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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1930

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 —.
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN
FOR  THE  YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31st, 1928
TRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Trinted by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1929.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your. Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Warden for
the year ended December 31st, 192S.
R. H. POOLEY,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1929. Office of the Provincial Game Warden,
Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1929.
Honourable R. H. Poolcy, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game Warden for the
year ended December 31st, 1928.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. MdMULLIN,
Provincial Game Warden. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1928.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
The Province is divided into five territorial divisions for administrative purposes and the
accompanying reports submitted by the Inspectors commanding these divisions are a careful and
full presentation of game conditions in British Columbia during the year 192S.
The system of game-law enforcement in the Province has no doubt been responsible for
better game conditions, due, to a great extent, to the fact that, with the present staff of Game
Constables or Wardens, very extended patrols could and have been made into remote sections
of each game division, and the public in general appears to realize the necessity of protecting
and conserving the game of British Columbia.
I regret to have to report that the Chief Game Inspector, Major M. Furber, took suddenly
ill in June last and as a result has not been able to return to duty. I am sure that all ranks
join me in wishing for Major Furber's complete recovery.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
The registration of trap-lines throughout the Province has gone on as speedily as possible,
aud I am pleased to state that registration certificates have been issued to holders of trap-lines
in '• I) " Division and work is proceeding on certificates for trappers in the other game divisions,
and it is hoped that before many months have elapsed all trappers in the Province will have
been furnished with certificates covering their registered trap-lines. Trappers, as a result of
the registration regulations, are realizing that the Department is endeavouring to conserve the
fur of the Province, and as a result much better co-operation is being received from trappers
(both white and Indian) in protecting our fur-bearing animals.
FUR-FARMING.
A considerable increase in the number of fur-farms in the Province has been noted during
the year 1928, and attention is respectively drawn to the statement covering the returns of
licensed fur-farmers on page 66.
As in past years, I have endeavoured to furnish all possible information on fur-farming to
any person inquiring for data in this connection. It was hoped that pamphlets could be
prepared and printed on fur-farming of the various fur bearing animals, but unfortunately this
could not be accomplished during the year.
BIRD-BANDING.
After very careful consideration it was decided to establish a migratory game-bird banding-
station on the McGillivary Creek Game Reserve, near Chilliwack, and I am pleased to be able
to report that the Game Constable operating this trap was successful in banding 642 ducks.
I respectfully wish to draw your attention to the statement covering these banding operations
which will lie found on page 53. I might state that the large banding-trap on this reserve was
erected by members of the Game Branch, while the Dominion Parks Branch, Ottawa, paid for
the material used in constructing this station.
PREDATORY-ANIMAL HUNTERS.
During the year 1928 Game Wardens E. R. Lee, Courtenay; W. O. Quesnel, Kamloops; and
C. Shuttleworth, Penticton, have been continually employed as predatory-animal hunters on
Vancouver Island, Central Interior, and the Okanagan and Similkameen Districts respectively.
Game Warden Lee accounted for forty-two cougars during the year and the other Wardens did
excellent work in ridding their districts of vermin. Game Constables throughout the Province
also accounted for a large amount of vermin being destroyed. .
II 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.
Prosecutions.
Revenue derived
from Sale of
Game Licences.
Fees, and Furs.
Calendar
Year.
Informations
laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Tines
imposed.
derived from
Fur Trade.
1917	
Ill
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
206
483
518
439
97
167
242
266
312
317
2S0
283
270
439
469
406
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
$1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7.275.00
5.670.50
4,70S.00
5.S25.00
7,454.00
10,4S0.50
7,283.50
$65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
1918	
1919
1920 	
1921	
$5,291.39
24,595.SO
192-'
51,093.89
1923..	
1924	
1925	
1926	
60,594.IS
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1028	
58,823.07
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The maximum of protection has been afforded the game of the Province during the year
1928, due to the splendid work of all members of the Force and the co-operation of the Game
Conservation Board, Game Associations, and the sportsmen in general.
"A" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF MAINLAND COAST).
By Inspector T. W. S. Parsons, Officer Commanding.
" A " Division, British Columbia Police, comprises the whole of Vancouver Island and vhat
coastal portion of the mainland of the Province lying between the 50th and 51st degrees of north
latitude, and for your information I beg to submit my divisional game report for the year 102S.
For administrative purposes this important game territory is subdivided into four game
districts respectively commanded by Sergeant Robert Owens, Victoria ; Sergeant J. Russell,
Nanaimo; Corporal II. II. Mansell, Courtenay ; and Corporal II. N. Wood, West Coast, all of
whom are officers of tried ability and interested in their work.
Generally speaking, Island game conditions are good. Certainly, in an experience now
covering twenty-five years, I do not recall a time when the public more willingly aided us in
the conservation of wild life. It is never very difficult to criticize so far as concerns an occasional specific instance. However, on the whole. I fancy our game service more than favourably
compares with that of other countries. During the past year I was afforded an opportunity of
studying what passes for conservation in Japan, parts of China, the Philippine Islands, and
Australia, and in none of these countries mentioned was the system in vogue either as comprehensive or effective as our own.
A harmonious spirit exists between both police and game officers and every attention has
been given to the conservation of wild life, and in drawing your attention to the game reports
submitted hereunder I would express my thanks to Staff-Sergeant Butler, of the Game Branch,
whose interest in and knowledge of the subject has been of the utmost assistance.
VICTORIA DISTRICT   (SOUTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND).
Report of Sergeant Robert Owens, N.C.O. i/c.
I beg to submit the following report covering game conditions in the Victoria District,
British Columbia Police, for the year ended December 31st, 1928.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear appear to be on the increase and complaints have been received of the
annoyance caused by these animals, particularly near Jordan River.
Deer.—In view of the fact that deer continue to be reported in large numbers an open season
on does might prove beneficial. Such a course, if adopted, would thin down the herds to reasonable dimensions and might prevent the waste sometimes occasioned by inexperienced hunters. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN,  1928. H 7
Elk.—The elk on the Shaw Creek Game Reserve have received regular attention. Although
there is absolutely no evidence of their molestation, previous reports touching their numbers
appear to have been unduly exaggerated.
Mountain-goat.—As a few of these animals have been seen in the Lake Cowichan area, it
may be assumed that they are on the increase.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Beaver are not plentiful.    A few have been noted at Somenos Lake, near Duncan.
Marten.—These animals are somewhat scarce in the district. One or tw70 close seasons
would assist in propagation.
Mink.—Mink are still very scarce.
Muskrats.—These animals are still increasing and have been spreading at a gratifying rate
throughout the lakes and flats in the Duncan, Lake Cowichan, and Saanich areas. Reports have
come to hand of muskrats being observed near Port Renfrew and it is presumed that these
animals have migrated into the Renfrew District from Jordan River.
Otter.—Occasionally these animals have been seen near the Chemainus River, but reports
indicate that they are very scarce.
Racoon.—Reported very numerous.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—Pheasants have been exceedingly plentiful throughout the district and last open
season hunters had no difficulty in obtaining good bags.
Grouse (Blue and Willow).—A scarcity of these birds still persists and in my opinion there
should be a close season in the Victoria District/
Quail.—Very large numbers observed and appear to be on the increase.
Partridge.—Although a few have been sighted in the Oak Bay and Saanich Districts these
birds are scarce.
Bob-white Quail.—No satisfactory reports regarding these birds.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and other migratory game birds appear fairly plentiful, except geese and brant, which
are seldom seen in the' district.
Vermin.
Cougar.—While a considerable number of these animals were destroyed during the year,
their presence is still reported in the Sooke, Metchosin, and Rocky Point Districts. However,
as the departmental predatory-animal hunters were particularly active during the past twelve
months, there has been a decrease in the number of cougar in the district.
Wolves.—Although reports of a band of wolves in the Cowichan Lake area were received,
none has been seen nor is the information definite.
Cats (Domestic).—This type of pest is now being kept well under control, due to the efforts
of Game Constables in trapping and destroying these animals.
Owls.—At times there appears to be an influx of this pest, but during the past year a
decrease in their numbers has been noted.
Game-protection.
During the year the provisions of the '" Game Act " and regulations thereunder have been
rigidly enforced. Game reserves and bird sanctuaries have also afforded good protection to
game birds and animals. Patrols have been maintained and through the diligent work of the
Game Wardens protection generally has been very satisfactory.
Game Propagation.
The Game Farm at Elk Lake is responsible for a considerable amount of propagation and
the work of the Wardens at the farm has been very successful.
Game Reserves.
Good reports have been received concerning reserves and bird sanctuaries in this district,
especially the Elk Lake and Shaw Creek Reserves, which provide excellent protection to animal
and bird life within their boundaries. H 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fi;r Trade.
As all transactions of this nature have been handled through the Game Branch Office at
Headquarters, I am unable to furnish any data as to the fur trade of the district.
Fur-fakms.
Several large fur-farms are operating and each farm appears to be on a paying basis.
During the year a number of applications for permits were investigated. I would suggest that
in settled areas these farms are a nuisance, especially during the breeding season.
Trap-lines and Guides.
All matters dealing with the registration of trap-lines and guides in this district have been
handled entirely by the Game Branch at Headquarters.
Special Patrols.
During the decidedly cold weather which prevailed during the month of January, 1928,
Constable W. H. Hadley patrolled the Sidney, Deep Bay, and North Saanich Districts, where
he put out a supply of grain for the purpose of sustaining the local wild-bird life.
In August Constable Geo. Williams, with the assistance of a special officer, patrolled the
Shaw Creek Game Reserve for the purpose of putting out rock salt for the elk, and Constable
G. H. Clark specially visited the Port Renfrew District on game-work, principally in connection
with the registration of trap-lines. All other parts of the district have been continuously
patrolled by Game and Tolice Constables.
Hunting Accidents.
Three hunting accidents occurred in this district. Edward E. Read, of Saturna Island,
wounded himself when picking up a loaded rifle by the barrel. Douglas Munday was killed
at Sooke by the accidental discharge of a rifle in the hands of one Lawrence Woodward.
L. Daykin, of Royal Oak, wounded himself in the arm by picking up a loaded shotgun in a
careless manner. The number of hunting accidents was considerably less over the preceding
year.
Summary-.
All matters pertaining to game-law enforcement in the district have been very satisfactory.
All complaints received were dealt with in a very efficient manner, due to the splendid co-operation of all concerned.
WEST COAST DISTRICT   (WEST COAST OF VANCOUVER ISLAND).
Report of Corporal H. N. Wood, N.C.O. i/c
In reply to your letter of December 22nd, 1928, I beg to submit my report on game conditions
in the West Coast District for the year 1928.
Game Animals.
Deer are very plentiful throughout the district and this also applies to black bear. Elk
are scarce around Alberni, but are fairly numerous around Kyuquot and Nootka.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Racoon, mink, otter, beaver, and weasel are scarce, while marten are fairly plentiful.
Game Birds.
Willow and blue grouse are fairly plentiful, while pheasants can be found in good numbers
around Alberni. The quail liberated in the Alberni District during the last two years are
doing well.
Migratory- Game Birds.
Ducks have been scarce this winter owing to the mild weather. Brant have not been very
plentiful around Alberni. Tofino, Kyuquot, and other West Coast areas. Vermin.
Cougar are on the decrease, while this also applies to noxious birds such as the crow, hawk,
and owl. About thirty cats (domestic) were destroyed in the bush this year by use of the box
traps supplied to Constable Monks.
Gaaie-protection.
Constable A. Monks has undertaken many patrols throughout the year in the interests of
game in the district.
Game Propagation.
On February 16th, 1928, seventy-five quail were released in this district and these birds
have done exceptionally well. Sixty-five pheasants were liberated in the district during the
year 1928.
Fur Trade and Fur-farms.
The district does not produce enough fur to warrant any extensive trading. There are
six fur-farms operating in the district.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
One hundred aud thirty-nine applications for registration of trap-lines have been received
and forwarded to Headquarters, while a number of trap-line disputes have been settled. There
are no guides operating in the district.
Hunting Accidents.
No hunting accidents were reported during the year 1928.
Summary.
The weather conditions during the spring were ideal and this resulted in a good breeding
season.    Game laws and regulations have been very well observed in this district.
NANAIMO DISTRICT   (CENTRAL VANCOUVER ISLAND).
Report of Sergeant J. Russell, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Game animals are on the increase in this district. Deer are more plentiful than they were
twelve months past, does predominating. The kill of deer during the past season was far
greater than for many preceding years and they were in good condition throughout the season.
Bear are also plentiful.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver are still on the increase and this also applies to racoon. There have been a large
number of beaver trapped this season in this district.
Game Birds.
The past season was not a very good one and pheasants are still very scarce. Owing to
the blue-grouse season opening one month earlier than the pheasant season, and as these latter-
mentioned birds are found in the same locality in this district, the shooting of blue grouse has
a tendency to scare the pheasants to the bush before the season opens, with the result that
hunters have to hunt very hard in order to obtain them. Blue grouse were as numerous before
the open season as in past years, but their natural habit is to move off their hatching-ground
just before the open season. Willow-grouse are scarce, although there is enough stock to
increase the number if the season remains closed for a few years. Quail increased in numbers
last season, but are not sufficiently numerous for the hunters to secure good bags. Taking into
consideration as a whole, the condition of game birds, except pheasants, appears satisfactory.
Pheasants are not increasing in such numbers as might be reasonably expected and I would
suggest that at the proper time a number of these birds be liberated in the district.
Migratory Game Birds.
Neither geese nor ducks have been plentiful during the season under review. II 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Vermin.
Nine cougar were killed in this district during the year. Constable H. C. Pyke, Game
Warden for this district, trapped a large number of cats in the traps provided by the Game
Branch, and this no doubt had beneficial results in the protection of game birds, especially
during the hatching season.
Ga me-protecti on.
Game Warden H. 0. Pyke secured a number of convictions under the " Game Act " during
the year 1928 and this officer's work deserves the fullest commendation.
Game Reserves.
There are no game reserves in this district.
Fur Trade.
The local catch of fur is usually disposed of in Vancouver.
Fur-farms.
Although established for some considerable time, the fur-farms in this district do not
appear to be making any particularly rapid progress.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
Owing to the fact that all lands in this district are either privately owned or are lauds
belonging to the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway, trap-lines have not been registered. No
licensed guides operate in the district.
Special Patrols.
There have been no special game patrols during the past twelve months, but all members
of the Force in this district have paid particular attention to the enforcement of the " Game
Act " and the regulations thereunder.
HujfTING Accidents.
I am pleased to be able to report that there were no hunting accidents in this district
during the year 1928.
Summary.
There is little to add to the information contained in the foregoing paragraphs. Prosecutions for serious infractions of the " Game Act " have been singularly few. It is satisfactory to
note that our own citizens show a keen desire to observe the provisions of the Act and to report
violations on the part of others. This applies for the most part to visiting tourists also, but
there are several exceptions in the case of tourists who seem imbued with the idea that it shows
" ability " on their part if they can break the law and " get away " with it.
On the whole, conditions with reference to the administration and enforcement of the provisions of the " Game Act " in this district are very satisfactory, and I believe that for this
condition of affairs considerable credit is due to Game Warden II. C. Pyke, about whose ability
and efficiency as a Game Warden there can be no question.
COURTENAY DISTRICT (NORTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND AND A PORTION
OF THE MAINLAND COAST).
Report of Corporal H. H. Mansell, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear are on the increase and a good number were killed during the open
season. Very few hunters bother about black bear as the pelt is not prized. There are no grizzly
bear on the Island, but these animals are found in fair numbers on the Mainland at Wakeman
Sound, Phillips Arm, and Knight Inlet.
Deer.—These animals are very plentiful throughout the district and are on the increase.
A large number of deer were found during the past season with swamp-liver (flukes), and
I believe that the dry summer last year was responsible for this being the case. Does are very
plentiful and a great many hunters are of the opinion that an open season should be declared. REPORT  OF  THE  PROVINCIAL  GAME  WARDEN,   1928. H 11
Wapiti (Elk).—Elk in the Campbell River area are doing very well and a good number of
calves were noted last spring. It is estimated that there is at least a hundred in the Buttle
Lake region and there are other small herds on the Nimpkish River. One band near Oyster
River consists of nine head, and as no increase was noted this year it has been suggested that
new blood be put in the district. On the West Coast there is a large band near Alice Lake and
smaller bands from Cape Scott south, and these also are on the increase. The public is taking
a keen interest in the propagation of these animals.
Mountain-goat.—Goat are found in good numbers on the Mainland in the regions around
Wakeman Sound, Kingcome and Knight Inlets, and Simoom and Thompson Sounds. A few
hunters visit Knight Inlet, but in the other sections these animals are left to themselves.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Although in good numbers at the start of the open season, beaver were intensively trapped
south of the Campbell River, where the registration of trap-lines is not in effect. As these
animals are now practically cleaned out, I would recommend that no open season be declared
for at least five years. North of the 50th parallel of latitude, where registration is in effect,
I would suggest that the season be left open, as the registered trappers may be expected to look
after their own lines.
Fisher are very scarce throughout the district and few were taken last year or during the
present open season. Marten have been scarce for a number of years and the trappers have
refrained from trapping them, with the result that they are now increasing slowly. This condition also applies to the West Coast.
Mink are very scarce all over the district. South of Campbell River they have been trapped
out, and north of that point and on the Mainland they have been pit-lamped to such an extent
that there is hardly breeding stock left. I would again recommend that the possession of shot-
marked pelts of the smaller fur-bearing animals by fur-buyers be considered an offence against
the Act. Otter are scarce, but there is the odd family in the Oyster and Campbell Rivers, on
the north end of the Island, and on the Mainland. They are, however, in such small numbers
that trappers do not make sets for them. Racoon are the chief fur-bearing animals of the district, aud although they are consistently trapped throughout this area, and sometimes run with
dogs, they do not appear to diminish in number, except where it is possible to pit-lamp them
from canoes. Weasel, although reported in good numbers on the West Coast, are scarce on the
East' Coast. Few trappers bother with them. Wolverine are fairly plentiful on the Mainland
near Wakeman and Salmon Arms and also in the vicinity of Knight Inlet. These animals are
not found on Vancouver Island. In other parts of the district they are on the decrease and
are scarce.
Game Birds.
Willow-grouse are very plentiful. They had a heavy increase last spring, and with a close
season last fall there will be a very large breeding stock this coming spring. Provided these
birds have a favourable nesting season, there would appear to be no need for a close season in
the fall of 1929. Blue grouse were very plentiful last summer, but the season was so dry that
these birds left for the hills to feed on blueberries about ten days before the season opened and
very few were taken. On Hornby Island these birds are scarce, but in other parts of the district
there is no scarcity.
Pheasants had a very good breeding season last spring, and although they suffered considerably during the winter of 1927 the increase this year was fair. Few were taken during the
past open season, due to the birds taking cover during the stormy weather. Pheasants are
rapidly spreading and a small number was noted north of Campbell River during the summer.
It is also reported that a few of these birds were seen in the Port Alice District. Pheasants
are wintering well and to date there has been no snow.
Quail were hard hit during the cold weather last year. As many as possible were fed. lint
many died and the breeding stock this spring was small. However, they made a good showing
and at the present time there is a good breeding stock for the coming spring. These birds do
not seem suitable for this district as they cannot stand cold weather.
Migratory Game Birds.
Mallards, wigeon, pintail and green-winged teal have been very scarce this season. A few
mallards were on the river eating salmon and were not worth shooting.    Geese in the vicinity H 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of Courtenay were very scarce this year and few migrating birds were seen during the fall.
These birds were plentiful on the West Coast and also at Alert Bay, Knight Inlet, and Wakeman
and Thompson Sounds. Brant were very late in putting in an appearance and it was not until
near the end of December that the first flocks were noticed. They are in good numbers on the
West Coast and in the Alert Bay District. Around Courtenay a few flocks have been seen off
the spit at Denman Island and on the banks off Oyster River. Shore-birds were plentiful all
along the coast, with the exception of greater and lesser yellowlegs. Whistling swans appeared
in small numbers on the Lower Campbell River.
Vermin.
Cougar are rapidly decreasing along the coast, but are still in fair numbers in the centre of
Vancouver Island and on the Mainland. Local hunters are getting good dogs, with the result
that 107 cougar were killed in this district last year. At this rate it is hoped that in a few
years they will be pretty well exterminated.
Crows are still in large numbers, although Game Warden Fenton killed 1,800 during the
last fall and this spring.
Cats (domestic) are living altogether in the bush and do a great deal of damage to nesting
field and song birds. These animals are on the increase. Fifty-five were taken during the fall
with traps supplied by the Game Branch.
Wolves are scarce. A few are reported at Phillips Arm and some near Alert Bay. It has
been reported that during the past month five wolves were seen on the West Coast.
• Game-protection.
During the past year the provisions of the " Game Act " were vigorously enforced and Game
Wardens were continually patrolling the district. Of the twenty-four prosecutions conducted
under the " Game Act," there was only one dismissal.
Fur Trade.
There are no licensed fur-buyers in the district, all fur being shipped to outside points.
Fur-farms.
Fur-farms are increasing in numbers each season and mink, marten, and muskrats are being
successfully raised. There is only one muskrat-farm in this area where these animals have
done exceptionally well. Many muskrats have escaped from the farm, with the result that the
near-by swamps and streams are well stocked. Some muskrats have been noticed in the Tsolum
River at least 12 miles from this fur-farm.
Special Patrols.
Special patrols have been made into Loughborough Inlet, Phillips Arm, Surge Narrows, Toba
Inlet, Knight Inlet, Frederick Arm, Nimpkish River, and passages and islands adjacent to Alert
Bay, and also on the West Coast in the vicinity of Port Alice.
Hunting Accidents.
On Sunday, October 21st, 1928, at Hornby Island, Jackson Nelson Arthurs, of Hornby Island,
and his son, John Nelson Arthurs, were hunting in the woods. The father was about 30 yards
in front when his son's shotgun was accidentally discharged, one pellet striking the father in
the right ear and one in the neck. Mr. Arthurs, Sr., spent two days in the Cumberland Hospital
as a result of his injuries.
On October 21st, 1928, C. DeCouer aud James Potter, of Cumberland, were hunting deer at
Union Bay. Potter was carrying his rifle (30-30) at half-cock. Apparently the hammer caught
iu some brush and the gun was discharged, the bullet striking DeCouer. who was about 10 feet
away, in the left ankle. DeCouer spent one month in the hospital at Cumberland and is now
convalescing.
On April 8th, 1928, Williams Johnson, of Quatsino, was cleaning out his gas-boat and took
a single-barrel shotgun by the barrel and pulled it off a shelf. The gun went off, causing serious
damage to the right arm. Johnson was rushed to the Port Alice Hospital for treatment and his
arm was saved. -
REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME  WARDEN,  1928.
H 13
On Tuesday, October 23rd, 1928, Dr. Lawson, L. L. Greig, and Alex. Palamo were returning
from a duck-hunting trip up the South-east Arm. Palamo was rowing and had the stock of his
gun on the floor of the boat with the barrel resting against his knee. The boat struck a snag
and Palamo's gun went off, striking him below the left knee.
On Thursday, December 20th, 1928, William Fraser and his partner, Stafford, were rowing
on Loughborough Inlet. Stafford sat in the stern of the boat and a very old hammer shotgun
lay across two of the seats, the muzzle pointing towards the bow. While Fraser went ashore
Stafford got the boat in the proper position for him to return aboard. Later a jar discharged
the contents of both barrels of the gun into Fraser's leg. The injured man was removed to
Rock Bay Hospital, where he subsequently died from shock.
"B" DIVISION   (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Inspector AV. R. Dunwoody/, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit hereunder my annual game report for " B " Division for the
calendar year 1928.
Game Animals.
Bear.—ffhe black variety is plentiful throughout the Division, although not in evidence to
the same extent as in. the previous year, probably due to better food conditions for them in the
hills. In the year 1927 these animals %vere so numerous as to be a positive pest in many localities, but during that year food conditions were very poor in general, so that with the advent of
the winter these animals were in poor shape, and the winter of 1927-28 being a very severe
one, there is very little doubt but that there was considerable mortality among them. In the
year under review, however, there has been an abundance of natural feed for them and fewer
reports of damage to crops and stock than in 1927.
Although grizzlies are found in the western portion of the Division, they are more numerous
in the high-range parts of the central and eastern portions. Some very good specimens are
taken each year, mostly by trophy-hunters from outside of the Province.
Caribou.—The woodland caribou is found in various parts of this Division. The principal
herds are in the Big Bend area to the north of the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway,
where they are plentiful enough to permit an open season. A few of these animals are reported
in the vicinity of the headwaters of the Granby River, on the Christina Range. There are also
small herds at the headwaters of the Pingston aud Kuskanax Creeks, in the Upper Duncan River
and Crawford Creek areas, in what is known as the Bayonne country between Salmo and
Creston, at 'the heads of Granite and Wilson Creeks in the Slocan, and a small band ranges from
the heads of Crawford Creek and St. Mary River to the upper reaches of Toby and Finlay
Creeks, All these latter, however, are remnants of what were at one time large bands and
should continue to receive complete protection as at present.
Deer.—Both mule and white-tail deer are plentiful. Compared to the previous season, there
w7ere comparatively few deer taken during the open season of 1928. The season closed on
November 30th, and up to that time there had been no snowfall to speak of, resulting in the
animals remaining in the higher altitudes and on the summer ranges out of reach of the ordinary
hunter. The absence of forest fires, excellent feed, the shorter open season, moderate weather
conditions, have all contributed greatly in keeping the numbers of the deer well up and will
foster their further increase greatly. The bags of 1927 must have been a severe strain on the
numbers of deer and it is a source of satisfaction that such ideal conditions prevailed during
1928. Should there be a continuance of the present milder winter, with fairly light snowfall,
the ravages of predatory animals amongst the deer should be materially decreased and the
outlook for 1929 promising.
Moose.—The moose areas in this Division are in the Fernie and North-east Kootenay Districts, in the Upper Kootenay Valley. The Upper Elk and the Flathead Valley, and a'so to
some extent in the Columbia Valley, more particularly to the west of the Columbia River, in the
Golden area, and, of course, in the Big Bend country. There are not any widespread areas of
moose pasturage, but nevertheless the moose appear to be on the increase from year to year
and are spreading out. It is quite a common thing now to see them ranging the higher mountains
where it is popularly supposed that only goat and sheep range. Except in the Electoral District of Columbia, to the east of the Columbia River, moose are completely protected in this
Division and should so remain. H  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Several moose now winter near Fernie, one might say almost on the outskirts of the town,
and there are probably a hundred or more head along the Flathead River and quite a number
along Sage Creek. In the Upper Kootenay particularly, the moose do not appear to have any
particular fear of man, even though this is one of the areas in which they may be hunted, and
it is no feat of huntsmanship whatever for one to secure his moose in that part of the country.
As a matter of fact, the writer has seen many range cattle much more wary. Quite a number
of moose were taken in that area during the past season and some good heads were procured.
Mountain-goat.—A few of these animals are seen from time to time in the Chopaka area,
in the Skagit Valley and Tulameen areas, in the Boundary District. The season is not open
in this part of the country and should remain as at present. Goats are fairly plentiful in the
Slocan and in the mountains bordering the Arrow Lakes, near Nakusp, Halcyon, Edgewood,
Arrow Park, and Burton, and also in the Lardeau country. In the eastern portion of the Division, goats, in some parts, would appear to be almost on a par with deer as to numbers, and it
is not uncommon to see them in flocks up to a hundred or more at certain times of the year.
They are very well able to take care of themselves owing to the more or less inaccessible type
of country they inhabit, aud there is very little danger of any decrease. Aside from an occasional trophy-hunter, very few people bother with hunting goats in this Division.
Mountain-sheep.—In the Boundary District these animals are found in the Afchnola area,
and although no hunting has been allowed there for a number of years they apparently do not
increase. It is evident, though, that they are extending their range somewhat, as Constable
Shuttleworth. while on a special" patrol during December last, found a number of sheep in the
Horn Lake District, an area where they had not been previously reported. Constable Shuttle-
worth on this patrol counted in the neighbourhood of a hundred sheep in the Ashnola area.
Undoubtedly, predatory animals play a part in keeping the Ashnola sheep at a low ebb, and the
proximity of Indian reserves doubtless has a bearing on the situation also, together with the
predatory hunter. Patrols are being made regularly into the Ashnola. however, for purposes of
protection. A few sheep are reported in the Princeton District. In the West Kootenay District
sheep are unknown.
In the Fernie District, however, sheep are quite plentiful, especially in the Elk River Game
Reserve and on the east of the Fording River. They are increasing slowly. The same might
be said of the Bull River and White River sectors, although in the latter area a decrease in
lambs was noted in 1928. In the Mitchell River and Cross River areas in the North-east
Kootenay District there are good stands of sheep, and a few are in the Camborne and Sable
Creek areas. There were not many sheep killed during the past open season and very few good
heads were taken. There is very little doubt but that the depredations of the golden eagle
accounts in some measure for the slow increase.
Wapiti (Elk).—In the early part of 1927 twenty-five of these animals were liberated at
Adra. near Penticton, in the Boundary District. It is now estimated that they have increased
to about sixty head. Reports have been received of several having been seen around Myra and
as far east as Carmi, although this has not been confirmed. It is apparent that the main body
of these elk still stays in the vicinity of Adra, and in consequence of some reports of damage to
orchards by them in that neighbourhood, an effort was made during 1928 to drive them farther
east towards the Kettle River country. The effort had to be abandoned, however, as it was
found that they could not be handled in this manner, particularly the younger animals.
So far as known there are no elk in the West Kootenay District.
In the eastern portion of the Division, in the Fernie and North-east Kootenay Districts, elk
are very numerous indeed and continue to spread out into new territory. As one of our officers
has reported. " These animals have developed on White River and in the Elk River Game Reserve
to the point where they do not offer much more sport than range cattle." In all the Upper Elk
River country, in the Bull River, White River, Fording River, and adjacent sectors, as well as
in the Flathead and to some extent south-east of Waldo, these animals continue to show a
remarkable increase. Some have even worked their way out to the Columbia Valley, and some
are also reported to be in the Big Bend country and also to the south of Glacier National Park.
They are reported everywhere as wintering well.
Fur-bearino Animals.
Beaver and muskrats have been subjected to heavy trapping throughout the greater part
of the Division and are generally scarce now, with the possible exception of the eastern part of REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME  WARDEN,  1928.
H 15
the Fernie District, where they are reported as being in fair numbers. During an ordinary
winter the season which now exists for these fur-bearers would do much to conserve their
numbers, but the present winter being such an open one, the pelts taken are mostly in poor
condition. During a usual winter season, with the freeze-up taking place in November, there
would be very few pelts of beaver and muskrats taken with the open season as at present.
Fisher are generally scarce, while foxes are in the same position, with more foxes reported
being taken in the Revelstoke area than in any other part of the Division. Lynx are in fair
numbers and trappers are looking forward to securing a few of these animals in order to swell
their fur receipts.
Marten, up to the end of December, were being caught in fairly good numbers by trappers,
and it is felt that the total catch will no doubt equal that of the previous year, or possibly
exceed it, as the season of 1927-28 was a poor one as to weather conditions, the trappers not
being able to give their lines the attention they will receive during the present open winter.
Those pelts taken to date this season are mostly in excellent condition. Marten could not be
looked upon as being very plentiful in the Division. However, they appear to hold their own
better than many of the other fur-bearers.
Mink appear to be scarce in the western portion of the Division, their numbers seeming to
increase farther east. They are rather scarce in the West Kootenay, in fair numbers in parts
of the Fernie District, and quite plentiful in the greater part of the North-east Kootenay.
Otter are rare, very few taken in any season. Weasel are plentiful throughout, notwithstanding that very large numbers are taken each season. Weasels are in larger numbers than
any other fur-bearers and are undoubtedly responsible for much destruction to our game birds
and small wild life in general. Wolverine are not plentiful; more to be found in the East
Kootenays than in any other part. Trappers have reported considerable trouble from these
animals on their lines during the present season.
Game Birds.
Willow-grouse were protected with a close season in this Division during 1928 and should
remain protected for some time to come, as they are scarce and the last hatching season was
not a favourable one in most localities, being cold and wet well on into the year. The close
season has been popular.
Blue and Franklin's grouse were also protected in a large portion of the Division during
1928, aud should remain so as they are not plentiful. The close season appears to have met
with general approval.
Ptarmigan, in the central, eastern, and north-eastern portions of the Division, are fairly
plentiful in the higher altitudes.    In the western portion, however, they are scarce.
European partridge are fairly plentiful in the Penticton and Oliver areas and in the Similkameen, where they have shown quite an increase. In the Greenwood-Grand Forks area there
are some of these birds, but apparently there is no noticeable increase. It is reported that
hawks destroy quite a number of partridge in the latter territory.
A few partridge are found around Nelson, Brilliant, and between Castlegar and Trail. There
are also a few on the Kootenay Flats and a few pairs were seen during the summer and fall
in parts of the Elk Valley and near Crowsnest. These latter disappear in the winter-time, however, and possibly they return to the prairie foot-hills. It is difficult to estimate the increase or
decrease of the European partridge from year to year, as they do not appear to settle in any
particular area for any great length of time, but are apparently given to wandering quite long
distances. Only in parts of the Boundary District in this Division do they seem to have made
any permanent stay.
Pheasants, in the Keremeos and Oliver areas, are reported plentiful, while in the Penticton
vicinity reports are that they are decreasing. A few birds were liberated in the Greenwood area
last spring, but apparently have not done well owing to wet weather during the nesting season.
These birds are in fair numbers in the Harrop, Procter, and Creston areas in the West
Kootenay District, and there are some scattered around Crawford Bay, Gray Creek, and Riondel,
on the Kootenay Lake: also a few in the vicinity of Nakusp, on the Arrow Lake. As this has
been an open winter to date, feeding has not been resorted to, as has been necessary during
previous winters.
With the exception of a few pheasants liberated last spring in the Revelstoke, area, there
are no pheasants in the East or North-east Kootenays.    It is thought that nearly all of the birds H 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
turned loose near Revelstoke have died. Some years ago an attempt was made to establish
pheasants in the Fort Steele area, but the birds did not survive, due to the prolonged severe
winter conditions experienced in that part of the country.
Quail are quite plentiful east and north of Penticton and there are some to the south of
Oliver. In the Keremeos area they are scarce. A few quail are seen from time to time in the
area between Trail and Rossland and also in the Sidmouth and Arrowhead Districts. Other
than these areas, quail are not found in any other part of the Division.
Prairie-chicken are found in small numbers in one or two portions of the Boundary District.
There are none in the central part of the Division. Some of these birds are found near Wardner
and the area south of Bull River Falls, on St. Mary Prairie, in the territory to the south of
Cranbrook and to the south of Elko, as well as in the Waldo area. Reports indicate that these
birds are decreasing.
Migratory Game Birds.
In the western portion of the Boundary District ducks and geese were plentiful during 1928
and have shown an appreciable increase, more especially in the Southern Okanagan Valley.
Geese frequent the Vaseaux Lake Sanctuary in quite large numbers and also nest there. The
exceptionally high-water conditions early last summer, though, is reported to have destroyed a ■
large portion of the nests. As many as 300 geese were seen at one time on Osoyoos Lake during
the last of November.    A. few snipe are found around Vaseaux Lake.
In the West Kootenay District migratory birds are found principally in the Kootenay Flats
area in the Creston Detachment. Ducks, chiefly mallards, breed here freely, but the showing
of northern birds is not nearly so great as in former years. Strong flights of geese are seen here
during the migration season. Shore-birds are in evidence at most times, although they are
never what might be called plentiful. What is known as the Lardeau area, at the northern end
of Kootenay Lake, is also quite a breeding-ground for ducks.
In the Fernie District migratory birds are found only in the western portion to any extent,
north and west of Cranbrook. in the Wasa area, and along the Kootenay River.    Ducks were
in fair numbers in these areas at the opening of the 1928 season, although no large bags were    .
obtained.    Geese were rather scarce.    Shore-birds were not plentiful.
Ducks and geese were reported in good numbers in the North-east Kootenay District, fair
numbers being seen in the Revelstoke area. There was also a fair showing of shore-birds. In
the Columbia Valley, a one-time stronghold for ducks, there appears to be a falling-off in numbers each year, although geese were numerous this past season. The migration of northern
ducks throughout this district was small.    Shore-birds, snipe chiefly, were in fair numbers.
Vermin.
In the Boundary District only a very few reports have been received of the presence of
cougar of late, and they do not appear to be as numerous as in the past. In fact, I think this
applies to the Division as a whole.
Coyotes, however, show no lessening of numbers to speak of, despite the increased bounty
and the efforts made by Indians, trappers, and others. The average trapper does not seem to
be very successful with the coyotes. Specialized knowledge of its habits seems to be necessary
in dealing with these animals. It is hoped that, with this winter's comparatively light snowfall,
the deer will not suffer so greatly as in former winters from the ravages of coyotes.
Crows showed an increase during 1928 in most localities. These birds, together with the
magpie, do an immense amount of damage to our upland and migratory game birds during the
nesting season and the re-establishment of the bounty system would do much to keep their
numbers down.
Other predatory birds, such as owls and hawks, do not appear to have increased during the
year under review.
Game-protection.
Our Game AVardens and Constables are at all times active in the discharge of their duties
under the " Game Act." Every effort is made by them to protect and conserve our game-life,
and notwithstanding their fewness in number and the immense area each officer is called upon
to patrol, I consider that their work has been very effective. While all officers realize that one
of their principal duties is to prevent infractions of the law if at all possible and bend their
efforts to that end, it was still necessary to institute proceedings in seventy-two cases during REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN,  1828.
H 17
the year, in which there were fifty-nine convictions, nine cases dismissed, some with a warning,
and four charges were withdrawn.
Numerous big-game hunting parties visit the East and North-east Kootenays each season,
from all parts of the continent and even from Europe, and it is felt that only one officer on the
Upper Kootenay patrol is not sufficient. This officer at the present time is also patrolling the
Columbia Valley, the officer who formerly performed that duty having been transferred to
Grand Forks.
During the year an officer was appointed to patrol the southern portion of the Fernie District, a section of the country where some of the people have very little regard for game laws
and a section which needed the attentions of a Game Warden.
Propagation.
My general remarks throughout this report seem to me to cover this subheading very well,
as all classes of game animals, game birds, and fur-bearing animals have been dealt with in
each locality.
Game Reserves.
In the Boundary District there is the Vaseaux Lake Bird Sanctuary. This sanctuary is a
very valuable asset indeed and is undoubtedly responsible for a very satisfactory increase in
water-fowl throughout the Southern Okanagan. Since the establishment of this reserved area
there is a distinct tendency for the birds to remain longer in the district instead of heading
farther south, across the boundary, in search of resting-places.
In the West Kootenay District there is a restricted area across the lake from Nelson. Ducks
make a haven of this to some extent during the fall and seem to realize that they are protected
therein. There has been some agitation amongst some "of the residents within this reserved area
of late to have the reserve lifted, largely on account of damage to orchards, etc., by bears
and deer.
In the Elk River Game Reserve, in the Fernie District, considerable work was done during
1928 in the way of cabin-building, trail-cutting, and posting of notices. Two Game Wardens'
cabins were built on the western boundary of the reserve near the Upper Bull River, one at
Bear Creek and the other at Wolverine Creek. About 17 miles of new trails were cut aud new-
linen notices posted along about 40 miles of the south and west boundaries. Material for a
third cabin has been packed in and it is hoped to erect this cabin in 1929. This cabin will be
located in the vicinity of Munro Lake. Also during the late summer our officers erected a large
Game Reserve sign at the main entrance to the reserve at Brule Creek. This sign is very
conspicuous, being painted in black and white, constructed in the form of an arch, and should
last for a number of years.
It is hoped that this year we may have some co-operation from the Forest Branch in trail-
cutting in the above reserve, and that also in the future the Department may sanction the erection of more Game Wardens' cabins around and through it, so that it may be properly and
efficiently patrolled. I also trust that the Department will this year be in a position to sanction
signs of a permanent nature for posting around this reserve, as previously proposed. Any
money spent in this way in this area will be very well spent indeed, as it is a remarkable
section of the country, ideal as to situation and as to general conditions for the propagation
of all classes of big and small game, and well merits every effort being made to preserve it
inviolate. Each year shows a decided increase in all game-life and the present stock of game
animals within its borders is almost unbelievable. The overflow from the reserve is creating
a wonderful hunting country on all sides without its boundaries. I do not think it could be
fairly said that there is any finer game reserve in this Province. For that matter, considering
its size of slightly under 400 square miles, I doubt if there is any game reserve in the Dominion
which surpasses it.
In the North-east Kootenay District there are the Glacier, Yoho, and Kootenay National
Parks, all excellently stocked and forming fine feeders for the surrounding country.
While dealing with the subject of game reserves, I would again bring to your notice the
proposal to set aside an area in the Fernie District, of about 30 square miles in the " Southfork "
or " Wigwam " country, for purposes of a deer sanctuary. This matter was dealt with in my
report, for last year and also formed the subject of separate detailed reports from our officers,
giving a very comprehensive outline of the conditions prevailing there. The Department would
be well advised, in my opinion, to set aside this area as a reserve.
2 1 ■:.. ■..,>■.-■■        .      . . ....   .-.*.=;. -,;-,:..4. ,'••..:   '
H 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fur Trade.
The bulk of the fur taken in this Division is forwarded to Coast firms for sale, with quite
a proportion going to Mr. J. H. Munro, Revelstoke. In addition, there are one or two buyers
in the Division representing Prairie houses, several resident buyers who operate on their own
accounts in a smaller way, and, of course, the Division is well covered each season by transient
British Columbia buyers.
Considerable difficulty has been experienced with trappers, particularly Indians, taking their
fur across the International Boundary-line and selling to United States buyers without paying
the royalty on this side. The co-operation of various State Game Wardens has been sought in
an effort to check this practice, resulting in several parcels of fur not bearing the royalty-tax
seal of this Province and unaccompanied by permit being seized. This tightening-up has had
a good effect, as it is now noted that the Indians are bringing their furs in for the purpose of
paying the royalty before shipping them out to the United States.
Fur-farms.
During 1928 there were, roughly, sixty-five fur-farms under way in this Division, some of
them large establishments. While a few have dropped out of the game from time to time, there
is no lack of interest being displayed apparently, as new applications for permits continue to be
received. This industry has been taken up quite extensively as a side-line by persons engaged
in other branches of farming.
While at first fur-farmers went in principally for foxes, chiefly silver-blacks, of late there
has been more of a tendency to take up mink and muskrats, and beaver in some cases. I do
not think I can point to any outstanding success in fur-farming as yet, although several of the
fox-farmers are doing quite well. No doubt with more experience matters will improve, but the
experiment has been costly in a number of cases and the industry did not show any marked
expansion during the year under review.
Several persons engaged in the raising of mink, notably in the North-east Kootenay District,
have had some very good increases in their stock during the past 5-ear and are feeling quite
encouraged with the venture. Those with stocks of marten And difficulty in inducing these
animals to breed in captivity.
As previously stated, the muskrat is becoming very popular, and there are several large
establishments in the Division engaged in raising this animal. They are conserving their stock
until a solid foundation has been laid, before pelting any of the increase. The largest of these
muskrat-farms is that of the Columbia Valley Fur Farms, Limited, at Edgewater. This company
has 20,000 acres of river-bottom and slough land leased and owned and are going into the business on a big scale.    They are also raising beaver.    Their farm is well stocked.
Near Revelstoke, the Revelstoke Fur-breeders' Association is in the muskrat business in a
large way, and in the Fernie District, at North Star Lake, Messrs. Cameron and Heaton are
building up an extensive muskrat-farm, having completely fenced some 480 acres and have an
estimated stock of about 250 rats on hand at the present time.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The principle of registration is good and meets with the approval of the genuine trapper.
I think the system is working out fairly satisfactorily. The more intelligent trappers, I am sure,
are now beginning to look upon themselves as fur-farmers, to all intents and purposes, and are
using their best efforts to keep their foundation stock up and to conserve their fur. During
1928 we had a number of trap-line disputes to settle, which were adjusted satisfactorily. These
disputes appear to break out periodically in quarters least expected, and the officers detailed to
adjust them have certainly to be possessed of a great deal of tact and good judgment in order
to pacify the aggrieved ones and to iron out the difficulties involved, in a manner fair to all
concerned.
The majority of guides in this Division reside in the Fernie and North-east Kootenay Districts, there being only two or three in the West Kootenay District. We have a large number of
very competent men who engage in this line of business and some of them are equipped to outfit
the largest parties and to give the very best service. A number of these men specialize in
certain kinds of big-game animals, know their haunts and habits thoroughly, and in most cases
the big-game hunters who come into our big-game country each year are well satisfied with the REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME  WARDEN,  1928.
II 19
sport afforded them. Unfortunately for our local guides, many visiting parties outfit at Banff
and other places in Alberta. This may be a matter of habit to a large extent, as it is certain
that many of our local men are in a position to meet all necessary requirements in outfitting.
Many of the hunters return each season to the same localities to hunt, engaging the same local
guides as in previous years, which speaks well for the guides' services.
Special Patrols.
In January last Constables McKay and Rutherford carried out a special patrol on snow-
shoes in the Upper Kootenay country in search of two trappers reported missing, and also for
the purpose of enforcing the provisions of the " Game Act " and regulations thereunder.
In February Corporal Mackenzie and Constable Ira Brown performed a special snow-shoe
patrol through the Flathead country, looking into game and fur conditions, and also into the
Wigwam River area in search of missing trappers. The trappers were located in both of these
cases.
In July Constable Ira Brown patrolled specially into the Upper Bull River country, on the
western boundaries of the Elk River Game Reserve, with a train of pack-horses, packing in
supplies for the construction of cabins in that area, remaining in there well into September
building cabins, cutting trail, etc.
In August a special patrol was made by Corporal Mackenzie into what is locally known as
the Bayonne country—that is, the high-range country lying between Salmo and Creston, taking
in the headwaters of Sheep Creek. Summit Creek, and Next Creek—in an endeavour to locate
a baud of caribou thought to be in that sector and to look into game conditions generally. While
the caribou were not located on this trip, evidence of their presence there was found and it is
hoped that they will be definitely located this year. Much evidence of the presence of grizzly
bear was noted in that area by this officer. A short special patrol was also made by Corporal
Mackenzie during the same month into the area drained by the West Fork of the Little Slocan
River and Grizzly Creek for the purposes of noting game conditions.
Iu November Corporal Mackenzie and Constable J. E. Ball undertook a special patrol to
survey big-game conditions in the Upper Kootenay, Palliser. Cross, and Mitchell River areas,
intending to be upwards of a month absent on this duty. They were in that sector only a little
over a week, however, when evidence of a' number of major infractions of the " Game Act "
was discovered, necessitating their return to Windermere to make further investigations and to
carry out prosecutions against the guilty persons, who were convicted and given heavy penalties.
All other patrols carried out during the year were in the line of regular duty.
Hunting Accidents.
Only two reports under this subheading were made during the year in this Division, details
of which are given below:—
William Tallis, a boy of 17 years of age, living at Nicholson, B.C.. went duck-hunting on
September 18th last in the Columbia River sloughs, riding a saddle-horse. The police at Golden
were notified on the 19th that he had failed to return home and a search was instituted, the
police officers covering some 20 miles of slough country, finding Tallis's body on the 20th. From
the evidence it was apparent that the boy had fallen off his horse while endeavouring to retrieve
a duck he had shot in one of the deeper sloughs, and being unable to swim, and becoming
entangled in the weeds, had drowned.
On November 12th, while deer-hunting, one William Neily, of Bull River, was accidentally
shot through the upper right arm by a rifle in the hands of his father, George Neily. The wound
was not serious. It appeared that the father had taken a shot at a white-tail buck at a distance
of some 75 yards, and the bullet struck his son, who was in the line of fire at about 200 yards,
unknown to his father.
Summary.
In so far as big game is concerned, the past year has been a very good one and conditions
are most satisfactory. The absence of any extensive forest fires, excellent and abundant feed,
a mild and open fall with very little snow, have helped materially. Big-game animals stand up
well and in most cases have shown an appreciable increase.
Upland game birds, more particularly grouse, are scarce compared to former years and
should be afforded continued protection.    Forest fires in previous seasons, wet and cold weather H 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
conditions in the spring in this and past years, the depredations of predatory animals and birds,
not overlooking the hunter, have all been contributing factors to their badly reduced numbers
throughout a large proportion of this territory.
As regards migratory game birds, geese stand up very well and there was a very satisfactory
showing of them this year. The Canada goose is one of our wiliest birds, and unless _his
nesting-places are flooded out or disturbed he appears well able to take care of himself. While
the stand of locally bred ducks is satisfactory, particularly mallards, the showing of northern
ducks is disappointing. Where in times past the flight of ducks from the north each fall was
an event to be looked forward to with much interest, of late this lias been weak and it may be
necessary to give some consideration to a further reduction in the daily and total bag limits.
Fur-bearing animals cannot be considered plentiful and the stock of beaver and muskrats
particularly is low in most localities.
Under the heading of " Vermin " I had intended to mention a condition amongst the coyotes
in parts of the North-east Kootenay District which has been noted, and that is the prevalence
of mange amongst them, which it is hoped will reduce their numers. Many have been taken and
many more seen almost totally devoid of fur, and it is remarkable that any of them are able to
live at all during the winter in this condition. Coyotes are still far too numerous in this Division. With the exception of the common crow and coyote, the situation in regard to other
predatory animals and birds is not bad.
In conclusion, I would like to say that I consider the officers in this Division are to be
commended for the interest they display in all game matters and for the manner in which they
carry out their duties, very often under the most difficult conditions.
" C " DIVISION   (KAMLOOPS, YALE,  OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By Inspector W. L. Fernie, Officer Commanding.
I beg to furnish you with a report on game matters in " C " Division for the year 1928.
Game Animals.
Bear.—The black and brown bears are still reported as numerous. No reports, however,
have been received about depredations committed by these animals.
Grizzly bear can still be found in the Monashee area, east of Vernon, also in the Similkameen
country, in the Clearwater District, in the vicinity of the Bowron Lake Game Reserve and in the
Quesnel Lake area. It seems to be the general opinion that the bag limit should now be limited
to one, as in 1928.
Caribou.—These animals have shown up very well on the North Thompson and some good
heads were secured last hunting season. In the Clearwater and Myrtle Lake area they are
increasing. The bands on the Hunter's Range, east of Grindrod, and at the head of Seymour
Arm are seen occasionally by prospectors, trappers, and hunters. Two varieties of this species
occur in this Division, both of which are found in the Bowron Lake Game Reservet
Deer.—Deer are increasing in the upper country, although there is at present no resemblance
to conditions which prevailed up to forty years ago, when bands of 100 mule-deer were no
uncommon sight in the Chilcotin country, and it would be a matter of comment if, during a drive
from Kamloops to Vernon, several small bands of deer were not seen.
Many sportsmen are in favour of the law being altered to allow the killing of one doe. I do
not think the cutting-off of two weeks at the end of the open season for deer has been popular.
The Coast deer are only to be found in the extreme north of this Division and also in the
extreme west, and are not in any large numbers.
Moose.—Moose are continuing to establish themselves, it is to be hoped, permanently on
the Silwhoiakun Plateau, the higher portions of which are to be seen from Kamloops in a northwesterly direction. This may, of course, be only a temporary halt in this interesting southerly
migration of these animals which became noticeable only three or four years ago. An odd
straggler has been-reported as having crossed the Canadian National Railway to the east and
also to the south, but the main body seems to have halted.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are reported as being plentiful in the Raft River peaks, also
in the higher mountains of the Clearwater River. They are also reported as holding their own
in the mountains back of Lillooet, and there are considerable numbers on the headwaters of the Swamp River, in the Cariboo.    There are also large bands at the headwaters of the Barriere
River, North Thompson.
Eagles seem to be their greatest enemy, as owing to their white colour they are very
conspicuous. The young ones are knocked off the narrow ledges of precipitous mountains by
the eagles, who then devour them at their leisure.
Mountain-sheep.—The Constable in charge of the detachment at Lillooet reports that these
animals are getting depleted in this vicinity. On the Yalakom Game Reserve, on the other hand,
they are now reported as increasing. This reserve is, of course, near the North Fork of the
Bridge River.
From what can be learned of the two shipments of these animals which were turned out at
Spences Bridge and Squilax respectively, reports seem to be very encouraging. The Spences
Bridge instalments are reported by Indians as having doubled in numbers. The forty-seven
sheep liberated at Squilax, it is reported, have separated into four bands, and they can be
seen occasionally visiting the ground on which they were first turned out. This, I think, can
lie accounted for by the fact that rock salt was given to them at the time they were liberated.
Shepherds herding domestic sheep report having seen quite a large number of lambs of the
mountain-sheep which have spread out from Squilax and penetrated as far as Notch Hill and
down the Tappen slope. Some stragglers are reported to have been seen crossing the South
Thompson River in the vicinity of Shuswap.
As the bighorn is supposed to be the finest trophy the hunters can take out of this Province,
and as these two instalments are reported as doing very well, I would suggest that more shipments be arranged for as soon as possible. 1 am informed that the mountains which these
animals range in the National Park, in Banff, are still considerably overstocked, and if the
overflow could be diverted into this Province it would be a tremendous benefit in the way of
advertising as a big-game country.
Wapiti (Elk).—The introduction of elk near the eastern boundary of "C" Division has
been more than successful aud they are increasing and doing well. Some rather bitter complaints have been received from fruit-growers near Naramata as to the damage done to their
trees by these animals.
On the Yalakom Game Reserve and in its vicinity the elk which were introduced have
increased. I would suggest that the introduction of a little new blood amongst the herds there
would be to the general advantage of the stock. I have an idea this can be done very economically, as the elk can be procured from the Banff National Park for a nominal sum, or even
gratuitously.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver have been heavily trapped and are now well scattered and scarce. There are,
however, some very fine beaver colonies in this Division and every effort is being made to keep
observation on them.
Fisher are reported as being scarce, while fox are increasing slightly. Some of these
animals have been trapped up the North Thompson River and to the west of that area. The
migration would seem to come from the Chilcotin District and from the north.
Mink are not plentiful. Lynx are still showing up and are increasing slightly. This is
perhaps due to the return of the rabbit. Marten are reported very scarce and catches are not
up to previous years, and this also applies to otter. Weasel have shown up fairly well so far
and a few favourable reports have come to hand concerning their numbers. In the Pemberton
Meadows and Upper Bridge River muskrats are fairly plentiful. The consensus of opinion
seems to be that they are decreasing.
Game Birds.
Blue grouse seem to be holding little more than their own, taking the Division as a whole,
while willow-grouse can certainly not be reported as having recovered from the effect of whatever disease or disaster that almost wiped them out, and there is no doubt that they should be
protected again this year.
Franklin grouse seem to be scarce. Very few reports have been received concerning these
birds.
Hungarian partridge are still continuing their invasion of this Province and the distance
advanced seems to be fairly consistent, amounting roughly to 50 miles per annum. Last year
they just reached Kamloops, coming from the east.    This year, after careful inquiries, their H 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
farthest western point seems to be about 5 miles east of Ashcroft, although they have spread in
a southerly direction from Kamloops as far as Merritt and possibly beyond.
A slight increase has been noted in the vicinity of Kamloops in respect to pheasants and
these birds are holding their own in the Okanagan and the Salmon Arm Districts. They are
reported as not being as plentiful as usual in the Ashcroft area. Taken as a whole, the breeding
season for these birds was unfavourable owing to continuous heavy rains in the hatching season.
Prairie chicken are not plentiful.    However, in favoured localities they are fairly numerous.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks, geese, and brant were more plentiful in the fall than in the previous two or three
. years.    Constable Dougherty reports that he observed twenty-six swans in a meadow in the
Horsefly District in the early part of the year.    Snipe are reported as being scarce.
Vermin.
Coyotes are still too plentiful and are on the increase in spite of the advanced price which
their pelts bring from fur-traders and inroads made by the small army of trappers who continue
to specialize in trapping coyotes.
The extermination or, at least, the cutting-down of the numbers of these animals-in this
vicinity is of great importance owing to the sheep industry continuing to grow.
Owls are still responsible for the destruction of a great deal of game and I would recommend
that the bounty on these birds (big-horned owl) be continued.
Crows and magpies are increasing. The crow-traps erected in this Division have been
given a thorough try-out and have not proved a success. Probably during the coining year
other traps will be constructed of natural wood and experimented with. I think the new
lumber used in the construction of the two traps erected during the year is partly responsible
for the crows becoming wary.
Goshawks, as far as I can gather, are responsible for the destruction' of more game birds than
can be calculated. Whenever an expedition is made through the forests which cover the interior
plateaus, these birds seem to be in evidence, and wherever they elect to breed and inhabit there
is a great dearth of game birds, both water-fowl and grouse. One reason for these hawks being
so numerous has been advanced, and that is, there is an unusual influx of robins whose presence
enables these hawks to exist and feed their young ones where before, when they had to depend
almost entirely on game birds, they had difficulty in securing enough food.
Cougar seem to be either more prevalent than they were last year, or owing to the fact of
having a cougar-hunter available at Divisional Headquarters, the settlers, trappers, etc.. are
reporting their presence to a greater extent. An exceptionally large timber-wolf was shot on
the Clearwater River recently.
Game-protection.
The interest which the officials responsible for the protection of game have taken in this
work is demonstrated to a certain degree by the number of prosecutions which have taken place
during the year, there having been in this Division seventy-six prosecutions, resulting in seventy-
two convictions and four dismissals. Fines amounted to $1,680 and three of the accused have
served prison sentences. There has been confiscated to the Crown nineteen muskrat-skins, six
beaver-skins, two shotguns, and a quantity of venison.
Owing to the exceptional depth of snow which fell last winter a quantity of hay was purchased and put out through the woods and men were employed to fell trees in order to give
the wild life access to the moss and lichen which grew on the limbs.
Propagation.
The methods which have been followed in regard to pheasants and their propagation seems
to be meeting with general satisfaction.
It has been shown now that the introduction of mountain-sheep from Alberta has got beyond
the experimental stage, and as it can be done with a phenomenally small outlay of money,
I would strongly recommend that this procedure should be repeated, as the benefit to the
Province would be out of all proportion greater than the comparatively small outlay of trouble
and cash which would have to be expended in getting a few more car-loads of these animals
distributed at suitable points.    The mountain-sheep seem to be particularly suitable for this REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME  WARDEN,  1928.
H 23
being done, as they are a unique trophy for a sportsman to take home, and however they may
happen to increase I have never heard of them making inroads or depredations on the ranches
in the vicinity in which they have been turned out or are to be found.
Regarding the problem of the different sanctuaries and game reserves in Alberta becoming
overstocked with buffalo, elk, and mountain-sheep, I am certain that there would be no trouble
in assimilating any number of these animals in this Division. However, it can be readily understood, the spring would be a far more suitable time to release such consignments than the fall
or winter.
Game Reserves.
The Bowron Lake Game Reserve seems to be a growing satisfaction to the community and
has been well patrolled and kept under surveillance by the two Game Wardens particularly
detailed for that work. Considerable work has been done this'past year by the Game Wardens
at Bowron Lake in improving portages and cabins.
At the Yalakom Game Reserve, on the Bridge River, the increase in the herds of elk
continues to be observed.
Concerning the proposed sanctuary near Kamloops, on the high plateau land known as
" Silwhoiakun," I hope to be able to furnish the Department with some data which would enable
them to lay aside this tract of land with some tentative boundary-lines. The fact of this
territory being made into a sanctuary seems to be coming more important on account of the
number of moose which have apparently established themselves there within the last few years.
Fur Trade.
There seems to be always a certain amount of activity in the fur trade throughout this
Division, particularly in the northern portions. The old-established fur-traders, who have
stores, still complain about the transient peripatetic fur-trader who doesn't have to pay more
for his licence than they do themselves and who have no stake in the country and no overhead
expenses to contend with.
Fur-farms.
We are still receiving applications to be permitted to open fur-farms, all of which are
carefully investigated. In patrolling through the country the increase in the number of farms
is quite noticeable. Silver-fox farming seems to be the most prevalent occupation amongst
them, although there are individuals who also devote their time to the farming of marten, fisher,
beaver, muskrats, blue foxes, and chinchilla rabbits.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The machinery for the registration of trap-lines is getting more and more established,
although even now there have been no registration certificates issued in this Division.
With very few exceptions, the Indian applications for trap-lines have been dealt with, and
as long as this duty devolves on this Department it will always be found necessary to make
some alterations from time to time. On the whole, in this Division there are very few lines
which might be considered in dispute at the present time. The Indians and Indian Agents
express themselves as satisfied with the treatment they have received.
There are now approximately 700 trap-lines in this Division. The whole idea of registering
these trap-lines for their owners was to make each trapper theoretically a fur-farmer—this we
hope will eventually be achieved; and to demonstrate the fact that overtrapping of a line, and
the exterminating of the fur-bearing animals on it, can be punished, I might draw to your
attention the fact that one trapper alleged to lie guilty of this conduct has had his rights to the
trap-line cancelled.
There is no doubt that the system of registering guides is proving satisfactory and enables
the Department to keep track of the different hunting-parties and the results obtained by them.
Also, in case of any complaint against guides by members of a hunting-party being proved to
have good grounds, it enables the Department to discipline  such guides if it is  considered
advisable to do so.
Special Patrols.
Very numerous special patrols have been undertaken; the Chilcotin country having received
more than usual attention, one of the patrols on horseback comprising a journey of nearly
400 miles all told. The Barkerville and Bowron Lake country has been under continual surveillance, it being
possible now, owing to having an extra canoe, to use the waterway which forms the natural
boundary of the reserve as a means of transportation.
The Yalakom Game Reserve and its vicinity have been patrolled by the officer specially
detailed for that purpose, and continual patrols have been made along all roads in the Okanagan,
Kamloops, and Yale Districts, more particularly during the open season for game.
There seems to be a divergence of opinion as to which is the most useful kind of patrol to
make with a view of detecting infringements of the " Game Act." Some ardent sportsmen
express themselves as being very much in favour of the game officials penetrating into the
forests and mountains; others seem sure that infringements of the " Game Act" can be
detected better by examining the cars, etc., of the sportsmen near the towns and places where
they live on their returning- from their hunting expeditions. I have attempted to steer a middle
course between these two methods.
Hunting Accidents.
I know of only one hunting accident which occurred in this Division this year and which
is reported from Vernon, as follows :—■
On November 17th, 1928, Bernhard Schmidt, of Vernon, a miner, was hunting duck in the
Swan Lake District, near Vernon, accompanied by his brother. Bernhard being a minor was in
possession of the necessary licence, and his brother, a few years older, was also in possession
of a licence, the latter accompanying his younger brother in accordance with the provisions of
section 29 of the " Game Act."
The elder of the boys had gone around the end of the lake to scare up some ducks, and as
they came over Bernhard reached for his gun. which was lying on the far side of a wire fence.
The youth caught the gun. which was of the hammer type, by the barrel, and in pulling it
through the fence one of the hammers caught on the wire, causing the gun to discharge. The
shot passed through the boy's right baud, making quite a large hole in the palm of the hand.
Bernhard was admitted to hospital and his hand was amputated.    The lad fully recovered.
Summary.
Game matters again may be reported on as being in a satisfactory state this year. One
thing, in reference to this, that is again brought to our attention is from the increasing numbers
of big-game hunters from the United States. The ones that have been here previously are apparently quite anxious to return and appear to have induced others to have similar experiences.
Judging from the reports which have come dowu from the guides and outfitters, and also from
the number of antlers of moose and caribou which our American friends seem to delight in
fastening on to the radiators of their cars, the large majority of the visitors have departed
more than satisfied.
There is no doubt that every trophy taken out of this country represents a good many
hundred dollars left in this Province as a sort of quid pro quo, and it behoves us not to relax
on any of the precautions which we are taking to preserve and propagate our big-game animals,
which every year are proving to be more difficult to obtain in any other Province than our own.
I again have to thank the staff of this Division for their hearty co-operation in the work
entailed and the duties involved in the enforcement of the " Game Act."
'•D" DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE. PEACE RIVER,
AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Inspector W. Spiller, Officer Commanding.
Game Animals.
Moose.—These animals continue to increase and are moving in a westerly direction. They
have been reported in great numbers in the Dean and Bella Coola River Districts, where formerly
they were unknown.
The greatest number of moose is to be found.in the Cassiar and Fort George Districts, which
are highly suited to the needs of these animals. Thanks to the westward movement, the area
drained by the Bulkley-Skeena and tributary rivers, where moose are at the present very scarce,
although the district is highly suited to their needs, will in the course of a few years harbour
great numbers of this species of the deer family. A healthy increase in their numbers has
been reported in the last two years. REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME  WARDEN,  1928. H 25
Reports have been received to the effect that a number of barren cows were observed during
the past season. The annual kill of bulls is assumed to be the cause of this condition, the
moose being monogamous (mating with but a siugle cow). The remedy suggested by some
hunters, to allow for the killing of one cow-, does not, I am pleased to say, meet with general
approval. The alternative suggestion of shortening the present season of fourteen weeks to
eight weeks would without a doubt, in course of time, re-establish the balance. Such a season
is assured of the support of all sportsmen in the district and should receive due consideration
from the Department.
Caribou.—The following species—namely, mountain, Osborne, woodland, and the Rocky
Mountain caribou—may be mentioned as occurring in this Division, and range from the Big Bend
of the Columbia River, the mountains along the Fraser River, the mountains of the Stikine
(Cassiar) District to the 60th degree of north latitude. If rumours can be relied upon, the
woodland caribou may be found along the Liard River.
A new species, the Rocky Mountain caribou, is reported in the vicinity of the Moose and
Sheep Creek Passes, to be found on the east slope of the Rockies at the headwaters of the Smoky
and Wapiti Rivers.
Two herds of caribou have also been reported south of Ootsa Lake and on the Dean River.
Undoubtedly these are the last of the Chilcotin caribou.
The caribou are quite numerous at present and are in no danger of extermination by hunters,
but the wolf is the principal enemy and may be safely held responsible for any decrease in their
numbers.
Wapiti (Elk).—Not to be found in this Division at present. The eastern slopes of the Rocky
Mountains, from Sheep Creek Pass to the Peace River, being highly suited to the needs of these
animals, it is presumed that great numbers of them grazed this area in the past, and it is.hoped
that they will again occupy this district in the future.
Two car-loads of wapiti were released during the year 1922 in Jasper National Park and are
reported to be on the increase and drifting toward British Columbia. Some have been seen
along the Canadian National Railway in the neighbourhood of the park boundary and a pair
was reported in 1925 south of Moberly Lake, in the Peace River District.
In view of the possibility of restocking the above-mentioned Rocky Mountain slopes, the
close season on wapiti north of the Canadian Pacific Railway should be strictly enforced for
a number of years. ■  '
Mountain-sheep.—Three recognized species of sheep—namely, Rocky Mountain or bighorn.
Stone's black mountain-sheep; and Dall's mountain-sheep, which is pure white—also Fannin's
mountain-sheep, also known as the saddle-back, is looked upon as a breed between Ovis dalli
and Ovis stonei, and not considered as a species by most big-game hunters, are all natural to
this Division.
The Rocky Mountain sheep is located in the Rocky Mountains north of the Sheep Creek
and Wapiti Passes. The others may be found in British Columbia north of the 56th degree of
latitude, especially in the Cassiar and Thudale Lake Districts.
A new flock of sheep, species unknown, has been located in the Cariboo range of mountains
south-east of Prince George. This will be reported on following a census, which will, if possible,
be taken this coining season.
Reports received vary a great deal as to the increase or decrease of the sheep. However,
precautions should be taken to minimize or, if possible, stop any reduction in the numbers of
these animals. A reduced bag limit, allowing but one specimen, is suggested as a precautionary
measure.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are very abundant in this Division and may be found in
practically all the mountain ranges from the Alberta boundary to the British Columbia Coast.
There is very little danger of the species becoming extinct, as they are very little hunted, thanks
to the ruggedness which characterizes their haunts.
Deer.—Three species are to be found in this Division. The white-tail, mule or black-tail,
and the Columbian black-tail or Coast deer. The first-mentioned deer may be found in the Tete
Jaune Cache District, also in the Woodpecker area. These animals are spreading over new
territory, some having been reported in the Peace River District.
The mule-deer is very plentiful in the Prince George. Smithers. and Peace River Districts,
where they are reported as being on the increase. II  26 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
The Coast deer, found along the coast and island areas of the Division, are reported to be
fairly numerous. A number of barren does have been seen these last two seasons in the Prince
Rupert District and the inclusion of one doe in the annual bag limit has been suggested by many
hunters. The opinion has also been advanced that a reduction of the bag limit to two bucks
would be beneficial.
Numerous reports have, been received each season on hunters killing in excess of the bag
limit, and the adoption of a tag system is advocated in order to stop this nefarious practice.
Bear.—The Division is famous for the number and variety of bears found within its
boundaries, the most noteworthy of the species being the grizzly. Grizzly bear may be found
from the Rocky Mountains to the Coast. The Fort George and Cassiar Districts are noted for
their grizzlies, but the Coast District, although not so well known to the hunter, has within its
limits (the western slopes of the Cascades) a greater number of these animals than any other
district in the Province.    The present bag limit of one should be maintained.
Black bear are found everywhere in this Division and are on the increase. At times black
bear become a nuisance to farmers. Six black bears that killed five pigs were caught last July
by a farmer of Stewart, B.C.
Kermode bear are reported to have been seen on Princess Royal Island last summer. The
close season should be maintained and strictly^enforced.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur-bearing animals are reported in fair numbers. It is expected that the present season's
catch will show a substantial increase over last year.
Muskrats should be looked upon in " D " Division as a major fur-bearer and regulations
should therefore be made with a view of protecting these animals. This also applies to the
beaver. There is no doubt that both these animals will increase in number provided trap-line
poaching is stopped in the fall and spring of each year. The registration of trap-lines will also
have a great effect in the protection of beaver and muskrats.
Marten, mink, fisher, lynx, foxes, etc., are not as plentiful as in the past. but. as in the
case of the water-animals, a substantial increase is anticipated providing the trap-lines are
protected.
The month of November has been found to be too early to start trapping on the Coast, and
December 15th has been recommended by white and Indian trappers alike.
Game Birds.
Blue grouse are numerous and in no danger of extinction owing to their keeping up on the
mountain-sides in the vicinity of timber-line, where they are little hunted. Franklin grouse or
fool-hen are quite scarce throughout the Division, although a slight recovery in numbers has
been reported throughout the Northern Interior as a result of the two years' close season.
A close season on Franklin grouse is still recommended.
Ruffed grouse, like the Franklin, have been scarce during the past few years, but owing to
the close season have slowly recovered.    It is recommended that the close season be continued.
Prairie-chicken or sharp-tailed grouse are plentiful in the Peace River District, but owing
to the rapid settlement of the district is liable to be overhunted. A shorter season and a smaller
bag limit is recommended.
Ptarmigan (white-tailed, willow, and rock) have been observed in various parts of the
Division and are quite numerous. These birds are naturally protected by the high altitudes
at which they remain throughout most of the year.
Migratory- Game Birds.
The Interior or Eastern District, although furnishing breeding-grounds for these birds, does
not afford good shooting owing to the early frost which drives the birds south before the hunting-
season opens. Numerous requests have been received to change the opening of the hunting-
season to September 1st in each year.
The Coast District provides splendid hunting for all migratory game birds, but owing to
the late fall the usual number of birds did not appear along the northern coast of this district
and very few were shot.
Queen Charlotte Islands remains the best hunting-field for geese, but more strict enforcement of the regulations is recommended over this area. REPORT  OF  THE  PROVINCIAL  GAME   WARDEN.   1928.
H 27
Vermin.
The Bella Coola and Dean River Valleys were overrun by cougars last season and seventeen
were killed by local trappers, but numerous complaints were received during the month of
December that they are as.plentiful as ever. The use of a trained cougar-hunter with dogs is
suggested as the most effective system of extermination.
Coyotes are not as numerous as last year, but with the return of the rabbits and the prolific
tendencies of these animals, it is expected that they will soon be as plentiful as ever. Methods
for their destruction are outlined below.
Wolves are increasing. The bounty being paid at the present time does not appear to be
a sufficient inducement for trappers and others to devote much of their time to the destruction
of these animals, and in view of the great number of wolves reported in this Division I would
respectfully suggest that a system of poisoning be adopted. With this object in view I have
approached the executive officer of the Alaska Game Commission who has conducted experiments in the use of poison. I hope to be able to obtain the results of the wolf-poisoning
operations in Alaska shortly, when a full report will be submitted.
The only complaints received in regard to owls, hawks, and eagles originated in the Queen
Charlotte Islands, where eagles are reported to be in great numbers and doing untold damage
to our game birds. Owls and hawks are still very numerous throughout the Division, but I am
pleased to say that a number of farmers have adopted the pole-trap method of destroying these
birds. This method, which has the advantage of being both economical and efficient, should be
given some publicity by the Department in order to induce a greater number of farmers to adopt
.this method of protecting their domestic birds.
Game-protection.
General protection throughout the Division is ou a par with last year. Forty-eight prosecutions were undertaken during- the year 1928, against forty-seven in 1927. Some districts have
given better results than others, as shown by the following comparative statement:—
District.
No. of                  1qo7
Offlcers.               '•'-'■
192S.
Prince Rupert. 	
12
5
9
5
13
S
IS
8
5
10
30
47
48
The Prince George District shows a large increase. This undoubtedly is due to the fact that
two men are specially detailed for game-enforcement work in the district. The bulk (nineteen)
of the prosecutions were obtained by the Constable attached to the District Headquarters Office,
and would indicate the advisability of stationing experienced Game Constables or Wardens at
all district headquarters in the Division.
Propagation.
From time to time pheasants have been liberated in the Smithers and Fort George Districts,
and I am sorry to say that the birds did not live through the winter. Further shipments should
not be made, but it would perhaps be advisable to ship eggs to the Constable i/c Telkwa Detachment, who has had wide experience in the rearing of pheasants and who would conduct experiments with a view to acclimatizing the birds prior to their release.
Pheasants have also been released on the Queen Charlotte Islands, where the experinienf
proved a success and the birds are showing a substantial increase. It would be advisable to
ship a few cock birds each year, thereby improving the breed.
It has been brought to my attention that the Queen Charlotte Islands would be suitable
for beaver and muskrats. An experimental shipment of beaver and muskrats should be made
with a view of stocking the islands. Perhaps some of the trap-line holders could be induced
to interest themselves in this work. H 2S BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Reserves.
Four game reserves are located in " D " Division—namely, Prince George, Kaien Island.
Kunghit Island, and the Sheep Creek Pass. The latter is located some 120 miles north of
McBride and owing to its remote location cannot be patrolled with any degree of efficiency.
One patrol visited this reserve (August 28th to September 20th), which is very inadequate from
an enforcement point of view. Recommendations have been made suggesting cancellation of
this reserve.
Fur Trade.
As most of the fur taken in the Division is shipped to Vancouver, it is difficult to form an
opinion as to the number and variety of pelts produced in the Division. From information
received from fur-traders, it appears that the catch during 1928 was an average one.
The established storekeepers, who invariably are fur-traders, are complaining bitterly
against transient buyers, who visit the trappers on their trap-lines and the Indians on their
reserves, thereby deflecting trade rightfully theirs by reason of credits extended to the trappers.
A transient fur-trader's licence has been suggested.
Fur-farms.
This industry is receiving considerable attention in the Division. A number of fur-farms
are in a position to show a substantial dividend on moneys invested. A showing of this nature
will naturally induce others to make a start or an attempt at fur-farming.
In order to obtain accurate data, regular inspections of all fur-farms should be made
covering methods of feeding, breeding, building, sanitation, etc. Cause and cure of diseases
should be studied. All data obtained should be printed in pamphlet form and distributed free
to all fur-farmers.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The registration of trap-lines is progressing throughout the Division, and 549 applications
are on file in the Prince Rupert District, 152 in the Hazelton District, 335 in the Fort George
District, and 94 in the Peace River District, making a total of 1,130 applications for the Division.
The Prince Rupert and Prince George Districts, having Game Constables or Wardens in
charge of this work, show a greater number of registrations. In order to complete the work
without delay it would be advisable to attach game officers to all district offices in the Division.
One hundred and twenty-two guides are registered in the Division. One hundred and nine
non-resident big-game hunters visited the various districts during the year, this being an increase
of 37% per cent, over the year 1927.
It is suggested that speedier returns from guides and big-game hunters on completion of
their hunting-trips could be obtained if the regulations and sections of the "Game Act" dealing
with guides and big-game hunters were printed in pamphlet form and issued with the licences.
Section 20 of the Act needs special attention.
Special Patrols.
Game Warden G. H. Soles made two patrols. In June, 1928, the Ootsa Lake District was
visited, covering a mileage of 250 miles. This patrol resulted in a recommendation that a
patrol be sent into the same district next year during the months of May and June.
During September, 1928, Game Warden Soles patrolled to the Sheep Creek Pass Game
Reserve.    About 900 miles were covered on this patrol.
Hunting Accidents.
On October 20th, 192S, William Scott, member of a prospecting-party camped about 70 miles
east of Stewart, noticed a movement in the bush and, thinking it to be a bear, fired a shot, which
wounded J. R. Howson. William Scott was prosecuted on November 28th, 1928, under section
284 of the Criminal Code of Canada. He entered a plea of '■ not guilty," was found guilty, and
sentenced to nine months' hard labour.    Sentence was suspended.
Summary.
Weather conditions have been favourable this year, especially for the big-game animals.
Providing the mild winter continues during February,  1929,  all big-game animals will come .
REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN;  1928. H 29
through the winter in good condition and healthier and stronger young animals may therefore
be expected this  spring.
Game law enforcement work for the Division as a, whole is on a par with the year 1927.
The posting of additional Game Wardens to the different districts is advocated as a means to
better enforcement of the "Game Act" and the speedy completion of the registration of
trap-lines.
"E" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER,  COAST,  AND FRASER VALLEY DISTRICTS).
By Staff-Sergeant S. North, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit my divisional game report for the year 1928.
" E " Division of the British Columbia Police, for administrative purposes, is divided into
two districts—namely, Vancouver District, in charge of Sergeant J. Shirras, and New Westminster District, in charge of Sergeant AV. Kier.    The Game Laws Enforcement Branch is under
the supervision of Sergeant J. G. Cunningham.    The Division is comprised of thii'ty-five noncommissioned officers and men, of which there are eleven regular men aud two probationers
specially detailed for game-laws enforcement work.
This report covers the following subjects :—
(1.)  Game animals.
(2.)   Fur-bearing animals.
(3.)  Game birds.
(4.)  Migratory game birds.
(5.)  Vermin.  ,
(6.)  Game-protection.
(7.)  Propagation.
(8.)  Game reserves.
(9.)  Fur trade.
(10.)  Fur-farms.
(11.)  Registration of trap-lines and guides.
(12.)   Special patrols.
(13.)  Hunting accidents.
(14.)   Summary of general game conditions.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Deer are very plentiful along the whole coast-line as well as in that portion of the
Division lying north of the Fraser River, between Pitt River and Lake and the summit of the
Cascade Mountains. Splendid sport.was enjoyed by parties hunting in the Harrison Lake
District, but while the deer-hunting on the Coast was good, there was not as many animals
killed as during the 1927 season owing to the closing of the season two weeks earlier. During
the last two weeks of the 1927 season—namely, December 1st to 15th—there were a great
number of deer killed along the Coast owing to the snow driving the animals down to lower
levels.
In my previous report I mentioned the diseased deer on Bowen Island. I am pleased to
state that this disease appears to have disappeared entirely and all deer taken off the island
this season have been in splendid condition. The disease amongst the deer on Gambier Island
does not seem to be killing the animals, but I know of a number of eases where the carcasses
were so badly diseased that they were left in the woods. The disease on Gambier Island takes
the form of long thin worms, from 3 to 10 inches in length, throughout the muscles and tissues
of the legs of the animals. In some iustances a large number of these worms have been found
rolled up in a ball just under the skin of the deer. The disease on Bowen Island took the form
of worms in the throat and lungs of the animals. AA'e sent specimens of the Gambier Island deer
to the Dominion Animal Pathologist, who in turn has forwarded same to Washington, D.C ,
for analysis.
A large number of sportsmen are still advocating an open season on doe deer. Personally,
I do not think that any great harm would be done by a short open season on does.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are holding their own throughout the Division. Some good
bags were procured up the inlets on the Coast and also at Stave Lake. II 30
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
Bear.—Black bear still continue to be plentiful and are a nuisance in and around the settled
areas on the Lower Mainland. A great number were seen during the past fall at the heads of
the various inlets, including Indian Riv^r at the head of the North Arm of Burrard Inlet.
Grizzly bear are fairly plentiful at the heads of the various inlets along the Coast.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver are not very plentiful in this Division. The registration of trap-lines will no doubt
have a tendency toward saving them from total extermination throughout the outlying districts.
An open season was granted for beaver throughout the whole Division, which, in my opinion,
is good policy, as I am not in favour of closing one area and leaving the adjacent territory open.
By opening the whole Division it prevents poaching and gives the legitimate trapper a chance.
The protection of beaver throughout the municipalities works a hardship on the farmers,
especially in the dyked areas and the low-lying land in Surrey and Langley, and by allowing an
open season it is now possible to keep these animals in check.
Marten are not plentiful, but reports indicate that they are not decreasing any in late
years.
Mink are still in great demand around fur circles and this accounts for their extensive
trapping, but in spite of this fact mink continue to thrive throughout the Division.
Muskrats still continue to increase throughout the Division. They appear to be just as
plentiful as ever in the Fraser A'alley districts in spite of the excessive trapping of these animals
and the long season allowed on them. Several trappers are box-trapping these animals for
breeding purposes. I am pleased to report, that the muskrats liberated on Nelson Island Game
Reserve have spread out and the lakes in the vicinity of Pender Harbour, on the Sechelt
Peninsula, are now fairly well stocked with these animals. These hikes are under trap-line
registration, and it is gratifying to learn that the trappers in whose names these lines are
registered are looking after this stock, and it will be a matter of only a few years when it is
thought that all the swamps and lakes on Sechelt Peninsula will be inhabited by muskrats.
Muskrats appear to be plentiful on the Burnaby Lake Game Reserve and steps are being taken
to trap up some live animals there for liberation in other parts of the Province.
Racoon are fairly plentiful in some portions of the district, especially throughout the Fraser
Valley.
Otter have not been plentiful in late years. Skunk have been very plentiful throughout the
Division, and I believe in many districts these animals should be treated as vermin.
Game Birds.
The apparent scarcity of pheasants is the burning question throughout the Division. Prior
to the opening and shortly after the closing of the season these birds appeared in fairly large
numbers, but bag limits were very few and far between this fall. Sea Island afforded the best
pheasant-shooting in the Division, due to its proximity to Point Grey, where the birds are protected, and also due to a large extent to the fact that the farmers do not take advantage of
the provisions of section 3 of the " Game Act." It is surprising that the stand of pheasants
is as good as it is with the number of guns in the field, the length of the season, and the liberal
bag limits.
If the sportsmen are still going to enjoy pheasant-hunting it will be necessary for the
Department to rear and liberate birds in greater numbers than at present, or to curtail the
season to one month and to cut the bag limit.
Some sportsmen are advocating an open season on hen pheasants. Personally, I think it
would be a great mistake, and I believe the majority of organized sportsmen are against such
an open season. There are enough hen birds killed accidentally and otherw-ise to keep them
from being too plentiful, and of course hen birds suffer more than cock birds as the result of
depredations by noxious birds.
Partridges, like the pheasants, were not plentiful, although our AATardens checked up several
limit bags returning from the Upper Sumas and Ladner Districts. A few partridges were again
seen on Lulu Island, and I would suggest that fresh stock be secured and that a number of these
birds be liberated on the north side of the Fraser River from Lulu Island to Nicomen Island.
I see no reason why partridge should not. do well in this district.
Quail were very hard hit during the last winter. In Point Grey coveys of forty and fifty
birds were reduced to twelve and fifteen birds during the latter days of 1927 and early days of REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME  WARDEN,  1928.
H 31
1928 in spite of the fact that our Wardens, assisted by residents of the district, fed heavily
during the bad weather. I do not believe that we will ever see the time when an open season
will be warranted on quail on the Low-er Mainland. The climate here does not appear to be
suitable for these birds. The bob-white quail liberated in the spring of 1925 at Point Grey
and in the Ladner District do not appear to have survived.
The past season on blue grouse in the Howe Sound District was fair. The birds were more
plentiful than they were a year ago and a great many bag limits were secured, the opening day.
I personally think that the season on blue grouse should be shortened to about one month. Like
the pheasants, if we are going to enjoy future grouse-shooting, we will have to shorten the
season.
AA'illow-grouse in some parts of the Division were reported as plentiful, but I would recommend that the season remain closed for another year at least.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks were very plentiful up to and including the opening day all along the foreshores and
in the marshes of the Fraser River. The opening day promised to be a good one from previous
indications, but the curtailing of the shooting until 7 a.m. spoiled the bags along the mouth of
the Fraser. By 7 a.m. the majority of ducks had gone out into the gulf; consequently bag
limits were scarce and the game regulations were severely criticized. Six a.m. would be the
proper time to open the season in the AArestern District, and I would suggest that arrangements
be made to give the sportsmen some signal for the opening hour. This could be done with very
little trouble and expense. Since the season opened ducks have been scarce, due, no doubt, to
the exceptionally mild weather. There has been very little water in the fields even up to the
end of December. Our officers report that there are a great number of ducks lying well off the
foreshores of Sea, Lulu, and AVestham Islands, as well as in Boundary Bay. It is gratifying
to again be in a position to report the presence of wood-ducks in very large numbers this season.
Constable R. Al. Stewart, of Chilliwaek, states that these birds are just as plentiful as they were
during the early fall of 1927.
Snow-geese are very plentiful. There have been quite a number of these birds shot this
season, especially on the days when we have had a strong westerly wind. A few of these birds
arrived prior to October 15th and some of the hunters were fortunate in securing a goose or
two on the opening day. Reports would indicate that brant have been very plentiful at
Boundary Bay, which is the only place visited by these birds in this Division.
AA'ilson snipe were about in the same numbers as last year, there being no noticeable increase
or decrease.
A few whistling swans were observed off the foreshore of Lulu Island, but. as was the case
in former years, spent only a few days in the district.
Band-tailed pigeons were very plentiful in the spring throughout the Fraser Valley. The
district was provided with a two-weeks' open season for the first time since 1918, but there were
very few birds killed. Throughout the Howe Sound District the casualties on pigeons did not
amount to an average of one bird per hunter. By opening the season the supply has not suffered
and the sportsmen have been satisfied.
ArERMIN.
A few coyotes have been taken during the past year around Agassiz and they have been
reported as being as far west as Burnaby, but not very plentiful. Personally, I do not place
very much confidence in the payment of bounties on this animal reducing the numbers. They
are far more valuable to the hunter and trapper as a fur-bearing animal. During the year 1927
bounty was paid on some 1,137 coyotes in the Vancouver District, while bounty was paid on
only 179 coyotes during the year 1928, showing a noticeable decrease due to the fact that in
1927 the pelt was retained by the applicant for bounty, who was paid the sum of .$2, while
in 1928 a bounty of $7.50 was paid and the pelt was required to be surrendered to the
Government.
AATolves appear to have increased during the year 1928. During 1927 bounty was paid on
seventy-one of these animals, as against 125 in 1928.
Cougar have also shown an increase if the bounty payments can be taken as an indication.
Bounty was paid on thirty-one cougar in 1927, compared with forty-eight in 1928. .
H 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Crows have been fairly plentiful. During the past year one of our Game Wardens erected
a crow-trap at Essondale and by so doing has accounted for a reduction of crows in that district.
The sportsmen still advocate the placing of a bounty on these birds, but I believe that the
Department could accomplish more by erecting traps at suitable places, such as slaughter-houses,
than by paying a bounty. Material for these traps, with the exception of poles, can be bought
for less than $10 per trap. The poles in most cases can be secured in the woods at practically
no cost.
In spite of big-horned owls being reported as plentiful, bounty was paid on only seven
of these birds in the Vancouver District.
The following is a summary of the vermin killed by Game Constables in this Division
during the year 1928:—
Crows 1,507 Eagles     17
Cats       473 Dogs      39
Hawks       83 Seals      1
Owls        58
Game-protection.
All our Game Wardens, assisted by their brother officers, have been very active during the
past season and the Division has been very well patrolled. Again I must mention the assistance
given by members of the sporting clubs. I have found that the majority of the organized sportsmen are ready to assist the Department in the protection of game and a number of prosecutions
secured during the past season have been through information received from the sportsmen of
the Division.
The Game Laws Enforcement Branch is under the supervision of Sergeant J. G. Cunningham,
and I am pleased to report the splendid co-operation of all our officers in an endeavour to do
their utmost in assisting in the protection of our game.
The following officers were detailed for game-protection duties during the year 1928: Jas. G.
Cunningham, Sergeant i/c Game Branch; A. P. Cummins, Constable i/c collection of fur royalties, Vancouver; ~W. Clark, Constable (launch " P.M.L. No. 3"), Vancouver; John Moir, Constable, North Vancouver; AV. H. Cameron, Constable, Ladner; R. E. Allan, Constable (launch
"Watla"), Powell River; John Murray, Constable, Port Moody; F. Urquhart, Constable, Pitt
Meadows; 3. D. H. Stewart, Constable, Agassiz; R. M. Stewart, Constable, Chilliwack; A. J.
Butler, Constable, Abbotsford.
The following constables or Game Wardens were appointed for game-protection purposes in
the Division prior to the opening of the hunting season: J. F. Ritchie, Constable, Vancouver;
E. L. Esterbrook, Constable, Langley; J. G. A'osburgh, Constable, Mission.
In addition to these men, the Game Laws Enforcement Branch had the whole-hearted support of the regular police officers in the Division.
Propagation.
The Division was fortunate in securing a larger number of pheasants for liberation during
the past season. These birds arrived from the pheasant-farm in splendid condition and were
liberated in the districts set out as follows:—
Agassiz  55
Langley   135
Delta  145
Pitt Meadows   125
Chilliwack  155
North Arancouver  26
Lulu Island  110
Surrey    85
Sumas Prairie   95
JIatsqui        65
Powell River
Squamish	
Mission   	
Port Moody ...
Sechelt 	
12
13
05
50
12
Total 1,138
Game Reserves.
The following game reserves are located in this Division :—
Nelson, Captain, and Hardy Islands Reserve, at the mouth of Jervis Inlet, comprising some
70 square miles.    Deer and grouse are abundant on this reserve, but there is a movement oh REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME AVARDEN,  1928.
H 33
foot at present to have the sanctuary cancelled as it works hardship on the settlers in the
adjoining districts. Personally, I am in favour of cancelling this reserve. The deer are far too
numerous and if not reduced in numbers will become diseased. The deer on this Coast are very
plentiful and I therefore do not think a reserve of this kind is necessary.
North Vancouver Reserve comprises some 160 square miles, consisting of all the mountains
and watersheds of the Seymour, Capilano, and Lynn Creeks. This reserve will in time become
a wonderful asset to the City of Arancouver and should be continued as a reserve for all time.
Trout, Burnaby, and Deer Lakes comprise 4 square miles of reserve on the peninsula
situated between the Cities of Araucouver and New Westminster, and these lakes afford a
wonderful resting-place for water-fowl driven from the hunting-grounds for food and rest.
Shortly after the season on ducks opens they can be found in great numbers within the boundaries of these reserved areas. • Beaver and muskrats thrive in the Burnaby Lake Reserve.
McGillivray Creek Reserve comprises some 1,000 acres or more of land and still continues to
be the best sanctuary for migratory game birds in the Division. The majority of the land
within the boundaries of this reserve is privately owned, and I would suggest that steps be
taken by the Department to either buy the property or obtain a lease for a number of years,
thereby assuring that the reserve will not be taken up by other interests.
During the latter part of August Sergeant Cunningham and Constable R. M. Stewart
erected a bird-banding trap on this reserve, with the object of conducting bird-banding operations
in conjunction with the Dominion Parks Branch and the United States Bureau of Biological
Survey. While the erection of this trap was an experiment and the plan of the trap was the
idea of one of our officers, I am pleased to report that the enterprise was a huge success.
Constable Stewart caught and banded 250 ducks in one day. The only drawback to the operation of the trap is the fact that the Constable is kept busy banding birds and consequently the
patrol-work suffers slightly. Next year it is hoped that he will be given some assistance in
these operations as they are certainly worth the time and expense. In years to come the
knowledge gained in banding birds will be very valuable.
AVhile the waters of English Bay, False Creek, and Burrard Inlet are not classed, as game
reserves, it is illegal to discharge firearms below high-water mark, and this fact practically
makes another large reserve comprising about 50 square miles, providing a splendid resting-place
for migratory birds.
Fur Trade.
The present system of collecting royalty on fur is still popular with the fur-dealers. The
fur-traders in this Division advocated the opening of the trapping season for November 1st,
which was granted, but from reports at hand it seems that a great deal of unprime fur, legally
caught, reached the market. The trappers in this Division are not in favour of opening the
season before December 1st.
Fur-farms.
Applications for fur-farming permits in this Division have decreased considerably during
the year. Prospective fur-farmers, especially those leaning toward the raising of muskrats, are
beginning to realize that the raising of these animals in pens will not pay. It is definitely
decided by most breeders that the only way to accomplish success in the raising of muskrats
is to rear them as near to their wild or natural state as possible. A few of the trappers in the
Fraser Valley are box-trapping muskrats as there has been a small demand for live stock during
the past few months.
There are good prospects in store for the mink-breeders. Demand and prices remain firm
and those farmers breeding a good class of mink have found a ready market for their output.
One of the mink-farms in the district exported 105 pairs of live mink this fall. Some thirty-
five pairs of these mink were sent to Germany at a price quoted around $175 per pair, which
goes to show the possibilities of this class of farming.
Some of the silver-fox breeders report a successful season, but reports of the blue-fox
industry are not so cheerful. A great many of the blue-fox farmers have met with complete
failure. Since my last report the royalty on the pelts of registered silver foxes bred in captivity
has been done away with, but I am firmly of the opinion that the Department should collect
royalty on live native animals being exported out of the Province. In a number of cases during
the past season muskrats and mink which have been caught in the Province have been exported
3 H 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
alive and the Department did not profit thereby, whereas if these animals had been pelted the
usual royalty would have been paid. I would suggest that the usual royalty should be collected
on the live animals leaving the Province.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The inauguration of the registration of trap-lines in this Division has been very successful.
At the close of the year we had 205 registered trap-lines and no dispute pending, which goes
to show what can be done providing the Game Wardens, Constables, and Indian Agents
co-operate with the trappers. There are seventy-five trap-lines registered by Indians in this
Division. These Indians have readily fallen into the idea of registering their line and a good
deal of credit for this is due to the hearty co-operation of the Indian Agent, Mr. Perry.
During the year 1928 only two applications for guides' licences were received.
Special Patrols.
As the Division was continuously patrolled throughout the year it was not found necessary
to conduct what would be classed as special patrols. Many lengthy and difficult patrols, however,
were made in this Division during the year 1928.
Hunting Accidents.
Reports show one fatal accident and five minor accidents with firearms in this Division
during the year.
Summary.
Game conditions throughout the past season have not been as good as expected. Migratory-
bird shooting has been very poor even on private game preserves. This condition has been due,
no doubt, to the extremely mild winter. This fact has made a noticeable decrease in the number
of firearms licences issued, there being 700 ordinary firearms licences less issued in the Division
than during the previous year.
Some sportsmen are advocating a reduction in the bag limit on ducks, but I do not think that
reducing the bag limit will make a particle of difference in the number of birds, as there are
very few men who ever get their limit on ducks, except on the opening clay.
I do think that a reduction of the bag limit on pheasants is warranted and should be
reduced to four cock birds a day. During the year 1916 the revenue derived from the sale of
licences was around $66,000, and at that time sportsmen were only allowed a month's open
season, with an unlimited area to hunt over, while during 1927 some $139,814 in revenue was
received and the sportsmen were allowed six weeks' open season with the same bag limits and
a great deal less territory to hunt over. It is certain that the supply of pheasants will not
stand up under present conditions.
The cry for public shootitng-grounds is becoming louder each year. Since my last report
a public shooting-ground has been formed at the mouth of the Pitt Lake through the co-operation
of the Dominion authorities. If the flooded islands in the mouth of the main Fraser River could
be set aside as public shooting-grounds also, it would be a great step and would meet with the
approval of the sportsmen. These lands are good for nothing else as it is practically impossible
to reclaim them.
There is a noticeable decrease in the revenue derived from the sale of licences, but the
revenue derived from the collection of fur royalties has increased considerably, and we find that
the total revenue collected in the Division during the past year comes within a few hundred
dollars of the revenue collected in 1927.
There is a small decrease in the number of prosecutions conducted under the various Acts
pertaining to game and fish. This probably is due to the fact that there were many less hunters
and those who hunted apparently realized the value of game-protection.
As was the case during the previous year, we have had a great deal of assistance and
co-operation from the various Game Associations, principally the B.C. Fish & Game Protective
Association, and I wish, therefore, in conclusion, to express my thanks to the N.C.O.'s and men
of the Division and the members of the Game Associations for their loyal support in an honest
endeavour to protect the game in the Division during the year 1928. REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAAIE   WARDEN,  1928. H 35
REPORT ON OPERATIONS OF THE ELK LAKE GAME FARAI.
By J. AAr. Jones, Constable i/c
I beg to submit my annual report for 1928, dealing with the operations of the Elk Lake
Game Farm and the propagation of game animals and birds. The farm, up to the present, is
in a position where considerable land-clearing is necessary if greater numbers of birds are to
be raised.
The following is a statement of the birds and animals raised at the farm during the year
under review:—
Pheasants in pens on December 31st, 1927      2,700
Breeding stock consisting of  ,      375
Hen pheasants      300
Cock pheasants         75
Strayed from breeding pens         25
Number of eggs laid (approximate number)       4,300
Set under hens   4,000
Small late eggs used for feeding       300
Young pheasants reared      3,000
Now in pens   2,250
Casualties       350
Strayed (approximate number)       100
Shipped   '.      300
Eggs received from Colville State Game Farm         200
Hatched       100
Silver pheasants  8
Ducks in pens on December 31st, 1928   75
Canada geese in pens on December 31st. 1928  14
Old geese        10
Young geese from year's breeding   5
Died    1
Muskrats in pens on December 31st. 1928  23
Old muskrats         17
Young muskrats from year's breeding  0
Wild turkeys in pens on December 31st, 1928  10
Stock birds          3
Eggs '.       22
Hatched      '.  9
Died, one stock bird and one young bird    2
Vermin destroyed.—Domestic cats, 6;   hawks. 10.
In regard to the propagation of wild turkeys, owing to arrival of these birds during the
breeding season they were delayed in laying and the eggs were not so fertile as they would
otherwise have been if the birds had been received earlier. As to the muskrats at the farm,
I regret to state that this year's operations have not been very succcessful owing to improper
mating. This is the first year the geese have bred and I think we may expect a considerable
increase during the coming year. ■
During the year 1928 birds were liberated in different parts of the Province, all these birds
being shipped from the farm:   Pheasants, 3.068;   quail, 500. H 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX.
Page.
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms licences, January 1st, 1928, to December 31st.
1928  37
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences, January 1st, 1928.
to December 31st, 1928  38
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from fur royalties,
1928   39
Statement showing particulars of skins on which royalty was paid, 1928  40
Bounties paid, January 1st, 1928, to December 31st, 1928  41
Statement showing fur confiscated, 1928  42
Statement showing firearms confiscated, 1928  43
Statement showing estimated expenditure, fiscal year 1928-29  43
List of guides, 1928  43
Hunting accidents. 1928  46
Statement showing big-game trophy fees paid, 1928  47
Prosecutions  (Police Divisions), 1928  51
Statement of migratory game birds banded at McGillivray Creek Game Reserve, 1928  53
List showing personnel of Game Branch, British Columbia Police, 1928  64
Statement showing returns of fur-farmers, 1928  68
Statement showing census returns on migratory game birds, 1928  77 •M
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H 37 II 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue beeived from Sale of Nox-besioext Licences, January 1st, 192S,
to December 31st, 1928.
Government
Agents.
General
Firearms
and Anglers.
No.
Amount.
Weekly Bird.
No.
Amount.
Season Anglers.
No.
Amount.
Daily Anglers.
No.
Amount.
Total.
Alberni	
Ashcroft	
Atlin	
Clinton	
Cranbrook '.	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Fort Fraser	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops..	
Kaslo	
Lillooet	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster.
Penticton	
Pouce Coupe	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Smithers	
Telegraph Creek...
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Williams Lake	
Wilmer	
Totals	
4
'7
1
7
4
10
3
17
20
4
DO
IS
S
29
13
4
13
47
1
41
15
9
$50.00
50.00
100.00
175.00
25.00
175.00
100.00
250.00
75.00
425.00
500.00
100.00
2,475.00
450.00
200.00
725.00
325.00
125.00
100.00
325.00
1,175.00
25.00
1,025.00
375.00
225.00
$10.00
25.00
'5,00
10
32
11
13
1'2
1
23
36
23
74
1
883
$9,575.00
$40.00
$100.00
40.00
320.00
50.00
110.00
130.00
70.00
120.00
10.00
230.00
70.00
360.00
•50.00
30.00
30.00
:25O.00
50.00
740.00
10.00
65
10
77
253
39
245
4
9
204
31
SI
82
313
107
3
11
3
29
26
7
3'5
■22
$117.00
24.00
3.00
135.00
454.00
65.00
268.00
25.00
13.'00
284.00
38.00
17.00
179:00
136.00
422.00
2:21.00
2.00
24.00
24.00
20.00
61.00
78.00
14.00
126.00
43.00
$217.00
24.00
50.00
93.00
'235.00
949.00
140.00
553.00
255.00
263.00
429.00
5S3.00
10.00
17.00
909.00
306.00
3/257.00
721.00
200.00
757.00
24.00
24.00
345.00
155.00
61.00
100.00
325.00
1.49S.00
114.00
3.S96.00
385.00
268.00
$2,750.00
1,666
$2,793.00
$15,15S.OO •
REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN,  1928.
H 39
or Tax on Fur, January 1st, 1928, to December 31st, 1928.
Government
Agent.
Resident
Fdr-traders.
Non-resident
Fur-traders.
FUR-TAX.
Taxidermists.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
5
3
5
4
3
1
32
'2
3
4
'2
'2
1
30
17
17
13
2
11
14
41
'2
2'2
24
1
$125.00
1
1
1
_ 3~
10S
8
11
18
1
28
2
7
60
34
25
1
43
14
10
26
6
27
7
8
124
121
6S
3
30
57
11
12
29
639
19
70
25
8
$344.68
12.59
62.71
467.92
25.00
'236.72
3.25
22.79
301.72
1,490.38
106.49
.30
137.93
22.19
12.79
'210.33
21.75
394.2:2
23.41
97.90
6,603.98
4,147.03
2,476.87
7.33
S83.01
3,803.34
20.97
66.31
404.63
28,540.94
101.28
166.54
86.0S
57.49
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
4
$469.68
12.39
75.00
125.00
100.00
75.00
25.00
137.71
Atlin	
592.92
125 00
$5.00
316.72
Cumberland	
28.25
22.79
$200.00
5.00
706.72
S00.00
50.00
2 290.38
Golden	
5.00
161.49
.30
75.00
5.00
217 93
Kaslo	
22.19
'50.00
100.00
62.79
310.33
21.75
50.00
50.00
25.00
750.00
425.00
425.00
444.22
3.00
SO.41
12:2.90
•200.00
7,553.98
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
5.00
5.00
4,577.03
2,906.87
7.33
Quesnel	
325.00
30.00
3.00
1,213.01
3,853.34
20.97
275.00
350.00
1,025.00
50.00
550.00
600.00
23.00
341.51
Telegraph Creek...
Vancouver	
754.63
200.00
20.00
5.00
20.00
29,783.94
156.28
736.54
686.08
82.49
Totals
203
$6,575.00
$600.00
1,675
$51,563.07
17
$85.00
$58,S23.07
Revenue derived from Sale of Fur-traders' and Taxidermists' Licences and from Royalty
- H 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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Ph REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN,  192S.
H 41
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st. 1928.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Big-homed
Owls.
Total.
1
7
1
8
2
3
3
82
36
48
35
2
3
11
75
3
129
3
23
1
2
105
19
6
26
2
4
5
2
11
19
37
5
1
37
6
4
7
2
1
23
50
40
6
115
1
218
270
106
136
136
454
6
23
225
56
9
10
113
363
426
176
39
5
64
45
244
124
308
20
■   414
1
1
13
100
2
141
17
18
3
63
49
103
6
1
6
2
8
24
33
$920.00
807.50
Atlin	
110.00
1,904.50
1,983.50
4,320.00
760.00
1,022.50
995.50
2,009.00
3,431.25
250.00
366.00
Merritt 	
1,758.00
Nanaimo	
440.00
1,158.50
1,584.00
1,502.50
New Westminster	
1,276.50
4,854.00
3,764.50
1,506.50
583.00
113.00
645.50
1,432.50
966.00
5,276.50
2,514.50
2,454.00
Totals...	
452
444
3,672
1,025
$50,709.25
Note.—Bounty paid as follows:   Wolves, $15 each ;   cougars, $40 each ;
$5 each, and $7.50 each ;   big-horned owls, 50 cents each.
coyotes, part of year, $2 each,
Comparative Statement op Bounties paid from 1922 to 1928.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
7,095
20
S9
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923
14,840.00
1924	
1925
172
20,398.40
24,397.00
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927
65,377.95
1928
1,025 •
50,709.25
Totals    .. ..
2,083
1,876
•53,164
69,431
4,803
7,204
18,822
$277,294.40 II 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List op Fur confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January' 1st, 1928,
to December 31st, 1928.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Police
Division.
19:28.
Feb. 8
7
1
March   10
22
Oct. 3
25
Nov. 5
March 24
June 2
Oct. 16
Dec. 18
Jan. 17
March 30
April      4
30
May
Feb.
Oct.
Nov.
12
2
2
31
31
3
26
23
M..
Boyd, J.
Dick, H	
John.T	
Swansky, T	
Markusen, P	
Paton, J	
Thompson, J	
Gas, J	
Bergen, E.	
Vandt, S	
Pat.Ng	
Boyd, J.K	
Lapachuck, B	
Mackenzie, D. G	
Blankenship, F	
Louie, Wm	
Pigeon, F	
Renshaw, E. T	
Holem, E	
Joseph, Chief A. (Ind.).
Joe, Felix (Ind.)	
Eexford, E	
Oliver, Wm	
Wigins, E	
Totals..
Hilliers	
Friendly Cove....
Friendly Cove....
Campbell River..
Wasa Lake	
Victoria	
San Juan River..
Phillips Arm	
Canyon	
Merritt	
Wigwam	
Revelstoke	
Fawn	
Kamloops	
Stump Lake	
Blacktown	
Hanceville	
Loos	
McBride	
Harrison Mills...
Harrison Mills....
Mission	
Cloverdale	
Coquitlam	
"A'
"A'
"A'
"A'
"A'
"A'
"A'
"A'
" B '
" C '
" B '
'■ B '
"C
"C
"C
"C
"C"
" D'
"D '
" E '
" E '
"E'
" E':
"E '■'
15
30
28
12
11
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of surrendered coyote-pelts and confiscated fur during 192S, $1,709.75. REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME  WARDEN,  192S.
H 43
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 192S,
to December 31st, 1928.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Police
Division.
Kind
confiscated.
19:28.
Jan.
18
Feb.
7
4
Sept.
20
25
Oct.
20
Nov.
22
May
8
,,
16
16
Sept.
13
Oct.
17
Nov.
"2
24
..
20
'26
Feb.
2
Dec.
1
Jan.
19
Feb.
27
June
'21
Sept.
25
29
Oct.
23
ff
24
,,
27
,,
27
Nov.
1
Dec.
31
Anderson, H	
John, Thomas	
Pollock, E	
Shaughnessy, A	
Dosenberger, A	
Purvey, C. R	
Brown, G	
Salanski, J 	
Stiraker, II	
Dolphin, J	
Bates, A....	
Blagbone, C'.W	
Bramell, G	
Mathson, A	
Knight, E. S	
Ross, E	
Renshaw, E. T	
Burmyto, N	
Shimano, K	
Yamada, H	
Sugaya, T	
Neroy, H	
Nippa, E	
Farino, T 	
Cunningham, W. (Ind.).
Armstrong, R	
Ellingsen, E	
Isogai, T	
Tanaka, U	
Duncan Bay	
Friendly Cove'..
Nootka	
Alert Bay	
Chemainus	
Duncan	
Fernie	
Nelson	
Nelson	
Revelstoke	
Gold Creek	
Wilmer	
Nelson	
Likely	
Redstone.	
Loos	
Prince George	
Lulu Island	
Lake Buntzen	
Pitt Lake	
Kerrisdale	
New Westminster.
Straiton	
Port Hammond	
New Westminster.
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Steveston	
'A'
1 A '
' A '
' A '
' A'
' A '
• A '
•B '
■ B '
• B ■
■ B '
■ B '
■ B '
■ B '
C '
C '
• D '
■ D '
' E '
■ E '
• E '
• E '
• E '
• E '
■ E '
■ b '
• E '
■ E '
•E '
1 auto, shotgun.
1 pump shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle ; 1 shotgun.
1 pump shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 pump shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 pump shotgun.
1 pump shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 auto, shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
Statement of Estimated Expenditure, Fiscal Year 1928-29.
Provincial Police—
Game Laws Enforcement Branch—
Salaries      $93,397.00
Expenses        63,730.00
Game Conservation Board—
Bounties on and extermination of noxious animals  (including salaries and expenses of hunters)      42,000.00
Game propagation (salaries and expenses, Elk Lake Game Farm)..      12,406.00
Game Conservation Board (salaries, office supplies, and miscellaneous expenses)         8,380.00
Total estimated expenditure  $219,973.00
Estimated expenditure, fiscal year 1927-28  $194,618.00
List of Guides, Season 1928.
Atlin District.
Murphy, N Atlin.
Muchlbauer, T     „
Noland, J. W Atlin.
Prpich, T     „ H 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Barkerville District.
Cochrane, J. D Barkerville.
Duffy, G. M	
Mason, H        „
Reed, F. de W	
Brooks, N Telegraph Creek.
Decker, L	
Farm, Billy	
Frank, B	
Gleason, H	
Hawkins, T	
Thompson, N Barkerville.
Thompson, R        „
Wendle, J	
Guthrie, H : Cottonwood.
Cassiar District.
John, Bear Lake Telegraph Creek.
Jackson, D ...
Jackson, F. A	
McClosky, P	
Simpson, W. S	
AVilliams, M	
Fort
Alexander, R. T Mud River.
Hughes, C. H	
Anderson, F McBride.
Goodell, T. R	
Goodell, W. R	
Johnson, L. M         „
Sweeney, W        „
Britton, H Red Pass.
Dennison, G. M        „
Smith, J. M	
Beirnes, G. M Hazelton.
Gun-a-Noot, S         „
Himadan, P	
Jack, T .'	
Hoy, D. H Fort St. James.
Hollerand, P Hixon.
Harrison,  B Wistaria.
Miller, S. L Nichol.
McNeill. J. W Ootsa Lake.
George District.
Bleskie, N. S Lucerne.
Colebank, G. F Woodpecker.
Carr, S. J Tete Jaune Cache.
Dayton, M Dome Creek.
Haynes, E. B  „
Hooker, J. B	
Jensen, E. H  „
Jensen, E. W  „
Caus, E. P Prince George.
Hargreaves, R. F Mount Robson.
Hargreaves, G. E  „
Hargreaves, R  „
Moon, F  ,,
Saladana, J  „
McGaghran, J Salmon Valley.
Ridler, T Willow River.
Sios, M. L Fraser Lake.
Thomas, H. J Giscome.
Anderson, D Clearwater Station.
Case, M. D	
Kamloops District.
Glover, G. M Clearwater Station.
Ray, J. B	
Lillooet District.
Archie, T Canim Lake.
Archie, Geo  „
Swan, J  ,.
Moore, K. B Tatla Lake.
Rioux, E Fawn.
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Kootenay District.
Boiven, W Natal.
Baker, M. C      „
Baker, M      „
Nordstrom,  C	
Stork, W      „
Booth, R Wasa.
Cowerby, J. L      ,,
Cartwright, G Revelstoke.
Munro, J. H  „
Canning, R. F Skookumchuck.
West, C. D	
Conover, H. W Castledale.
Fromey, C. E	
Sheek, W. P	
Thomas, W. S	
Gilbert, F Field.
Dilworth, J Athalmer.
LeGrandeur, E        „
Rutherford, M. G	
Yearling, W         „
Fenz, W Golden.
Lawrence, C. G        „ 	
REPORT  OF THE  PROVINCIAL  GAME  WARDEN,   1928.
H 45
Kootenay District—Continued.
Harrison, G. II Banff.
Kain, C Wilmer.
Nixon, G. AV Tnvermere.
Nixon, AA7  „
Nixon, W Radium Plot Springs.
Riviere, G. F Crowsnest.
Riviere, H. Y         „
AA7oodrow, F Rosebery.
AAledeman, O. AA" Leanchoil.
AVise, C. C Corbin.
Prince Rupert District.
Balmain, F Butedale.
Edwards, R. A Atnarko.
Peace River District.
Cameron, P South Pine River.
Callio, S Hudson Hope.
Kiely, AV. S	
Piquette, M	
Ross, J. A  „
Thomas, J. M	
Harrington, J Fort St. John.
Gladu, P Kelly Lake.
Cochrane, AV. T Rolla.
Golata, F. AV     „
Hill, W     „
Cassie, F. C Arras.
Napoleon, J     „
Quesnel District.
Brammer, C   Likely.
Burkholtz, E	
DeWees, R      „
Hamilton, M        „
Hamilton, R     „
Johnson, J. W      „
Maxwell, T      „
Stephenson, A      „
Tighe, J. H      :,
Wyllie, R. R	
McLeese, P Ochiltree.
Collins, J. M Keithley Creek.
Gaspard, E Horsefly.
Hooker, F. C         ,,
Parminter, J. AA'         „
Patenaude, G. B         „
Reid, W. H	
Walters, G        „
AValters, E. L	
Johnnie, C Hanceville.
MacKill, J Klinaklini.
Nanaimo District.
Smith, J. C Comox.
Vancouver District.
French, J. AAT   Vancouver.
AVilliams, A. B	
Mansell, F North Arancouver.
Phillips, F. A  „ a .
£■§•9
■S'o
•sgg
a j)
3 A B B0
■3 s B  ■
CD U CD    2
■-. ci ■-. .a
P3 U Ai oo
o S w
m
U>
00
a ? ** 3
■3 o
.a
a:
c  ^
§3  °
^ a o
■" „ .5
M° a-
■s a t« •«
& 3 .s «
o S ^
in   O   ^
S  K
a-
-2
u
3
6*
;-
fit
&
C
O
id
a
O
■5 (h
B
ft
3)
Cf,
bjo a
U
ci
O
\t
fcj
43  ^!
fcu
XI
a ed
;i.
0
a
& ■£
^
7.
a;
'—
*r?
§ S a:
« -3 £ 3
■S »|aS*
— as a
V  r,
a ,te
M
> 3
a js
G> 02 O
a |
6 S
'■2 i § a I a •&■
d   -h . ^ (« ^    ?
3   S ,-5 CJ O O   C
<y pq <; > M « ^3
^ fp       QJ
O a
•j S.O'
»!?g:
: fe       P
■a a a      ^-
<i a
Q pq ?
S£i
ha g
a c .—
A. S5
Sc &
5
a M
£3 REPORT OF THE  PROVINCIAL GAME  AVARDEN,  1928.
H 47
Bio-came Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1928, to December 31st, 1928.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
mo
a p
m &
™ o
aP5
CD u
MS
Amount.
Atlin—
Booth, A. A'., Chicago, 111	
Galloway, Dr. C. B., Evanston, 111	
Blackett, H., Chicago, 111	
Gamewell, J. M., North Carolina	
Booth, F. B., San Francisco	
Barkerville—
Lombardi, M. E., Berkeley, Cal	
Milton, M. C, Oakland, Cal	
Aubert, C. C, Bellingham, Wash	
Pfortes, Dr. R. E., Canton, Ohio	
Laiblin, C. A., Canton, Ohio	
Gray, J. W., Toronto, Ont	
Grant, J. W., Fort Worth, Texas	
Cumberland—
Lile, M. C, Seattle, Wash..	
Pickering, F. C, Mount Vernon, Wash
Fowler, G. W., Mount Vernon, Wash..
Fox, W. L., Jr., Mount Vernon, Wash
Riskell,  Geo., Mount Vernon, Wash....
Cameron, B., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Smithbeg, O., Everson, Wash	
Martin, J., Bellingham, Wash	
Serrurier, G. P., Lynden, Wash	
Hartzelt, A. W., Lynden, Wash	
Craighead, C. L., Lynden, Wash	
Clinton—
Buffurn,  A.  D.,  Cal 	
Pyle, J., Lemoore, Cal	
Cambern, J. A., Spokane, Wash	
Cranbrook—
Richman, F. I., Los Angeles, Cal	
Fort Fraser—
Atkins, W. A., Indianapolis 	
Golden—
Van A7lick, E. A., New York	
ATan A7lick, L. A., New York	
Woltenham, F. AV., Kansas City	
Neely, R. M., Lima, Ohio	
Frye, S. H., Finlay, Ohio	
Hunter, J. G., Lima, Ohio	
Wright, W. J., Hackensack, N.J	
Boettger, T., Hackensack, N.J	
White, S., Beloit, Wis	
White, Mrs. F. E., Beloit, Wis	
Greenwood—
Fairbanks, F. M., Seattle, AVash	
Oules, L. A., Fall City, Wash	
AA'arren,  M.,  Chesaw,  AVash	
Kamloops—
Bennett, F. A., Pomeroy, Wash	
Reichert, O., Pomeroy, Wash	
Chapman, L. F., Spokane, AVash.	
Senften, D., Ohio	
Lillooet—
Hinckley, W. R., Seattle, Wash	
MacDonald, D. K., Seattle, Wash	
$90.00
130.00
105.00
210.00
105.00
30.00
55.00
25.00
65.00
95.00
25.00
50.00
35.00
15.00
5.00
5.00
15.00
5.00
lo.OO
10.00
15.00
'5.00
'5.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
35.00
40.00
'25.00
55.00
15.00
65.00
50.00
70.00
30.00
25.00
40.00
40.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
65.00
5'5.00
55.00 H 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1928, to December 31st, 1928—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Stecies.
CD  t.
«o
aM
M o
Amount.
New Westminster—
Griffin,  H.  O., Bellingham,  AVash	
Hollingsworth, O. R., Bellingham, W7ash	
Whitlow, Dr. L., Seattle, Wash	
Dent, H. A., Seattle, Wash	
McTaggart, G.,  Seattle, AA7ash	
McTaggart, D.,  Seattle, Wash	
Arentsen, N., Seattle, Wash	
Arentsen, H., Seattle, Wash	
Groves, Dr. Sumas, Wash	
Gallagher, J. A., Corvallis, Ore	
Ray, W. R., San Francisco, Cal	
Johnson, A., Marpole, B.C	
Nanaimo—
Brents, P., Bellingham, Wash	
Mattson, E., Bellingham, Wash	
Evans, T. W., Bellingham, Wash :	
Griffin, H. O., Bellingham, Wash	
Leegor, F. W., Lynden, AVash	
Schafer, P., Montesano, Wash	
Schafer, H., Montesano, Wash	
Stockbridge, F. D., Montesano, Wash	
Ashland,  G., LaConner, Wash	
Nelson, H., LaConner,  Wash	
Penticton—
Heastand, F. D.,  San Monica	
McNeill, H. G., Ellensburg, Wash	
Prince George—
Herman, A., New York	
Grey, P. N., New York	
McLaren, W. B., Spokane, Wash	
Boomer, G. R., Spokane, Wash	
Dobbs, S. C, Atlanta, Ga	
Schaffier, S. C, Sand Point, Idaho	
Smith, S.,  South Bend, Ind	
Meyerding, Dr. H. M., Rochester	
Loving, M. W.,  Chicago, III	
Nostrand, W. H. R., Mill Valley	
Midgley, D., Ford Creek, Okla	
Cobb, W. R., Louisville, Ky	
Bartlett, A. G., Louisville, Ky	
Bottenfield, O. C, Pittsburg	
Durnell, M. F., SpringHeld, Mo	
Duffarn, W. A., London, England	
Nelson, J. W., Baltimore	
Beach, Dr. L. E., Baltimore	
Wanamaker, A. T. ; McKenny, M. W., Seattle
Wash	
AVorkman, Jas., Belfast	
King, Dr. B. T., Seattle, Wash ,
Bergland, F. L., Wilmington	
Bergland, AV.  S.,  Wilmington	
Goodman, Col. C	
Tuppett, F. D., Johnson, Pa	
Wright, A. G. ; Wright, Miss M.; Bingham, J.
Toledo, Ohio	
Butler,  Jas.,  Saskatoon	
Heisler,  C,  Saskatoon.	
$25.00
10.00
25.00
. 25.00
10.00
10.00
15.00
15.00
5.00
25.00
40.00
5.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
10.00
15.00
10.00
80.00
5.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
115.00
l'o.OO
70.00
95.00
70.00
25.00
95.00
15.00
75.00
75.00
25.00
15.00
90.00
90.00
50.00
80.00
'25.00
25.00 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN,  1928.
H 49
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1928, to December 31st, 1928—Continued.
Species.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
3|
CD U
MO
i4
CD    .
a a
™ o
Sm
& u
Mo
a
o
•2
'u
a
to
a
%
u
CD
CD
a
3
o
o
u
CD    •
O CD
a
a
-M
a .
3o
CD
m
O
o
a
Pi
CD
CD
JS
a
a
Amount.
Pouce Coupe—
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
4
1
1
:2
1
1
1
1
■2
2
2
4
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
i
i
i
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
'2
2
4
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
2
i
i
i
'2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
:2
1
4
2
....
.  2
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
$75.00
90.00
Leadbetter, F. W., Portland	
90.00
90.00
130.00
80.00
Heckman, I., Adamstown, Pa.; Stor, N., Den-
335.00
125.00
Quesnel—
25.00
25 00
Harley, C. S., Seattle, Wash           .......
40 00
Craig   C. E., Three Rives   Mich.    ..           	
2'5 00
Ulrich, H. M., Spokane, Wash	
25.00
Revelstoke—
Griffiths, F. W., Elgin, 111	
15.00
25.00
Smithers—
155.00
100 00
125.00
Cokell, A. H., Chicago, 111	
140 00
Telegraph Creek—
Ullery, Dr. G. C, Springfield	
120 00
125 00
145.00
ISO 00
Biddle, N., Philadelphia	
170.00
160 00
185.00
170.00
Benedict, H. A., Flushing,  N.Y	
Stone,  W. M., Flushing, N.Y	
15 00
Nash, F. J., Flushing, N.Y	
55 00
25 00
Hunter, G., Flushing,  N.Y	
15 00
Victoria-
25 00
Stewart, J. T., Seattle, Wash	
10 00
Hall, A., Seattle, Wash	
5.00
Christen,  P.,  Seattle,  Wash	
10 00
10 00
15 00
McClellan, T. ; McClellan, Mrs. T., Los Angeles
Vancouver—
Hill   R   L., Miami, Fla..              	
135.00
'25 00
65.00
40.00
Mall   Thos.,  Hollygrove,  Cal	
120 00
35 00
Wrare   Dr. H. B    Chicago   111	
25 00
Bartlett, R. P., San Diego	
Konig, G. F. H., New York	
35.00
25.00
25.00
270.00
70 00
90.00 H 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1928, to December 31st, 1928—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
SB
MC5
3M
CD  CD
OS
St
7, be
Vancouver—Continued.
Reese, M. A., Seattle, Wash	
Hyatt, R. A., Seattle, AVash	
Bird, S. E., Seattle, Wash	
Ward, R„ Seattle, Wash	
Purdy, G. A., Seattle, AVash	
Healy, J. A., Arlington, Wash	
Duryee, K. T., Seattle, Wash	
Henderson, C. B., San Francisco....
Pifft, R. H., Buffalo, N.Y	
Plevan, L. L., Santa Anna, Cal	
Snowdon, T. D., Memphis, Tenn	
Wishart, L. W., Hawaii	
Williams Lake—
Baer, F. N., Chicago, 111	
Phillips,  M	
Baumert, J. A., Antwerp, N.Y	
Barnet, L., Los Angeles, Cal	
Crzynski, Dr. P. J., Chicago	
MeMath, H. K., Willows, Cal	
AVeinrich, F. B., Willows, Cal:	
McClellan, Mrs. D., Los Angeles	
Dickerson, J. F., Los Angeles	
A7an Schaaek, R. H., Jr., Chicago...
Wilmer—
Everett, R. W., Brevard, N.C	
Hart, G. M., Brevard, N.C	
Wagner, Wm., New York	
Smith, E. L., New York	
Cummings, O. P., New York	
Kellogg, Dr., New York	
Krippen, Wm., New York	
Carpenter, R. E., Newport, AVash...
Elkins,   I.,  Newport,  AVash	
Everett, R. N., Brevard, N.C	
Clarke,  H.,  Brevard, N.C	
Cummings, U. B., Tell City, Idaho
Dougherty, J., Pottstown, Pa	
Hampton, W. S., Pottstown, Pa	
Howell, C. F„ Cusick, Wn	
Totals	
42
41      89
24   1102
89
1
1
71
11
18
$15.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
25.00
15.00
90.00
100.00
5.00
25.00
15.00
65.00
75.00
80.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
90.00
60.00
50.00
40.00
55.00
■25.00
25.00
25.00
'25.00
■50.00
80.00
40.00
40.00
70.00
50.00
$9,345.00
Note.—With reference to trophies taken by Dr. Bakes, this gentleman was granted a special permit
to collect specimens of big-game animals for scientific purposes. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AVARDEN,  1928.
H 51
PROSECUTION'S   (PROVINCIAL POLICE DIVISIONS),  JANUARY  1ST,  1928,  TO  DECEMBER 31ST,   1928.
Description of Offence.
Game Animals.
Exceeding bag limit on big game	
Game on premises of logging camp, etc	
Hunting deer between sunset and sunrise	
Killing  or  having  in   possession   game   animals   of
female sex 	
Killing or having game animals in possession dur
ing close season	
Killing fur-bearing animals between one hour after
sunset and one hour before sunrise	
Killing mountain-goat under 1 year of age	
Possession of deer under 1 year of age	
Possession  of pelts  of  fur-bearing animals  during
the close season	
Running deer with dogs.	
Selling big game	
Trapping bear 	
Game Birds.
Allowing   dogs   to   hunt   game   birds   during   close
season :	
Exceeding daily bag limit on game birds	
Game birds on premises of shop, etc	
Hunting game birds from power-boat	
Hunting or  molesting game  birds  in  a prohibited
area 	
Hunting game birds between sunset and sunrise	
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle	
Killing   or   hunting   game   birds   during   the   close
season   	
Possession of game birds during the close season	
Possession of migratory non-game birds during the
close season 	
Licences.
Buying fur without a licence	
Carrying firearms without licence	
Failing to produce licence on request of Game
Warden   	
Failing to make returns under S.F.L 	
Guiding without a licence	
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied
by an adult	
Making false application for trapping licence	
Non-resident angling without licence	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence..	
Non-British subject carrying firearms without required licence 	
Using another person's licence	
Firearms.
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same
from an automobile, etc	
Carrying unplugged pump shotgun	
Carrying firearms or traps in game reserve	
Discharging firearms on or across highway in municipality 	
Possession of an automatic shotgun	
See Foot-note.
■4S
- a
as
s a
OS
-. a
HS
: a
10
2
28
11
Z CD
* a
So
Ho
2
4
1
2
4
1
25
9
25
0
12
13
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
$125.00
7O.00
100.00
1,105.00
50.00
25.00
285.00
185.00
115.00
20.00
10.00
150.00
10.00
110.00
140.00
20.00
40.00
10.00
690.00
340.00
150.00
200.00
695.00
30.00
20.00
70.00
20.00
100.00
115.00
20.00
150.00
220.00
115.00
125.00
70.00
20.00 H 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Police Divisions), January 1st, 1928, to December 31st, 1928
—Continued,
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
- Q
Trapping.
Interfering with licensed trapper's trap-line	
Non-resident trapping without a licence	
Setting out poisoned bait on a trap-line	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence	
Trapping during close season	
Trapping on other than a registered trap-line	
Miscellaneous.
Approaching within 25 yards of a fur-farm enclosure  	
Buying fur taken during close season	
False information to an officer	
Failing to keep record-book of fur purchased	
Fur-farming without permit	
Feeding game-meat to fur-bearing animals	
Trespassing 	
Violating conditions of permit	
B.C. Special Fishery Laws.
Catching redfish (Kokanee) in stream where fish
ascend to spawn	
Exceeding daily bag limit on trout....	
Fishing with fish-roe	
Fishing with nets and selling fish illegally	
Fishing for trout in non-tidal waters other than by
angling 	
Jigging salmon	
Selling trout under weight	
Taking trout under 8 inches in length	
Gaol Sentences.
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Killing game animals of the female sex..
Killing game birds during the close season	
Killing game animals during the close season	
Pit-lamping  -.	
Possession of game animals under 1 year of age	
Possession of game during close season	
Trapping without a licence	
Trapping without first registering a trap-line.....	
Possession of game over bag limit	
Trespassing 	
Totals :...
3
MS
56
62
OS
: O
74
*     10
OS
a a
RS
= a
42
44
140
140
33
33
% CD
-~ co
+jO
E-i o
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
1
2
12
12
10
387
406
3
1
4
1
2
2
1
13
420"
439
$50.00
50.00
85.00
230.00
480.00
115.00
30.00
100.00
65.00
20.00
10.00
10.00
40.00
10.00
6.00
40.00
10.00
40.00
7.50
105.00
$7,283.50
2 months.
1, 14 days ; 1,
90 days.
1,15 days ; 1,
60 days.
30 days.
30 days each.
1,15 days ; 1,
90 days ; 1,
1 month.
14 days each.
3 months.
14 days each.
14 days.
2 months.
Note.—" A " Division : Vancouver Island area and part of mainland. " B " Division : Kootenay and
Boundary areas. " C " Division : Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division :
Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division : Vancouver
Coast, and Lower Mainland areas. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AVARDEN,  1928.
H 53
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations eor 1928 at McGillivray Creek
Game Reserve.
(Banding-station operated by Constable R. M. Stewart, B.C.P. Police, Chilliwack Detachment.)
Date.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Retukns.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
Oct. 20
A-602501
A-802502
A-602503
A-602504
A-602505
A-602506
A-602507
A-602508
A-602509
A-602510
A-602511
A-602512
A-602513
A-602514
A-602515
A-602516
A-602517
A-602518
A-602519
A-602520
A-602521
A-602522
A-602523
A-602524
A-602525
A-602526
A-602527
A-602528
A-602529
A-602530
A-602531
A-602532
A-602533
A-602334
A-602535
A-602536
A-602537
A-602538
A-602539
A-602540
A-602541
A-537001
A-537002
A-602542
A-602543
A-602544
A-602545
A-602546
A-602547
A-602548
A-602549
A-602550
A-602551
A-602552
A-602553
A-602554
A-602555
A-602556
A-602557
Ma
Hard 	
1928.
„    20
Male	
„    23
„    23
.,    23
,.    23
„    23
Pin
Ma
tail	
„    23
Hard	
„    23
Male	
„    24
Nov.   25
„    25
„    25
„    27
.,    27
„    28
Dec.     2
Dewdney.
„    28
„    28
Male	
„    29
..    29
„    29
„    29
Dec.     2
2
„    29
„    29
„    29
„    29
Pin
Ma
Gr«
Ma
tail	
Nooksack River, Wash.
„    29
Hard	
„    29
.,    29
,.    29
29
„    29
,.    29
„    30
30
Nov.   1
1
2
4
Male    	
4
-
-
en-winged Teal.	
-
6
Hard    	
Dec.     2
Harrison  River.
6
6
6
6
6
Male    	
„      6
6
.,      6
Nov.   11
Bellingham, AA7ash.
..      6
„      6
.,      6
.,      6
Male	 II 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGillivray Creek
Game Reserve—Continued.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
Nov.  S
A-602558
A-602559
A-602360
A-602561
A-602562
A-602563
A-602564
A-602565
A-602566
A-602567
A-602568
A-602569
A-602570
A-602571
A-602572
A-602573
A-602574
A-602575
A-602576
A-602577
A-602578
A-602579
A-602580
A-602581
A-602582
A-602583
A-602584
A-602585
A-602586
A-602587
A-602588
A-602589
A-602590
A-602591
A-602592
A-602593
A-602594
A-602595
A-602596
A-602597
A-602598
A-602599
A-602600
A-602601
A-602602
A-602603
A-602604
A-602605
A-602606
A-602607
A-602608
A-602609
A-602610
A-602611
A-602612
A-602613
A-602614
A-602615
A-602616
A-602617
A-602618
Mallard      	
Female	
Male	
1928.
9
Dec.      9
Nov.   20
Hatzic.
9
Chilliwack.
9
Female...	
9
9
Male	
9
9
Nov.   19
12
Maple Falls. Wash.
9
Male	
9
9
Female	
9
9
Nov.   15
„      15
„      10
„      10
„      10
9
9
9
Male	
9
9
9
Nov.   25
„      20
„      18
Pitt Lake
9
9
Female	
9
9
9
Alale	
9
9
9
9
Nov.   10
11
Dec.    30
9
Male	
9
Hatzic.
9
Female	
9
9
9
Alale
9
9
9
Pintail	
9
,,      9
9
Mallard	
Alale	
Nov.   18
9
Male	
9
Dec.      4
Nov.   11
„      11
„      12
„      9
9
Alale
9
„      9
„      9
„      9
9
„      9
Male	
9
„      9
Female	
Male	
i.      9
„      9
9
Male	
Nov.   18
.,      9
„      9
Nov.   30
„      9
9
9
Female	
.,      9 REPORT" OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AVARDEN,  1928.
H 55
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Sanding Operations for 1928 at McGillivray Creek
Game Reserve—Continued.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
A-602619
A-602620
A-602621
A-602622
A-602623
A-602624
A-602625
A-602626
A-602627
A-602628
A-602629
A-60263O
A-602631
A-602632
A-602633
A-602634
A-602635
A-602636
A-602637
A-602638
A-602639
A-60264O
A-602641
A-602642
A-602643
A-602644
A-602645
A-602646
A-602647
A-602648
A-602649
A-602650
A-602651
A-602652
A-602653
A-602654
A-602635
A-602636
A-602657
A-602658
A-602659
A-602660
A-602661
A-602662,
A-602663
A-602664
A-602665
A-602666
A-602667
A-602668
A-602669
A-602670
A-602671
A-602672
A-602673
A-602674
A-602675
A-602676
A-602677
A-602678
Mallard
Female	
1928.
9
Dec.   25
State of Washington.
9
Male	
9
Dee.     3
Agassiz.
9
9
9
9
Nov.   18
Ridgefield, B.C.
9
9
0
Nov.  28
„      19
Nicomen Island.
9
Sumas Prairie.
9
9
Male	
Nov.   10
Sumas.
9
9
9
Male	
9
Pintail
Nov.   25   .
Sumas.
9
9
9
9
9
0
Nov.     9
Sumas.
9
9
9
9
Male	
9
9
Male	
Nov.   16
Lynden,  AVash.
9
,,      9
9
Male	
9
9
9
Female	
9
Dec.     1
Harrison River.
9
Male	
9
1
9
9
9
Dec.     8
Dewdney.
9
9
Male	
9
9
9
9
Dec.   18
Nov.   14
„      10
Dec.     8
Liberty, Wash.
9
Sumas Prairie.
9
Sumas.
9
Pitt Meadows.
9
Male	
9
9
g
Female	
9
9
Nov.   11
Hatzic.
9
,,      9
Nov.   20
Sumas.
Male   	
„      <> H 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGillivray Creek
Game Reserve—Continued.
No. of Band.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
A-602679
A-602680
A-602681
A-602682
A-602683
A-602684
A-602685
A-602686
A-602687
A-602688
A-602689
A-602690
A-602691
A-602692
A-602693
A-602694
A-602695
A-602696
A-602697
A-602698
A-602699
A-602700
A-6027'01
A-602702
A-602703
A-602704
A-602705
A-602706
A-602707
A-602708
A-602709
A-602710
A-602711
A-602712
A-602713
A-602714
A-602715
A-602716
A-602717
A-602718
A-602719
A-602720
A-602721
A-602722
A-602723
A-602724
A-602725
A-602726
A-602727
A-602728
A-602729
A-602730
A-602731
A-602732
A-602733
A-602734
A-602735
A-602736
A-602737
A-602738
Ma
lard	
1928.
Dec.      8
Skagit,  Wash.
9
Male    .. .
9
9
Male    ...
0
9
9
Nov.   19
„      10
Pitt Lake
9
Male    	
9
9
Nov.   15
9
Male	
9
9
9
Nov.   19
9
Male    ..
9
Nov.   20
9
9
Male	
9
9
Male    	
9
9
Nov.   23
Dec.      1
9
9
Male     '
9
Dec.      8
„      12
Nov.   25
9
Male
9
Pin
tail	
9
Ma
lard	
9
Nov.   15
9
9
„      9
Male	
9
9
Nov.   18
„      25
„      10
,.      20
9
9
9
Male
9
9
Nov.   10
9
9
9
9
9
9
Nov.   12
9
9
„     9
9
Nov.   20
9
9
Male	
Female	
JIale
Dec.     9
9
9
Nov.   10
9
9
9-
Female	
9
9
9
„      9 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN,  1928.
II 57
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGillivray Creek
Game Reserve—Continued.
Date.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
Nov   9
A-602739
.1-602740
A-602741
A-602742
A-602743
A-602744
A-602745
A-602746
A-602747
A-602748
A-602749
A-60275O
A-602751
A-602752
A-602753
A-602754
537003
537004
537005
A-602755
A-60275'6
A-602757
A-602758
A-602759
A-6027.60
A-602761
A-602762
A-602763
A-602764
A-602765
A-602766
A-602767
A-602768
A-602769
A-602770
A-602771
A-602772
A-602773
A-602774
A-602775
A-602776
A-602777
.1-602778
A-602779
A-602780
A-602781
A-602782
A-602783
A-602784
A-602785
A-602786
A-602787
A-602788
A-602789
A-602790
A-602791
A-602792
A-602793
A-602794
A-602795
Mallard
1928.
9
Male	
9
9
Nov.   10
9
9
Nov.   12
„      9
9
9
Male .
Dec.      2
Nov.   15
Dewdny.
9
Female	
9
,,       	
9
JIale	
„      9
9
9
„      9
Dec.   13
9
Teal     ..         	
Male	
9
9   '
,.    15
,    15
15
Dec.   18
5
,    15
,    15
15
Male
15
,    15
,    15
Dec.   13
15
15
13
Nov.   21
15
JIale
15
15
Male	
Pintail	
Male .
Nov.   16
Sumas.
15
15
JIale
15
15
Alale
Nov.   22
Pitt Lake.
„    15
JIale
15
15
15
JIale.
„    15
Nov.   15
Sumas Trairie. II 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA;
Statement showing
Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGillivray Creek'
Game Reserve—Continued.
Date.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
Nov. 15
„    15
„    15
.,    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
..    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
.,    15
„    15
,,    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„   '15
„    15
,,    15
„    15
„    15
„     15
„    15
.,    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
,,    15
„    13
„    15
„    15
„    15
„   15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
'„    15
„    15
„    15
„    15
„    13
„    15
„    16
,.    15
„    15
..     15
A-602796
A-602797
A-602798
.1-602799
A-602800
A-602801
A-602802
A-602803
A-602804
A-602805
A-6u2S0fl
A-602807
A-6O2S08
A-602809
A-602810
A-602811
A-602812
A-602813
A-602814
A-602813
A-602816
A-602817
A-602818
A-602819
A-602820
A-602821
A-602822
A-602823
A-602824
A-602825
A-602826
A-602827
A-602828
A-602829
A-602830
A-602831
A-602832
A-602833
A-602834
A-602835
A-602836
A-602837
A-602838
A-602839
A-602840
A-602841
A-602842
A-602843
A-602844
A-602845
A-602846
A-602847
A-602848
A-602849
A-602830
A-602851
A-R02852
JIallard	
JIale	
1928.
Chilliwack.
Harrison River.
Barney Lake, Wash.
Sumas Prairie.
Sumas Prairie.
Chilliwack.
Hatzic.
Chilliwack.
Sumas Prairie.
Sumas.
Female	
JIale	
	
Dec.    12
Female	
|
JIale    	
1
Slale    ..
Nov.   25
Dec.   17
	
JIale
Nov.   15
Dec.      3
JIale	
Male ,
Nov.   16
Pintail	
JIallard      	
JIale
JIale            	
JIallard	
Nov.   18
Alale.. .
JIale	
Female	
JIale	
Pintail
Female	
JIallard          	
Male	
Dec.     9
„    15     '     A-602853
„    15          A-602854
„    15     !     A-602853
JIale	
Nov.   19
„      25
1 REPORT  OF THE  PROVINCIAL  GAME  WARDEN,  192S.
H 59
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGillivray Cheek
Game Reserve—Continued.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
Nov. 17
A-602856
.1-602857
A-602858
A-602859
A-602860
A-602861
A-602862
A-602663
A-602864
A-602865
A-602866
.1-602867
A-60286S
A-602869
A-6028'70
.1-602871
A-602872
A-602873
A-602874
A-602876
A-602877
A-602878
A-602879
A-602880
A-602881
A-602882
A-602883
A-602884
A-602885
A-602886
A-602887
A-602888
A-602889
A-602890
A-602891
A-602892
A-602893
A-602894
A-602895
A-602890
A-602897
A-602898
A-602899
A-602900
A-602901
A-602902
A-602903
A-602904
A-602905
A-602906
A-602907
A-602908
A-602909
A-6 02910
A-602911
A-602912
A-602913
A-602914
A-602915
.1-602916
JIale	
1928.
17
Female	
,,    17
17
Male	
Dec.      5
.    17
,    17
.    17
.    17
.    17
Female	
17
„    17
JIale	
17
17
Female	
17
JIale	
Dec.   11
17
Female	
17
17
JIale	
Nov.   20
„      17
Dec.   13
17
17
Chilliwack.
17
17
Female	
17
17
JIale	
17
17
Nov.   28
Pitt Meadows.
17
17
Female	
Dec.     8
Nov.   18
Pitt Meadows.
17
Chilliwack.
JIale	
17
17
17
Dec.      6
17
Nov.   17
Harrison River.
Glenn  A'alley.
17
17
Dec.      1
Sumas Prairie.
JIale	
17
Nov.   25
Harrison Lake.
Nov.   20
A7ancouver. B.C.
Dec.     1
Nov.   18
Sumas Prairie.
„    17
„    17
17
Blaine, Wash.
JIale	
,<    17
„    18
„    18
„    18
„    IS
,.    -8
Dec.      1
Sardis.
Nov.   25
Sumas.
JIale	
-
Nov.   18
Chilliwack.
„    18
„    IS
"
JIale	 H 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGilliyray Creek
Game Reserve—Continued.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
Nov. IS
A-^602917
A-602918
A-602919
A-602920
A-602921
A-602922
.1-602923
A-602924
A-602925
A-602926
A-602927
A-602928
A-602929
A-602930
A-602931
A-602932
A-602933
A-602934
A-602935
A-602936
A-602937
A-602938
A-602939
A-602940
A-602941
A-602942
A-602943
A-602944
A-602945
.1-602946
A-602947
A-602948
A-602949
A-602930
A-602951
A-602952
A-602953
A-602934
A-602955
A-602956
A-602957
A-60295S
A-602959
A-602960
A-602961
A-602962
A-602963
A-602964
A-602965
A-602966
.1-602967
A-602968
A-602969
A-602970
A-602971
A-602972
A-602073
A-602974
.1-602975
A-602976
Female	
1928.
„    18
.,    18
18
JIale	
18
Female	
„    18
„    20
Dec.     6
Chilliwack.
,    20
Male	
20
Female	
„    20
,.    20
20
JIale	
„    20
..    20
Female...	
,    20
Dec.      2
Chilliwack.
,.    20
,.    20
Dec.      9
Chilliwack.
„    20
JIale	
„    20
„    20
„    20
Female	
„    20
JIale	
Nov.   20
Sumas.
,.    20
„    20
„    20
Nov.   20
Sumas.
.„    20
,.    20
„    20
..    20
Dec.    15
Sumas Prairie.
,,     20
„    20
Female	
„    20
..    "0
„    20
„    20
JIale	
„    20
..    20
„    20
„    20
„    20
Female	
„    20
JIale	
„    20
„    20
Female	
„    20
„    20
Dec.     1
Sumas Prairie.
„    20
„    20
JIale	
Female	
Dec.     8
Nicomen Island.
„   20
„   20
.,    20
„    20
„    20
JIale	
„    20
Female	
„    20
JIale	
Dec.   20
„    20
„    20
Female	
,.    20
.,    20
„   °o
JIale	
„    20 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AVARDEN,  1928.
H 61
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGillivhay Creek
Game Reserve—Continued,
Date.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date-
Killed at.
1928.
Nov. 20
A-602977
A-602978
A-602979
A-602980
A-602981
A-602982
A-602983
A-602984
A-602985
A-602986
A-602987
A-602988
A-602989
A-602990
A-602991
A-602992
A-602993
A-602994
A-602993
A-602996
A-602997
A-602998
A-602999
A-603000
A-624000
A-624001
A-624002
A-624003
A-624004
A-624005
A-624006
A-624007
A-624008
A-624009
A-624010
A-624011
A-624012
A-624013
.1-624014
A-624015
A-624016
A-624017
A-624019
A-624020
A-624021
A-624022
A-624023
A-624024
A-624025
A-624026
A-624027
A-624028
A-624029
A-624030
A-624031
A-624032
A-624033
A-624034
A-624035
A-624036
Female	
1928.
,,    20
20
JIale	
Female	
,    20
„    20
„    20
..    20
,,    20
Male	
„    20
,    20
Female	
20
,,    20
Male	
,    20
,    20
Female	
Dec.   17
20
Male	
„    20
„    20
„    20
„    20
20
Female	
,    20
90
Male	
20
BVmale	
20
Male	
30
Female....	
,    30
30
Male	
,    30
Female	
,    30
Dec.   —
Shawnigan Lake, V.I.
2
JIale	
4
4
Dec.      7
4
7
JIale	
8
8
11
11
Dec.   27
Male	
"
11
Female	
„    11
Male	
Female	
11
„    11
„    11
„    11
»
Male	
'
Dec.   15
Nooksack River, Wash.
Female	
„    11
JIale	 H 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGillivray Creek
Game Reserve—Continued.
Date.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
Dec. 11
A-624037
A-62403S
A-624039
A-624040
A-624041
A-624042
A-624043
A-624044
A-624045
A-624040
A-624047
A-624048
A-624049
A-624050
A-624051
A-624032
A-624053
A-624054
A-624033
A-624036
A-624037
A-624058
.1-624059
A-624060
A-624061
A-624062
A-624063
A-624064
.1-624065
A-624066
A-624067
A-624068
A-624069
A-624070
A-624071
A-624072
A-624073
A-624074
.1-624075
.1-624076
A-624077
A-624078
.1-624079
.1-624080
A-624081
A-624082
A-624083
A-624084
A-624085
A-624086
A-624087
A-624088
A-624089
A-624090
A-624091
A-624092
A-624093
A-624094
A-624095
A-624096
JIale	
192S.
JIt. A'ernon,  Wash,
Deroche, B.C.
„    ll
,.   11
,,    11
„    11
,,    11
„    11
,,    11
,    ll
JIale	
„    ll
,,   11
,.    11
„    11
,    ll
„   11
„    11
11
JIale	
„    ll
,    11
,    11
JIale...	
„   11
,    11
„    13
„    13
13
,    13
13
13
13
13
13
JIale	
,    13
,    13
13
13
13
13
13
Male	
13
13
,,    13
„    14
Female	
„    14
Female	
,',    14
Male	
„    14
„    14
„    14
„    14
Female	
,    34
'
Dec.   21
„    14
„    14
JIale	
„    14
Female..	
Male	
,.    14
"
„    14
„    14
„    14
Female	 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN,  1928.
H 63
Statement showing Migratory Game-bird Banding Operations for 1928 at McGillivray Creek
Game Reserve—Continued.
Date.
No. of Band.
Kind of Bird banded.
Sex of Bird
banded.
Returns.
Date.
Killed at.
1928.
Dec. 14
A-624097
A-62409S
A-624099
A-624100
A-624101
A-024102
.1-624103
A-624104
A-624105
A-024106
A-624107
A-624108
A-624109
A-624110
A-624111
A-624112
A-624113
A-624114
A-624115
A-624116
A-624117
A-624118
A-624119
A-624120
A-624122
A-624123
A-624124
A-624125
A-624126
A-624127
A-624128
A-624129
A-624130
A-624131
A-624132
A-624133
A-624135
A-624136
A-624137
A-624138
A-624139
JIallard    ...
Female	
„    14
„    14
JIale	
„    14
Dec.   22
„    14
„    14
JIale	
„    14
Pintail _	
„    14
„    14
Male	
,    14
Female	
,,    14
„    14
„    14
;,    14
Male	
„    14
,    14
JIale	
„    14
Pintail
,.    14
,    14
14
JIale	
,    14
„    14
Female	
JIale	
,    14
„    14
Female	
14
14
JIale	
Dec.   29
„    14
Female	
„    14
14
JIale	
14
,    14
Female	
,    14
JIale	
Female	
Male	
,    14
,    14
14
14
JIale	
14
15
94
"8
Summary of Migratory Game Birds banded, 1928, and Returns on.
Birds banded.
Returns.
Mallards.
Pintail.
Teal, etc.
Mallards.
Pintail.
Teal, etc.
621
15
6
123
2
Total birds banded, 642 ;  returns, 125.
Note —The banding of migratory game birds has been carried on in co-operation with the Dominion
Parks Branch, Ottawa, and the United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C, U.S.A. The
purpose of banding is to .endeavour to ascertain information on bird migration, age of birds, etc. A pintail
banded bv Staff-Sergeant Butler and Sergeant Cunningham at Lulu Island on April 7th, 1924, was killed at
Colusa County, California, on January 12th, 1929. List of Game Constables, British Columbia Police, as at December 31st, 1928.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General  (Minister) R. H. Pooley, K.C victoria.
Provincial Game AVarden Lieut.-Col. J. H. McMullin        „
Chief Game Inspector Major M. Furber       „
Staff-Sergeant Game AVarden F. R. Butler	
Stenographer Miss A. McGregor       „
Game AVarden T. H. M. Conly	
 G. H. Clark	
 W. H. Vickers	
"A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portion of Mainland Coast).
Inspector   T. W. S. Parsons A7ictoria.
Staff-Sergeant Game Warden F. R. Butler	
Game AVarden R. Gidley       ,,
 W. H. Hadley Sidney.
„  R. Marshall Duncan.
„  A. Dunbar Lake Cowichan.
 R. Elliott, Sr Port Renfrew.
„  H. -C. Pyke Nanaimo.
„  A. Monks Alberni.
„  W. V. Fenton Courtenay.
„  O.  Mottishaw Alert Bay.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector   W. R. Dunwoody Nelson.
Corporal-Game AVarden  .C. K. Mackenzie      „
Game Warden R. M. Robertson Penticton.
 A. G. F. Barclay Golden.
„  D. Greenwood Canal Flats.
„  J. E. Ball Kootenay A7alley.
„  I. J. Brown Elk Prairie.
„  N.  Cameron Cranbrook.
„  H. J. Broley Fernie.
„  H. H. A7ickers Nelson.
"C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
Inspector   W. L. Fernie Kamloops.
Corporal-Game Warden  R. D. Sulivan        „
Game AVarden JE. G. Stedham        „
„  C.  Ledoux        „
„  J. A. Quesnel Lumby.
„  W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
„  C. F. Kearns Salmon Arm.
„  G. F. Turner Barkerville.
„  F. Kibbee	
„  F.  Broughton Hanceville.
 L. W. S. Brown Likely.
„  G. D. McKenzie Clinton.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector   W. V. E. Spiller Prince Rupert.
Sergeant-Game AVarden  T. A7an Dyk  „
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Fort St. James.
„  G. H. Soles Prince George. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AVARDEN,  1928. II 65
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and .
Yukon Boundary Districts)—Continued.
Game Warden  J.  S. Clark Fort Nelson.
 T. A. Camm Fort St. John.
Stenographer Miss J. C. St. G. Smyth Prince Rupert.
" E " Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Staff-Sergeant  S. North Vancouver.
Sergeant-Game AVarden  Jas. G. Cunningham         „
Stenographer Miss N. Bryce         „
Game AVarden A. P. Cummins         „
 W.  Clark	
 J. F. Ritchie	
„  AA7. H. Cameron Ladner.
 R. E. Allen : Powell River.
 R. M.  Stewart Chilliwack.
„  J. D. H. Stewart Agassiz.
 A. J. Butler Abbotsford.
„  E. L. Easterbrook Langley.
„  F.  Urquhart Pitt Meadows.
„  J. Murray Port Moody.
Predatory-animal U unters.
Game AVarden E. R. Lee Rock Bay.
„  AV. O. Quesnel Kamloops.
„  C. Shuttleworth Penticton.
Elk Lake Game Farm.
Game Warden (in charge) J. AV. Jones Alctoria.
Game AA7arden E. Boorman        „
 S. H. McCall '.	
 F. H. Greenfield	
 G.  Cuthbert ,
Game Conservation Board (Advisory Body).
Chairman JVI. B. Jackson, K.C Victoria.
Secretary  F. R. Butler       „
Member J. A. Buckham, M.L.A Golden.
 H. F. Kergin, M.L.A Alice Arm.
 Major Allan Brooks Okanagan Landing.
 Dr. P. D. MacSween New Westminster.
 J. Murray Vanderhoof.
 T. B. Booth Nanaimo.
 C. E. Whitney-Griffiths Victoria.
 R. Harrison Pritchard. .
H 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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H 67
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II 69
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Johnson, G. B., North Pacific Cannery ■	
James, C. S., Burnaby	
Jones, Mrs.  I., Wyatt Bay	
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Lang, A. V.,  Seven Oaks P.O	
Litte, F. G., C. W., and A, W., Prince George	
Lakeview Fox Farm, Quilchena	
Landry, O. T., Bella Coola	
Lust,  A., Forest  Grove...	 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AVARDEN. 1928.
H 71
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II 75
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a o a Bied Census, 1928, showing Monthly Census taken by Game Constables in each Police Division.
H 77
Division.
Police
Dccks.
Geese.
Swans.
Month.
14
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B a
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Total.
"A'
"B "
"C"
" D "
"B"
"A"
"B "
"C"
"D"
"E "
"A"
"B"
"C"
"D"
"B "
"A"
"B"
"C"
"D "
"E "
"A"
"B"
"C"
"D "
"B "
"A"
"B "
"C"
"D"
"B "
"A"
" B "
"C"
"D"
"E"
"A"
"B"
"C"
" D"
"B "
"A"
" B "
"C"
" D"
"B"
"A "
" B "
" C "
" D "
"B"
"A"
" B "
"C"
" D"
"E"
"A"
"B "
"C"
"D"
"E"
Totals
7-2
7
139
21
4
31
48
4
10
83
7
'55
46
37
105
9
10
17
1
14
40
12
2
18
85
7
13'
4
18
49
7
16
21
3
2
65
47
30
24
7
3
'2
9
20
101
4
10
19
19
'20
13
52
23
16
12
42
63
300
11
40
7
431
3
48
1:23
3
25
700
25
84
470
2
360
2
50
411
3
1,527
'200
8
100
12
18
65
9
76
4
43
6
7
36
40
80
80
SO
16
68
72
14
6
8
19
2
6
3
1
15
5
9
25
15
11
63
2
45
290
3
80
3
5
300
23
5
12
39
7
16
20
67
26
100
173
731
27
8
100
50
4
3
4
4
308
200
20
200
150
80
2
15
9
4
30
4
9
8
45
9
15
10
7
6
2
7
3
9
'5
1
10
46
9
42
45
■20
14
14
37
60
12
32
26
10
23
4
21
1S'7
24
375
22
2
800
17
47
25
'   250
1   139
19
4
140
■241
2
43
230
100
1
22
400
6
26
27
7
250
2
200
3
509
60
28
850
870
4
650
486
111
19
161
314
180
35
286
95
185
31
390
240
63
485
51
340
20
121
533
40
5
5
6
200
11
17
40
176
348
21
100
363
217
156
665
,401
330
106
327
8
160
'20
41
13
15
5SO
62
25
749
166
24
60
511
313
33
111
60
23
61'2
43
'52
4
2
362
2
6
22
268
19
83
SO
6
676
27
6
476
14
8
36
279
1,015
7
290
6
503
21
83
40
50
2
4
SO
4
75
11
102
50
2'2
4
100
13
19
25
16
108
1,121
9
80
8
SOO
40
10
200
20
16
15
7
28
32
3
372
124
99
2
17
143
1'2
85
56
1
164
68
93
685
91
647
25
11
121
443
10
■51
192
56
88
250
12
5
75
10
3,000
151
23
9
1
SOO
4
1,500
2
'2
11
8
7
13
4
7
2,622
87
1,766
25
11,152
2,987
195
2,590
91
8,808
4,874
162
4,034
89
8,758
617
1,601
February	
1,349
473
55
73
25
1,037
182
30
227
15
1,259
24
571
'540
71
923
'21
167
1,125
'28
234
10
144
20
91
285
11
78
558
2
286
52
203
652
10
500
190
372
3,029
1,749
146
1,536
163
1,260
337
6
67
112
34
1,900
4,500
£'
546
8
11
7
736
50'2
60S'
3,006
2
11
137
33
58
3,010
5,000
111
127
6
54
313
46
8
10
230
5
933
45
62
■558
6
7
1,143
257
60
305
3,507
40
24
198
'606
8
16
822
1,263
179
21
177
2,435
5,000
9,696
148
7
600
50
994
7 375
100
625
29
2
26
231
65
31
36
71
621
31
15
35
47
158
740
'5:2
32
188
98
18
16
1,230
25
300
36
347
12
300
351
3,784
'55
41
40
38
117
158
8
17
254
44
5
197
250
656
14
862
1,636
10
119
6
22
435
216
27
85
555
232
20
37
18
287
2,150
1,171
297
September	
1,093
9,354
550
2,228
900
321
1,469
591
350
8
330
577
50
S3
466
2,123
112
23
430
165
5
625
3,500
5 964
1,637
1,272
8,907
28
16,416
786
5,877
371
1,029
1,460
6
4,S29
6
245
891
6
1,678
1,140
65
1,173
8
8
235
4
2,254
4,268
80
542
30
1,4*2
3,000
1,800
20
3,699
7,705
23
210
303
3,313
106
4,960
319
3,500
21,912
25
80
75
3,000
671
12
532
883
1,266
431
4,500
12,261
1,18(2
1,480
37,067
3,817
206
1:2,199
12,664
1,748
943
345
24,072
854
6,482
7,194
257
7,541
492
1,437
30,816
24,410
250
3,777
5,340
54
184,577
Note.—On a set day in each month throughout the year each Game Constable makes a survey or takes a bird census of some part of his district, and the figures given in this statement are taken from monthly bird
census cards submitted by Game Constables in the various Police Divisions in the Province.
825-6'29-,6421
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to Hie King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1929.

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