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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1929

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OP ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL
POLICE
FOR  THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31ST, 1927
PBINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1928.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the year ended December 31st, 1927.
A. M. MANSON,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., April, 1928. Office of Superintendent of Provincial Police,
Victoria, B.C., April, 1928.
Honourable A. M. Manson, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report for the year which ended December
31st, 1927.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Superintendent of Provincial Police: REPORT OF
SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1927.
Hon. A. M. Manson, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to forward herewith my Annual Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1927.
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
At midnight of December 31st, 1927, the strength of the Force stood as follows: 9 officers
and 209 non-commissioned officers and men, exclusive of Special Constables and female
stenographers.
The following table shows the distribution Of the Force as at December 31st:—
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There is a decrease of ten men as compared with the strength of the Force at December
31st, 1926. This is accounted for by the discontinuation of the Liquor Enforcement Branch,
when eighteen men were taken from the strength, leaving an increase of eight men in the
regular force, not including Special Constables and female stenographers. Two men were stationed at Ladysmith on the taking-over of that city. An additional man was sent to Fort
Nelson and also to Princeton as the work became too great for one Constable to attend to
efficiently. A new detachment was created by the appointment of an officer at Sechelt, between
Powell River and Vancouver, while on repeated representations from ranch-owners in the Chilcotin country a Constable was appointed to endeavour to put a stop to the cattle stealing and
killing that was far too prevalent in that district. A Game N.C.O. was appointed in " B "
Division.    Formerly this Division had been without a Game N.C.O. at Divisional Headquarters.
On the establishment of a system of photographing prisoners at Oakalla Prison one man
was attached to the Criminal Investigation Branch to look after the camera and at the same
time take the prisoner's finger-prints. Formerly we relied upon the Guards at the Gaol to take
the finger-prints, but with the installing of a camera the Guards found that they had no time
to spare to look after it and I deemed it expedient to have a man specially appointed. The
increased efficiency shown in obtaining finger-prints has quite justified this appointment.
ENLISTMENTS, DISCHARGES, ETC.
The following are the particulars regarding enlistments, etc., during the year 1927: Enlistments, 22 ;  resignations, 7;  dismissals, 6. I 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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NEW BUILDINGS.
" A " Division.
The only work done to lockups in this Division was the erection of a garage adjoining the
Sidney lockup and a fence put around the Courtenay district headquarters. At the latter place
improvements have been made to the grounds by the N.C.O. and men, giving the quarters a very
smart appearance. I 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" B " Division.
An addition has been completed to the Yahk Detachment lockup and residence, converting
it from a single to a married man's quarters.    Some minor improvements and alterations were
carried out during the year at the Golden lockup.   An appropriation was made at the last
session of the Legislature for a new lockup at Invermere.    Due, however, to some difficulty in
the selection of the site, the season became too far advanced to allow the erection of the
building.
" C    Division.
No new buildings have been erected during the year in this Division. The old gaol at
Kamloops has been remodelled, converting it from an old insanitary building to a modern one
comprising living-quarters for two married officers and two lockups capable of holding twelve
prisoners in one and eight in the other.
Plans have been submitted for the remodelling of the old Court-house at Ashcroft. It is
intended that the remodelled building should contain police offices, lockup, and quarters for
one married officer.
A suitable house for the Game Warden at Likely is needed and I hope that in the coming
year the Department will be able to either erect quarters or purchase a house that would be
suitable for our purpose.
The building at Clinton which  was destroyed by fire in  January,  1927,  has  now  been
rebuilt. , „ .. „
"D" Division.
Appropriations were made for new lockups at Bella Coola and Burns Lake, but construction
has been delayed and I am hoping that work will commence on these buildings in the coming
year. The Officer Commanding this Division also reports that new buildings are urgently
required at Atlin, Port Essington, and Telegraph Creek. None of the present buildings at these
places are habitable and, through age, are beyond repair.
" E " Division.
No new buildings were constructed in this Division during the year. Extensive alterations
and repairs, however, were made to the lockup at Powell River. A new system of heating from
the Powell River Company's plant was installed.
The old police building at Vananda is still unoccupied, as has been the case, except for
short periods, for the last few years. If a satisfactory offer could be obtained I consider it
advisable to sell this property.
It is hoped that a new building will be constructed at Agassiz. From this detachment
Harrison Lake and Hot Springs is policed and considerable development has taken place in that
district. With the new hotel recently opened an increasing number of tourists is attracted each
year.    From this detachment also the Municipality of Kent is policed.
UNIFORMS.
The Force has now been in uniform for three years and there is no doubt that the change
was fully justified. From reports received from the Divisional Commanders the men are all
very well satisfied with their issue. The issue of slacks was a welcome addition to the uniform
and has been a comfort to the men, but the heavy material now used is not altogether suitable
for the hot summer weather and the issue of a tunic made of some lighter material should be
considered. The shirts and collars as at present issued are of an excellent quality, but hardly
what one would choose to wear on a hot summer's day, and I am hoping that something may
be done to alleviate the discomfort of those officers at detachments subject to extreme heat.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES.
In " A " Division Inspector Parsons, Officer Commanding, reports that the civic officials of
the City of Duncan and the Municipality of North Cowichan appear well satisfied with the
services given and on many occasions have commended our N.C.O.'s and Constables on the energetic and capable manner with which they have performed their various duties. With regard
to the City of Nanaimo, at the end of the year the citizens appeared well satisfied with the
arrangements made with the Provincial Police. At the meeting of the Courtenay City Council
held on January 19th, 1928, the Provincial Police presented the report of their activities during REPORT OF PROVINCIxlL POLICE, 1927. I 9
the month of December, 1927. Alderman Macdonald thought that the Council should give the
Police Department some recognition for what they had done in the city during the time they
had been policing. He expressed the opinion that conditions in the city never were better than
they were at that time. A few days after this meeting Corporal Matthews, i/c Courtenay District, received a letter from the City Clerk, reading as follows:—
" I have been instructed by the Council to convey to you their appreciation of the efficient
manner in which the policing of the City of Courtenay has been carried out during the
year 1927." .
On May 1st, 1927, we commenced to police the City of Ladysmith and Constable T. Smith
was placed in charge, with another Constable to assist him. The officials and citizens appear
to be well satisfied with the arrangements.
Inspector Dunwoody, commanding " B " Division, reports that Rossland still remains the
only municipality within that Division which has availed itself of the amendment to the
*' Municipal Act." The citizens seem to be well satisfied with the arrangement. One or two
other cities or municipalities are still considering the question of a change.
The policing of the Coldstream Municipality, near Vernon, was taken over by this Force
on the 1st day of July, 1927, and Inspector Fernie, commanding " C " Division, reports that the
authorities appear well satisfied with the change. I may say that the Clerk to the Police Commissioners of this municipality wrote to me on January 11th, 1928, as follows:—
" I am directed by the Board of Police Commissioners of this municipality to express their
appreciation to you of the most efficient and satisfactory service rendered by Sergeant Mortimer
and his Constables in the policing of this municipality from the date of agreement between the
municipality and your Department."
In " D " Division, commanded by Inspector Spiller, the cities of Prince George and Prince
Rupert continue to leave their policing in the hands of the Provincial Police.
Four municipalities are policed by the Provincial Police in " E " Division, under the command of Staff-Sergeant S. North—namely, Matsqui, Port Coquitlam, Coquitlam, and Kent. The
last named reached an agreement with this Force and we commenced policing there on June 15th,
1927. Constable McConnell, i/c Port Coquitlam, has received the following letter from the
Secretary to the Board of Police Commissioners:—
" I have much pleasure, by direction, in conveying to you herewith a resolution passed at
a meeting of the Port Coquitlam Board of Commissioners of Police held on January 3rd, 1928:
' Moved by Commissioner Merrick, seconded by Commissioner White, and carried unanimously,
That this Board hereby expresses its appreciation of the efficient and courteous manner in
which Constable J. J. McConnell is discharging his duties as officer in charge of the Port Coquitlam Detachment, B.C.P.P., and that the. Secretary be instructed to forward a copy of this
resolution to Constable McConnell.' "
Needless to say, I am very gratified to receive these various expressions of satisfaction with
the services rendered by the Provincial Police to civic authorities in those municipalities and
cities with which we have agreements to police. I am at all times striving to give the best
police service possible, and any complaints received are given my immediate attention and where
necessary and justifiable the cause quickly remedied.
CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.
As will be seen under the heading " Enlistments, Discharges, etc.," six men were dismissed
from the Force. Of this number, two were dismissed for misconduct and four for disobedience
to orders in refusing to transfer. Outside of these instances the conduct of the Force has been
exemplary and discipline well maintained. Officers have on occasions been adversely criticized
on the manner of carrying out their duties, but in the majority of cases, on investigation, the
criticism has been found to be quite unfounded and probably prompted by an innate disrespect
for the law on the part of the critics.
During the year I have been pleased to commend in General Orders the following N.C.O.'s
and men:—
" A " Division.
Constable H. C. Pyke and Constable F. E. Bradner for good work in connection with a
case of attempted bribery under the " Opium and Narcotic Drug Act." In his written judgment
the Magistrate remarks:— I 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" I must congratulate Constable Pyke on the efficient and honest discharge of his duties as
a Constable and think his actions are much to be commended, and I trust this commendation
will reach Headquarters.    Constable Bradner also proved an able assistant."
Constable T. Smith for smartness in the arrest of two men at Ladysmith wanted by the
Vancouver City Police for housebreaking.
" B " Division.
Inspector W. R. Dunwoody, Staff-Sergeant E. Gammon, and Corporal J. F. Johnson for good
work in assisting the Trail City Police in their investigations in connection with the case of
Rex. vs. Bailey  (murder).
Sergeant G. H. Greenwood, Constable G. C. Sharpe, Ira J. Brown, E. T. Davies, and G. W.
Donohoe for devotion to duty and commendable disregard of danger in arresting an insane
Chinaman who had barricaded himself in a shack, armed with a .45-calibre revolver, which he
freely used. Constable Sharpe was seriously injured in this encounter. This is the case
referred to at the foot of page 15 in my report for the year 1926.
Constable G. C. Sharpe was later again commended for smart police-work in effecting the
arrest of two men wanted for false pretences.
Constable E. T. Davies for effecting the arrest of a man wanted for theft, from a meagre
description given in a C.I.B. circular.
Staff-Sergeant J. A. Fraser, Constable J. J. McConnell, and Constable R. M. Robertson for
devotion to duty and courage displayed in the case of Rex. vs. George Barden (murder). Staff-
Sergeant Fraser showed particular coolness and courage when he parleyed for an hour and
a half with this criminal, who, armed with a rifle and revolver, was continually threatening to
use these weapons should attempts be made to effect his arrest. In connection with this case
the Hon. the Attorney-General was pleased to express himself as follows:—
" It has come to my attention that Staff-Sergeant Fraser and Constable R. M. Robertson
behaved themselves very creditably when faced with a very serious situation in the capture
of George Barden, and that they showed courage and coolness which is highly commendable.
I would thank you to express to the officers my appreciation of their conduct. It is extremely
gratifying to know that we have on our Force men of this calibre."
" C " Division.
While no officers were personally commended in General Orders, I have received many
letters expressing appreciation of services rendered by numerous men in this Division.
" D " Division.
Inspector W. Spiller, Sergeant A. McNeill, Constables T. A. Camm, G. A. Wyman, and
R. Gibson were all recommended in General Orders for excellent work in connection with the
investigation into the murder of the school-teacher at Port Essington.
" E " Division.
Constable J. J. McConnell for his zeal and ability in connection with the arrest of a man
who stole a team of horses at North Vancouver, and generally for the able manner he has
carried out his duties at the Port Coquitlam Detachment. I was also pleased to publish in
General Orders a commendation from the grand jury at the Vancouver Spring Assize for the
way in which the men of " E " Division carried out their duties during the Assize Court.
ASSISTANCE RENDERED OTHER DEPARTMENTS.
Increased attention was given the question of heavy vehicular and other traffic under the
" Highway Act" during the year in co-operation with the Provincial Public Works Department.
The usual assistance has been given this Department in erecting and testing road-signs and
checking up various complaints and infractions of the " Highway Act." One constable is
detached from Victoria District Headquarters for duty at the Parliament Buildings and is at
the disposal of the Public Works Department.
Investigations in cases of " destitute, poor, and sick" under the Provincial Secretary's
Department and investigations under the " Mothers' Pensions Act" are practically all carried
out by the members of this Force. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1927. I 11
Men were especially detailed for work under the Forestry Branch and from reports received
rendered excellent service during the fire-hazard season.
Considerable aid has been rendered the Treasury Department and Government Agents in
the collection of revenue throughout the Province. As the Constables attend to these tasks
along with their ordinary police duties no additional expense is entailed. Appendix IV. at the
end of this report shows the revenue collected during the year by Provincial Police officers.
The Provincial Fisheries Department has been assisted in the collection of salmon, gill-net,
and purse-seine licences, the amount collected being $31,235, and in addition data pertaining
to the industry were gathered. To accomplish this in " D " Division it was necessary to withdraw from regular police service three Constables and the police motor-launch.
Co-operation with other Government departments, such as the Lands Department, Department of Agriculture, Fire Marshal's Office, Industrial Schools, Mental Hospitals, Provincial
Home, Taxation Department, etc., has been maintained as in the past and every assistance given
when asked for. Since the reorganization of the Force many of these departments have come
to rely on us entirely to attend to matters which cannot be accomplished by their own organization. Dominion Government departments have also received the same co-operation, particularly
the Immigration Department, Indian Department, Inland Revenue Department, and similar
departments concerned with the enforcement of Dominion Statutes.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT.
Inspector Cruickshank, i/c Criminal Investigation Department, reports the operations of his
Department as follows :—
" Summaries covering the Criminal Investigation Department for the year 1927 are submitted, which you will note includes a summary from the Sergeant i/c of the Finger-print
and Records Office.
" Referring to the investigation analysis, a comparison of 1927 with that of 1926 does not
indicate a very great difference in these two years. Although the matters investigated in 1927
appear less than in 1926, the mileage travelled by the officers of this Branch in 1927 exceeds
that of 1926 by about 6,000 miles.
" The large mileage incurred during the months of July, August, September, October, and
November is due to investigations in Rex vs. Bailey, Rex vs. MacCormack, and the Craig
murder at Squilax; and December mileage is exceptionally large owing to some special investigations. During 1927 officers of this Branch travelled as far south as Los Angeles and north
to the northern boundary of the Province, and in addition to this there were some extensive
patrols in the Interior.
" I might make comment on several of the cases handled during the year, but this, I
believe, is hardly necessary as they are all a matter of record. I should, however, like to draw
your attention to the Rex vs. Bailey murder case. This crime was committed at Trail and
conviction in due course obtained. Considerable, and I think valuable, assistance was given
the Trail Municipal Police by this Force.
" An increasing number of inquiries are being received at the Vancouver office of this
Branch, and I have noted, too, that throughout the year there is a considerable increase in
requests from outside Police Forces for assistance in locating persons against whom warrant
has issued, and in quite a few cases we have been successful in making arrests'.
" The Finger-print and Photograph Office at Oakalla, i/c Constable Bella, is now well
organized and working efficiently. Constable Bella has his duties well in hand and photographs
are being received at this office regularly. In the course of a couple of weeks I hope to have
our photograph cabinet in operation and this will undoubtedly be of great assistance to us.
" The conduct and efficiency of the officers of this Branch has been entirely satisfactory.
" I believe it can be said of 1927 that there is a decided falling-off of crimes within the
jurisdiction of this Force that can be traced to highly organized gangs of criminals. I quite
appreciate that there is an increase generally in crime, but what I have in mind is the apparent
decrease in bank robberies and " safe-blowing " in establishments where large sums of money
are kept. If I may be permitted to pass an opinion in this regard, I would say that I believe
the vigorous action taken by the Department in important cases in the past is now showing a
very beneficial result. I 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Investigation Analysis.—The following table shows briefly the number of cases receiving
the attention of this Department:—
No. Miles.
Complaints and  C.I.D. investigations   ;    484 30,512
Insane persons         2 95
Missing persons       63 2,961
Patrols made      836 .      3,848
Prisoners' escorts       44 747
Totals  1,429 38,163 "
FINGER-PRINT BUREAU.
The N.C.O. i/c Finger-print and Records Office reports as follows :—■
" The following table shows the number of finger-prints received during the year and the
source:—
Male.
Female.
Total.
17
12
24
42
375
102
123
104
-67
1415
121
139
1
15
14
2
4
4
17
12
25
" E " Division   	
42
390
102
123
118
69
149
125
139
Totals            	
1,271
40
1,311
" In addition to the above figures, we received 264 prints of men who were identified as
having previous records and already on our files.
" All prisoners who are finger-printed at the Oakalla Prison Farm are also now photographed. The same number of photographs are received at Headquarters as finger-prints, so
that we are able to send out to the different Police Forces with which we maintain an exchange
a photograph with each set of prints. I may say that we receive photographs as well as fingerprints from the Calgary City Police, Victoria City Police, Alberta Provincial Police, and the
Burnaby Municipal Police. AVith these coming in regularly and with those we receive from the
Oakalla Prison, we now have at Headquarters an extensive collection of photographs. I should
like to point out for the benefit of members of this Force that it is not a very difficult matter
to obtain a number of copies of a man's photograph quickly, should we have him on record.
" The installation of Constable Bella at Oakalla Prison Farm to operate the camera and
take the finger-prints, under the direction of the Inspector i/c C.I.B., has tended to increase the
efficiency of the Bureau. Previously we were compelled to rely on the Guards for our fingerprints, and as they found themselves with little time to spare after doing their regular duties,
the receipt of finger-prints at Headquarters was spasmodic.
" I must still urge the great importance of amending the ' Identification of Criminals Act'
to make the finger-printing of vagrants and hoboes legal. I would respectfully suggest that this
matter be again brought before the annual convention of the Chief Constables' Association,
which this year will be held at Toronto, on August 21-22-23, 1928. Should we have a representative at this convention, could he not sponsor a resolution recommending to the Department of
Justice an amendment to the 'Identification of Criminals Act' as outlined above? I am confident that this Province would reap a great benefit from such a measure, as it would tend to
keep a check on the large number of men who annually make their way west by freight-trains.
These men are usually caught at some centre, prosecuted under the ' Railway Act,' sentenced to
a small fine or a short term of imprisonment, and allowed to go.   If at the time of their REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1927. I 13
prosecution they were finger-printed,  copy of which would be forwarded  to  Ottawa in  the
course of routine, some interesting records might be disclosed.
" Before leaving the Finger-print Section I should like to again mention the possibilities of
finger-print clues found at the scene of crimes. Officers should be continually on the lookout for
any latent prints that may afford a clue to the identity of the perpetrator, and they will always
find the Bureau ready to give any assistance possible. I realize that the chances of obtaining
a latent print of any value are not very frequent and the Finger-print Bureau, on receipt of
articles said to contain finger-print clues, may on examination find the ridges insufficient in
number or too blurred to be of any practical value, but officers should not allow themselves
to be discouraged on this account or discount the value of finger-print clues therefor. George
Dilnot, in his book, 'The Story of Scotland Yard: Its History and Associations,' speaking of
the Finger-print Bureau, writes: ' Some hundreds of articles bearing finger-marks are sent to
the Branch every year as having a possible bearing on some crime. In the majority of cases the
prints are too blurred to be of much use, but some remarkable mysteries have been solved
in this way.'
" Records Office.
" The total number of crime reports received at the Records Office again shows an increase
over the previous'year. The statistics show a total of cases entered of 5,210, against a total
of 4,937 for 1926. The number of crime reports received since January 1st, 1924, is 16,494.
This does not include the period from July 1st, 1923, when the system was inaugurated, to
December 31st, 1923, as no statistics were compiled for that period. By years the number is
made up as follows: 1924, 2,724; 1925, 3,623; 1926, 4,937; 1927, 5,210. Appendix I. of the
Annual Report, compiled from the crime reports received at the Records Office, gives in detail the
number of cases under the different classes of crime dealt with by the Provincial Police.
" During the year forty-four cases of persons missing were reported to the Provincial Police
and 184 inquiries for relatives or friends who had not been heard from for lengthy periods were
dealt with. In regard to the missing persons twenty-seven were found and we were able to
locate eighty-eight of the persons whose whereabouts were being sought. Ninety cases of deaths
by drowning were reported and dealt with by this Force and 153 cases of accidental deaths from
various causes.    The Force also attended ninety cases of death from natural causes.
" From the ' duty analysis,' shown as Appendix II., it will be seen that the Force investigated a total of 5,813 complaints in the course of the year and made 29,190 patrols. This
includes patrols made by those Constables specially detailed for Game Laws Enforcement work.
This duty analysis mentioned above, and which is compiled from the Divisional monthly reports,
gives a very clear idea of the many and varied tasks undertaken by the Force."
MOTOR BRANCH.
To cope with the great increase in the automobile traffic in this Province it has been necessary to effect sweeping changes in the method of recording licences. I give hereunder the report
of Inspector Hood, who has had charge of this Branch of the Provincial Police service:—
" During the year 1927 a new system was put into effect in connection with the keeping of
records relating to licences issued under the ' Motor-vehicle Act.' Under this system all issuing
offices make a daily return on a special form of advice of all licences issued by them, together
with the amounts thereof, and forward such returns to the Motor Branch at Headquarters,
together with the necessary duplicates and receipts required.
" Upon receipt at Headquarters such returns are checked, particulars entered by make of
motor-vehicle, or as the case may be, in the ledger of the station making the return, after which
licences are made out and forwarded to the licensees, and copies of such licences are filed
alphabetically in the name of the licensee and by engine number, the original applications being
filed under the licence numbers. This gives a three-way index of the car; i.e., by licence number,
by name of the licensee, and by engine number.
" Transfers as soon as received are recorded, new licences being forwarded to the new
owners and the records altered accordingly after such transfers have been examined to see that
they are in order.
" Licences for trailers, motor-dealers, motor-salesmen, chauffeurs, and drivers are filed
numerically and alphabetically, as well as permits to minors. I 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" In connection with the filing of motor-vehicle licences by engine number, as soon as notification is received of a stolen car a stop-card is placed in this file and a watch kept on all
incoming applications for licences after the licences already in for that particular year have
been checked up.
" During the year 5,290 reports of conviction were received at Headquarters Motor Office.
" Reports from Magistrates relative to convictions, as provided for under the Act, when
received at the Headquarters Motor Office are noted and filed with the original applications for
drivers' licences of the persons referred to. Such reports and such applications are tabbed with
various coloured index-tabs in order that the record of each individual driver's licence may
always be up-to-date, and also to prevent a person who has lost his driver's licence in one
place going to some other issuing office and making a false statement, thereby obtaining a new
driver's licence. Immediately the application covering such a case is received at the Headquarters Motor Office the false statement is uncovered and the necessary action taken.
" Up to December 31st, 1927, there were 125,S85 drivers' licences on file.
" The growth of motor-vehicle traffic in this Province is shown in the following table, which
gives the number of motor-vehicles licensed during the years 1907 to 1927 inclusive, as follows:—
1907        175 1918   15,370
1908        263 1919  ,. 25,000*
1909        504 1920   28,000*
1910     1,026 1921   32,000*
1911     2,220 1922   33,000*
1912     4,289 1923   40,000*
1913     6,13S 1924   47,615
1914     6,688 1925 ..,  55,657
1915     7,440 1926   67,012
1916    8,596 1927   76,187
1917   11,639 * Approximate.
" From the foregoing it is interesting to note that the number of motor-vehicles has nearly
doubled since 1923, and in this connection a comparative statement showing the issuance of
licences during the years 1925, 1926, and 1927 is given in Appendix A.
" Particulars of licences issued under the ' Motor-vehicle Act' in 1927 are given in
Appendix B.
" In 1927 there were 143 different makes of passenger-vehicles licensed and during the
same period there were forty different makes of motor-cycles licensed.
" For the convenience of applicants for 1927 motor-vehicle licences, forms of application,
together with instructions as to the filling-out of the same, were forwarded to all registered
motor-vehicle owners on Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland, and following this up
during 1927, applications filled out with fees computed were prepared and sent to all registered
owners of motor-vehicles for their convenience when making application for their 1928 licences,
such forms being complete and required only the signature of the registered owner and presentation, together with the fee, to the nearest motor-vehicle issuing office, or by mail to the
Motor Office at Victoria, with an additional sum of 15 cents to cover return postage on plates,
to enable them to get their 1928 licences.
" The preparing of the 1928 application forms took a great deal of work, it being necessary
to make up 76,187 master-plates from which to print the application forms, and for this purpose
an addressograph system was installed, graphotypes being rented and a special staff put on this
work, who worked on two shifts, commencing at 7 a.m. and finishing at 11 p.m. each day.
Proofs from all master-plates were run off and these were checked against the original
applications.
"At the same time a portion of the staff was engaged computing the licence fees for the
year 1928, which were put on the application forms as soon as they were made. Applications
were then enveloped and forwarded to all registered owners in the first week in December, 1927.
" From reports received it would appear that this new system is well worth the time and
expense spent on it, as it has done away with the tedious waiting and preparation of forms
on the part of the individual car-owners, who appear to be unanimous in their commendation
of the change. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1927.
I 15
" This year also a system of checking cars was put into force, and through the efforts of the
outside staff a great many cars were checked, when it was found that approximately 20 per
cent, of the cars did not bear the engine number which had been given by the owner, due in a
great many cases to taking a casting number and also carelessness on the owner's part when
making out his application for licence, quite a few of the numbers evidently being ' guessed ' at,
with the result that should such car have been stolen police officials in endeavouring to locate
the same would have been looking for a car bearing an engine number which possibly did not
exist. The new system, however, will take care of this, as once the correct engine number is
given it is placed on the master-plate from which applications are printed, so that each year
the engine number and data remain the same.
; Appendix A.—Comparative Statement showing the Issuance of Licences during
the Years 1925, 1926, and 1927.
Licences issued.
Year 1925.
Year 1926.
Year 1927.
Motor-vehicles—
8,110
38,226
11,851
44,421
11,237
52,357
46,336
56,272
63,594
Trucks—
1,291
8,030
1,802
8,938
1,984
10,609
9,321
10,740
12,5-93
Total motor-vehicles 	
55,657
67,012
76,187
770
335
243
231
28
798
352
274
247
18
961
420
Motor-dealers—
Original	
285
272
15
Salesmen's licences 	
758
Salesmen's  licences   (duplicates)   	
2
347
?
?
•i
-5,342
?
72,115
56-8
859
47
2
11,970
5,645
28
29,367
2,633
1
829
M'Otor-cvcle substitutions 	
33
6
29,192
5,367
Chauffeurs—
33
Drivers—
24,403
4 211
822
882
" Appendix B.—Licences issued under ' Motor-vehicle Act ' from January 1st
to December 31st, 1927.
1 Motor-vehicles:
Passengers—
New registrations   11,098
Amputation cases, N.R         54
Orders in Council, N.R  3
Provincial Government, N.R         72
Fire and Police, N.R         11
 11,238
Carried forward  11,238 " Appendix B.—Licences issued under ' Motor-vehicle Act ' from January 1st
to December 31st, 1927—Continued.
Brought forward  11,238
" Motor-vehicles—Continued.
Passengers—Continued.
Renewals   51,786
Dominion Government   120
Amputation cases   172
Orders in Council   22
Provincial Government   213
Fire and Police   44
 52,357
Total passenger vehicles  63,595
Commercial—
New registrations     1,842
Provincial Government, N.R       133
Fire and Police, N.R.   9
   1,984
Renewals   10,197
Dominion Government          58
Amputation cases   9
Provincial Government        249
Fire and Police          95
 10,608
Total commercial vehicles  12,592
Total motor-vehicles  76,187
" Motor-cycles—
New registrations   252
Provincial Government, N.R  11
Fire and Police, N.R  15
      278
Renewals   636
Dominion Government   1
Provincial Government   8
Fire and Police          38
      683
Total motor-cycles       961
" Trailers—
Registrations       418
Dominion Government   1
Provincial Government   3
Total trailers  422
" Motor-dealers—
Original motor-dealers' licences   278
Additional plates, motor-dealers' licences   270
Original motor-cycle dealers' licences   6
Additional plates, motor-cycle dealers' licences   2
Substitution motor-dealers' licences   12
Substitution motor-cycle dealers' licences   3
Salesmen's licences   758
Salesmen's duplicates   2 " Appendix B.—Licences issued under ' Motor-vehicle Act ' from January 1st
to December 31st, 1927—Continued.
" Substitutions:
Motor-vehicles—
Passengers  ,  597
Provincial Government   1
Trucks   229
Provincial   1
Fire and Police  1
Total motor-vehicle substitutions       829
Motor-cycles         33
Trailers  '.  6
"Transfers  29,192
" Chauffeurs-
Original licences     5,460
Substitutions         33
" Drivers—
Original licences  24,403
Duplicate licences     4,211
Permits to minors        821
" Duplicate motor-vehicle licences       882 "
GENERAL.
During the' past year I have been compelled, owing to pressure of work, to remain more in
my office than usual, and I have unfortunately not been able to visit Divisional and District
Headquarters or detachments as much as I would like to have done. However, I have had
visits from all the Divisional Commanders on more than one occasion and kept in close touch
with all matters affecting the Force. With a minimum of exceptions, all ranks continue to give
excellent service to the public and I can safely say that the British Columbia Provincial Police
Force is a Force of which the Province can be justly proud.
Commencing August 1st, 1927, and calculated from the date of last enlistment, service stars
were awarded to each N.C.O. and man for every completed five years of service. These stars are
worn on the left sleeve midway between the cuff and the elbow and grouped or placed as
follows:— * * *
* *
5 yrs. 10 yrs. 15 yrs. 20 yrs. 25 yrs.
At the time these stars were first issued there were 205 N.C.O.'s and men on the Force,
182 of whom were entitled to receive stars when the scheme was inaugurated, with varying
lengths of service made up as follows: 49 with 5 years' service; 34 with 10 years' service;
19 with 15 years' service; 2 with 20 years' service. Some of these men, of course, had more
than the length of service that the stars denote, but additional stars cannot be obtained until an
additional five years' service has been done. Staff-Sergeant Fraser and Constable A. P. Cummins
are the two men with twenty years' service, while Staff-Sergeant Stephenson and Constable R.
Webster will complete twenty years' service in 1928.
Last year we were confronted with a number of murder cases which presented problems-
that I regret to say have to date remained unsolved. The murder of James Craig, J.P., outside
his store at Squilax has been engaging the attention of this Force since September 28th, 1927,
the night of the murder, and while untiring in our investigations and inquiries, no tangible
clue has as yet been presented that would afford grounds for arresting any person. The
murder of E. A. Leach, Fisheries Overseer at Tofino, gave the Inspector Commanding " A"
Division and his men a mystery to cope with which they did all in their power to solve. Three
Indians were finally arrested and tried, but evidence of their actual presence at the scene of
the murder—Leach's launch—was necessarily weak and they were found " not guilty." The
murder of Emmett Todd at Merritt also presented difficulties, but as a man concerning whom
inquiries disclosed strong suspicions suddenly committed suicide, I think this case may be said
2 I 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Regulation of/v\otor Traffic
Superintendent of Provincial Police
Inspector Motor Traffic Branch
Headquarters
Office and Staff
Victoria, B.C.
 1
"TffiSS™
\ Corn
V
\
" \
- I
■/
H
R-ega/ations
Highway Act.
I    Motor Cyclists    j REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1927. I 19
to have been cleared up. Against these few isolated cases there were numerous murders investigated by this Force and brought to satisfactory conclusions, as will be seen from the resume
of the more important cases. I think I am justified in saying that in its criminal investigation
work the Force has a very creditable record.
In March, 1927, Their Excellencies the Governor-General and Lady Willingdon came to
British Columbia and during their stay the Provincial Police Force was called upon to furnish
escorts. In this connection I have received congratulatory letters on the services rendered and
the appearance of the men from the Secretary to the Governor-General and from his Honour
the Lieutenant-Governor.
Dominion Day parades were of more than usual interest last year on account of the celebration of the Dominion Jubilee. All Provincial Police detachments were decorated for the occasion. In Victoria a motor-cycle squad was detailed to take part in the parade and the Hon. Mr.
Justice Martin, Chairman of the Pageant Committee, wrote me thanking me for the assistance,
and remarking that " the smart appearance of your men was the subject of general and most
favourable comment."
In August H.R.H. the Prince of Wales visited Victoria, and again the Provincial Force was
asked to furnish escorts in conjunction with other Police Forces, the Victoria City, and the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company's.
It was with the profoundest regret that the Force learned of the passing of the Hon. John
Oliver, Premier of British Columbia. ' An outstanding figure in the life of the Province, he was
always interested in the welfare of the Force and watched its progress with interest. Every
member of the British Columbia Provincial Police feels that he has lost a real friend.
In conclusion, I must again refer to the loyal support I have received from Assistant
Superintendent Walter Owen and each Inspector. At the same time I should like to express
to you the appreciation of myself and all ranks for the support you have given us during the
year and the sympathetic manner with which you have considered all matters touching the
welfare and advancement of the Force.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Superintendent, British Columbia Provincial Police.
CRIMINAL STATISTICS.
Appendix I. at the end of this report gives in detail the cases dealt with by Provincial
officers. This table does not give the full total for the Province, but includes all indictable
offences where the accused was committed for trial and summary convictions dealt with by the
Force, but not summary convictions of cities and municipalities which have their own Police
Force. The number of all cases entered amounted to 5,210, with convictions amounting to
4,657, or 89.38 per cent. This shows an increase of cases entered over last year of 273. The
number of escorts of prisoners made during the year was 2,242 and 169,130 miles were travelled
in the course of these escorts. The following is a short summary of the most important cases
occurring during the year:—
MURDER AND ATTEMPTS.
Rex vs. Margaret C. McRae.—Details of this case were given in my last report. At the
Victoria Spring Assize the prisoner was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to ten
years' imprisonment.
Rex vs. Milo Eggers.—This case was referred to in my report for the year 1924. After a
prolonged extradition fight the prisoner was finally brought to this Province for trial and at the
Fall Assize, Victoria, was found " not guilty." Difficulty was encountered in obtaining the testimony of witnesses from the U.S.A., which seriously affected the course of the trial. This man
was deported at the conclusion of the hearing.
Rex vs. Edward Joe, Sennen David, and Jacob George (Murder).—On the morning off
August 30th,  1927, the launch of Edward Ainslie Leach,  Fishery  Overseer,  was  discovered I 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
stranded on the beach at Clayoquot. On investigation the dead body of Leach was found on the
bunk in the cabin of the boat, death having been caused by his head being held under water
with his mouth and nostrils in sand. The subsequent investigation brought out that the three
accused Indians, who had apparently been drinking cider in the local store the previous evening,
were the last to have been seen in the company of Leach when they were seen with him ini the
cabin of his launch, which was tied to the Tofino landing-stage, about 10 p.m. About 11 p.m.
Leach's boat was seen drifting with another boat alongside which could not be recognized, and
this was the last seen or heard until it was found the following morning at Clayoquot, about 3
miles from Tofino. The three Indians were arrested and charged with the murder and at the
Fall Assize Court, Nanaimo, were found " not guilty."
Rex vs. Chin Mee (Murder).—At 12.30 a.m. on December 30th, 1927, Corporal R. L. Matthews
answered a call from Chinatown, Cumberland. On arrival he found at No. 36 Ling Chung Street,
Chen Fong Man lying on a bed in a very critical condition, having been stabbed in the right side
with a knife. He died at 2 p.m. the same day. Following inquiries Chin Mee was arrested and
charged and will be tried at the Spring Assizes at Nanaimo.
Rex vs. Kenneth R. Bailey (Murder).—Bailey was charged with the murder of Charles Jury
at Trail on June 24th, 1927. This case occurred in the City of Trail, but the Provincial Police
rendered every assistance possible to the City Force in solving this crime. The prisoner had
evidently entered the Jury home about 1 o'clock in the morning and murdered Jury, who was
then in bed. Bailey was arrested some time later at Langley Prairie and tried on this charge
at Nelson Fall Assizes. Sentenced to death, the prisoner paid the extreme penalty on January
13th, 1928.
Rex vs. John Ritola (Murder).—This case arose at Ainsworth and was the result of a
drunken brawl, when the prisoner shot and killed a man named Leo Kolehmainen. In company
with Corporal Mackenzie and Constable H. A. Mackenzie, Inspector Dunwoody investigated this
case and arrested the prisoner, in a drunken condition, at the Kootenay-Florence Mine, near
Ainsworth. At the Nelson Fall Assizes the jury brought in a verdict of manslaughter, and the
Judge, taking all the circumstances into account, allowed the prisoner out on suspended sentence
for five years.
Rex vs. William Morpeth (Murder).—Charged with the murder of Roderick Munro, Fire
Ranger, on the Banff-Windermere Highway on August 27th, 1927. Munro had gone to the
cabin of the accused and remonstrated with him as to the setting of bush fires, and Morpeth,
who was an old eccentric, immediately went inside his cabin, got a revolver, and shot Munro
through the back. Prisoner was arrested about an hour afterwards by Constables F. G. Brown
and W. J. McKay. At Morpeth's trial at the Nelson Fall Assizes the defence raised the plea of
insanity and a jury was sworn to try this issue. The prisoner was adjudged insane; the
presiding Judge ordered his confinement during the pleasure of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council.
Rex vs. Michael James Mullin (Attempted Murder).—This man was committed for trial
for an attempt to murder Constable J. P. Brown, B.C. Police, at Princeton on November 15th,
1927. Mullin was apparently nursing a grievance against the police for a former arrest under
the " Government Liquor Act," and entering the Tulameen Hotel, he brutally attacked Constable
J. P. Brown with a pump-plunger. This man's trial will, in all probability, come up at the
Vernon Spring Assizes.    Bail has been refused by Judge Brown.
Rex vs. Aaron Kosta (Murder).—This trial, which was held over from the Prince George
Fall Assize on account of the illness of the main medical witness, came up at the Spring Assizes
at that place on June 23rd, 1927. Mr. A. M. Johnson, K.C., prosecuted, and the evidence was
brought out very fully, with the exception of the evidence which Dr. West, of Prince Rupert, was
prepared to give as to the analysis of the blood-stains f ound on the clothes of the accused;
this was ruled inadmissible because others besides the police might have had access to the
exhibits. This particular evidence was not vital to the case; the defence took the form of
suggesting that somebody else might either maliciously or accidentally have shot the deceased,
which in that very isolated spot seemed almost an impossibility. However, the jury brought in
a verdict of " not guilty " and the accused was discharged after being in custody since September 27th, 1926.
Murder of James Craig, J.P. and Postmaster at Squilax, at 9 p.m., September 28th, 1927.—-
Word was received about 2 a.m. by Constable Pritchard on September 29th that the deceased REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1927. I 21
had been found shot through the brain outside his garage, which is just east of his house and
facing the motor-highway, from which it is about 30 feet. The body was discovered by
Mr. Hedley Vickers, who had joined Mrs. Craig and her adopted daughter, Kathleen, in the
search for deceased, whose last words were to his wife about 8.30 p.m. on September 28th;
these words were spoken as he set out on a journey of about half a mile in length and were
to the effect that " he would be back shortly." Mrs. Craig, who had retired to bed with her
daughter about 8.40 p.m., awoke about 11.30 p.m. and found her husband had not returned, and
she got out of bed and called down the stairs, as she thought it possible he might be engrossed
in a book. This shouting woke her draughter, Kathleen, and as there was no answer they
returned to bed, but not to sleep, and after lying awake worrying about his prolonged absence
a search was instituted, with the above result.
The main witness to the murder was an intelligent boy of 11, a Finn, who speaks good
English. He was standing about 60 feet south from the scene of the crime a few minutes
before 9 p.m.; saw Craig's car come from the east and turn into the garage, then the lights
were put out; the night was very dark; the boy heard steps coming out of the garage and the
sliding doors being pulled to; immediately there followed a shot; the boy says he thinks from
a revolver or a small rifle, but admits he only knows a very little about such things. Immediately after he says he heard heavy footsteps running east along the highway; he could hear
them for about 50 or 60 yards; he says then that they went too far for him to hear; he heard
nobody speak, although if this had occurred it seems probable he must have heard.
Another witness, Jack Kiuru, who was in the section-house about a quarter of a mile east
close to the highway, heard the shot and went outside to listen and heard something passing
through the brush in a field; whatever made the noise, which he says was " lighter than a
horse's steps," was going east, and it would seem probable that whoever was responsible for
the heavy footsteps was just about due where the one witness heard the noise.
Five Indians, who were playing cards and listening to one of them fiddling in a house
about 500 yards north-east, heard the shot and are of the opinion that it was a rifle, but as
they had heard shots fired at night near Craig's house on previous occasions they paid no more
attention, except one went out to listen for a few minutes but heard nothing.
Unfortunately it had rained heavily the night of the crime, and although Indian trackers
were on the scene about daylight they could make nothing of the tracks, with the exception of
the impression of what they thought was a man's hand on a mound of gravelly earth; this
was sheltered from the rain by the side of a drum of gasoline and gave the impression that
some one had used a left hand to steady themselves whilst crouched just outside the garage
door; the nature of the soil and the fact it was on a ridge of earth made it impossible to get
a plaster cast of the impression.
This case has created a great deal of interest and neither time nor money has been spared
I need hardly say the investigation is still being vigorously carried on, so far, I regret to say,
without result.
Murder of Emmett (Lucky) Todd, at Merritt.—On December 10th, 1927, the body of the
above named, who was well known as a prospector, was found in the Hub Rooms, Merritt. An
inquest was held and a verdict returned that " Death was due to suffocation owing to bleeding
from a blow on the nose received from some person unknown." Every assistance was given the
Municipal Constable at Merritt, the matter being thoroughly investigated, and different people
who were with Todd the night previous to his death examined closely. On December 19th, 1927,
Angelo Serbenoff, a Greek, committed suicide by throwing himself in front of a Kettle Valley
passenger-train, a note being left by Angelo concerning the murder of Todd. The presumption
is that Serbenoff committed the offence and rather than face trial committed suicide; this is
the belief of almost every one in the Nicola District.
Rex. vs. Peter Whitewash (Attempted Murder).—On August 3rd, 1927, at Bella Coola,
Constable Williams was injured by a rifle-shot fired by one Peter Whitewash, an Indian, whose
arrest Constable Williams was attempting to effect. At the Prince Rupert Fall Assize, 1927,
Peter Whitewash was found " guilty " of wounding and was sentenced to twenty-five months
in the B.C. Penitentiary.
Rex vs. Burgess and McKenzie (Murder).—The two accused, who are youths, were stealing
a ride on a freight-train east from Vancouver, and on the way picked up two others, whom they
later attacked to rob.   One of the two, named Bosch, was struck on the head in a brutal attack I 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
and died a short time after in a hospital. A typical case of utter irresponsibility on the part
of the vagrant youths, who deserved the full effect of the law. Their youth has been advanced
as a chief argument against the carrying-out of the extreme penalty imposed. The outcome,
however, is pending developments of the next few days.
MISCELLANEOUS CASES.
Rex. vs. Tadao Dot (Manslaughter).—The accused was arrested for the death of Esther
Wright Logan, aged 8—the result of an accident on the Royston-Cumberland Highway, the
accused knocking the child down, he being in charge of the automobile, killing the child almost
instantly. Preliminary hearing at Cumberland ; accused committed for trial on May 3rd, 1927.
Accused was tried at Nanaimo Fall Assize 1927, His Honour Judge D. Murphy presiding; the
accused was acquitted.
Rex vs. Solomon Dubeau (Manslaughter).—Automobile accident at Powell River, when
Laura Hayes, aged 10, ran unexpectedly in front of car and was run over. Not clearly established that accused was driving at excessive speed. Dismissed. A very sad tragedy as the
little girl was very popular throughout the whole district.
Rex vs. William Irvine (Manslaughter).—Another Powell River accident between local
stage and a toboggan during heavy snowfall in December. William McDonald, aged 7, killed.
Charge withdrawn after jury exonerated driver of stage.
In this connection, toboggan accidents came prominently into the limelight at this time,
both at Powell River and elsewhere, when several deaths were recorded. A toboggan hitting
a telephone-pole caused several deaths at Powell River, in addition to the death of the little
boy McDonald referred to above. A recommendation that some control over such pastimes on
the main streets of towns might well be instituted was submitted as an aftermath of these
accidents, as the danger is one which will likely occur from year to year when the snow falls.
Rex vs. William Goodlet (Manslaughter).—This is the first of a series of manslaughter
charges laid by the Department, with a view to curtailing the number of hunting accidents,
which has grown to undue proportions during the last few years. An Indian, Teddy Roosevelt,
was killed in mistake for a bear at Rivers Inlet. Accused committed for trial at the Spring
Assizes, 1928 ;  on bail.
Rex vs. Richard Lawrence Walker (Manslaughter).—Arrested October 30th, 1927, for the
death of John Barr, whom the accused took for a bear whilst out shooting near Oyster River,
killing John Barr instantly. Preliminary hearing before AV. A. W. Hames, Esq., S.M., Courtenay ;   accused placed on his trial and allowed out on bail, $3,000, November 11th, 1927.
Rex vs. William Alexander McDonald (Manslaughter).—Arrested November 7th, 1927, at
Campbell River for the death of Sidney Cox, whom the accused took for a deer at Penn Island,
near Campbell River, Sidney Cox dying en route to Campbell River Hospital. Preliminary
hearing before R. J. Walker, Esq., S.M., sitting at Campbell River; accused placed on his trial,
bail §3,000, November 10th, 1927.
Rex vs. Victor MacDonald and Robert Askins (Robbery with Violence).—The prisoners in
this case followed an old man named McDonnell on his way to his cabin on the morning of
November 24th, beat him up, and robbed him of approximately $80 in cash and certain time-
checks. Prisoners were subsequently arrested on this charge and committed for trial. They
elected for speedy trial; found " guilty " by Judge Brown and sentenced to twenty-three and
twenty-two months respectively.
Albert Esplin (Robbery with Violence).—The above named at Kelowna committed an offence
against Roy Martin by knocking him down and robbing him of $90. Esplin was arrested at
Vernon, committed for trial, and on November 19th, 1927, at Vernon Fall Assizes found " guilty "
and sentenced by His Lordship Mr. Justice Murphy to two years in the B.C. Penitentiary.
Rex vs. Robert Alderman and Joseph Hammond Walmsley (Breaking and Entering).—
Offence committed at. Fanny Bay, in the Courtenay Police District, December 4th, 1927. Both
accused arrested in Vancouver by B.C. Police officers on warrants issued at Courtenay on
December 10th, 1927. Both accused appeared and were jointly charged at preliminary hearing,
Courtenay, December 19th, 1927; both committed for trial; taken to Nanaimo County Court,
December 20th, 1927, before Judge Barker; elected for speedy trial, tried forthwith, and pleaded
" guilty." Robert Alderman sentenced to one month's hard labour ; Joseph Hammond Walmsley
to three months. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1927. I 23
Rex vs. Ray Graham (Breaking and Entering).—At Prince George on August 27th, 1927, one
Ray Graham broke and entered a garage and stole $134.50. On September 1st, 1927, he pleaded
" guilty " and received a sentence of two years in the B.C. Penitentiary.
Rex vs. Harry Wong (Breaking and. Entering).—At Prince Rupert on November 8th, 1927,
a Chinese named Harry Wong was sentenced to eighteen months' hard labour for breaking and
entering a restaurant and stealing therefrom $115.
BANK ROBBERIES.
Bank robberies have been conspicuous by their absence during 1927 in our territory. One
such occurred at Agassiz; then the Bank of Montreal was entered by two men and $14 only
stolen. The teller was ordered to open the main vault, but being a time-lock, he could not do
so.    Otherwise the booty would have been much greater.
In July the Liquor Store at Chilliwack was broken into and some $210 worth of liquor and
$227.75 in cash stolen.
In September a Vancouver Liquor Store on Cordova Street was robbed and fifty-three cases
of liquor and $500 in cash taken. One Robert Cress is now serving a penitentiary term for this
robbery; three others also being implicated. Some good work was done by Provincial Constable W. Greenwood, of Abbotsford, in this case on behalf of the Vancouver City Police.
THEFT, FRAUD, ETC.
Rex vs. James O'Rourke and Thomas McMahon alias J. Gordon (Theft).—These men
appeared before Stipendiary Magistrate at Nanaimo on November 30th and consented to be
tried summarily by the Magistrate on the charge of theft of clothing. Both pleaded " not
guilty " to the charge. O'Rourke was convicted and sentenced to six months in Oakalla Gaol.
The charge against McMahon was dismissed on account of lack of sufficient evidence.
Rex vs. James O'Rourke and Thomas McMahon alias J. Gordon (Theft).—These men
appeared before the Stipendiary Magistrate at Nanaimo on November 30th, 1927, and consented
to be tried summarily on the charge of theft of an automobile from Cowichan District. Both
accused were found " guilty " and sentenced to serve two years in the B.C. Penitentiary at New
Westminster.
Rex vs. James O'Rourke and Thomas McMahon alias J. Gordon (Theft).—These men
appeared before the Stipendiary Magistrate at Nanaimo on November 30th, 1927, and consented
to be tried summarily on the charge of theft of a launch, the property of Joseph Becque, at
Big Qualicum, in the County of Nanaimo. Both accused were found " guilty " and sentenced
to twelve months' imprisonment in Oakalla. In the case of O'Rourke this sentence is to run
consecutively after the expiration of six months' sentence already imposed on the first-mentioned
charge.
Rex vs. James McCormac (Theft).—In July, 1927, the accused stole 43 oz. of amalgam from
the Engineer Mines at Atlin. McCormac, who managed to evade arrest and cross the border to
the United States, was arrested in Los Angeles and returned here for trial. He received a
sentence of two years in the B.C. Penitentiary.
Rex vs. Harry Saunders (Fraud).—On October 1st, 1927, Harry Saunders, a pseudo company-
promoter, obtained three sums of money ranging from $50 to $150 on the strength of promoting
a company to build a pulp-mill near Port Essington. On October 14th, 1927, Saunders pleaded
" guilty " before His Honour Judge Young, and was sentenced to two years in the B.C. Penitentiary on each charge, sentences to run concurrently.
Rex vs. Joseph Hammond Walmsley (Forgery).—Complaint received from the Canadian
Bank of Commerce, Courtenay, December Sth, 1927. The accused had stolen a letter from a
mail-box at North Wellington, taking therefrom a letter addressed to Mrs. Haynes, containing
a pass-book. The accused took this pass-book to the Canadian Bank of Commerce, Courtenay,
and issued a cheque on Mrs. Haynes's account at Nanaimo for $150. Warrant issued at
Courtenay and accused arrested at Vancouver, December 10th, 1927. Preliminary hearing at
Courtenay, December 19th, 1927; accused committed for trial. December 20th, 1927, accused
taken before Judge Barker, Nanaimo County Court, for election; accused elected speedy trial
forthwith and pleaded " guilty " to the charge; sentenced to six months' hard labour, and on
the same day to one year's hard labour for the theft of the letter from the mail-box in question, the accused having pleaded " guilty " to the charge. Rex vs. Paddy Ryan (Forgery).—On August 25th, 1927, one Paddy Ryan obtained a pay-
cheque from a fellow-workman at Port Clements. He forged the man's name and cashed the
cheque for $131.87. Ryan was arrested at Stewart and took his preliminary hearing at Prince
Rupert. On commitment he pleaded " guilty " and was sentenced to eighteen months' hard
labour at Oakalla Prison Farm.
Rex vs. John MacLean (Forgery).—At Smithers in August, 1927, John MacLean, alias
Melville, forged a cheque on the Duthie Mines for $129.25. When committed on the charge he
pleaded " guilty " and was sentenced to four years in the B.C. Penitentiary by His Honour
Judge Young.    This man was an old offender.
Rex vs. George Cawston (Cattle-stealing).—On May 23rd, 1927, on information received,
Staff-Sergeant Fraser arrested George Cawston on a charge of cattle-stealing at White Lake,
County of Yale, on or about May 19th, 1927. This man was a butcher at Penticton and Staff-
Sergeant Fraser got sufficient evidence to charge him with the crime. He was convicted at
Vernon Fall Assizes and sentenced to two years in the Penitentiary.
Rex vs. Grover Hance (Cattle-killing).—In January, 1927, Grover Hance, of Hanceville,
was arrested on a charge of cattle-killing, a complaint having been made by Mr. C. Spencer,
owner of the Chilco Ranch, that a steer belonging to him had been killed. On January 1st,
1927, Hance appeared before two Justices of the Peace at Hanceville, who dismissed the charge
on account of insufficient evidence. Mr. Spencer, the complainant, was not satisfied with the
decision, so the matter was referred to the Deputy Attorney-General, who instructed that
the case be reopened. This was done and on April 6th, 1927, Hance was committed for
trial. On May 17th, before His Honour Judge Calder at Williams Lake, Hance elected for
speedy trial. Hance was acquitted, His Honour giving him the benefit of the doubt, stating
that in his mind there was no doubt but what Hance had killed a steer not his own, but there
was nothing to prove that the steer was. the propery of Mr. Spencer, the complainant.  I 26
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02 H REPORT OP PROVINCIAL POLICE, 192T.
I 35
LIST OF OFFICERS OF
A.PPENDIX VII.
THE B.C
POLICE, WITH DETACHMENTS.
Headquarters.
Superintendent and Provincial Game Warden—Colonel J. H. McMullin, Victoria.
Assistant Superintendent—W
Owen, V;
mcouver.
Superintendent's Office—                      Regt. No.
Motor Branch—Continued.                   R-gt. No.
A/Cpl. Clark, C, Victoria 	
     86
Miss I. G. Fairall (stenographer) ...
A/Cpl. Lowe, J. C, Vancouver ....
  204
Miss M. Thomson (stenographer) ...
2/Cst. Kennelly, T., Victoria 	
  303
Motor Branch, Vancouver—
3/Cst. Kelly, M., Victoria 	
  276
A/Cpl. Baker, H. E	
198
Criminal Investigation Branch—
1/Cst. Lord, J. S	
320
Inspr. Cruickshank, F	
     03
1/Cst. Asquith, G. L	
258
Sergt. Peachey, R	
  133
1/Cst. McArthur, E	
104
Corpl. Cruickshank, J. W	
  177
3/Cst. Edwards, J. W.	
338
1/Cst. Bella, J. M	
  146
Game Branch—
1/Cst. Bailey, A. H	
  296
Inspr. Furber, M	
2/Cst. Ockenden, C. O	
  273
S/Sgt. Butler, F. R	
72
3/Cst. Swanson, F	
  331
1/Cst. Conly, T. H. M	
120
Motor Branch—
2/Cst. Vickers, W. H	
Inspr. Hood, Geo. A	
     28
Miss A. McGregor (stenographer) ....
Sergt. Handley, W. H	
  103
Game Farm, Victoria—
Corpl. Pentecost, P	
     16
1/Cst. Jones, J. W	
174
1/Cst. Clarke, H. H	
     84
3/Cst. McCall, S. H	
161
Miss D. Hicks (stenographer) ....
3/Cst. Boorman, E	
Miss R. M. Steele (stenographer)
Accounts Branch—
Miss V. Holland (stenographer)
	
Sergt. Gale, W. T	
294
Miss V. Lawson  (stenographer)..
2/Cst. Greenwood, H. W	
283
Miss I. Gandy (stenographer)  ....
2/Cst. Cooke, A. O	
292
Miss J. Taylor (stenographer) ....
2/Cst. Paulding, J. E	
289
Miss V. Wylde (stenographer) ....
Miss H. V. Fraser (stenographer)....
Miss N. Johnston (stenographer)
" A " Division.
Inspector-
-Thos. W.
S. Parsons, Victoria.
Victoria District—-                                     Regt. No.
Nanaimo District—Continued.              R,g
t. No.
Sergt. Owens, R., Victoria 	
     31
Corpl. Mustart,   A.   D.   I.,   Nanaimo
1/Cst. Harvey, R.( Victoria 	
  221
City   	
53
2/Cst. Jacklin, C. C, Victoria 	
  265
2/Cst. McDonald, A., Nanaimo City.
298
2/Cst. Meadows, R. E., Victoria .
  280
2/Cst. Blaney, G. S., Nanaimo City ..
317
2/Cst. Philp, F. E. L., Victoria 	
  150
2/Cst. Smith, T., Ladysmith 	
309
Prob. Carmichael, A. G., Victoria
Prob. Okon, A. C, Ladysmith  .....
1/Cst. Cline,  S., Chemainus 	
     78
1/Cst. Williams, G., Port Alice	
141
Corpl. Russell, J., Duncan 	
     44
1/Cst. Wood, H. N., Alberni 	
73
1/Cst. Shepherd, W. V., Duncan .
  122
Game—
1/Cst. Marshall, R., Ganges 	
..... 159
2/Cst. Monks, A., Alberni 	
284
Game—
1/Cst. Pyke, H. C, Nanaimo	
101
1/Cst. Tweedhope,  D.  0.,  Cowichan
Courtenay District—
Lake 	
  318
Corpl. Matthews, R. L., Courtenay....
76
1/Cst. Gidley, R., Victoria 	
     19
1/Cst. Condon, M. J., Courtenay 	
124
1/Cst. Hadley, W. H., Sidney 	
     97
1/Cst. Johnson, G. A., Courtenay ....
202
3/Cst. Hughes, H. P., Duncan 	
  225
3/Cst. Mottishaw, 0., Alert Bay	
336
Nanaimo District—
1/Cst. Dawson,    S.    W.,    Campbell
S/Sgt. Stephenson, A. T., Nanaimo..   13
River 	
185
2/Cst. Bradner, F. E., Nanaimo ...
  164
Game—
3/Cst. Telfer, W. J. M., Nanaimo.
.... 281
1/Cst. Fenton, W. V., Courtenay 	
117
3/Cst. Embleton, C. V., Nanaimo
327 1 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" B " Division.
Inspector—W. R. Dunwoody, Nelson.
Divisional Clerk—2/Cst. Paterson, E. H., Nelson, Regt. No. 340.
Boundary District— Regt. No.
S/Sgt. Fraser, J. A., Penticton        5
1/Cst. Hatcher, W. J., Penticton   210
1/Cst. Martin, C. IL, Coalmont     98
1/Cst. Killam, F. G., Grand Forks .... 140
3/Cst. Powers, W. R., Greenwood .... 339
1/Cst. Spall, A. E., Keremeos   116
1/Cst. McDonald, D. A., Oliver   125
1/Cst. Thomson, W. J., Princeton .... 293
3/Cst. Brown, J. P., Princeton   306
Game—
1/Cst. Robertson, R. M., Penticton.... 143
Fernie District—
Sgt. Greenwood, G. H., Fernie      57
1/Cst. Mead, G. D., Fernie   201
1/Cst. Emmott, F. N., Fernie      48
1/Cst. Sinclair, A. F., Cranbrook  179
1/Cst. Sharpe, G. C, Elko   153
Corpl. Smith, A. J., Kimberley   170
2/Cst. Clark, H. S., Kimberley   286
2/Cst. Nelson, R. S., Natal   262
1/Cst. Donohoe, G. W., Wardner   155
3/Cst. Davidson, C. E., Yahk   304
Game—
1/Cst. Thomas, G., Cranbrook   187
1/Cst. Brown, Ira J., Elk Prairie .... 182
North-east Kootenay District— n gt. No.
Corpl. King, H. W., Golden      69
3/Cst. Jennings, H. J., Golden   335
1/Cst. Brown, F. G., Athalmer  100
1/Cst. Brindley, F., Revelstoke   189
Game—
1/Cst. Butwell, F. H., Golden      92
2/Cst. Greenwood, D., Canal Flats .. 266
3/Cst. McKay, W. J.„ Athalmer   337
Spec.    Const.    Rutherford,    M.    G.,
Athalmer 	
Spec. Const. Smythe, C. W. S., Revelstoke 	
West Kootenay District—
S/Sgt. Gammon, E., Nelson   108
3/Cst. McKenzie, H. A., Nelson   311
3/Cst. Hassard, R. H., Nelson  313
1/Cst. McLaren, H.,  Creston      37
1/Cst. Oland, F., Kaslo      41
1/Cst. Jupp, P. AV., Nakusp      62
1/Cst. Laird, W. H., New Denver .... 105
Corpl. Badman, P., Rossland      87
1/Cst. Henley, W. R., Salmo      63
Corpl. Johnson, J. F., Trail      54
Game—
Corpl. McKenzie, C. K., Nelson   195
" C " Division.
Inspector—W. L. Fernie, Kamloops.
Divisional Clerk—A/Corpl. Patterson, E., Kamloops, Regt. No. 134.
Kamloops District—                              Regt. No.
Sergt. Kier, W., Kamloops     18
2/Cst. Herdman, T., Kamloops   315
3/Cst. McCabe, J. O., Kamloops   326
1/Cst. Pritchard, R., Chase      51
1/Cst. Vachon, E. A., Blue River     22
1/Cst. Carr, P., Merritt     85
Game—
Corpl. Sulivan, R. D., Kamloops   222
1/Cst. Stedham, E. G., Kamloops .... 147
2/Cst. Ledoux, C, Kamloops   253
Cariboo District—
Sergt. Gallagher,   F.   W.,   Williams
Lake     68
3/Cst. Dougherty,   F.   F.,   Williams
Lake   308
3/Cst. Weir, D. J., Williams Lake .... 333
2/Cst. Clarke, H. C, Quesnel   142
Game—
3/Cst. Turner, F. G., Barkerville .... 165
Prob. Kibbee, F., Barkerville 	
Cariboo District—Continued.
Game—Continued. Regt. No.
1/Cst. Broughton, F., Hanceville    42
3/Cst. Brown, L. W. S., Likely   319
Vernon District—
Sergt. Mortimer, G. C, Vernon   119
3/Cst. Green, J. M., Vernon   321
1/Cst. Smith, J. M., Enderby      35
1/Cst. Corrigan, P., Kelowna   203
1/Cst. Kearns, C. F„ Salmon Arm.... 162
Game—
2/Cst. Quesnel, J. A., Lumby   269
3/Cst. Maxson, W. R., Kelowna   323
Yale District—
Sergt. Bowen, R. W., Ashcroft      36
2/Cst. Bradley, G. F., Ashcroft   207
1/Cst. Foote, R. C. B., Clinton   215
1/Cst. Hazelton, D. A., Hope      74
1/Cst. Stewart, W. B„, Lillooet      39
1/Cst. McRae, I., Lytton      90
1/Cst. Giles, W. E„ North Bend   191
Game—
2/Cst. McKenzie, G. D., Clinton   194 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1927.
I 37
" D " Division.
Inspector—W. V. E. Spiller, Prince
Divisional Clerk—A/Cpl. Ponder, R
Fort George District— Regt. No.
Sergt. Walker, W. A., Prince George 200
1/Cst. McGlinchy, II., Prince George
City     299
3/Cst. Martin,    M.,    Prince    George
City    :  282
3/Cst. Lewis, W.  E., Prince George
City     330
Spec. Const. Gill, W. A. H., Prince
George City 	
2/Cst. McKenny, H. L., Giscome   205
3/Cst. Dickson, L. R. P., MeBride.... 242
3/Cst. Crate, Geo., Red Pass   301
1/Cst. Mansell, H. H., Vanderhoof ..    79
Game—
2/Cst. Muirhead, C. D.,Fort St. James 236
1/Cst. Soles, G. H,, Prince George .... 178
Prince Rupert District—
Sergt. McNeill, A., Prince Rupert ....    71
2/Cst. Camm, T. A., Prince Rupert .. 272
3/Cst. Raybone, H., Prince Rupert.... 307
Sergt. Hannah, J. P. M., Prince Rupert City   180
3/Cst.  Smith,  J.  H.,  Prince Rupert
City     264
1/Cst. Kench,  Chas., Prince Rupert
City     190
1/Cst. McKinlay, R., Prince Rupert
City     290
3/Cst. Harrison, W. T.,  Prince Rupert City   252
Rupert.
. P., Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 64.
Prince Rupert District—Continued.   Regt. No.
Spec.   Const.   Gilker,   R.   C,   Prince
Rupert City 	
2/Cst. Smith, W., Anyox   270
2/Cst. Webster, R., Atlin  :.    14
1/Cst. Williams,  J.  A.,  Bella  Coola    59
1/Cst. Dryden, A., Ocean Falls      77
Corpl. Stone, A. AV., Ocean Falls      45
3/Cst. Grant, A., Masset   251
1/Cst. Gibson, R., Port Essjington ....    99
3/Cst. Potterton, L. A. N., Stewart.. 297
1/Cst. Service, S., Terrace  126
1/Cst. Ashton, G. E., Telegraph Ck. 113
Game—
Sergt. Van Dyk, T., Prince Rupert.. 128
1/Cst. Clark, Geo. H., Prince Rupert 186
Hazelton District—
Sergt. Service, W. J., Smithers     66
2/Cst. Hall, O. L., Smithers   278
2/Cst. Silk, A. H., Burns Lake   188
3/Cst. Wyman, G. A., Hazelton   287
1/Cst. Fairbairn, A., Telkwa     33
Peace River District—
Sergt. Duncan, W. A. S., Pouce Coupe   60
3/Cst. Batchelor, A. T., Hudson Hope 329
Game—
Corpl. Barber, C. G., Fort Nelson ....    43
3/Cst. Devlin, J. C, Fort Nelson   334
3/Cst. Hayes, J., Fort St. John   328
' E " Division.
Officer Commanding—S/Sgt. North
Vancouver District— Regt. No.
Sergt. Shirras, J., Vancouver   324
Sergt. Wilkie, O. J. J., Vancouver .... 163
Corpl. Markland, F. D., Vancouver .. 131
1/Cst. Marshall, S., Vancouver      26
1/Cst. Baker, T. R., Vancouver   135
1/Cst. Sims, R. A., Vancouver   193
2/Cst. Rigby, F. AV. R., Vancouver.. 274
1/Cst. Sutton, A. C, Powell River .... 199
1/Cst. Chadwick, J. W., Squamish .... 110
Game—
Sergt. Cunningham,   G.  J.,  Vancouver    Ul
1/Cst. Cummins, A. P., Arancouver ....     8
2/Cst. Clark, W., Vancouver   214
Spec. Const. Byatt, T., Vancouver	
1/Cst. Cameron, AV. H., Ladner   107
3/Cst. Moir, J., North Vancouver .... 300
2/Cst. Boyt, F. W. B., Powell River 310
S., Vancouver, Regt. No. 27.
Vancouver District—Continued.
Game—Continued. Regt. No.
Prob. Sutherland, T. D., Sechelt 	
Miss N. Bryce  (stenographer), Vancouver   	
New AA'estminster District—
Sergt. MacDonald, John, New Westminster        65
Corpl. Kelly, J., New AA^estminster ..    49
3/Cst. Pilling, J.  S., New Westminster  277
3/Cst. Pattenden, S., New AVestmin-
ster   295
1/Cst. Greenwood, W., Abbotsford ..    55
1/Cst. McConnell,   J.   J.,   Coquitlam   ■
City     152
2/Cst. Elliott, G. F., Coquitlam Municipality     267
1/Cst. Renner, J., Matsqui     50 I 3"S
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" E " Division—Continued.
New AVestminster District—Continued. New Westminster District—Continued.
Regt. No. Game—Continued.                              Regt. No.
Corpl. Duncan, G. J., Mission      75 gpec. Const. Butler, A. J., Mission	
2/Cst. Pare, E., Mission   312 3/Cst_ Urquhart, F., Pitt Meadows.. 332
Game— 3/Cst. Murray, J., Port Moody   130
3/Cst. Collison, A. J., Agassiz   275 Motor	
1/Cst. Stewart, R. M., Chilliwack .... 148 j/Cst. Dawson, C. H., New Westmin-
Spec. Const. Stewart, J. D. H., Chilli- ster                                                         173
wack 	
Prob. AVilson, R. A., Langley Prairie 	
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Trinted by Charles F.  Banfield, Printer to tbe King's  Most Excellent Majesty.
1028.
625-428-1640

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