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TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1932]

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 TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1930, TO MAEOH 31ST, 1931
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-seventh Annual  Report  of  the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1931.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial School for
Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1930, to March 31st, 1931.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. S. L. Howe, Provincial Secretary.
P. Walker, Esq., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Brankin, David B., Superintendent. Brankin, Mrs. M., Matron.
Clayton, C, Assistant Superintendent.
Sparrow, Miss M., Stenographer and Book-keeper.
Workman, Miss E., Assistant Supervisor and Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborne, J., Shoemaker Instructor.
Stewart, D. R., Carpenter Instructor.
McDowell, J., Farm Instructor. Scott, W. J., Plumber and Engineer^
McVicar, C. A., Poultryman.
Peck, Miss A., Junior Teacher. Blaoburn, E. W., Senior Teacher.
Trerise, W. J., 'Night-ivatchman.   PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Hon. S. L. Hotve,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting to you the Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, British Columbia, for the year ended March
31st, 1931. Like its predecessors, it contains information regarding the activities of our various
vocational departments, products of the farm, income from our poultry-ranch, statistical data
on the movement of our population, and information of general interest to the public.
In looking back over the period covered by this report, I can with confidence say that
Biscoq has functioned in a manner intended by those responsible for its operation, and many of
the boys who passed through our hands left the institution recognizing the fallacy of a criminal
career, and fully intended becoming good useful citizens and a credit to their country. A small
percentage fell by the wayside; the fault was not altogether theirs, the acute economic conditions and Dominion wide unemployment being the main contributing factors, although lack of
sympathy and interest on the part of parents, the general public, and employers of labour made
its contribution as well.
It is also well, in a retrospect of this character, to bear in mind that we only have sent to
us boys who are difficult to handle, and who were looked upon in their districts as more or less
of a nuisance, and who could not be successfully handled by any local organization. A percentage of those we receive are well-nigh hopeless, their mental condition being such that
remedial efforts avail very little, and about all we can do on their behalf is to build them
up physically and give them custodial care.
The sports section of the institution was again well taken care of. The gymnasium was
very popular with the basket-ball teams during the winter months. The swimming-tank was
a boon and a blessing during the summer. Soccer football in the fall and winter had many
followers, and our teams were able at all times to give a good account of themselves when
playing outside teams.
I fully appreciate the co-operation and assistance rendered the institution by the Provincial
Police, New Westminster City Police, and the other police forces in the Province, also the
valuable help rendered by the ministers and church workers of the various denominations.
Special mention might be made of the Salvation Army of New Westminster and Vancouver, who
came out on several occasions with their bands and singing brigade, cheering and helping both
the members of our staff and the boys.
My many and varied duties as Superintendent were made much easier during the year by
the whole-hearted and sympathetic support of yourself and those of your Department, for which
I am very grateful indeed.
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION, APRIL 1st, 1930, TO MiVRCH 31st, 1931.
We release a boy of working age, either at the completion of his sentence or before, providing he has made good, and suitable arrangements are made by those interested in his after-care.
In the case of boys of school age, we endeavour to arrange their release at the end of the
school term, so that they may commence at the beginning of a new term wherever they locate.
We impress upon every boy while he is with us that this institution is not an abiding-place,
but merely a training-ground; and while a boy is usually ready and happy to go home when his
time comes, yet it is not unusual to receive a letter requesting that the writer be allowed to
come back again, and in several instances old boys have actually come back on their own.
It is also interesting to note that 1,190 boys have passed through the institution, representing fifty-five different nationalities. K 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1931.
On roll, March 31st, 1930   129
Boys admitted during year, March 31st, 1830, to March 31st, 1931      79
208
Released as wards of the Juvenile Court     43
Released by order of Attorney-General 	
Paroled by Department of Justice, Ottawa 	
Completed sentence     20
Transferred to Oakalla       1
Transferred to Essondale Mental Hospital       1
Deported to Old Country       2
Released on recommendation of Medical Health Officer       4
    71
'
Total in school, March 31st, 1931   137
Number of escapes during year      13
Number captured and returned       8
Number whose whereabouts are known but still at large      2
Number still at liberty      3
BISCOQ'S DAILY PROGRAMME.
6.00 a.m.    Reveille. 1.00 p.m. Trades   and   vocational
7.00 a.m.    Breakfast. training commences.
7.30 a.m.    Morning prayers. 1.30 p.m. Schools open.
7.45 a.m.    Flag-raising ceremony. 4.30 p.m. Trades and schools close.
8.00 a.m.    Trades   and   vocational 5.00 p.m. Supper.
training commences. 5.30 p.m. Recreation.
9.00 a.m.    Schools open. 8.00 p.m. Retreat and flag-lowering
11.30 a.m.    Trades and schools close. ceremony.
12.00    m.    Dinner and play. 8.30 p.m. Evening prayers.
9.15 p.m. Lights out.
Band practices are held Saturday afternoons at 1.30 and Tuesday mornings at 10.
Sunday mornings are devoted to inspection and check-up of clothing;   Sunday afternoons
to religious services and lectures.
SOME THINGS WE EMPHASIZE AT BISCOQ.
(1.)  That instant obedience to the voice of authority is necessary at all times.
(2.) That loyalty, respect, and fidelity towards the flag of our country is the duty of all
who claim its protection.
(3.) That homage, reverence, and veneration of His name is the least tribute man can
pay his Creator.
(4.)  That a healthy body is the best assurance for old age a boy can have.
(5.) That all work is honourable, and no one has the right to sponge upon others for a
living.
(6.) That other people's property is sacred and must not be interfered with, except by the
owner's consent.
(7.)  That honesty in every form is a principle and not a policy.
(8.) That there is nothing clever or honourable in breaking the laws of our country.
(9.) That Canada has a code of morality and a standard of living befitting her citizens,
and all who live within her borders should strive to live up to her ideals and not by any act
of theirs lower her standards.
(10.) That the really worth-while citizen is the man who plays a clean game, whether on
the side that is winning or on the one that is losing.
(11.)  That all improvement of a permanent nature takes place within and works outward.
(12.)  That we are either good for something or good for nothing. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1930-31.
K 7
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1931.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
PREVIOUS TO
BEING ADMITTED TO
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Years.
Years.
17
17
15
15
4-9 mos.
15
15
15
15
15
16
16
11
11
12
12
12
12
10
10
19
19
18
18
16
16
18
18
8
8
10
10
15
17
16
16
....
16
14
14
16
16
17
17
14
14
6
16
13
13
9
17
18
18
6
6
17
17
18
18
17
17
15
15
17
17
14
14
1
18
5%
14
15
15
9%
13
16
16
4
4
1
17
17 %
17%
16
16
18
18
12
12
7
7
14
14
11
17
16
16
3—5 mos.
3—4 mos.
18
18
6
17
16
16
3
14
14
14
8
11
6
12
16
16
2-3 mos.
12
855
898
911
966
982
983
990
1007
1008
1015
1025
1029
1030
1031
1043
1052
1053
1055
1056
1057
1058
1059
1061
1062
1064
1066
1067
1068
1069
1070
1071
1072
1073
1074
1081
1082
1084
1087
1088
1089
1090
1091
1092
1093
1094
1095
1096
1097
1098
1099
1100
1101
1102
1103
1104
1105
1106
1107
1108
1109
B.C..
Vernon, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C...
Tide Lake, Alta..
New Westminster,
Armstrong,  B.C	
Parkbeg,  Sask	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Victoria,  B.C	
Victoria,  B.C	
Port Moody, B.C	
London, England	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Bucks, England	
Vancouver, B.C	
Peachland, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Athabaska Landing, Alta..
Victoria,  B.C	
Yale Road, Surrey, B.C	
Victoria,  B.C	
New Westminster, B.C	
Humboldt,  Sask	
Victoria, B.C	
London, England	
Vernon,  B.C	
Liverpool, England	
Victoria, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Britannia,  B.C	
Winnipeg, Man	
Tabor, Alta	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Hanna, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Poland	
Calgary, Alta	
Vancouver,  B.C	
Duncan,  B.C	
New Westminster, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Newcastle,  Scotland	
Kamloops, B.C	
Toronto, Ont	
Armstrong,  B.C	
Pontriprid, Wales	
Victoria, B.C	
Pine River, Man	
Enderby,  B.C	
Red Deer, Alta	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
Calgary, Alta	
Maillardville, B.C	
Beauvallon, Alta	
English	
French	
American	
Canadian	
American	
Scotch	
Canadian	
Canadian-English	
Canadian-English	
American	
English	
English-Irish	
English-Irish	
Canadian	
Canadian	
English	
Canadian	
English	
Porto Rican-Prench	
American	
Irish-English	
English	
English-Canadian	
Canadian	
American	
Greek	
English	
Canadian	
New  Zealand-English..
English	
Canadian-Scotch	
English	
Serbian	
Canadian-American	
Japanese	
Irish-English	
Welsh-Canadian	
French-Canadian	
English	
Canadian	
Ukranian	
Canadian	
French-Canadian	
Quarter-breed-English..
Quarter-breed-Indian...
Scotch	
Scotch	
English	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Welsh-English	
English	
Ukranian	
Scotch	
Irish-Canadian	
Austrian	
Rumanian	
Rumanian	
French-Canadian	
French-Canadian	 K 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1931—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1110
1111
1112
1113
1114
1115
1116
1117
1118
1120
1122
1123
1124
1125
1126
1127
1128
1129
1130
1131
1132
1133
1134
1135
1136
1137
1138
1139
1140
1141
1142
1143
1144
1145
1146
1147
1148
1149
1150
1151
1152
1153
1156
1157
1158
1159
1160
1161
1162
1163
1164
1165
1166
1167
1168
1169
1170
1171
1172
1173
Maillardville,  B.C	
Ardmore,   Alta	
Sunny side, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Stry, Alta,	
Winnipeg,  Man	
Fernie, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Scollard, Alta	
Vancouver,  B.C ~	
Vancouver,  B.C	
Boston, Mass	
Kamloops, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria,  B.C	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Alert Bay, B.C	
North Vancouver,  B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Regina,  Sask	
Maxborough,  England	
Stavenger, Norway	
Drumheller,  Alta	
Vernon, B.C	
Fernie, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Italy	
Vancouver,  B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Stockton-on-Tees, England
Lillooet, B.C	
Vancouver,  B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Port Alberni, B.C	
Sorsjon,  Sweden	
Hathersage, Alta	
Edmonton,  Alta	
Telegraph Creek, B.C	
Thunder Bay, Ont	
McLeod,  Alta	
Swift Current, Sask	
Maillardville,  B.C	
Maillardville, B.C	
Lac de Bonnette, Quebec...
Nanaimo,  B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
East Prettiwell, England-
Vancouver, B.C	
Saskatoon,  Sask	
Victoria,  B.C	
Rosthern, Sask	
Edmonton, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Melford,   Sask	
French-Canadian	
Norwegian-Canadian
Canadian -Half-breed.
Canadian	
Hawaiian-English	
Austrian	
Polish	
Polish	
Scotch	
Serbian	
Jewish	
English	
Japanese	
American	
Canadian	
Canadian....	
English-Norwegian....
English	
Dutch	
Bulgarian-American-
Scotch	
Scotch-English	
American-English	
English	
Norwegian	
Irish	
Canadian	
French-Canadian	
English	
American-Canadian...
Italian ,	
French-Canadian	
Canadian	
Scotch	
Indian	
Canadian	
Canadian-Indian	
English	
Swedish-Norwegian...
English	
Canadian English	
Indian	
Irish-English	
Canadian	
English	
F'rench-Canadian	
French-Canadian	
French-Canadian	
Russian	
English	
English	
Italian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Russian	
Scotch-Canadian	
Serbian	
Indian	
English	
English	
Years.
14
1—5 mos.
10
16
15
8
13
15
15
3
12
13
9
14
11
12
15
13
17
10
6
8
5
10
16
14
7
16
12
9
16
17
16
17
6
15
15
3
11
8
12
10
17
17
17
16
17
10
Years.
14
15
10
16
15
16
16
15
15
17
12
13
9
14
11
12
15
13
17
10
16
6
S
14
10
16
16
14
7
16
12
12
16
17
16
17
6
17
12
15
17
14
13
12
10
17
17
17
5
17
10
16
15
15
17
10
17
15 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1930-31.
K 9
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1931—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
PREVIOUS  TO
BEING  ADMITTED  TO
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Tears.
Years.
15
15
3
15
13
13
8
8
17
17
10
10
14
14
15
15
G mos.
15
11
11
10
16
14
.14
15
15
11.
11
12
12
17
17
17
17
1174
1175
1176
1177
1178
1179
1180
1181
1182
1183
1184
1185
1186
1187
1188
1189
1190
Australia	
Ninevah,  Nova  Scotia..
Burnaby, B.C	
San Diego, Cal	
Scotland	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Rocky Point, B.C	
Nanaimo,  B.C	
Montreal, Quebec	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
Sechelt,  B.C	
Sechelt, B.C	
Cumberland, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C.Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
English-Australian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
American	
Scotch	
English-Canadian	
Canadian	
English	
Scotch	
Scotch	
Indian	
Indian	
Indian	
Japanese	
French Bulgarian-American..
Scotch	
Canadian-English	
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
Americans (both) ..
Austrians (both) ....
Canadians   (both)   ..
Dutch  (both)   	
English (both)  	
French   (both)   	
Greek (both) 	
Indian (both) 	
Irish   (both)   	
Italian   (both)   	
Japanese   (both)   ....
Jewish (both) 	
Norwegian  (both)  ..
Polish  (both)   	
Rumanian   (both)   ..
Russian   (both)   	
Scotch (both)  	
Serbian (both)  	
Ukranian  (both)   ....
Canadian-American
Canadian-English   ..
Canadian-French ....
7
2
21
1
25
1
1
6
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
2
11
3
2
2
6
10
Canadian-Indian   	
Canadian-Quarter-breed
Canadian-Irish 	
Canadian-Norwegian	
  1
  1
  1
  1
Canadian-Scotch  2
Canadian-Welsh   1
English-American     1
English-Irish   5
English-Scotch     1
English-Welsh   1
Hawaiian-English     1
Quarterbreed-Indian   1
Swede-Norwegian  1
French-Bulgarian-American    2
Quarter-breed-English     1
English-Australian     1
Porto Rican-French   1
New Zealand-English   1
English-Norwegian     1
Total 137
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
Alberta  	
British Columbia
Saskatchewan   ....
Manitoba  	
Ontario 	
England   	
Scotland 	
Wales   	
United States 	
19
88
7
3
2
6
2
1
2
Italy   ....
Poland
Norway
Sweden
Australia •    1
Nova Scotia    1
Quebec     1
Total 137 K 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Theft   78
Incorrigibility   13
Receiving      5
B.E. & S  24
False pretences      3
Damage to property      1
Indecent assault     3
Assault with intent to rob      2
Forgery  2
Vagrancy    4
Unlawful   obstruction   of   C.N.R.
property    1
Unlawful possession of firearms.. 1
Total 137
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Armstrong    2
Ashcroft   1
Burnaby   7
Chilliwack   1
Creston   1
Cumberland   1
Enderby    1
Kamloops   2
Kimberley     1
Kelowna  1
Maillardville   5
Mission   1
Nanaimo   3
Nelson   1
North Bend   1
Penticton    4
Pouce Coupe     1
Port Coquitlam     1
Port Haney      1
Prince George      1
Prince Rupert      6
New Westminster   21
North Vancouver      5
South Vancouver      4
Roberts Creek      3
Sechelt        1
Vancouver     41
Vernon     1
Victoria     18
Total 137
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 16, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
2 years 	
3 years 	
4 years 	
1908
1929
  25
  42
  32
     6
     1
5 years      1
1 year 	
Indefinite  	
Sec. 17, J.D.A.,
190S
Total 137
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
8 years   1
10 years   7
11 years   6
12 years   10
13 years   14
14 years   14
15 years   18
16 years   22
17 years   26
18 years   12
19 years   6
20 years   1
Total 137
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholics   44
Methodists     4
Presbyterians    r  18
Church of England  33
Baptist       6
United   19
Buddhist        2
Lutheran     4
Salvation Army   4
Latter Day Saints   1
Greek Catholic   1
Jewish   1
Total 137 Total	
 137
EMPLOYED.
Blacksmith   	
    2
Plumbing	
     3
Garage   	
1
Gardens   	
2
General outside work 	
School all day	
Total	
  21
  56
 137
REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1930-31. K 11
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  8cS
Number who have both parents dead     7
Number who have father living and mother dead      9
Number who have mother living and father dead   17
Number who have stepfathers   11
Number who have stepmothers      5
Farm and dairy   12
Poultry   11
Carpentering      6
Painting      1
Shoemaking      5
Tailoring        3
Cottage duties      3
Kitchen and bakery      5
Dining-rooms     6
HEALTH.
The health of our boys during the year has been very good. The usual examination upon
admission and the medical after-care was well taken care of by our Medical Officer, D. C. R.
Symmes, Port Moody. The dental work, which is increasing every year, was well attended to
by Dr. Emery Jones, D.D.S., New Westminster, B.C.
Medical Report.
" The Superintendent,
Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—During the year we have had a very clean bill of health and been exceptionally
free from infectious and contagious diseases, when taking into consideration the class of boys
entering and the number of visitors who may act as carriers, as in cases of diphtheria, scarlet
fever, measles, and chicken-pox, etc. It is routine practice on admitting new boys to keep
under observation all suspicious cases of infectious or contagious diseases and segregate before
allowing them to intermingle with other boys. Culture swabs from nose and throat and sample
of sputum from suspects are forwarded to the Bacteriological Laboratories, Vancouver General
Hospital, for confirmation. Cases admitted to the Royal Columbian Hospital and St. Mary's
Hospital, New Westminster, during the year were for the following ailments : Appendicitis, 1;
infected hand, 1; glandular tuberculosis, 3; fractured rights elbow, 1; circumcision, 1; rheumatism, 2.
" The following conditions have occurred which did not necessitate hospital treatment:
Sprained ankle, 10; sprained knee, 2; sprained wrist, 4; infected hands, 7; abscess which
necessitated opening under local ansesthetic, 6; enlarged tonsils, 7; influenza, 11; rheumatism,
3; pleurisy, 2; chicken-pox, 4; sore throats, 14; boils, 8; indigestion, 12; conjunctivitis, 4;
sore ears, 16; scabies, 4; impetigo, 2; endocarditis, 3; fractured ribs, 2; sore fingers, 2 ; defective
feet, 4; epileptics, 2; stomatitis, 3. Boys suffering mental deficiency, examined and sent to
Mental Hospital, 1. There were seventy-nine boys admitted during the year and amongst those
examined were: Gonorrhoea, 1; broken arm, 3; glandular tuberculosis, 2 ; strabismus goitre, 5:
endocarditis, 2; ulcers of leg, 1; eczema, 1.
"Dr. A. S. Lamb, Travelling Medical Health Officer, on his semi-annual visit only found
fourteen cases in institution that should be re-examined next visit, if still in institution. There
was nothing of an infectious nature about any of them.
" Mr. D. B. Brankin, Superintendent, has taken up the Indian and Breed situation, whereby
they will not be allowed to intermingle with the white population if tubercular suspects, etc.
They will be sent to the tuberculosis ward for observation and treatment. " In conclusion, from personal observation of boys entering the institution, a large proportion are criminalistic and indifferent and careless about their mode of life and home. They
should be controlled by law and discipline. I think great credit is due the staff of ' Biscoq '
for turning out boys they do, considering that, before entering, parents of these children have
had fifteen years of previous attempts at instruction reform and failed.
" Yours, etc.,
" C. R. Symmes, M.D."
Dental Report.
" The Superintendent,
Industrial School for Boys, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—During the year ended March 31st, 1931, the mouths of 145 boys have been examined.
Since very few of them had ever had dental treatment before, I found a great number of badly
diseased teeth. It has been necessary during the year to extract 113 abscessed and badly diseased teeth. I have relieved severe pain for 36 boys, inserted 71 fillings, treated 10 cases of
severe gingivitis, and treated 1 boy for Vincents disease. The removal of the diseased teeth
and the restoration of many others should improve the health and prevent much suffering.
" Yours sincerely,
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
EDUCATIONAL.
We are fortunate in having on our staff such capable teachers as Mr. E. W. Blagburn and
Miss Ayra Peck, who during the year worked very conscientiously on behalf of every pupil.
It is intended to appoint another teacher next term, so that more individual attention may be
given to the retarded.
Report of Division I.
" Sir,—The following shows the movements of pupils in Division I. for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1831 :—
" Number on register, March 31st, 1930   35
Admitted to April 1st, 1931   16
51
Discharged to April 1st, 1931      7
Pupils sent to Division III  16
—    23
Number on register, March 31st, 1931      28
" Grade I., 5; Grade II., 7; Grade III., 8; Grade V., 8; total, 28.
" Pupils of the type found here require a good deal of individual teaching, but owing to the
size of the class this has been difficult to give. However, marked progress has been made and
the majority of the boys show a gratifying interest in their work. The regular course of study
for elementary schools has been followed, with accent on the fundamentals and hand-work, for
which some of the pupils show great aptitude.
" Thanks to a generous supply of new Silent Readers, it has been possible to greatly increase
the standard of reading, which is very important, as many boys on leaving here will, owing to
age and home conditions, gain the remainder of their education by comprehensive reading.
" I should like on this occasion to express my appreciation to you and the staff for the
cheerful support accorded to me at all times.
" Ayra E. Peck."
Report of Divisions II. and III.
" Sir,—By the end of the summer term (1930) the number of school-boys had decreased to
such an extent that it was decided to carry on the following year with only two teachers. This
naturally meant increased classes for both teachers, so that it was not possible to give the same
individual attention to pupils as in former years. However, in spite of this fact, the results
obtained compare favourably with past years. The pupils responded well on the whole and
co-operated as well as could be expected. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1930-31. K 13
" The new supplementary books have proved a great help to pupils and teachers.
" Pupils on register, March 31st, 1930   23
Pupils admitted during year   14
Pupils received from Division 1, September 2nd      9
46
Pupils removed for various reasons  18
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1931   28 "
Educational Standing op all Boys in School.
Grade 1     5 Grade VII  21
Grade II  10 Grade VIII  14
Grade III  11 High  School       9
Grade IV  15 Special Class   13
Grade V  16 —
Grade VI  23 Total 137
SCHOOL INSPECTOR'S REPORT.
" Mr. D. B. Brankin,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—I spent January 21st and part of 22nd in two divisions of your school. I am pleased
to state that conditions were generally favourable and progress definite.
" At the time of my visit fifty-two pupils were enrolled and all were in attendance.
" The class-rooms were bright, sanitary, and suited to the special conditions under which
teachers and pupils were working. The class-room in which Division I. is held is rather
peculiar for school purposes, being long and narrow.
" Your present teachers are sympathetic and working faithfully. They render very satisfactory service, considering the difficult nature of their work. The quality of instruction
observed was satisfactory.
" Discipline generally is much better than one would expect, considering the restless nature
of the pupils comprising the classes.
" The equipment is generally suitable. However, some supplementary readers will be
required from time to time.
" Mr. Blagburn is energetic and presents lessons in a forceful manner that secures attention.
He has a difficult task with four classes and with pupils of marked differences in ability.
" Miss Peck is energetic and interested in her work. She will have to organize the work of
Grades I. and II. and provide suitable seat-work, as she has not taught these grades recently.
" The Grade III. pupils are doing well. In Grade V. there are two restless but interesting
spirits that require special attention, but who already show considerable appreciation for the
teacher's efforts.
" Yours very truly,
"(Signed)     J. F. Pollock,
Inspector of Schools."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY DEPARTMENT,
Showing Classified Expenditure and Per Capita Cost.
In an institution where the population is growing boys and young men, there must b&
provided substantial, wholesome, and appetizing meals, and we pride ourselves on the daily menu
provided at Biscoq.
Menu for One Week—Staff.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Cornflakes, toast, bacon and eggs, grapefruit, brown and white bread, butter,
tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast pork, potatoes, cabbage, brown and white bread, butter, raisin pie, tea. K 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, salad, cold meat, fried
potatoes, cheese, fruit, cake, and tea.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Mush, poached eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, potatoes, peas, brown and white bread, butter, cake pudding,
tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, fish or boiled eggs, baked
potatoes, salad, fruit, cheese, cake, and tea.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, boiled eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, potatoes, beets, brown and white bread, butter, apple pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, salad, mashed potatoes,
cold meat, cheese, fruit, cake, and tea.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast pork with apple sauce, potatoes, carrots, brown and white bread,
butter, rice pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, cold pork, baked potatoes,
cheese, fruit, cake, and tea.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Mush, poached eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, chicken, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, butter, cake pudding,
tea.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon, eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, mint sauce, potatoes, beans, brown and white bread, gooseberry pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, salmon salad or cold meat, fried potatoes,
fruit, cheese, cake, and tea.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Mush, boiled eggs, toast, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter, tea or
coffee.
. Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, potatoes, peas, brown and white bread, butter, milk pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, peanut butter, fish, chip potatoes or boiled
eggs, cheese, fruit, cake, and tea.
Fresh fruits and green vegetables when in season.
Menu for One Week—Boys.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Cornflakes, boiled eggs, brown and white bread, butter, milk for small boys, tea
for big boys.
Dinner.—Roast beef, potatoes, peas, brown and white bread, steamed pudding, sauce.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, jelly and custard, iced cake, tea for big
boys, milk for small boys.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, stewed figs, milk for small boys,
tea for big boys.
Dinner.—Meat, vegetable and potato pie, beans, brown and white bread, rice pudding. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1930-31. K 15
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, canned salmon, stewed peaches, tea for
big boys, milk for small boys.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, stewed raisins, coffee for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Sausage and onions, potatoes, brown and white bread, apple pie.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, macaroni and cheese, canned pineapple,
tea for big boys, milk for small boys.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, marmalade, tea for big boys, milk
for small boys.
Dinner.—Roast beef, potatoes, peas, brown and white bread, milk pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, fried eggs, mashed potatoes, stewed apricots, cake, tea for big boys, milk for small boys.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, stewed currants, coffee for big
boys, milk for small boys. "
Dinner.—Fish with white sauce, potatoes, brown and white bread, cake pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, egg omelet, salad, potatoes, tea for big
boys, milk for small boys.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, jam, tea for big boys, milk for
small boys.
Dinner.—Chicken stew, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, raisin pie.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, cheese, baked beans, stewed plums, tea
for big boys, milk for small boys.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, stewed apples, coffee for big boys,
milk for small boys.
Dinner.—Roast pork, potatoes, carrots, brown and white bread, milk pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread, butter, salmon salad, stewed peaches, tea for big-
boys, milk for small boys.
Fresh fruits and green vegetables when in season.
Cost of Provisions.
Groceries     $6,279.62
Meat and fish from butcher  3,103.21
Bread     2.778.S1
Flour, rolled oats, etc  344.40
Milk from farm   2,585.68
Eggs from poultry-farm  1,856.55
Poultry from poultry-farm   641.25
Vegetables from farm   731.90
Beef from farm   97.50
Pork from farm   416.25
Potatoes from Colony Farm   273.00
Fruit from farm   83.57
Carrots from Colony Farm   -y.81
Parsnips from Colony Farm   § 00
Turnips from Colony Farm   4 25
Beets from Colony Farm   4 50
$19,210.36 K 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Meals supplied—
Boys   151,412
Staff      32,675
Total  184,087
Average cost per meal, 10% cents.
Per Capita Cost.
This includes all cash expenditure during the year, and covers salaries, repairs, extensions,
replacements, food, clothing, light, water, heat, and feed for stock.
Actual cash expenditure during year   $104,115.79
Less cash from sale of poultry, eggs, etc  $17,406.16
Less money refunded for board and room       ,8,850.97
      26,257.13
Balance     $77,858.66
Per capita cost per boy per month    $49.53
Per capita cost per day per boy         1.63
TRADES AND VOCATIONAL STATISTICS.
It has been our aim during the year, as in past years, to emphasize the importance of work,
and officials are ever urged to make this thought uppermost in the minds of the boys in their
care. With this end in view we have been excavating and preparing a site to erect a vocational
building, where all our trades will be housed in a well ventilated and equipped building and
manned by competent instructors.
Tailoring Department.
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time) —
Overalls,  355 pairs    $532.50
Tweed pants, large, 59 pairs   413.00
Tweed pants, small, 90 pairs   225.00
$1,170.50
Value of work for other departments (time only) —
Table-covers, 82   $25.50
Sheets, 65   10.00
Tea-towels,  100    5.00
Curtains, 8 pairs   9.00
Pillow-covers, 220   34.80
Roller-towels, 38  5.00
Aprons for kitchen, 12   6.00
Gym-tights, 60  45.00
Table-napkins, 42   4.00
Clothes for concert   38.00
Repairs  (general) —
Overalls     $207.50
Uniforms pressed, 112   112.00
Table-cloths   9.00
Aprons     3.00
Blinds    11.00
Rugs     3.00
182.30
Carried forward      $345.50    $1,352.80 Tailoring Department—Continued.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward      $345.50    $1,352.80
Shirts     66.00
Kitchen repairs, aprons, etc  3.,50
Pants, tweed          10.00
Mackinaws            20.00
Suits pressed and repaired         43.50
Gym-tights     10.00
Carpets  '.  3.00
Dining-room repairs   6.00
Small repairs         178.50
         6S6.00
Value of time spent on other duties          279.00
Total credits      $2,317.80
Debits.
Salary and rent allowance of instructor      $1,620.00
Material used as follows :—
Denim, black, 600 yards   $159.00
Denim, khaki, 112 yards   31.92
Elastic     4.45
Tweed, 80%  yards   95.28
Needles   5.60
Machine thread silk   8.50
Tailor's square   3.25
Tape and tape measures  1.90
Tailor's chalk   1.50
Thread     24.80
Lead for marking   .50
Buttons  !  4.25
Repairs  8.90
  349.85
Total debits     $1,969.85
Shoemaking Department.
New shoes made, etc.— Credits.
277 pairs at $5.50      $1,523.50
Boots repaired, 1,832 pairs        2,139.10
Total credits     $3,662.60
Debits.
Salary and rent allowance of instructor      $1,440.00
Material used as follows:—
Leather,  etc  $1,599.30
Awls, brushes, etc  11.78
Oil     2.89
Repairs         30.91
 '■      1,644.88
Total debits    $3,084.88
2 K 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Carpentering Department.
This department erected a three-story building, 30 by 60, to be known as the Biscoq
Poultry Utility Building, all the work being done by boy-labour under the supervision of their
instructors. The plans were furnished by the Public Works Department and the building was
erected at a saving of not less than $8,500. They remodelled Poultry-house No. 1 so as to
conform with the other buildings and give -space for an additional 250 birds, saving in labour
alone $125. They also remodelled two pens in Poultry-house No. 3, to house baby chicks, at a
saving of $20. They built a lattice fence for the poultry, using 12,300 feet of 2-inch material
and thirty-one 6 by 6 cedar posts 14 feet long, at a saving of not less than $185. They altered
an assembly-room in No. 3 Cottage, making six private rooms for boys promoted, to the Star
class, value of work alone being $125. They erected a shelter on No. 2 Playground; estimated
value, $100. Built a new book-case in the library, 14 by 8; value of labour alone was $45.
They made three benches for the lawns and two window-boxes for the auditorium, two new
serving-trays' for the dining-rooms, and 134 packing-cases for shipping dressed poultry; and in
addition to this there was considerable general repair-work to doors, windows, locks, and
furniture that would have cost in the aggregate several hundred dollars.
During the winter months or inclement weather the boys' time was occupied by the
instructor in teaching them care of tools, different grades and grains of lumber, reading of
blue-prints, and making fretwork.
Painting and Glazing Department.
In an institution where we have nearly 10,000 panes of glass and 137 healthy and robust
boys, accidents to glass are bound to occur. We do, however, charge against the boy's honour-
money damages occurring wilfully or carelessly. This has the effect of making the boy realize
that all damage to property must be paid for by some one and tends to make them more
thoughtful and careful.
During the year this department has to its credit the painting, outside and inside; of the
three-story Poultry Utility Building, the basements in Nos. 1 and 3 Cottages, all new fences on
poultry-ranch, and shelters on No. 2 Playground, and covering of all general repair-work. They
also did considerable lime-washing in the furnace-rooms in all buildings, saving to the department several hundred dollars.
Plumbing, Heating, and Blacksmith Department.
During the year this department was kept busy overhauling and repairing the heating
equipment and attending to the necessary plumbing repairs in all buildings, which in itself
means considerable work. Repairing farm implements, sharpening and repairing shovels, picks,
etc., in addition to carrying water-supply, planning and installing lavatory accommodation to
the new Utility Poultry Building, and the making of new steel tables for use in the kitchen
and repairing of old ones.
Value of the above in the aggregate amounted to not less than $3,600.
Cement and General Work Gangs.
During the year this department was kept busy with numerous minor repairs to buildings,
regrading and repairing old roads, making of new roads, digging ditches, and extending playgrounds, and the approximate value of same is not less than $2,600. In addition to this, they
erected a brick chimney at the new Utility Poultry Building, containing over 4,000 bricks;
value of labour and material, approximately $225. They also built a septic tank and put in
260 square yards of concrete floor and sidewalks at the above poultry-house, at a value of $875,
besides putting in 600 feet of 6-inch drain and 250 feet of 4-inch drain, which has a value
of $220.
All of this work is carried out in connection with the Public Works Department. BISCOQ   FARM   BUILDINGS.  Garage.
The work of our garage has for obvious reasons to be limited, but justifies its existence
by its usefulness to the institution.
Gasoline for all purposes   $271.67
Oil and grease      35.33
Repairs at service-station and in our own workshop      366.54
$672.54
Less credits for hauling eggs to institutions for shipment     316.75
$355.79
Cost to institution for use of the truck and passenger-car, 97 cents per day.
GENERAL FARMING AND KITCHEN GARDEN STATISTICS,
Showing Credits and Debits for the Year.
For the simplifying of administration the following subsections are grouped together under
the above heading: (a) Dairying; (b) piggery; (c) kitchen gardens and general farming;
(d) land-clearing, teaming, hauling, and road-work; but in the last named the value of the
work accomplished cannot be shown in dollars and cents.
Dairying.
Credits.
Milk, 71,212.2 lb. at 4 cents per pound   $2,848.49
Beef to kitchen, 650 lb. at 15 cents          97.50
Total credits  $2,945.99
Debits.
Feed purchased during the year   $1,517.32
Veterinary attention and medicine  :         71.00
Stock purchased from Girls' Industrial School, etc       600,00
Stock registration          22.17
Total debits ,  $2,210.49
Piggery.
Credits.
Pork to kitchen, 2,775 lb. at 15 cents       $416.25
Debits.
Feed purchased during year      $109.11
Pigs purchased from Colony Farm during the year        188.00
Total debits      $297.11
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens.
Vegetables- 0redits-
Potatoes     $588.36
Lettuce   27.00
Green Peas   19.56
Swiss chard   ..50
Onions    4,35
Spinach    1.20
Carried forward  $640.97 K 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens—Continued.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward  $640.97
Beets     4.29
Cabbage   26.10
Carrots  .83
Corn on cob   34.25
Tomatoes   25.56
       $732.00
Fruit-
Rhubarb        $26.50
Cherries         1.80
Raspberries          32.04
Peach plums        14.53
Crab-apples   .90
Apples           7.80
  83.57
Miscellaneous—
Kale, 1,200 head at 5 cents per head   $60.00
Timothy-hay grown on farm, 13 tons at $20 per ton  260.00
Red carrots, 2 tons at $15 per ton   30.00
Soy-beans, 2 tons at $85 per ton  170.00
Mangolds, 7% tons at $6 per ton   45.00
Feed potatoes, 2 tons at $20 per ton   40.00
Seed-potatoes, 2% tons at $50 per ton   112.50
Silage-corn and sunflowers, 15 tons at $5 per ton   75.00
Oat-hay, peas, and vetches, 3 tons at $5 per ton   15.00
         807.50
Total credits     $1,623.07
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $820.88
One manure-carrier purchased    34.30
Fertilizer    108.80
Oil, grease, and gas   1S.19
Medicine   8.50
Freight on hay  109.43
Blasting-powder for clearing land  28.17
Rope, twine, etc  22.28
Shovels, forks, hoes, etc  103.53
Repairs, implements  96.15
Harness and repairs   87.34
Milk-cans    30.31
Seed   199.05
Stockaid sprayers   40.63
One team of horses purchased  495.00
Coal, 6 tons   59.40
Brushes, brooms, pails, etc  18.60
General repairs    66.70
Membership fees to association   2.00
Laundry, soap, etc  22.90
Veterinary attention  79.50
Horse-shoeing   191.50
Total debits     $2,633.28 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1930-31. K 21
Land-clearing, Teaming, Hauling, and Road-work.
Single cart, hauling stone, cement, etc., G3 days at $4   $252.00
Single cart, grading for poultry, 11 days at $4   44.00
Single cart, hauling gravel, soil, etc., for labour gang, 111 % days at $4 447.00
Single cart, hauling greens, manure, etc., for poultry, 44% days at $4 178.00
Team and single cart doing chores, hauling ashes, etc.,316 days at $1.50 474.00
Team hauling rock, sand, gravel, 89 days at $8   712.00
Team hauling lumber, poles, etc., for poultry, 35 days at $8   280.00
Team clearing land, 521/4 days at $S   418.00
$2,805.00
Farm Credits and Debits by Sections.
Credits. Debits.
Dairy     $2,945.99 $2,210.49
Piggery  -       416.25 297.11
General farming, kitchen gardens      1,623.07 2,633.28
Salary of instructor and assistant   2,220.00
Land-clearing, etc     2,805.00
Credit balance  429.43
$7,790.31 $7,790.31
BISCOQ POULTRY-RANCH STATISTICS.
Showing Credits and Expenditure during the Year.
This is one of the fast-growing departments at Biscoq, and if the egg market would only
become stabilized we would be able to make a wonderful showing on the credit side of the
ledger, besides having a training-ground for a number of extra boys. At the present time we
have accommodation for 5,000 birds, besides room for another 3,000 birds up to 8 weeks old.
Our utility house meets our every need for cleaning, candling, and grading of eggs. There is a
killing and poultry-dressing room where twelve boys can work in comfort, and a store-room for
tons of feed. i
Our most pressing need is an incubation and brooder house, and this we can erect when
funds permit, at a minimum cost.
Credits.
Eggs produced during the year, 43,684 dozen ;  eggs in storage from March, 600 dozen ;  eggs
bought from B.C. Egg Pool, 2,8S0 dozen; total, 47,164 dozen.
Eggs disposed of as follows:—
Eggs for own use and hatching purposes, 0,921% dozen at 35
cents    :     $2,422.44
Eggs  shipped   to   Tranquille   Sanatorium,   22,020  dozen   at  41
cents       9,02S.20
Eggs shipped to Essondale Mental Hospital, 8,250 dozen at SOVa
cents          3,011.25
Eggs shipped to New Westminster Mental Hospital, 3,660 dozen
at 36% cents        1,335.90
Eggs shipped to Home for Incurables, 6,240 dozen at 36y2 cents     2,277.60
Eggs shipped to Provincial Home, 30 dozen at 36y2 cents   10.95
Eggs sold for hatching purposes, 25% dozen at 60 cents   15.45
Eggs on hand, March 31st, 1931, 17 dozen.
Poultry to kitchen, hens and cockerels          641.25
Poultry shipped to Tranquille Sanatorium, 5,011 lb. at 25 and 28
cents          1,336.96
Carried forward  $20,080.00 K 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward  $20,080.00
Poultry shipped to Essondale Mental Hospital, 1,635 lb. at 20 and
21  cents    331.14
Poultry shipped to New Westminster Mental Hospital, 234 lb. at
20 cents    46.20
Sale of young cockerels   6.00
Sale of feathers   6.51
Total credits  $20,469.85
Debits.
Feed purchased during the year   $9,328.13
Express on eggs to Tranquille Sanatorium  929.40
Salary of Instructor and Assistant, and rent allowance of Instructor
to September   2,085.00
Transportation of eggs by own truck   288.00
Express on empty crates returned from Tranquille Sanatorium   136.17
Express on empty crates returned from Home for Incurables  3.80
Storage of eggs in Pacific Coast Terminals, New Westminster  20.79
Coal for brooders, etc  119.00
Laundry, soap, etc  21.74
Pullets purchased    1,525.25
Cockerels purchased for breeding purposes   25.00
Day-old chicks purchased, Barred Rocks and White Leghorns   405.00
Coal-oil  .'...' '.  45.60
Egg-testers, wafers, thermometers, etc  30.08
Crates, pads, and fillers   47.25
Founts, killing-knives, etc  13.27
Cheese-cloth, etc  12.28
Lime, stockaid, etc  7.00
Shims for crates    33.77
Brooms, pails, brushes   23.56
One brooder-stove   38.25
Services for culling hens   15.00
Fees for Poultry Association   1.00
Repairs   18.80
Medicine, capsules, etc  49.58
2,880 dozen eggs from B.C. Egg Pool   1,024.50
$16,247.20
FLOWER-GARDENS.
Our flower-gardens at Biscoq have been better than ever this year and visitors from all
over the world have commented upon our roses, gladiolas, and dahlia-beds, also our rockeries.
We were the recipient of many beautiful letters from friends and admirers who received our
annual report, many of them never having seen the place, but commented upon its neatness
and the beneficial results boys must derive from such an environment.
SWIMMING AND AQUATIC SPORTS.
During the summer months our boys have every opportunity to learn the art of swimming
and nearly all take advantage of this opportunity, some going into the tank twice and sometimes
three times a day.
BOYS' BRASS BAND.
We find it very difficult to keep our band up to musical strength, owing to the many changes
that takes place amongst our trained boys.    Nevertheless, our band rendered valuable assistance   REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1930-31. K 23
during the year and were able to perform at several public functions.    Great credit is due our
bandmaster, Mr. J. Rushton, for keeping the band together.
BISCOQ LIBRARY.
During the year our library was reorganized, and during the first three months the report
of Mr. C. Clayton, School Librarian, showed that our library had served a very useful purpose.
He is to be congratulated on the very efficient way he performed his duties, and also every
boy for the careful way the books were kept while in their care.
Number of books on hand   590
Number of new books added during quarter      14
Number of old books reconditioned      37
641
Old books condemned and destroyed        9
Total books in library  632
Number of boys who borrowed books during quarter   124
Number of books issued to boys  869
Number of staff who borrowed books      15
Number of books issued to staff  j     95
Number of books lost during quarter, none.
CONCERTS AND ENTERTAINMENTS.
In April the Boy Scouts' Band of New Westminster gave us a band concert, which was
really good and much appreciated.
A concert party from Vancouver came out and put on a programme, and, although not up
to our usual programme, was very acceptable.
The Canadian Legion Band of Port Coquitlam gave us a splendid concert, which was much
enjoyed by all.
The New Westminster Symphony Orchestra came out and gave us a real treat of classical
and popular music.
The Salvation Army Band, Vancouver No. 1, gave one of the best musical programmes we
ever had at Biscoq, and was much appreciated by all.
The Salvation Army of New Westminster came out and gave their annual concert and bags
of fruit and candy.
Our annual concert was held in November this year, and, as usual, was real good. Owing
to the fog the crowd was not quite as large as usual, but all were delighted with our programme.
The Biscoq Gym night was without doubt the best ever put on by us, and the many visitors
present went away full of praise.
The Songster Brigade, Salvation Army, Vancouver, gave a very fine concert, which was a
treat to every one.
The story of the Somme Battle, illustrated, was given by Major J. S. Matthews, and was
most interesting, especially to those who took part in that engagement.
Mr. Lennox, of Vancouver, gave us two very fine concerts and helped to cheer us up and
drive dull care away.
The Lions' Glee Club, of Vancouver, gave one of the finest entertainments ever put on at
Biscoq; at least, that is the opinion of the staff members and boys who heard it. We all
hope they will come again and soon.
SEASIDE OUTINGS.
During the summer months the Matron has taken all boys belonging to No. 2 cottage and
a few from Nos. 1 and No. 3 Cottage, by truck, on different days to Crescent Beach, where they
had an opportunity to swim and gambol on the sand and have a real good time. These treats
are looked forward to, and up to the present no boy has committed any offence to bring discredit
upon the others. K 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
SPECIAL VISITORS REPRESENTING ORGANIZATIONS.
We were favoured by having a number of visitors during the year who represented various
organizations.    It was a pleasure to entertain them and hope they will come again.
The Rotary Club of New Westminster came out, over forty members, and remained for
lunch, afterwards visiting the grounds and workshops and were much impressed.
The Women's Institute of Burquitlam was represented by over twenty ladies. They
visited the various trades and saw the boys at work and were delighted with our system of
handling boys.    They also stayed over for afternoon tea.
A representation of fourteen ladies from the Women's Institute of Langley Prairie paid
us a visit and expressed their appreciation of the good work being done for the delinquent boys
under our care.
Several members of the Vancouver Child Welfare Association were out and made a thorough
inspection of our cottages, dining-rooms, poultry-ranch, farm, garage, and the auditorium building, and expressed themselves as being delighted with the surroundings and the training the
boys received here.
SPORTS SEOr-   ^>N.
Football.—The first game of the season was played between Port Coquitlam and our
Seniors; the former played a very good game and had several new men out trying hard to win,
seeing that they had had four previous trys and failed each time. Once again, however, they
had to acknowledge defeat.    The final score was 2 to 1 in Biscoq's favour.
The Hastings News, Vancouver, paid us a visit, playing Biscoq Bantams. In this game
penalty kicks were Scored on both sides.    The result was in favour of Biscoq.
The Mountain View Hotspurs, 3rd Division, who were undefeated, paid us a visit. They
had to acknowledge defeat by a better team, as our Bantams won easily, 3 goals to 0.
Port Coquitlam paid us another visit and succeeded this time in winning, by a score of
1 to 0.
The Westminster Royals, New Westminster, gave us the honour of a visit. This team has
been twice champions of Canada and Provincial champions last year. They played nine of
their regulars. We were treated to an exhibition of how the game should be played, their head-
work and footwork being wonderful. At the beginning of the game we exchanged goalies, and
by so doing strengthened our defence and made the game more equal. Biscoq played an
excellent game against their more experienced opponents and scored two difficult goals. The
Royals won 3 to 2. One of the boys playing inside right scored two goals and by doing' so
won a pair of football boots donated by Mr. Brankin for the boy scoring the most goals during
the game.
New Westminster Elks paid us a visit and were successful in winning the game by a score
of 28 to 18.
The C.A.A. of Coquitlam paid us a visit and were the losers, the final score being 6 to 2 in
our favour.
The Toe H. Juveniles, Vancouver, came out and had to admit defeat to a better team, the
score being 3 to 2.
Port Moody paid us a visit and we again won.    This time the score was 4 to 1 in our favour.
Port Coquitlam again paid us a visit and brought a very strong team with them, much
better than they had last time, and after a hard game they won by 2 to 1.
Basket-ball.—An Intermediate team from Westminster eame out to play our boys, and
although they had a much smaller team, their shooting was deadly and they won from Biscoq
by 3 points.
Two teams played us from Coquitlam, an Intermediate team and a Senior team. The
Intermediate game ended with a tie, 18 to IS, but the Senior team of visitors had to admit
defeat, and the game ended with a score of 34 to 16 in Biscoq's favour.
Trapp Motors, New Westminster, came out to play our Seniors. The visitors were big and
outweighed our boys to a considerable extent. The game started in a brisk manner and within
a few minutes one of our boys found a loop for the opening basket.    The home team, once in REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1930-31. K 25
the lead, never lost it, and at half-time saw them leading, 11 to 6. At the beginning of the
second half Biscoq set a good fast pace and within a few minutes had trebled the score of the
visitors. Then the Trapp boys woke up and gave a pretty exhibition of how the game should
be played. They came within 11 points of the home team, but could not get any nearer, and
the final whistle showed the score to be 30 to 10 in favour of Biscoq.
The Toe H., Vancouver, came out.    This was a good game and the visitors won by 23 to 22.
The Trail Rangers, Coquitlam, played our boys, and again were the losers, the score being
this time 28 to 18.
The Westminster Elks played our Seniors. Our boys did very well, considering that the
team had not had much practice. We took the lead early, but could not hold it, and at the
end of half-time the visitors had a comfortable margin. In the second half Biscoq. held them
even.    The final score was 30 to 20 in favour of the Elks.
The Investors of Vancouver, rated one of the best teams in Vancouver, came out. Our
weakened team was no match for them, but the boys did their best; although we lost, I think
all of the boys profited by the experience.
RELluIOUS SERVICES.
During the year religious services were held every Sunday and sometimes during the week.
The Salvation Army, Baptist, Anglican, Apostolic Faith, and Christian Mission alternated with
each other. The Roman Catholic priest came when convenient to himself. The following
letters show appreciation of the courtesy shown and the facilities we have to assist these
unselfish workers in their efforts to help the delinquent boy on the right path:—
" Mr. David Brankin,
Biscoq.
" Dear Brankin,—It is now almost two years since at your invitation I began holding
a monthly Sunday service of worship at the Boys' Industrial School. Am writing this note just
to say that during the time mentioned the boys have entered into the singing and other exercises
of worship with a heartiness that was pleasant to see, and the unfailing interest and courtesy
of the staff always made our Sunday afternoon service something we can believe to be of real
value to the boys.
" We are not privileged to see the final results in the lives of those under your care, but
honest service and a sincere prayer will bring some of the results at which we aim.
" Yours fraternally,
"J. L. SLOAT."
" The Superintendent,
Industrial School for Boys, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Dear Sir,—It is a pleasure and privilege to conduct the monthly meeting at the Industrial
School.
" We endeavour to intersperse bright community hymn-singing and musical items between
short speeches calculated to bless and help the listeners spiritually and morally. The boys
respond with enthusiasm and apparent enjoyment, though always with the necessary reverence
and decorum.
" I have been impressed with the healthy morale maintained at the institution, revealing
the fact that not only is discipline upheld as a salutary measure, but that a high moral and
spiritual influence is being exercised upon the inmates by the Superintendent, his wife (the
Matron), and their staff.
" This augurs well for the future prospects of the boys of this school, for no work of this
nature may be considered successful unless there is a change for the better in the spiritual
outlook of each case. There is every indication that to a large extent this is being accomplished
at " Biscoq," and no doubt many of those now present in the Industrial School will become
valuable assets to Canada.
3 K 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" The Salvation Army appreciates the opportunity of giving a little assistance in this great
work via the medium of its monthly meeting.
" I remain,
Sincerely yours,
" Ensign E. Ede,
Commanding Officer, New Westminster Corps."
" Mr. D. B. Brankin,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
" Dear Sir,—Re your request for annual report, I write to say that I am quite satisfied
with the way I find the boys responding to my endeavours  to touch  them up on religious
matters.
" I am sure, also, that it improved matters wonderfully to have, through your courtesy, the
assistance of Mr. Hughes, to see that discipline is observed during the service on Sunday,
because, after all, you know, boys will be boys. The necessary facilities and courtesy of the
staff are all that one can desire.
" I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Yours faithfully,
" Rev. Father, Matthew Collins."
"Port Coquitlam, B.C., August 5th, 1931.
■ " David B. Brankin, Esq.,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial School for Boys.
" Dear Sir,—It has been my privilege during my incumbency here the past three years to
include in my duties that of conducting Divine service at the Boys' Industrial School, and I
would like to express my thanks to you and your staff for the courtesies extended to me on those
and other occasions of my visitations.
" Visitors to the school cannot but be impressed with the site, plan of laying out the buildings and grounds, and the splendid facilities provided for the physical and spiritual welfare of
the boys. In fact, the whole appearance gives one the idea of a large well-kept private estate
rather than a school where boys are sent for infractions of the law.
" This is all to the good, for the beautiful gardens, well-kept farm and poultry-ranch and
thoroughbred stock, must inevitably raise a boy's ideals.
" You evidently believe, ' That all work and no play makes Jack a dull hoy, and one must
congratulate you on the splendid auditorium, with its beautiful concert-room, swimming-pool,
gymnasium, and school-rooms, built, I understand, chiefly by boys themselves under the supervision of skilled tradesmen. That building in itself is a wonderful accomplishment, and I will
long remember the gymnastic display and pageant given by the boys last January in the
gymnasium, which was real evidence of the usefulness of such a building and the excellent
training given to the boys.
If such facilities could be provided in every village and town throughout the country, fewer
boys would, I am sure, get into mischief.
" Another great asset to your school is the band. Considering that the conductor has to
constantly use new and raw material so frequently, it is a marvel that you have any band at
all.    In spite of that the Boys' Band is worth listening to.
" In Divine service the boys join very heartily and are ready to listen as long as one has
something interesting and practical to say to them. On more than one occasion I have been
surprised at the remarkable knowledge of the Bible shown by some of the boys, knowledge
gained while they have been with the school.
" May I close with an incident that is probably unknown to you.
" A short time ago my churchwarden announced that he had received a subscription for
our Church Building Fund from a boy discharged from the Industrial School some time ago.
The boy had heard that we were desirous of building a new church and wanted to help, as he
felt that he owed something to Coquitlam. In sending the subscription he asked that if possible
the sum should be so used as to increase itself.  -
:  -  iat?
siBdlA
""       i
c " The committee was so impressed that steps were at once taken to do as the boy desired
and gratifying results were obtained.
" The subscription was entirely unsolicited and no one but the churchwarden knows who
the boy is, as he desired to remain anonymous, so that I cannot give you his name as I would
like to.
" That act shows a boy reclaimed and that your work is well worth while.
"I am,
Yours very sincerely,
" Herbert Pearson,
Vicar, St. Catherine's Church."
INTERESTING VISITORS.
Rev. A. H. Sovereign, Vancouver; General F. A. Sutton, Vancouver; Mr. J. A. Dunwaters,
Fintry; Miss Stuart, Fintry; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Collier, Chief Probation Officer, Vancouver
Juvenile Court, Vancouver; Chief of Police John Cameron, New Westminster; Dr. and Mrs.
Carson, Superintendent Home for Incurables, Marpole; Mr. Noble, Superintendent Provincial
Home, Kamloops; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Slater, Vancouver; Rev. Chas. Motte, Prince Rupert;
Rev. E. Pym, New Westminster; Mr. N. J. Sewell, Vancouver; Mr. G. W. Sewell, Vancouver;
Mrs. M. R. Burns, Vancouver; Misses Bessie and Lillian Brown, Vancouver; Miss Muriel Wilson,
Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. J. Read, West Vancouver; Mr. Croy, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. May,
Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Leigh, Vancouver; Mr. M. Carson, Eburne; Mr. H. L. Mutton,
Vancouver; Rev. J. M. Nutterfield, Enderby; Mr. and Mrs. C. W. English, San Francisco, Cal.;
Mr. and Mrs. Swan and Miss J. Swan, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. J. Wigley, Edmonton, Alta.;
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Fuller, Saskatoon, Sask.; Mr. Frank Holland, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs.
Steinman and family, Winnipeg, Man.; Miss Dorothy Strong, Vancouver; Mr. Wm. Morrison,
Albany Orphan Asylum, Albany, N.Y.; Mr. Frank Frazer, Jamaica, West Indies; Dr. and Mrs.
H. W. Mustard, Vancouver; Dr. H. R. Mustard, Vancouver; Mr. J. T. Husband, Nanaimo;
Mr. Isa A. Husband, Nanaimo; Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Beaubien, Chemainus; Miss A. Lamb.
Toronto, Ont.; Miss E. M. Pearson, Vancouver; Miss E. Wiegand, Vancouver; Rev. A. Clarke,
Vancouver; Dr. A. S. Lamb and Miss Petrie, of the Department of Health, Victoria; Mr. Sam.
Boyd, Vancouver; Mrs. Crossfield, Vancouver; Mrs. Mortimer, Vancouver; Mrs. E. Bowler, Vancouver ; Mrs. M. E. Cross, Vancouver; Mr. R. Shina, Tokoyo, Japan; Mrs. H.- Humphreys,
Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Radcliffe, Vancouver; Miss H. E. Gerry, Indian Department
Nurse; Mr. Thos. Higginbottom, Dominion Commissioner.
NEWS OF THOSE WHO WERE ONCE IN OUR CARE.
We endeavour by every means available to keep in touch with old Biscoqites, and during
the past year a great number came out to visit us, some of whom were discharged several years
ago. They brought us news of others whom they had met in different parts of the world and
who were doing real well. A number of others were met by myself and members of the staff
in various parts of British Columbia, but a greater number is kept connected by correspondence,
and most interesting and sometimes amusing are the letters we receive. Occasionally we get
" touched " for a loan, ranging from a dollar to over a hundred; others ask for advice on
personal matters, and in many cases assistance in getting employment. We help all to the best
of our ability.
One is much impressed by the spirit of gratitude expressed, both orally and in writing, by
nearly every boy, and the keen appreciation of our efforts to help them on the way to success,
also the kindly relationship existing between themselves and those associated with Biscoq.
In one of the letters received from a boy who is now living in Montreal, he said that
remembrances of the three square meals a day he had at Biscoq often helped to overcome the
pangs of hunger he has often had since leaving. Another one from the interior of British
Columbia wrote to say that he would have been very much handicapped in life without the
trade he was taught here. And one boy from Alberta, who left us nine years ago, wrote to
say that, in spite of the depression and the difficult times the farmers on the Prairies were
having, he was plodding along in the true Biscoq spirit. A Vancouver boy wrote to thank us
for finding him such a good position, which was in line with the trade he learned here, and K 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
assuring us he was very happy and would not let us down. Another one from the Crowsnest
Pass area wrote to say that his parents were so pleased with the change made in him while
here that they wanted to send his two brothers down right away, which of course we had to
stop them from doing.
It was our privilege during the year to tune in on the radio and listen to vocal and instrumental music being broadcasted by artists who got their first musical tuition here.
True, we do hear at times of others who have failed to make good; but private schools,
church colleges, and universities have their quota of failures as well, and in their case the
pupils are hand-picked; ours are usually what no one else would accept, and history shows
that it is much easier to form than it is to reform.
I am still hoping that the day will soon come when some capable man of vision will be
appointed to act as a big brother and adviser to those we are pleased at all times to call our
OLD BOYS.
To get good is ANIMAL.
To do good is HUMAN.
To be good is DIVINE.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1931.
650-831-6431

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