominion Government, after a survey of
conditions throughout the country, announced that the emergency relief measures of the two previous winters would not be reintroduced, and that the municipal authorities would have to take
care of their unemployed, with such assistance as they could procure from their Provincial
Governments. «
In the month of December there were indications that the situation might require further
measures, and a meeting for the purpose of gathering information as to unemployment was held
in the Court-house, Vancouver.   The Deputy Minister of Labour presided, and representatives were present of all the principal cities and municipalities on the Lower Mainland. Many of
them spoke of their experiences in dealing with the unemployed and the situation existing in
their own districts, and the general 'opinion appeared to be that some form of Government aid
was required in dealing with the problem. In the afternoon of the same day the Deputy Minister
met representatives of the unemployed and heard their views, which on the general situation
agreed in the main wiith those of the municipal representatives.
(Later, early in 1923, the Provincial Government, without calling for assistance from either
Dominion or municipal authorities, opened up work in the clearing of land at Point Grey, where
500 men were employed for two months. Schemes on a smaller scale were set on foot in order
to assist the unemployed of Victoria and surrounding municipalities, work being done on roads
in the district. In other parts of the Province the Government found it necessary to render
some slight assistance along similar lines.)
It may be that we have not yet heard the last of the controversy as to how far the responsibility for providing for unemployment rests with the Dominion and how far with the Provincial
Government. The causes of unemployment very often are neither local nor Provincial. We have
the annual influx of unemployed from the Prairie to the Coast each winter, and we have also
the fact that since the war this Province has received far more than her quota of unemployed
ex-soldiers, many of them suffering from disabilities. In meeting the responsibilities which the
presence of these men in our midst has placed upon us, the Province is entitled to expect some
co-operation from the authorities at Ottawa.
Claims of Disabled ex-Soldiees.
In the latter part of the year the claims of the disabled ex-soldiers who were out of work
were brought prominently before the public by the Honourable Minister of Labour, and instructions were given to the Superintendents of Employment Bureaus to do everything in their power
to secure suitable employment for these men. This was preparatory to an appeal from the
Honourable Minister which was circulated later to all employers of labour in the Province, asking
that the disabled men should have first consideration for any employment which was available,
and that each large employer should so arrange the work in his establishment as to permit of a
number of positions being filled by such men. Some of the employers have received the appeal
very sympathetically and have done their best to carry out its suggestions, with the result that a
large number of disabled men have now been given employment. Our basic industries are not
such as to absorb readily men who are not physically fit, and the Employment Service in the
Province has been co-operating as far as possible with the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment in securing suitable employment for the citizens who, because of war service, find themselves physically unfit for the work they performed prior to the war, in addition to those who
meet with misfortune in following their occupations in the industrial life of the Province.
White Laboub in Place op Asiatics.
Another matter which was taken up directly by the Minister of Labour was a request to the
railways in the Province that they should agree to hire all the men required for work on section
and extra gangs through the Employment Offices, and to refrain from employing the gangs of
Asiatics usually hired during the summer months. Through this arrangement more than 2,000
white labourers were sent to employment on railways in British Columbia, and though a large
number of those men did not remain in employment, a sufficient number stayed to the end of
the summer to render it unnecessary to employ more than a small percentage of the number of
Asiatics usually engaged. The rate of wages, and on the more recently constructed railways the
absence of proper accommodation for married men, made it somewhat difficult to secure citizens
for this work, but many men have reported that, if housing accommodation could be provided for
their families, they would follow railway-track work the year round, preferring steady employment to the intermittent work offering in many industries where the operation is of necessity
seasonal.
Laboub Disputes of the Year.
Comparatively few labour disputes took place in tb^e Province during the year. The most
serious in extent was that affecting the coal-miners in the Crowsnest area, which was really
a part of the larger dispute which spread over a great portion of the mining area of the continent.
In the Crowsnest, after a stoppage of nearly five months, from April to August, the miners 13 Geo. 5
Eeport of the Deputy Minister.
signed an agreement making a concession in the way of a lower rate of pay; but this was almost
immediately revised, the former rate being restored in conformity with an agreement made
in the coalfields of the Central area in the United States. In the lumber industries there
were a number of small disputes, and some dissatisfaction was manifested over the charges
which employers make for board in camps where the men have no opportunity of arranging
for private residence. When very high wages were being paid three years ago, and the cost
of food and commodities was much higher than it is to-day, the charge for board was
increased to $1.20 and sometimes as high as to $1.50 per day, and this became fairly general.
Since then wages in the lumbering industries have gone down, on the average, by $7 to $8 per
week, and food, generally speaking, is much cheaper; but some firms have still kept the charge
for board at its highest figure, though others have made a reduction. This has caused some discontent, and there does not appear to be any reason why the charge for board should not come
down in sympathy with the general movement of prices.
Delay in Payment of Wages.
A large number of complaints have been received during the year regarding violations of the
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Such violations occur most frequently at camps in
isolated districts. Some employers, on having the complaints brought to their attention, have
made the excuse that the men had no means of spending their money in the locality where they
were working; but this is not a reasonable ground for non-compliance with the law, and, in cases
when employers have eventually been unable to meet their obligations, depriving the men of
money which they have earned, or delaying the payment indefinitely. Such delay imposes a
hardship especially upon men with families to support. Several prosecutions under the Act have
resulted from complaints made to this Department, and have been the means of securing redress
for the workmen. Men employed in out-of-the-way districts who find a difficulty in obtaining
their wages at the proper time should notify the circumstances to the Department of Labour.
Other Questions.
During this year there was a slight downward movement in industrial wages in the Province
and a slight upward movement in the matter of working-hours, but both these movements have
now been reversed. The activities of the Minimum Wage Board and the Employment Service,
the administration of the " Factories Act," the labour disputes of the year, and the collection of
statistics of wages and industries are-dealt with in separate sections of this report. Department of Labour.
1923
STATISTICS OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIES.
AVith each successive year the section of our annual report appearing under the above
title becomes a more complete statement. Since the Department of Labour became into
existence, in 1918, an effort has been made every year to assemble details relating to the total
pay-roll, rates of wages, nationality, fluctuations of employment, and working-hours of people
employed in the industries of the Province. In carrying out this work we are dependent to
a very large extent upon the co-operation and goodwill of employers of industrial labour, each
of whom is asked at the beginning of the year to furnish the details relating to his own business.
It is a pleasure to report that this co-operation has been more effective this year than
ever. In 1918, the Department's first year, 1,047 employing firms sent in their reports; in the
second year, 1,207; in the third year, 1,869; in the fourth year, 2,275; and for this, the fifth
year, we have received no fewer than 2,809 returns. This is truly a remarkable result, and
one which, we venture to think, would not have been possible were it not for the recognition,
on the part of employers, of the fact that the Department, in collecting and publishing this
information, is rendering an important service to the Province and its industries. Doubtless
there are some who have not sent in their reports, but they are comparatively few. Our chief
regret is that the returns in some cases were not made with greater promptitude. Statistical
forms were sent out by the Department at the beginning of the year and were returnable for
January 31st; but some firms did not make their returns until the latter part of April, and
then only after repeated applications by the Department. But for this dilatoriness on the part
of a small number of employers our report would have been published at a much earlier date.
In the first two years for which returns were asked a period was chosen ending with July
31st. Then, in order that statistics might be presented covering as recent a period as possible,
the date was moved to September 30th; and carrying the same movement further for the report
covering 1921, a full calendar year was chosen. As this change appeared to justify itself,
the same plan was again adopted this year, and the returns now presented are for the full
year 1922. No change has been made this year in the grouping of the returns, which for
the purposes of this report have been assembled under twenty-five heads, and the questions put
to employers were also identical with those of last year. • In this way there has been avoided
anything that would detract from the value of the two reports for the purpose of comparison.
Salary and Wage Payments.
The salary and wage payments made by the 2,809 firms during the year amounted to
$86,192,190.73. This compares with a total of $79,742,380.10 paid out in tne previous year by
2,275 firms. The amount paid to officers, superintendents, and managers, $7,730,624.73, is about
$500,000 more than in the previous year, but the payments to clerks, stenographers, and salesmen are actually a little less in 1922 than 1921, notwithstanding the increase in the number
of firms reporting. The amount paid to purely industrial wage-earners, however, represents
an increase of nearly $6,000,000 over the previous year, the total for 1922 being $71,324,416.39.
An analysis of these figures shows that, while the number of firms reporting increased by 2214
per cent., their aggregate pay-roll showed an increase of rather less than 9 per cent. This is
explained in part, no doubt, by the fact that the 534 employers who sent in returns this year
for the first time are mostly firms in a smaller way of business; and also partly by the fact
that in most industries wages during 1922 showed a reduction as compared with 1921. This
reduction would appear to have been felt most of all by the non-industrial workers. The payments for managerial services in 1921 amounted to 10 per cent, of the total, and in 1922 to
9 per cent.; while the proportion allotted to office-help fell from about 10 per cent, to 8:14 pet-
cent. Perhaps a reason for this may be that a number of firms which closed their works for
considerable periods in 1921, but which required office-help to keep together the thread of their
business, were operating more steadily in 1922. The total industrial pay-roll would have been
augmented to somewhere in the neighbourhood of $100,000,000 had it been found practicable
to include the salary and wage payments made in this Province to employees on the various
steam-railway systems. 13 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
Industries with a Smaller Pay-roll.
An examination of the pay-roll of the different industries and of the corresponding figures
for 1921 affords some interesting comparisons. One of the industries showing a falling-off is
that of the breweries, with a pay-roll of $446,424.81 in 1922 as against $654,654.65 in 1921.
How far such a result has been produced by changes in the law affecting the sale of beer,
the most important of which went into effect in the summer of 1921, it is not within the
province of this Department to inquire. Another industry showing a slightly reduced pay-roll
is that of cigar and tobacco manufacturing; but with regard to this it may be observed that
the largest concern in the Province engaged in this business underwent a reconstruction last
spring. Slight reductions are also shown in the pay-roll of the metal trades, and in some of
the smaller industries, such as oil-refining and paint-manufacturing. The industry which
shows the biggest reduction is that of ship-building, with a pay-roll down from $2,837,344.02 in
1921 to $940,530.73 in 1922. This industry in the last two years has been gradually terminating
contracts and engagements entered into during or shortly after the war, when a much more
rosy view was taken of the prospects of ship-building on this Coast than would now appear to
have been justified. Probably we have reached the low point of depression, and though the
ship-building boom times of 1918 and 1919 can hardly be expected to return, we have a number
of yards on the Coast equipped for any ship-building that may be required, while the dry-dock
developments in Esquimalt and Vancouver will almost certainly mean that a larger amount
of ship-repairing will be done here in the future than in the past
The camparative pay-rolls for 1921 and 1922 also show the pulp and paper manufacturing
industry to have been passing through quiet times during the past year, but there is the
satisfactory feature that nearly all the mills were employing more help at the end of the year
than at the beginning. The pay-roll for public utilities is also down compared with the 1921
total, one of the reasons for this being the adoption of the one-man service on many of the
street-cars.
Where the Pay-roll has increased.
Most of our industries, however, had a larger pay-roll from a bigger number of firms than
in the previous year. Conspicuous among these is the lumbering group, in which the 667
firms making returns paid out $23,827,204.80, while in the previous year 533 firms paid
$18,180,962.66. It was in the last few months of the year, especially, that the lumbering interests began to show practical signs of recovery after two years of depression, and the outlook
at the beginning of 1923 is distinctly better than at any time since the spring of 1920. The
building and contracting industries, another large group, improved on their 1921 pay-roll by
nearly $3,000,000, or over 40 per cent. The coal-mining pay-roll for the year just more
than held its own in comparison with 1921, in spite of the closing-down of the mines in the
Fernie area for nearly five months owing to a strike. In the group relating to the manufacture of food products there was an increase of $500,000 paid in wages, mainly owing to
the fact that the fish-canneries, though not by any means enjoying a boom, had a better year
than 1921.    Metal-mining also showed a slight advance, as did printing and publishing.
Fluctuations in Employment.
Under the heading "Average Number of AArage-earners," the numbers are given of those
employed, month by month, by the 2,809 firms sending in returns. A glance at these figures
will at once throw into relief the seasonal character of many of the industries in this Province.
For the month of January the number of males employed by these firms is given as 45,577.
An improvement began in March, which was continued and accentuated until in May the total
was 55,090. The volume of employment reached its peak in August, with a total of 59,670,
but it is noticeable that the numbers employed were fairly well maintained until the end of
November—a much more healthy state of things than in 1921, when there was a progressive
decline from July to the end of the year. From last November to December there was a drop
of nearly 6,000, but even after allowing for this the total employed at the close of the year
was 5,119 more than at the beginning. This bears out the contention made by the Department,
and maintained by various authorities in the last few months, that unemployment in the
Province was very much less- serious than it had been in the two previous winters. Perhaps
it is too much to expect that we shall be able to do away entirely with winter unemployment, Department of Labour. 1923
but the evil might he greatly minimized if employers would do their best to spread work over
as long a period of the year as possible, and if workmen, in the time when work is steady and
wages regular, would have more forethought for the months of scarcity in midwinter.
Workers' Country oe Origin.
A careful effort has again been made to ascertain the countries of origin of the workers
in our various industries, and these are shown in the tables headed " Nationality of Employees." The figures all round are higher than the corresponding figures for last year, as
was to be expected from the larger number of returns and the increased pay-roll. But otherwise the list conforms fairly closely to those previously published. Native-born Canadian again
take the first place, their numbers being rather more than one-third of the total. They are
closely followed by natives of Great Britain and Ireland, and if we add to these groups the
number of Americans and Australians, we find that approximately 70 per cent, of our industrial workers are of our own race. Of the remaining 30 per cent., rather more than one-
half came from the Continent of Europe and rather less than one-half from Asiatic countries.
In the lumbering group of industries native Canadians outnumber the British-born by nearly
three to one, which is probably explained by the fact that few immigrants coming to this
country from the Old Land have had any previous experience of such work. There are also
more Canadians than British in the industries of cigar and tobacco manufacturing, manufacture of food products, garment-making, manufacturing jewellery, the metal trades, metal-
mining, printing and publishing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. On the other hand,
Great Britain supplies the largest number of our workers in breweries, the production of
builders' materials, coal-mining, Coast shipping, contracting, explosives and chemicals, manufacture of house furniture, laundries, manufacture of leather and fur goods, oil-refining, paint-
manufacture, ship-building, smelting, and public utilities.
Where Orientals are employed.
Oriental workers—i.e., natives of China, India, and Japan—are included in the returns
in somewhat higher numbers than last year, the increase being closely in proportion to that
of all workers. Each of the three nationalities shares in this increase. The returns for the
last five years, however, show a declining percentage of Oriental workers. The first of these
returns was for the seven months from January to July, 1918, when the war was in progress
and the supply of white labour somewhat limited. Orientals were at that time 20.37 per cent,
of our industrial workers. In the following twelve months they were 18.35 per cent, and in
1919-20 they were 16.64 per cent. In 1921 they fell to 14.45 per cent., but for the year now
under review there was a very slight advance, to 14.61 per cent. One cause of this may have
been the greater activity of the lumbering industries, which absorb nearly two-thirds of our
industrial workers of Asiatic origin, and which derive 25.63 per cent, of their labour-supply
from this source. This proportion, it may be noted, varies very considerably in the different
branches of the lumbering industry. Only 5.34 per cent, of the workers engaged in logging
were Orientals; on logging-railways, 9.62 per cent; in planing-mills, 30.30 per cent; in
sawmills, 39.82 per cent; and in shingle-mills, 53.68 per cent.
A Slight Falltng-off in Wages.
The general decline in industrial wages, which was so marked between 1920 and 1921,
was carried further in 1922; but whereas the average decline from 1920 to 1921 was nearly
12% per cent., between 1921 and 1922 it was only 2% per cent, and there is good ground for
believing that the present year will witness an upward tendency. Of the twenty-five industrial
groups, nineteen registered an average decrease during the year and six an average increase,
but the latter include such important groups as lumbering, coal-mining, the manufacture of
food products, and pulp and paper manufacturing. In these basic industries the low-water
mark was evidently touched during 1921, perhaps with the exception of coal-mining. The
general decrease is fairly evenly distributed among the majority of the industries, and is not
in any case such as to call for special comment
Following the practice adopted in our last two reports, a series of diagrams have again
been prepared, this time showing the changes in the prevailing industrial wages in the Province
over a period of five years. From these diagrams the wage fluctuations between 1918 and 1922
may be seen at a glance. 13 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
S 13
Weekly Percentage
Wages. Employees.
Under   $15 00    2.64%
$15 to    19 90     14.10%
20 to    24 99     25.78%
25 to    20  99     19.19%
30 to    34 99    15.94%
35 to    39 99     13.71%
40 to    44 99     4.84%
45 to    49 99    1.97%
50 and over       1.83%
Under   $15 00    2.49%
$13  to    19 99    10.19%
20 to    24 09     23.69%
25 to    29 99'  21.04%
30 to    34 99    10.74%
35 to    39 99     15.13%
40 to    44 90     5.23%
45 to    49 99     2.60%
50 and over       2.29%
Under   $15 00     0.79%
$15 to $19 99    4.85%
20 to    24 99    14.29%
25 to    29 99     23.80%
30 to    34 99    19.98%
35 to    39 99    17.89%
40 to    44 99    9.24%
45 to    49 99     4.58%
50 and over       4.58%
Under   $15 00    4.35%
$15 to    19 99    13.14%
20  to     24  99     24.62%
25 to    29 90     22.52%
30 to    34 99    15.00%
35 to    39 99    11.52%
40  to     44 99     4.87%
45 to    49 99    2.06%
50 and over      1.86%
Under   $15  00     4.70%
$15 to    19 99     17.18%
20 to    24 99    25.83%
25 to    29 90     20.43%
30 to    34 99    13.38%
35 to    39  99     9.82%
40 to    44 99     4.43%
45 to    49 99     2.28%
50 and over      1.95%
IX -
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10 S 14
Department of Labour.
Contrasting the diagram for 1922 with that of 1921, it will be seen that a higher proportion
of wage-earners received less than $25 a week, a smaller proportion received from $25 to $45
a week, and the percentage of more highly skilled workers, or those holding responsible positions,
who received more than $45 a week, showed an increase.
Avebaqe Wage-bate in Industries.
For the third successive year the average wage for adult hiales in each industry has been
wrorked out on the basis of the classified weekly wage-rate. The method was explained in
our last report, but may again be indicated briefly. In the questionnaire sent out by the
Department firms were asked to give the number of wage-earners within specified limits, but
were not asked to give exact figures; so that the G,433 wage-earners receiving " $24 to $24.99
weekly " will doubtless include some receiving $24, some $24.25, some $24.50, some $24.75, etc.;
while the 9,682 who receive " $30 to $34.99 weekly " will be made up, in unknown proportions,
of those receiving $30, $31, $32, $33, $34, etc. For the purpose of making an average it has
been assumed, where steps of $1 were given in the table, that " $24 to $24.99," for example,
meant $24.50, and, where steps of $5 were given, that " $30 to 34.99," for example, meant $32.
Lest these assumptions should be criticized as erring a little on the side of generosity, " $50
and over " was taken in all cases to mean $50 only.
Since the same method of computation has been adopted for each of the last three years,
the comparison in the following table is claimed as being entirely fair:—
Average Wage in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1919-20.
1921.
1922.
Breweries   	
Builders'  materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacture  	
Coal-mining    	
Coast shipping  	
Contracting	
Explosives,  chemicals,  etc   	
Food products   (manufacturing of)   	
Garment-making    	
House-furnishing	
Manufacturing jewellery   	
Laundries,  cleaning and dyeing   	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods   	
Lumber  industries   	
Metal trades  	
Metal-mining    :	
Miscellaneous trades and  industries   	
Oil-refining   	
Paint-manufacture   	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc
Manufactures of wood (not elsewhere specified)   ..
$28 2T
31 05
32 48
37 64
26 81
31 01
31 53
29
36
28
34
72
14
79
20
28 42
28 81
32 47
31 14
35 96
28 24
28 52
27 23
35 79
35 18
28 11
36 44
32 81.
27 46
$28 67
28 82
23 97
32 83
28 45
28 82
26 34
25 67
29 38
26 00
33 54
27 32
29 85
24 70
30 33
32 00
28 40
35 73
24 14
36 30
25 41
29 87
31 98
29 55
23 48
$26 62
25 61
25 30
33 61
25 43.
28 06
26 13
27 39
27 28
24 23
30 90
26 11
26 67
25 29
27 73
30 97
25 91
32 63
21 79
36 23
25 88
25 55
29 91
30 41
23 12
It is necessary to point out that these averages are calculated from figures supplied by
each firm for the week of employment of the greatest number, and represent the pay for a
full week's work. Actual weekly earnings at certain periods of the year would be much lower,
owing to deductions for broken time or when a plant is closed down.
By pooling the figures for all the above industries, and taking into account the respective
numbers employed in them, we arrive at the following:— 13 Geo. 5
Eeport of the Deputy Minister.
S 15
Average Industrial Wage for All Adult Male Wage-earners, as Computed from Returns.
1918   (January to July)  $27 97
1918-19  29 11
1919-20      31 51
1921     27 62
1922  20 98
The general average for 1922 was the lowest for the past five years.
Working-hours.
Pieturns were also made by most of the firms of the number of hours worked weekly by
their employees. The tendency in the past year appears to have been in the direction of
working longer hours, as the average working-week for all industries was 51.15 hours, which
compares with 50.41 hours in 1921 and 50.96 hours in 1920. The industrial group with the
longest average working-week was that of smelting (55.87 hours), in which industry there is
continuous operation for a seven-day week with three shifts of workers and a legal maximum
working-day of eight hours. The shortest average week was worked in the cigar and tobacco
manufacturing (44.23 hours).
Firms with over $100,000 Pay-roll.
Some attention was attracted last year by a list given in our annual report of large
industrial firms in the Province with a pay-roll of over $100,000 for the year. In the returns
received for -1921 there were 118 such firms included; but this year the number has grown to
164. These figures take no account of any public authorities, Dominion, Provincial, or municipal, or of the transcontinental railways, wholesale and retail merchants, and deep-sea shipping. The increase in the number for last year is partly accounted for by additional returns
received for 1922 from firms who did not send in in 1921, but the higher figure also speaks
of business having been done on a larger scale by many firms, to whom the congratulations
of the Department are extended. Here, as in other respects which have been noted, the
greatest improvement was in the lumbering industries, in which there were 79 firms who passed
the $100,000 mark, as against 47 in the previous year. Others were in the following groups:
Breweries, 1; producers of builders' materials, 3; coal-mining, 10; Coast shipping, 8; explosives, 2; contracting, 6; house-furnishing, 1; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 2; manufacture
of food products, 13; metal trades, 3; street-railways, gas, power, telephones, etc., 5; manufacturing wood, 1; manufacture of jewellery, 1; manufacturing leather and fur goods, 1;
metal-mining, 8; oil-refining, 1 ; paint-manufacture, 1; printing and publishing, 5; pulp and
paper manufacturing, 5; ship-building, 4; smelting, 2; and miscellaneous trades and industries,
2. With so many and varied industries firmly established in our midst on a large scale, there
is little fear that our Province will be left behind in the march of industrial progress. S 16
rMENT of Labour.
1923-
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following-, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc— Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.— This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting.--Here a.re grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., j ute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishi7igs.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—-Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.— Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blaeksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
•   machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.— Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
♦ No, 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.— This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasolene lighting and heating devices, and supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES.
Returns covering 23 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $104,760 55
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     61,486 26
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    2S0,178 CO
Total $446,424 81
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
May	
June	
198
200
2C2
210
248
290
1
1
1
3
3
4
July	
August	
September .
October.  ...
November ..
December...
316
306
293
257
252
245
3
2
3
1
1
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
i 6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
18 Yrs.
& over.
13
4
14
7
7
21
18
82
13
27
14
2
43
10
9
3
4
Under
18 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan :...
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
139
153
9
1
3
16
1
1
4
3
S
1
Weekly Hours of Labour.
10 at 33 hours.
1 at 36     ii
9 at 44     ii
1 at 45     ii
128 at 48     ii
112 at 50 hours.
6 at 52     i,
2 at 54     i,
9 at 55      ,i
10 at 56      „ ■, "
13 Geo. 5
Report of the Depl'ty Minister.
S 17
TABLE   NO.   2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 53 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   150,830 54
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       222,653 02
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       901,485 68
Total $1,274,969 24
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March...
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
609
2
554
3
616
3
726
3
888
4
918
4
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
916
862
792
742
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00	
to$ 6.99.
7.:
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
to 18.99.
to   19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
10
6
87
10
5
26
68
41
106
93
189
24
26
95
51
23
87
49
47
20
12
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia'or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated 	
Males.      Females.
271
302
28
1
1
40
19
2
192
56
1
16
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 18,112 96
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         7,422 42
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     68,784 40
Total  $ 94,319 78
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June
Males.   Females.
28
25
16
15
18
48
56
47
1
1
1
64
Month.
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
Males.   Females.
56
51
57
59
59
30
77
78
95
107
103
100
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
1.99.
$6.00	
to$ 6.99.
to    7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99.
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
to. 34.99..
to 89.99..
to 44.99..
to 49.99..
and over ..
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
&over.    18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.    Under
&over.    18 Yrs.
15
19
11
6
7
19
7
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia'or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
Ail other countries   	
Nationality not stated	
30
9
15
55
77
27 at 40 hours.
216 at 54 hours.
18 at 63 hours
160 at 44     ii
88 at 55     ii
10 at 70     ii
133 at 48     ii
42 at 56     ii
2 at 72     ii
137 at 49     ii
1 at 68     ii
1 at 77     ii
29 at 50     n
40 at 59     .,
4 at 84     i,
4 at 52     ii
174 at 60     ii
Weekly Hours of Labour.
218 at 44 hours. 13 at 48 hours. 8 18
Department of Labour.
1923
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering IS Firms.
Table No.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 80 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   426,562 38
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       201,117 22
Wages-earners (including piece-workers)    8,842,872 12
Total $9,470,551 72
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $    262,707 96
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       318,182 44
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,487,845 23
Total $ 4,068,735 63
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January..
February.
March....
April 	
May	
June	
6,291
6,205
6,158
4,678
4,773
4,712
Month.
Males.   Females.
July	
August	
September .
October	
November..,
December...
4,837
5,944
6,424
6,408
6,517
6,445
Month.
10
10
11
11
January..
February.
March
April	
May	
June.....
Males.
Females.
2,707
36
2,492
37
2,628
36
2,566
40
2,934
42
3,083
35
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December ..
Males.   Females.
2,934
3,073
3,107
3,012
2,945
3,019
31
30
28
30
25
24
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to$ 6.99.
7.!
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
104
113
25
58
40
100
80
97
62
54
70
47
122
139
125
139
470
188
1,067
849
806
475
375
2
31-
7
21
31
25
20
1
8
2
7
3
Females.
IS Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to$ 6.!
7.9
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
to 14.99..
to 15.99..
to 16.99..
to 17.99..
to 18.99..
to 19.99..
to 20.99..
to 21.99..
to 22.99..
to 23.99..
to 24.99 .
to 26.99..
to 26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.   18 Yrs.
44
24
91
26
12
127
104
184
472
138
81
55
185
27
197
177
20
135
353
60
228
205
128
and over.. |     120
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
2
1
22
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren.
tices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
1,029
3,379
. 139
6
58
33
639
18
201
129
323
58
765
81
68
Country of Origin.
10
1
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
1,214
1,231
313
5
250
61
3i8
19
5
Weekly Hours of Labour.
268 at 44 hours. 132 at 53 hours.
6,147 at 48     m 66 at 56     n
Weekly Hours of Labour.
1 at 37 hours.
651 at 40
164 at 44
1 at 45
1,455 at 48
53 at 50
34 at 54
61 at 55 hours.
268 at 56 „
192 at 60 .i
17 at 63 ,,
13 at 70 ,,
276 at 72 „
216 at 84 ii 13 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
S 19
Table No. 6,
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 716 Firms.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 20 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 1,035,981 54
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       806,150 97
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,941,384 18
Total $9,783,516 69
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 80,053 45
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  142,066 79
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  262,215 60
Total $484,335 84
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March...
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
4,536
4,937
5,615
5,978
6,839
7,625
55
59
65
64
71
79
Month.
Males.
July	
8,549
August	
8,566
September .
8,168
October ....
7,969
November..
6,747
December...
4,826
Month.        Males.   Females.
79
77
S3
71
66
54
January..
February.
March	
April	
May	
June	
185
194
215
209
200
212
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December ..
Males.    Females.
203
201
204
211
192
208
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to$ 6.!
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28 99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44 99.
to 49.99.
an 1 over.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 fts.
1
4
5
4
1
10
14
74
33
20
60
72
270
101
846
403
236
1,367
366
527
509
1,385
1,610
289
242
87
16
12
51
73
10
9
2
6
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
2
1
1
34
10
3
7
2
1
10
6
4
4
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
38.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to$ 6.99.
to     7.99
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99..
11.99..
12.99 .
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
89.99..
44.99..
49.99..
18 Yrs.
& over.
7
1
9
10
30
7
8
9
12
31
9
19
13
5
31
31
4
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France     	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark .
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
4,119
4,805
445
22
15
59
370
9
59
599
40
22
20
1
34
24
431
Country of Origin.
34
37
3
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
67
116
2
49
Females.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
8 at 30 hours.
74 at 36 .1
40 at 40 ii
26 at 41 .,
12 at 42 ,.
1 at 43 ,i
4,979 at 44 ,i
2 at 45 i,
1 at 46 hours.
14 at 47 ii
3,694 at 48 ii
58 at 49 ..
31 at 50 ■
11 at 61 i,
II at 52 „
824 at 54 i,
4 at 55 hours.
437 at 56
110 at 60
106 at 63
2 at 64
213 at 70
5 at 72
2 at 77
36 at 44 hours.
94 at 48 ii
1 at 49 ,,
5 at 50 ii
1 at 51 i,
63 at 54 n
1 at 59 ii
18 at 60 ,i
4 at 63 hours.
II at 70 „
3 at 71 ii
5 at 72 „
4 at 79 ,,
3 at 80 ,,
3 at 84 ,,
1 at 94 ii S 20
Department of Labour.
1923
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 255 Firms.
Table No. 9.
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 55 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   870,SOI 80
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        688,030 25
Wage-earners (incloding piece-workers)    5,026,012 55
Total 8 6,584,844 60
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $112,347 83
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     82,575 71
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    570,769 09
Total $765,692 63
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January...
February..
March	
April	
May	
June   	
Males.   Females.
2,182
2,186
2,398
2,859
3,139
4,156
431
440
431
461
480
858
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August	
September .
October	
November..
December .,
4,568
4,609
3,943
3,675
2,912
2,399
Month.
1,069
1,316
1,436
1,128
856
481
January..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
166
170
176
183
1S2
185
456
464
490
614
481
453
Month.
July	
August	
September .
October
November ..
December ..
Males.   Females.
176
187
182
179
202
199
447
466
490
479
466
453
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rafes (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
* 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
r$6.00	
) to $ 6.99.
I to     7.99.«
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
20.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
2
4
7
30
75
10
50
117
188
168
270
208
209
168
237
207
420
529
155
405
228
121
605
485
274
155
152
6
1
3
8
19
8
6
9
6
4
8
4
fl
13
4
3
8
2
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
1
5
13
15
59
2fl
118
60
291
181
102
88
183
58
52
49
77
28
89
13
6
12
19
6
41
1
1
8
ys
30
19
23
17
2
48
3
7
3
6
1
1
3
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50 00
$6.00 ....
to$ 6.99.
to    7.99.
to    8.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.1
and over..
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
2
1
1
4
2
5
1
8
11
3
4
7
1
3
9
17
4
1
5
38
28
12
2
5
18 Yrs.
&over.
8
15
4
32
26
104
69
41
17
47
34
24
6
15
4
4
Under
18 Yrs.
5
5
5
10
15
12
4
3
2
1
3
Apprentices.
10
3
3
1
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia <:	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
J apan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
2,254
1,820
144
21
14
2,5
48
3
10
274
28
21
635
27
562
153
Country of Origin.
A3
6
8
14
22
4
5
11
1
9
Canada and Newfoundland
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium       	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
3
4
15
7
11
211
267
18
'   1
1
1
23
Weekly Hours of Labour.
83 at 30 hours. 1,"905 at 48 hours.
29 at 36 ., 416 at 49 ..
17 at 40 „ 217 at 50 .i
20 at 42 „ 55 at 51 „
781 at 44 ,i 35 at 52 n
22 at 45 ,i 185 at 64 .i
32 at 46 .,. 54 at 55 .i
128 at 47 „ 62 at 50 ,,
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Id at 58 hours.
2,711 at 60 i,
109 at 64 ,i
18 at 68 ,,
94 at 70 „
53 at 72 „
6 at 76 ,,
540 at 90 ,.
14 at 43 hours.
459 at 44  ,,
79 at 46  „
30 at 47 hours.
106 at 48  .i
5 at 50  ., 13 Geo. 5
Eeport ob7 the Deputy Minister.
S 21
Table No. 10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 30 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 63,966 25
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     45,150 42
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    288,299 63
Total $397,416 30
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January ...
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
258
24
269
25
258
26
241
29
267
30
277
30
Month,
July 	
August...
September
October ..
November
December.
Males.   Females.
265
268
267
280
299
285
24
24
25
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11 00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18 00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00...
to$ 6.99
7.!
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29 99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
18 Yrs.
& over.
4
1
1
4
6
4
4
5
2
6
7
8
8
17
20
13
11
15
3
17
10
11
6
13
4
53
23
3
1
Under
18 Yrs.
12
3
4
5
4
2
4
2
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France..	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark .
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
147
158
5
1
Females.
11
16
1
Weekly Hours of Labour.
2 at 33 hours.
1 at 38     ii
5 at 40     ,i
163 at 44     „
6 at 46      i,
24 at 48 hours.
115 at 49  .,
7 at 50  i,
3 at 54  n
Table No.  11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 15 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 41,111 88
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    96,380 13
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 108,687 09
Total $246,179 10
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April.   ..
May	
June....
Males.
Females.
80
12
90
12
85
10
85
9
84
9
79
9
Month.
July 	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.    Females.
85
85
86
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to$ 6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99..
12.99..
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99 .
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
18 Yrs.
& over.
10
5
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
55
41
3
1
6
4
Italy	
1
1
1
Weekly Hours of Labour.
40 at 43 hours.
71 at 44      ii
14 at 45      m
1 at 48 hours.
7 at 50     ii Department of Labour.
1923
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 51 Firms.
Table No. 18.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 44 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers   .. .$ 81,228 34
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     53,542 45
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  887,390 60
Total $1,022,161 39
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $ 48,624 38
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     65,800 99
Wage-earners (including piece-w-orkers) 298,372 86
Total $412,798 23
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
335
336
350
353
372
584
591
602
608
Month.
July	
August 	
SeptembeT..
October ....
November..
December ..
Males.   Females.
380
377
374
370
354
338
Month.
623
637
632
610
January,
February
March...
April —
May	
June....
Males.   Females.
231
232
218
218
229
236
67
67
67
68
Month.
July	
August	
September.
October ...
November.
December .
Males.   Females.
235
236
242
264
263
260
77
80
80
83
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
toj
7.99..
8.99..
9.99.
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
16
14
7
3
14
23
17
13
11
10
24
50
18
31
17
13
58
27
13
2
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
over.    18 Yrs.
1
5
18
13
204
77
106
62
23
31
3
2
15
4
9
18
10
10
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
13
7
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.09
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to)
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
18 Yrs.
& over.
5
13
9
13
14
9
24
14
8
20
5
56
14
7
3
2
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
3
5
2
5
10
3
1
10
11
3
3
7
1
1
3
1
2
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
German}'	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
102
219
8
1
1
3
1
47
1
1
1
9
Country of Origin.
198
374
18
6
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
24
6
1
Italy.
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries 	
N.-itionalitv not stated	
Males.
67
157
17
Females.
44
41
1
Weekly Hours of Labour.
3 at 37 hours.
4 at 40     ,.
145 at 44     „
15 at 45     11
257 at 46     ,,
88 at 47 hours.
322 at 48     „
9 at 49     .1
1 at 50     ,1
1 at 52      ,,
3 at 54 hours.
2 at 55     ,,
12 at 60     ,,
I at 65     11
Weekly Hours of Labour.
1 at 41 hours. 4 at 46 hours. 75 at 50 hours.
1 at 43     ,, 7 at 47     1,           1 at 53     „
45 at 44     „ 183 at 48     .,            6 at 54     „
20 at 45     „ 10 at 49     .,             2 at 55     „ 13 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 667 Firms.
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 333 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 1,791,814 14
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       872,344 49
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 21,163,016 17
Total $23,827,204 80
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $    659,720 92
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       568,947 15
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    2,405,494 68
Total $ 3,634,162 75
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
Males.    Females
14,293
14,004
15,333
17,338
20,355
21,664
58
62
67
77
90
Month.
Males.
July	
20,812
Aug-ust	
21,227
September.
21,156
October ...
22,341
November.
21,730
December..
18,497
Month.
95
94
96
92
88
January
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
1,814
1,867
1,884
1,927
2,005
2,036
12
12
13
13
15
17
Month.
July	
August....
September
October ...
November .
December..
Males.    Females.
2,092
2,099
2,199
2,090
2,032
1,950
16
16
16
16
16
16
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
36.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to$ 6.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
7.!
8.!
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99..
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
10
54
111
327
451
502
552
1,036
1,289
1,148
2,274
1,519
1,111
2,738
1,264
647
2,790
813
707
1,118
698
507
2,593
1,225
630
3S9
427
Under
18 Yrs.
4
1
1
7
11
6
7
23
17
6
17
6
5
18
7
s
7
4
1
4
2
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
3
2
6
11
10
11
22
4
10
13
7
1
5
4
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00....
to$ 6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
18 Yrs.
& over.
101
22
5
38
21
22
10
44
142
90
120
37
114
91
70
94
112
231
521
248
54
31
23
Under
18 Yrs.
7
10
10
7
7
10
II
19
10
1
6
13
2
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
20
5
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated !...
Males.       Females.
642
.388
40
246
401
106
349
776
547
228
163
013
171
367
495
Country of Origin.
3
10
4
ii'
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
1,196
1,098
110
4
10
7
17
1
3
37
12
5
85
21
2
4
10
6
1
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
64 at 36 hours.
52 at 40 ,i
147 at 44 ii
78 at 45 ii
7,950 at 48 ii
3,024 at 50 u
190 at 62 ,i
5,320 at 54 ii
1,103 at 55 hours.
194 at 56 ii
293 at 57 ii
380 at 59 „
6,647 at 60 ,,
7 at 61 ,,
13 at 63 „
7 at 65 .,
11 at 66 hours.
71 at 68 ii
30 at 70 ii
7 at 72 ,.
3 at 77 ii
1 at 78 ii
17 at 84 ,i
1 at 91 .,
1 at 30 1
3 at 34
1 at 35
3 at 36
1 at 38
50 at 40
3 at 41
2 at 42
1,405 at 44 hours.
'     19 at 45 ..
2 at 46 ii
29 at 47 ,,
376 at 48 n
77 at 49 n
24 at 50 n
4 at 51 ..
150 at 52 hours.
14 at 53 n
14 at 54 ii
3 at 55 ,.
4 at 66 ,,
1 at 57 ii
26 at 60 ii
1 at 66 n Department of Labour.
1923
Table No.  16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 126 Firms.
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 55 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   261,086 32
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      116,823 22
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,322,098 05
Total." i $3,700,007 59
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   173,789 03
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      235,989 81
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      852,248 74
Total $1,262,027 58
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..,
February..
March .
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
1,815
14
1,825
13
2,196
13
1,927
16
2,165
18
2,416
•23
Month.
Males.
July	
1,354
1,382
September..
1,344
October   ...
1,386
November...
1,405
December...
2,183
Month.
24
25
25
22
21
18
January..
February
March
April
May	
June ....
Males.   Females.
540
630
562
575
624
117
113
116
131
124
132
Month.       Males.    Females
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December .
651
623
609
595
602
581
137
137
132
129
126
115
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00.
to$ 6.
to    7
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99..
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
3
5
5
16
48
11
98
46
53
390
74
291
255
243
179
590
1,020
119
24
39
Under
18 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
11
i
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to$ 6.99.
to     7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99
15.99.
16.99.
17.99
18.99
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99,
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
IS Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
2
10
7
17
9
8
22
15
38
21
55
37
55
51
23
26
54
27
124
48
9
4
5
2
2
3
14
8
15
3
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
2
2
1
4
10
76
14
3
7
4
1
2
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China    	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
1,279
836
261
14
3
16
149
9
43
426
123
103
24
16
12
Females.
Country of Origin.
7
15
1
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
324
389
27
22
3
3
57
87
2
6 at 42 hours.
2 at 47     ,i
957 at 48     n
29 at 52      i,
301 at 54     .,
1,880 at 56      „
Weekly Hours of Labour.
7 at 60 hours.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
16 at i
3 at 84
34 at 70
1 at 72
6 at 84
11 at 40 hours.
8 at 41  „
215 at 44  ,,
14 at 45  ii
4 at 46  i,
89 at 47 hours.
179 at 48  „
11 at 49  ,i
190 at 50  ,,
5 at 52 hours.
28 at 54  „
20 at 56  i,
4 at 65  „ 13 Geo. 5
Eeport of the Deputy Minister.
S 25
Table No.  18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $    4,400 00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   116,989 38
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   420,878 20
Total $542,267 58
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 43,900 00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     52,402 33
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     88,666 95
Total $184,969 28
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January...
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
275
250
266
238
244
263
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
270
260
258
256
252
239
Month.
January..
February
March
April.  ...
May	
June ....
Males.
Females.
72
1
68
1
09
2
75
2     '
85
2
91
2
Month.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.    Females.
89
84
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
9 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.1X1
45.00
50.00
$6.00 	
to* 6.99.
to     7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
14.99...
15.99...
16.99...
17.99...
18.99...
19.99...
20.99...
21.99...
22.99...
23.99...
24.99...
25.99...
26.99...
27.99...
28.99...
29.99...
34.99
39.99
44.99
49.99
and over.
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
30
22
1
4
69
40
92
6
7
6
.18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
tor* 6.99.
to     7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
4
1
2
1
4
4
2
2
7
1
8
3
15
18 YTrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
119
140
18
3
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country ..
Other European country	
China 	
Hindustan	
Japan ,	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
60
3
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
1 at 44 hours.
298 'at 48     ii
1 at 56 hours.
2 at 84     ii
81 at 44 hours.
1 at 45     ii
11 at 46     ii
2 at 48     ii
1 at 49 hours.
7 at 50     i,
1 at 84     i, S3 26
Department of Labour.
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 8!) Firms.
Table No. 21.
PL'LP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  411,828 30
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      724,272 83
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,239,702 85
Total $2,375,803 98
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  292,367 92
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      152,781 53
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,194,531 50
Total  $3,639,680 95
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February..
March.
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
809
801
804
803
804
103
104
122
129
109
95
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
Males.   Females.
777
803
829
Month.
103
116
138
101
116
107
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
2.106
2,093
1,812
1,944
2,191
2,201
60
58
56 '
53
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November .
December..
2,173
2,242
2,234
2,141
2,221
2,314
53
54
53
51
54
56
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00..
to* 6.!
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.98.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Males.
18 Yrs.    Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
6
2
fi
5
4
19
4
5
13
9
21
6
14
15
4
9
28
91
315
84
32
5
5
8
16
7
9
3
2
1
1
10
IS Yrs.
& over.
4
1
7
3
15
25
14
3
7
8
15
4
3
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
* 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 .
to* 6.99.
7.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
3
25
1
230
79
65
100
8
349
42
34
169
382
135
86
196
22
162
182
81
38
51
18 Yrs.     Under
over.    18 Yrs.
Appren-
tices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country.,..
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries .... ,	
Nationality not stated	
458
348
46
5
1
'26'
Females.
Country of Origin.
69
9
1
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China ....   	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
659
581
89
8
1
31
132
8
23
55
33
1
123
29
719
1
Females.
34
11
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
7 at 36 hours.
1 at 38     1,
4 at 39     11
6 at 43     ,,
370 at 44     ,,
176 at 45 hours
4 at 46       i,
1 at 47       .1
399 at 48   n
15 at 50   ,,
43 at 44 hours.
287 at 48  11
65 at 50  ,1
443 at 54  ,1
687 at 56 hours.
650 at 60  ,,
30 at 72  ,1
5 at 84  11 13 Geo. 5
Eeport op the Deputy Minister.
S 27
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 31 Firms.
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 3 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 91,004 91
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  110,157 37
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  745,368 45
Total $ 946,530 73
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $    148,317 79
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       315,579 41
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    2,468,870 99
Total $2,932,768 19
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
873
914
852
645
696
578
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
Males.   Females.
529
516
490
454
481
Month.
January.
February
March..
April...
May....
June ...
Males.
Females.
1,418
1,439
1,487
24
22
23
1,594
1,598
1,568
25
24
24
Month.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.    Females.
1,549
1,521
1,545
1,629
1,522
1,626
23
22
22
22
22
22
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 	
to* 6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
6
142
203
66
71
50
90
22
32
105
80
34
135
67
27
2
"j"
"i"
io'
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Y'rs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 	
to* 6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
17
ii'
3
2
181
202
278
319
197
228
72
23
12
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria".	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark .
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.        Females.
380
675
2
21
1
40
4
3
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.        Females.
470
722
69
5
2
7
264
9
40
50
26
71
47
15
7
3
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
955 at 44 hours.
32 at 48     ,i
5 at 49      ..
5 at 50 hours.
1 at 54     ii
25 at 48 hours.
2 at 50     ii
1,652 at 56 hours. \l    ■
S 28
Department op Labour.
192?
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, POWER, TELEPHONE, ETC.
Returns covering 62 Firms.
Table No. 25.
WOOD-
-MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 51 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  .*  411,465 79
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc 1,012,106 83
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  5,625,334 03
Total 47,048,906 65
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1922.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   143,839 75
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc.        68,196 19
Wage-earners (including pieceworkers)      833,878 75
Total  $1,045,914 69
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.        Month.       Males.   Females.
January. .
February.
March
April	
May.
June     3,140
1,065
1,063
1,063
1,083
1,099
1,148
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November .
December..
3,505
3,287
3,219
3,203
3,065
2,909
Month.
1,173
1,176
1,147
1,103
1,086
1,079
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
January..
February.
March. ...
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
709
669
714
741
786
837
2
14
17
17
22
20
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November..
December .
Males.   Females.
869
902
820
80S
776
19
21
19
19
19
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
* 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17 00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
80.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
tot 6.99..
to 7.99..
8.99..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99.
12.99..
13.99...
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99...
18.99..
19.99...
20.99...
21.99...
22.99...
23.99...
24.99..
25.99...
26.99...
27.99...
28.99...
29.99...
34.99..
39.99...
44.99...
49.99...
and over .
Males.
18 Yrs.
& over.
20
1
3
36
3
1
61
190
72
248
70
114
290
233
62
107
89
62
1,518
507
270
63
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    IS Yrs.
333
249
24
131
83
84
30
47
1
17
1
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
21
153
37
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29 00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
*6.00 ....
to* 6.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
..99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
84.99.
39.99.
44.99.
to 49.99.
and over
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
5
4
12
24
26
35
25
38
67
66
33
22
29
34
62
27
32
25
45
34
21
31
98
55
18
6
1
5
1
4
3
15-
5
13
4
3
8
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan .. t	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated   ...
1,324
2,279
186
11
3
11
115
9
13
58
7
12
17
1
3
93
Country of Origin.
633
577
49
7
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationalitv not stated	
Males.
455
265
26
1
2
2
19
4
1
17
3
1
89
6
40
6
23
20
2
1
Weekly Hours of Labour.
1 at 33 hours. 1,666 at 48 hours. 14 at 55 hours.
.    1 at 40     ii                     56 at 50     ,. 308 at 56       „
907 at 42     ,,                       54 at 52      i, 222 at 60       ,■
1,287 at 44     ,.                    260 at 54     „ 1 at 84       n
55 at 45     ii
Weekly Hours of Labour.
2 at 30 hours.
6 at 40 ..
1 at 42 ii
240 at 44 i.
38 at 45 ,i
2 at 46 ii
87 at 48 ii
109 at 49 hours.
104 at 50     i,
1 at 52     „
50 at 53     ,,
270 at 54     „
3 at 56     „
45 at
7 at
1 at
2 at
1 at
59 hours.
60 „
64 „
72 „
84     „ 13 Geo. 5
Eeport op the Deputy Minister.
S 29
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 2,809 Firms.
The information grouped in. the twenty-five tables in the foregoing pages is summarized in
the general table hereunder. It is analysed at some length in the introductory portion of the
Report on Statistics of Trades and Industries. The firms whose returns are here dealt with
include the principal employers in the industrial groups which have been covered, but do not,
of course, comprise all the industrial employers in the Province. However, the conditions here
shown as to wages, working-hours, nationality, and fluctuation of employment may fairly be'
taken as typical.
Total   Salary   and   Wage   Payments  during   Twelve  Months ending  31st  December,  1922: —
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $ 7,730,624 73
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       7,137,149 01
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)        71.324,416 39
Total    $80,192,190 73
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only.)
During the Month of
January...
Fehruarj-..
March	
April	
May	
June.	
July	
August
September.
October....
November .
December..
Males.
45,1
45,<
46,5
49,i
55,(
58,1
58,5
59,(
58,!
69,5
56,4
50,(
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia    	
Belgium.	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries    	
Nationality not stated	
26,001
23,253
3,685
181
151
467
2,304
175
766
4,650
2,208
601
6,484
1,134
3,758
513
1,551
Females.
577
3,180
403
3,215
912
3,218
336
3,340
090
3,365
716
3,837
206
4,099
670
4,395
379
4,548
250
4,125
474
3,805
696
3,360
2,483
2,276
199
23
15
29
52
68
14
16
74
11
52
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
.$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to$ 6.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
to 18.39.
to   19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
to
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
IS Yrs.
& over.
9
7
18
49
.     79
229
448
992
809
765
1,695
2,076
2,111
3,531
3,018
2,556
4,762
3,275
1,666
6,433
3,323
2,295
3,488
3,315
2,365
9,682
7,105
3,203
1,651
1,414
Under
18 Yrs.
56
80
128
161
86
107
69
59
110
65
22
54
16
18
20
10
4
18 Yrs.
& over.
7
17
28
92
70
217
335
639
807
518
195
447
190
223
124
169
54
110
14
43
16
1
22
2
25
9
60
4
15
1
3
Unde
18 Yri
9
9
17
36
62
81
50
49
27
68
42
10
3
7
1
1
3
Apprentices.
42
22
17
77
29
43
52
196
56
19
19
6
14
14
12
9
6
6
3
3
3
Weekly Hours of Labour.
94 at 30 hours. -
12,232 at 44 hours.
5,634 at 56 hours.
3 at
71 hours.
13 at 33- .,
3 at 34  ,i
456 at 45  n
294 at 57  ,,
381 at
72  .,
402 at 46  h
17 at 58  ii
5 at
70  .1
1 at 35  ii
388 at 47  ,i
466 at 59  .1
6 at
77  ,1
178 at 36  ii
26,523 at 48  ,.
10,776 at 60  ..
1 at
78  ..
4 at 37  „
889 at 49  ii
7-at 61  „
4 at
79  „
3 at 38  .1
4,024 at 50  „
174 at 63  ..
3 at
80  ,1
4 at 39  i,
71 at 51  ii
115 at 64  .,
256 at
84  „
764 at 40  ii
486 at 52  u
12 at 65  .1
546 at
90  1,
38 at 41  ii
197 at 53  ,i
12 at 66  „
1 at
91  1,
948 at 42  i,
7,972 at 64  n
89 at 68  .1
1 at
94  „
62 at 43  i.
1,340 at 55  n
405 at 70  .1
1 at 104  1. S 30 Department of Labour. 1923
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent J. II. McVety, 714 Richard Street, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, 714 Richard Street Superintendent, W. S. Dickson.
Vancouver, 53 Powell Street Assistant Superintendent, J. Mitchell.
Vancouver ("Women's Branch), 714 Richard Street, Supt., Miss A: L. Davidson.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets Superintendent, H. Crisford.
Victoria (Women's Branch), Langley & Broughton Sts., Supt., Miss W. Marlatt.
New Westminster, 44 Eighth Street Superintendent, M. Standbridge.
Nanaiimo  Superintendent, J. T. Carrigan.
Kamloops  Superintendent, J. H. How.
Vernon  Superintendent, G. B. Street.
Nelson  Superintendent, G. Anderson.
Cranbrook Superintendent, J. E. Kennedy.'
Fernie  Superintendent, E. Hooper.
Revelstoke Superintendent, H. M. Coursier.
Prince Rupert Superintendent, J. M. Campbell.
Prince George  Superintendent, G. Sinclair.
In this statement, which represents the fourth annual report of the British Columbia
branch of the Employment Service of Canada, the period dealt with is the year ending with
December 31st, 1922. The Service is both Federal and Provincial in character, the Dominion
Government contributing a proportion not exceeding one-half of the operating expenses, while
the administration is carried on by the Provincial Government as a branch of the Department
of Labour.
The number of offices in operation in the Province was the same as in the preceding
year, sixteen, and they were situated as follows: Vancouver, 3; Victoria, 2; and one each in
Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Prince George, Fernie, Cranbrook, Nelson, Revelstoke, Kamloops,
Vernon, Kelowna, and New Westminster ; separate offices for the employment of women being
operated in Vancouver and Victoria.
The Absorption of the Unemployed.
In the early part of the year there was a considerable amount of unemployment in the
Province, but the unemployed were gradually absorbed in the spring owing to the expansion
of our industries and the opportunity presented in April of sending approximately 1,600 men
to the Prairie Provinces as farm-labourers. This number was augmented in August by an
additional 4,500 harvesters. These various movements greatly relieved the situation throughout the Province.
Although there were no railway-construction or other similar works requiring a large
number of men, and the movement of farm-labourers to the Prairie Provinces was smaller
than that of the previous year, the Employment Offices placed a larger number of persons in
employment within the Province during the period under review than in the last preceding
year, this expansion being due largely to the increasing popularity of the Service among both
employers and workmen.
Business Tbansacted during the Yeah. %
The tables appearing on another page show the business transacted by the Employment
Service for the period under review, both by months and offices. Eight offices show increases
in placements—namely, Cranbrook, Nanaimo, Prince George, Vancouver (Richards Street,
Powell Street, and the Women's Branches), Victoria, (Men's and Women's Branches). The
other offices show small decreases, reflecting, in the main, the comparative conditions in the
industries operating in the areas which they served. Approximately 1,700 of the men and
women placed were secured by offices other than where the order was originally placed by 13 Geo. 5 Eeport op the Deputy Minister. S 31
the employer, the system of organization being such that the importation of labour from other
Provinces or countries is discouraged until workers in every part of. our own Province have
been given an opportunity to accept the vacancies. This system has a beneficial effect on the
communities where there is a surplus of labour, and also those where a shortage exists, not
forgetting the benefit to the men and women who, through the medium of our offices, are placed
in employment in vacancies of the existence of which they were not previously aware.
The number of applicants for work increased from 99,240 to 147,787, this increase being
accounted for to some extent by applicants for relief being required to register each week
instead of every two weeks, which is the usual practice. The balance of the increase is due
to the larger number of workers who are using the Employment Offices. Employers' orders
increased from 3S,079 to 40,721, although no operations calling for large bodies of men were
carried on in the Province during the year. The increase in the number of orders is accounted
for by a gradual widening of the field covered by the Employment Service and the more complete recognition by employers of the value of the Service.
Rise and Fall of Placements, etc.
The chart shows rather more graphically the rise and fall by weeks in the number of
applicants, vacancies, and placements. It will be noted that during the months of April and
August the placement-line rises (particularly in the latter month) far above that showing
the vacancies. This is due to the movement of farm-labourers out of the Province, vacancies in
other Provinces being recorded in the reports of the Province in which the placements are
made. The rapid rise in the number of vacancies in .Tune and July is caused by the demand
for pickers for the small-fruit crops, this labour being required principally in the Victoria and
Hatzic Districts.
The number of applicants fluctuated greatly and quickly. It was at its peak about the
middle of March, but the gradual discontinuance of relief measures during April, and altogether at the end of that month, caused an almost precipitous fall. This was accentuated to
some extent by a return from the weekly to bi-weekly registrations and by the migration of
a large number of single men to the Prairie Provinces and other districts where employment
was likely to be secured. The number rose rapidly again in August, when harvest-labourers
were being recruited for the Prairie, and early in September there was a fall to the lowest
number recorded during the year owing to the absence of several thousand men in the harvest-
fields. The number rose again gradually until the end of the year, but this was only the
normal increase due to the return of harvesters and the closing-down of certain seasonal
industries, and was further reduced owing to a heavy emigration to the United States, particularly of building-trade mechanics.
Harvest Labour Movement to the Prairie.
Owing to the degree of unemployment prevailing during 1921, an arrangement was made
with the Employment Service officials of the Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan to take
all the available experienced farm-labourers for spring seeding and ploughing. Accordingly a
representative of the Employment Service was sent to Winnipeg, and with the co-operation of
the officials from the Prairie Provinces a reduced rate was secured from the railway companies. Counting the workers who went to the farms in the spring, approximately 6,600 British
Columbia workers found employment at a wage guaranteed by the Employment Service of
the Province to which they were sent. For the first time harvest-labourers were selected
through the Employment Offices. As a result the farmers secured a more suitable class of
labourer and the labourers the assurance of guaranteed minimum wage, with the knowledge
that definite employment awaited them on arrival at their destination.
During 1922 the arrangements made in the previous year were renewed, and although the
number of workers sent to the Prairie Provinces was somewhat smaller, the opportunity
offered to place these men greatly assisted in relieving the unemployment problem in this
Province. A notable feature of this movement was the presentation by 1,004 men of letters
from the employers for whom they had worked during the previous year offering them reemployment, showing that the most desirable condition of having both employers and workmen satisfied was obtained through the care used in the selection of the men in the first instance. S 32
Department op Labour.                                              1923
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V 13 Geo. 5 Report op the Deputy Minister. S 33
A Satisfactory Movement.
If the absence of complaints can be accepted as conclusive, the men who went to the Prairies
during 1921 and 1922 received all that they were promised, and hundreds received very much
higher wages than the amount guaranteed by the Employment Offices. In the cases of the few
who had not been able to collect their wages before leaving, the Saskatchewan officials did
so for them on receipt of the details. The whole movement appears to have met with the
approval of all parties concerned.
As in former years, the terms of the Federal Order in Council, by which the issue of relief
by municipalities was authorized, required that all applicants for relief must first secure a
certificate from a Government Employment Office certifying that the applicant had applied for
employment and that none was available. During the months the Order in Council was in
force this work consumed a great deal of the time of the members of the staff in the Coast
city offices, and created the impression in some quarters that the Employment Offices were
for relief purposes and supplied only the class of labourers usually found in the ranks of
relief applicants.
Exceptional activity along the Grand Trunk Pacific line of the Canadian National Railway in the timber industry created a considerable shortage in the supply of tie-makers, and
through the organization of the Employment Service it was possible to transfer all the unemployed of this class from the Coast cities to work in the north-eastern portion of the
Province. This movement had the effect of reducing the surplus on the one hand and the
shortage on the other.
A Check on the Entry of Aliens.
The arrangement between the' Employment Service and the Department of Immigration,
whereby aliens are prevented from entering British Columbia except when suitable persons
cannot be found in Canada to fill vacancies, has been continued, and has worked most satisfactorily. Many applications for permission to import aliens have been refused, and aliens illegally
in Canada have been deported and the vacancies, or positions in which they were employed,
have been filled by citizens of the Dominion. In many instances, however, it has been found
impossible to secure help in Canada to fill certain positions where technical or highly specialized
knowledge was required, and in such cases permission has been granted to import labour in
order to keep the industries operating, and thus make employment available for other workers
who would otherwise be laid off. Forty-five applications were received for the admission of
364 workers from the United States, but only thirty-seven of the positions were filled by the
admission of Americans, the balance being supplied through the Employment Offices.
Government and Private Employment Offices. •
Under the legislation in force in this Province it is unlawful to receive a " fee or compensation " for directing workmen to employment, and the practice of charging applicants for
this service has practically ceased.
The Legislature, during the 3921 session, amended the Act in order more definitely to
include school-teachers. In the early part of the present year a complaint was received that
a school-teacher had been charged 3 per cent, of her salary for being directed to employment.
The person making the charge was prosecuted and a conviction obtained, a fine and costs being imposed.
Although it is unlawful to receive compensation for directing workmen to employment,
a number of individual employers and groups still continue to patronize private offices in the
City of Vancouver, which offices confine their work almost exclusively to supplying labour for
the logging and lumbering companies operating in the Coast area. Gradually, however, employers are coming to the conclusion that the expenditure in maintaining private employment
agents is unnecessary, and that a better service can be secured by utilizing the offices of the
Employment Service of Canada, with sixteen branches in the Province of British Columbia
and eighty in the Dominion of Canada, all of which are available to the employer if the necessity arises. ' Many testimonials have been received from employers regarding the service
received by them from our offices, and many of these firms until recently patronized private
offices and were frankly sceptical that an equal or better service could be furnished by the
Government Offices. Where the change has been made no instance is known where an employer has transferred back to private agents.
3 )epartment op Labour.
1923
The Supply of Fruit-pickers.
During the fruit-picking season many requests are made by the growers in the Province to
our offices in Vancouver and Victoria for a supply of temporary help to be sent out from those
cities. The work is such as can be done by men or women, or by older boys and girls who
wish to earn a little money during the long school vacation. Ever since the Employment Service
was established it has done its best to meet the demand for this kind of help. The conditions
of the industry, as a rule, will apparently afford only a moderate remuneration, and this, together
with the fact that there is more fruit to be handled year after year, and that the supply of
this kind of labour available is by no means unlimited, has made it at times a difficult task
for the Employment Service to meet growers' requirements. Among the people who go out
fruit-picking there is a decided preference for ranches from which they can return at night
to their own homes, and pickers who go out to camp or board at the more distant ranches are
apt to make their stay extremely short if they find conditions not to their liking. There are
some large growers who have made excellent arrangements for the -comfort of their pickers,
and these are usually able to obtain an adequate supply of efficient help. On the other hand,
it looks as if any ranch where conditions and accommodation are not of a fairly good standard
will experience a scarcity of help in the future.
The Service better Appreciated.
Confronted at first by suspicions of both employers and workmen, the Employment Service
has gradually, by a system of fair dealing and by endeavouring to give out accurate information regarding industrial conditions, attained a position where the service rendered is better
appreciated and understood by all sections of the population. It has proved of the greatest
value to employers and workmen engaged in the outlying sections of the Province, by giving
the employer the advantage of obtaining men from the larger centres when none are available
locally, and discouraging the unemployed workmen from wasting time and money in travelling
to districts in search of employment where none exists.
That the work of the Employment Service of Canada is becoming known over a wider
field is evidenced by the large number of letters received from prospective settlers from all
parts of the Empire and from foreign countries, inquiring as to conditions in the Province.
Other inquiries of a similar nature are referred to the Employment Service by municipal
officials and other organizations. Replies are made in such terms as will enable the applicants
to visualize the conditions in the particular industries in which they are interested.
With brighter prospects for the coming year, the Employment Service should further increase its usefulness to the citizens of the Province, thereby reducing the economic waste which
exists where industries in one part of the Province are in need of employees and workmen in
other districts are in need of employment.
Total of Year's Business oy Months.
Month.
Applicants
and
Reapplicants.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out B.C.
January  	
February
March   	
April    	
May   	
June   	
July   	
August  	
September
October  	
November
December  	
Totals
15,051
16,868
17,152
18,703
9,971
11,130
9,032
15,673
7,342
8,405
10.733
7,727
147,787
1,673
2,001
2,009
2,762
3,597
5,622
5,143
5.924
3,838
3,275
2,805
2,072
40,721
1,514
1,813
1,820
2,482
3,071
4,649
4,306
4,353
3,387
3,285
2,595
1,872
35,147
41
27
51
71
110
179
165
391
223
162
190
80
1,690
2
23
1,422
76
1
6
4,439
23
1
11
6,004 13 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
S 35
Total of Year's Business hy Districts.
Office.
Applicants
and
Reapplicants.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out B.C.
Cranbrook   	
Fernie   	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Nanaimo   	
Nelson   	
New Westminster	
Prince George	
Prince  Rupert	
Revelstoke  	
Vancouver   (Richards Street)
Vancouver (Powell Street)   .
Vancouver (Women)   	
Vernon  	
Victoria   	
Victoria    (Women)    	
Totals	
3,876
898
3,201
869
2,343
4,876
5,119
1,272
7,524
643
33,834
40,132
13,541
3,752
21,052
4,855
147,787
4,047
1,374
1,710
305
557
2,009
1,595
1,464
1,521
763
3,663
10,174
4,532
995
3,050
2,962
3,100
852
1,257
287
592
1,644
1,408
1,179
1,436
536
3,251
9,622
3,987
752
2,945
2,299
198
27
31
2
73
5
46
55
17
320
717
125
2
29
43
16
19
37
3
30
140
403
48
9
13
2,139
2,258
124
71
668
26
40,721
35,147
1,690
6,004 S 36
Department of Labour.
1923
ASSOCIATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
In the list of associations which follows it is sought to include only those organizations
which have direct connection with the employment of labour. Those whose functions have to
do only with trade or commercial or social matters are not included.
The particulars given have been corrected at the last possible moment before*, going to the
press, and may therefore be taken as authentic. The name of one new association appears in
the list, and the names of two others which have gone out of existence during the year have
been removed.
Box Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association —■ Chairman,
J. H. McDonald, B.C. Manufacturing Co., Ltd.,
New Westminster; Secretary, Hugh Dalton,
402 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Canadian Jewellers' Association (B.C. Section)
—President, G. E. Trorey; Vice-President,
Thomas Lyttleton; Secretary-Treasurer, A.
Fraser-Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Executive (District): J. Little, Victoria; E.
W. Harding, Nanaimo; J. O. Patenaude, Nelson ; C. J. Whiten, Vernon; W. J. Kerr,
Kamloops.
B.C. Loggers' Association—President, Goodwin
G. Johnson, Capilano Timber Company, North
Vancouver; Secretary, G. W. Muddiman,
Metropolitan Building, Vancouver. Officers
elected annually on January 15th.
B.C. Lumber & Shingle Manufacturers' Association—President, J. D. McCormack, Canadian
Western Lumber Company, Eraser Mills;
Secretary, R. H. H. Alexander, 917 Metropolitan  Building,  Vancouver.    Officers  elected
annually  on   third  Thursday  in  January.
B.C. Salmon Canners' Association — Secretary,
W. D. Burdis, 804-5 London Building, Vancouver.    Chairman elected at each meeting.
B.C. Tow Boat Owners' Association—President,
E. J. Coyle, Coyle Towing Company, Ltd., 207
Hastings Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Capt.
J. R. Stewart, 837 Hastings Street West, Vancouver ; Vice-President, Capt. Geo. McGregor,
Victoria Tug Company, Victoria. Election of
officers in September each year.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division) ; Provincial Headquarters, 701-3 Board
of Trade Building, Vancouver—Chairman, F.
E. Burke, Wallace Fisheries, Ltd.; Secretary,
Hugh Dalton, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (Victoria
Branch), 402-3 Pemberton Building, Victoria
—Chairman, E. Tomlin, B.C. Cement Company,
305 Belmont House, Victoria; Secretary, T. J.
Goodlake, 402 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Canadian Storage & Transfermen's Association—■
President, J. B. Baillargeon, Express, Ltd.,
Montreal; Secretary, E. A. Quigley, Suite 10,
423 Hamilton Street, Vancouver. This Association has Board of Directors of each Province.
Clay Products Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, James
Parfitt, Victoria Brick Company, Victoria;
Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 402-3 Pemberton
Building, Victoria.
Drug Extract & Vinegar Manufacturers' Section,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, D. Hockin, National Drug and Chemical
Company, Ltd.; Vice-Chairman, _W. A. Hunter,
Empress Manufacturing Company; Secretary,
Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Employers' Association of B.C.—President, Innes
Hopkins, B.C. Marine, Ltd., Vancouver; Manager, R. C. Timmins, 308 Credit Foncier Building, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association, Inc.—President, Capt. Martin Johnson, Pier 8, Seattle,
Wash.; Secretary, John Lokken, Pier 8, Seattle,
Wash.
General Cartage & Storage Association of B.C.—
President, D. Scott (Scott & Pease) ; Secretary, E. A. Quigley, Suite 10, 423 Hamilton
Street, Vancouver.
General Contractors' & Master Builders' Association—President, Colonel E. J. Ryan, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Hart, 929 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Jam Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman,
F. G. Evans, Dominion Canners B.C.,. Ltd.,
Vancouver; Vice-chairman, G. D. Hunter, Empress Manufacturing Company, Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Manufacturers' Association of B.C.—Hon. President, J. H. Falconer, Vancouver; President,
J. A. Cunningham, President B.C. Refining
Company, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Hart, 929
Granville Street, Vancouver. Election of
officers takes place annually within eight weeks
of beginning of year.
Metal Trades' Employers' Association of B.C.
(Vancouver Division)—President, E. Davies,
Vancouver Engineering Works, 519 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Hart, 929
Granville Street, Vancouver. Meets for election of officers in January or February each
year.
Metal Trades' Section, Manufacturers' Association—President, Innes Hopkins, foot Victoria
Drive, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Hart, 929
Granville Street, Vancouver. Election of
officers in  February each year.
Mining Association of Interior British Columbia
—President, W. R. Wilson, Fernie; Secretary,
E. Mortimer Lamb, Pacific Building, Vancouver. 13 Geo. 5
iEPORT   OP   THE   DEPUTY
LlNISTER.
S   37
Mining Association of Interior British Columbia
—President, R. Randolph Bruce, Invermere;
Secretary, W. H. Burgess, Kaslo. Annual
meeting first Thursday in December.
Mountain Lumber Manufacturers' Association—
President, H. Burns, Blairmore, Alta.; Secretary, I. R. Poole, Nelson. Officers elected at
annual meeting held in January.
Northern B.C. Lumbermen's Association—President. E. F. Duby, Prince Rupert; Secretary,
W. E. Williams, Prince Rupert.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Board—President, Harvey Murphy, Nanaimo ; Vice-President, Daryl H. Kent, Vancouver ; 2nd Vice-President, H. S. Stephenson,
Victoria; 3rd Vice-President, A. P. G. MacDonald, New Westminster; Treasurer, T. F.
McDowell, Vancouver; Acting - Secretary,
Walter F. Ing, Vancouver, Head Provincial
Office at 420 Pacific Building, Vancouver.
Branches are established at Agassiz, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook,
Cumberland, Duncan, Esquimalt, Grand Forks,
Kamloops, Kelowna, Ladner^ Ladysmith, Lytton, Maple Ridge, Merritt, Mission, Nanaimo,
Nelson, New Westminster, Princeton, Revelstoke, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria, and
White Rock.
Sheet Metal Employers' Association of B.C.
—Secretary, J. Hart, 929 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Shingle Manufacturers' Association of B.C.—
President, J. A. Edgecombe, c/o Canada
Shingle Company; Secretary, F. H. Lamar,
905 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver. Meets
for election of officers in January each year.
Shipping Federation of B.C.—Manager and Secretary, Capt. J. R. Stewart, 837 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver. Meets for election
of officers in December each year.
Vancouver Association of Electragists—President, S. E. Jarvis, 570 Richard Street; Secretary, R. A. Graham, 929 Pender Street West,
Vancouver; office, 425 Pacific Building.
Officers elected annually in September.
Vancouver. Association of Sanitary & Heating
Engineers—President, David Ross, 751 Howe
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Robert G. Hargreaves, 425 Pacific Building, Vancouver.
Officers elected annually in June.
Vancouver Hotels' Association—President, T. H.
Whelan, Regent Hotel, Vancouver; Secretary,
Ernest A. Masters, 333 Dunsmuir Street.
Officers elected in January each year.
Vancouver Publishers' Association—President,
J. H. Hamilton, Vancouver.
Timber Industries Council of B.C.—President,
E. W. Hamber, B.C. Mills Timber and Trading
Company; Managing Director, W. MacNeill,
911 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Vancouver Typotheta?—President, John B. Cowan,
500 Beatty Street; Secretary and Manager,
Wm. Brand, 511 North-west Building, Vancouver. Officers elected annually on the last
Wednesday in May.
Victoria Bread & Cake Manufacturers' Association—President, D. W. Hanbury, Golden West
Bakery; Secretary, H. Amphlett, 212 Union
Bank Building. Election of officers annually
in January.
Victoria Builders' Exchange—President, Walter
Luney, 508 Sayward Building ; Secretary, J. W.
Bolden, 2509 Prior Street. Officers elected
annually in January.
Western Canada Coal Operators' Association—
President, John Shanks, Nordegg, Alta.; Secretary, R. M. Toung, Calgary, Alta. Officers
elected on second Friday in January each year. 8 38
Department of Labour.
1923
UNION DIRECTORY.
There has been a slight increase in the number of trade-union organizations in the Province
during 1922. Some branches of unions went out of existence, but their number is exceeded by
new branches reporting, of which the Department had no previous record. Every care has been
taken to obtain reliable particulars of the most recent date, and our thanks are due to trade-
union secretaries and others who have supplied us with this information. The Department will
be grateful if union officials will kindly notify any changes which may be made from time
to time.
TRADES AND LABOUR CONGRESS OF
CANADA.
President, Thomas Moore, Ottawa. Vice-Presidents, Bert Merson, Toronto; J. T. Foster,
Montreal; A. McAndrews, Moose Jaw, Sask.
Secretary-Treasurer, P. M. Draper, Hope
Building, Ottawa.-
B.C.   EXECUTIVE   OF   TRADES  &   LABOUR
CONGRESS.
Chairman, W. J. Bartlett, 1193 Burrard Street,
Vancouver; Members, A. D. McDonald, Box
271, Prince Rupert, and E. S. Woodward, Box
302, Victoria.    Meets at call of Chairman.
NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.
Canadian Merchants' Service Guild.
Vancouver—President, Capt. W. J. Boyce, c/o
C.P.R., Vancouver; Secretary, A. Goodlad,
505 Hastings Street West, Vancouver. Meets
at 505 Hastings Street West twice a month.
Victoria—President, Capt. W. J. Boyce, 1037
Southgate Street, Victoria; Secretary, T. H.
Brown, 311 Union Bank Building.
National Association of Marine Engineers.
Vancouver Council No. 7—President, W. A.
McAlpine, 3729 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver ; Secretary, E. Read, 232 Thirteenth
Street West, North Vancouver. Meets at 407
Hastings Street West.
Victoria Council No. 6—President, W. Jordan,
2929 Queen's Avenue; Secretary, A. Stewart,
82 Moss Street, Victoria. Meets at 401 Union
Bank Building at 8 p.m. on first and third
Mondays of month.
TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCILS.
Nelson—President, J. Lotman, Nelson; Secretary, Felix Pezeril, Box 624, Nelson.
New Westminster—President, F. A. Browne,
1575 Inverness Street; Secretary, Mrs. Mary
England, c/o Municipal Hall, Edmonds. Meets
second and fourth Wednesdays in month at
Labour Temple, New Westminster.
Prince Rupert—President, S. D. McDonald, Empire Office. Prince Rupert; Secretary, T. Ross
Mackay, Box 1573, Prince Rupert. Meets at
Carpenters' Hall on second and fourth Tuesdays of each month.
Revelstoke—President, James Mathie, Revelstoke ; Secretary, Philip Parker, Box 234,
Revelstoke. Meets at 8 p.m. at City Hall,
Revelstoke, on the second and fourth Saturdays of each month.
Vancouver—President, H. Neelands, M.P.P., Vancouver ; Secretary, P. R. Bengough, 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver. Meets first and
third Tuesdays of each month at 319 Pender
Street West at 8 p.m.
Victoria—President, S. J. Peele, 1241 Oxford
Street; Secretary, E. Woodward, 1253 Carlin
Street. Meets at 8 p.m. on first and third
Wednesdays in month at Trades Hall, Broad
Street.
Federated   Trades   Councils   (Railroads).
Victoria (Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Employees' Federation)—President, Geo. Phil-
brook, 637 King's Road, Victoria; Secretary,
Charles Rose, 315 Wilson Street, Victoria.
Meets in Room 4, Green Block, Victoria, at
7.30 p.m. on third Monday in month.
METAL TRADES COUNCILS.
Vancouver—President, A. J. Crawford, Vancouver ; Secretary, P. R. Bengough, Vancouver.
Meets at call of Chairman.
DISTRICT   LODGES  AND  COUNCILS.
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners
of America.
Victoria District Council—President, R. McLeod,
1239 Seaview Avenue; Secretary, J. Ley, Box
770. Meets first and third Tuesdays in month
in Trades Hall at 8 p.m.
International Association of Machinists.
"Vancouver District Lodge No. 78—President, W.
Clarke, 2044 York Street West, Vancouver;
Secretary, Evan Macmillan, 1820 Thirtieth
Avenue West. Meets on first Sunday of each
month at 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver,
at 2.30 p.m.
District No. 2 (all Railroads in Canada)—President, D. S. Lyons, 331 Edmonton Street. Winnipeg ; Secretary, H. Kemster, 14 Labour
Temple, Winnipeg.
Allied Printing Trades Council.
Vancouver—President, J. R. White, Box 66,
Vancouver; Secretary, R. H. Neelands, Box
66, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street
West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second Monday
in month.
Victoria—President, C. K. Christian, 434 Simcoe
Street, Victoria; Secretary, C. F. Banfield,
642 Craigflower Road, A^ictoria. Meets at
Trades Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on second
Friday in month. 	
13 Geo. 5
Eeport of the Deputy Minister.
S 39
Theatrical   Federation of Vancouver.
President—E. A. Jamieson, 991 Nelson Street;
Secretary, C. H. Williams, 2200 Ontario
Street, Vancouver. Meets at 991 Nelson
Street at 10 a.m. on Tuesday before first
Sunday in month.
Civic Federation.
Vancouver—President, C. Watson, No. 3 Fire
Hall, Twelfth Avenue and Quebec Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, H. Urquhart, Water Department, City Hall, Vancouver. Meets at call
of Secretary.
TRADE  UNIONS.  '
Amsbury.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of Canada
(Government Division, British Columbia) —
Secretary, R. Gooding, Amsbury. .
Ashcroft.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
210—President, J. D. Nichol, Spatsum via
Spences Bridge; Secretary, E. W. Kirby, Box
76, Lytton. Meets quarterly at 7.30 p.m. on
third Saturday in March, June, September,
and December at Ashcroft.
Barrett Lake.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 340—President, F. H. Fljozdal,
Smithers; Secretary, G. J. Maggs, 506 Scott
Building, Winnipeg.
Boulder.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 15—President, E. Murphy,
Barriere;   Secretary, A. Taylor, Mount Olie.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 23—Secretary, F. A.
Browne, 1575 Inverness Street, Edmonds.
Central Park.
Carpenters & Joiners (Amalgamated), No. 2605
—President, F. Williams, 2469 Twenty-ninth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Muir-
head, 2572 Monmonth Avenue, Collingwood.
Copper Mountain.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, International,
No. 160—Secretary, J. Cuthbertson, Copper
Mountain.
Chilliwack.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
31—President, E. Hall, Rosedale; Secretary,
T. J. Blackadder, Box 134, Matsqui. Meets
at 1.30 p.m. on first Sunday in March, June,
September, and December at C.N.R. Freight
Office Building, Vancouver.
Cranbrook.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 632—President, A. R. Webster, Baker
Street, Cranbrook; Secretary, A. H. Bullock,
Cranbrook Street, Cranbrook. Meets at 8 p.m.
on last Monday in month at A. H. Bullock's
Barber Shop, Cranbrook.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers,
No. 308—Secretary, A. Mueller, c/o Cranbrook
Brewing Company, Cranbrook.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 559—President, R. Bartholomew,
Cranbrook; Secretary, M. H. Johns, Box 214,
Cranbrook. Meets at 2.30 p.m. on first and
third Sundays in month at Maple Hall, Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
563—President, Hugh J. Brook, Box 551, Cranbrook ; Secretary, G. L. Ingram, P.O. Box 1,
Cranbrook. Meets at 7.30 p.m. on alternate
Mondays in Maple Hall.
Machinists, International, No. 588—President,
W. Henderson, Cranbrook; Secretary, P. C.
Hartnell, Cranbrook.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
229—President, Geo. C. Brown; Box 739, Cranbrook ; Secretary, C. A. Fransen, Kitchener.
Meets at call of Secretary.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 407—President, R. T. Tiffin, Cranbrook;
Secretary, W. A. Wilson, Box 843, Cranbrook.
Meets at K.P. Hall, Cranbrook, on second Sunday in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 173—President, J. L. Martin, Slater-
ville, Cranbrook; Secretary, J. F. Lunn, Cranbrook. Meets at 8 p.m. at Maple Hall on fourth
Wednesday in month.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
585—President, G. S. Mcintosh, Cranbrook;
Secretary, P. C. Hartnell, Cranbrook. Meets
at Maple Hall every Sunday at 7.30 p.m.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1292—
President, G. Merrington, Cranbrook; Secretary, E. G. Dingley, Box 728, Cranbrook.
Corbin.
United Mine Workers of America, Local No. 2877
—President, G. Findlay, Corbin; Secretary,
J. MacDonald, Box 273, Corbin. Meets at
Corbin every second Sunday at 2 p.m.
Duncan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
533—President, W. H. Smith, Parksville Junction ; Secretary, H. W. McKenzie, Duncan.
Meets at Duncan at call of President.
Fernie.
Brewers' Union—President, P. Robinson, Fernie ;
Secretary, O. N. Woods, Fernie. Meets at
Fernie at 7 p.m. on first Monday of month.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of, Local No.
308—President, J. W. McGladrey, McPherson
Avenue; Secretary, J. E. Robson, Box 1071,
Fernie. Meets at Howland Avenue, Fernie, on
first Monday of each month at 7 p.m.
United Mine Workers of America, Local No. 2314
—President, Wm. Hunter, Dalton Avenue,
Fernie; Secretary, T. Whitehouse, Chipman
Avenue, Fernie. Meets at South Room,
Miners' Theatre, on Fridays at 7.30 p.m. S 40
Department of Labour.
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, No. 1454—Secretary, T. Barlow, Field.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
165—President, G. Carlson, Golden; Secretary,
W. Johnson, R.R. No. 3, Armstrong. Meets at
Golden on the last Sunday of each quarter at
10 a.m.
Greenwood.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, International
Union of, Local No. 22—Secretary, W. Lakeland, Greenwood.
Kamloops.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers,
No. 296—Secretary, T. E. Sanderson, 179 Hill
Street, Kamloops.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 821—President, F. W. McKenrot, General
Delivery, Kamloops; Secretary, T. J. O'Neill,
Box 753, Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall
on first and third Thursdays in month at 2.30
p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 855—President, L. L. Ross, Kamloops;
Secretary, J. Patterson, Kamloops. Meets first
and third Sundays at Orange Hall, Kamloops,
at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 258—President, Howard Embley,
Kamloops; Secretary, R. Eccles; Recording
Secretary, Frank Vereker, Box 315, Kamloops.
Meets at L.O.L. Hall, Kamloops, at 2.30 p.m.
on second and fourth Wednesdays in month".
Railroad Employees, No. 611—President, J. E.
Fitzwater, Kamloops; Secretary, A. S. Greig,
Kamloops.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 148
—President, O. E. Klemmer, Kamloops; Secretary, H. T. Batchelor, Box 221, Kamloops.
Meets on fourth Thursday in month at 8 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 611—President, H. S. Fromhart,
Kamloops; Secretary, W. Bailey, Box 798,
Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops,
on second and fourth Sundays in month at
2 p.m.
Railway Enginemen, Canadian Association of—
Secretary, W. Dohm, Kamloops..
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of,' Local No.
519—President, G. H. Farquharson, Kamloops ; Secretary, V. Mott, Kamloops. Meets
at 113 Main Street on first and third Sundays
in month at 2.30 p.m.
Lucerne.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers,  United  Brotherhood  of,  Local No.
15—President,    Ed.   Murphy,    Hilton,    Alta.;
Secretary, T. Tostenson, Boulder via Kamloops.
Meets  first  Sunday  in  January,  April,  July,
and October.
Locomotive   Firemen   &   Enginemen,   No.   904—
President,   P.   Sorenson,   Lucerne;    Secretary,
C. M. Richmond, Lucerne.
Railroad Trainmen,  Brotherhood  of,  No.  737—
President, G. M. Booton, Lucerne;   Secretary,
C. Hedberg, Lucerne.
Railway Conductors, No. 674—Chief Conductor,
M.   J.   Williams,   Lucerne;    Secretary,   R.   C.
Woods, Lucerne.
Lytton.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 210—President, J. D. Nicol,
Spatsum via Spences Bridge; Secretary, E. W.
Kirby, Box 76, Lytton.
Matsqui.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 31—President, E. Hall, Rose-
dale; Secretary, T. J. Blackadder, Box 134,
Matsqui.
Mission City.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
168—President, F. W. Brunton, Hatzic Post
Office; Secretary, H. Anderson, Harrison Mills.
Meets once in three months (no date set).
Michel.
United Mine Workers of America, Local No. 2334
—President, A. Causey, Natal; Secretary, F.
Irvine, Box 42, Michel. Meets in Natal Club
Hall, Natal, at 2.30 p.m. on Sundays.
Nanaimo.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 54
—President, W. Johns, Rosehill Avenue, Town-
site, Nanaimo; Secretary, W. H. McMillan,
410 Bruce Avenue, Nanaimo. Meets (at
discretion of President) at 7.30 p.m. on 5th of
month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
337—President, James J. Begg, c/o Free Press
Block. Nanaimo; Secretary, L. C. Gilbert, Box
476, Nanaimo.    Meets at call of President.
Nelson.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 196—President, A. E. Allanay, Nelson;
Secretary, T. Dunbar, Nelson. Meets in Nelson
at 8 p.m. on third Thursday in month.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, & Soft Drink Workers
of America, Local No. 28—Secretary, W. J.
Brodie, Nelson.
Building Trades Association of Nelson—President, J. Notman, Nelson ; Secretary-Treasurer,
G. B. Campbell, Nelson. Meets at Labour
Temple on first and third Wednesdays in month
at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 579—President, J. Simons, Nelson; Secretary, P. C. Lindsay, Box 805, or 204 Latimer
Street, Nelson, Meets at K. of P. Hall, Nelson,
on first and third Sundays in the month at
2.30 p.m. ■
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Division No. 631—President, G. Turner,
Box 10S4, Nelson; Secretary, Stanley Smith,
Box 1084, Nelson. Meets second and fourth
Sundays at 1.30 p.m. in I.O.O.F. Hall. 13 Geo.
vEPORT of the  DEPUTY
Linister.
S 41
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 663—President-Secretary, Fred. Chapman,
Box 253, Nelson.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
181—President, H. Erickson, Midway; Secretary, F. Gustafson, Box 265, Nelson. Meets
last Sunday in January, April, July, and
October at 2 p.m. at Nelson.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, International
Union of, Local No. 95—Secretary, Marcus
Martin, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 98—President, W. Beatty, Box 614,
Nelson; Secretary, R. Vyse, Box 884, Nelson.
Meets in Labour Temple at 7.30 p.m. on second
and fourth Thursdays in month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 460—Chief Conductor, A. B. Hall,
915 Stanley Street, Nelson; Secretary, H. L.
Genest, Box 216, Nelson. Meets in K. of P.
Hall at 1.30 p.m. on second Sunday in month.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
558—President, C. H. Sewell, Victoria Street,
Nelson; Secretary, A. Kirby, 820 Carbonate
Street, Nelson. Meets at 11 a.m. on second
and fourth Sundays in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1291—
President, James Kay, Nelson; Secretary,
A. T. Richards, Box 701, Nelson.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
340—President, D. C. McMorris, Nelson; Secretary, K. S. Hudson, " News," Nelson. Meets
in Daily News Office, Nelson, at 5.10 p.m. on
last Wednesday in month.
New  Denver.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 173—Secretary, R. McPherson,
New Denver.
Bline, Mill & Smelter Workers, No. 98—Secretary, J. H.  Strickland, New Denver.
New Westminster.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 573—President, R. Collins, B.C.E.R. Barber Shop, New Westminster; Secretary, Geo.
Yorkstown, 35 Eighth Street, New Westminster. Meets at 35 Eighth Street on fourth
Tuesday in month at 7.30 p.m.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 392—
President, G. Couldwell, 412 Fourth Avenue,
New Westminster; Secretary, A. Buckingham,
1329 Strike Avenue, New Westminster.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of, Local No.
286—Secretary, R. H. Reubens, Sapperton.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1251—President, A. Shaw,
New Westminster; Secretary, T. Blackledge,
824 Fifth Avenue, New Westminster. Meets
at Labour Temple on first Thursday in month
at 7.30 p.m.
Cigar Makers of America, International Union
of, Local No. 486—Secretary, A. C. Miller,
243 Boyne Street, New Westminster. Meets
at Labour Temple on the first Wednesday in
month at 8 p.m.
Civic Employees of New Westminster, Union of
—President, Richard Reid, 527 Ninth Street,
New Westminster; Secretary, Rees Morgan,
313 Regina Street, New Westminster. Meets
in Labour Temple at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday
in month.
Civil Servants of Canada (Amalgamated)—President, D. K. Chester, New Westminster; Secretary, H. G. Cox, New Westminster.
Fishermen's Protective Association of B.C.—
President, L. Patterson, Annieville; Secretary,
H. Iverson, Annieville.
Longshoremen's Union (International), Local
38-54, New Westminster Auxiliary—Business
Agent, A. A. Stewart, Carnarvon Street, New
Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 151—President, H. Bailey, 321 Third
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, T. Ken-
yon, 620 Fader Street, New Westminster.
Meets in Labour Temple on first and third
Fridays in each month at 7.30 p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 654
—President, J. W. Rushton, Royal Theatre,
New Westminster; Secretary, F. C. Bass, 61
Sixth Street, New Westminster. Meets in
Labour Temple at 2.30 p.m. on fourth Sunday
in month.   -
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No.. 280—President, J. Huggan, New
Westminster; Secretary, A. H. Muttitt, 212
Fifth Avenue, New Westminster. Meets at
Labour Temple on fourth Tuesday in month
at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 134
—President, R. C. Higgins, 1019 Hamilton
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, J. B.
Mouat, 525 Tenth Street, New Westminster.
Meets in Labour Temple at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Tuesdays in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
632—President, J. T. Burnett, Box 1024, New
Westminster; Secretary, R. A. Stoney, Box
1024, New Westminster. Meets in Labour
Temple at 5 p.m. on last Friday in month.
Notch   Hill.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 193—President, L. Hubbard,
Sicamous;    Secretary, W. Loftus, Notch Hill.
Penticton.
Locomotive Engineers, 866—Secretary, S. Cor-
nock, Penticton.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1023—President, James Slatter, General Delivery, Penticton; Secretary, E. H. Croucher,
Penticton. Meets in Penticton at 1 p.m. on
second Sunday of every second month. S 42
Department of Labour.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 884—President, C. A. Tupper,
Penticton; Secretary, R. O. Blackstock, Box
385, Penticton. Meets at Burtch's Hall, Penticton, oh first and second Thursdays at 2 p.m.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
914—President^ A. Campbell; Secretary, R.' S.
Fraser, B.C. Hotel, Penticton.
Typographical Union, International, Local 541-—
President, H. de Pencier, Penticton; Secretary,
E. C. Murray, Penticton. General meetings,
Kelowna; monthly meetings, Penticton, at 8.30
p.m. on fourth Saturday of month. Area comprises Vernon, Armstrong, Kelowna, Penticton,
and Princeton.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1426—President, H. Suckling, Box 322, Penticton ; Secretary, W. G. Archard, General
Delivery, Penticton.
Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's Association, International, No.
38-22—President, L. Larsen, Port Alberni;
Secretary, W. G. Bigmore, Port Alberni.
Powell River.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 142—President, Raymond Newby,
Powell River; Corresponding Secretary, E. L.
Dollar, Box 153, Powell River; Financial Secretary, W. Hutchinson, Powell River. Meets
in Central Hall at 7 p.m. on second Sunday
of each month.
Pulp, Sulphite & Paper Mill Workers of United
States and Canada, International Brotherhood
of, Local No. 76—President, George P.
O'Malley, Powell River; Secretary, J. A.
Goddard, Powell River. Meets first and third
Sundays of each month at Central Hall.
Prince George.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 843—President, George Abbott, Prince
George; Secretary, J. A. McMillan, Prince
George. Meets in Odd Fellows' Hall on
second and fourth Mondays of each month at
2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 827—President, F. Armstrong,
Prince George; Secretary, M. Whitford, Prince
George. Meets in I.O.O.F. Hall at 7.30 p.m.
on first and third Sundays in the month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Nechako
Lodge No. 1870—President, G. Sturley, Eugen
Post Office; Secretary, T. Nielsen, Box 162,
Prince George. Meets at Prince George about
once in six weeks.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
202—President, A. Peterson, Newlands; Secretary, W. Sims, Giscome. Meets at McBride
or Prince George on first and third Sundays
each quarter at 8.30 a.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 620 — President, Bert Gogna, Prince
George; Secretary, J. E. Paschall, Box 305,
Prince George. Meets in Odd Fellows' Hall
on second and fourth Mondays in month at
S p,m.
Railroad Employees, Local No. 28—President,
F. C. Saunders, Prince George; Secretary, H.
A. MacLeod, Prince George. Meets in Odd
Fellows' Hall at call of President.
Prince Rupert.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1735—President, J. J. Gillis,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. Clark, Prince
Rupert; Financial Secretary, T. Ross Mackay,
Box 1573, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall, at 8 p.m. on first and third Wednesdays of each month.
Civic Employees' Association—President, G. B.
Casey (fireman) ; Secretary, Miss C. Orchard,
Box 474, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall on second Thursday in month at 8 p.m.
Deep Sea Fishermen's Union of the Pacific;—
Secretary-Treasurer, P. B. Gill, Box 65,
Seattle. Meets at Seattle, Prince Rupert, and
Ketchican on Tuesdays at 7 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 344—President, A. McRae, Box 457,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, S. Massey, Box 457,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at
8 p.m. on second Friday of each month.
Longshoremen's Association, International. Local
No. 38-41—President, Manuel Borgis, Box 531,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, T. Rosie, Box 531,
Prince Rupert. Meets at Prince Rupert on
Monday of each week at 8 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 207—President, J. McLean, 1060 Seventh
Avenue East, Prince Rupert; Secretary, J.
Campbell, Box 469, Prince Rupert. Meets in
Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on second Wednesday in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
335—President, J. C. Walker, Shames, c/o
C.N. Railways; Secretary, AV. H. Wilson,
Amsbury, c/o CN. Railways. Meets at Carpenters' Hall, Prince Rupert, at call of President and Secretary.
Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers of America,
Brotherhood of, Local No. 731—President, J.
A. Curtis, 331 Second Avenue, Prince Rupert;
Secretary, W. Bissett, Empress Hotel, Prince
Rupert. Meets at 331 Second Avenue at 8
p.m. on first and third Tuesdays of each month.
Plumbers & Steamfitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
495—President, R. Wilson. P.O. Box 209,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, W. M. Brown, Box
209, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall at 8 p.m. on first Monday in the month.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 426—President, H. Leaper, Box 465,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, Frank Derry, Box
498, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall, .
Prince Rupert, at 8 p.m. on second Monday of
each month.
Railway Employees, Brotherhood of, Division No.
154—President, J. Wolstenholme, P.O. Box
270, Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. A. Roberts,
P.O. Box 447, Prince Rupert. Meets at Carpenters' Hall, Fraser Street, on the last Thursday of each month. 13 Geo. 5
Eeport of the Deputy Minister.
S 43
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
426—President, H. Leaper, Box 465, Prince
Rupert; Secretary, F. Derry, Box 498, Prince
Rupert.
Sheet Metal Workers, International Alliance,
Local No. 672—President, G. Dodds; Secretary, N. C. Robinson, Box 820, Prince
Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m.
on fourth Friday in the month.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Local No. 510—■
President, R. C. Parson's, Box 720, Prince
Rupert; Secretary, A. A. McEwen, Box 720,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at
8 p.m. on first and third Fridays of each month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
413—President, S. D. MacDonald, Box 689,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. M. Campbell,
Box, 689, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall at 8 p.m. on last Thursday of each month.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 407—President, Jas. Mathie, Revelstoke; Secretary, Jas.
M. Goble, Box 283, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on the fourth Saturday of each
month at 8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 466—President, Thomas McMillan, Revelstoke ; Secretary, Allen McMahon, Box 407,
Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall, Revelstoke,
at 3.15 p.m. on third Sunday of each month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
657—President, S. Stingley, Revelstoke; Secretary, J. P. Purvis, Box 27, Revelstoke. Meets
in Selkirk Hall at notice of Secretary on first
and third Tuesdays of each month.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 341—President, R. McKay,
Revelstoke; Secretary, W. Pavey, Revelstoke.
Meets in Selkirk Hall, Revelstoke, on the
second Wednesday of each month.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 258—President, A. W. Bell, Box 234,
Revelstoke; Secretary, Dugald Bell, Box 234,
Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8 p.m.
on first Monday of month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
208—President, A. L. Anderson, Revelstoke;
Secretary, A. Blackberg, Revelstoke. Meets in
Revelstoke at 8 p.m. on first Saturday in February, May, August, and November.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 481—President, J. Bell, Revelstoke;
Secretary, H. Parsons, Box 42, Revelstoke.
Meets in Smyth's Hall at 7 p.m. on third Tuesday of each month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Mount
Stephen Division, Local No. 487—President, J.
R. Duncan, Revelstoke; Secretary, R. M. McDonald, Box 25, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk
Hall on second Monday and fourth Thursday
of each month at 2.30 and 7.30 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 51
—President, S. L. Ross, Revelstoke; Secretary,
W. Maxwell, Box 44, Revelstoke. Meets at
Revelstoke at 2 p.m. on first Sunday and at
8 p.m. on third Monday of each month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
1257—Secretary, R. Hodson, Box 254, Revelstoke.
Rosebery.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
173 — President - Secretary, Warren Nelson,
Rosebery.
Salmon Arm.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
193—President, W. E. Boyde, Pritchard; Secretary, Chas, G. Anderson, Box 49, Notch Hill.
Meets at Finn Hall, Salmon Arm, at the call
of the Chair.
Slocan Lake.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, International
Union of, Local No. 98—President, J. H.
Strickland; Secretary, A. Shilland, New Denver. Meets at New Denver at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays.
Smithers.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America. No.
53—Chairman   and    Secretary,    W.   Mitchell,
Smithers.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of,   Local   No.   Ill—Chief   Engineer,   J.   M.
McCawley, Smithers;   Secretary, F. V. Foster,
Smithers.   Meets at Smithers on first and third
Tuesdays in month at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen,  Brotherhood
of, No. 902—President, R. Lawseth, Smithers;
Secretary, T. L. Stafford, Smithers.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers,  United Brotherhood of,  Local No.
340—President,    H.    Johnson,    Burns    Lake;
Secretary, D. Matheson, Barnett Lake.    Meets
at Smithers every three months.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 157—Secretary, Hugh Forrest, Smithers.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 869—
President, A. Greenhalgh, Box 12, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415—President, E. Hann, Smithers; Secretary, J. G. Calderwood, Box 122, Smithers.
South Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union—President, A. W.
Richardson, City Hall, South Vancouver;
Secretary, W. S. Welton, City Hall, South Vancouver.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of. No.
1419—Secretary, W. F. Ogilvie, Squamish.
Steveston.
Fishermen's Benevolent Society (Japanese Independent)—President, Goro Shimono, Box 54,
Steveston; Secretary, E. Kuwabara, Box 54,
Steveston.
Stewart.
Mine, Mill & Smelters Workers' Union, International, Local No. 181—Secretary, W. Fraser,
Stewart. S 44
Department of Labour.
192c
Trail.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 763—President, H. A. Johnston, Trail;
Secretary, Alex. Balfour, Box 114, Trail. Meets
in Miners' Hall at call of Chair.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 713
President, Claude H. Wright; Secretary, C.
W. Openshaw, Trail.
Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen's International Union of America, Local No. 371—President, J. Brightwell;
Secretary, H. A. Bowron, 2849 Burns Street.
Meets at 319 Pender Street West on second
Thursday of each month at 8 p.m.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 120—President, C. E. Herrett, 71 Hastings Street East; Secretary, A. R. Jennie, 320
Cambie Street. Meets at Room 313, 319 Pender
Street West, at 7.15 p.m. on second and fourth
Tuesdays in month.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 151—President, W. J. Bartlett, 1193 Burrard Street;
Secretary, A. Annan, 2048 Second Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street
at 8 p.m. on third Tuesday of each month.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, & Helpers, international Brotherhood of, Local No. 194—President, P. Wilkies, 260 Dufferin Street East,
Vancouver; Secretary, A. Fraser, 5079 Ross
Street, South Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender
Street West at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays of each month.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 105—President, George Mowat, Box 411,
Vancouver; Secretary, Francis J. Milne, Box
411, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street
West, Vancouver, on second Tuesday of each
month at 8 p.m.
Boot & Shoe Workers' Union, Local No. 505—■
President, T. M. Spence, 1812 Forty-seventh
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, Tom
Cory, 445 Vernon Drive, Vancouver. Meets at
319 Pender Street West at 8 p.m. on first
Wednesday in month.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of, Local No.
281—President, F. W. Graham, 2284 Fourth
Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, W. H.
McLean, 2035 Broadway West, Vancouver.
Meets at Labour Temple, 319 Pender Street
West, at 8 p.m. ,on third Wednesday in month.
Bricklayers, Masons & Plasterers' International
Union of America, Local Union No. 1, B.C.—■
President, H. Cupit, 1606 McLean Drive, Vancouver ; Secretary, W. S. Dagnall, Box 53,
Vancouver., Meets at 319 Pender Street, Vancouver, on second and fourth Wednesdays in
month at 8 p.m.
Bridge & Structural Iron Workers, International
Association of, Local No. 97—President, R.
Massecar, Box 1196, Vancouver; Secretary,
W. L. Yule, Box 1196, Vancouver. Meets at
Room 310, 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Mondays of each
month.
Carpenters & Joiners, Amalgamated Society of,
Branch No. 1—President, W. Taylor, 3030
Miller Avenue, McKay Post-office; Secretary,
C. E. Ellis, 1657 Thirty-sixth Avenue East,
South Vancouver. Meets at 148 Cordova
Street West at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Tuesdays of each month.
Carpenters & Joiners, Amalgamated Society of,
Branch No. 2—President, G. Finlay, 454
Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver ; Secretary,
W. Bray, 72 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 148 Cordova Street West on
first and  third  Tuesdays  of month  at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 452—President, W. Dunn, 1510
Eleventh Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
G. II. Hardy, 1925 Sixty-seventh Avenue East,
South Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street
West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Mondays in month.
Cigarmakers, International Union of America,
Local No. 357—President, G. Thomas, 1199
Bidwell Street, Vancouver; Secretary, F.
Brown, 53 Twenty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday in month.
City Hall Employees' Association—President, R.
W. Armstrong, 2505 Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver ; Secretary, D. Robson, c/o 1006 Pend-
rell Street, Vancouver. Meets at Roaf Building, 432 Richards Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
on first Wednesday of each month.
Civic Employees' Federal, Local No. 28 (Chartered
by Trades & Labour Congress of Canada) —
President, D. Cuthell, 2852 Albert Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, G. Harrison, 1335 Woodland Drive, Vancouver. Meets at 148 Cordova
Street West, Vancouver, on first and third
Fridays in month at 8 p.m.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated—President, H. E. Warburton, Box 322, Vancouver;
Secretary, M. W. Buck, Box 322, Vancouver.
Meets at Eagle Hall, Homer Street, on second
Tuesday in month at 8 p.m.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated (Post
Office Department Group)—President, D. T.
McCarthy, 2325 Maple Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, J. Linsen, 1728 Yew Street, Vancouver.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
Division 65 (Canadian Government Radio)—■
President, J. Daniel, 1132 Seventh Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, W. L. Parkin,
Wireless Station, Vancouver.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
C.P.R. System, Division No. 1—Chairman, W.
D. Brine, Box 432, Vancouver; Secretary, H.
S. Cunningham, Box 432, Vancouver. Meets
at 319 Pender Street West on first Sunday in
month at 2.30 p.m.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
Local 52—Chairman, J. Clark, 738 Sherburn
Street, Winnipeg; Secretary, J. A. McDougall,
1633 Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver. 13 Geo. 5
Eeport of the Deputy Minister.
S 45
Dominion Express Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 15—President, J. Greenwood, Mayne
Avenue, Burnaby; Secretary, F. Christie, 124
Wessex Street, South Vancouver. Meets at
Belvedere Court, Tenth Avenue and Main
'Street, on first Tuesday and third Friday of
each month at 8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 213—President H. Northrop; Secretary, D. S. Pallen, 1811 Trafalgar Street;
Financial Secretary and Business Agent, E.
H. Morrison, 148 Cordova Street West, Vancouver. Meets at 148 Cordova Street West
on Mondays at 8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of.
Local No. 310—President, A. S. Baird, 3660
Twenty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver;
Recording Secretary, Lloyd Purdy, 3754 Inverness Street, Vancouver; Financial Secretary,
F. G. Hurst, 3043 Forty-third Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street West,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. every Monday.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local
No. 18—President, C. A. Watson, 1644 Tenth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, H. A.
Urquhart, 1145 Semlin Drive, Vancouver.
Meets at Trades and Labour Council, 319
Pender Street West.
Garment Workers of America, United, Local No.
160—President, Mrs. W. Mahon, 843 Cardero
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Miss May Ward,
1020 Eveleigh Street, Vancouver. Meets at
319 Pender Street West at 0 p.m. on first
Thursday in month.
Granite Cutters, International Association of—
President, G. Fordyce, 533 Fifty-third Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, John Philip, 2537
Trinity Street. Meets on third Friday of
month at 319 Pender Street West at 7.30 p.m.
Hotel & Restaurant Employees, International
Alliance, Local No. 28—President Minnie
Barnes, 541 Burrard Street, Vancouver; Secretary, A. Graham, 441 Seymour Street, Vancouver. Meets at 441 Seymour Street at 2.30
and 8.30 p.m. each Wednesday.
Jewellery Workers, International Union of, Local
No. 42—President, O. Holtham, 685 Homer
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, R. C. Wilson,
2239 Granville Street, Vancouver. Meets on
second and fourth Mondays in month.
Lathers, Wood, Wire & Metal, International
Union, Local No. 207—President, S. White,
2754 Sixth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. G. Finlayson, 2635 Twelfth Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at Federated Labour
Party Hall, Cordova Street, Vancouver, at 8
p.m. on first Friday in month.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, Local
No. 44—President, H. J. Rhodes; Secretary,
C. Spain, 1947 Wolfe Street, South Vancouver.
Meets at Room 302, 319 Pender Street West,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on third Wednesday in
month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 320—President, G. P. Boston, 1741 Third
Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, H. O. B.
McDonald, 1222 Pendrell Street, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on second Tuesday in
month at 8 p.m. and on fourth Tuesday in
month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Local No. 656
—President, T. McEwen, 157 Sixteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, S. H. Water-
house, 1425 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Thursday of
each month.
Longshoremen's Association, International, Local
No. 38-52—President, W. A. Pritchard, 152
Cordova Street East, Vancouver; Secretary,
G. Thomas, 152 Cordova Street East, Vancouver. Meets at 152 Cordova Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first and third Fridays
in month.
Longshoremen's Association, Auxiliary, Local
(Waterfront Freight Handlers)—President, A.
Rawden, 233 Main Street, rear, Vancouver;
Secretary, L. G. Hillier, 233 Main Street, rear,
Vancouver. Meets at 233 Main Street, rear,
Vancouver, on first and third Wednesdays in
month at 8 p.m.
Lumber Workers' Industrial Union of Canada,
Coast Branch—Secretary, J. M. Clarke, 61
Cordova Street, Vancouver. Meets on second
and fourth Sundays of each month at 2 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 182—President, L. B. George, 538 Georgia
Street AVest, Vancouver; Secretary, J. G.
Keefe; Business Agent, P. R. Bengough.
Meets at 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 692—President, E. Dawson, 842 Nineteenth
Street, North Vancouver; Secretary, P. R.
Bengough, Room 309, 319 Pender Street West,
Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street West,
A'ancouver at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Tuesdays.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers. United Brotherhood of, Local No.
167—President, C. J. Beck, 1612 Eighth
Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, A. D.
McDonald, 991 Pender Street AVest, A'ancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street West, A'ancouver, at 8 p.m. on third Thursday in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1734—President, AV. Egan, Ardley; Secretary,
J. Roscoe, 22 Fourteenth Avenue West, A'ancouver.    Meets at 3 p.m. last Sunday in month.
Marine Firemen & Oilers' Union of B.C.—President, Dan Canlin, 108 Main Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, AV. Donaldson, 108 Main Street,
Arancouver. Meets at 108 Main Street at 7
p.m.  on  first and  third  Wednesday  in month.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, No. 7
—President, L. A. McAlpine, 3729 Sixteenth
Avenue West, A'ancouver; Secretary, E. Read,
232 Thirteenth Street West, North Arancouver.
Meets at 10 Jones Building, 407 Hastings
Street West, on Fridays in winter months and
on second and fourth Fridays in summer
months at 8 p.m.
Milk Drivers & Dairy Employees, Local No. 464
—President, H. C. McBride, 430 Fifty-second
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, B.
Showier 1115 Robson Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 319 Pender Street West at 8 p.m.
on second and fourth Fridays in month. S 46
Department of Labour.
1923
Moulders of North America, International Union
of, Local No. 281—President, J. W. Welsh;
Secretary, George Arnaud, 823 Pender Street
East, Vancouver. Meets at Room 3, 319
Pender Street AVest, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
first and third Fridays in month.
Moving Picture Machine Operators, Local No.
348—President, W. Tenney, 506 Hornby
Street; Secretary, G. Gerrard, P.O. Box 345,
Vancouver. Meets on first Sunday in month
at 991 Nelson Street at 7.30 p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No.
145—President, E. C. Miller, 991 Nelson
■Street; Secretary, Edward A. Jamieson, 991
Nelson Street, Vancouver. Meets at Moose
Hall, Homer Street, Vancouver, at 10 a.m. on
second Sunday in month.
Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers of America,
Local No. 198—President, W. Hunt, 2063
Fourth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary,
R. A. Baker, 5136 Prince Edward Street, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Party Hall, 148 Cordova Street, A'ancouver, at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Thursdays in month.
Pile Drivers, Bridge. Wharf & Dock Builders,
Local No. 2404, United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners—President, W. II. Pollard,
Box 320, Arancouver; Secretary, J. Thomson,
Box 320, Vancouver. Meets at 112 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Fridays of month.
Photo Engravers' International Union of North
America, Local No. 54—President, W. W.
Looney, A'ancouver; Secretary, Gordon
Edwards, 2723 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m.  on first Wednesday in month.
Plasterers & Cement Finishers, International
Association of the United States and Canada,
Local No. 89—President, W. R. Strickland,
289 Forty-sixth Avenue East, South Vancouver ; Secretary, Andrew Campbell, 464 Fifty-
sixth Avenue East Vancouver. Meets at 319
Pender Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
first Wednesday in month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
170—President, B. Stinchcombe, 1759 Thirty-
fourth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J.
Gillies, Arancouver; Business Agent, S. G.
Smylie, Box 1131, Vancouver. Meets at 319
Pender Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
second and fourth Fridays.
Policemen's Federation (Chartered by Trades &
Labour Congress of Canada), Local No. 12—
President, J. Ellice, 1306 Bidwell Street, Vancouver; Secretary, C. McDonald, 726 Vernon
Drive, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street
AVest, Vancouver, at 7.30 p.m. on first Tuesday
after change of shift.
Postal AVorkers, Amalgamated—President, D. J.
McCarthy, 2325 Maple Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, J. Linsen, 1728 Yew Street, Vancouver. Meets at 535 Homer Street at 8 p.m.
on second Friday of month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 69—President, H. F. Longley, North Shore Press, North
Vancouver; Secretary, F. P. Lacey, 2221
McGill Street, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender
Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second
Tuesday in month.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Division No. 59—President, A. N. Lowes, 4841
AVindsor Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, Charles
Bird, 2030 Union Street, Vancouver. Meets at
I.O.O.F. Hall, 515 Hamilton Street, at 8 p.m.
on fourth AVednesday in month.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 187—Secretary, R. Lydiard, 288 Twenty-
second Avenue East, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144—
President, G. H. Patterson, 1776 Thirty-ninth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, D. A.
Munro, 70 Seventh Avenue AVest, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 58—President, H. A. Benbow, 549
Eleventh Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. D. Vulliamy, 2215 Fifteenth Avenue West,
A'ancouver. Meets at Cotillion Hall, Davie and
Granville Streets, on first and third Fridays in
month at 8 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 267—President, J. R. Burton, 1324
First Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J.
B. Physick, 1156 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday at 2
p.m. and on third Thursday at 8 p.m.
Railway Mail Clerks' Federation (Dominion) —
President, H. F. Hatt, 1317 Eighteenth Avenue
East, A'ancouver; Secretary, C. S. Bate, 2172
Seventh Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets in
post Office Building, Vancouver, at 2.30 p.m.
last Tuesday of month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 630—President, J. Brodie, Thirteenth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, A. Mc-
Naughton, Box, 1184, Vancouver. Meets at
Eagle Hall, Richard Street.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 46—President, G. S. Hodgson, 5615
Commercial Street, South Vancouver; Secretary, H. Glover, 1725 Third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
144—President, G. H. Patterson, 1776 Thirty-
ninth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, D.
A. Munro, 70 Seventh Avenue West, Arancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall, Hamilton Street,
Vancouver, at 7.30 p.m. on first Tuesday and
2.30 p.m. on third Sunday.
Sawmill Filers & Sawyers' Association—President, D. B. Firth, 2878 Silver Street, McKay;
Secretary, Geo. Gray, 1638 First Avenue East,
Vancouver. Meets at Eagles' Hall, 535 Homer
Street, Vancouver, at 2.30 p.m. on first and
third Sundays in month.
Seafarers' Union of B.C., The Federated—President, D. Gillespie, 318 Cordova Street West,
A'ancouver; Secretary, W. Donaldson, 318
Cordova Street West, Vancouver. Meets at
318 Cordova Street West at 8 p.m. on first
Tuesday and third Friday of month. 13 Geo. 5
Eeport of the Deputy Minister.
S 47
Seamen's Union of the Pacific—President, Andrew
Furuseth, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco, Cal.;
Secretary, C. Larsen, 59 Clay Street, San Francisco, Cal.; Business Agent, J. Pearson, Box
571, Vancouver. Meets at Vancouver at 7
p.m. every Monday.
Sheet Metal AVorkers, Local No. 280—President,
T. Burke, 2731 Twenty-fourth Avenue East,
A'ancouver; Secretary, J. Hale, 825 Twenty-
fifth Avenue East, A'ancouver. Meets at 319
Pender Street at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Thursdays.
Soft Drink Dispensers' Union, No. 676—President, Frank McCann, 1423 Eleventh Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, T. J. Hanafin,
2376 Sixth Avenue AVest, Vancouver. Meets
at 319 Pender Street AVest, Vancouver, at 2.30
p.m. on first Sunday in month.
Steam Engineers, Sawyers, Filers & Mill Mechanics, Canadian Society of Certified, Headquarters No. 1—President, AV. W. Burton, 1030
Pender Street East, Vancouver; Secretary, H.'
Isherwood, 858 Sixty-sixth Avenue East, South
A'ancouver. Meets on second and fourth Mondays in month at 152 Hastings Street West,
A'ancouver, at 7.30 p.m.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union of, Local No. 844—President, J. Flynn,
319 Pender Street, A'ancouver; Secretary, N.
Green, 953 Hornby Street, Vancouver. Meets
at 319 Pender Street AA'est, A'ancouver, at 8
p.m. every Thursday.
Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers & Station
Employees, No. 626—President, II. P. Wilson,
Thirty-third Avenue East, A'ancouver; Secretary, E. Baldock, 6433 Argyle Street, Vancouver. Meets at C.P.R. Store-room, Drake
Street, Vancouver, on last day- of month at
5 p.m.
Stfeam Shovel & Dredgermen, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 62—President, D. Clark,
Aldergrove; Secretary, G. D. Lamont,. 223
Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Stereotypers & Electrotypers, International Union
of, Local No. 88—President, H. G. AV'oodbury,
180 Gothard Street, Vancouver; Secretary, A.
Keddy, 1828 Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver,
Meets at 319 Pender Street West at 4 p.m. on
second Monday in month.
Stone-cutters' Association of North America—
President, J. Pennock, 2227 Eighth Avenue
West, A'ancouver; Secretary, F. Lowe, 3225
Twenty-sixth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at 319 Pender Street West on first Tuesday in
month at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 101
—President, F. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive;
Secretary, W. H. Cottrill, 166 Seventeenth
Avenue AVest, Vancouver. Meets at K. of P.
Hall, Eighth Avenue and Kingsway, A'ancouver, at 10.15 a.m. on first Monday and 7 p.m.
on third Monday.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No.
Ill—President, J. D. Murray, 1161 Comox
Street, A'ancouver; Secretary, A. S.. Crosson,
1228 Homer Street. Meets at 319 Pender
Street AVest at call of Secretary.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, Local
No. 178—President, A. R. Gatenby, 1721 Cotton
Drive, Vancouver; Secretary, C. McDonald,
P.O. Box 503, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender
Street AVest, A'ancouver, at^.8 p.m. on first
Thursday in month.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers, No.
371 (Bakery Drivers)—President, J. Bright-
well, 2020 Quebec Street, Vancouver; Secretary, H. A. Bowron, 2849 Burns Street, Vancouver. Meets on second Thursday of each
month at 319 Pender Street AVest, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers, No.
464 (Milk AVagon Drivers and Dairy Employees)—President, H. C. McBride, 430 Fifty-
second Street East, Vancouver; Secretary, B.
Showier, 1115 Robson Street, Vancoviver.
Meets at 319 Pender Street West on second
and fourth Fridays in month at 8 p.m.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers, No.
655 (General Teamsters and Chauffeurs) —
Secretary, B. Showier, 1115 Robson Street,
Vancouver; President, W. M. Brown, 141
Forty-ninth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at 319 Pender Street West, A'ancouver, on
second and fourth Wednesdays in month at
8 p.m.
Telegraphers' Union of America, No. 52, Commercial (Canadian Press Division)—Secretary,
J. A. McDougall, 1633 Twelfth Avenue East,
Vancouver.
Telegraphers' Union of America, Division 65,
Commercial (Canadian Government Radio
Division)—President, AV. L. Parkin, Wireless
Station, Point Grey; Secretary, AV. D. Burford,
Digbjr Island, Prince Rupert.
Theatrical Stage Employees & Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, Local No.
118—President, A. L. Harrington, Box 'JU,
A'ancouver; Secretary, G. Martin, P.O. Box
711, 2S35 Stephens Street, Vancouver. Meets
at 991 Nelson Street, Vancouver, at 9.30 a.m.
on second Friday in month.
Theatrical Stage Employees & Moving Picture
Operators of the United States and Canada,
International Alliance of, Local No. 348—
President, W. Tenney, 506 Hornby Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, G. Gerrard, Box 345, Vancouver. Meets at 991 Nelson Street, A'ancouver, on first Sunday in month at 8 p.m.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
226—President, W. Skinner, P.O. Box 66, Vancouver; Secretary, R. H. Neelands, P.O. Box
66, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street
AVest, Vancouver, at 2 p.m. on last Sunday
in month.
Wood-workers, Amalgamated Society of Shipyard,
Branch No. 2—President, F. L. Barrett, 1762
Fifteenth Avenue East, Arancouver; Secretary,
W. Bray, 72 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at F.L.P. Hall, 148 Cordova Street
West, A'ancouver, at 8 p.m. first and third
Tuesdays of each month. S 48
Department of Labour.
Victoria.
Barbers, Journeymen, International Union of,
Local No. 372—President, J. A. Green, 1319
Douglas Street, Victoria; Secretary, G. W.
AA'ood, 1242 Government Street. Meets at
Cooks & Waiters' Hall on fourth Monday in
month at 8 p.m.
Bridge, Dock & Wharf Builders, No. 2415—
PAsident, J. McLeod, 7 Boyd Street, Victoria;
Secretary, E. E. Goldsmith, 2565 Grahame
Street, A'ictoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad
Street, A'ictoria, at 8 p.m. first and third Mondays in each month.
Bridge, Structural & Ornamental Ironworkers,
International Association of, Local No. 185—■
President, D. Kennedy, Box 236, A'ictoria;
Secretary, A. M. Davis, Box 236, A'ictoria.
Meets at Trades Hall at 8 p.m. on first-and
third AA'ednesdays in month.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 191—President, G. Penketh, 2517 Blan-
shard Street, Victoria; Secretary, H. Prior,
1225 Juno Street, Esquimalt. Meets at Foresters' Hall at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Mondays.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 147—President, J. A. Wiley, 141 Clarence
Street, Victoria; Secretary, AV. AV. Laing, 125
Linden Avenue, A'ictoria. Meets at Trades
Hall, Broad Street, A'ictoria, at S p.m. on
fourth Friday in month.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers of
America, International Union of United, Local
No. 280—President, G. W. Brewer, Crease
Avenue, Saanich; Secretary, Ernest Orr, 58
Sims Avenue, Saanich. Meets at Trades Hall,
Broad Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second
Tuesday in month.
Bricklayers, Masons & Plasterers of America,
International Union of, Local No. 2—President, Fred. Plows, corner of King's Road and
Grahame Street, Victoria; Secretary, J. Owen,
541 Toronto Street, Victoria. Meets at K. of
P. Hall, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second Monday
in month.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 2651—President, A. J. Shaw,
1043 Victoria Avenue, Oak Bay; Secretary,
Joseph Ley, Box 770, Victoria. Meets at
Trades Hall, Broad Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m.
on second and fourth Tuesdays.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of
(Ship Carpenters & Caulkers)—President, R.
H. Macleod, 2663 Fifth Street, Victoria; Secretary, A. E. McLennan, 2523 Government
Street, Victoria.
Carpenters & Joiners.(Bridge Workers), United
Brotherhood of, Local No. 2415—Secretary,
E. E. Goldsmith, 2565 Grahame Street,
Victoria.
Civic Employees, Local No. 50—President, James
AValker, 221 Robertson Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. Whitecomb, City Yard, Garbally
Road, A'ictoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad
Street, A'ictoria, at 8 p.m. on second AVednes-
day.
Civil Service Association—President, C. B. Peterson, Lands Department, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria; Secretary, A. M. D. Fairbairn, Parliament Buildings, Victoria. Meets usually at
Campbell Building, Victoria, when called.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated—President, C. Sivertz, 1278 Denman Street, Victoria ;
Secretary, G. C. Bloomfield, 2528 Garden
Street, Victoria.
Cooks, AVaiters & Waitresses, Local No. 459—
President, M. C. V. Moir; Secretary, AV. H.
Hatcher, P.O. Box 14, A'ictoria. Meets at 1305
Government Street on first and third Tuesdays
in month.
Dominion Express Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 20—President, C. Little, 2723 Mount
Stephen Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, Miss M.
H. Frank, 1120 Pembroke Street, Victoria.
Electrical AVorkers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 230—President, H. Popham, 1045
Yates Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. Reid,
2736 Asquith Street, Victoria. Meets at Labour
Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. every Monday.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America—President, J. Eva; Secretary, J.
Barlow, P.O. Box 392. Meets at K. of P. Hall
on third Friday of each month.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union, Local No. 446—President, T. Carson,
651 Belton Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, H.
Geake, 114 Howe Street, AAictoria. Meets at
K. of P. Hall at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Tuesdays.
Firefighters, Civic, Local No. 13—President, H.
Dyer, Headquarters Fire Hall, Victoria; Secretary, L. Colombin, Headquarters Fire Hall,
Victoria. Meets at Headquarters Fire Hall,
Cormorant Street, at 8 p.m. on first Monday
of each month.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
11—President, C. Tubbs, Victoria; Secretary,
H. J. Brown, 405 John Street, Victoria.
Locomotive Firemen & Engineers, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 690—President, Harry Richmond,
414 Russell Street, Victoria; Secretary, H. J.
Brown, 405 John Street, Victoria. Meets at
A.O.F. Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on first
Wednesday and  third Thursday in month.
Longshoremen's Association, International, Local
No. 38-46—President, John Shelley, Box 1315,
Alctoria; Secretary, Thomas Bourne, Box
1315, Victoria (residence, 427 Luxton Avenue,
Victoria). Meets at 565 Johnson Street at
7.30 p.m. on first and third Wednesdays of
each month.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 456—President, James Turnbull, 2020
Fernwood Road, Victoria; Secretary, C. B.
Lester, 215 Hampton Road, Victoria. Meets
at K. of P. Hall, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Thursdays.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood, Local No. 2824
—President, J. Reece, 783 Market Street, Victoria ; Secretary, G. E. Wilkinson, 50 Sims
Avenue, Victoria. Meets at 50 Sims Avenue
about 18th of March, June, September, and
December at 2 p.m. 13 Geo. 5
Eeport of the Deputy Minister.
S 49
Marine Engineers", National Association of, No.
6—President, AV. G. Gordon, 2929 Quadra
Street, Victoria;    Secretary, A. McNiven.
Meat Cutters & Butchers, International Union
of, Local No. 485—President, W. J. O'Connor,
c/o Hollywood Meat Market, Foul Bay; Secretary, R. Elliott, 2347 McBride Avenue,- Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall, Broad Street,
Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Moulders, International Union of North America,
Local No. 144—President, J. Stewart, 1231
Pandora Avenue; Secretary, J. Dakers, Box
127, Victoria; Financial Secretary, W. Kaye,
421 Portage Street, Victoria. Meets at K. of
P. Hall at 8 p.m. on second AA'ednesday in
month.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No.
247—President, Stanley Peele, 1214 Oxford
Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. H. Press, 1060
Burdette Avenue, Victoria. Meets at K. of P.
Hall at 2.30 on second Sunday in month.
Pattern Makers' League of North America—
Secretary, John L. Parkinson, 1235 Lyall
Street, Victoria. Meets on second Thursday
each month.
Photo Engravers, International Union of North
America (Auxiliary of Vancouver), Local No.
54—Secretary, Frank M. Day, c/o Engraving
Department, " The Times," Victoria.
Pile Drivers & Wooden Bridgemen, No. 185—
President, Joseph Munroe, 1117 Hillside Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, E. E. Goldsmith,
2565 Grahame Street, Victoria. Meets at
Trades Hall at 8 p.m. on first and third
Mondays.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
324—President, J. Fox, 2858 Austin Avenue;
Secretary, H. Johnson, 3261 Harriet Road.
Meets at K. of P. Hall at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Tuesdays.
Policemen's Federal Union, Local No. 24—President, H. F. Jarvis, 1536 Westall Avenue;
Secretary, A. H. Bishop, 316 Skinner Street,
Victoria. Meets at 25 Fisgard Street at 8.15
p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 79—President, Thomas Nute, 534 Michigan Street, Victoria ; Secretary, Robert C. Malcolm, 1405
Grant Street, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall,
Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on second Monday in
month.
Railway & Steamships Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1137—President, E. Leonard, 1221 Whittaker Street, Victoria ; Secretary, V. I. Duncan. 832 Tolmie
Avenue, Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall at 8
p.m. on first Thursday in month.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
613—President, E. A. Wyatt, 58 Portland
Rooms, Yates Street; Secretary, W. M.
Parlby, 780 Dominion Road, Esquimalt. Meets
at A.O.F. Hall, Broad Street, Victoria, at 7
p.m. on second Tuesday and last Friday in
month.
4
Retail Clerks, International Association of, Local
No. 604—President, J. Talbot, 1737 Bank
Street, A'ictoria; Secretary, H. H. Hollins,
Trades Hall, Broad Street. Meets at Trades
Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday
in month.
Sheet Metal Workers, Amalgamated, International Alliance of, Local No. 134—President,
E. Lamphere, 2636 Roseberry Street, Victoria;
Secretary, T. Brooke, P.O. Box 1093, Victoria.
Meets- at K. of P. Hall, 842 North Park Street,
at 8 p.m. on third Thursday.
Shipwrights, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1598—President, F. H. Williams, 2112 Richmond Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, A. G. Mac-
Lennan, 2523 Government Street, A'ictoria.
Meets at Trades Hall, Broad Street, Victoria,
at 8 p.m. on first Monday.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 109
—President, W. H. Gibson, 1512 Fort Street,
A'ictoria; Secretary, R. A. C. Dewar, 1218
Johnson Street, A'ictoria. Meets corner Broad
and Yates Streets, Victoria, at 10 a.m. and
7 p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Stonecutters' Association of North America
(Journeymen)—President, W. Mackay, Box
853, A'ictoria; Secretary, J. Barlow, Box 853,
Victoria.    Meets at 8 p.m. on second Thursday.
Tailors' Journeymen Union of America, Local
No. 142—President, John Morrison, Harriet
Road; Secretary, Ed. Christopher, Box 387,
A'ictoria. Meets at A.O.F. Hall, Broad Street,
A'ictoria, at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday in month.
Teamsters & Chauffeurs, General, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 365—President, S.
Holdridge, 1104 Johnson Street, Victoria; Secretary, John Scouland, 350 Robertson Street,
Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad Street,
at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday.
Theatrical Stage Employees & Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, Local No.
168—President, S. Evans, Fairfield Hotel, Victoria ; Secretary, C. More, 949 Balmoral Road,
Victoria. Meets at Trades. Hall, Broad Street,
Victoria, at 11.15 p.m. on first Thursday in
month.
Typographical Union. International, Local No.
201—President, John Chrow, 1030 Burdette
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, Chas. F. Banfield,
642 Craigflower Road, Victoria. Meets at
Trades Hall, Broad Street, Victoria, at 2 p.m.
on last Sunday in month.
Upholsterers & Trimmers, No. 25—President, P.
Clift,  516 Joffre  Street,  Victoria;    Secretary,
F. Jenkins, Colville Road, Victoria. Meets in
Campbell Building at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Mondays in month.
Wellington.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 50—President, Thomas M. Biggs,
Wellington P.O.; Secretary, T. Richards,
AVellington. Meets at Wellington on third
Thursday in month at 8 p.m. LABOUR DISPUTES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA IN 1922.
Comparatively few labour disputes disturbed business in the Province during the year 1922.
Only 10 which involved a stoppage of work came within the cognizance of the Department of
Labour in the course of the year, which is the lowest number for any of the last five years,
21 having been reported in 1921 and as many as 68 in 1920. Speaking generally, employers and
employed appear to have been willing to accept the wages and working conditions already
established before the end of 1921, or to make only slight changes in them, and any differences
that developed were found adjustable without a dispute coining to a head. In our large basic
industries, which are often closed down for a few months in the winter season, rates of pay
are set when the new season's work begins, and changes may be made without the process of
negotiation which is found necessary in industries where employment is continuous. Wages in
these basic industries were, as a rule, a little higher in 1922 than in the previous year, but this
was the result rather of increased business activity than of any pressure from organized labour.
The Strike of Printers.
One of the longest labour disputes ever recorded in the history of the Province is that
affecting the printers in A'ancouver, who left work on May 1st, 1921, with the object of securing
a 44-hour working-week. After lasting for nearly two years the dispute is apparently as far
off as ever from a formal settlement. Some of the employers have conceded the terms of the
men, and others are still holding out against them, having found available a sufficient amount
of non-union help to enable them to carry on their business. At the end of the year there were
still 15 men in receipt of strike pay.
Miners' Wages in Crowsnest District.
The most important dispute of the year was one which affected the important coal-mining
industry in the south-eastern portion of the Province, and which lasted from the beginning of
April until late in August. The dispute was, in reality, part of the larger struggle in which the
miners over most of the North American Continent were engaged.
In District 18 of the United Mine Workers of America the miners had an agreement with
the operators which expired on March 31st. The district comprised mines both in Alberta and
British Columbia and the workers affected in this Province numbered 1,756, of which 856 were
in Fernie, 670 in Michel, and 230 in Corbin.
Prior to the expiration of the old agreement two conferences were held during March, at
which both sides submitted proposals for amended terms. The men asked for the adoption of
a 6-hour day, the maintenance of the existing basic day-wage, and an increase of 25 per cent,
on all contract mining rates: failing such increase, the miners demanded the abolition of the
contract system.
The counter-proposals submitted by the operators were that the contract rate should revert
to the scale of 1915, plus 22 per cent., thus making a reduction of between 20 and 25 per cent.
The reductions proposed in the basic day-rate schedules wrere from $6.S9 to $3.80 for underground
labour, from $6.58 to $3.25 for surface labour, and from $7.50 to $4.50 for the miners' minimum
day-rate. An extraordinary feature of the dispute, therefore, was the very wide difference
between the demands of the two sides.
Agreement reactieo.
Efforts to bring the parties to an agreement were unavailing, and on April 1st the men left
work.
The dispute continued for nearly five months, and then, on August 23rd, an agreement was
arrived at by the parties, the terms of which were as! follows:—
" 1. That the general clauses of the agreement which expired on March 31st, 1922, between
the Western Canada Coal Operators' Association and the United Mine Workers of America,
District 18, shall be continued unchanged to the 31st day of March, 1923. 13 Geo. 5 Eeport of tpie Deputy Minister. S 51
" 2. That all day-wage and contract rates in the said agreement and supplement dated
October 25th, 1920, shall be reduced 15 per cent., effective at once, and shall remain in effect
to March 31st, 1923 :
" Provided that if at any time before the said March 31st, 1923, not less than 75 per cent,
of the Union miners in the Central Competitive Field, comprising Western Pennsylvania, Ohio,
Indiana, and Illinois, shall have negotiated through the executive heads of the United Mine
Workers of America a new agreement with the operators in that field, the day-wage and contract
rates in District 18 shall, subject to the provisions of paragraph 3 hereof, be amended so that
the same relation shall exist between the new rates and those which expired in this district
on March 31st, 1922, as exists in- the Central Competitive Field between the new rates and
those which also expired on the 31st day of March, 1922, there.
" 3. That the decision as to the time when and the extent to which such an agreement
shall have been consummated in the Central Competitive Field shall be left to the Federal
Minister of Labour, the Hon. James Murdock, and that amendment of the rates referred to
in paragraph 2 shall become effective as and from the date notification of such decision shall
have been received by this Association and by the United Mine Workers of America, District 18.
" 4. Respecting ,the dispute over the construction of the make-up clause, it is agreed that
the minimum wage shall be the same as a miner working on company work, $7.50 per day.
This construction to be effective only from date of this agreement.
" 5. That the AVestern Canada Coal Operators' Association and United Mine AVorkers of
America, District 18, shall meet in conference thirty days prior to March 31st, 1923, to consider
the terms of a new agreement for this district.
" 6. This agreement shall be forthwith submitted by the Union for ratification by referendum
vote to its membership in District 18, and upon being ratified by a majority voting, upon such
referendum, this agreement and all and every the provisions hereof shall be deemed to have
become and to have been binding on the Union and upon such and every of its members in the
said district as and from the day of the date hereof."
The agreement was signed by the following: For the Western Canada Coal Operators'
Association, Jesse Gouge, Vice-President, and R. M. Young, Secretary; for the United Mine
Workers of America, District 18, Robert Livett, William Potter, N. McDonald, AVilliam Sherman,
R. Peacock, Conference Committee.
It will be seen from the above that an important condition was attached to the acceptance
of a 15-per cent, reduction. Its effect was that, if any new agreement were entered into by
75 per cent, of the union miners in the Central Competitive Field, comprising Western Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, the agreement affecting the British Columbia and Alberta
miners should then be revised in conformity with it. On September 1st, only three days after
work in British Columbia and Alberta had been resumed, a new agreement became effective in
the Central Competitive Field, and in accordance with its provisions the wage-rates of 1921 were
reverted to in the mines affected in this Province and Alberta. A later agreement between the
parties made these terms effective until March 31st, 1924.
The Payment for Salmon-fishing.
At the commencement of the fishing season the firms operating canneries on Rivers Inlet
fixed the price to be paid for sockeye salmon at 30 cents each if caught with "cannery gear "
and 40 cents if caught with " independent gear." Some of the fishermen, among whom, it was
stated, a number of Finns were prominent, organized a demand for 45 cents a fish. This the
companies stated they could not comply with owing to market conditions. Accordingly the
boats, instead of going out on June 20th, remained tied up and 950 men remained idle. This
number embmraced 478 whites, 346 Indians, and 126 Japanese. The cannery managers invited
the men to a full and free discussion, at which the prevailing business conditions were clearly
explained.
For two weeks after the date mentioned very few sockeyes were reported in the inlet, so
that there was little inducement to fish. Soon after the run began, however, about 200 men,
mostly Indians, went out to fish on July 9th and the remainder followed on the ensuing days,
thus bringing the dispute to an end. Department of Labour.
1923
The following is a summary of the year's disputes in brief:
Tie-makers—
Prince George
Pile-drivers, etc-
Esquimalt   .. .
Coal-miners-
Fernie   ..
Engineer:?—
Vancouver
Brewery-workers-
Fernie    	
Shipyard-workers—
North Vancouver
Fishermen—
Rivers  Inlet
Carpenters—
New Westminster
Compositors—
A'ancouver
Commenced February 6th. Men demanded $4 for an 8-hour
day and employers offered $3 for 10 hours. Settled on
employers'  terms.     Work resumed on February  15th
Commenced February 23rd. Dispute caused by differences
as to rates of pay. Work resumed on March 21st on
employers' terms
Commenced March 15th. Pile-drivers, dock and bridge
builders, etc., refused to agree to a reduction in wages.
Vacancies were rilled chiefly by new men who accepted
employers' terms.    Work resumed on March 31st
Commenced April 1st. Wage agreement previously in existence expired on March 31st, and in District 18 of the
United Mine Workers' of America, which includes the
Fernie area of British Columbia, both employers and
employed demanded a rearrangement more favourable to
themselves. No agreement being reached, the miners, in
common with others in many of the coal areas of the
Continent, left work. The dispute lasted nearly five
months. On August 23rd an agreement was reached which
involved the temporary acceptance of a 15-per cent, reduction, but this was revised a few days later in accordance
with a new agreement in the Central American coalfields,
and the former rates were restored. The 1921 rates are
to be effective until March 31st, 1024.
Commenced April 15th. For an increase of wages for operating and hoisting engineers. Increase granted after
mediation.    Work resumed on April 25th
Commenced May 31st. Old agreement haying expired, employers asked for a reduction of pay of $1.50 a day.
Workers resisted demand and left work. Resumption of
work on basis of 50 cents a day reduction took place on
June 15th
Commenced June 1st. Employers had asked for a reduction
averaging 45 cents a day in wages of shipwrights, ship-
joiners, boat-builders, and caulkers, and men refused to
agree. Employers reverted to former rate of pay and
work  was resumed  on June  10th
Commenced June 20th. Employers had fixed pay of fishermen for sockeye salmon at 30 cents each if caught with
" cannery gear " and 40 cents if caught with " independent
gear." Fishermen demanded 45 cents a fish, but when the
" run" began they gradually accepted the employers'
terms
Commenced about July 7th. Dispute with employers was
over question of what should constitute a working-week.
Employers' terms accepted and work resumed after five
days
Commenced May 1st, 1921, the men's demand being for a
44-hour week. Some employers had conceded the 44-hour
week and some still operated on the 48-bour week. Dispute unfinished at end of year
Totals
100
23
1,756
1,200
2.300
300
150,000
36
15
300
950
17
20
300
200
2,400
4,000
85
6,000
3,369     | 166,785
1 '-"■ -V'V''"
13 Geo. 5 Eeport of the Deputy Minister. S 53
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Chief Factories Inspector  R. J. Stewart.
Inspector H. Douglas.
Inspector Miss J. Dickinson.
Inspector  Mrs. W. Mahon.
Office   Court-house, Vancouver.
In the year 1922 the industries of the Province were still very much under the influence of
the depression which set in towards the close of 1920, and which is only now showing signs of
clearing away. At such times the work of factory inspection has to be performed with more
than ordinary vigilance; for experience has taught us that during these periods of retrenchment
second-hand machines of an obsolete nature are often purchased in the interest of economy.
When such machines are located it is often necessary either to prohibit their use or to specify
certain improvements which, when completed, would cost as much as up-to-date machines, and
which even then are far from rendering as good results, either from a producing or an accident-
prevention point of view.
Accident-prevention.
Under this heading all orders for the safeguarding of dangerous machinery are issued by
the Factory Inspector, with the authority of the Workmen's Compensation Board, on forms
supplied by them. After these orders are mailed from the Inspector's office all correspondence
in connection therewith is taken up directly with the Board.
The duties of the factory inspection officials, as Inspectors for the Workmen's Compensation
Board, are not confined to ordering guards on dangerous machinery, but extend to seeing that
guards already installed are maintained in place. This particular phase of the work requires
at times the greatest persuasive powers, for the reason that there are still found employees
who believe little in the value of a guard as a preventive of accidents in their own work.
Some men seem to regard its use as a sign of timidity, and apparently think that ignoring or
dispensing with it is the way to demonstrate their courage.
In the course of the year all major and a great many minor accidents are investigated, and
reports of such inquiries sent to the Workmen's Compensation Board. These reports are made
use of in connection with the injured persons' claims for compensation. Apart, however, from
this aspect of the matter, the investigation of an accident serves a twofold purpose1—it enables
the Inspector, in conjunction with the employer and employee, either to design a guard or to
change the mode of operation. The possession of particulars in connection with any one
industrial accident serves as a guide to the Inspector in having precautionary measures taken in
other plants with hazards of a like nature. In other words, there is an endeavour to make
one accident prevent another.
The past year has revealed a substantial reduction hi the number of accidents of a serious
nature in plants over which supervision is exercised, and this shows that the educative work
which has been carried on in previous years is now beginning to bear fruit. If, however, this
reduction is to be made of a lasting nature, at will require the united efforts of both the employers
and employees.
Working-hours in Laundries.
The 1922 Amendment to the " Factories Act" was the means of compelling the laundries
operated by Orientals in the Province to observe the statutory holidays and hours of labour
as prescribed for that industry. Previous to that amendment being passed it was practically
impossible to obtain compliance with the law owing to the fact that the Police Magistrate
had discretionary powers in respect to fixing the amount of fines. These in most cases amounted
to only $5 or $10, notwithstanding the fact that the same offenders had previously been convicted
of similar offences. Under these circumstances the impression seemed to be prevalent among
the proprietors of these laundries that it was cheaper to pay a small fine than to abide by the
restrictions. During the first two months following the passage of -this amendment successful prosecutions
were instituted against several offenders, and fines aggregating $450 were imposed. These
results have only been attained through frequent inspections, and any laxity in conducting
future inspections would result in these laundries operating an unlimited number of hours.
Dust and Fumes.
As in former years, a portion of the activities of the inspectorate have been devoted to the
suppression or removal of dust and fumes which are generated in the course of manufacturing
operations. Marked improvement in this respect is to be noted, particularly in the shingle
industry of the Province. In the manufacture of shingles a great deal of fine cedar dust is
generated, and if allowed to go uncontrolled is detrimental to the health of the employees.
Mechanical exhaust systems have been and are now being installed in a great number of the
plants, which has revolutionized the working condition in this industry.
The introduction of the electric melting-pot on linotype machines in printing-offices has
resulted in healthier working conditions for the operators of these machines and other employees.
Previous to the elimination of gas for heating purposes, suction-fans and piping were necessary
for the purpose of removing the gas fumes from work-rooms. Since the introduction of the
electric heater, however, a number of these systems have either been removed or their use
discontinued.
Child-labour.
While no prosecutions for the employment of children under age have taken place, it has
been found, nevertheless, that children who had not attained the required age as defined by the
Act were occasionally working in factories. As the violations usually were not wilful acts on the
part of the factory proprietors, it was thought that, in the circumstances, the ends of justice
would be served by warning the employers and prohibiting the children from further work.
During the summer school holidays many requests are made for permission to allow boys
under the age-limit to be employed in certain industries. Invariably the reason given is that
the money is required to permit the boys to purchase school-books. As the Act does not permit
of any latitude in this respect, there has been no other course open than to refuse the requests.
There are, moreover, certain industries in the Province in which young boys, even after
they have attained the age-limit as prescribed by the Act, should not be employed. All too
frequently our Inspectors are called upon to investigate the loss .of one or more fingers, and
sometimes even a hand is sacrificed by these young industrial workers, in the majority of
instances through lack of realization of the hazards of machinery. It is regrettable that any
one of such immature years should be thus handicapped so early in life.
Elevators.
It is gratifying to be able to report the non-occurrence of any fatal accidents on' passenger-
elevators during the year 1922. This record reflects great credit on the efficiency of the operators
and those in charge of the maintenance of the elevators. AA'hen one considers the vast number
of persons who are daily making use of this form of convenience, with its attendant hazards, it
must be recognized that a record of this nature has not been left to an element of chance.
During the past year some progress has been made formulating a set of rules and regulations pertaining to the installation and operation of passenger-elevators. In the preparation
of these rules it has been sought to embody all safety devices which have passed the experimental
stage and which will be adaptable to present and future installations. 13 Geo. 5 Eeport of the Deputy Minister. S 55
REPORT OF THE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
Secretary of Board Miss Mabel A. Cameron.
Office  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Inspector Mrs. Winifred Mahou.
Office  Court-house, A'ancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—AVe have the honour to present the fifth annual report of the Minimum Wage Board
of British Columbia, covering the various matters which have been dealt with by the Board
during the year 1922.
The number of meetings held by the Board during the year was fourteen, some of them being
held in Victoria and some in A'ancouver. Several important matters in connection with the
administration of the " Minimum Wage Act" have been under consideration.
Administration of Act and Enforcement of Orders.
The Board has given a large amount of attention during the year to cases brought to its
notice of evasions of the law by employers. Such evasions most commonly take the form of
paying a lower scale of wages than that set by the Board. It cannot be too widely known
that where an employer, either deliberately or inadvertently, has employed female labour for
less than the legal minimum, not only has he committed an offence punishable by law, but,
what is probably a more satisfactory feature of the case to the underpaid employee, the balance
between the amount actually paid and the legal minimum is recoverable as a civil debt. This
has been very pertinently brought home to a number of employers who had so offended. When
the facts came to the knowledge of the Board, communication was opened with the employers
in question. A good deal of time and trouble was thus expended in correspondence and personal
interviews, and, thanks to the firm line taken, nearly all the employers concerned paid over the
money due without the cases having to be taken into Court. A sum of about $400 was obtained
in this way by Minimum Wage Board officials on behalf of girls and women who had been underpaid, the individual amounts ranging from $1.16 to $66.
A tendency to evade the law in another direction is shown in respect of working-hours.
In each of the Orders issued by the Board a specified maximum number of working-hours is
laid down, with a margin in some industries for overtime, for which extra payment must be
made. The most numerous infractions of this provision were on the part of hotel and restaurant
proprietors, especially in the smaller towns and in country districts. The Order relating to this
industry defines the working-week as 4S hours, with an extra four hours for overtime; but it
was found that a period of 56 hours was being worked in some cases, or eight hours daily on
seven days a week. The intervention of the Board has, however, secured a more general
recognition of the practice of allowing one day's relief from duty each week.
Measures taken against Delinquents.    •
As has already been shown, the great majority of cases where the Minimum Wage Orders
were not being complied with have been settled privately, on full redress being obtained, without
taking a complaint into Court. It is no part of the Board's policy to show a vindictive spirit
in dealing with delinquents, while at the same time making their requirements clear and
insisting that employers shall lyve up to them. In only two cases during the year were the
stronger measures found necessary. In the clause relating to Orders fixed by the Board, the
" Minimum Wage Act" states that " each employer shall be required to post a copy of said
Order in each room in which employees affected by the Order are employed." Two informations
were laid against a firm in Vancouver, one for failure to post the Order of the Board, and the
other for failure to pay the minimum wage. Before the case came on for hearing, however,
the defendant paid the amount of the wage deficiency to three employees and pleaded guilty to
the first charge. The second charge was then withdrawn, and on the other a conviction was
entered with a fine of $25. S 56
>epartment of Labour.
192S
In another case a charge was brought against a A'ictoria employer for failure to pay the
minimum wage, but a settlement was arrived at and the charge withdrawn on payment of the
arrears of wages in full.
Difficulties in enforcing the Act.
In any efforts to bring matters to ah issue with employers who have disregarded their
Orders, the Board are almost invariably handicapped by the unwillingness of the women on
whose behalf they are acting to have their identity known. It is a common thing for complaints
to be sent in by parties who insist upon their names being entirely suppressed; or, if there is
any question of a prosecution and evidence is required, the girls concerned will resolutely refuse
to appear in Court. Sometimes complaints are made in anonymous letters, and almost invariably,
of course, these have to be ignored. While the Board is obliged to respect a girl's desire to be
spared the ordeal of an appearance in the witness-box, and also her fear that in some way such
an appearance will tell against her at some future time when she is seeking employment, it is
felt that such reticence is a factor subverting the firm administration of the Minimum Wage Law.
In the past year, in cases where the Board took action to see that employers obeyed its
Orders, such action was prompted sometimes by information received by the Board from other
sources, quite independently of the employees. Where action was taken on the complaint of
an employee herself, it was almost an invariable rule that such information was not supplied
to the Board until after she had left that particular employment.
Special difficulties have arisen in dealing with cases where piece-rates were paid for work
done. Sometimes it would appear that a female employee who was paid in this manner was
not earning an amount equal to the minimum wage in her industry. On the matter being brought
to the attention of the employer by the Board, the deficiency has been made good, but some
employers have announced their intention of obtaining more competent or more rapid workers,
so that such deficiencies would not need to be paid. The subject is a somewhat technical one,
and it would require a good deal of expert knowledge of an industry to determine what wouid
be an adequate scale of pay for piece-work.
Summary of Orders.
For the purposes of reference a brief summary of the Orders now in effect is here given:—
Mercantile Industry.
This includes all establishments operated for the purpose of trade in the purchase or sale of any
goods or merchandise, and includes the work of all female employees engaged therein on the sales
force; the wrapping force; the auditing or check-inspection force; the shoppers' force in the mailorder department; the receiving, marking, and stock-room employees; sheet-music saleswomen; and
those otherwise engaged in the sale, purchase, or distribution of any goods or merchandise.
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers 18 years of age or over: A weekly wage of not less than
$12.75 for a week of 48 hours, and 26 9/16 cents per hour for additional work.
Girls under 18 years of age: A weekly wage of not less than $7.50 for first three months, $8 for
second three months, $8.50 for third three months, $9 for fourth three months, $9.50 for fifth three
months, $10 for sixth three months, $10.50 for seventh three months, $11 for eighth three months, and
$12.75 thereafter.
Apprentices over 18 years of age: A weekly wage of not less than $9 for first three months,
$10 for second three months, $11 for third three months, $12 for fourth three months, and $12.75
thereafter.    Licences required in this class.    Application forms supplied.
Laundry, Cleaning, and Dyeing Industries.
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers 18 years of age or over: A weekly wage of not less than
$13.50 a week of 48 hours.
Girls under 18 years of age: A weekly wage of not less than $8 for first four months, $8.50 for
second four months, $9 for third four months, $10 for fourth four months, $11 for fifth four months,
$12 for sixth four months, and $13.50 thereafter.
Apprentices over 18 years of age: A weekly wage of not less than $9 for the first four months,
$10.50 for second four months, $12 for third four months, and $13.50 thereafter. Licences required
in this class.    Application forms supplied.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
This includes the work of waitresses, attendants, housekeepers, janitresses, cooks, and kitchen
help in restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, ice-cream parlours, light-lunch stands, and other places where
food is cooked, prepared, and served for which a charge is made; and the work of chambermaids in
hotels, lodging-houses, and apartments where lodging is furnished, whether or not such establishments
are operated independently or in connection with any other business; and the work of all female
elevator operators. 13 Geo. 5 Eeport of the Deputy Minister. S 57
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers 18 years of age or over: A weekly wage of not less than
$14 for a week of 48- hours.
Girls under 18 years of age: A weekly wage of not less than $12 until girl is 18 years of age
and $14 thereafter.
Apprentices over 18 years of age: No apprenticeship deemed to exist in this occupation. Licences
may be issued at the discretion of the Board to the physically defective.
Note.—In emergency cases 52 hours a week may be worked. Time and one-half shall be paid
for work in excess of 48 hours and up to 52 hours. AVhen lodging is furnished, not more than $3 a
week may be deducted for such lodging. When board or meals are furnished, not more than $5.25
a week may be deducted for a full week's board of 21 meals. A fraction of a week's board shall be
computed upon a proportional basis. As elevator operators are required by law to pass an examination before running elevators, no apprenticeship is permitted under the Minimum Wage Order.
Office Occupation.
This includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks,
tiling clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other Orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer
operators, auditors, attendants in physicians' and dentists' offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers 18 years of age or over: A weekly wage of not less than
$15 for a week of 48 hours.
Girls under 18 years of age: A weekly wage of not less than $11 for first six months, $12 for
second six months, $13 for third six months, $14 for fourth six months, and $15 thereafter.
Apprentices over 18 years of age: A weekly wage of not less than $11 for first three months,
$12 for second three months, $13 for third three months, $14 for fourth three months, and $15 thereafter.    Licences required in this class.    Application forms supplied.
Manufacturing Industry.
This includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, and adapting for use or sale any article or
commodity, but excepting fish, fruit, and vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers 18 years of age or over: A weekly wage of not less than
$14 for a week of 48 hours.
Personal Service Occupation.
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring, hairdressing, barbering, and other
work of like nature, or employed as attendants at shooting-galleries and other public places of amusement, garages, and gasolene service stations, or as drivers of motor-cars and other vehicles.
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers 18 years of age or over: A weekly wage of not less than
$14.25 for a week of 48 hours.
Girls under 18 years of age: A weekly wage of not less than $10 for first six months, $11 for
second six months, $12 for third six months, $13 for fourth six months, and $14.25 thereafter.
Apprentices over 18 years of age: No apprenticeship for attendants at shooting-galleries and
other public places of amusement, garages and gasolene service stations, or for drivers of motor-cars
or other vehicles. For remaining classes a weekly wage of not less than $10 for first three months,
$11 for second three months, $12 for third three months, $13 for fourth three months, and $14.25
thereafter.     Licences required in this class.    Application forms supplied.
Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, lecture-halls, or the like—Ushers engaged after
6 p.m., on legal holidays, and for special matinees: A wage of not less than 30 cents an hour, with
a minimum payment of 75 cents.
Ushers working more than 18 hours a week but not in excess of 36 hours a week: A weekly wage
of not less than $10,80. (Ushers in this category may be employed only between the hours of 1.30
p.m. and 11 p.m.)
Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours a week: A weekly wage of not less
than $14.25.
Note.—No distinction in wages to be made for ushers under 18 and over IS years of age. No
apprenticeship considered necessary for ushers.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy, and shall also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the
operation of the telephone or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers:   A weekly wage of not less than $15 for a week of
Inexperienced workers: A weekly wage of not less than $11 for first three months, $12 for second
three months, $13 for third three months, and $15 thereafter.
Note.—Except as hereinafter mentioned, the maximum hours of labour shall be not more than
8 hours in any one day nor more than 48 hours in any one week, and every employee shall have one
full day off duty in every week. Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty
between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., 10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of
8 hours of work in computing the number of hours of employment a week. In cases where employees
reside on the employer's premises, the employer shall not be prevented from making an arrangement 8 58 Department of Labour.
with such employees to answer emergency calls between the hours of 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. In cases of
emergency 56 hours a week may be worked. Time and one-half shall be paid for work in excess of
48 hours and up to 56 hours. The total number of inexperienced female employees shall not exceed
35 per cent, of the total number of females employed in any plant or establishment.
Fishing Industry.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers of any age:   A weekly wage of not less than $15.50.
Inexperienced workers of any age: A weekly wage of not less than $12.75 for the first four
months, $13.75 for second four months, $14.75 for third four months, and $15.50 thereafter.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
This includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use, any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Minimum Wage.—Experienced workers of any age: Not less than $14 a week of 48 hours; for
work over 48 hours but not in excess of 60, not less than 30 cents an hour; for work in excess of 60
hours a week, not less than 45 cents an hour.
Inexperienced workers of any age: A weekly wage of not less than $10 for week of 48 hours
for first month, $11 for week of 48 hours for second month, and $12 for week of 48 hours for third
month.
Note.—Overtime work for inexperienced employees to be paid in same proportion to their wages
as overtime payment for experienced employees. AA7ork in excess of 48 hours a week allowed only
during an emergency period of 90 days in any 12 months, or if the Board finds unusual conditions
necessitate a longer period, it may, in its discretion, extend such emergency period.
Reopening of the Fruit and Vegetable Order.
It is provided in the " Minimum. Wage Act" that, where an Order has been made fixing
the hours and rates of wages of female employees in a particular industry, such Order may be
reviewed, and, if thought desirable, amended, on a petition to the Board from either employers
or employees. Two of the Orders made by the Board have come under review during the past
year. One of these, relating to the fruit and vegetable industry, stipulated a minimum wage
for experienced help of $14 a week. As long ago as July, 1921, a request was made to the Board
by the employers that steps should be taken to have the minimum lowered. The reasons given
were that the depressed condition of the business made it necessary for employers to ask for this
concession, and that the cost of living, upon which the Order was based, had gone down since
the Order was made. It was pointed out at that time that a considerable period must elapse
before any change in the Order could come into effect, and that no change could therefore
be made to affect the payment for work in connection with that year's crop. The question
accordingly was allowed to remain in abeyance until the following spring.
On March 9th, 1922, however, a petition was received by the Board, influentially signed by
fruit packers and canners in the Okanagan Aralley. They set forth that, " owing to the reduced
prices now received for our fresh and canned fruits, and also the general all-round wage reductions that have taken place within the last twelve months," the time bad arrived for a reduction
in the minimum wage.
Conference at Kelowna and Vancouver.
In accordance with this petition it was decided to hold a Conference for the purpose of
reviewing the Order, and, as the industry both at the Coast and in the Interior was affected,
it was arranged for meetings to be held at Kelowna and Arancouver. Mrs. MacGill, a member
of the Board, and Miss Cameron, Secretary, paid a visit to the Okanagan A'alley, and held
preliminary meetings at Penticton, Summerland, Naramata, Peachland, Kelowna, and Amnion,
chiefly for the purpose of gathering information as to the cost of living.
At the Conference proper the decisions rested with a committee of nine, consisting of three
representatives of the employers, three representatives of the employees, and three of the outside
public.
The employers were represented by Colonel C. E. Edgett, of Vernon, associated with the
Okanagan Fruit Growers,' Limited; Mr. E. L. Cross, of the Dominion Canners, B.C., Limited,
Kelowna; and Mr. W. A. Hunter, of the Empress Manufacturing Company, Limited, A'ancouver.
The employees were represented by Mrs. Margaret Paul, of Kelowna; Miss Elsie King, of
Kaleden;  and Miss Isabel Smythe, of Penticton.
Mrs. Paul Smith, of New Westminster; Mrs. Wm. McConkey, of Naramata ; and Mr. Arthur
Creagb, of Vancouver, were the representatives of the public. 13 Geo. 5 Eeport of the Deputy Minister. S 59
Mr. J. D. MeNiven, Deputy Minister of Labour and Chairman of the Minimum Wage Board,
presided over the Conference, and explained that, as it was'necessary for the minimum wage to
be adequate to supply the necessary cost of living, a large amount of data bearing upon this
subject had been gathered from employers, employees, and the general public in all parts of
the Province.
Method of taking the Vote.
The method used in the collection of this data may be explained. An itemized list was
prepared of the various heads of- expenditure which would be necessary for a prudent, self-
supporting woman following an occupation in the industry in question in the course of a year.
Each person to whom the list was sent was asked to give his or her estimate of the amounts
which would be so expended. These estimates were returned by 86 persons, and the average
for each item of expenditure and the general average for all were then worked out. It was
thus found that the general average estimated as the cost of living of a woman working in
the industry was $16.97 per week. It may be recalled that when the original Order for the
industry was made in 1919 a similar method was employed in determining the cost of living.
On that occasion the average for the general estimate was $15.57 per week.
At the meetings at Kelowna on May 26th and at A'ancouver on May 29th the Conference
heard the views of a large number of interested parties, and the figures relating to cost of living
were also carefully considered. As the different members of the Conference held widely divergent
views as to the figure at which the minimum wage should be fixed, a series of straw ballots were
taken, each member of the Conference giving the figure at which, in his or her opinion, the
weekly wage should be set. In the ballot there voted: One for $12; one for $13.25 ; three for
$14; one for $16; and two for $16.50—an average of $14.50. An informal discussion followed,
and then a second ballot, which raised the average to $14.56. A third ballot reduced it to
$13.98, a fourth gave $14.25, a fifth $13.93, and a sixth was taken without the latter figure being
changed, the final vote being: One for $13, six for $14, and one for $14.50. Then, as it did not
appear that any further ballot would give a different result, a resolution was put and carried
unanimously that the rate for experienced women workers in the fruit and vegetable industry
should be not less than $14 for a week of 48 hours. A resolution was then approved, reaffirming
the recommendations of the Order of 1919 in their entirety. Thus the Conference, which had
brought out some keen differences of opinion, terminated in a spirit of compromise and mutual
concession.
Consideration of the Manufacturing Order.
In the original Order relating to the manufacturing industry, which became effective on
September 1st, 1919, rules were laid down as to the employment of girls under 18, and inexperienced women workers over that age. for a limited period at less than the normal minimum wage.
After some experience of the working of the Order, it became evident that the rules in question
were not sufficiently elastic to afford proper provision for the very various requirements of the
numerous industries which it covered. This part of the Order was accordingly withdrawn, with
a view to the making of new rules to regulate the wage and other working conditions of
employees of this section. At a later date the Minimum Wage Board suggested the division of
the manufacturing industries in which female labour is employed in the Province into four
groups, and drew up tentatively a schedule of wages for inexperienced women 18 years of age
and over and for girls under 18 years of age in each group. These schedules were published in
full in the last annual report of the Board.
It was then announced by the Board that, before finally approving these regulations and
putting them into effect, it was desirous of hearing the views of employers and employees on
the subject, and persons interested were invited to attend public meetings at A^ictoria and
Vancouver on April Sth and 6th respectively.
An Objection by Employers.
At the A^ictoria meeting the views of both employers and employees were presented; but
at Vancouver, while the employees were fairly well represented, unfortunately the delegation
representing the manufacturing interests took the view that they would not take part or assist
in any way unless the Board immediately desisted from this discussion to reopen the whole
wage question, both for experienced and inexperienced workers. S 60
)epartment of Labour.
1923
The Chairman pointed out that this was impossible, and that a reopening of the Order could
only be taken up again legally after the conditions had been complied with as set forth in
section 9 of the Act. He further explained that if there were any change in the legal minimum
for experienced workers the schedules would be modified in accordance with the same. In this
position he was supported by the other two members.
In the circumstances the Board did not feel themselves in a position to issue any amendment
to the existing Order for the time being. Later a petition was received from the manufacturing
employers, asking for a Conference to be held at which the entire Order could be reviewed.
This petition was accepted by the Board, and much of the work of preliminary inquiry has been
done, but the conditions obtaining in these industries present such a variety of problems which
must be thoroughly investigated that up to the end of the year the time had not been thought
opportune for the holding of the necessary Conference.
Statistical Report. >
As in former years, pay-rolls were obtained by the Board from employers throughout the
Province having women or girls in their employ. The information received relates to the week
ending November 18th, 1922, except in the case of the very seasonal occupations—namely, the
fruit and vegetable industry and the fishing industry. For these two divisions the Board called
for returns for " the week of greatest employment during the season of 1922."
Tabulation of the data furnished by the employers has been arranged in nine groups,
corresponding to the Orders of the Board. In five of these classes, mercantile, laundry, public
housekeeping, office, and manufacturing, it will be noted a comparison is available for four
years—1919, 1920, 1921, and 1922. The figures for the remaining four groups are for the three
latter years only, as in 1919 no Orders were in effect in the occupations or industries classified
as personal service, telephone and telegraph, fruit and vegetable, and fishing.
The Board received a total of 2,135 returns, as against 1,943 in 1921, being an increase of
192 firms reporting. The number of employees recorded shows a gain of 509, the figures having
risen from 9,722 in 1921 to 10,231 in 1922. This advance has been achieved in spite of the fact
that 124 employers who in 1921 had one or more women workers sent in returns this year
advising they had no female employees.
The tables for the various groups are set out below, with brief comment in each case:—
Mercantile Industry.
1922.
1921.
1920.
1919.
Number of Arms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years    	
Under 18 years   	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
Employees under 18 years  	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
320
1,828
283
$27,577.19
$2,682.00
$15.09
$9.48
13.4%
43.7
278
1,788
256
S.601.35
!,389.50
$15.99
$9.33
12.52%
44.17
317
1,685
369
$26,852.90
$3,528.00
$15.94
$9.56
17.96%
43.7
121
1,42S
323
$20,951.25
$3,144.25
$14.67
$9.73
18.5%
46.1
The minimum wage in this industry was set at $12.75 for a week of 48 hours. From figures
compiled in 1922 it is found 2,111 women and girls are employed, as compared with 2,054 reported
the previous year. Returns were received from 42 more firms than in 1921. The average weekly-
wage for employees over 18 years of age works out at $15.09, being $2.34 in excess of the
minimum, but 90 cents lower than the average in 1921. For girls under 18 years we find the
average weekly wage has increased 15 cents since the previous year. There has been a very
slight rise—less than 1 per cent.—in the number of employees under 18 years of age. The
average hours worked have dropped'from 44.17 to 43.7 per week. The highest weekly wage
noted in this industry is paid by a Vancouver establishment. The figure stands at $67.30 per
week. A Victoria firm holds the record for long service, 22 years being given as the period
during which one employee has served the same employer continuously. 13 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
S 61
In this occupation 456 women and girls are reported as receiving weekly wages between
$12 and $13. The wage next in order of frequency is between $15 and $16, with 308 employees
in this group. Out of 2,111 workers in this industry, 847 are working a 44-hour week, 364 are
engaged 441/i2 hours, and 265 work 47 hours. The working-week of the remainder varies from
short hours in some cases to fairly long in others. It must be noted in this connection that
employees working over 4S hours in any week are entitled to an hourly rate for the extra time
they are on duty.
Laundry Industry.
1922.
1921.
1920.
1919.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—-
Over 18 years   	
Under 18 years   	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years 	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
46
i
474     I
101
$6,880.00
$1,215.50
$14.51
$12.03
17.57%
44.73
33
449
70
$6,478.50
$837.00
$14.43
$11.96
13.49%
44.74
35
486
84
$7,332.00
$1,004.00
$15.08
$11.95
14.74%
45.72
23
361
75
;5,229.50
$839.50
$14.48
$11.19
17.00%
45.1
The total number of employees reported in this industry is 575, being 56 in excess of last
year's figures, which were compiled from 33 returns. In 1922 46 firms supplied the necessary
information for the Board. The legal minimum wage for experienced women of 18 years or
over is $13.50 for a 48-hour week. The average weekly wage for 1922 figures out at $14.51 for
experienced workers—over $1 in excess of the minimum and S cents in advance of last year's
average. The weekly average for girls under 18 has also risen slightly for 1922. Last year it
stood at $11.96 a week, while it now appears at $12.03. An increase of 4.08 per cent, in the
number of workers under 18 years of age is noted over the previous year's figures. Even with
this advance the percentage is 17.57, practically the same as in 1919, although there was an
appreciable drop in 1920 and 1921. The average hours worked per week are 44.73 for this year,
as against 44.74 during 1921, scarcely any change being revealed.
The peak in numbers receiving a certain wage is reached in the division between $13 and
$14, 153 women and 18 girls being recorded in this classification. A 48-hour week is worked by
the greatest number of employees, 158 being employed for this time. The next most prevalent
working period is that in which 129 workers are engaged for 46 hours a week.
In one establishment an employee is credited with 16 years' service, the longest reported in
this industry. The highest weekly wage is $30, paid by a dyeing and dry-cleaning firm, whose
workers are covered by this Order.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
1922.
1921.
1920.
1919.
287
1,171
44
$18,718.25
$658.00
$15.98
$14.95
3.62%
46.23
242
994
26
$15,774.06
$373.00
$15.87
$14.35
2.55%
45.26
244
1,184
58
$19,625.44
$913.50
$16.58
$15.75
4.67%
46.51
97
Number of employees—
652
43
Total weekly wages—
$10,568.00
Average weekly wages-—
$612.50
$16.20
$14.24
6.00%
48.93 S 62
Department of Labour.
Returns in this group accounted for 1,215 employees, 195 more than reported last year,
spread over 45 more establishments than in 1921. The prescribed minimum wage in this
occupation is $14 for experienced women over 18 years of age working a 48-hour week. It is
gratifying to note that the average weekly wage—namely, $15.98—is $1.9S in excess of the
minimum, and this figure surpasses last year's average by 11 cents. The weekly average for
the younger workers is shown at $14.95, compared with $14.35 a year ago, registering a gain
of 60 cents. A slight increase is shown in the percentage of employees under 18 years of age,
the figures for 1922 appearing at 3.62 per cent., while 2.55 per cent, was the quota last year.
The average working-week in 1921 was 45.26 hours and for the current year it is shown at
46.23 hours.
The weekly wage-rate paid to the greatest number of employees in this occupation is between
$14 and $15. Altogether 329 workers, 11 of whom are under IS years of age, are receiving this
amount. In the next classification—between $15 and $16—251 employees are found, all but 10
being adults. The Order governing this occupation provides that not more than $3 a week may
be deducted from an employee's wages when lodging is furnished, and meals are valued at
25 cents each, or $5.25 for a full week's board of 21 meals. More than half the workers in this
occupation, or 665 out of 1,215, are working a 48-hour week, while 112 are reported on duty for
the shorter 44-hour week.
The longest continuous service with one employer is 19 years, and the highest weekly
wage $35.
Office Occupation.
1922.
1921.
1920.
1919.
Number of firms reporting ,	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years    	
Under 18 years   	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years  	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
1,097
2,502
91
$48,341.00
$1,110.50
$19.32
$12.20
3.5%
41.93
1,043
2,434
50
$47,155.97
$577.00
$19.37
$11.54
2.01%
40.89
1,019
2,467
155
$47,941.00
$2,110.00
$19.43
$13.61
5.9%
41.5
220
750
60
$13,683.00
$804.00
$18.24
$13.40
7.00%
43.6
Table showing Number of Employees receiving Wages of $25 or more per week.
Weekly Wages.
No. of
| Employees.
Weekly Wages.
No. of
Employees.
$25.00 to $25.99	
96
31
29
41
5
19
11
10
13
3
26.00   „     26.99	
o
27.00   „     27.99	
38 00   „     38.99
2
28.00   „     28.99 ■	
3
29.00   „     29.99	
4
30.00   „     30.99	
43.00   „     43.99
2
31.00   „     31.99	
46.00   „     46.99	
5
1
34.00   „     34.99	
Total  	
277
From returns received by the Board 2,593 women and girls were reported in this occupation.
The legal weekly minimum wage for experienced women over 18 years of age for a 4S-hour
week is $15. The average weekly w-age of $19.32 exceeds this by $4.32, which is only 5 cents
lower than the 1921 average. For girls under 18 the weekly average for the present year—
$12.20—surpasses the previous year's sum by 66 cents. Since last year there has been an
increase of approximately 1.5 per cent, in the employment of young girls. The average hours
worked per week have risen from 40.89 in 1921 to 41.93 in 1922.
This occupation stands out above all others as offering the best wages to the greatest number
of employees.   In the division between $15 and $16 a week 401 employees are recorded; between 13 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
S 63
$16 and $17 there are 225; 289 are receiving between $17 and $18; 318 between $18 and $19;
184 are in the $19-$20 class; 289 between $20 and $21; 195 receive between $23 and $24; and
277 are getting $25 a week or over. A detailed table of these 277 appears above. It must be
borne in mind that these highly paid employees are included in the general table dealing with
the office occupation, and obviously their wages tend to keep the average high. Another noticeable feature in analysing these returns is that over 5 per cent, of those reported have been with
their present employers for 10 years or longer.
There are three outstanding working-weeks, differentiated by the number of hours worked.
It is found 678 employees, or over 26 per cent., have a 44-hour week, 461 are engaged for a
39-hour week, and 225 are kept on duty 48 hours. The highest weekly wage reported is $50,
while a term of service extending over 29 years with the same firm establishes a record in this
occupation.
Manufacturing Industry.
i
1922.                  1921.
1
1920.
1919.
Number of employees—
231
1,093
203
$17,485.00
$2,150.50
$16.00
$10.59
15.66%
43.92
199
1,145
298
$18,323.42
$2,939.00
$16.00
$9.86
20.65%
42.63
181
989
201
$16,454.96
$2,087.00
$16.64
$10.38
16.89%
43.8
127
837
264
Total weekly wages—
$12,694.00
$2,939.00
$15.13
$11.13
23.93%
Average weekly wages—
45.9
In this industry 1,296 employees are reported this year from 231 firms. This is a slight
decrease in the number of women and girl workers, although more establishments returned the
forms. For experienced women of 18 years of age or over the minimum wage is $14 for a
48-hour week. In working out the average weekly wage for this class of worker it is found to
stand at $16, the same as for 1921, and $2 a week in advance of the prescribed minimum. For
the younger workers an increase of 73 cents a week is noticed in the weekly average. A
substantial decrease in the percentage of young workers is recorded, the figures for 1922 being
5 per cent, lower than for the previous year. The average hours worked per week rose from
42.63 in 1921 to 43.02 this year, an increase of 1.29 per week.
The wage classification between $14 and $15 embraces more employees than any other.
Adult workers numbering 200 and 10 girls are placed iii this scale; 457 employees are found
to be working 44 hours a week, and 241 are grouped in the 48-hour class, the limit set under
the " Factories Act." The highest wage reported is $44 a week, while the longest term of
service is 3S years.
Personal Service Occupation.
192
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting   	
Number of employees—:
Over 18 years   	
Under 18 years   	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  	
Employees under 18 years  	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
32
78
19
,196.00
$214.00
$15.33
$11.26
19.59%
38.03
22
69
18
$1,077.50
$203.00
$15.62
$11.28
20.06%
38.52
144
17
$2,403.25
$246.00
$16.69
$14.47
10.56%
35.7
I S 64
Department
jABOUR.
The total number of female employees is 97, an advance of 10 over last year's figures. For
experienced women over 18 years of age the minimum wage is $14.25 weekly. The average
for this class appears at $15.33 per week, $1.08 over the minimum, but 29 cents a week less than
last year. Between the 1922 and 1921 figures for girls under 18 years of age there is a difference
of 2 cents only in the weekly average. They stood at $11.28 last year and $11.26 this year.
A drop from 20.06 per cent, to 19.59 per cent, occurs in the percentage of employees under 18
years of age.
Unlike most of the other occupations, the greatest number of employees receiving a given
wage does not appear in the class of the prescribed minimum, but is found in the next higher
division between $15 and $16. In this group 18 employees are recorded, 5 of whom are under
18 years of age. The average weekly hours have fallen from 38.52 in 1921 to 38.03 this year.
Theatre ushers are included in this occupation and their short-hour employment is the cause
of the low average. Twenty-two employees are shown to be working 48 hours per week and
20 enjoy the 44-hour period.
The highest weekly wage recorded is $35 and the longest term of service is set at 10 years,
this occurring in 2 cases in different establishments.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
11122.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting  	
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced   	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees  	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees   	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
1,084
142
$18,698.50
$1,550.00
$17.25
$10.92
11.58%
41.53
69
988
158
$15,986.37
$2,113.50
$16.18
$13.38
13.8%
41.7
71
848
379
$14,528.00
$4,778.50
$17.13
$13.90
30.88%
42
This year the total number of employees reported is 1,226, an advance of 80 over 1921,
spread over 14 more firms than last year. The minimum wage for experienced workers of any
age in this occupation is $15 for a week of 4S hours. In cases of emergency the hours may be
extended to 56 a week; the additional time, however, calls for pay at the rate of time and
one-half. The average weekly wage for experienced employees for 1922 works out at $17.25,
$2.25 in excess of the legal minimum and $1.07 in advance of last year's average. For the
inexperienced workers there has been a decrease of $2.46 in the weekly average since last year,
the figures having fallen from $13.38 to $10.92. This is coupled with a decrease of 2.22 per cent,
in the number of inexperienced workers employed, the 1922 percentage standing at 11.5S, against
13.8 for 1921. x\. slight reduction in working-hours is also noted. Whereas the average week
was formerly 41.7 hours, it now appears at 41.53 hours.
The wage classification between $15 and $16 covers the greatest number of employees in this
occupation. There are 249 in this group, 194 between $16 and $17 and 134 whose wages range
from $18 to $19. The highest wage reported is $35 a week and a term of continuous service
for 19 years outclasses al! others in this work. 13 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy. Minister.
S 65
Fishing Industry.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced    	
Inexperienced   	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees   	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees   	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
50
15
$778.00
$181.50
$15.56
$12.10
23.08%
46.08
12
36
12
$534.00
$143.50
$14.81
$11.06
25.00%
41.5
24
1
$433.19
$9.50
$18.05
$9.50
4.009
40.36
The number of women and girls reported in this industry is 65, an increase of 17 over last
year, although returns were received from 9 firms only, in place of 12 in 1921. The legal
minimum for experienced women is set at $15.50 a week, the highest in effect in this Province.
In both the experienced and inexperienced classes increases over last years weekly averages
are apparent. The figures in the higher-paid group rose from $14.S1 in 1921 to $15.56 the
following year, while the average for inexperienced women advanced from $11.96 to $12.10
weekly. There was a falling-off of almost 2 per cent, in the number of inexperienced employees.
In 1921 25 per cent, of unskilled workers were employed, but in 1922 this had dropped to 23.0S
per cent.
The 1922 season was a busier one than the previous year had been, and consequently the
average hours worked per week show an advance. In the slacker year the working-week
averaged 41.5 hours, but in 1922 46.08 hours constituted the average week. More employees are
reported receiving wages between $15 and $16 a week than any other amount, and the 48-hour
week was in vogue for about CO per cent, of the employees. The highest wage recorded was
$22.50 a week and the longest period of service is given as 3 years.
Fruit and A^getable Industry.
1922.
Number of firms reporting
Number of employees—
Experienced    	
Inexperienced   	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees   .
Inexperienced employees
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees  .
Inexperienced employees
Percentage of inexperienced employees  	
Average hours worked per week (time-workers)
30
Time.
574
242
$10,598.00
$1,967.50
$18.46
$8.13
Piece.
135
102
$2,619.00
$817.00
$19.40
$8.01
32.67%
43.07
1921.
Time.
509
145
$8,841.69
$1,234.60
$17.37
$8.51
Piece.
180
97
$4,311.82
$861.00
$23.95
$8.87
25.9%
46.75
1920.
$11
26
654
64
676.27
$762.00
$17.85
$11.90
8.91
48.45
The employees reported in this occupation number 1,053,-an advance of 122 over last year's
figures. The minimum wage for this work is set at $14 for a 48-hour week, with increased rates
for overtime. In tabulating the data received by the Board the employees were divided inlo
two classes, time-workers and piece-workers, 816 being placed in the former group and 237 in
the latter. In this connection where actual hours were given for piece-workers for the week
reviewed they were classified with the time-workers, so that the average hours worked per
week could be calculated for as many employees as possible. Department op Labour.
1923
For experienced time-workers the average weekly wages stood at $18.46, as against $17.37
the previous year. The wage for the same class of piece-workers was $19.40, compared with
$23.95 in 1921. The percentage of inexperienced employees rose from 25.92 per cent, in 1921
to 32.67 per cent, in 1922. This is partially due to an extraordinarily heavy crop of tomatoes
in the Okanagan A'alley, the handling of which necessitated the employment in the canneries
of many women and girls who had never done such work before.
More workers are reported in the wage class of $25 a week and over than in any other
group, 100 earning this high wage, and 93 appearing in the $14-$15 division. The average hours
worked per week by the time-workers are calculated at 43.07. The highest individual weekly
earnings for the period reviewed were set down at $50.
Summary of all Occupations.
1022.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting   ■.	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years, or experienced   	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced  	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced  	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced   	
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18 years, or inexperienced
Average hours worked per week	
2,135
8,989
1,242
$152,890.94
$12,546.50
$17.00
$10.10
12.14%
43.28
1,923
8,592
1,130
5147,084.68
$11,671.10
$17.12
$10.33
11.63%
42.96
1,939
8,481
1,328
$147,247.01
$15,439.50
$17.36
$11.62
13.54%
43.62
This table is an aggregation of the figures for wage-earners in all industries in the Province
coming under the " Minimum Wage Act," and comparative figures are given for the year 1022
and the two preceding years. As considerably more returns were received this year than
last year a larger number of employees was accounted for. The percentage of inexperienced
employees, or those under IS years of age, though slightly in excess of that for 1921, is considerably less than the proportion for 1920. Under the Act an employer is permitted to engage
inexperienced help at a rate of pay lower than the official minimum wage to the extent of
35 per cent, of his total female employees; but from the figures supplied we find that the
average employer employs only a little over 12 per cent, of inexperienced help, from which it
would appear that the margin of inexperienced help under the Act is generous enough for the
requirements of industry.
For the 8,989 experienced women employees whose names were given in the returns the
average wage was exactly $17 per week. This, it is noted, is well above the legal minimum
wage, as the average minimum permitted under our various Orders is $14.23 weekly, so that
the employers of the Province are actually paying to their female employees an amount equal
to $2.77 per week for each woman over and above the amount they are compelled to pay. This
is one more refutation of the argument we have so often met, that the legal minimum wage in
industry tends to become the maximum.
. Similarly, with reference to the hours worked, the average is found to be 43.28 per week,
although all the Orders which specify the number of working-hours permit of a 48-hour week.
Length oe Service.
In connection with the following table showing the labour turnover in each of the nine
industries it. is self-explanatory and needs but little comment. It might be well to point out,
with reference to the large number of employees reported in the fruit and vegetable industry
as having been with the concern for a period under one year, that, this is perhaps a little
misleading. Most of these establishments are running for a few months only each year, and
although some of their employees may have served them for several seasons, still they are
reported on the form as being employed less than 1 year.
The office occupation records more long service with the same employer than any of the
other groups.    The peak for service in the telephone and telegraph occupation appears between 13 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
2 and 3 years. In the public housekeeping occupation practically 50 per cent, of the employees
reported had been with their present employers less than 1 year. It is gratifying to note that
2S9 employees out of a total of 10,231, or 2.8 per cent., bad served continuously 10 years or longer.
Tattle Showing Labour Turnover in each Croup—Number of Employees in Continuous
Service of Employer reporting.
Name of Industry.
Mercantile	
Laundry	
Public housekeeping....
Office	
Manufacturing	
Personal service	
Telephone and telegraph
Fishing	
Fruit and vegetable ....
Totals.	
i
a
IH
CJ
><
CJ  ^ CJ
Jj  O^
cSft
cj
a,
CJ
CTJ
CO
rH
rH
CO
1"
O
«
rH '
fc
D
784
rH
C]
CO
*Ji
Kl
CO
r~
00
OS
s
r5H   £
32
462
302
179
125
82
38
16
20
16
55
2,111
49
199
109
84
52
46
11
9
1
3
6
6
575
15
625
222
158
87
42
21
16
7
9
2
11
1,215
35
611
428
481
319
233
153
86
43
30
35
139
2,593
50
460
209
172
153
95
67
33
12
17
12
26
1,296
3
36
22
10
11
6
3
2
1
1
2
97
32
237
62
155
352
2
148
1
85
74
39
9
15
30
50
1,226
65
57
926
15
26
17
9
3
1,053
273
3,940
1,622
1,587
967
641
404
223
89
94
102
289
10,231
'id
3 »- ca
5 6H.5
46
287
1,097
231
32
83
9
30
2,135
A Movement to amend Minimum Wage Law.
Towards the close of the year a movement was inaugurated by the British Columbia Division
of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association in favour of drastic changes in the Minimum Wage
Law of the Province. Their proposals were laid before the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
with a lengthy memorandum giving their reasons for advocating the changes indicated. A'igorous
opposition to such changes was voiced by the representatives of organized labour in the Province
and by various women's organizations. Finally it was intimated by the Minister that, in view
of the great divergence of opinion on the subject, he did not feel that he could accede to the
request of the Manufacturers' Association that he should bring in a Bill to effect the changes
proposed. He suggested, however, that the parties concerned should meet together for discussion,
and decide what changes, if any, in the existing law would be mutually acceptable, and that
they should then lay their proposals before the Government. Efforts have been made to carry
out the Honourable Minister's suggestions, but up to the time of this report going to press these
have not been attended with success.
Decision of U.S. Supreme Court does not affect our Legislation.
Although, so far as we are aware, no one has ever questioned the competence of the
Legislature of British Columbia to pass Minimum Wage Laws for the Province, a number of
communications have recently come to hand, inquiring whether we are affected in any way by
the decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, the effect of which was to declare
unconstitutional the Minimum Wage Law of the District of Columbia, which includes, of course,
the City of Washington. The answer to these inquiries may be given briefly: the decision
does not affect us at all. What its precise effect may be in relation to the Minimum Wage Laws
now in operation in many States of the Union we are unable to say, but as British Columbia
is not one of these States the question for us has only an indirect interest. About our own
Constitution and the power of our Legislature, in dealing with the subject, to pass and to
enforce such legislation as it thinks fit, there is fortunately no ambiguity.
The decision of the American Supreme Court was given in a case in which the plaintiff
was a young woman who formerly operated the elevator in an hotel in Washington. Her pay
was $35 a month, and she also received two meals a day. AVhen the Minimum Wage Law
became effective in the city her employers stated that they could not afford to pay her more
than they were already paying, and so she lost her employment. Declaring that she was
satisfied with the wages she had been receiving, she brought an action to establish her right
to retain her position at the old rate of pay, and in this contention she was upheld by five
Judges out of eight. The immediate effect of this decision is to cancel the Minimum AVage Law
in the District of Columbia. Department op Labour.
1923
Employment not reduced by- the Act.
Advocates of Minimum Wage Laws have always seen the possibility of isolated cases where
employment, under conditions which would not support the payment of a legal minimum wage,
might be terminated under the operation of such an Act, but in practical experience such cases
occur very rarely. It would be surprising indeed to find any community where a minimum wage
for women has been enacted, in which the total number of female wage-earners has not increased
after the passing of such an Act. To legislate for the occasional exception would be to demonstrate once more the soundness of the old legal truism, that " Hard cases make bad law."
And so, if the decision of the American Supreme Court is really as far-reaching as many people
in the United States appear to think, we shall very probably see a determined effort to reverse
it by giving the people of that country the power to pass legislation for themselves which will
be in harmony with modern social needs.
Meanwhile the decision appears to be having some very disquieting effects. One American
journal informs us that cuts in wages in AA'ashington are " coming fast and furious. A whole
chain of stores in the National Capital has reduced the wages of its saleswomen by 50 per cent,
and the girls are now earning but $8 and $9 per week. Others are laying off their girls in large
numbers, undoubtedly with the view of filling their places with cheaper help. In this situation
even the employer who desires to keep up wage standards will soon find himself helpless in face
of competition." Steps are being taken to meet the emergency and the friends of adequate pay
for female workers are very far from being in a despairing mood.
The results which appear to have followed from the suspension of the " Minimum Wage
Act" in the City of Washington are only another reminder to us of the value of such a law
in its unimpaired condition to the working women and girls of this Province. They may also
be quoted in answer to some who have contended that wages could be maintained at their
present level just as well without the " Minimum Wage Act" as with it. Our Act, like all
other human institutions, may have its imperfections, but there can be no doubt as to the
enormous benefit it has conferred upon a class of the community who, without it, would have
no adequate means of securing for themselves a living wage.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
.T. D. McNiven, Chairman.
'. . Thomas Mathews. 13 Geo. 5
port op the Deputy Minister.
S 69
CHAPTER 56.
An Act to Fix a Minimum Wage for Women.
[Consolidated for convenience only, April J/th, 1921.]
IS MAJESTY,  by  and  with the  advice and consent of the  Legislative
Assembly of the Province of British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Minimum Wage Act."
H
2. In this Act the following expressions shall have the following meanings short title,
respectively :—■     '
The term  " employer"  shal  include every  person,  firm,  or corporation, interpretation,
agent,  manager,   representative,  contractor,  sub-contractor,  or principal, or other persons having control or direction of any employee
in any trade, business, occupation, or calling, or responsible directly
or indirectly for the wages of another:
The term " employee " shall include every female person who is in receipt
of or entitled to any compensation for labour or services performed
for any employer:
The terms " wage" and " wages" shall include any compensation for
labour or services,  measured by time, piece, or otherwise:
The term " minimum wage" shall mean the amount of wages fixed by the
Board:
The term " Board" shall mean the Minimum AVage Board constituted
under the provisions of tills Act.
3. For the purposes of administering and carrying out the provisions of Minimum wage
this Act, there shall be in the Department of Labour of this Province a Board, BoariJ constituted.
to be called the " Minimum AVage Board," which shall consist of three members,
one of whom shall be the Deputy Minister of Labour, who shall be Chairman
of the Board, and the other members shall be appointed by and hold office
during the pleasure of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. One member of
the Board shall be a woman. Two members of the Board shall constitute a
quorum.
4. No member of the Board shall receive any salary as such.    The Board Provision for staff
may employ a secretary and such expert clerical and other assistants as may ttn« expenses.
be necessary to carry out the purposes of this Aot, who shall bold office during
the pleasure of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. AH necessary expenses
incurred by said Board shall be paid by the Department of Labour from the
Consolidated Revenue Fund unless moneys have been appropriated by the
Legislature for that purpose.
5. lit shall be the duty of the Board to ascertain the wages paid and the Duties ana powers
hours and conditions of labour and employment in the various occupations, o( Boara-
trades, and industries in which females are employed in this Province, and to
fix the minimum wage, the maximum hours, and such conditions of labour and
employment as in the opinion of the Board seem necessary or expedient for the
welfare of employees. The Board shall have full power and authority, either
by any member of the Board or by any duly authorized representative, to
inspect and examine any and all books, pay-rolls, and other records of any
employer that in any way appertain to or have any bearing upon the question
of wages, hours, or conditions of labour and employment of any employees,
and to take extracts from or make copies of any entries in such books, payrolls, and records, and to require from any employer full and true statements
of the wages paid to his employees and the hours and conditions of labour and
employment of such employees. A register of the names, ages, and residence
addresses of all employees shall be kept by employers. S 70
Department op Labour.
1923
Power to hold
public meetings
and inquiries.
6. The Board may from time to time hold public meetings ait a time and
place to be fixed by them, at which employers and employees and all persons
interested may appear and be heard. For the purpose of obtaining information, the Board shall have the powers and authorities conferred by the " Public
Inquiries Act" on a Commission issued or appointed by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council, and the provisions of that Act shall, mutatis mutandis,
extend and apply to any inquiry held by the Board under this Act. All witnesses subpoenaed by the Board shall be paid the same witness fees and mileage
as are now allowed by law to witnesses before the Supreme Court of British
Columbia.
Conference to consider and recommend
minimum wage and
maximum hours of
labour.
Power of Board to
approve recommendation of conference
and make order
fixing minimum wage,
maximum hours, and
conditions of labour.
Inexperienced
employees over
eighteen years to
be licensed.
7. If, after investigation, the Board shall find that fti any occupation,
trade, or industry the wages paid to employees are inadequate or the hours
of labour are excessive, the Board is empowered to call a conference composed of an equal number of representatives of employers and employees in
the occupation or industry in question, together with one or more disinterested
persons representing the public; but the representatives of the public shall
not exceed the number of representatives of either of the other parties; and
a member of the Board shall be a member of such conference and chairman
thereof. The Board may make rules and regulations governing the selection
bf representatives and the mode of procedure of said conference, and shall
exercise exclusive jurisdiction over all questions arising as to the validity of
the procedure and of the recommendations of said conference. On request of
the Board, it shall be the duty of the conference to recommend to the Board
an estimate of the minimum wage proper in the occupation or industry in
question, and adequate to supply the necessary cost of living; and also, when
so requested, to recommend the maximum hours of labour proper in the
occupation or industry. The findings and recommendations of the conference
shall be made a matter of record for the use of the Board.
8. (1.) Upon the receipt of such recommendations from a conference, the
Board shall review the same, and may approve any or all of such recommendations, or it may disapprove any or all of them, and recommit the subject or the
recommendations disapproved of to the same or a new conference. After such
approval of the recommendations of a conference the Board shall issue an
obligatory order specifying the minimum wage for employees in the occupation affected, and may also specify such maximum hours of labour and such
conditions of labour and employment as are deemed necessary or expedient
for the welfare of the employees. Such order shall become effective in sixty
days from the date thereof, or if the Board shall find that unusual conditions
necessitate a longer period, then the Board shall fix a later date on which such
order shall become effective. Said order shall be published in one issue of the
British Columbia Gazette at least thirty days before the same becomes effective.
After such order is effective, it shall be unlawful for any employer in the
occupation named in said order to employ or pay employees less than the
minimum wage or to require or to permit employees to work for longer hours
or under conditions of labour and employment contrary to the terms specified
in said order. The Board shall send by mail, so far as practicable, to each
employer in the occupation named a copy of said order, and each employer
shall be required to post a copy of said order in each room in which employees
affected by the'order are employed.
(2.) Where by any order heretofore or hereafter issued by the Board
under this section-in respect of any occupation, trade, or industry a minimum
wage for inexperienced employees is fixed at a rate less than the minimum
wage fixed by the order for experienced employees, no employer in that occupation, trade, or industry shall hereafter employ any employee over eighteen
years of age at a wage less than the minimum wage so fixed for experienced
employees, unless the employee is the holder of a licence under section 10, and
is employed in conformity with the provisions of that section. 13 Geo. 5 Report op the Deputy Minister. S 71
9. After a minimum wage has been fixed by the Board in any occupation, Reconsideration of
upon petition of either employers or employees the Board may in its discretion SSfjSSaOTL8
reopen the question and reconvene the former conference or call a new one,
and any recommendations made by such conference shall be dealt with by the
Board in the same manner as the original recommendations of a conference.
10. (1.)  In the case of women who are physically defective, and in the. Licences to women
case of female apprentices over eighteen years of age in any occupation in anaSapprentices. "*
which apprentices are usually  employed, the Board may in respect of any 6x.h]f special
^ " r    ■       . .'  - minimum wage.
occupation, trade, or industry as to which a minimum wage has been fixed
issue to any such woman or apprentice a special licence authorizing her
employment in that occupation, trade, or industry at a minimum wage, to be
fixed in the licence, less than the minimum wage fixed for that occupation.
(2.) In the case of women over eighteen years of age who are desirous LiCences to
of learning any occupation, trade, or industry in respect of which a minimum g"^"'™1^1 wo,)le"
wage has been fixed, and in which apprentices are not usually employed, and minimum wage,
who have not had sufficient experience, in the opinion of the Board, or as
defined  in  any  order  of  the  Board  relating  to  that  occupation,   trade,   or
industry, to qualify them as experienced employees therein, the Board may
in respect of that occupation, trade, or industry issue to any such woman
a special licence authorizing her employment in that occupation, trade, or
industry at a minimum wage according to the rate fixed in the order for
inexperienced employees, or, if no rate has been fixed therein for inexperienced
employees, at a minimum wage, to be fixed by the Board in the licence, less
than the minimum wage fixed for that occupation, trade, or industry.
(3.)  Every special licence under this section shall be issued only in the Licences to be
discretion of the Board, and in cases where the Board is satisfied that the 0f^1!d'.dis<;retio1'
application therefor is made in good faith, and shall remain in force for such
period as is fixed by the Board.
(4.) The number of employees holding special licences under this section Employment of
employed in any plant or establishment shall not exceed one-seventh of the ^fj^Iicelisees
whole number of the employees in that plant or establishment:  Provided that
in any plant or establishment where less than seven employees are employed
one employee holding a special licence may be employed.
(5.)  The aggregate number of employees holding special licences under Employment of
this section and employees under eighteen years of age employed in any plant m™ereSghteenUlS
or establishment shall not exceed thirty-five per centum of the whole number years limited,
of the employees in that plant or establishment.
11. The Board may at any time inquire into wages, hours, and conditions inquiry into wages,
of labour of girls under eighteen years of age employed in any occupation in elghte.LTeare of*
the Province and may determine wages, hours, and conditions of labour, suit- age.
able for such girls. When the Board has made such determination in the
cases of girls under eighteen years of age it may proceed ito issue an obligatory
order in the manner provided for in section S of this Act, and after such order
is effective it shall be unlawful for any employer in said occupation to employ
a girl under eighteen years of age for less wages or for longer hours than
are specified for girls under eighteen years of age in said occupation, or under
conditions of labour prohibited by the Board for said girls under eighteen
years of age in its order.
12. Any employer who discharges or in any other manner discriminates Penalty for dis-^
against any employee because such employee has testified or is about to testify, eSpioTee^aktng'pa'rt
or because such  employer believes  that said  employee may  testify,  in  any in investigations,
investigation or proceedings relative to the enforcement of this Act shall be
liable, upon summary conviction, to a penalty of not less than twenty-five
dollars and not more than one hundred dollars. S 72
Department of Labour.
1923
Peualty for violation
of Act.
13. Every employer who employs an employee for whom a minimum wage
has been fixed under this Act, at less than the minimum wage, or who employs
an employee for whom maximum hours of labour have been fixed under this
Act, for longer hours than the maximum so fixed, or ivho neglects or falls to
comply with any order made under this Act as to conditions of labour and
employment, or who violates any provision of this Act, shall be liable, upon
summary conviction, to a penalty of not less than twenty-five dollars and not
more than one hundred dollars.
Employee entitled
to recover full
minimum wage.
Application of Act.
Evidence of
effectiveness
of orders.
Section
retrospective.
14. If any employee is paid less than the minimum wage to which she is
entitled under this Act, the said employee shall be entitled to recover from
her employer, In a civil action, the balance between the amount of the minimum
wage and the amount paid, together with costs and solicitors' fees, to be fixed
by the Court.
15. This Act shall not apply to farm-labourers, fruit-pickers, or domestic
servants or their employers.
16. (1.) Evidence of any order of the Board may be given by the production of a copy of the British Columbia Gazette purporting to contain a copy
of the order. Such copy of the order as set out in the Gazette shall be conclusive evidence that the order was duly and regularly made, and that all
matters and things required or directed to be done or performed prior to
the order being made or becoming effective were duly done-and performed, and
that the order was duly and sufficiently published and became effective upon
the day or date it purports to become effective as set out in the order.
(2.) This section shall be retrospective in its application, and shall apply
in respect of orders heretofore made or purporting to have been made as well
as to orders hereafter made or purporting to be made.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by William H. (Jullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1923.

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