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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE LANDS AND SURVEY BRANCHES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LANDS… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1928

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL EEPOET
OF   THE
LANDS AND SURVEY BRANCHES
OP  THE
DEPABTMENT OF LANDS
YEAE ENDED DECEMBEE 31ST, 1926
Hon. T. D. PATTULLO, Minister of Lands
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1928.  Victoria, B.C., March 1st, 1928.
To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Lands and Survey Branches
of the Department of Lands for the year ended December 31st, 1926.
T. D. PATTULLO,
Minister of Lands. Victoria, B.C., February 29th, 19£8.
The Honourable T. D. Pattullo,
Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Lands and Survey Branches of
the Department of Lands for the twelve months ended December 31st, 1926.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. R. NADEN,
Deputy Minister of Lands. PART I.
DEPARTMENT OE LANDS. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
REPORT OP LANDS BRANCH.
Page.
Report of Superintendent of Lands   7
Revenue      V
Pre-emption Records, etc  9
Pre-emption Inspections  10
Summary, 1926   11
Land-sales  12
Coal Licences, Leases, etc  12
Crown Grants issued  12
Letters Inward and Outward     12
REPORT OP SURVEY BRANCH.
General Review of Survey-work    .'.  15
Details of Field-work    16
Office-work—■
Survey Division    :      19
Geographic Division  21
Table A—Shows Acreages of each Class of Surveys gazetted since 1900   24
Table B—Summary of Office-work   24 DEPARTMENT OF LANDS.
Victoria, B.C., February 29th, 1928.
G. R. Naden, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith report of land administration by the Lands
Branch of the Department of Lands for the year ended December 31st, 1926.
I have, etc.,
H. CATHCART,
Superintendent of Lands.
STATEMENT OF REVENUE, YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st, 1926.
Land-sales.
Victoria.
Agencies.
Total.
Under " Coal and Petroleum Act
Under " Taxation Act "	
Townsite lots	
Country lands	
Pre-empted lands	
Mineral claims	
Totals	
$13,400.30
41,245.47
36,168.59
9,999.59
81.90
$90,995.91
56,420.52
8,046.72
6,477.63
$13,400.30
41,245.47
127,164.50
66,429.11
8,128.62
6,477.63
$100,895.85   I     $161,949.78
262,845.63
Revenue under " Land Act."
Victoria.
Agencies.
Total.
$60,675.38
5,796.64
290.83
1,033.50
407.76
15,855.00
$60,675.38
5,796.64
$3,550.61
1,964.65
3,841.44
3,898.15
407.76
15,855.00
4,631.01
1,764.00
4,631.01
Rent      7	
1,764.00
Totals              	
$84,959.11
$11,910.27
$96,869.38
Revenue under " Coal and Petroleum Act
"
Victoria.
Agencies.
Total.
$12,300.00
$12,300.00
11,840.60
2,827.20
200.00
11,840.60
2,827.20
200.00
$27,167.80
$27,167.80
_l
Sundry Receipts.
Victoria.
Agen
:ies.
Total.
$6,437.99
46.68
4,772.00
	
$6,437.99
46.68
4,772.00
$11,256.67
$11,256.67 W 8
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF LANDS, 1926.
Summary of Revenue.
Victoria.
Land-sales	
Land reAoenue	
" Coal and Petroleum Act "...	
Sundry receipts	
Improvements.	
Amount of rent of Government property
Totals	
$100,895.85
84,959.11
27,167.80
11,256.67
$224,279.43
Agencies.
Total.
$101,949.78
11,910.27
4,631.01
1,764.00
$180,255.06
$262,845.63
96,869.38
27,167.80
11,256.67
4,631.01
1,764.00
$404,534.49
j
Summary of Cash received.
Victoria.
Agencies.
Total.
Revenue	
" Soldiers Land Act "■—
South Okanagan Project..
Houses, South Vancouver
" Better Housing Act "—
Principal	
Interest	
Refunds to votes	
University Hill lands o...
Exchange	
Totals ,	
I I
$224,279.43  |     $180,255.06   |     $404,534.49
I
23,194.11
23,194.11
1.808.57
1.808.57
55,650.00
55,650.00
62,218.32
62,218.32
94.120.55
94,120.55
47,744.62
47,744.62
7.30
7.30
$509,022.90
$180,255
0.6
$680,277.96
TOWN-LOT SALES DURING 1926.
Sale of lots placed on the market at previous auction sales:—
21 lots in Point Grey   $49,620.50
106 lots in Powell River  8,666.13
63 lots in Atlin  _  3,662.00
11 lots in Vancouver   3,400.00
256 lots in Marysville   2,445.00
And some 58 low-priced lots in various other townsites, amounting to 2,765.00
A total of 515 lots for   $70,558.63
Sale of town lots at public auctions hehl during the year 1926:—
Prince Rupert, 7 lots     .$6,015.00
Blue River, 3 lots   305.00
Holberg, 6 lots   322.50
VanElerhoof, 1 lot  _  150.00
In all, 17 lots for      $6,792.50
Southern Okanagan Land Project.—Fifty-five parcels were sold in 1926, comprising 592.10
acres, the purchase price being $105,298. Eleven parcels comprising 209.56 acres were leased
with option to purchase, representing a purchase price of $13,807. Nine of the parcels sold ansl
leased as above were held under previous agreements which were caneelleEl. LANDS BRANCH.
W 9
PRE-EMPTION RECORDS, ETC.. 1926.
Agency.
Pre-emption
Records
allowed.
Certificates
of
Purchase.
Certificates
of Improvements.
7
7l'
Q
100
85
25
7
g
10
8
12
65
17
40
17
4
21
53
25
93
13
153
34
10
53
49
2
83
10
41
7
08
84
2
35
2
387
24
601
3
Atlin	
12
31
1
46
38
1
13
3
1
4
4
4
51
29
Telegraph  Creek	
1
26
Totals	
477
 1
1,850
276 W 10
REPORT OP THE MINISTER OF LANDS, 1926.
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iJ STATEMENT OF LETTERS INWARD AND OUTWARD, 1926.
Letters inward   17,737
Letters outward   15,475
LAND-SALES, 1926.
Acres.
Surveyed (first class)        572.60
Surveyed (second class)     7,045.22
7,617.82
Unsurveyed        671.90
Total     8,289.72
COAL LICENCES, LEASES, ETC.
COAL-PKOSPECTING LICENCES.
Number of licences issued, 118;   area, 75,520 acres.
Coal Leases.
Number of leases issued, 17;  area, 9,765 acres.
Sundry Leases.
Number of leases, 157;   area, 16,971.4 acres.
CROWN GRANTS ISSUED, 1926.
Pre-emptions   279
Purchase   170
Mineral  228
Town lots  -  255
Reverted lands  (other than town lots)  74
Reverted town lots   151
Reverted mineral    121
" Dyking Assessment Act " ,  3
" Public Schools Act "  1
Soldier Settlement Board  8
Land Settlement Board  12
Miscellaneous  19
Totftl      1,316
Applications for Crown grants      1,457
Certified copies _         23
Total Acreage deeded.
Pre-emptions  40,175.55
Mineral claims (other than reverted)   9,297.38
Reverted mineral claims  -  4,709.41
Purchase of surveyed Crown land (other than town lots)   9,376.25
Purchase of reverted land   6,192.34
Purchase of unsurveyeEl Crown land  89.50
Lands conveyed to SolElier Settlement Board   162.00
LuikIs Crown-granted to Land Settlement Board   1,285.08
Miscellaneous  13,154.68
Total     84,442.19 PART II.
SURVEY BRANCH.  REPORT OF THE SURVEYOR-GENERAL.
Victoria, B.C., January 7th, 1927.
To the Hon. T. D. Pattullo,
Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report on the operations of the Survey
Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1926:—
Eighteen qualified British Columbia land surveyors were employed during the year for
various periods in charge of Government surveys. Fifteen parties were in the field for the
whole or greater portion of the surveying season, while the remainder were employed on work
of limited extent.    Three qualified surveyors were employed as assistants.
GENERAL REVIEW OF FIELD-WORK.
The field-work carried on by the Department is divided into three main classes—namely,
surveys of Crown lands for settlement purposes, control surveys, and topographical surveys.
The following is a short review of the policy of the Branch with regard to the work under these
various headings and the work done under each during the past season:—
Grown Land Surveys.—As there is still a large amount of vacant surveyed Crown land
available for settlement estimated at 4,500,000 acres, the work of surveying Crown land for
settlement purposes has been, in recent years, confined to such lands as have come into active
demand, consisting usually of logged-off lands close to existing settlements, and to scattered,
individual areas required from time to time.
The area surveyed during the past season totals only 8,217 acres, as compared with 16,832
acres during 1925. This consisted of about 3,000 iicres surveyed in the valley of the Kingcome
River, at the head of Kingcome Inlet, where a large area has been logged over by the Powell
River Company. The area surveyed consists of the best of land rendered available, and all of it
will be accessible to tide-water along the old logging-railway grade. About 2,000 acres in
scattered parcels in the Upper Chilcotin Valley were surveyed to meet local demand, and at
Creston an area of approximately 2,000 acres was subdivided into small holdings. The remainder of area consists of widely scattered parcels surveyed to meet requirements. A new
townsite was also laid out at Bella Coola, more details concerning which are given later in this
report.
Control Surveys.—The necessity for control surveys has been fully discussed in previous
reports of this Branch. During the last ten years the control surveys have each year been
carried out with two main objects in view : First, to have each year's work designed that it will
eventually constitute an integral portion of a complete and comprehensive system covering the
whole of the Province; second, to so allocate the work that it will be of the most immediate
benefit in departmental administration and the systematic mapping of the Province.
All the triangulation done by this Branch is now, or will eventually be, based on the work
of the Geodetic Survey of Canada, who have already established a chain of precise triangulation
along the British Columbia Coast from the 49th parallel to the Alaska boundary. The numerous
Coast triangulations made by the Branch have all been connected to this net. Connections
have also been carried across the Coast Range at various points to a chain of triangulation
done by this Branch and which parallels the Coast Range and now extends from Stewart, at the
head of Portland Canal, to Lillooet. By co-operation with the Topographical Survey of Canada,
a connection was made this past season across the Railway Belt from Lillooet to a separate
net of triangulation established south of the Railway Belt and dependent upon stations established by the International Boundary Commission along the 49th parallel. It is hoped that the
Geodetic Survey of Canada will be able to extend at least one or possibly more nets across the
Province in order to permit of more efficient control of the Provincial triangulation in the
Interior. It might be explained that the Geodetic Survey work, which is of a high order of
accuracy, not attainable except by means of special instruments, is of special value to this
Department, as it permits adjusting our work to the geodetic values without the expense of
special instruments and refinements of survey and calculation, which would otherwise be necessary to keep our work within the accuracy commensurate with its ultimate extent. W 16 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF LANDS, 1926.
During the past season fourteen parties were engaged wholly or partly on work of this
nature. Three parties operated on Vancouver Island, one on the Mainland Coast, one on an
attempt to connect the Coast triangulation with the Interior net via the Klinaklini Valley, and
one on the extension of the net eastwarEl towards the Fraser River from the vicinity of Chilko
Lake. One party carried the Interior net northward through the Nass Valley and connected
with the Coast at Stewart. The main triangulation was carried eastward to the 124th
meridian in the vicinity of Sinkut by another party, which also made a reconnaissance of the
area covered, and which has been very inaccurately mapped to date. Similar work was done
by another party in the area lying between Bella Coola and Eutsuk Lake, which was an extension of work of previous years covering the lake area, which forms the headwaters of the
Nechako River. Another party, on purely triangulation-work, was engaged in the Kettle River
Valley in preparation for future photo-topographical surveys of the Kettle River Forest Reserve.
In addition to the above, four parties were employei! for short periods on minor control
surveys mainly in the Kootenay District, where work was being done to assist in the preparation
of mineral reference maps. With the revival of interest in the mineral districts, especially in
the Kootenays, it is found that many applications are receivecl for new grants of mineral claims
which revertetl under the " Taxation Act." As these claims are in many instances complicated
with other grants, it is important that these locations be accurately known in all instances, anEl
it is found that carefully compiled maps are the only means of arriving at proper clearances of
these applications. In compiling these maps the lack of proper information is discovered in
many instances, anil instructions are issueEl to surveyors from time to time to supply these
deficiencies.
Photo-topographical Surveys.—The area which remained unmapped in the vicinity of
Princeton was completed this year. When this map is finished contour information with a
100-foot interval can be supplied for the entire area lying south anil east of the Railway Belt
and extending south to the International Boundary and east to the eastern boundary of the
watershed of Okanagan Lake and river, including an area of 8,222 square miles.
Another party was engageEl in the vicinity of Mabel Lake, covering portion of ei forest
reserve known as the Grizzly Hill FE>rest Reserve.
According to an arrangement with the Greater Vancouver AVater Commission, by which
they contribute towartl the cast, a photo-topographical survey was undertaken of the North
Vancouver Peninsula, incluEling the watersheils of the Capilano anEl Seymour Creeks.
DETAILS OF FIELD-WORK.
The practice commenced last year of omitting surveyors' general reports from this report is
being continued this year. It is hoped to compile these for publication, issuing same in
pamphlet form covering the reports of various surveyors for the same district over a periotl of
years. It is consiilered that in this way the information concerning any particular ilistrict will
be much more refidily accessible to the interested public than scattereEl through a large number
of annual reports, some of which are out of print.
The following paragraphs give a resume of the work done by each party in short and concise
form:—
P. M. MoncktoiCt, B.C.L.S. Mr. Monckton was employeEl in extending a triangulation control
northward from Aiyanish, on the Nass, through the Nass Valley to Meziadin Lake, and from
thence westerly to the Bear River and down the valley of that river to connect with the International Boundary survey in the vicinity of Stewart, making connections to existing surveys
en route. Owing to the fact that there is no safe crossing on the Nass during high water in
the summer, Mr. Monckton was obligeil to approach his work both from Aiyanish and then by
Stewart. This work forms the northerly end of the chain of triangulation control surveys which
now extends along the east side of the Coast Range as an unbroken net to the 49th parallel.
F. C. Swannell, B.C.L.S. The party headed by Mr. Swannell was engaged on a reconnaissance topographical survey in the area north of the Bella Coola River and south of Eutsuk Lake.
His report gives interesting information on trails in this area. He also discovered evidence of
Mackenzie's overland trip to Bella Coola in 1793 and Lieutenant Palmer's surveys of 1862.
The area covereEl is a high plateau country of about 3,600 feet elevittion, cut through by
the Dean River and rising to high snow-covered peaks, the highest of which is some 9,000 feet. - . :	
SURVEY BRANCH. W 17
J. A. F. Campbell, B.C.L.S. Mr. Campbell's work consisted of extending the Interior triangulation from the vicinity of the headwaters of the Euchiniko River to the 124th meridian,
in the vicinity of Tsinkut Lake, and making a reconnaissance topographical survey of this
hitherto imperfectly mapped area. The area includes the divide between the Nechako River to
the west and the Chilako aud Blackwater Rivers to the east, the higher summits of which reach
about 5,000 feet in elevation. The whole area is considerably broken, but contains large areas
of timber, consisting of pine, spruce, balsam, and fir. Large areas west of the divide have been
burned. Very little agricultural land was found and such as exists is widely scattered. The
area contains two lakes of considerable area—namely, Tatuk and Finger Lakes. Mr. Campbell
recommends the area for development as a forest reserve.
John Davidson, B.C.L.S. The party in Mr. Davidson's charge was engaged in surveying a
number of scattered lots on the Upper Klinaklini River, One Eye Lake, Sap Eye Lake, and Chilko
River Valley. He also made connections between the main triangulation net and existing land
surveys, including the intersection of the 52nd parallel with the 124th meridian, and extended
the main triangulation north-easterly from the vicinity of Chilko Lake towards the Fraser
River. In the latter part of the season he occupied some triangulation stations in the vicinity
of the town of Lillooet, with a view to establishing a connection between the net established by
A. J. Campbell, B.C.L.S., in 1925, with the triangulation of the Railway Belt made by the
Topographical Survey of Canada during the past season.
The area in which Mr. Davidson was working is primarily a range country. He reports
evidence of many wild horses denuding the ranges of feed which would be more profitably
utilized by cattle or sheep.
J. T. Underhill, B.C.L.S. In order to establish a connection between the Interior triangulation and the Coast triangulation at the head of Knight Inlet, Mr. Underhill was engaged on a
triangulation survey during the season, extending a net from the Interior down the Klinaklini
Valley. Owing to a mishap to one of his canoes on the river, resulting in the loss of part of his
supplies, and also due to the early snowfall in September, Mr. Underhill was unable to proceed
with his work farther than the head of the canyon about 20 miles from tide-water. He reports
the valley very rough and narrow, with practically no available agricultural lands. The construction of a road through the valley would be very expensive owing to the amount of rock-
work which would be entailed.
A. S. G. Musgrave, B.C.L.S. Mr. Musgrave was engaged on the survey of logged-off lands in
the valley of Kingcome River. About 3,000 acres were subdivided by him into parcels of about
160 acres each. This area was formerly included in a timber lease held by the Powell River
Pulp and Paper Company, who logged the available timber in the valley and brought it out by
means of a standard-gauge railway. The rails have now been removed, with the result that the
grade forms an excellent foundation for a roadway, giving access to the lands surveyed. Much
of the surveyed area is subject to flooding at high-water periods, but there are portions on each
lot, as laid out, where buildings can be erected with reasonable safety. The soil is fertile, but
will of course require clearing before it can be utilized for agricultural purposes. E. Halliday
has farmed successfully for over thirty years on dyked tidal lands at the mouth of the river.
G. M. Downton, B.C.L.S. During 1924 a special reconnaissance and resources survey was
made by Mr. Downton in the south-eastern portion of the Lillooet District adjacent to the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway. His report and maps gave a great deal of valuable information
of value in arriving at an estimate of the ultimate possibilities of the country served by that
railway. During the past season similar work was extended over an area lying between
longitudes 121° 30' and the Fraser River and latitudes 50° 53' and 51° 22', covering, in all, an
iirea of about 700 square miles. The area is sparsely settled and does not offer very attractive
inducements for denser settlement. The area is chiefly valuable for grazing purposes and the
map now being prepared by Mr. Downton will be of value in grazing administration.
O. B. N. AVilkie, B.C.L.S. Mr. Wilkie commenced his season's surveys in the North Thompson
Valley, laying out various parcels in scattered localities., Nine lots of 20 acres each were
surveyed near Clearwater. This district seems to be developing as a small-fruit district, strawberries being reported as doing well. The main summer months were spent in the Trout Lake
area, Kootenay District, tying in old mineral-claim surveys, and at the endi of the season an
investigation survey was made in Otter Valley, with a view to adjusting some erroneous surveys.
F. S. Clements, B.C.L.S: In order to facilitate the work of SEibsequent topographical surveys, a main triangulation net was established during the past season in the valley of the main W 18
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF LANDS, 1926.
Kettle River by Mr. Clements. This work was connected with the triangulation of the Inter-
national Boundary along the 49th parallel, and also with previous triangulation stations on the
easterly boundary of the Okanagan watershed. An area of about 1,100 square miles was so
covered. This work will materially reduce the cost of the photo-topographical surveys which it
is expected to extend over this area in the near future.
Chas. Moore, B.C.L.S. Mr. Moore was employed on subElividing an expiretl timber lease
near Creston, and another similar area on Corn Creek, on the west side of the Kootenay Flats,
directly west of Creston. The former area, consisting of about 1,200 acres, was subdivided
into parcels of approximately 20 acres. The soil varies from a ehocohite loam to heavy clay
loam and is considered suitable for fruit-growing. The clearing is light and its proximity to the
railway stations of Creston and Erickson should make this area desirable from a ilevelopment
standpoint, especially if it should be found possible to provide the area with water for
irrigation.
The area on CE>rn Creek consists of 440 acres. This also is suitable for fruit-growing and
stock-raising. This area can be readily irrigated from Corn Creek. Its main handicap is the
difficulty of access to the railway on the east side of the Kootenay River during high-water
periods.
Mr. Moore also made some ties between land-survey corners and the Geological Survey
triangulation stations on either side of the Kootenay Valley, south of Kootenay Lake.
H. D. Dawson, B.C.L.S. Mr. Dawson's instructiEms incluEled a triangulation survey from
the Slocan to Arrow Lakes at Nakusp and ties to surveyed mineral claims not previously so tied.
He experienced poor weather conditions and smoke from forest fires which interfered considerably with his work. Owing to an accident he was also obliged to close down for a portion of
the season. He reports considerable revival in the mining industry, especially affecting small
operators who are able to carry on at a profit now, on account of the fact that the smelter at
Trail now pays for the zinc content of the ores, whereas in the past such ores were penalized
fE>r zinc content. The change has been brought about by improved methods of smelting introduced by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company in their modern plant at Trail.
B. A. Moorehouse, B.C.L.S. Mr. Moorehouse was employed on miscellaneous surveys in the
vicinity of Cranbrook, including a resurvey of some okl lots at Fort Steele, tying in land aiul
mineral-claim surveys to the Geological Sui-vey triangulation in that district, si small lantl survey at Flagstone, and a small subtlivision for summer home-site purposes on Monroe Lake. At
the latter point, which has become a resort for residents of Cranbrook during the summer
months on account of the fishing and bathing facilities, some twenty-two lots were laid out-
fronting on the lake, together with an area of about 8 acres, which it is intended to reserve
for picnic and tourist camping jrarposes.
H. H. Roberts, B.C.L.S. The Mainland Coast triangulation was extended during the past
season by Mr. Roberts, covering all or portions of the following waters: Chatham Channel,
Clio Channel, Tribune Channel. Fife Sound, Sutlej Channel, Drury Inlet, Wells Pass, Nowell
Channel, and Mereworth Sound. He connected his work to the Mount Bullock Geodetic Station
in the vicinity of Drury Inlet. The main industries in the area covered are fishing and lumbering, including a considerable amount of hand-logging.
W. J. H. Holmes, B.C.L.S. The work carried on by Mr. Holmes consisted of a triangulation
survey up the Gold River, at the head of Muchalat Arm, thus forming a connection between his
previous year's work on the latter arm and the west boundary of Strathcona Park, surveyed by
him some years ago. In addition to this he made a triangulation survey of portion of Hecate
Channel, in the vicinity of which several fish-reduction plants have recently been erected.
L. S. Cokely, B.C.L.S. Mr. Cokely was employed on a triangulation survey on A'ancouver
Island, mainly with the object of checking the alignment and chainage of the westerly boundary
of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Belt. Land anEl timber surveys adjoining this line have
slmwn up errors in original survey, and the triangulation has revealed the location and extent'
of these. He based his work on the Dominion Geodetic Survey and incidentally tied in other
surveys, thus permitting a more accurate mapping of the area covered. His work extenEleEl
from Mt. Arrowsmith to about the 50th parallel of latitude.
An interesting item of Mr. Cokely's work was the fact that, he was able to definitely locate
and measure the altitude of a very high mountain-peak in the Coast Range, about 20 miles
inland from the head of Bute Inlet. This peak gained some notoriety in the press during the
past summer, due to the fact that a party from A'ancouver endeavoEired to climb it without SURVEY BRANCH. AV 19
success. As the existence of this rather remarkable mountain was first mapped by Alfred
Waddington in 1863 while engaged in a trail-location up the Homathko River, it is proposeEl to
name it Mount Waddington.    Mr. Cokely determined the elevation to be 11,884 feet.
In the early spring Mr. Cokely made a survey of a new townsite at Bella Coola. This was
necessitated by the floods of the Necleetsconnay River washing out portions of the old townsite
and making the maintenance of roads and bridges excessively expensive.
The new townsite is on the south side of the Bella Coola River, on a main highway leading
to the Government wharf, and which highway will eventually be extended inland up the Bella
Coola River to connect with the Interior road system.
Fred Butterfield, B.C.L.S. Mr. Butterfield made a triangulation control survey connecting
his work with the International Boundary monuments at the entrance to the Strait of Juan
de Fuca and carrying same to Barkley Sound, connecting with monuments established this year
by the Geodetic Survey of Canada.
In addition to the above several surveys of a smaller nature were made during the season.
A. H. Green, B.C.L.S., made eonnectioEis between land surveys and the Geological Survey triangulation stations on Kootenay Lake.
D. M. McKay checked up an error in the survey of the 124th meridian and made other
miscellaneous surveys in the Upper Chilcotin District, where he was employed by the Department of Indian Affairs for the greater portion of the season on the survey of new Indian reserves.
AA7. G. McEllianney, B.C.L.S., was employed intermittently during the year on a survey of
the foreshore in False Creek, A7ancouver.
Photo-topographical Surveys.—R. D. McCaw, B.C.L.S. Mr. McCaw covered an area of
approximately 454 square miles in the Grizzly Hills Forest Reserve, east of Vernon, including
Trinity A7alley, Creighton Valley, and the vicinity of Mabel Lake.
G. J. Jackson, B.C.L.S. Mr. Jackson's surveys consisted of the completion of. the area in
the vicinity of Princeton, covering portion of the Similkameen Aralley, both above and below the
town of Princeton, and the valley of the Tulameen above Princeton. His work covered an area
of about 488 square miles.
A. J. Campbell, B.C.L.S. During this year an arrangement was arrived at with the Greater
A'ancouver AA7ater Commission to make a topographical survey of the watersheds of the Seymour
and Capilano Creeks, in the North Vancouver Area. It was EleciEled that, in order to make ei
E'omprehensive map of the watershed areas, it would be advisable to include the asljacent areas
between Howe Sound and the North Arm of Burrard Inlet, and extending from Burrard Inlet on
the south to the Britannia Mineral Belt .Area to the north, previously mappeil by the Geological
Survey of Canada. As the mapping of this area is being done on a larger scale than other work
of this kind undertaken by this Department, and is consequently being done in a somewhat
more intensive way. and as the field operations were considerably hampered by smoke and poor
weather conditions, the work did not progress as rapidly as was hoped, and only about 101
square miles were actually mapped. Information was obtained, however, which, with additional
information to be obtained this year, will, it is hoped, permit of the mapping of the entire area.
Private Surveys.—Siirveys of Crown lands and mineral claims made at the instance of and
paid for by private applicants, under the provisions of the various Statutes, are known as
" private surveys." The number of such surveys shows an increase from the previous year,
except in the case of applications to pEirchase. This increase is specially noticeable in the case
of mineral claims.
OFFICE-WORK.
The office staff is divided into two main sections—namely, the Survey Division and the
Geographic Division.
SURVRY DIVISION.—The Survey Division deals with general correspondence, supplying
survey information, blue-prints, etc.. the preparation of survey information, plotting official
plans from surveyoi's' returns, filing and indexing field-notes and plans, compiling departmental
reference maps, clearing all applications, and other incidental work.
During the year 690 field-books were received containing notes for 803 lots, together with
seventy-four additional field-books containing notes for traverses and control surveys. The
number of lots plotted and gazetted during the year number 735: tracings and plans of these
were made and forwarded to the various Government Agents. Miscellaneous tracings prepared
totalled 127, while 1.662 tracings were prepared in duplicate for leases and Crown grants. W 20 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF LANDS, 1926.
An analysis of the various surveys gazetted during the year is given in the following
table :—
Acres.
Purchase surveys     1,081.35
Mineral-claim surveys     9,166.42
Timber-licence surveys          Nil.
Coal-licence surveys ...  10,437.00
Lease surveys     2,641.61
Government surveys       29,393.23
Total :..'..  52,719.61
A comparison of these figures with those of previous years is given in Table A attached to
this report.
Right-of-way Plans.—Plans of surveys of rights-of-way for railways, logging-railways, and
power-lines are dealt with by this office where such rights of way affect Crown lands. Plans of
90 miles of such rights-of-way were dealt with during the year.
Clearances.—The Survey Division supplied clearances for various applications as follows:—
Pre-emptions       568
Applications to purchase      176
Applications to lease      311
Coal licences -.       121
AA'ater licences         181
Timber-sales  .•_    1,075
Hand-logger licences          116
Crown grants        1,276
Reverted parcels       770
Cancellations  _         972
Reinstatements        11
The purpose of these clearances is to keep a graphical record of all applications and alienations. The survey system of individual lots in this Province, anil the numerous Acts under
which surface and sub-surface rights are alienable, make it Eliflicult to record all transactions
in any other way; consequently it is important that the graphic record should be as complete
and accurate as possible. The recording E)f applications for reverted lands under the " Taxation
Act " is especially complicated ansl necessitates a large amount of correspondence with the
various District Registrars.
Departmental Reference Maps.—In order to provide the basis for the graphic record above
referred to, a set of reference maps, on the scale of. 1 mile to 1 inch, covering the greater
portion of the Province, is maintained by the Branch. These maps are drawn on tracing-linen,
so that prints may be supplied at any time, showing all alienations up to date. The maps are
being constantly revised as new geographical and other information becomes available, and as
the linen maps wear out with constant use they have to be replaced. During the past year
sixteen new maps of this description were replaced, and five new maps were made on a larger
scale for the purpose of showing mineral claims in the areas where the surveys of this nature
cause too much congestion on the standaixl 1-mile-to-l-inch maps.
Information and Blue-prints.—A nominal charge is made to the public for the preparation
of copies of field-notes, blue-prints, etc., and the revenue from this source last year was $3,087.63,
of which $1,884.58 was for blue-prints, the total number of prints made being 21,627.
During the year a new process paper has been introduced. This paper, known by the tradename as " Ozalid," does not require washing, as it is developed in an enclosed tank filled with
ammonia gas. The paper has two advantages over blue-print paper: First, it proiiuces a true-
to-scale print as it does not require to be washed and dried; and, secondly, the elimination of
the washing anil drying speeds up the work of the staff and requires less operating-space. The
paper produces a dark-brown line on a white background, and while perhaps not as pleasing to
the eye as a blue-print, it has the further advantage of permitting other work to he done on
the print in any colour.
Correspondence.—During the year 6,249 letters were received by this Division and 5,342
sent out, which does not include form letter and interdepartmental memoranda. SURVEY BRANCH.
AV 21
Accounts.—The accounts with the surveyors employed by the Department and the sale of
information and maps have been dealt with in the usual manner.
GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION.—The Geographic Division deals with the compilation and preparation of maps for reproduction, the compilation of the Standard Base Map of the Province, and
the work incidental thereto.
The past year was highly satisfactory from the standpoint of the preparation of new
geographical mapping. The actual publication was small, as the staff was engaged almost
throughout the year in the preparation of four new, large geographical works.
Published.
Name.
No. of
Copies.
Date of
Issue.
No.
Scale.
Area in
Sq. Miles.
Bast Lillooet Degree Sheet.
Nechako Pre-emptors' Map.
Map of B.C. showing T.G.E.
Aid Act Blocks	
6,000
7,250
.      250
10,000
May, . 1926
May,    1926
Jan.,    1926
Dee.,    1926
4l
3b
2 m. to 1 in.
3 m. to 1 In.
31.56 m. to 1 in.
3,100
9,000
Special publication, Economic Geography of B.C.
The East Lillooet Degree Sheet is of the standard topographic series, showing land surveys,
contours, road system, and resources economic classification.
Miscellaneous.
Reproduction.
Scale.
For whom prepared,
. printed, etc.
Sumas Area Lands-sale Plan	
Small map of Oliver and District	
Special map of B.C. showing Provincial
Electoral Divisions and Game Districts..
Special Mapping System for recording Fur-
trap Line Licences of the Province	
Photozinc
Photozinc
2 colours, photozinc
40 ch. to 1 in.
Display.
63 m. to 1 in.
Land  Settlement Board.
Lands Department.
Game Conservation Board.
Game Conservation Board.
In Hands of Printer.
Name.
No. of
Copies.
Date of
Issue.
No.
Scale.
Area in
Sq. Miles.
Iiosslnncl Degree  Sheet	
8,000
3,500
Mar.,    1927
May.     1927
4jV
4 n
2 m. to 1 in.
2 m. to 1 in.
3,100
Arrowhead Degree  Sheet 	
3,100
In Course of Preparation.
Name.
No. of
Copies.
Date of
Issue.
No.
Scale.
Area in
Sq. Miles.
Queen   Charlotte    Islands
(Preliminary)   Map  	
Nicola Degree  Sheet	
7.000
Aug..    1927
Oct.,    1927
2f
4 m
4 m. to 1 in.
2 m. to 1 in.
l/l,O0O,OO0==15.78 m. to 1 in.
3,952
4,100
270,428
The Queen Charlotte Islands Map will introduce the system of notations upon the face of
the map and constructive appreciations by the Government departments interested upon the
principEil phases of economic resources. In this publication an especial new feature is introduced—that of marketing diagram,  by which  is shown the strategic position  of the  Queen '
W 22
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OP LANDS, 1926.
Charlotte Islands for the production anEl supply of produce to the Northern Interior of the
Province, as well as fisheries, mining, and forest industries of the coastal areas of British
Columbia and Alaska.
The Nicola Degree Sheet is of the standard topographical series, showing land surveys,
contours, road system, and resources economic classification.
The British Columbia Central Map will be similar in design to the map of South-western
British Columbia, No. Ik, showing resources economic notations and appreciations by the
departments interested upon the principal phases of development.
Gazetteek.
The compilation of the Gazetteer is progressing steailily and to date 75 per cent, has been
edited and is now in the hands of the printers.
Cost-cakd System.
All work executed by the Geographic Branch for other offices and departments during the
past year has been efficiently checkeEl up by the cost-card system, antl each order has been
charged for according to the actual cost. The number of cards made out for other offices was
fourteen, with a total charge of $1,087.78.
Map-mounting.
The following is a synopsis of the work accomplished by the Map-mounting Division for
the year 1926 :—
Loose-leaf map-books—mounteEl maps in  rexine cover antl  unmounteEl
maps in brown-paper covers      107
Mounted maps     819
Blue-prints and ozalid prints mounted     1,351
Photostats mounted   92
Photos mounted on cards   1,061
Blue-prints, photostats, maps, and plans joineEl  754
Official plans repaired      ■.  69
Reports, field-books, etc., bound  ..  11
Maps reinforced, unmounted, to hang   216
Miscellaneous—repairing, mounting, and joining oeIe! jobs  96
Work done, Receipts, and Credits.
Geographic and Survey Branch  $935.94
Lands Department  354.81
Other Departments      714.08
Public ...  179.43
Total   $2,184.26
Photostat.
Year.
Requisitions.
Receipts and Credits.
Dept.
Public.
Dept.
Public.
Total.
1921	
1922   	
1923  	
1924  	
1925 	
1926 	
568
750
793
792
875
724
204
172
188
187
122
136
$1,537.50
2,380.00
3,367.30
2,675.75
3,037.62
2,505.91
$710.85
635.65
520.30
748.50
556.05
643.60
$2,248.35
3,015.65
3,887.60
3,424.25
3,593.67
3.149.51 Map Stock and Distribution.
Year.
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
(!•)
(2.)
(3.)
(4.)
Year.
Maps issued
to  Depts.
and Public.
Maps received
into
Geographic Stock.
,       16,375 24,492
     17,047 18,663
 _     19,800 57,102
     19,446 30,108
     21,224 48,607
     16,526 19,545
Cash receipts for printed maps, January 1st to December 31st,
1926  $934.97
Credits  (Lands Department) for printed maps, January 1st to
December 31st, 1926  1,023.59
Credits, Government Agent, for printed maps   369.95
Value of printed maps issued free to public and departments  2,227.33
Letters received
and attended to.
1921  1,298
1922  _  1,318
1923  1,400
1924  1,399
1925 '.  1,961     '
1926 _  1,426
Standard Base Map.
The staff of the Standard Base Map normally consists of one computer and three draughtsmen ; during the past year one draughtsman was employed entirely on geographic map compilation and another was similarly engaged for a period of six months. In conseEiuence the
output was considerably less than usual. New S.B.M. routes were compiled and certain of the
older routes were revised, necessitating the compilation of 1,000 miles of ordinary traverse and
365 miles of railway traverse.
Plots on the scale of 20 chains to 1 inch were made of the area covered by the photo-
topographic surveys of Mr. McCaw, B.C.L.S. (1925), in the Nicola District, and of Mr. Jackson,
B.C.L.S. (1926), in the vicinity of Princeton;  nine 10-minute quadrangle sheets being completed.
In addition, a plot on the scale of 40 chains to 1 inch was made of the area covered by the
topographical survey of Mr. Downton, B.C.L.S., in the vicinity of Clinton, three; sheets being-
completed.
Owing to the pressure of other work, progress in the plotting of the skeleton routes on the
scale of 1 mile to 1 inch was greatly curtailed, only three new sheets of 30-minute areas being-
completed.
The work of recording details of all triangulation stations established in British Columbia
was continued, and at the present date 835 triangulation stations have been entered in two
registers, one register being arranged alphabetically and the other in accordance with the
(luad-index system. „
As in past years, control nets were supplied as required for geographic printed maps and
departmental reference maps, as follows :—
Geographic Printed Maps.
Wall Map of B.C.
Nicola Degree Sheet.
Queen Charlotte Islands Map.
Departmental Reference Maps.
Nos.  2,  5a,  5b,  27a,   32a,  32b,  72,
17on, 17-9n.
Mineral Reference Maps in Revelstoke Mining Division.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Tour obedient servant,
J. E. TJMBACH,
Surveyor-General. W 24
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF LANDS, 1926.
APPENDIX TO REPORT OF SURVEYOR-GENERAL.
Table A.—Showing Acreages of each Class of Surveys gazetted each Year since 1900.
Year.
Preemptions.
Purchase.
Mineral    i    Timber
Claims. Limits.
Coal
Licences.
Leases.
B.C. Govt.
Surveys.
Totals.
1900.
1901.
1902.
1903.
1904.
1905.
1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
1910.
1911
1912.
1913.
1914.
1915
1916
1917.
1918.
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1920
Acres.
22,873
26,493
35,297
37,615
48,124
42,660
33,573
50,460
66,788
71,316
79,273
89,485
99,461
55,202
45,551
22,746
14,335
12,632
10,835
8,514
8,172
3,078
1,268
991
1,180
Acres.
4,419
16,401
29,652
26,787
36,468
58,705
66,668
162,218
147,980
145,325
455,356
1,352,809
1,011,934
50S,062
234,580
41,551
8,771
802
1,634
153
5,992
8,122
6,160
3,341
11,926
2,307
1,081
Acres.
33,441
33,400
31,057
18,115
20,549
15,535
9,894
10,017
14,607
10,744
12,499
21,325
16,645
18,043
7,546
S.339
7,677
8,386
9,247
10,264
12,580
6,290
4,637
9,175
11,382
4,750
9,166
Acres.
59
2,027
1,040
127,992
155,279
214,841
77,829
83,016
167,925
426,121
509,201
686,909
S04.730
1,181,355
1,105,635
512,628
302,903
275,538
223.76S
165,289
347,729
247,766
37,966
53,101
33,028
2,150
Acres.
626
48,670
137,218
41,312
20,367
9,821
8,310
43,363
120,938
99,236
72,719
36,098
29,245
10,983
2,843
953
160
22,143
4,423
2,520
4,480
7,561
320
10,437
Acres.
664
593
1,026
2,003
3,009
806
9,566
4,387
2,580
15,239
5.S64
6,500
8,560
4,740
4,209
841
5,145
2,960
2,342
1,495
3,227
11.8S4
3,094
2,790
1,437
2,273
2,641
Acres.
10,057
800
179
107
113,968
97,072
512,373
302,536
948,644
826,362
1,014,366
1,078,579
705,170
124,953
111,256
60,311
77,121
63,505
127,797
, 98,841
147,927
33,860
23,402
29,393
Acres.
71,513
79,094
98.69S
213,312
312,278
469,872
23S.842
444,433
506,773
1,1S9,428
1,407,912
3,226,610
2,S66,997
2,854,487
2,512,198
1,320,520
474,767
414,417
309,090
262,996
463.34S
409,360
154,486
221,805
100,374
36,192
52,718
Table B.—Summary of Office-wojrk for the Year 1926 and Comparativ
Survey Division.
Number of field-books received 	
„ lots surveyed	
„ lots gazettes! and tracings forwarded to Government Agents
„ miles of right-of-way plans dealt with	
„ applications for purchase cleared	
„ applications for pre-emption cleared 	
„ reference maps compiled  :	
,, Crown-grant applications cleared	
Total number of letters received by Branch	
„ „        Crown-grant antl lease tracings made in duplicate 	
„ ,,        blue-prints made	
TE)tal revenue from sale of blue-prints and other information  $1,
e Figures
for 1925,
1925.
1926.
666
690
802
803
469
735
363
90
163
170
703
568
20
21
1,130
1,276
6.026
5,921
1,481
1.602
20,388
21,627
949.24
$3,087.63
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Ciiaiii.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1028.
1,825-228 1038

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