Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE OF… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1928

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0300571.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0300571.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0300571-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0300571-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0300571-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0300571-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0300571-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0300571-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0300571-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0300571.ris

Full Text

 DEPARTMENT OE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOE   THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST, 1927
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles E. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
102S.    To His Honour Robebt Rakooi.ph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British. Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersignetl respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Medical Superintendent of Tranquille Sanatorium for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1927.
WILLIAM SLOAN,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. Wm. Sloan, Provincial Secretary. J. L. White, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM STAFF.
Medical Staff:
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent.
H. G. Chisholm, M.D., Medical Assistant. M. McEjuitty, M.B-., Medical Assistant.
A. A. Rowan, M.D., Medical Assistant.
W. G. Lothian, Radiologist. G. Darling, Laboratory Technician.
G. J. Cameron, Dentist. Miss B. Bibby, Matron.
Administrative Staff:
s
A. Whitecross, Bursar. Miss R. Burgess, Clerk.
A. N. Low, Steward. .1. R. Mathieson, Clerk of Works.
Miss L. Wright, Dietitian. 3. Trevors, Laundry Manager.
J. L. Stephenson, Chief Engineer.
Chaplains:
Rev. Dr. E. D. McLaren, Presbyterian. Rev. Father A. Madden, Roman Catholic.
Rev. Mr. Bartlett, Church of England.
Sanatorium Farm Staff:
D. W. Strachan, Farm Superintendent.
Miss Gordon Forbes, Book-keeper. TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1927.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Sixth Annual Report of Tranquille
Sanatorium, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1926, to March 31st, 1927.
A total of 368 patients received treatment during the year. There were 136 admissions and
145 discharges. The number of betls available was 245 and the average population was 223, the
largest number in residence at any time being 237.
These figures when compared with similar ones for other years show that there were fewer
discharges and admissions, which means that our patients are remaining for longer perioils.
This is clue to the advanced class of cases which we find we have to admit. The explanation is
that there are far too few beds available to accommodate the people who apply. The result is
the attending physicians only apply for those cases they consider urgent. An urgent case
practically always turns out to be a far-advanced one. These cases naturally occupy beds for
longer periods than earlier cases and do not show as good results of treatment. At the same
time, I believe it good business to admit these advanced cases. The more ill a patient is the
more dangerous he is as regards spreading infection. The isolation of these advanced cases
undoubtedly accomplishes something in the way of prevention. It is not enough, however, as
earlier cases can be dangerous spreaders of infection also. If given proper treatment, early
cases show good results and a high percentage are able to return to their occupation. Beds
should be provided for all cases seeking admission.
DENTAL SERVICE.
A full-time dentist has been employed for the past two years antl the benefits of this service
cannot be overestimated. Practically every patient on ailmission presents a neglected condition
of the teeth and mouth, which requires a good deal of attention from the dentist. The general
health is undoubtedly much improved by remedying such conditions.
LABORATORY.
There has been a marKed increase in the work as compared with previous years. We hope
to be able to do more work each year. The amount of work we can do will be governed by the
staff and equipment available. The laboratory is now playing a much more important role than
two or three years ago, when no specially trained men were employed and only one or two
procedures were routine.
SURGICAL.
The results of surgery in the treatment of suitable cases of pulmonary tuberculosis are
proving very satisfactory. Cases in which artificial pneumothorax was previously instituted
and treatment continued during the year numbered forty-three. New cases in which artificial
pneumothorax was successfully instituted during the year numbered eleven. There were two
cases in which the treatment was attempted without success. The number of refills given during
the year was 891.
During the year five patients had thoracoplasty done. One patient died following the operation, but good results were obtained in the other four. This makes a total of twenty-one patients
who have had the operation performed. Eighty per cent, of these cases have had good results.
As many of them were clone as a last resort, we consider these results highly satisfactory.
Phrenicotomy was performed as an independent measure in six cases with beneficial results.
Surgical attention was required for a few other cases. R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
X-RAY DEPARTMENT.
The X-ray has been used freely and is a most useful adjunct to the medical work. Complete sets of dental films are taken of all patients on admission. Stereoscopic films are taken of
the chests of all employees on joining the staff. This has proven worth while, as many people
apply for work at the Sanatorium because they know they have some chest-trouble. The X-ray
gives us an accurate record of their condition, so that they cannot claim that they contracted
the disease here.
There were 518 pairs of stereoscopic films of the chest ansl fifty-three miscellaneous films
taken during the year besides the dental films.
Over 100 X-ray treatments and more than 4,000 quartz-light treatments were given. We
hope to add more quartz lamps to our equipment soon.
LAUNDRY.
This efficient and well-conducted department turned out over 32,000 pieces per month. A
twin press was added to the equipment and is proving most satisfactory. A new mangle, which
is badly needed, has been included in next year's estimates and will be installetl when the money
is available.
FINANCIAL.
The bed capacity of our Sanatorium is one which makes for high per capita costs. Our
beds could be greatly increased in number without proportionate increase in the staff. None of
the higher-paid officials would have to be duplicated. When our new infirmary is built we expect
to operate the institution at a much lower per capita rate than at present and at the same time
show improvement in all our services.
It has been our policy to improve the buildings and grounds every year and this has entailed
considerable expense. At the same time, we feel that it is money well spent and is merely
anticipating a public demand. We are making an institution of which the citizens of this
Province can speak with pride, and believe that we are merely carrying out their wishes in
doing so.
SANATORIUM FARM.
A good deal has been done towards improving the appearance of the farmyards and the
approach to the Sanatorium grounds. The old road has been done away with and a new road
built on a lower level. This will be flankeE! with an avenue of trees. Substantial paddocks for
exercising the pure-bred stock have been built arouiiEl the barns and are a great improvement
both for usefulness and appearance. The financial statement is quite satisfactory, as it shows
a profit on operating in spite of the money that has been spent on improvements. It might not
be amiss to point out again this year that the farm is operated on a strictly cash basis and
receives current market prices from the Sanatorium for its produce.
BUILDING OPERATIONS.
By far the most important addition to the Sanatorium during the past year was a gravity
water system from Tranquille Creek. This consists of a dam to create a pond large enough to
keep the intake free from refuse and ice. a 12-inch pipe-line from the dam to the Sanatorium over
2 miles long, and a battery of two large mechanical filters of the latest type, ensuring a constant
supply of pure clear water. A by-pass connects with the fire-mains, where the water is not
filtered. This gives us sufficient pressure to operate four fire-hose simultaneously with sufficient
force to throw a full stream over any of our buildings.
Almost equally important was the installation of a trunk sewer, which eliminated the
necessity for the group of septic tanks and which carries the sewage to some considerable
distance from the Sanatorium. Both these changes have been recommended every year for a
number of years.
A building to house the female employees was erected not far from the Nurses' Home. This
building is comfortable, well equipped in every way, and enables us to house all our female
employees together in a building quite removed from any patients' quarters. It has also helped
relieve the congestion which formerly existed in the quarters occupied by male employees.
Some of the rooms vacated by the women are now being used for housing some of the male staff. A new cottage was built for the Clerk of Works and provided us with more room for
married staff.
Cement curbs and irrigation-ditches were built around some of the lawns antl cement curbs
and gate-posts were built at the entrance to the grounds.
A large open feed-barn was built on the farm for feeding the beef stock during the winter.
It has been our experience that the range stock fattens better when loose in a paddock than
when tied up in a barn. The feed-barn provides a place where they can eat while running loose
and gives them shelter at the same time.
Funds were provided for at the last session of the Legislature to erect a new 100-bed
infirmary and the other additions necessary to enable us to operate it. Work on these buildings
will be commenced during the coming year.
RECOMMENDATIONS.
When the new buildings are aElded it will be very important to have some members of the
staff fairly permanent. Owing to the isolated position of the Sanatorium, it will not be possible
to do this unless quarters are provided for us to employ married men or to enable some of our
present staff to get married. Four or five years have been spent in building up a good organization, and I would strongly recommend that married quarters be provided for four or five senior
officers of our staff, in order that we may hold it together. This should be done during the
next year.
Year after year I have recommendeEl the erection of a proper auditorium ami assembly-hall,
with provision in the basement for indoor recreation for the employees. I have always felt the
need for this building to be urgent, but with the increased size of the institution it will be
imperative. The room at present in use is quite inadequate. I would recommend that this be
provided for as soon as the new infirmary is openeil.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The visiting committee of the Red Cross continued their regular visits throughout the year.
They are always looked forward to antl appreciated.
The Kamloops branch of the I.O.D.E. donated subscriptions to a large number of periodicals.
These are circulated amongst the patients, through the library, and are very gratefully received.
Various donations were made at Christinas and these are all acknowledged with thanks.
Many enjoyable entertainments were provided by various organizations and I wish to thank
those responsible most heartily.
The work of the chaplains and visiting clergymen is much appreciated and is acknowledged
with thanks.
I wish to thank the consulting surgeons for their assistance during the past year.
I wish to acknowledge the splendid co-operation of all members of the staff of the Sanatorium who have in any way contributes! towarils the successful operation of the Sanatorium.
In conclusion, I wish to thank you, sir, for the support and assistance which has been
granted me by all members of your Department with whom I have come in contact.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP,
Medical Superintendent. R 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
STATISTICAL TABLES.
TABLE No. 1.—GENERAL STATISTICS FOR YEAR 1926-27.
Civil.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Number of patients in Sanatorium. March 31st, 1926	
122   .
65
64
187
123
37
30
43
07
24
_J
73
41
38
114
76
232
136
145
368
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1927	
223
TABLE No. 2.—CLASSIFICATION OF 136 CASES ADMITTED TO  SANATORIUM
DURING YEAR 1926-27.
Civil.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Percentage.
Incipient or minimal	
o
15
41
6
1
12
17
5
16
19
1
9
43
77
7
6.62
31.62
56.62
5.14
Totals	
05
30
41
136
100.00
TABLE No. 2a.—CLASSIFICATION OF 7 CASES ADMITTED AS MISCELLANEOUS.
Bronchial asthma   2
Bronchitis  2
Bronchiectasis   1
Lung-abscess '.  1
New growth of lung   1
Total
TABLE No. 3.—SHOWING CIVIL  STATE  OF PATIENTS  ADMITTED  FROM
APRIL 1st, 1926, TO MARCH 31st, 1927.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Married....
Single	
Divorced..
Widowed..
Totals..
36
59
18 54
21 80
|
90
40
I
136
TABLE No. 4.—SHOWING RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS OF PATIENTS ADMITTED
FROM APRIL 1st, 1926, TO MARCH 31st, 1927.
Religious Denominations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
9.
1
70
14
1
2
32
6
9
11
1
102
20
Totals	
95
41
136 [
WEST PAVILION.
n
, c
^ ,-hzM , .,,: ,
I " I      i
IMlj
BACK   LAWNS.  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27.
R 9
TABLE No. 5.—SHOWING THE NATIONALITY OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1926, TO MARCH 31st, 1927.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
3
1
38
1
23
3
6
1
5
1
2
G
.1
1
1
1
1
1
19
9
1
2
1
2
5
1
4
1
57
1
32
Holland .'	
1
8
Italy -  	
1
6
o
Scotland__ _   __ _	
11
Sweden _           .          .   	
9
South Africa	
1
1
1
Totals	
95
41
136
TABLE No. 6.—SHOWING WHAT DISTRICTS CONTRIBUTED PATIENTS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1926, TO MARCH 31st, 1927.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Abbotsford.              	
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
44
4
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
03
1
1
9
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
6
4
1
1
1
1
1
Sointula...-	
1
Tranquille	
9
Terrace	
1
Trail..	
1
U.S.A	
1
67
5
White Rock	
1
Totals           	
95
41
136 R 10
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE No. 7.—SHOWING THE OCCUPATIONS OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM
APRIL 1st, 1926, TO MARCH 31st, 1927.
Occupations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Able seaman	
Addressographer	
Accountant	
Auto mechanic	
At home	
Butcher	
Book-keeper	
Bralteman	
Clerk	
Chauffeur	
Civil engineer	
Car-conductor	
Cashier	
Carpenter	
Dentist	
Dressmaker	
Express messenger-
Electric engineer	
Farmer....	
Freight agent	
Fireman	
Gas engineer	
Gardener	
Housewife	
Housework	
Hotel manager	
Insurance-adjuster..
Logger	
Lumberman	
Laundry-help	
Labourer	
Miner	
Master mariner	
Motorman, B.C.E.R
Marine stoker	
Nurse	
None	
Oiler	
Orderly	
Pharmacist	
Petty officer	
Painter....	
Printer	
Photographer	
Retired	
Stenographer....	
Sheet-metal worker.
School-children	
Salesman	
Shingler	
Storekeeper	
Student	
Secretary	
Shingle inspector....
Telegraph operator-
Tailor	
Telephone operator.
Telephone lineman.
Tile-setter's help....
Teacher	
Time-keeper	
Train-conductor	
Vulcanizer	
Waiter	
Totals	
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
5
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
17
17      ■
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
o
2
1
1
0
9
2
0
1
1
1
1
o
2
2
o
5
3
8
1
1
2
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
7
11
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
95
41
136 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27.
R 11
TABLE No. 8.—SHOWING THE AGES OF THOSE ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st,
1926, TO MARCH 31st, 1927.
Male. Female.
Under 15 years    2 3
15 to 20  „     8 11
21 „ 25  „    10 9
26 „ 30  „    22 4
31 „ 35  „    14 5
36 „ 40  „    15 5
41 „ 45  „    12 1
46 „ 50  „     6 2
51 „ 55  „   o   4 1
56 „ 60  „   '..  1
61 „ 65  „     1
66 „ 70  „  	
Over 70  „   .	
Totals   95 41
TABLE No. 9.—SHOWING ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, AND DEATHS FROM
APRIL 1st, 1926, TO MARCH 31st, 1927.
Admissions.
DlSCHAEGI
s.
Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1926.
7
IS
8
8
11
13
10
6
■
4
4
6
4
5
7
5
3
3
2
2
2
4
4
11
23
15
13
14
16
10
8
2
6
8
10
15
15
10
14
6
4
2
2
3
5
7
6
3
3
.7
1
1
1
2
3
27~
21
18
13
21
7
1
4
3
3
7
10
1
1
6
1
5
1
3
1
3
9
1
3
1
1
2
....
1
2
1
May	
June	
July	
1
4
6
August	
2
October :....
6
1
December	
1927.
5
1
4
4
Totals 	
95
41
136
83
110
_J
24
11
35
_J
_J
TABLE No. 10.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 145 DISCHARGES DURING 1926-27.
Results.
Classification on Admission.
Apparently
arrested.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Died.
Total.
4
9
3
19
29
2
5
5
17
3
3
17
1
1
6
28
13
35
91
Non-pulmonary tuberculosis	
6
Totals   	
6
53
30
21
35
145 TABLE No. 11.—SHOWING CLASSIFICATION OF 6 NON-PULMONARY
TUBERCULOSIS CASES. Male Female
Debility   1
Bronchial asthma   1
Lung-abscess     1
Bronchiectasis        1
Pott's disease and discharging sinuses        1
Pleurisy   1
Totals   :       2 4
TABLE No. 12.—SHOWING CAUSES OF 35 DEATHS.
Male.
Female.
Total.
15
4
1
1
1
1
1
10
1
25
4
Benal tuberculosis	
1
1
1
1
1
1
Totals                                           	
24
11
35
Daily average population        223
Per cent, of discharge on admission (not including deaths)       80.8
Per cent, of fair recoveries on admissions       65.4
Per cent, of deaths on whole number under treatment        9.5
Total number of patient-days  81,422
DENTAL REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., April 1st, 1927.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following statement of work completed in the Dental
Clinic of this institution during the year ended March 31st, 1927.
The principal aims of the clinic have remained the same as in the preceding year—namely,
to remove all foci of infection, to restore the mouth to a healthy condition, and maintain it as
such as long as the patient is in the institution. Very often the commencement of the work
must, from necessity, be delayed on account of the weakened condition of the patient on admission, but, acting on the advice of the physician in charge, the work is started as soon as possible
either in the patient's room or in the clinic.
It has yet to be the experience of the clinic to examine a patient and find no need for
Elental treatment. During the past year the condition of the mouths of patients on admission
has been slightly better, and from a checking of examinations for the last six months it has
been found that the general average mouth requires seven cavities to be filled, two extractions to
be performed, and gum-infections to be relieved in 50 per cent, of the cases. These conditions
have no doubt been aggravated by the fact that a great many patients have been confined in
their homes for some time awaiting admission, thereby making dental treatment practically
impossible.
I would also like to draw attention to the great benefit anEl help deriveEl from constant
co-operation with an X-ray Department. This fact has always been recognized by the profession
at large and is being used as far as possible, for undoubtedly the examination and treatment of
a patient is bettered by the addition of full-mouth X-ray films at the examination and check-up
films during the treatment.   Following is a statement of the work completed in the clinic for year ended March 31st,
1927 :—
Fillings     648
Extractions  _  387
Dentures  122
Rebases       9
Repairs       30
Inlays (gold)  _       8
Bridges        11
Devitalizations      14
Treatments   233
Pyorrhoea      33
Prophylaxis    163
I have, etc.,
G. J. Cameron, D.D.S.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., April 1st, 1927.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report of work done in this
Laboratory during the fiscal year 1926-27.
The figures in the accompanying statistical report indicate a slight increase in routine work.
In addition, much extra time has been consumed in the preparation of our own media, reagents,
and antigens.
The development-work, in preparation for research in the carbohydrate metabolism of the
tuberculous, is now completed and a preliminary paper compiled for publication. Dr. R. E.
Coleman, Assistant Director, Laboratories, Vancouver General Hospital, under whose direction
this investigation is being conducted, has submitted a tentative programme by which further
studies are now proceeding.
Comparative renal functional tests between the phenolphthalien and Mosenthal methods
have afforded information prompting further investigation in cases with albuminuria. These
findings with non-protein nitrogen determinations will form the basis for an article in the
B.C. Laboratories Bulletin. During the year several compositions have been contributed to
this source.
Stock cultures of tubercle bacilli, primarily grown in this Laboratory, are being subcul-
tured in an effort to attenuate the organism. A sample of this strain has been supplied to the
University of British Columbia for demonstration purposes.
We have recently acquired a microtome and, in future, pathological specimens will be
prepared to supplement the gross findings at autopsy. Tissue-slides from animal autopsies will
also assist in diagnosis.
During the year emergency blood-counts only have been done. Complete blood examination
on all new admissions is now practised as a routine procedure.
As shown in the report, we continue to employ both the Kahn and Wassermann reactions
—the Kahn as routine and the Wassermann a corroborative test. A number of sera have been
examined for the Laboratories of the Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops, which has enabled us
to add to our record of the two reactions. Our findings favour the Kahn preciptin test as being
more sensitive than the Wassermann in treated cases. One per cent, of the institutional patients
react positively to both tests.
Two lectures, with microscopic demonstrations, were given at the Tranquille School and at
the Lloyd George Public School, Kamloops. The subject in each case was " Micro-organisms."
The interest evinced by the pupils antl the commendations of the teachers emphasized the practical usefulness of this feature.
All of which is respectfully submitted. Geokgb DaelinGi
Laboratory Technician. R 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GENERAL WORK DONE IN THE LABORATORY.
Material examined.
Sputum...	
T.B. positive	
T.B. negative	
B. fusiform	
Urinalysis	
T.B. urine	
Positive	
Negative	
Renal functional test...
Albuminuria	
Blood-tests—
Wassermann	
Kahn	
Erythrocytes.	
Hemoglobin	
Leukocytes	
Differential	
Blood-sugar	
Autopsies	
Animal inoculation	
Animal autopsy	
Cerebrospinal fluid	
Cultures	
Fa;ces	
Gastric contents	
Vaccines	
Milk-
Bacteriology	
Butter-fat	
Water—Bacteriology..
Bacteriological smears
59
38
21
10
1
78
46
32
217
13
5
8
1
27
100
47
30
6o
32
23
13
4
1
19
1
1
4
4
7
1
4
1
277
85
55
30
212
13
24
46
7
11
2
1
137
1
1
1
1
1
40
35
16
1
83
48
35
236
16
4
12
27
16
28
1
1
280
1
80
45
35
14
8
16
141
70
40
30
70
16
11
19
1
1
1
1
4
2
143
1
91
44
47
91
267
12
20
25
124
32
44
76
34
3
3
23
23
30
37
2
2
2
2
16
1
1
53
928
519
409
237
1,111
71
17
54
46
162
136
117
7
7
15
15
48
6
14
19
1,168
5
2
20
24
24
METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
SUMMARY OF METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FOR YEAR ENDED
MARCH 31st, 1927.
Month.
Maximum
Temp.
Minimum
Temp.
Average
Temp.
Average
Humidity.
Rain.
Sunshine.
1926
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1927
January	
February	
March	
Deg. F.
8-0.0
83.0
94.0
100.0
88.0
85.0
70.0
57.0
49.0
53.0
52.0
60.0
Deg. F.
21.0
36.0
42.0
49.0
44.0
26.0
26.0
15.0
— 5.0
-20.0
-02.0
23.0
Deg. F.
52.67
57.19
65.73
72.30
67.50
53.26
49.00
37.37
15.69
12.90
28.37
40.45
62.20
61.13
58.53
55.90
62.80
68.90
79.56
Inches.
2.00
3.00
12.00
6.25
Inches.
0.43
0.64
0.31
1.11
0.61
0.40
0.42
0.29
Hours.
223.2
214.2
246.7
262.8
205.1
211.8
113.9
61.7
42.3
55.7
80.0
159.5 BURSAR'S REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1927.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheet and the Profit and Loss
Accounts covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1927.
In reviewing the work for the year you will note a slight increase in our expenditures by
voucher, the total expenditure for the period being $286,858.74, as against $281,169.23 for the
previous year, the difference being the sum of $5,689.49. The departments showing increases
are salaries, travelling and transportation, office supplies, and provisions. The remaining
departments are practically the same, or show a slight decrease.
Our total revenue has shown a decrease from the previous year, although accounts covering
both donations and private patients show increases. Receipts from the Department of Soldiers'
Civil Re-establishment continue to fall off as the number of ex-soldiers being treated here is
steadily becoming less each year. Owing to changes in the rates governed by the amendment
to the " Hospital Act " of 1926, our collections from municipalities fell off for a time, but as
each month passes this Act is becoming better understood, and I think it is quite safe to
predict that our collections from municipalities have reached zero-point and from now on will
show increases.
The gross and net per capita have shown an increase of 20 and 40 cents respectively, and is
due more to a decrease in the number of hospital-days and to the decrease in the revenue than
to the slight increase in our expentlitures. Our net expenditure (including depreciation) for
the year is $241,802.90, which, with 81,422 days' treatment, makes the net cost to the Government
of the Province $1,084.31 per patient.
The Occupational Therapy classes still continue to do splendid work, and taking into consideration the large number of advanced cases in the institution the work is very creditable
to the instructor.
I again take this opportunity of thanking you for the valuable support and assistance you
have given me during the year; also, to my assistants and all departmental heads I wish to
tender my sincere appreciation of their co-operation in carrying on the work of the institution.
I have, etc.,
A. Whitecross,
Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1927.
Assets.
Land    $4,943.14
Buildings     361,742.09
Plant and equipment  _  09,365.32
Furniture and fixtures   14,670.79
Inventories  _  9,443.59
Treasury advance (for petty expenses)    1,000.00
Accounts receivable  _  2,622.00
$463,786.93
Deficit (cost of operations, 1926-27)  241,802.90
$705,589.83
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia      $705,589.83 R 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st. 1927.
Depreciation—
Buildings      $19,039.58
Plant and equipment   3,650.80
Furniture and fixtures   772.14
Salaries        111,849.59
Office supplies   2.121.47
Travelling and transportation  _  3,302.55
Fuel, water, light, and power  ,         38,626.74
Maintenance and repairs          14,684.17
Furniture antl fixtures   7,573.66
Provisions         95,050.92
Medical and surgical supplies  _ :  8,766.89
Incidentals anil unforeseen  : 2,756.31
By Donations               $2,750.00
Receipts from maintenance of patients          63,641.92
Balance        241,802.90
$308,194.82    $308,194.82
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31st, 1927.
Operating Expense Accounts.
Expenditure by voucher (Jess amounts credited to vote for supplies sold) —
Salaries—
Medical and clerical staff       $14,913.83
Sundry employees          90,935.76
     $111,849.39
Office supplies—
Books and journals  $98.86
Postage and office supplies  _  1,685.25
Telephone and telegraph   369.86
  2,153.97
Travelling and transportation—
Travelling expenses   $878.93
Transportation expenses   2,574.80
  3,453.73
Fuel, water, light, and power—
Fuel   $34,314.27
Plant supplies   974.44
Plant repairs   287.32
•         35,576.03
Maintenance and repairs—
Janitors' supplies   $6,492.95
Equipment renewals   5,867.29
Garden and grounds  995.71
Sundries  658.57
        14,014.62
Furniture and fixtures—
Linen,  etc         $5,762.19
Beds and bedding   1,214.08
  6,976.27
Carried forward    $174,023.21 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27.
R 17
Expense and Revenue Statement—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought forward ;...    $174,023.21
Expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Provisions—
Groceries   $41,462.38
Meats   28,256.00
Fish  3,090.61
Milk and eggs   25,395.25
 98,204.24
Medical and surgical supplies—
Medicines and drugs          $4,797.53
Consultants' fees, etc _  2,017.84
X-ray and dental   2,246.98
  9,063.35
Incidentals and unforeseen—
Laundry            $3,138.47
Freight and cartage  980.07
Clothing, etc  1,370.05
Sundries     79.35
  5,567.94
Total operating expense by voucher      $286,858.74
Inventories as at March 31st, 1926—
Office supplies  $415.98
Travelling and transportation  174.74
Fuel, water, light, and power   3,569.27
Maintenance and repairs   3,887.03
Furniture and fixtures   1,715.00
Provisions  1,696.09
Medical and surgical supplies   459.10
Incidentals and unforeseen   90.85
        12,008.06
Depreciation written off—
Buildings       $19,039.58
Plant and equipment  _ 3,650.80
Furniture anil fixtures   772.14
         23,462.52
$322,329.32
Less inventories as at March 31st, 1927—
Office supplies   $448.48
Travelling and transportation  _ 25.92
Fuel, water, light, and power   510.66
Maintenance and repairs   3,217.48
Furniture and fixtures   1,117.61
Provisions   3,198.86
Medical and surgical supplies  _  320.83
Incidentals and unforeseen  603.75
  9,443.59
$312,885.73
Less equipment transferred to Asset Account  1,920.73
Carried forward     $310,965.00
2 R 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Expense and Revenue Statement—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought forward     $310,965.00
Less sundry collections—
Provisions  $500.26
Board  _  1,180.50
Post-office   300.00
Junk _  44.90
Thermometers    168.00
X-ray plates, medical examinations, etc  175.00
Laundry     172.55
Miscellaneous   228.97
  2,770.18
Gross cost of maintenance for year     $308,194.82
Revenue.
By Donations. Greaves Estate         $2,750.00
Receipts, Department of S.C.R        28,638.20
Receipts, municipalities          22,516.20
Receipts, sundry patients  :         12,487.52
        66,391.92
Net cost of maintenance for year      $241,802.90
Summarv of Profit and Loss Account.
Depreciation	
Salaries	
Office supplies 	
Travelling and transportation
Fuel, water, light, and power ..
Maintenance and repairs 	
Furniture and fixtures  	
Provisions 	
Metlical and surgical supplies ..
Incidentals and unforeseen 	
Yearly
Per Capita.
$23,462.52
$105.21
111,849.59
501.57
2,121.47
9.51
3,302.55
14.81
38,626.74
173.22
14,684.17
65.85
7,573.66
33.96
95,050.92
426.23
8,766.89
39.32
2,756.31
12.36
Less donations       $2,750.00
Less revenue (maintenance)      63,641.92
$308,194.82        $1,382.04
66,391.92 297.73
Net cost to Government for maintenance of patients     $241,802.90       $1,084.31
Remarks.
Number of days' treatment given during year 1926-27  81,422
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1927  223
Daily average population for year ended March 31st, 1927  223
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  $1,382.04
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  3.79
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  1,084.31
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  2.96 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27.
R 19
Capital Expenditures.
Female boarding-house   $20,601.68
Cottage  -       3,230.00
Curbs, salaries, etc !       2,895.16
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year, the Total
Amounts spent for Maintenance, and the Gross Per Capita Cost.
1921-22	
190.04
194.46
207.15
221.21
224.00
223.00
$271,730.08
284,019.31
312,065.72
300,350.00
293,980.72
30S,194.S2
J
$1,429.85
1922-23	
1923-24	
1924-25              	
1,460.55
1,506.46
1,357.75
1925-26    	
1,312.44
1926-27	
1,382.04
Table B.—Showing Analysis of Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
■gfi
■a
03 2
0>    ■
as
a
C3
<CJ
a
Oj
09
si
C Cm
'ti
a a
h-l ^-jO
E v
3
t/3
5
> c
ei coj
•OJ O)
SI
Is
m
0<73
HEH
feSPn
&.fe
"3  COS GJ
2, * a
<. X 'JI
zz
H
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
1926-27.
1
$16.96
$439.59
$9.01
$20.56
$225.14
12.49
482.22
8.09
11.32
232.81
* 119.81
479.85
7.46
9.42
243.48
*116.77
467.52
6.01
11.93
211.11
♦103.53
479.75
8.97
8.09
189.92
* 105.21
501.57
9.51
14.81
173.22
$138.43
133.03
85.77
70.55
68.62
65.85
I
$57.79
66.89
13.70
25.78
6.62
33.96
I.
$421
472.17
441.26
288.86
392.08
426.23
I
$28.37
13.07
39.95
26.17
34.68
39.32
$72.06
28.46
65.76
33.05
19.31
12.36
$1,429.85
1,460.55
1,506.46
1,357.75
1,312.44
1,382.04
I
Depreciation. R 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
b
H
0
FM
o
«
o
a
<
on
—
<N
b-
CM
(M
©  CO  b-  rH  tr-  CO
©  © lo © © ri
co rH co »o cc Ci
ri
fc-   ©   ©   CO   Ci   rH
"£
i-i  ^ti   EM  ©  CO  CC
t-   CC   rH   ©   cTl   ©
>Ol ■ Cl  CO CO  M  CO
m-
^S     d
b-  CO   CO   r-l   IQ   ri
©  CO  OO  Cl  CO  CO
CO    Tfl    CM    CM    *#    ©
£¥■ S
O M ffl  H  N  itj
3 ^ o
©  iO  CD  CO  CO  I—
CO  IO  CO  b-  -<cfl  CM
fl   5
rH          r-i
l-H         |_J
CO CO H CO (M  O
rH  X  I—  Ol  tH  00
rH   rH    ©   00   ©   CO
a ^ i- oo t- co
15    oT3   G
'C  H1  ovj
CO  IO  Cl^ I-  b-  t-»
LO  Ci  X~ IO  In  00
m-
O  t-   ri   O   I'M
a zo co cd a a
o
ci tn b- cd b b
X   H   ©   ri   CM   IO
ri   X   ri   ©   ©   ©
O  H  H  CD  CC  IO
00  ©  Ci  CC  00 ©
ri
ft)
S-E              i»
X -^ b- © t> ©
t- t- co to CC ©
C-1  X  t-  tM   rH  CO
"3 S.3
X © CO o x b-
Ci © X t- ri IO
O «  CM  W  H   t-
ri  rH
(-<        l-H
oW
a -
© O  © X  IO  b-
H  CN  CM  b-  H  H
■s8'ri
©  X  b-  b-  X  "tf
©  ©  ©  ©  ©  oo
3 a a
CO  CC I-  O  M  CD
S3 *,£
CD  W  t» ID  lift  Tfl
fltf
CN  (M  H  ri   H  H
s
^£-
.
CO  ri  ri  IO  X  •*
b- b- b- © 01 b-
g«sc
tO  CN  ©  O  rH  CD
CC  tH  CO  ©  ri  em
a>.5?ft
N  Ift O  CO CM  CO
rH   -Hi   io   ri   ri   CO
r3'"'
<&r
Si
cCfgd
©  CD  b-  ri  CO  IO
b-   ©   rH   rH   ©   io
CO  Ci   Ci   Ci   rH   Ci
>bS
O  O  LQ  CO  H  O
©   M   Ci   CD   X   CO
riro^  ^
■H    _,    O
CO   M   rH   CM   rH   CO
m-
-ttf   tO   ©   tH   *fl   l-
cu SJ
ri   CO   ©   OS   ©   TfH
CO  (M   IO  ©  X  ri
eg*
OS1
rH   b-  -fl  CM  ©  CM
b-   LO   IO   CO   ©   rH
W
©  X  b-  CO  -fl  ©
tn
b-  CD  ri  C-1  CO  IO
El)
b- CM CJ> © ■■# ci
CO  I-  © Cl  ©  ri
ri
IO  I-  ri  Tfl  ri  X
ri
CO CO  Ci  CO  b-  rH
CC  Ci 01  O © rH
m-                ririri
OS CM  CD  >ft  O  CM
u
©  O  M   CO  ri  IO
ri
CM  X  Ci  C\   Ci  Ci
EM  M  ri  CO  X ©
fl
M  ri  X  X  ri  ri
CO  (M  ri  IO  CO  CO
£/^         CJ  CM   Cl  M
1-1
ri
<D
H
<N  CO  ri  IO  CO  b-
Cl CM  CM CM Ci Ci
1     1     1     1      I     1
ri  CM  CO  ri  IO  CD
M  CM  CM  CM   C-1  Ci
Ci  Ci  Ci Ci Ci  Ci'
-r-
I-
i—
r-
H
<
o
H
H
<
Ch
m
C=H
o
02
Hi
o
W
EH
>>i
©  ©  b-  b-  ©  ©
CO  X  b-  ri   ift ©
ri  r-!   ri  CM   CM  CM
£s
fit
©  O  ri   b-  LO  L—
«o
CO ri ■* CO CO CO
<*r
O&H
i?e
rH  Ci  CO  ©  C-1  ri
S a
X  CO  LO  CM  X CO
ri © t- ri co ri
ho
I- X ri  © CO X
ri  ©  ©  ©  Ci  ©
fcft,
"tC s
to io © lo ri ri
ojEg
X   LO   Tfl   tH   ri   ©
in e
© © CO I- CM IN
Cl  ©  ©  LO  ri  X
aiO
ri   ri   LO   CO   CO   CO
PS
ri  ri  ri  ri  ri  ri
&r
o
CC  rH  CM  b-  M  SM
0 Sf
©   CO   l-   rH   b-   X
■a s S
© a io © o ri
tr cj g
CO   ri   ©   IO   X   ©
b-  ©  ©  CO  Ci  rH
Eh a 9
ri" ri" CN  ©" CO  x"
t-  X  r-i  ©  ©  ©
3H
.  C-1  Cl  CO  CO  CN  CO
eh,
C*r
a     <S
© © o cp o ©
B„S
© © © o © ©
a S3
©©©©©©
© © © © © to
—     o
0
X ri  ©  CM tH CM
9 o>  .
3 u to
X  X  X  X  ©  CM
©  ©  iH  ©  b- ©
IO H  CO H  C5  H
ou as
©  ©  M   rH  © ri
M  b-  ri  CO  X  ©
s.gp-i
CO  IO  I-  X  CO CO
tH  -^  <©  ©  X  CD
H  ri  ri
Wr«=>
ee-
W4J
LO  X  ©  CO  1ft  IN
©   t--   ri   IO   b-   CM
8«h
CO  ©  X  b-  L-  ri
OSes
tried w
©  ©  IO  ©  ri   ri
CD  b-  b-  X  X  X
1-1
<n S
ri   ©   IO   rH   ©  ©
st;
©  ri  r-i  a   ©  ©
©"  ri*  t-   tH   ri   CO
< o    .
Ci  Ci  ©  Cl  CM  CM
ri  ri  CM  CM  CM  CM
h
"^
K'S'S
ca ei io r- im co
■g-S-s
ScSg
fl£_.-tj
X 1- Cl © x ©
CO  CO  ri  ri  CO  CO
ri
<u
tH
CM
0*
ri
tr;
•o
b-
CM  CM   CM  CM  CM  M
1      1      1      1      1      f
rH   CM   CO   ri   LO   ©
C-1  CM  Cl  Cl  CM  M
©  ©  © ©  Ol ©
*~
1-
r-
T-
T-
r- TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27.
R 21
Table E.—Showing Number of Days' Treatment given each Month.
Year.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Total
for Year.
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
1926-27
6,102
5,566
6,548
6,701
6,982
6,7S7
6,059
5,343
6,329
6,575
6,982
6,936
5,439
4,961
5,740
5,965
6.638
6,582
5,359
4,523
5,567
5,815
6,543
6,549
5,680
5,022
5,981
6,312
6,182
6,587
J
5,160
5,334
5,786
6,457
6,581
6,619
5,547
5,641
6',346
6,513
6,191
6,527
7,101
7,133
6,951
6,714
7,033
6,896
6,078
6,662
6,543
7,243
7,002
6,947
J_
6,405
5,809
6,086
7,061
6,554
7,093
6,600
6,703
7,304
7,382
6,686
7,383
7,269
6,592
7,319
7,027
6,458
7,003
69,365
70,978
75,819
80,753
81,775
81,422
Table P.—Showing Laundry-work Done.
Number of Pieces done from April 1st, 1921.
Year.
Flat-work.
Personal.
Total.
1921 22                               	
159,393
181,399
196,011
212,508
230,653
256,067
123,875
140,447
147,060
146,694
145,438
133,862
283,268
1922-23   	
321,846
1923-24                              .     ..                                	
343,071
359,202
1924-25	
1925-26	
1926-27 -	
376,091
389,929
Number of Pieces done during Year ended March 31st, 1927.
April	
May	
June.	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
January...	
February 	
March    	
Totals for year	
Average number of pieces per month
19,
20;
19
21,
19
21.
20,
21
23
21
21,
964
178
801
511
917
657
812
.953
502
718
059
995
250,067
11,193
11,573
11,137
9,297
11,081
10,727
10,353
13,357
10,995
11,832
10,393
11,024
133,862
11,15
31,157
31,751
30,938
30,808
30,998
32,384
31,165
35,310
34,497
33,550
31,452
35,919
389,929
:,494
Table G.—Showing Work completed by Patients in Occupational Therapy Classes
during Year ended March 31st, 1927.
Reed-work—
Trays—
Size 14 by 20   36
Size 18 by 10 (oval)  .'  28
Size 12 by 12 (round)   12
Size 9 by 12 (oval)   _  12
Size 10 by 10 (round)   12
Table-lamps _  44
Dresser-lamps  (small)     18
Lamp-shades  (drop) _  16
Sewing-baskets   18
Sewing-baskets  (floor)    4
Flower-vases   48
Flower-baskets  _  26
Pin-trays     62 Table G.—Showing Work completed by- Patients in Occupational Therapy'
Classes—Continued.
Pine-needle work—
Sewing-baskets     48
Trinket-baskets  (small)   _  28
Fruit-dishes    26
Flower-vases   18
Trays (round), 14 by 14  6
Woodwork—
Inlaid trays   4
Bed-trays  -  4
Picture-frames   68
Book-case   1
Card-tables  4
Clock-cases  _  10
Foot-stools     2
Cribbage-boartls   16
Bedside locker   2
Bead-work—
Necklaces     42
Bead-bags   82
Butterflies   98
Embroidery-work—
Table-runners     6
Table-centres   4
Passe-partout work—Passe partout frames  116
Note.—During the year 102 male patients and twenty-four female patients were able to
participate in and complete the above work.
FARM SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1927.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the operations of the Tranquille
Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1927.
The crops in all lines were particularly good, with the possible exception of the potaoto-crop,
and this, notwithstanding the care that was given in the selection of good seed and the preparation and fertilization of the soil, did not yield sis heavy a crop as might be expected. This
condition, however, was general throughout the community, and was doubtless due in most part
to the climatic conditions of this particular season. The alfalfa-crop wTas the best that we have
yet harvested; three crops were obtained in all fields and four crops on a large percentage of the
acreage. The season was very favourable to the growing of hay, and a larger acreage has been
put under alfalfa than ever before. The timothy-crop also was good, a very fine first crop, with
a very fair second crop, being obtained. A large number of garden vegetables were also produceEl
to supply the needs of the farm and the Sanatorium.
A survey of this farm shows a great variety of soil, varying from a light covering of silt,
with a subsoil of heavy gravel, to a heavy top soil of silt, or in other parts to a heavy gumbo soil.
This variety of soil composition makes it difficult to follow the regular rotation of crops, owing
to the limited amount of acreage which is suited for root and hoe crops. We are, however,
fortunate in having the manure from over 500 heatl of cattle, as well as the horses, to spread
upon this land.    This has always been done in a liberal manner, with good results.    It has been TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27. R 23
found that neither a very light soil nor a very heavy soil is suitable for corn, potatoes, or other
vegetables.
All the popular fodtler-plants have been tried out, including sunflower, corn, alfalfa, timothy,
bromus, Sudan grass, sorghums, millets, billion-tlollar grass, alsike, and clover, but it has been
found that corn for silage and alfalfa for hay and roughage give the best results, both with
respect to high tonnage yield and suitability for milk production.
An important factor in the production of this ranch is the bountiful supply of irrigation-
water. While there has always been a large amount of irrigation-water run down as a freshet,
we are at times very short of the necessary amount of water for irrigation in the latter part of
the season.
The dams which I mentioned in my last report have been 100 per cent, efficient in this respect
and have been in a large measure responsible for the three and four crops of alfalfa which have
during the past few years supplemented our hay-crop. The dam on Saul Lake has been a
wonderful success and has required no repairs whatever, nor does it look as if it ever will need
any repairs, so substantial does it seem at the present time. However, it may be necessary to
build this dam higher in order to secure a greater water-supply in years to come. I am sorry
to say that the dam at the Tranquille Lake has not been up to this standard. This was due in
a small measure to our inexperience in building the original dam, but in a larger measure to the
faultiness of the material which we were compelled to use in its construction. The consistency
of the Saul Lake dam was such that it absolutely withstood the action of the water, while the
character of the earthy material available at Tranquille Lake would suggest a volcanic ash which
was not impervious to the water, and the greatest difficulty has been experienced in withstanding
the eroding effect of the water. However, less than $25 in expenses was necessary to hold the
water-supply this year. It will be necessary, however, to put considerably more expense on the
Tranquille dam during the coming year in orEler to bring it up to the standard of requirements.
I am pleased to report that the dairy herd has kept up its production, exceeding the output
of last year by 26,000 lb. The appended list of R.O.P.'s wili give some idea of the individual
yields. It will be noticed that '■' Mercena Molley Hengerveld," " Alexandra Birdie May," and
" La Vata DeKol of Penticton " have sustainetl their previous reputations by protlucing respectively, 23,988 lb., 21,436 lb., and 19,629 lb. of milk, with butter yields of 996.25 lb., 903.75 lb., and
855 lb. " Alexandra Ormsby Birdie " produced 21,831.2 lb. of milk and 967.5 lb. of butter, while
" Alexandra Verona May " and " Excellency Hengerveld Echo " will finish their test in a month
or two with well over 21,000 lb. of milk.
While no apology is necessary regarding the production of this herd, we feel that higher-
quality sires should be purchased in the future in order to sustain this average production and
at the same time build up the conformation and quality of each individual in the herd. The
value of the sire cannot be too strongly emphasized and the purchase price should not interfere
with the selection of a suitable sire. As will be readily seen, the purchase price is a small item
when distributed over the calf-crop of a number of years. The purchase of one poor sire will
undermine the work of many years of upbuilding. Attention to milk production has always been
given first place in this herd, with gratifying results, but some attention must be paid in the
future to type. When type and production are combined in the same individual, it, of course,
means greatly increasetl value. It will be necessary to purchase a sire of this description during
the coming year.
This dairy herd is tested regularly twice a year for tuberculosis and no reactor has been
found for many years. The general health of this herd has also been better than last year and
very few losses have been sustained. While speaking of the health of the herd I would like to
mention that the northerly end of the barn is very much exposed to cold wind coming from the
north-west; this wind hits the animals in that part of the barn during the cleaning-out of the
building, and I would suggest that a shed be erected during the coming year which will be
sufficiently large to enclose the manure-spreader, and thus protect the cattle from these cold
blasts. I might state here that three calves kept in this part of the barn last winter contracted
pneumonia and died.    I attribute the cause to this exposure.
The beef cattle are showing steady improvement in type, due in part to the introduction of
a few pure-bred females and in a greater extent to the use of better bulls. In past years great
difficulty has been experienced by stray, non-descript bulls running at large upon the open R 24 . BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ranges. This difficulty has largely been eliminated, so that our own good bulls have been
allowed to show the results. The herd has been increased during the year from 341 head to 416.
The range cattle have been given better attention in the matter of feed during the winter
months; their ordinary roughage having been supplemented with silage. The animals which
have been selected for beef to supply the Sanatorium have also been placed in feed lots and fed
on grain rations for several months before slaughtering. This has resulted in beef of first quality
being supplied to the institution at all times.
For many years a small flock of sheep has been kept on the farm, but were never allowed
to go upon the open ranges. As it was difficult to keep this flock upon the farm, and it was not
large enough to supply the entire needs of the Sanatorium, we decided last spring to purchase
an addition to the flock and to run them all upon the ranges, with a herder in charge. This was
done and 217 ewes were purchased from the Prairies. The lamb-crop was a real success,
resulting in a 115-per-cent. crop. As the season advanced, however, we found that the greatest
care had to be exercised in selecting feeding-grounds where water was of more easy access than
was necessary for the cattle. We also found that a very poisonous weed (Astragulus cam-
pestris) was prevalent upon our ranges, and this affected our sheep, causing a slow poisoning.
The sheep also interfered with the feeding-grounds of the cattle and required much more attention than could be conveniently given them on a mixed farm. We saw an opportunity in the late
fall of disposing of them at a small profit over the purchase price and operating expense for the
season, and with the experience we had gleaned during the summer months we felt it to be the
wiser course to dispose of them while the opportunity offered.
The swine, always a profitable department of the ranch, gave us this year better returns
than ever before. No difficulties or diseases of any kind affected the herd this year. Our breeding stock have been mostly pure-bred Berkshires, but little attention has been paid to the sale
of pure-bred stock, as we have found the raising of pigs for the general market equally
profitable. We are able at all times to supply the needs of the institution, besides selling a very
large surplus elsewhere.
For the past three years turkeys have been raised on the ranch to supply our home needs.
Very little expensive accommodation has so far been given them, and as a result they have
proved fairly profitable. The one drawback in the raising of turkeys is the great difficulty in
obtaining labour with sufficient experience to handle them properly.
With a large number and variety of stock, such as we have on this ranch, we have always
experienced trouble in segregating them into the necessary groups at different seasons of the
year, especially in the fall, when we are rounding up and weaning the calves and selecting the
beef for winter feeding. In order to obviate this difficulty we have constructed several new
paddocks close to the farm buildings. These are doing good service and are filling a long-felt
want. A little more work has been done on the grounds than ever before; more should be done,
but money has not been available for that purpose in the past. As the grounds of the
Sanatorium are improving every year, and as the ranch-grounds adjoin them, I think that it
would be advisable to include a sum of money in our estimates for the purpose of bringing
up these grounds to the standard which would be more in keeping with the immediate surroundings.
The beef-barn, 180 feet long and divided into two parts, with adjoining paddocks, was constructed during the year. One part of this building affords excellent accommodation for the
beef cattle selected from the ranges for home consumption. The other part proved valuable for
the feeding of the weaned calves, approximately 100 in number.
In conclusion, I wish to thank you for the valuable co-operation afforded me in my work,
and to the Department for all assistance given during the past year.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
D. W. Strachan,
Farm Superintendent. MOUNT MARA, OVERLOOKING TRANQUILLE.
■ ALEXANDRA OIEMSBY BIRDJE." RECORD .TUNIOR FOUR-YEAR-OLD.      MILK, 21,831  LB. ;   BIT-
tteie. 967.5 lb.  LIST OF RECORD OF PERFORMANCES PRODUCED BY THE TRANQUILLE
SANATORIUM FARM HERD FOR THE YEAR 1926-27.
Milk Production. Butter.
Name. Lb.                         Lb.
Mercena Molley Hengerveld  23,988 996.25
La Vara DeKol of Penticton  19,629 855.00
Alexandra Birdie May  21,436 903.75
Inka Darkness Hengerveld  17,679 775.00
Juliana  Korndyke  DeKol  17,136 780.00
Miua  Posch Pontine  16,125 737.50
Stella Korndyke Butter Girl  16,628 716.25
Excellency Hengerveld Echo  15,522 657.50
Fairy Sylvia Echo  15,125 631.25
Johanna DeKol Princess  15,627 692.50
Brema DeKol Korndyke  15,246 648.75
Hengerveld  Pontine  Countess  14,280 708.85
Alexandra Betty Waldorf  14,197 575.00
UneeEla Peach DeKol  14,418 575.00
Lady DeKol Clinker  14,529 700.00
Easter Belle DeKol  14,908 792.50
Alexandra Tranquille Korndyke  13,1,58 608.75
Brema Pontiac Hengerveld  13,121 535.00
Alexandra Queen Hengerveld  13,219 633.75
Johanna Butter Girl Pontiac  13,602 583.75
SANATORIUM FARM REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1927.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheet with the Profit and Loss
Accounts for the Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1927.
You will note that the farm again shows a profit on its operating account.
During the year the farm has supplied the Sanatorium with 616,259 lb. of milk, 3,958 lb. of
pork, 35,550 lb. of beef, 66,500 lb. of potatoes, 2,944 lb. mutton, and 489 lb. of turkey.
I have, etc.,
A. Whitecross,
j..."        ,   Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1927.
Assets.
Building and improvements      $101,869.43
Equipment _ 4,463.97
Land Account          70,405.88
Accounts receivable   2,256.35
Dam Account  - 421.72
1). W. Strachan (petty cash advance)  1,000.00
Inventories (live stock)— ,
Dairy herd   $16,605.00
Bulls  _  475.00
Range stock      16,915.00
Swine        4,882.00
Horses         6,980.00
Poultry  36S.50
         46,225.50
Carried forward      $226,642.85 Balance-sheet—Continued.
Assets—Continued.
Brought forward  ...    $226,642.85
Motor-vehicles  500.00
Unissued stores—
Wool         $470.05
Potatoes -         100.00
Coal           456.00
Ice  _ :         300.00
Feed        S.567.00
  9,893.05
Machinery and plant   3,654.40
Tools .:  812.47
Harness  -  645.00
Canadian Bank of Commerce (Trading Account)  1,500.12
Deficit    4,524.03
$248,172.52
Liabilities.
D. W. Strachan (petty cash advance)   $1,000.00
D. W. Strachan (Stock Trading Account)   _  1.500.00
Capital   245,672.52
2
$248,172.5:
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
_.    „, Receipts.
Profit on—
Live stock   $11,519.95
Hide-sales   116.96
Board Account   38.00
Sanatorium Account  (farm produce)        27,688.85
Milk-sales, sundry _  8.55
Teaming     3.50
 $39,355.81
„ ,    . Expenditure.
Salaries— '
Farm Superintendent   $2,400.00
Book-keeper  855.86
Sundry employees   11,057.06
Feed Account   7,572.78
Fuel, light, and water   1,539.84
Provisions  -  3,115.21
Blacksmith's supplies   713.55
Seeds and fruit-boxes   431.32
Drugs and veterinary   186.00
Implements and harness   1,787.53
Incidentals and contingencies   8,373.55
        3S.032.70
Profit on Operating Account         $1,323.11
Less depreciation—
On automobile         $115.15
On equipment   470.04
On farm buildings       5,261.95
  5,847.14
Balance, being deficit for year         $4,524.03 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27. R 27
Dairy Cattle—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Milk supplied to Sanatorium, 564,670 lb  $20,423.30
Milk supplied to boarding-house, 18,680 lb  747.60
Sundry sales  -  36.75
Manure produced, 358 tons   545.50
Beef sold, 800 lb _         112.00
Inventory, feed, 1926-27        1,887.38
Inventory, live stock, 1926-27      17,080.00
 $40,832.53
Expenditure.
Inventory, live stock, 1925-26  $16,470.00
Inventory, feed, 1925-26   2,782.50
Wages     3,631.61
Board of employees   1,800.00
Equipment  28.96
Hay, 400,000 lb _  4,000.00
Oats    2,443.73
Bran   427.50
Green feed, 765,000 lb ;  1,912.50
Salt -  49.50
Barley    67.38
Mangels   131.00
Silage, 442,500 lb .-  1,106.25
Meal, etc _ '. '  130.75
Laundry   81.91
Drugs and veterinary   200.76
Horse-labour, 320 days at $3.50  _  1,120.00
Sundries    71.13
        36,455.48
Profit, 1926-27          $4,377.05
Dairy Herd—Production and Costs Account, March 31st, 1927.
Dairy herd—
Salaries      $3,631.61
Board of employees  _       1,800.00
Feed        9,162.36
Sundry expenses   382.76
Silage, 442,500 lb ,       1,106.25
Horse-labour, 320 days at $3.50       1,120.00
      $17,202.98
Less allowance for manure   545.50
$16,657.48
March 31st, 1926, inventory feed   2,782.50
Total cost of milk  C       $19,439.98
Milk production for year, 616,259 lb.    Average cost of production, 31.54 cents per gallon. R 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Milk Production, March 31st, 1927.
1926.                                                                    Milk, Lb. 1926.                                                                    Milk, Lb.
April  41,168.4 December   52,747.5
May  44,636.6 1927.
June .-.  46,140.3 January   58,085.8
July   51,114.3 February  .,  46,482.5
August   49,201.1 March  58,932.0
September   57,450.5 	
October    57,154.5 616,259.0
November   53,145.5 ==*=*
Swine—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Pork sold to Sanatorium, 3,958 lb  $512.67
Pork supplied to boarding-house, 796 lb  147.26
Boar sold  30.00
Hogs sold   3,203.34
Inventory, feeEl, 1927  _  662.00
Inventory, live stock, 1927   4,852.00
Expenditure.
Salaries   $365.58
Board of employees   240.00
Boars purchased   94.63
Feed for stock  _  1,621.82
Inventory, 1926  '  2,394.00
$9,407.27
4,716.03
Profit. 1926-27          $4,691.24
Range Stock—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Beef sold to Sanatorium, 35,550 lb  $4,482.75
Beef supplied to boarding-house, 5,941 lb  831.74
Hides sold   210.01
Cattle sold   485.00
Manure allowance, 175 tons   262.50
Inventory, March, 1927   16,915.00
Inventory, feed, March, 1927   267.62
       $23,454.62
Expenditure.
inventory, 1927   $14,125.00
Bulls purchased  1,265.00
Beef cattle purchased  '. : 2,668.42
Leased ranges  _  361.03
Silage, 57,500 lb  143.75
Sundry expenses   123.80
Hay' (swamp), 451,000 lb  1,578.50
Hay (alfalfa), 70,000 lb  700.00
Mill-feed, 25,000 lb  400.00
Wages    ,  527.53
        21,893.03
Profit, 1926-27         $1,561.59   TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27. R 29
Poultry Department—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Poultry sold to Sanatorium, 489 lb ■.  $415.59
Eggs supplied to boarding-house, 400 dozen   124.00
Sundry sales   188.62
Inventory, March, 1927  368.50
$1,096.71
Expenditure.
Inventory, March, 192(3—
Hens        $162.50
Turkeys  -  157.50
  $320.00
Wages     163.88
Board of employee     120.00
Feed  -.  217.25
Sundry expenses   2.80
  823.93
Profit, 1926-27   $272.78
Sheep Department—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Sales—■
Mutton sold to Sanatorium, 2,944 lb  $675.07
Sheep pelts sold  21.96
Sheep sold  (Essondale)    2,300.00
Sheep sold (sundry sales)   1,800.00
Rams sold (3)   60.00
Inventory, 1927—
Wool, 1,923 lb  470.65
Sheep-dog   30.00
        $5,357.68
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1926   $4,410.00
Salaries   328.63
Board of herder  75.00
Pasture   (rent)     18.20
Hay, 22,000 lb  220.00
Sundries     69.05
  5,120.88
Profit, 1926-27   $236.80
Orchard—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Apples supplied to boarding-house, 100 boxes       $100.00
Apples sold to Sanatorium, 95 boxes  95.00
  $195.00
Expenditure.
Materials, boxes, etc         $61.63
Pruning and packing  _  26.04
Inventory, 1926   30.00
  117.67
Profit, 1926-27   $77.33 R 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Root yield, as sold to Sanatorium—
Corn, 275 doz.; vegetable marrow, 3,955 lb.; carrots, 1,635 lb.;
pumpkin, 1;075 lb.; turnip, 812 lb.; beets, 3,270 lb.; spinach,
750 lb.; peas, 120 lb.; radishes, 182 lb.; onion, 1,690 lb.; onions
(green), 80 doz.;   tomatoes, 2,280 lb.;   beans, 65 lb.;   cucumber,
28 doz.;  parsnip, 210 lb        $445.25
Vegetables supplied to boarding-house          182.50
  $627.75
Expenditure.
Seeds and vegetables   $87.30
Plants _  15.00
Teaming     8.75
Wages     344.79
  455.84
Profit, 1926-27   $171.91
Crop Department (Ice)—Profit and Loss Account, Makcii 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Inventory, March, 1927—Ice, 50 tons   $300.00
Expenditure.
Wages    _         $41.17
Teaming and trucking  44.72
  85.89
Profit, 1926-27   $214.11
Crop Department (Potatoes)—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Potatoes sold to Sanatorium, 66,500 lb     $1,032.25
Potatoes supplied to boarding-house, 13,500 lb         168.75
Inventory, 4 tons, March, 1927   100.00
         $1,301.00
Expenditure.
Inventory, March, 1926         $700.00
Wages            225.96
Seed   62.00
Weeding, ploughing, etc         176.15
  1,164.11
Profit, 1926-27   $135.89
Ensilage—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Supplied to cattle, 250 tons      $1,250.00
Inventory, 150 tons, March, 1927         750.00
        $2,000.00
Expenditure.
Wages           $452.16
Board of employees  -         420.00
Seed, corn   5.25
Seed, oats and peas   55.00
Inventory, March, 1926  :         625.00
  1,557.41
Profit, 1926-27   $442.59 TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM, 1926-27. R 31
Hay Department—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Hay (alfalfa), beef cattle, 70,000 lb  $700.00
Hay (swamp), beef cattle, 451,000 lb  1,578.50
Hay (alfalfa), horses, 320,000 lb  3,200.00
Hay (alfalfa), sheep, 22,000 lb  220.00
Hay (alfalfa), dairy, 400,000 lb  4,000.00
Green feed, dairy, 765,000 lb  1,912.50
Sundry sales   _ .-.  76.00
Inventory, 1927, 450,000 lb  4,500.00
       $16,187.00
Expenditure.
Inventory,  hay  $3,640.00
Irrigation, wages  -  897.20
Labour, cleaning ditches, etc  373.29
Board, irrigator   90.00
Board, labourers   889.34
Sundry expenses  201.76
  6,091.59
Profit, 1926-27        $10,095.41
Grounds—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
To Expenses—
Wages    _ $360.85
Board of employees  360.00-
Rose-bushes     4.75
Plants _ 3.30
Loss, 1926-27   $728.90
Fuel, Light, and Water—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Receipts.
Sundry sales  _  $44.68
Inventory, 1927   456.00
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1926   $240.00
Salaries   36.45
Salary   (electrician)  148.49
Water fees   25.48
Coal, 86% tons   1,038.79
Sundry expenses  _  487.85
$500.68
1,977.06
Loss, 1926-27  '.         $1,476.38
Fencing—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
To Material  c  $808.46
Wages  -  239.28
Board, employee  150.00
Loss, 1926-27  _         $1,197.74 R 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Range Horse—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
By Sale of 3 horses   $45.00
Sale of ■' Victory Boy "   175.00
Inventory, 1927  _  6,980.00
$7,200.00
Automobiles and Motor Machinery—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
To Equipment        $150.00
General expenses   45.80
Gasoline and oil, 1,695 gallons   504.07
Repairs to motors, etc         588.78
Depreciation, automobiles  _         150.00
Inventory,  1926   615.15
 ,         $2,053.80
Inventory, 1927  500.00
Loss, 1926-27  - .'         $1,553.80
Blacksmithing—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Expenditure.
Coal     $16.00
Acetylene     55.39
Wages  200.37
Loss, 1926-27   $271.70
Machinery, Harness, and Tools—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1927.
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1926—.
Harness  $622.50
Machinery, etc.   2,673.50
Tools   419.35
New equipment   890.62
Depreciation   470.04
 $5,076.01
Receipts.
Inventory, 1927—
Harness     $645.00
Machinery, etc  3,500.50
Tools     812.47
—  4,957.97
Loss, 1926-27   $118.04
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Chabi.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
192S.
525-128-410

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0300571/manifest

Comment

Related Items