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TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1928]

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 TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL  INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOE BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1926, TO MAEOH 31ST, 1927
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed: by Charles F. Banfielo, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1928.  To His Honour Eobekt Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour : '
The undersigned lias the honour to present the Twenty-third Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1927.
WILLIAM SLOAN,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June, 1927. Provincial Industrial School for Boys.
Port Coquitlam, B.C., June 2nd, 1927.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1926, to March 31st, 1927.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Xour obedient servant,
DAVID  B.  BRANKIN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. William Sloan-, Provincial Secretary.
J. L. White, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Brankin, David B., Superintendent. Brankin, Mrs. M., Matron.
Clarke, Miss A. D., Book-keeper, Stenographer, and Commercial Teacher.
Holland, Miss A., Assistant Supervisor and Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborn, J., Shoemaking Instructor.
Stewart, D. E., Carpenter Instructor.
McDowell, J., Agricultural Instructor. Scott, W., Plumber and Engineer.
Wells, Miss W., Senior Teacher. Mutrie, Miss J., Junior Teacher.
Hughes, R., Chief Attendant. Tberise, W. J., Night-icatcliman.
Scott, W. J., Attendant, Poultrgman, and Blacksmith.  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPOET.
The Honourable WiUiam Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-third Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, B.C., covering the fiscal year 1926-27.
I find it somewhat difficult to give expression through purely statistical data to my deep
appreciation of the work accomplished during the year by both the staff and the boys in my care.
It is really wonderful the changes that have been carried out, which not only add to the
beauty of our surroundings, but assists in making this institution a place where its inmates can
be prepared to face the world better equipped in every way than they were when they came to us.
It is admitted by those who have visited Biscoq that the Government of the Province of
British Columbia has endeavoured to carry out the prime purpose of industrial schools, which
is to surround its inmates with influences which will result in their reformation, and if a boy
fails to make good while in our care it is due largely to causes of heredity, mental or physical
disabilities, or due to the fact that the boy was either not sent at a younger age or there was
too much interfering by parents or friends while the boy was in our care, resulting in his being-
released before learning the lesson on citizenship and the sacredness of other people's property.
Well-meaning friends should kindly remember that no boy is ever sent to this institution
merely because he is an orphan, homeless, or a first offender, but that he has, in nearly every
case, committed a series of offences against the law, and has proved to be a problem to the
Judge and officials who sought to guiEle him aright. He has usually failetl while on suspended
sentence or while on probation. His friends and relations have in most cases thrown up their
hands in despair, leaving the Judge no other alternative than that of committing him to this
institution, and they shoultl not expect us to accomplish in a few months what parents, teachers,
pastors, and courts failed to do in previous years of effort. A change of environment sometimes
works both ways, that is, both for and against a cure.
During the year we fountl several boys around 18 years of age rather trying and difficult to
handle. Fourteen of these either escaped or attempted to do so. We did not have one runaway
from amongst the smaller boys; in fact, it is nearly two years since one attemptetl to escape
from No. 2 Cottage, which would indicate that the 17- and 18-year-old boy requires sterner
measures and less coddling.
I have of late met a number of people who did not even know where the school was situated,
how to get there, or what kind of buildings we had. For the benefit of others like these I herewith give a description of our location, the layout of each building, and the particular use these
are put to, together with an account of the work done by each department.
Location.—We are situated on the Dewdney Trunk Road, 1 mile from Port Coquitlam, and
reached by British Columbia Motor Transportation.
Buildings.—These consist of three cottages, administration building, kitchen block, auditorium, barn and poultry buildings, and temporary workshops, and are used as follows:—
Cottage No. 1 consists of three dormitories, holding thirteen beds each, with dressing-
rooms and lavatories attached, a large reading and rest room, one section of private rooms for
star boys, and staff quarters, assembly-rooms in basement, and one room for refractory boys.
All newcomers over 16 years of age are placed in this cottage upon their admittance, and kept
there until examined by our Medical Officer and for at least sixty days after. This is for the
purpose of observation and to get them accustomed to their new surroundings. These are the
diamonds in the rough class, but are about the same stuff we have made our star boys out of.
Cottage No. 2 consists of four dormitories, holding thirteen beds each, with dressing-room
and lavatories attached, reading and rest rooms, staff quarters, and assembly-rooms in basement.
This cottage is set aside exclusively for the younger boys, who must attend school all day and
who are kept apart from the boys belonging to the other cottages. Q 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Cottage No. 3 is identical in construction as Nos. 1 and 2, but one dormitory is used as a
hospital ward and one assembly-room as an isolation ward. This cottage is used by boys who
have proven themselves worthy of a little better consideration, and who are attached to some
vocational class or are members of the School Band.
Administration Building consists of Superintendent and staff quarters, offices, surgery and
visitors' rooms, and store-rooms.
Kitchen and Dining-room Block.—This building consists of kitchen and store-room, four
dining-rooms, dental, first-aid, and band rooms, tailoring department, shoemaking-shops, and
several small rooms used for stores.
Auditorium Building consists of large auditorium (seats 300), two class-rooms, rooms set
apart for religious worship, swimming-tank, and gymnasium.
Workshops (temporary) consist of carpenters, plumbing, electrical, and blacksmith departments.
Farm buildings consist of dairy-barn, silo and feed-rooms, bull-pens, horse-barn, piggery,
antl poultry-houses.
POPULATION OF THE SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1927.
On roll, March 31st, 1926.     132
Boys admitted during year, March 31st, 1926, to March 31st, 1927       56
188
Releases during the year       58
In school, March 31st, 1927     130
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL AT MARCH 31st, 1927.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
PREVIOUS   TO
being admitted to
School in
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Years.
Years.
18
18
14
14
12
12
15
15
6
6
12
12
10
10
2
17
11
11
2
16
14
14
14
14
15
15
15
15
10
10
11
11
10
. 10
3 mos.
16
12
12
6
■6
5
7
4
4
13
13
8 mos.
14
15
15
1
17
13%
13%
15%
15%
15
15
11
11
002
691
703
710
728
730
735
739
741
746
747
748
749
750
754
755
764
776
778
780
782
784
785
786
787
788
780
790
791
792
Rossland, B.C	
Michel,B.C 	
St. Eugene Mission, B.C.Scotland	
Russia  	
St. Eugene Mission, B.C..
England... 	
Saskatchewan	
Nanaimo. B.C..	
Cobalt,Ont	
Saskatchewan	
A'ictoria, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Summerland, B.C	
Summerland, B.C 	
Vernon, B.C	
Edinburgh, Scotland	
Teline, B.C..	
China	
j Minnesota, U.S.A	
j Minnesota, U.S.A	
| Esquimalt, B.C	
Russia 	
Nanaimo. B.C	
London, Ont	
Alberta	
Portage la Prairie	
Vancouver, B.C	
Sweden	
Canadian	
Hungarian	
Indian	
Scotch	
Russian 	
Indian	
English	
English 	
English	
Canadian	
Russian	
Scotch	
Newfoundlander...
American 	
C'anadian-English
Canadian-English
Canadian	
Scotch	
English	
Chinese	
Indian	
Canadian	
English	
Ukranian	
Scotch....	
Canadian-English
Canadian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Swedish	 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1926-27.
Q 9
LIST OP BOYS IN SCHOOL AT MARCH 31st, 1927—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School is
British
Columbia.
Canada.
793
794
795
796
797
798
799
802
803
S04
805
806
807
808
809
810
811
812
813
814
815
816
817
SIS
819
820
821
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
831
832
833
835
836
837
838
839
840
841
842
843
844
S45
S46
847
S48
849
850
851
S52
853
854
855
856
857
British Columbia	
Melville, Sask	
Melville, Sask	
England	
British Columbia...	
Winnipeg, Man	
Prince George, B.C..	
Penticton, B.C	
Dorset, England	
Grand Forks, B.C	
Nelson, B.C	
Prince George, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C...
Victoria, B.C	
England	
British Columbia	
Alberta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Montana, U.S.A	
Montana, U.S.A	
Cranbrook, B.C	
Nanaimo. B.C	
Trail, B.C	
United States	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Chilliwack, B.C	
Saskatchewan	
Vancouver, B.C	
Nelson, B.C _	
Regina, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Russia	
Alberni, B.C	
British Columbia	
Bridesville, B.C	
Victoria. B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Wales	
Eyelander, Wis., U.S.A...
Vancouver, B.C	
Epsom, Surrey, England
England	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Duncan, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Warwickshire, England..
Innisfail, Alta	
New Westminster, B.C..
Toronto, Ont	
Vernon. B.C	
Grand Forks, B.C	
Regina, Sask	
Edmonton	
Vancouver, B.C	
Port Moody, B.C	
London, England	
Vernon, B.C	
Edmonton	
Vancouver, B.C	
Indian	
Canadian-Austrian..
Canadian-Austrian.
English	
Norwegian	
English-Welsh	
Canadian	
Indian	
English.	
Scotch-Irish...	
Polish	
English	
Scotch	
Canadian-American
English	
Canadian	
Swedish	
American	
American 	
Canadian 	
Scotch	
Canadian...	
Canadian-American
Canadian	
English-Canadian....
Indian	
Irish	
Servian 	
Scotch	
Canadian....	
Italian	
Ukranian 	
Indian	
Indian	
American	
English  	
Canadian-Irish.	
Welsh	
American....	
Canadian	
English 	
English	
Montenegro	
Irish  	
English	
Scotch-English	
English	
Canadian 	
Canadian-Irish	
Canadian	
Indian	
American	
Canadian	
English	
Canadian	
American	
English  	
English	
Canadian	
English	
15
Years.
15
25 mos.
25  mos.
11
16
5 mos.
11%
17
O
14
12
i)  mos.
17
9 mos.
;5
14
9
13
6
6
16
12
14
10
14
13
15
9
12
14
O
15
5 mos.
16%
13%
12
17
16
14
8
13%
16
12%
13
15
15
14
13
6
16
13
13
9
13
15
12
17
Years.
15
15
16
11
16
17
11%
17
3
14
12
5 9 mos.
17
5 9 mos.
8
8 mos.
16
17
6
6
16
12
14
10
14
13
15
12
12
14
11
15
15%
16%
13%
12
17
16
14
8
13%
5
5
16
12%
13
15
15
18
13
32
16
-13
15
15
13
9
13
15
12
32 Q 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL AT MARCH 31st, 1927—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School in
British
Columbia.
Canada.
858
859
860
861
862
863
864
865
866
867
869
870
871
872
873
874
875
876
877
878
879
880
881
882
883
884
885
886
887
888
889
890
891
892
893
894
895
896
897
Dundee, Scotland	
Ireland	
Portland, Ore	
Winnipeg	
Grand Forks, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Rexham, North Wales...
South Vancouver, B.C...
Kilgard, B.C	
Fairview, B.C	
Edinburgh, Scotland	
Bucks, England	
New Westminster, B.C..
Vancouver, B.C	
Cardston, Alta	
Port Simpson, B.C	
North Dakota, U.S.A.....
Earlton, Ont	
Vancouver, B.C..	
Vancouver, B.C	
Anyox, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
York, England	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Winnipeg	
Vancouver, B.C	
Penticton, B.C	
Saskatchewan	
Saskatchewan	
Vancouver, B.C	
Calgary, Alta	
South Vancouver, B.C...
England	
New Westminster, B.C..
Glasgow, Scotland	
Calgary	
Scotch-English	
Irish	
American	
English-Canadian	
Austrian	
French-Canadian	
Welsh	
English	
Half-breed	
American	
Scotch	
English	
Canadian	
English	
Scotch	
Three-quarter-breed..
American	
Scotch	
Canadian 	
Scotch	
Indian	
Servian...	
Servian.	
English	
Newfoundlander	
Canadian	
Italian	
Scotch	
Canadian	
Indian	
English	
Canadian	
Scotch	
Canadian	
Welsh	
Irish	
Quarter-breed	
Scotch	
Scotch	
tears.
8
14
13
12
4 mos
l-H
8 mos.
12
10
4
7
11
13
6
16
17%
14
8
11
2
16
15
11
4%
13
15
3
14
16
18
16
12
15
14 H
6
Years.
8
14
13
15
13    4   mos.
12
16
8 mos.
12
10
5
7
11
13
9 mos.
5 mos.
15
9 mos.
16
17%
14
8
11
2
16
15
11
11
13
15
13
16
16
18
16
12
15
14%
14
Total No. of boys, 130.
WHERE THEY WERE BORN.
British Columbia   73
Alberta     6
Saskatchewan   11
Manitoba  4
Ontario    4
Scotland    5
Wales   2
England     11
Ireland     1
United States     8
China      1
Russia    3
Sweden     1
Total   ...130
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Theft   70
Incorrigibility  21
B. E. & S  26
Receiving    2
Trespassing on C.P.R. property.... 1
Forgery   1
Indecent acts   4
Assault   — 4
Violation of " Railway Act "  1
Total 130 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1926-27. Q 11
LENGTH OF SENTENCES.
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 1908  50 Indef. and undef  23
2 years   44 6 months   (transferred from
3 years      5 Oakalla)       1
4 years      5 	
5 years     2 Total   130
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
New Westminster    8           Nelson   2
Vancouver     44           Trail  1
North Vancouver      6            Chilliwack     1
South Vancouver      1           Point Grey   1
Burnaby      4           Powell River   2
Port Haney      1            Vernon  5
Nanaimo      1           Penticton  4
Terrace      1           Oliver   1
Alberni        2           Grand Forks   2
Port Coquitlam      1           Sumas    2
Victoria   20           Summerland  2
Michel      1           Creston   1
Cranbrook     3           Keremeos    1
Abbotsford      1           Ladysmith     1
Prince Rupert      6           North Bend   1
Smithers      1 	
Total   130
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
10 years  2    16 years  26
11 years  2    17 years  19
12 years  8    18 years  19
13 years   12    19 years  8
14 years  16    20 years  4
15 years  14 	
Total  130
Average age of boys, 16 years.
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholic   31 Russian Church      3
Methodist (United)    30 Christian Science      1
Presbyterian   29 Lutheran     1
Church of England  18 Pentecostal     1
Baptist      8 Salvation Army     2
Greek Catholic      3 Seventh Day Adventist     2
Chinese Mission      1 	
Total    130
MEDICAL AND DENTAL REPORTS.
The following reports of our Medical Officer, Dr. Stanley Paulin, M.D., and our Dental
Surgeon, Dr. Emery Jones, D.D.S., show that every effort is put forward to remove the boys'
physical handicaps.
In addition to those mentioned in these reports, the following received attention : 154 received first aid for minor ailments and spent short periods in our hospital wards and rest-rooms.
Medical Report.
" During the greater part of the year ended March 31st, 1927, the health of the boys has been
fairly good. Q 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" During the latter part of December, 1926, and extending well into January, 1927, there was
an epidemic of severe influenza, with twenty-eight of the boyst in bed for varying times and
necessitating the taking-on of a trained nurse. Resulting from the influenza, there were three
cases of otitis media and two of pneumonia, one of whom developed empyeura, and the other,
an Indian, has since shown signs of tuberculosis of the lungs.
" Beginning in June, 1926, there was an outbreak of gonorrhceal infection, necessitating the
removal of eight boys to the hospital. A very exhaustive investigation failed to disclose the
source of infection of most of the cases. In addition to the average run of minor ailments and
mishaps, but not sent to the hospital, there were: Fractured arm, 2; rheumatism, 1; impetigo,
1;  mumps, 1;  discharging ears, 3;  scabies, 2.
" In addition to the above, admissions to hospital were as follows :   Acute appendicitis, 1;
tuberculous glands of the neck, 2;   caries of tibia,  1;   tonsillectomy,  2;    fistula in ano,  1;
fractured tibia, 1;   diabetes mellitus, 1;   fissure in ano, 1;   empyeura  (post pneumonic), 1.
" There were no deaths in the school during the year.
" Among the boys admitted during the year, the following abnormalities were noted:—
Short sight      4 Pediculosis     2
Blepharitis      1 Ulcer on head      1
Conjunctivitis       1 Eczema       2
Enlarged tonsils and. adenoids     7 Evidence of old T.B. glands      1
!  Discharging ear      1 Phimosis     3
Deviation of nasal septum     1 Balanitis      1
Slight goitre      1 Hydrocele of cord     1
Flat feet      3 General underdevelopment     3
" (Signed)    Stanley Paulin, M.D."
Dental Report.
" During the year I have examined the mouths of 112 boys and find that about 80 of that
number needetl dental treatment of some kind.
" It has been necessary to remove 103 badly abcessed or infected teeth. Fifty-seven fillings
—amalgam, cement, or silicate—have been inserted. Local ansesthetic has been used 108 times
for the prevention of pain during extraction or filling operations. Twenty eases have been
treated for the prevention of dental caries; five treatments for the relief of pain and two acute
abcesses treated. In two boys, accidents have caused fractures of the alveolus. These fractures
were reduced and treatetl with satisfactory results.
" The dental work completed should save the boys considerable pain and ill-health and be
of great benefit to them.
" Respectfully submitted.
" (Signed)    Emery Jones, D.D.S."
EDUCATIONAL.
Inspector's Report.
" I spent the day of March 31st in the two divisions of your school, and am pleased to be
able to state that conditions are favourable and progress definite.
" At the time of my visit fifty-three pupils were enrolled antl fifty of these were in attendance.
" The class-rooms are bright, sanitary, and suited to the special coiulitions under which
teachers and pupils are working. As the class-rooms are on the second-floor of the building it
is necessary that every precaution be taken to guard against panic in case of fire.
" Equipment is generally suitable. I am pleased to report that modern Silent Readers have
been supplied. Coming from all parts of the Province and from varied influences and environments, the pupils composing each group or class are naturally homogeneous. This necessitates
much individual instruction. In order that classification be most effective and to enable the
teachers to determine the nature of the indiviElual tuition most needed, the use of Intelligence
Tests and Standardized Tests should be adopted in your school. In order that effective use be
made of information gained from these scientific sources, your teachers should be given an
opportunity to attend the summer courses, where they would receive such instructions. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1926-27. Q 13
" Your teachers are sympathetic antl well suited for the difficult work they are doing. The
quality of instruction observed was satisfactory.
" Discipline is better than one would expect, considering the restless nature of the pupils
comprising those classes.    The majority of pupils in both rooms display interest in their work.
" The influence of the class-room on the lives of these boys will certainly justify the hearty
support of your department.
"(Signed)    J. T. Pollock,
Inspector of Schools."
Division I. Report.
" On March 31st, 1926, enrolment was : Grade VI., 3; Grade VII., 8; Grade VIII., 2;
seven boys having gone home during this month.
" Enrolment, March 31st, 1927, was : Grade VI., 7; Grade VII., 9 ; Grade VIII., 7. During
the year three boys went home; 14 new boys were received—3 by promotion antl 11 by entry
to the school.
" This year the moral tone of the school has been noticeably higher than previously ansl
the boys have gained a greater sense of responsibility in the matter of class-room discipline.
The organization of a society of their own may have helped in this, as it has in oral composition.
All have had a chance to study nature at first hand in the care of plants in the school-room, and
many have shown special talent in art antl woodwork.
"(Signed)    Winnifred Wells."
Division II. Report.
" On March 31st, 1926, there were in Grade II. 5 pupils, in Grade III. 11 pupils, in Grade
IV. 5 pupils, and in Grade V. 2 pupils, making a total of 23 pupils in all.
" During the above period the following changes occurred in the classes: Number of boys
sent home, 4; number of boys sent to traEles, 1; number of boys promoted, 4; number of new
boys admitted, 15 ;  making a total of 29 boys on the register at April 1st, 1927.
" With the exception of one 'or twTo subnormal cases, I am glad to report a decided improvement in the morale of my pupils. They take more interest in their work and are making
satisfactory progress in practically all subjects. It takes a little longer to win the complete
confidence of these boys, but, this once acquired, there is no lack of application. Owing to the
fact that most of the boys admitted here do not attend school regularly outside, they are usually
at least two years over age for the gratle. It is my constant enrleavour to devote more than usual
attention to those subjects which shoukl prove of greatest value to them in later life. Discipline,
ou the whole, has been excellent.
" I find that the majority of my pupils show considerable aptitude for and take a keen
interest in making small articles in wood, and I would respectfully suggest that more facilities
be provided for them in this direction.
"(Signed)    Jean Mutrie."
Commercial Course.
During the year there has been only one student in this class studying shorthand, typewriting, ami general office-work under the supervision of the stenographer.
During the year $220 was spent for stationery, books, etc., supplied to our class-rooms for
educational purposes.
TAILORING DEPARTMENT.
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time) —
Overalls, 368 pairs   $549.00
Tweed pants, 24 pairs     169.50
Tweed school pants, 91 pairs    211.50
Uniform pants, 9 pairs        63.00
Uniform coats, 3       45.00
Carpenters' aprons, 10 _       17.00
Gymnasium pants, 104 pairs        37.25
 $1,092.25 Credits—Continued.
Brought forward  $1,092.25
Value of new work for other departments (time only) —
Sheets, 336  $79.75
Table-cloths, 35  _  10.50
Bed-covers, 8  15.00
Pillow-covers, 75   22.20
Mattress-covers, 4 _  2.00
Curtains for Auditorium  8.00
Concert clothes  20.00
 157.45
Repairs (general) —
Overalls repaired, 881 pairs  $222.00
Uniforms repaired, 26 pairs  40.00
Uniforms pressed, 76   74.00
Mackinaws repaired, 31   31.00
Suits pressed, 21   26.00
Shirts  repaired    79.00
Miscellaneous repairs  _  203.50
Tweed pants repaired  4.00
Suits repaired, 3   8.00
687.50
$1,937.20
Debits.
Material, etc., used—
Denim,  535 yards  $184.57
Denim, striped, 330 yarEls  94.05
Canton, 64 yards   14.08
Buttons   -  16.00
Tags, etc  4.00
$312.70
SHOE DEPARTMENTS.
Credits.
New shoes niiule, 228 pairs at $7 per pair  $1,596.00
Boots repaired, 1,532 pairs     2,124.60
$3,720.60
Debits.
Shoe-findings and replacements   $1,181.94
CARPENTERING DEPARTMENT.
During the year this department erected a gymnasium and swimming-tank building, 90 by
42, receiving a special letter of commendation from the Deputy Minister of Public Works and
the Supervising Architect on the workmanship antl finish of both the exterior and interior of the
building.
In addition to erecting this structure, considerable repairs to existing buildings were carried
out, bird-houses built, fences repaired and erected, gates made, besides many useful and ornamental articles in fretwork.
The whole in the aggregate amounting to hundreds of dollars and served the twofold purpose of teaching boys practical construction anil saving money to the school. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1926-27. Q 15
PAINT AND GLAZING DEPARTMENT.
This department during the year painted the exterior of the new gymnasium building, also
stained and varnished the interior walls and floors, making a very creditable showing indeed.
In addition to this, all fences around barns were painted by them, broken glass replaced in
windows; the last nameil can be better appreciated by remembering we have over 8,000 panes
of glass to take care of, and 130 boys all able to throw stones. In every way this department
justified its usefulness.
PLUMBING DEPARTMENT.
This department, in addition to the regular work of attending to the heating and lighting
system, kept our plumbing and water systems in repair, also most of the necessary repairs to
things electrical at a considerable saving to the institution.
GARAGE.
We do all our own minor repairs anEl cleaning of cars, which means a considerable saving
during the year.
We have been able to used the truck a great deal more this year than formerly, owing to the
roads around the farm being in good condition. We purchased a new drag-saw and fitted up
an old Ford engine to drive a circular saw to cut cordwood. Still our yearly cost for the upkeep
of cars, gasoline, oil, and repairs, including work done at service stations, only amounted to
the sum of $567.63, or an average of $47.30 per month.
FARM DEPARTMENT.
For convenience, this department is divided into sections as follows: Dairying, piggery,
general farming and kitchen gardens, apiaries, poultry, land-clearing and teaming, road-work,
and tree and shrub planting.
Dairying.
We have the following dairy stock, all fully accredited: 12 milk cows, 1 senior bull, 5
heifers, and 2 calves.
We dill not show at any exhibition during 1926, but intenil doing so this year.
We continue to find our dairy not only a necessary asset, but also a paying proposition, as
the following will show:—
Credits.
Milk, 62,690.9 lb. at 4 cents   $2,508.00
Butter, 440.5 lb. at 40 cents  17(5.20
Beef, 600 lb. at 15 cents   90.00
Sale of stock during the year  700.00
$3,474.20
Debits.
Feetl purchased during the year  $1,880.66
Veterinary attention      55.00
$1,935.66
Poultry.
Credits.
Eggs produced at 35 cents a dozen (39,659)   $1,154.36
Poultry for table use, 345 birds   345.00
Young chicks hatched, 959 at 25 cents   267.50
1 White Wyandotte cockerel sold  3.00
$1,769.86 Debits.
Feed purchased during the year   $842.65
Coal  -  66.50
Charcoal  ,  1-45
Straw from barn  84.00
1 No. 18-500 Buckeye brooder and pipes   21.95
Leg-bands, 300  5.00
Hatching-eggs, 200   10.00
Medicine    8.10
$1,039.65
Piggery.
Credits.
Pork, 1,553 lb. at 15 cents      $232.95
Sale of pigs during the year         118.50
$351.45
Debits.
Feed purchased during the year      $383.24
1 boar purchased (" Colony Farm Dare Devil")            30.00
$413.24
Note.—We had 26 young pigs ready for sale and awaiting a buyer at the end of the year.
These are worth $120.
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens.
Credits.
Parsnips, 1,173 lb  $23.46
Parsley   2.90
Potatoes, 11 sacks  111.00
Peas, 235 lb  14.10
Onions, 158 lb  4.75
Beet-greens _  1.50
Radish   .25
Lettuce   19.25
Corn, 205 doz _  30.75
Beets, 812 lb  16.24
Beans, 276 lb  16.56
Cabbage, 315 lb ,  11.33
Cucumbers, 336 lb  9.84
Carrots, 2,127 lb  42.69
Brussels sprouts, 10 lb -  .50
Leeks  50
Celery, 40 roots  :  4.00
Tomatoes, 844 lb  50,64
Marrow, 334 lb  33.40
Turnips, 360 lb  7.20
     $400.86
Fruits—
Raspberries, 303 lb     $24.24
Red currants, 29 lb        2.32
         26.56
Hay growm on farm       600.00
$1,027.42 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1926-27. Q 17
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $1,252.63
SeeEls   (potatoes)  44.00
Seeds   (oats)    :  7.20
1 No. 320 Deere cultivator   11.25
1 No. 1 Royal plough  _ 58.50
1 Wilkinson drill-plough and attachments  :  41.75
General repairs (horse-shoes), etc  198.20
Harness, etc :... 125.20
$1,738.73
Apiaries.
During the year we received 108 lb.  of honey from our hives,  and hope for continued
results.
Land-clearing, Grading, and Teaming.
We have had a particularly busy year with our teams on work apart from the usual farm
requirements, which the following will show:—
1 team, 31 full days ploughing and grading lawns in front of cottages
at $8.50 per day   $265.50
2 single carts hauling rock ami soil for grading, 42 days at $10 per day 420.00
1 team, 56 days making new road to barn at $8.50 per day  476.00
239 loads of gravel from the river for roads and concrete-work at
$1.75 per load       418.25
$1,579.75
In addition to the work performed by teams, the general work group made a road 1,800 feet
long and 25 feet wide, also a culvert ditch 2,047 feet long, 4% feet deep, antl an average of 5 feet
wide.    This was covered with cellar slabs out from the bush.
The road has been fencetl on both sides antl planted out with trees. There has also been
considerable land roughly cleared of rocks and fallen timber, and fences put up in fields already
cleared.
The labour value of all this work amounts to not less than $2,000.
Tree and Shrub Planting.
Under this heading considerable work was done by the combined effort of all departments,
each coming out as required for a few days at a time. During the year we planted and
replanted the following:—
500 shrubs anEl trees (new).
150 shrubs and trees (replanted).
122 fruit-trees (new).
450 currant-bushes (transferred to new location).
510 raspberry-canes (transferred to new.location).
426 raspberry-canes  (planted in nursery for future use).
The labour value of preparing the ground and planting was equal to the work of one man
and three boys for 53 days at $10 per day, or a total of $530. Parse Credits and Debits by Sections.
Cr. Dr.
Dairy  !.    $3,474.20 $1,935.66
Poultry          1,769.86 957.34
Piggery           351.45 413.24
Apiaries   16.20 	
General farming      $1,027.42
Land-clearing and teaming       3,579.75
Tree and shrub planting          530.00
 5,137.17 1,738.73
Credit balance   5,703.91
$10,748.88 $10,748.88
KITCHEN AND CULINARY SECTIONS.
Meals served—
Boys   137,264
Staff     26,384
103,648
Cost of Provisions.
Groceries     $6,023.91
Meat  -  3,108.77
Bread  2,791.60
Flour, etc  316.40
Milk (from farm)   .,  2,502.52
Eggs  (from farm)   _  1,146.26
Vegetables (from farm)   403.47
Poultry (from farm)   345.00
Peanut butter  39.93
Pork and beef (from farm)    322.95
Butter  203.80
Average cost per meal, 10% cents. $17,264.64
MUSIC SECTION.
As in previous years, we found a difficulty in keeping our band up to full strength owing to
boys going home just when they are able to play creditably.
Nevertheless, the band was able to play at the unveiling of the Cenotaph at Cloverdale, at
the Maple Ridge Exhibition, the New Westminster Exhibition, and the Vancouver Exhibition,
and also took part in a contest with other juvenile bands, and came out second, only losing
first place by a few points.
In addition, the band played every morning and evening at the flag-raising ceremonies,
which are conducted at the school. They also took an active part in our annual concert,
receiving favourable press comment.
SPORTS SECTION.
During the year our football team had games with teams from outside ami usually held
their own.
Our basket-ball teams were in great demand during the winter anil haEl several games with
Burnaby Boy Scouts, the Elks of New Westminster, the boys from Jubilee United Church, the
St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church boys, New Westminster, and in every instance played a good
sporting game, sometimes losing and sometimes winning.
Our baseball teams tlid not have many teams from outsiile to meet them, but one cottage
played often against the other, and it matte at least good practice. CONCERTS AND ENTERTAINMENTS.
During the year, in addition to our annual concert, which was repeated three times by
request, and an Easter pageant put on by the boys, the following gave us much appreciated
entertainment: St. Mark's Church, Vancouver; Essondale Concert Party; Salvation Army,
New Westminster, Shelly's Minstrels, Vancouver; Kiwanis Glee Club, New Westminster; Jubilee
United Church Concert Party, Burnaby ;   and Mr. Concannon, of Tacoma, U.S.A.
OUR VISITORS.
Dr. E. J. Rothwell, M.L.A.; J. L. White, Esq., Deputy Provincial Secretary (several times) ;
Judge H. C. Shaw, Vancouver; H. W. Collier, Vancouver; Colonel Phillips, Vancouver; A.
Capon, Esq., Vancouver; A. DeLong, Esq., Vancouver; S. Lesser, Esq., Vancouver; Police
Magistrate Philip, North Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. A. Blyth, Vancouver; A. Rundle, Esq.,
Vancouver; New Westminster Ministerial Association; part of Salvation Army officers; Mrs.
Harry Duker, Vancouver; Presbyterian Synod of British Columbia: Ministerial Association of
Vancouver.
In addition to the above, several visitors from London, England, calletl upon us, also many
from various parts of United States.
We wish it to be wiElely known that any one interested is at liberty to visit us at any time.
All that is requiretl is to call at the office for permit.
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent.
victoria, B.C. :
Printed §y Chari.es F. ISanfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
102S.
525-12S-373

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