Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1929]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0300570.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0300570.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0300570-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0300570-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0300570-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0300570-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0300570-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0300570-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0300570-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0300570.ris

Full Text

 TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF  THE
PBOVINCIAL  INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOE BOYS
OP   THE   PROVINCE   OP
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1927, TO MAECH 31ST, 1928
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1928.  o
o  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  present  the  Twenty-fourth  Annual  Report  of  the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1928.
T. D. PATTULLO,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June, 1928. Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C., June 2nd, 1928.
The Honourable T. D. Pattullo,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1927, to March 31st, 1928.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. T. D. Pattullo, Provincial Secretary.
J. L. White, Esq., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Brankin, David B., Superintendent. Brankin, Mrs. M., Matron.
Hughes, R., Assistant Superintendent.
Sparrow, Miss M., Stenographer and Book-keeper.
Holland, Miss A., Assistant Supervisor and Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborne, J., Shoemaker Instructor.
Stewart, D. R., Carpenter Instructor.
Jose, C, Farm Instructor.       Scott, W. J., Plumber and Engineer.       Holrotd, H., Poultryman.
Mutrie, Miss Jean, Senior Teacher. Mutrie, Miss E., Junior Teacher.
Brakes, Wm. H., Male School-teacher. Trerise, W. J., Night-watchman.  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL EEPOET.
The Hon. T. D. Pattullo,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting to you the Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, B.C., covering our activities for the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1928.
OUR DIFFICULTIES.
It is somewhat difficult to get the average man in the street to realize what it means to
have a group of about 200 boys assembled together, not as eager pupils in a school of their choice,
but who have been forcibly taken from their former evil associations and sentenced to remain in
a home of correction for a long uncertain period, in order to be made over into the best possible
citizen. In many of these boys the ordinary courtesies of life are absent; amongst them
interesting difference of personality exists; deeply rooted vices to be reckoned with; a dislike
for authority is soon evidenced; clever deception and lying is freely resorted to at first, as
though it were second nature; the love of stealing remains a long while with some; steady
work appears to them as an enemy, judged by the amount of persistent oversight required on any
little job. A perverted knowledge of sex affairs is so common that a young boy of reasonably
innocent mind is hard to find. The cruel and bullying type is more common than is supposed;
then there is a sprinkling of those social problems whose physical or mental conditions makes
them misfits in the world, and their stay with us is very uncertain in its duration. It certainly
falls to the lot of few people in pursuit of their life's calling to be brought into intimate association with such a group of boys for twenty-four hours every day the year round. This comes
only to the institutional workers, whose task is very little known and often, I am afraid, their
contributions to the public cause are much undervalued; their work does, however, carry with
it a peculiar charm, that is also a challenge to receive boys just as they are and endeavour to
give them the training and example they have needed but did not get outside the school. One of
the first things we try to impress upon a new boy is that work is honourable and that no one
able to earn his own living has a right to sponge upon others. We accordingly lay out for every
boy a busy, useful programme of work, with a reasonable amount of time appointed for recreation ; this and being well-nourished, comfortably clad, well-housed, observing regular hours,
living under kindly but firm restraint, with home-like environment, produces a response from
many that is very pleasing indeed. A few do not appreciate these things and are for ever
looking for an opportunity to escape and take others with them; experience has, however,
taught us that this disturbing element is largely confined to boys who have been fooled with
too long by unwise sympathizers and foolish parents, or those who have the mistaken notion that
they are tough and hard-boiled, which indicates that boys of tender years are more amenable to
a form of discipline than those who are older.
IS IT WORTH WHILE?
This is a question often put to me by visitors and friends, and my reply is, " Yes, undoubtedly " ; and if it were permissible to cite cases or give names of our successes, it would make
very interesting reading. Unfortunately, we have had a few complete failures and some of our
old boys are to-day in either the Prison Farm or the Penitentiary; but, if the truth must be
told, the fault was not altogether theirs, broken home conditions and scarcity of employment
being contributing factors, coupled with the influence arising from the pernicious doctrine that
the world owes every man a living and that it is not necessary to recognize the law of exchange
to get through life.
In the statistical data which follows under the various vocational department activities, it
will be readily seen that we have at the present time at Biscoq a very efficient and loyal staff
of instructors, the majority of them having been with us several years. This also includes our
old and tried cottage attendants, who have at times a difficult task to perform and mostly behind
the scenes.    It is very true that the training of young life is not one person's work, and most O 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
efficient is that institution where each officer works loyally with those in charge, and who looks
upon his position as an opportunity to better serve his country and the less fortunate youths
of to-day.
POPULATION OF THE SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1928.
On roll, March 31st, 1927   130
Boys admitted during year, March 31st, 1927, to March 31st, 1928      85
215
Deaths during the year     2
Releases during the year  62
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm      2
—   66
Total in school, March 31st, 1928  149
This constitutes a record in new admissions and of boys who have previously passed through
our Juvenile Courts and other reforming agencies.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1928.
No.
741
754
75'5
764
778
796
S02
808
812
813
814
816
826
827
828
833
833
837
838
841
843
844
846
847
849
850
851
852
853
854
855
856
857
860
S'61
862
863
Place of Birth.
Nanaimo, B.C	
West Summerland, B.C
West Summerland, B.C
Vernon, B.C	
Teline, B.C	
England	
Penticton, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Montana, U.S.A	
Montana, U.S.A	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Regina, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Russia	
Vancouver, B.C	
Wales	
Vancouver, B.C	
Surrey, England	
Vancouver, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Warwickshire, England
New Westminster, B.C..
Toronto, Ont	
Grand Forks, B.C	
Regina,  Sask	
Edmonton, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Port Moody, B.C...:	
London, England	
Vernon, B.C	
Edmonton, Alta	
Burnaby, B.C	
Dundee, Scotland	
Belfast, Ireland	
Portland, Ore., U.S.A....
Winnipeg, Man	
Grand Forks, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Parentage.
English	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
English	
English	
Indian	
Canadian-American
Canadian	
American	
American	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Italian	
Russian	
Canadian-Irish	
Welsh	
Canadian-American
English	
Irish	
Scotch-Irish	
English	
Canadian-Irish	
Scotch-Canadian	
American	
Canadian	
English-Irish	
Canadian	
American	
English	
English	
Canadian	
English	
Scotch-English	
English-Irish	
American	
Canadian-English...
Austrian	
French-Canadian....
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School in
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Years.
Years.
11
11
10
10
11
11
10
10
12
12
11
11
18
IS
14
14
14%
17
6
6
6
6
10
10
3
11
14
14
5 mos.
15%
14
14
7
14
14
14
!5
5
12
12
15
15
15
15
13
13
6
12
13
13
■5
15
2
15
13
13
9
9
13
13
15
15
12
12
12
12
8
8
14
14
8
13
15
13
13
13 LIST OF BOYS IN
SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1928—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
.   being admitted to
School in
British
Columbia.
Canada.
864
Welsh                          	
Years.
1%
12
12
10
4
7
11
13
15
2
16
17
14
8
11
16
16
3%
13
15
3
14
16
8
16
15
14%
14
13
17
14
17
14
8
17
3
3  mos.
6
8
13
13
16
3
3
13
7
12
13
12
11
16
12
12
17
12
10
9
14
S
Years.
2
865
12
866
Kilgard, B.C	
12
86'7
10
869
Scotch                  ...                            	
870
7
871
11
872
English                                 	
13
873
Dutch-Scotch                                  	
15
874
15
875
North Dakota, U.S.A	
15
877
16
878
Scotch	
17
879
Kincolith, B.C	
14
S80
8
881
11
883
16
884
16
886
Scotch                                               	
11
887
13
888
Penticton, B.C	
15
889
13
890
16
891
Scotch
16
89'2
18
893
Welsh
16
895
Quarter-breed	
Scotch
15
896
14%
14
897
Scotch    .
898
Vancouver, B.C	
13
899
17
900
16
901
17
902
14
904
Everett, Wash., U.S.A	
8
905
17
906
Seattle, Wash., U.S.A	
007
17
909
6
910
8
911
13
912
13
913
Chilliwack, B.C	
16
914
Drumheller,  Alta	
15
915
18
916
Vancouver, B.C	
13
917
England	
Scotch	
7
918
Kitchener, Ont	
IJuck Creek, B.C	
French-Canadian	
13
919
13
920
Point Grev, B.C	
12
921
Victoria, B.C	
11
9'22
Lillooet, B.C	
16
923
Vancouver, B.C	
14
924
12
92'5
Kaslo, B.C	
Nelson, B.C	
Canadian     ..
17
926
13
11
10
14
15
927
92S
Nelson, B.C	
929
930
Ottawa, Ont	 O 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN
SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1928—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School in
British
Columbia.
Canada.
931
Victoria, B.C	
French-Belgian	
Years.
13
6
11
14
15
14
2
14
14
16
1
'8
9
15
6
13
15
8
8
16
15
13
4
16
16
1
1
17
as
17
12
11
13
6
11
2
1%
6
17
16
7 mos.
11
9%
15
15
10
15
7
13
Years.
13
6
932
Ladner, B.C ;	
933
Ottawa, Ont	
Scotch
16
934
16%
15
935
Nanaimo, B.C	
936
Burnaby, B.C	
14
937
938
South Vancouver, B.C	
14
939
Vernon, B.C	
14
940
16
941
Walla Walla, Wash., U.S.A	
Glasgow, Scotland	
1
943
8
944
Winnipeg, Man	
14
945
Kossland, B.C	
946
Vancouver, B.C	
15
947
Winnipeg, Man	
15
948
Port Coquitlam, B.C	
13
949
15
950
Glasgow, Scotland	
Scotch
8
951
Youngstown, Sask	
13
952
Stuart Lake, B.C	
16
953
Grand Forks, B.C	
1'5
955
Prince Rupert, B.C	
13
956
15
957
Hazelton, B.C	
16
958
Metlakatla, B.C	
16
959
Russian	
13
960
Klezkowsko, Sask	
17
961
Vancouver, B.C	
17
962
15
9'63
Calgary, Alta	
17
964
12
963
11
966
13
967
VVelland, Ont	
14
968
Polish                                      	
14
969
16
970
971
Glasgow, Scotland	
1%
6
972
Indian	
17
973
16
974
7 mos.
975
11
976
16
977
Victoria, B.C	
Scotch    	
15
978
15
979
Irish-English	
16
980
Vancouver, B.C	
15
9S1
17
982
Armstrong, B.C	
13
Total number of boys, 149.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
Canadian   (both)     27
Canadian-American      3
Canadian-Scotch      3
Canadian-French        I
Canadian-Austrian      1
Scotch-Irish   5
English-Irish   4
Quarter-breed  5
Icelander (both)   1
Chinese (both)    1 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1927-28.
O 11
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS—Continued.
Canadian-English 	
Canadian-South American
Canadian-German	
Canadian-Swede 	
Canadian-Irish  	
English  (both)  	
American   (both)  	
Italian (both) 	
Scotch-English	
Russian (both) 	
Austrian (both) 	
Irish (both)	
Scotch (both) 	
Welsh (both) 	
4 French-Scotch    1
1 Polish-Roumanian     3
1 Scotch-American   1
1 French-Belgian    1
6 Irish-Swede   1
20 Japanese (both)   1
13 Luthanian (both)   1
3 French (both)   1
2 Norwegian  (both)    1
5 Dutch-Scotch   1
1 Serbian (both)   2
2 Half-breed-Indian  1
11 American-Half-breed   1
3 Polish  1
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
British Columbia   83
Alberta     15.
Saskatchewan   10
Manitoba  5
Ontario    7
Scotland    8
Wales  1
United States  10
England     7
Ireland        1
China      1
Russia      1
Total 149
It will be seen from the above that 47 of the parents and 120 of the boys are Canadian-born.
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Theft   92
Incorrigibility    20
B.E. & S  24
Receiving       2
Trespassing on railway property..    1
Vagrancy     2
Assault       6
Violation of " Railway Act "      1
Total 149
LENGTH OF SENTENCES.
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 1908  60
1 year     1
2 years   59
3 years     7
5 years     1
Indef. and undef  20
Total :i49
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
New Westminster   12
Vancouver  53
North Vancouver     5
South Vancouver _    ,9
Burnaby       4
Port Haney      1
Nanaimo      3
Fort St. James      1
Maple Ridge     1
Port Coquitlam      3
Victoria   15
Cranbrook     3
Abbotsford      1
Prince Rupert      6
Smithers      2
Burns Lake      1
Ladner    1
Chilliwack     2
Point Grey   2
Vernon     1
Powell River   1
Penticton  2
Oliver  1
Grand Forks   3
Sumas    2
Summerland  2
Kamloops    3
Lillooet    1
Cumberland   1
Kootenay  5
North Bend  1
Hazelmere     1
Total  149 O 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
10 years  1    17 years  22
11 years ......'..  2    18 years  10
12 years ...:....  8    19 years :  8
13 years  17    20 years  2
14 years  24 —
15 years  27 Total  149
16 years '.  28
Average age of boys, 15 years.
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholic   28 Russian Church      1
Methodist   19 Christian Science      2
Presbyterian  28 Lutheran     1
Church of England  23 Salvation Army     4
Baptist  12 Seventh Day Adventist     2
Greek Catholic    4 Pyramid Temple      2
Chinese Mission     1 	
Doukhobor      1 Total  149
United Church  21
MEDICAL AND DENTAL REPORTS
The following reports of our Medical Officer, Dr. Stanley Paulin, M.D., and our Dental
Surgeon, Dr. Emery Jones, D.D.S., show that every effort is put forward to remove the physical
handicap of every boy.
Medical Report.
" Sir,—The following is my medical report for the year ended March Slst, 1928:—
" The health of most of the boys during the past year has been very good. There have been
no epidemics. However, in June and July, 1927, a case of diphtheria developed, from whom
three other contacts proved positive on examination of throat-swabs. Later in the year a fifth
case developed. All were taken to the infectious-diseases ward of the Vancouver General
Hospital, where they were kept till free from infection.
" I have to report the death, from tuberculosis, of the Indian boy mentioned in last year's
report. He was in the hospital for a considerable time before his death at that institution.
One other Indian boy, with gland tuberculosis and lung involvement also, was released from
the school for that reason. The diabetes case was carried over into this year and was in
hospital on several occasions.
" Admissions to the General Hospital were for the following conditions : Tuberculous glands
of the neck, 4; removal of tonsils and adenoids, 6; circumcision, 2; inguinal hernia, 1; abscess
of shoulder, 1;  diphtheria, 5 ;  gonorrhoea, 2 ;  diabetes, 1.
" The following conditions not requiring hospitalization were noted as well:  Rheumatism, 4;
rheumatic endocarditis,  1   (included in previous condition);   conjunctivitis, 2;   impetigo, 2;
. otitis media, 2; pleurisy, 1; hematuria, 1; balanitis, 1;  acute flat feet, 1;  Schlatter's disease,
1; sprained knee, 3 ; traumatic synovitis of knee, 3 ; dislocated toe, 1; crushed toe, 1;  fractured
finger, 1;  severe cut of thumb, 1.
" The medical examination of the 85 new boys admitted disclosed the following defects :
Valvular heart-murmurs, 3; enlarged tonsils, 9; defective sight, 4; blepharitis, 1; impaired
hearing, 2; marked subnormality, 3; marked undernourishment, 1; slight varicocele, 1;
hydrocele, 1;  phismosis, 1;  scabies, 3.
"(Signed)    Stanley Paulin."
Dental Report.
" During the past year I have found it necessary to remove 59 abscessed or badly diseased
teeth. I have administered local anaesthetic 73 times for the relief of pain; have examined and
made dental charts of the mouths of 62 of the boys; inserted 68 fillings and 32 pulp caps; and
treated 9 cases for preventing caries.
" Respectfully submitted.
"(Signed)    Emery Jones, D.D.S." AUDITORIUM   AND  ELOWER-GARDEN  AT  BISCOQ.
SWIMMING-POOL  AT  BISCOQ.  REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1927-28. O 13
EDUCATIONAL.
Division I. Report.
" The following table shows the movement of pupils in the senior room for the year ended
March 31st, 1928.
" Pupils on register, April 1st, 1927   24
Pupils admitted during year  12
Pupils promoted from Division II     8
Pupils discharged (this includes pupils who were put to a trade and those
who were sent home)    13
Pupils transferred to Division III  12
Total number of pupils on register, March 31st, 1928  19
" The policy of segregating the older boys in a separate room, which was instituted in
October, 1927, has proved very beneficial to the work in all grades. Under the old arrangement
some of the more hardened older, boys were at times a disturbing factor and set a bad example
for the younger pupils. I have always found that, in normal cases, the younger the boy the
better the results that could be obtained, and now that I am in a position to give each of the
younger boys more individual attention the result has been most gratifying. They are more
attentive in their work and more amenable to discipline. It must be remembered that these
boys differ considerably, as a class, from those attending an ordinary public school. In nearly
every case their attendance at school, prior to admission, was intermittent at the best, and
though many of them have good natural ability, they are for some time too sullen and suspicious
to exercise it.    All this must be overcome before any real progress can be made with them.
" Discipline has been well maintained and good progress made in most subjects.
"(Signed)    Jean Mutrie."
Division II. Report.
" The following table shows the movement of the pupils of the Junior Division for the year
ended March 31st, 1928:—
" Pupils on register, March 31st, 1927   31
Pupils sent home   3
Pupils sent to trades   4
Pupils promoted to Division 1  9
Pupils promoted to Division III  2
New pupils admitted   15
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1928   28
" Since the removal of the older boys from this division there has been a notable change in
the attitude of the younger boys towards their work, and I am glad to report a marked improvement in the tone of the rooms.
" Many of the pupils admitted to the junior grades are subnormal, or have been attending
special classes; therefore the progress in this division is somewhat retarded. These subnormal
cases demand an amount of time and effort altogether out of proportion to any results that can.
be obtained from them, and constantly distract the attention of the other boys. Apart from
these, the boys have been making satisfactory progress.
"(Signed)    Edythe L. Mutrie."
Division III. Report.
" This class was organized during the latter part of October, 1927. The initial enrolment
of twenty-three consisted partly of boys transferred from Division I. and partly of boys not
previously attending school in this institution.
" During the year six new boys were added to the class and four boys were released and
sent to their homes.    This left an attendance of twenty-five at the end of the year.
" Eight pupils have been in school half-time only. During one-half of each day they have-
been employed at various trades. I have endeavoured to give these pupils the maximum benefit
to be derived from such attendance. O 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" The school-room is at present of a temporary nature.    Equipment is not quite complete,
but this condition is being remedied from day to day.
" Progress has been generally satisfactory, especially in the fundamental subjects, upon
which I have placed considerable emphasis.
"(Signed)    Wm. H. Brakes."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY SECTIONS.
Meals served—
Boys  147,951
Staff    28,782
Total  176,733
Cost op Provisions.
Groceries   $5,864.16
Meat   2,432.83
Bread  ,.  3,671.02
Flour, etc  286.95
Milk from farm  1,925.87
Eggs from farm   2,042.75
Vegetables from farm  :  692.70
Poultry from farm   453.00
Peanut butter  31.95
Pork from farm   348.70
Average cost per meal, 10% cents. $17,749.93
TAILORING DEPARTMENT.
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time) —
Overalls, 351 pairs  .$513.50
Tweed pants, 65 pairs   206.00
Tweed pants, small, 2 pairs   7.00
White pants, small, 50 pairs  25.00
White pants, large, 72 pairs  _  126.00
Shirts    3.00
Aprons, 85   29.75
Carpenters' aprons, 4   7.50
Shoe-shop aprons, 2  2.00
Gymnasium strips, 56  46.00
$965.75
Value of new work for other departments (time only) —
Sheets, 82  $20.50
Curtains for auditorium   10.00
Curtains for dining-room  '.  6.00
Car-covers, 2 sets ,  10.00
Table-cloths, 98   24.50
Cow-blankets, 13   8.00
Pillow-covers, 67 :  16.75
Bed-covers, 2  3.00
Mattress-covers    '.  2-4.00
Costumes for concert  25.00
147.75 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1927-28. O 15
Credits—Continu ed.
Brought forward  $147.75
Repairs  (general) —
Overalls    $210.00
Pants     5.00
Carpets   9.00
Uniforms  repaired    77.50
Aprons and white coats   9.00
Suits repaired  10.00
Cow-blankets repaired   9.00
Mackinaws repaired  37.00
Aprons for dining-room   4.00
Carpenters' aprons   6.00
Shirts     16.00
Pants shortened   .25
Mats fixed in gymnasium   8.00
Shoe-shop aprons   5.00
Binding rugs   4.00
Repairs to dining-room   6.00
Suits pressed  14.50
Uniforms pressed   96.50
Ties pressed   .50
Pants pressed   .25
Small repairs   186.50
       714.00
Total credits   $1,827.50
Debits.
Material used, etc.—
Denim, 417% yards .'  $105.52
Twill lining, 83 yards  !  62.25
Duck, bleached, 198 yards   47.43
Tailor's chalk, 2 boxes  1.20
Buttons, white, 4 gross   3.25
Button tacks, 4 gross   9.00
Tape measures, 3  1.39
Intrinsic thread, 1 lb  2.80
Black Italian lining, 83 yards   40.31
Black cotton, 74 yards   14.42
Thread, 2 gross   21.15
Striped drill, 293y2 yards   68.97
White flannel, 50 yards  :  9.00
Electric iron  13.20
1 No. 31K20 Singer sewing-machine  126.75
Needles, bobbins, etc  4.10
Total debits  $530.74
SHOE DEPARTMENT.
Credits.
New shoes made—
231 pairs at $7 per pair  $1,617.00
2 pairs of canvas shoes   5.00
Boots repaired, 1,651 pairs     2,128.10
Total credits   $3,750.10 O 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Debits.
Shoe-findings and replacements  •  $1,136.82
1 chain-stitch sole-sewing machine        380.00
1 Singer shoe-closing flat machine  59.90
Brushes, etc., for motor  3.29
Total debits   $1,580.01
CARPENTERING DEPARTMENT.
The work of this department is very varied and the value of same is somewhat difficult to
show on paper, as it chiefly consists of repairs to chairs and tables for the dining-room, overhauling and reconstructing wagons and carts for the farm, and general repairs to doors and
floors of all buildings.
The new work undertaken and completed during the year was two brooder-houses for the
Poultry Department, an implement-shed for the farm, form-work for curbs and sidewalks, new
hardwood floors in two of our dining-rooms, construction of a basement for a building required
in future, ornamental arches for entrance to garden, and considerable fence-work. In the
aggregate this amounts to several thousand dollars in labour alone.
PAINT AND GLAZING DEPARTMENT.
In an institution like ours accidents will happen to windows, and this year was no exception
to others. In addition to keeping these in repair, this department had considerable outdoor
painting to fences, arches, etc.; also interior work, such as the painting of the new staff dining-
room and the decorating of staff bedrooms, besides a great deal of lime-work in basements and
outbuildings.
PLUMBING, HEATING, AND BLACKSMITH DEPARTMENT.
This department takes care of the fires in all buildings, repairs to all furnaces, care and
upkeep of all plumbing, and all blacksmith-work apart from horse-shoeing. In addition to this,
the Plumbing Department has undertaken the installation of a sprinkling system for our front
lawn, and at the rate they are working will have it completed in the near future.
This department fills a very useful purpose and its value cannot be estimated in dollars and
cents, although they save us thousands of dollars each year.
GARAGE.
During the year our truck hauled nearly 150 tons of manure from Port Coquitlam, which
we were able to purchase at a very cheap rate, thus saving several hundred dollars on fertilizer.
In addition to this, there were many demands for truck service, such as taking stock to exhibition,
boys to camp, stores from city, etc. Total cost for the upkeep of this department, including
gasoline for all purposes, oil and repairs, as well as work done at service station, amounted to
the sum of $814.54, or an average of $67.88 per month.
FARM DEPARTMENT.
This department is divided into sections as follows: Dairying, piggery, poultry, general
farming and kitchen gardens, land-clearing and teaming, and road-work.
Dairying.
During the year we experienced a set-back owing to several of our young stock eating
poisonous weeds, resulting in their death. We were, however, able to carry on without purchasing others, apart from a young bull.
Credits.
Milk, 481,461.8 lb. at 4 cents per pound   $1,925.85
Sale of stock during year        500.00
$2,425.85 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1927-28. O 17
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $1,526.06
Veterinary attention       319.00
1 bull purchased, " Brampton's Rosebay Prince "         250.00
$2,095.66
Piggery.
Credits.
Pork, 2,318 lb. at 15 cents per pound       $347.70
Sale of pigs during year         342.70
19 young pigs born, value $7 each         133.00
$823.40
Debits.
Feed purchased during year       $545.51
Poultry.
Credits.
Eggs produced at 35 cents per dozen (73,380)  $2,140.25
Poultry for table use, 466 birds   466.00
Young chicks hatched, 1,457 at 25 cents each  364.25
Hens sold, 12 at $1 each  12.00
Cockerels sold, 9 at $1 each  9.00
Hatching-eggs sold   60.00
Eggs sold to grocer  140.05
$3,191.55
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $1,033.10
Coal     48.00
Medicine    4.15
Hatching-eggs bought and day-old chicks   259.25
2 St. Helen's incubators   205.00
Charcoal    26.25
Leg-bands   .•  7.00
Straw from barn   7.10
2 thermometers   3.00
Egg-crates, etc  47.44
Chick-founts   12.60
Coal-oil     11.03
$1,065.12
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens.
Credits.
Parsnips, 2,335 lb. at 2 cents per pound      $46.70
Parsley  30
Potatoes, 360% sacks at $1 per sack     360.50
Peas, 106 lb. at 6 cents per pound        6.36
Onions       11.20
Carried foncard  $425.06 O 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward  $425.06
Broad beans   4:30
Radishes  3.25
Lettuce   14.25
Corn     19.35
Beets   5.25
Cabbage    54.73
Cucumbers   11.82
Carrots   75.40
Curly kale   2.90
Leeks     1.00
Bush-beans     4.20
Tomatoes   1.65
Marrows   18.21
Turnips     36.74
Chives  30
Swiss chard   3.20
Timothy-hay grown on farm   $120.00
Oats grown        80.00
Green oats for silo    160.00
Corn and sunflowers for silo      200.00
$682.21
560.00
$1,242.21
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $1,141.12
Seed   (potatoes)  45.00
6 new wheelbarrows   67.50
Rakes, shovels, etc  260.60
1 steel truck-wheel   16.00
1 Adams dump-cart   123.48
Harness, etc  203.15
General repairs, horse-shoeing, etc  226.00
Manure for fertilizer   211.56
$2,294.41
Land-clearing, Grading, and Teaming.
During the year considerable land-clearing and lawn-making was accomplished by the
united effort of the Farm Department and the General Work group, which required the services
of several teams, for which the Farm Department is entitled to the following credits :—
1 team hauling soil for lawn, 43 days at $8 per day       $344.00
2 single carts, same work, 131% days at $5 per day each     1,315.00
1 team clearing, grading, and hauling of rocks for implement-shed,
65% days at $8 per day :       524.00
244 loads of gravel from river for roads and cement-work at $1.75
per load        427.00
$2,610.00
All this is additional to the ordinary farm-work and clearing fields of stones and stumps. FARM   SCENE   AT   BISCOQ.
A   SECTION   OF  POULTRY  RANCH,   BISCOQ.  REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1927-28. O 19
Farm Credits and Debits by Sections.
Cr. Dr.
Dairy      $2,425.85 $2,095.66
Piggery    :          823.40 545.51
Poultry          3,191.55 1,665.12
General farming        1,242.21 2,294.41
Land-clearing and grading       2,010.00 	
Credit balance   3,692.31
$10,293.01 $10,293.01
CONCERTS AND ENTERTAINMENTS.
Boys spent July 1st at Coquitlam, where the Diamond Jubilee of Canada was celebrated,
and gave a display of drill which was much appreciated.
Biscoq Concert Party gave a good programme at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, New
Westminster, on November 24th;  it went off well and everybody went away pleased.
Shelly's Minstrels, November 16th, was much enjoyed by all.
Annual concert, December 14th; A. Wells Gray, M.L.A., of New Westminster, acted as
chairman.
On Christmas Day Mendelssohn's Messiah was heard over the radio from the Capitol
Theatre, Vancouver.    This was given by the Vancouver Choral Society.
Salvation Army, New Westminster, gave their annual concert and bags of candy and fruit
to each boy.
Grandview United Church's young people gave a fine concert on March 26th, which was
thoroughly enjoyed.
Nearly one hundred boys were taken down by the Matron to Crescent Beach during the
year as a reward for playing the game.
MUSIC.
On June 15th our band played at the " Pioneers' Picnic " held at Port Coquitlam; they
received great credit for their playing and also for their good behaviour.
On July 2nd our band went to Port Moody and Coquitlam and took part in the Diamond
Jubilee celebration at both places.
On September 18th, in the band competition held at Vancouver Exhibition, our band was
successful in winning the silver cup.
SPORTS SECTION.
Basketball.—St. Andrews Club, Vancouver, and Biscoq ; Vancouver team and Biscoq Juniors;
Mountain View Church, Vancouver, and Biscoq; Burnaby Scouts and Biscoq; New Westminster
Sixth Avenue United Church and Biscoq; Kitsilano Shrimps, Bantams, and Crosby Juniors and
Biscoq teams; St. Paul's Anglican Live Wires and Canucks, Vancouver, and Biscoq; W. Marks
Team, New Westminster, and Biscoq.
Football.—Shamrocks of North Burnaby and Biscoq Juniors; Knox United Church, Kerris-
dale, Soccer Team and Biscoq;   St. Paul's Church, Vancouver, and Biscoq.
Baseball.—On June 18th the baseball team from Vancouver played Biscoq; score, 14-8 in
favour of visitors; Coquitlam Intermediates and Biscoq Seniors; loco Intermediate Team and
Biscoq Intermediates; Cardinal Runners-up, competing for champion honours in Senior Baseball
League, and Biscoq;   score in favour of Biscoq.
GIFTS FROM FRIENDS.
Mrs. Harry Duker, of Vancouver, kindly donated a cup for inter-cottage competition, which
was much appreciated. The Kiwanis Club, of New Westminster, graciously forwarded $10 at
Christmas-time for gifts to boys not otherwise provided for. Captain I. Harvey, of the C.N.R.,
kindly forwarded a football for our use that had been used in winning the British Columbia
championship.
OUR VISITORS.
Officers and members of T.O.C.H., Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds, Regina, Child Welfare
Officers;   Mr. K. C. McLeod, Edmonton, Alta.;   Judge F. A. E Hamilton, Winnipeg, Man.;   Mr. O 20 BRITISLI COLUMBIA.
and Mrs. Hamilton, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, Vancouver; Mr. W. F. Osborne, Vancouver ; Mr. R. M. Osborne, Vancouver; Dr. C. M. Hincks, Toronto, Ont.; G. A. Jickell, Dawson,
Yukon; Judge Ethel MacLachlan and sister, Regina ; Mr. Walker and party of friends, Victoria;
Mr. and Mrs. Jennings, Victoria; Mr. Joe Harward, Vernon ; Judge Laura E. Jamieson, Juvenile
Court, Burnaby; Miss Elixa Marshall, India ; Police Magistrate Findlay, Vancouver; Mr. Willis,
Superintendent of Education, Victoria, and party of friends ; Mr. W. A. Bundle, Provincial
Boys' Work Board ; T. Imaseki, Tokio, Japan; T. Sato, Tokio, Japan; A. H. Cox, Civil Service
Commissioner, Victoria ; J. L. White, Deputy Provincial Secretary, Victoria, on several occasions.
Also delegations from the various societies and associations, such as the Women's Institute,
Children's Aid Society, Child Welfare Association, Orange Association, and other friendly
societies, who expressed themselves as being well pleased with the manner in which the boys
were looked after and the interest shown in their welfare.
In conclusion, I would respectfully point out that during my visit last year to the Old
Country and the U.S.A., studying the various institutions for delinquent boys, I found none that
were better cared for by their respective Governments than we are in British Columbia and none
showing a greater percentage of successes.
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent.
victoria, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
192S.
525-62'8-24S4

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0300570/manifest

Comment

Related Items