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TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1930

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 TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1928, TO MAEOH 31-ST, 1929
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF THE LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to (he King's Most Excellent Majesty.    To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Tour Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-fifth Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1929.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1929.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C., August, 1929.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1928, to March 31st, 1929.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. S. L. Howe, Provincial Secretary.
P. Walker, Esq., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Brankin, David B., Superintendent. Brankin, Mrs. M., Matron.
Hughes, R., Assistant Superintendent.
Sparrow, Miss M., Stenographer and Book-keeper.
Greener, Mrs. E. A., Assistant Supervisor and Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborne, J., Shoemaker Instructor.
Stewart, D. R., Carpenter Instructor.
Jose, O, Farm Instructor.       Scott, W. J., Plumber and Engineer.       Holroyd, H., Poultryman.
Mutrie, Miss Jean, Senior Teacher. Mutrie, Miss E., Junior Teacher.
Brakes, Wm. H., Male School-teacher. Trerise, W. J., Night-ivatchman. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL  SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Hon. S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting to you the Twenty-fifth Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, B.C., covering our activities for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1929.
It is not an easy task to present in a short space an adequate valuation of the work accomplished at the school or in such a way that those reading this report may get a glimpse of our
true value as a reforming agency in the life of the boys of British Columbia who have run
foul of the law. Still, this is about the only way open to us to enlighten those who may have
formed a wrong impression about Biscoq from the comparatively few cases of failure which
came under their notice or from newspapers who give prominence sometimes in a sensational
way to introduce incidents which inevitably occur from time to time in a place where a group
of problem boys are living together, not from personal choice or desire, but by the will of others.
I would like to remind one and all that the boys committed to our care range in age from
9 to 18 years. They have appeared many times in our Juvenile and other Courts; have been
on probation; have failed to respond to the efforts of the many social and religious agencies
working for reclaiming of delinquent and truant boys. As a rule, they have a dislike for schools
and their education is much retarded. They have little love for work and apparently have been
permitted to lead a life of their own choice. The great wonder is that so many of these boys,
in the short time they are with us, do outlive their former habits and begin to cultivate and
train both mind and body and become respectful citizens of our land.
In the statistical summary that follows it will be clearly seen that we endeavour to keep
before those committed to our care the necessity of following a vocation of some sort, and that
all work is honourable, also that good workmanship is the foundation of life, because of the faith
it inspires in others.
It will also be seen that supervised play, coupled with music and religious training, are'
helpful factors in the development of the boy in body, mind, and spirit.
I wish to express my appreciation for the help and loyal support given me by my superiors
and those working under my direction; without such co-operation success is not possible.
POPULATION OP THE SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1929.
On roll, March, 1928   149
Boys admitted during the year, March 31st, 1928, to March 31st, 1929     71
220
Releases during the year   67
Transferred to Oakalla  ;     2
     69
Total in school, March 31st, 1929   151 N 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1929.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
■Residence previous to
being admitted to
School in
British
Columbia.
Canada.
741
841
855
878
883
888
800
801
892
895
896
897
898
899
901
002
904
905
906
807
909
910
011
912
913
914
915
916
917
020
922
923
024
925
926
927
'928
929
930
931
932
933
935
936
937
938
930
940
941
943
944
945
946
947
948
949
050
051
952
955
Nanaimo, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vernon, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C.	
Penticton, B.C	
Mortlach, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Calgary,  Alta	
New Westminster,  B.C
Glasgow, Scotland 	
Calgary,  Alta 	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C. 	
Vancouver, B.C	
Cranbrook, B.C. 	
Everett, Wash	
Nanaimo,   B.C	
Seattle,  Wash	
Begina, Sask	
China	
London, Eng.	
Tide Lake, Alta	
Glasgow, Scotland 	
Chilliwack, B.C	
Drumheller,   Alta	
Edmonton,  Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
England    	
Point Grey, B.C	
Lillooet, B.C.  .-.	
Vancouver, B.C	
Prince Rupert,  B.C	
Kaslo, B.C	
Nelson, B.C	
Nelson, B.C	
Nelson, B.C	
Wisconsin,  U.S.A	
Ottawa, Ont	
Victoria, B.C	
Ladner, B.C	
Ottawa, Ont	
Nanaimo,  B.C	
Burnaby,  B.C.   ..'.	
South Vancouver, B.C.
Vernon, B.C	
Regina, Sask	
Walla Walla, Wash	
Glasgow, Scotland 	
Winnipeg, Man	
Rossland, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Winnipeg, Man	
Port Coquitlam, B.C. ....
North Vancouver, B.C.
Glasgow, Scotland 	
Youngstown, Sask	
Stewart Lake, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
English	
Irish	
English..	
Scotch -	
Canadian-South American
Indian	
Canadian	
Scotch -	
Canadian.	
Quarter-breed	
Scotch	
Scotch..-- —	
French 	
Italian	
Canadian	
Indian	
American	
Canadian	
American-Canadian 	
Irish..	
Chinese	
English	
American	
English-Scotch	
Indian	
Canadian-Irish	
Canadian-Irish—	
Italian	
Scotch 	
Canadian-English....	
Quarter-breed	
Quarter-breed.--	
Italian	
Canadian 	
Polish-Roumanian 	
Polish-Roumanian	
Polish-Roumanian	
Scotch-American	
German-Canadian -	
French-Belgium	
Canadian-Austrian	
Scotch	
Canadian-English 	
English	
English	
Canadian	
English..	
Irish-English	
American	
Canadian-Scotch	
Canadian	
Swedish-Canadian	
Italian	
Irish-Swede	
English-Canadian	
Japanese	
Scotch	
American	
Quarter-breed	
Spanish	
Years.
12
13
16
18
17
16
15
17
9
10
15%
15
14
18
18
15
9
18
4
1%
7
9
14
14
17
4
4
14
8
13
17
13
13
18
13
11
10
15
9
14
7
12
16
16
3
15
15
17
2
9
10
16
7
14
16
9
9
17
14
Years.
12
13
16
18
17
16
17
17
19
16
15%
15
14
18
18
15
9
18
4
18
7
9
14
14
17
16
19
14
8
13
17
15
13
18
14
12
11
15
16
14
7
17
16
16
15
15
17
2
9
15
16
16
14
16
9
14
17
14 REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1928-29.
N 7
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1929—Continued.
No.
Place ot Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School in
British
Columbia.
Canada.
956
Saskatoon,  Sask.   	
Hazelton, B.C	
Years.
5
17
17
2
2
18
16
18
13
12
14
7
12
2
2%
7
1 7/12
12
10%
16
10
11
16
8
14
16
14
15
15
16
15
15
15
15
16
14
4
11
13
15
11
17
14
6
14
10
11
9
8
e%
i
it
10
16%
8
2
10
Years.
16
957
American-Quarter-breed	
17
958
Metlakatla.   B.C	
17
959
14
900
Klezkowsko, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
18
961
18
962
16
963
Calgary,  Alta	
Calgary,  Alta	
New Westminster,  B.C	
Welland, Ont	
Winnipeg, Man 	
18
964
13
965
12
966
14
967
15
968
969
Polish	
15
17
970
Scotch....	
2%
971
rj-
974
1  7/12
975
12
976
17
977
Victoria, B.C	
San Francisco, Cal	
Scotch-	
10
978
English	
10
979
Duncan,  B.C	
17
980
16
9S1
Calgary,   Alta.    	
IS
982
14
983
Parkbeg.  Sask.	
Vancouver, B.C	
Assiniboia,  Sask.    -	
Morris,   Sask.  	
West Vancouver, B.C	
West A7ancouver, B.C  ....
East Burnaby, B.C	
Prince George, B.C :....
Greenock,  Scotland 	
Point Grey, B.C	
Courtenay. (B.C	
Nelson, B.C	
Bellis,  Alta	
Saskatoon,  Sask.	
984
16
985
10
986
15
987
15
988
English	
16
989
15
990
15
091
15
992
15
993
16
994
995
14
996
14
997
15
998
13
1000
Duncan,   B.C	
15
1001
Golden, B.C	
11
1002
Vancouver, B.C 	
17
1004
Calgary,  Alta  	
16
1005
Tabor, Alta  	
16
1006
Grand Forks, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
14
1007
10
1008
11
1009
Wetaskewin, Alta	
14
1010
Seattle,  Wash	
1011
Glasgow, Scotland 	
Winnipeg, Man	
8
1013
Scotch
12
1014
English	
1
1015
Port Moody,  B.C	
Chatham, Ont	
11
1016
15
1017
New Westminster, B.C	
Winnipeg, Man	
16%
1018
8
1019
Canadian	
12
1021
Italian	
10 N
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1929— Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence tkevious to
being admitted to
School in
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1022
Years.
10
15
9
14
15
17
18
17
15
14
16
17
15
7 mos.
7
15
15
16
5
7
17
3%
5
13
14
4
12
15
15
7
Years.
3
1023
Sechelt, B.C.
16
1024
15
1025
English                       	
9
1026
Chilliwack, B.C.
14
1027
Chilliwack, B.C.                    	
15
1028
Victoria, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Vancouver, B.C	
17
1W29
18
1030
17
1031
15
1032
Abbotsford, B.C	
14
1033
New Westminster,  B.C	
16
1034
Canadian-American _ _	
17
1035
15
1036
1037
Burks Falls, Ont	
16
1038
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C.	
Decker Lake, B.C	
15
1039
15
1040
16
1041
1042
Welsh       	
7
1043
17
1044
London,   Ont	
Lynn,  Ont _	
North Vancouver, B.C 	
Regina,  Sask 	
17
1045
17
1046
13
1047
TO48
Italian	
14
14
1049
17
1050
1051
Vancouver,  B.C.   	
Alberni, B.C	
15
15
1052
English	
7
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
Americans   (both)     10
Canadians   (both)     26
Chinese (both)       1
English  (both)    18
French (both)      1
German (both)      1
Half-breeds   (both)        1
Indian (both)       8
Italian (both)      9
Japanese (both)      1
Luthanian (both)      1
Polish   (both)        2
Quarter-breed   (both)       3
Russian (both)      4
Scotch  (both)    13
Spanish (both)      1
Swede  (both)        1
Swiss (both)      1
Ukranian   (both)       2
Welsh   (both)        1
Irish (both)   2
Canadian-American    3
Canadian-Austrian   1
Canadian-English   10
Canadian-French     1
Canadian-German     2
Canadian-Irish     5
Canadian-Scotch   4
Canadian-South American   1
Canadian-Swede   1
Canadian-Welsh    1
English-Irish    4
English-Scotch   1
French-Belgian   1
Irish-Scotch   '.  2
Irish-Swede    1
Polish-Roumanian     3
Half-breed-American   1
Scotch-American   1
Norwegian-Chilian   1 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1928-29.
N 9
Alberta     13
British Columbia   87
Saskatchewan    13
Manitoba        5
Ontario       7
England        (i
Scotland    :     7
Wales      2
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
States      7
United
China   1
Galicia   1
Switzerland    1
Italy   1
Total 151
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Theft    82
Incorrigibility    18
Receiving       3
B.E. & S  35
False pretences      2
Damage to property      2
Assault        G
Vagrancy        3
Total 151
LENGTH OF SENTENCES.
Sec. 16, J.D.A  78
1 year       1
2 years     40
3 years        5
4 years        2
5 years      1
2%  years  :     1
Indefinite     20
Sec. 17      3
Total 151
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Abbotsford   1
Burnaby     4
Burns Lake   1
Chilliwack     4
Cranbrook     3
Cumberland   1
Flood    2
Fort St. James   1
Gibsons Landing   1
Grand Forks   1
Hazelmere  1
Invermere   1
Kamloops    3
Keremeos     1
Ladner  1
Lillooet    1
Maple Ridge  1
Nanaimo   2
Nelson       4
New Westminster      9
North Vancouver      6
Penticton        5
Point Grey      1
Port Alberni      1
Port Coquitlam      2
Prince George      1
Prince Rupert      4
Rtiskin        1
Sechelt     1
Smithers      2
South Vancouver   10
Vancouver  57
Vernon      1
Victoria   16
Total : 151
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
8 years  1
10 years  2
11 years  3
12 years  1
13 years  11
14 years  21
15 years  31
16 years  35
17 years  24
18 years  15
19 years  7
Total 151 N 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholics  42           Christian Science      1
Methodist    14           Lutheran      2
Presbyterian     24           Salvation Army      3
Church of England  20           Pyramid Temple     2
Baptist     12           Mission       1
Greek Catholic  3           Doukhobor       1
Chinese Mission   1 ■—
United Church  25                           Total 151
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living   92
Number who have both parents dead     7
Number who have mother living and father dead   15
Number who have father living and mother dead     18
Number who have stepfathers   12
Number who have stepmothers       7
Total : 151
HOW ALL ARE EMPLOYED.
Farm and dairy  :  14 Blacksmith     2
Poultry     12 Plumbing        4
Carpentry      8 Garage '.     1
Shoemaking      5 Gardens       3
Tailoring        4 General outside work      25
Painting        3 School all day   55
Cottage duties      7 	
Kitchen and bakery      4 Total    151
Dining-rooms      4
MEDICAL AND DENTAL REPORTS.
The following reports of our Medical Officer, Dr. Stanley Paulin, M.D., and our Dental
Surgeon, Dr. Emery Jones, D.D.S., show that every effort is put forward to remove the
physical handicap of every boy:—
Medical Report.
" Sir,—The following is my medical report for the year ended March 31st, 1929:—
" The general health of the boys for the year has been a good average.
" We had a series of cases of measles during the summer months and a small epidemic of
influenza colds at midwinter, but with no serious complications. One case of diphtheria
occurred in July, but no new cases developed or were found, after having swabs examined by
the Provincial Laboratory, from possible contacts. The diphtheria case was sent to the Vancouver General Hospital, as were also the first cases of measles, but as more developed they
were segregated at the school.
" One Indian boy was released on account of tuberculosis; our experience in this case and
others for some years indicates that the Indians are very prone to develop tuberculosis, mostly
of the glandular type, when put in confinement even as mild as at the Industrial School.
" Admissions to the General Hospital were for the following conditions : Diphtheria, 1;
measles, 2; rheumatism, 1; tuberculosis, 1; gonorrhoea, 1; herniotomy, 1; dislocated elbow,.
1;   tonsillectomy, 5.
" Apart from the usual run of minor bruises and cuts, sore heels and toes, colds and sore
throats and earaches, the following conditions have occurred, but the patients were not hospitalized : Measles, 8 ; influenza, 20; chicken-pox, 2; herpes zoster, 3 ; scabies, 1; T.B. glands
of neck, 1; pityriasis rosea, 2 ; impetigo, 1; conjunctivitis, 2 ; inguinal hernia, 1; frozen feet, 1
(in a runaway) ; cuts needing sutures, 2; fractured radius, 3; fractured finger, 1; sprained
ankle, 1. " Physical examinations of the seventy-one new boys and readmissions disclosed the following conditions: Tuberculous pleurisy, 1; defective sight, 3; defective hearing, 2; chronic
discharge from ear, 1: squint, 1; enlarged tonsils, ,9; heart-murmurs, 2; pigeon-breast chest,
1; mental subnormality, 2; undersized, 1; contracted finger, 1; deformed elbow from old fracture, 1; recent fracture of nose, 1; flat feet, 5; ulcer on foot, 1; inguinal hernia, 1; hydrocele
of cord, 1; undescended testicle, 1; varicocele, 1; phimosis, 1; unvaccinated, 11.
"(Signed)      Stanley Patjlin, M.D."
Dental Report.
" During the year ended March 31st I have succeeded in keeping the mouths of the boys
in a fairly healing condition. First in importance came the relief of pain and the removal
of hopelessly diseased teeth. Using local anesthetic for the reducing of pain, I found it necessary to remove 77 abscessed teeth.
" Very few of the boys had previously had any teeth filled; hence of thel 124 patients
examined about 80 per cent, needed dental attention: During the year I have succeeded in
inserting 15 amalgam fillings, 5 enamel fillings, 17 cement fillings, 34 pulp caps, used local
anaesthetic 86 times for the reduction of pain, and have constructed and inserted one porcelain
crown, replacing a broken tooth for one of the younger boys.
" The removal of the diseased teeth and the restoration of many others should be of lasting
benefit to the health of these patients.
"(Signed)      Emery Jones, D.D.S."
EDUCATIONAL.
Report of Divisions I. and II.
" Sir,—The following tables show the movements of the pupils in Divisions I. and II. for
the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1929:—
" Division I.—
Pupils on register, April 1st, 1928  ,  20
Pupils admitted during the year   12
Pupils promoted from Division II     5
37
Pupils discharged      5
Pupils promoted to Division III     4
    9
Total number of pupils on register, March 31st, 1929  28
" Division II.—
Pupils on register, April 1, 1928  28
Pupils admitted during year     4
32
Pupils promoted to Division I .'     5
Pupils discharged (this includes pupils who were put to a trade or sent
home)     10
  15
Total number of pupils on register, March 31st, 1929   17
"I am glad to report that the arrangement under which the bigger boys are segregated in
a separate school continues to bring excellent results. The younger boys, removed from the
influence and example of their more hardened seniors, are far more amenable to discipline and
make more satisfactory progress. There is no doubt that the younger the boy when he comes
under the influence of the school, as a whole, the better material he offers for education and
reform.
" It is surprising how many of the very young boys, sullen and backward at first, respond
to persistent effort and become apt and studious pupils. There are, however, a few subnormal
cases in Division II. which appear to be hopeless from an educational point of view.    It is ■ — ■ ^   -    -y1  ■     -, ,   > ^m ,-,     -;.--,     ,.!■
■
N 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
possible, however, that they benefit to some extent by the routine and discipline of school-life,
but they are a disturbing factor in the class-room, and the undue proportion of time and effort
expended on them is practically wasted.    •
" A number of boys show very considerable aptitude for drawing and design. Some examples
of copied and original posters, advertising goods made in Canada, which they have done recently,
show much promise. I am of the opinion that if these boys were given an opportunity" to
develop this talent further, it might prove of great value to them in after-life.
" Discipline has been well maintained and, everything considered, satisfactory progress
made throughout the year.
" I am taking this opportunity of expressing to you our appreciation for the support which
we have invariably received from you in the difficult cases which have developed during the year.
"(Signed)      Jean Mutrie."
Division III. Report.
" Pupils on register, March 31st, 1928  25
Pupils admitted during the year      9
Pupils received from Division I., September 4th     4
38
Pupils removed for various reasons   22
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1929   16
" Considerable improvement was effected in the year 1928-29 by discontinuing the practice
of sending boys part time to school and part time to other duties. More satisfactory organization was made possible, resulting in greater efficiency.
" The type of boys in attendance was considerably better than the predominating type of
the previous year and secured greater benefit from the opportunities presented.
" As in the preceding year, and in consideration of the fact that many of the boys leave
school when discharged from the institution, I have stressed the parts of the curriculum which
are of a more practical value in daily life.
" General progress throughout the year was quite satisfactory, especially in the higher
grades.
" A permanent school-room, of which there is great need, is at present in the course of
erection and will be of great benefit when completed.
(Signed)      Wm. H. Brakes.
Educational Standing op all Boys in School.
Special class or subnormal      8
Grade 1 	
Grade 2      7
Grade 3   10
Grade 4   12
Grade 5   25
Grade 6   15
Grade 7   37
Grade 8   23
High School   14
Total    151
School Inspector's Report.
" Sir,—I spent part of May 31st in the three divisions of your school and am pleased to be
able to state that conditions are favourable for classes Of boys of the nature of those who.
comprise your school. The general tone in Division I. is very good. In Division II. there is a
marked improvement both in the attitude of the pupils and their response. Efforts made in
drawing, especially some designing-work, are worthy of commendation. There has been a marked
improvement in the teaching ability during the year. I am also pleased to state that conditions
in Division III. are much more satisfactory. The tone is rather pleasing and the general
response and attitude of the pupils to their work is good. ■   lis:;   ■■'■.. .
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1J J i4J  IfJU IiW  " The class-rooms are bright and suitable. I am pleased to note that a fire-escape has been
provided on the frame building occupied by Divisions I. and II., as there was not a suitable
means of escape in case of fire.
" The equipment is generally satisfactory. Additional books and' maps have been supplied,
and results in intelligence tests and standardized tests in reading, spelling, and arithmetic have
been obtained by the teachers.
" While good work is being done generally, a greater effort could be made to socialize the
work and introduce more of the project method.
" Yours very truly,
" (Signed)      J. F. Pollock,
Inspector of Schools."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY SECTIONS.
Meals served—
Boys     161,148
Staff     31,027
Total  192,175
Cost of Provisions.
Groceries   $6,547.22
Meat from butcher  2,330.94
Bread   3,346.18
Flour, etc  384.35
Milk from farm   1,731.70
Eggs from poultry-farm   2,024.13
Vegetables from farm   612.63
Poultry from poultry-farm   621.25
Veal from farm  14.40
Beef from farm   229.45
Pork from farm   329.94
Potatoes purchased from Colony Farm  137.00
Fruit from farm  16.38
Average cost, per meal, 91/7! cents.
."518,395.57
TAILORING DEPARTMENT.
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time) —
Overalls, 470 pairs   $705.00
Tweed pants (large), 19 pairs  140.00
Tweed pants (small), 69 pairs  165.00
Gymnasium tights, 2 pairs   10.00
Clothes for concert   35.00
  $1,055.00
Value of new work for other departments  (time only) —
Gymnasium tights, 10 pairs   $5.00
Curtains, 8 pairs   9.00
Roller-towels, 32   3.20
Tea-towels,  72   7.20
White coats, 7   7.00
Bed-sheets,  60    15.00
Aprons, 6   6.00
Pillow-covers, 4   1.00
Aprons, carpenters', 12  24.00
Carried forward   ,$77.40 $1,055.00 N 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward      $77.40 $1,055.00
Value of new work for other departments—Continued.
Car-curtains, 2 sets   6.00
Curtains for exhibition, 4   4.00
Table-covers, 14   3.50
Bed-ticks, 5   2.50
Car-covers, 1 set '.  5.00
Curtains for auditorium, 2   4.00
       102.40
Repairs  (general) —
Overalls    $217.00
Pants  14.00
Carpets   16.00
Mackinaws     15.00
Table-cloths   3.00
Aprons and white coats, for kitchen   13.00
Sweaters     4.00
Aprons for shoe-shop   8.00
Mats repaired  4.00
Gymnasium strips _  13.00
Rugs   75
Uniforms pressed and repaired   80.00
Suits pressed and altered   15.25
Small repairs   166.00
        169.00
Total credits   $1,726.40
Material used, etc.—
Denim, black, 1,230 yards   $384.36
Denim, khaki, 172% yards   53.75
Tailor's chalk, 2 boxes   1.20
Silk thread, 1 lb  17.00
Thimbles, 3 dozen  -.... .90
Grey pocketing, 59 yards  10.33
Canvas, 91 yards   30.03
Spools, 2 gross   17.00
Repairs, etc., to machines      26.48
Total debits  $541.05
SHOEMAKING DEPARTMENT.
Credits.
New shoes made—
246 pairs at $7 per pair   $1,722.00
Boots repaired, 1,737 pairs  2,330.95
Total credits   $4,052.95
Debits.
Shoe-findings  and  replacements    $1,681.63
Oil, etc  23.98
Repairs, etc  4.55
Tools, awls, etc  4.89
Total debits   $1,715.05 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1928-29. N 15
CARPENTERING DEPARTMENT.
This has been a busy year for this department, which has the following special work to its
credt, in addition to general repairs to tables, chairs, doors, and floors, besides reconstructing
farm-wagons, etc.: One poultry-house, 220 by 20; one shelter on playground, 75 by 14; one
4-section poultry-house, 48 by 12; one lattice fence; form-work for new entrances and fountain ;
woodwork of greenhouse.
PLUMBING, HEATING, AND BLACKSMITH DEPARTMENT.
This department is responsible for the fires in all buildings, repairs to furnaces, care and
upkeep of all plumbing, and all blacksmith-work apart from horse-shoeing. During the year it
completed the installation of one large section of a sprinkling system; installed drinking-
fountain in grounds and carried water-mains to flower-gardens; made_ and installed a urinal
system near playgrounds.
PAINTING AND GLAZING DEPARTMENT.
During the year this department painted new poultry-house, greenhouse, and fences, besides
replacing all broken windows and whitewashing basements where required.
GARAGE.
Repairs  and  work  done  at  service-station,   $879.34;   gasoline  and  oil  for   all  purposes,
$259.55; total, $1,138.89.
FARM DEPARTMENT.
For administration  purposes  the following  sections  are  shown  under  this  department:
(a) Dairying; (6) piggery; (c) general farming and kitchen gardens;  (d) land-clearing, teaming, hauling, and road-work.
Dairying.
During the year we purchased two more pure-bred cows, making our stock now twelve all
told. One of the cows reared at Biscoq secured a silver medal for production in the R.O.P.
class.
Credits.
Milk, 43,991 lb. at 4 cents per pound   $1,759.64
Sale of stock during year       280.00
Beef furnished to kitchen, 1,901 lb. at 15 cents        229.45
Veal furnished to kitchen, 72 lb. at 20 cents   14.40
$2,283.49
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $1,385.50
Veterinary attention         133.60
Cows purchased        500.00
Medicine for stock          19.95
$2,039.05
Piggery.
We have had a good year and finished with a substantial profit and the future looks,
promising.
Credits.
Pork furnished to kitchen, 2,106 lb. at 15 cents       $315.90
Sale of pigs during year        584.84
17 young pigs born, value $1 each          17.00
$917.74
Debits.
Feed purchased during year       $676.30 N 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens.
To those who are familiar with farming on a hillside, they will appreciate the amount of
labour entailed in preparing land to produce vegetables, etc. AVe did not have a success with
our potatoes owing to a dry season and the ground being poor, but our future looks good.
Credits.
Potatoes   $157.00
Lettuce  ".  19.85
Green peas  21.33
Curly kale   .75
Turnips    .  1.05
Onions  .65
Beets   26 29
Carrots   85.61
Cucumbers   12.60
Cabbage   39.15
Parsnips   9.10
Corn     32.61
Tomatoes    3.50
Broad beans   14.16
String beans   4.80
Squash     23.80
Vegetable marrow   1.70
Cauliflower     5.95
Pumpkin     10.25
■ $652.28
Rhubarb   $5.60
Gooseberries     1.00
Red currants   3.68
Raspberries   6.08
■         16.36
Timothy-hay grown on farm, 20 tons at $20 per ton   $400.00
Ensilage, 10 tons at $5 per ton   50.00
Mangolds, 5 tons at $9 per ton   30.00
White carrots, 5 tons at $5 per ton   25.00
Manure, 500 tons at $1 per ton   500.00
Wood, 50 cords at $8 per cord   400.00
■     1.405.00
Total credits   $2,073.64
Debits.
Feed purchased during year  $1,293.30
1 engine, 8 horse-power  349.50
1  cultivator   17.50
1 bush-breaking plough   58.50
Repairs to implements, etc  180.89
Tools, rope, etc :  60.55
Gasoline, oil, grease   26.59
Seed    29.00
Repairs to harness  ,  19.29
Horse-shoeing     214.00
Fertilizer  235.88
Coal, 4 tons   43.00
Total debits   $2,539.52 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1928-29. N 17
Land-clearing, Lawn-making, and Road-work.
During the year the farm teams spent 302% days hauling soil, gravel, clearing, and grading,
apart from general work on farm, and are entitled to the following credits:—
214 loads of gravel hauled at $1.75 per load  $374.50
40 days, single cart for chicken-ranch, at $4  160.00
15 days, team for chicken-ranch, at $8   120.00
10 clays, team for garden, at $8   80.00
199 days, single cart carrying soil, stone, cement, lumber, etc., at $4 .... 976.00
87 days, single cart clearing, grading, etc., at $4 ; 348.00
16% days, team road-clearing, grading, etc., at $8  132.00
2% days, 1 single cart, Essondale, at $4  10.00
3% days, team and wagon, Essondale, at $8   28.00
365 days, 1 horse for chores of school, ashes, etc., at $1.50   547.50
$2,596.00
Farm Credits and Debits by Sections.
Credits. Debits.
Dairy   $2,283.49 $2,039.05
Piggery   ,        917.74 676.30
General farming, kitchen gardens      2,073.64 2,539.52
Land-clearing and grading      2,596.00 	
Credit balance   2,616.00
$7,870.87 $7,870.87
Poultry Credits and Debits.
Poultry     $7,439.90 $3,897.46
Credit balance  3,542.44
$7,439.90 $7,439.90
POULTRY DEPARTMENT.
This has now become a very important and revenue-producing department, besides being a
training-ground for a number of boys. We are hoping to develop this department considerably
during the next fiscal year.
Credits.
Eggs produced during year, 15,085 dozen.
Eggs for table use, 5,775 dozen at 35 cents per dozen   $2,021.25
Eggs shipped to Tranquille Sanatorium, 6,450 dozen at 41 cents   2,644.50
Eggs used for hatching purposes, 2,S60 dozen at 35 cents per dozen .... 1,001.00
Poultry for table use, hens and cockerels, 377 birds  377.00
Pullets for table use  223.15
Dressed poultry shipped to Tranquille, 1,100 lb. at 30 cents per pound.. 330.00
Hens sold during year  41.50
Young chicks hatched, 1,930 at 40 cents each  772.00
Hatching-eggs  sold    29.50
Total credits   $7,439.90 N 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $3,470.23
Coal for brooders, 2 tons at $18  36.00
Medicine  .■  1.60
Hatching-eggs and day-old chicks bought   296.00
Hens bought   71.00
Coal-oil     14.88
Leg-bands, toe-punches, etc  2.50
Cheese-cloth, etc  5.25
Total debits   $3,897.46
CEMENT AND GENERAL WORK GANGS.
These groups (have to their credit new lawns in front of Administration Building, new
entrances and sidewalks leading from road, a beautiful fountain, concrete, greenhouse, new- roads
behind poultry-house, a number of new drains, and several other improvements around playing-
fields.
FLOWER-GARDENS.
These have been extended and considerably improved and will no doubt be a pleasure this
year.
BIRD-HOUSES.
During the year we received from the Vancouver Exhibition Association, through the
secretary, Mr. J. K. Matheson, a gift of Australian love-birds, zebras, and canaries, which was
very acceptable and much appreciated by the boys of Biscoq.
BAND.
Our band was kept up to strength better this year than for some time past, and their playing
is very creditable indeed.
MUSIC.
In August our band took part in the Port Coquitlam field-day given by the Elks' Club, and
conducted themselves becomingly.
In September our band was present at the opening of the Children's Home at New Westminster by our Premier, Hon. S. F. Tolmie, and they were congratulated on their playing and
deportment.
CONCERTS AND ENTERTAINMENTS.
On Good Friday evening a lantern service was given by the Superintendent, entitled " Footprints of the Man from Galilee," and was much enjoyed.
In June the Choral Society of Coquitlam gave us a fine concert.
In July Mr. W. S. Concannon gave us a real fine concert.
In September a concert was given by the Young People of St. Paul's Church, Vancouver, and
was thoroughly enjoyed by all. Also in September we had an interesting lantern travelogue on
Alaska by an original pioneer.
In October we had a moving picture, entitled " A Trip to Europe via Panama Canal and
Havana," by Mr. Harry Kent.    This was very good.
In November our concert party attended a Rotary luncheon and conducted themselves well.
On November 28th we had our annual concert by Shelly's Minstrels, which, as usual, was-much
enjoyed. In the latter part of November we had another lantern lecture, " In the Kootenays,"
by Mr. John Humphrey, which was both interesting and enjoyable.
On December 14th we held our annual concert, which was instructive, educational, and
artistic, and with a touch of comedy. The weather being good, we had a splendid turnout. Our
chairman being the Hon. S. L. Howe, our Provincial Secretary. On December 22nd an exhibition of dances and folk-lore was given by Miss A. Elliott, of North Vancouver, which was
thoroughly enjoyed.    On December 25th our new radio was installed.
Sixty-four boys were taken to Crescent Beach by the Matron during the summer. ^msm
ROSES   AND   SUNKEN   GARDEN   AT  BISC0Q.
: ::.:....  .:..e^»%
malt: ■--_■• •'' -*•■» nil I   ■»"■
A  COSY  CORNER  AT BISCOQ.  GYM   AT  BISCOQ.
: ■ ■       ' ■;:
BISCOQ   POULTRY-RANCH.     FROM   FOOTBALL-FIELD. ERRATUM.
POPULATION OF THE SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1929.
(To take the place of figures on page N 5.)
Boys on roll, March 31st, 1928      149
Admitted during the year, March 31st, 1928, to March 31st, 1929       71
220
Returned as wards of Juvenile Courts     22
Released by order of Attorney-General	
Paroled by order of Department of Justice, Ottawa      2
Completed sentence      43
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm      2
Deaths 	
Total boys in school, March 31st, 1929     151
Number of escapes during year       28
Number captured and returned     22
Number whose whereabouts are known       3*
Number unaccounted for  :      3*
* Still on roll.

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