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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1930

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR   THE
TEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST
1928
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1920.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1928 is herewith respectfully submitted.
W. A. McKENZIE,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
June, 1929. The Honourable W. A. McKenzie,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Eleventh Annual Report on the work of
the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1928.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., June, 1929.
J. D. McNIVEN,
Deputy Minister of Labour. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Deputy Minister     7
Strikes      7
Apprentices     7
"Hours of Work Act"      7
New Legislation     8
Statistics of Trade and Industries -  10
Returns from 4,846 Employers   10
Working Capital and Value of Production   10
A Record Pay-roll  10
Where Pay-rolls have increased and decreased  12
Fluctuation of Employment during 1928  13
Asiatic Employees still declining  15
Canadian and British Workmen lead   15
Changes in Wage-rates  16
Reduction in Low-paid Workers  18
Employers with a Large Pay-roll  19
Statistical Tables   20
The " Male Minimum Wage Act"   34
Judgment of Supreme Court of Canada   34
Text of New Act  37
Labour Disputes and Conciliation   40
Carpenters, etc., Vancouver and District  42
Summary of Labour Disputes  47
Employment Service   48
Conditions during the Year   48
Business transacted   48
Employment for Handicapped Men   51
Inspection of Factories   53
Report of Minimum Wage Board  55
Legal Proceedings ,  56
Statistical Section   57
Average Wages, 1927 and 1928   02
Wage Laws in United States and Canada  04
Appendix—Summary of Orders   68
Associations of Employers   72
Union Directory   74 . REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR
FOR 1928.
The increasing industrial activity in the Province is again demonstrated by a record pay-roll
as tabulated from actual returns received by this Department, and a conservative estimate of
other branches of industry not covered by our questionnaire, reaching a total for 1928 of
$183,097,781.72, as compared with $177,522,758.14 for the year 1927, an increase of $5,575,023.58.
Of the twenty-five tables covering our various industries, twenty show an increased pay-roll,
while five show a decrease. The largest increases are shown in two. of our basic industries,
the lumbering and metal-mining groups. Coast shipping, food products, the utility group, and
the manufacture of wood, N.E.S., also made substantial gains. Advances were also registered by
the contracting, builders' materials, oil-refining, miscellaneous trades and industries, laundries,
cleaning and dyeing, garment-making, house-furnishing, leather and fur goods, explosives and
chemicals, jewellery-manufacturing, printing and publishing, and smelting. The groups suffering
a decrease in pay-roll are breweries, coal-mining, paint-manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, and ship-building. The statistical section also shows that 69.29 per cent, of all industrial workers are British-born and that Orientals are gradually being reduced in the industrial
occupations covered by our report, the percentage being 9.33 per cent.—being the lowest yet
recorded. The average weekly wage-rates are in the majority of tables higher than for the
previous year.
STRIKES.
The number of working-days lost during 1928 was somewhat larger than the previous year.
There were nine disputes, which affected 2,644 employees and resulted in a loss of 20,791 working-
days, as compared with 1,668 workers affected and 17,006 working days lost for the previous year.
APPRENTICES.
Reference is made in the statistical section of this report to the continued increase in the
number of apprentices, and in view of the importance of this phase of industrial life I am of
the opinion that the time has arrived when a law to govern the employment of apprentices
should be seriously considered.
THE " HOURS OF WORK ACT."
The " Hours of Work Act " has now become a part of our industrial life and is being
observed by both employers and employees.
The Board of Adjustment administering the Act has not found it necessary to make any
new regulations and the smooth working of this legislation is proof that the majority of those
affected are in sympathy with its provisions.
Exemptions of a temporary nature in urgent cases are granted by the Board. During 1928
there were 161 temporary permits issued. The overtime covered by these permits vary from
a total of one hour to one hour per day for a week or longer. Lumbering accounted for 105 of
these permits. The principal reason for the granting of exemptions to this industry being that
overtime is required because of the arrival of steamships from one to three days earlier than
they were expected. The granting of overtime in such cases becomes a necessity, otherwise
shipping would become disrupted and other industries suffer as a result.
Other branches of industry requiring temporary permits at certain seasons of the year
are the printing firms to take care of rush orders for Christmas cards and other special work;
general contractors, especially when pouring concrete; garment-manufacturing during rush
season, etc.
AVERAGE WORKING-HOURS REDUCED.
During the past year the average working-hours for all industrial occupations was further
reduced to 48.43 hours weekly, from 48.55 in 1927 and an average of 48.84 in 1926. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
■
The following table shows the trend of average weekly hours in all industries covered in
this report for the past three years:—
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries.
Industry.
Breweries	
Builders' materials, etc	
Cigar and tobacco manufa'cturing	
Coal-mining....	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
E-xplosives, chemicals, etc ......
Food products, manufacture of	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Jewellery, manufacture of '.	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of	
Lumber industries—■
Logging	
Logging-railways.	
Mixed plants	
Lumber-dealers	
Planing-mills	
Sawmills	
Shingle-mills ,.
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and Industries	
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc	
Wood-manufacture  (not elsewhere specified).
1926.
1927.
47.91
45.60
48.22
47.10
46.94
47.55
44.46
44.48
46.58
48.00
48.02
48.02
53.29
52.48
53.05
45.57
44.97
44.83
51.49
45.85
45.32
51.82
50.65
61.75
44.81
46.38
44.54
45.14
45.52
45.30
43.96
44.25
44.75
46.54
46.28
46.42
47.26
46.77
46.62
48.71
48.63
48.40
48.06
40.08
49.16
49.03
44.00
47.21
46.78
45.88
46.70
50.48
49.81
49.29
49.23
49.63
49.03
48.32
48.84
47.97
45.81
45.51
45.42
55.43
52.26
53.93
47.67
47.20
47.64
51.46
54.35
54.16
44.25
44.51
44.44
45.58
45.51
45.42
48.23
48.46
48.24
44.14
45.13
44.45
53.21
52.94
53.07
45.83
45.90
45.69
46.28
46,42
46.77
1928.
The " Hours of Work Act" was amended at the last session of the Legislature. Section 6
has been strengthened by striking out the word " or" in the fourth line, and substituting
therefor the words " but only."    The section now reads :—■
" 6. The limit of hours of work prescribed in section 3 may be exceeded in case of accident,
actual or threatened, or in case of urgent work to be done to machinery or plant, or in case of
force majeure, but only so far as may be necessary to avoid serious interference with the
ordinary working of the undertaking."
And the following has been added as section 10a :—
"10a. (I.) Every employer shall keep in his principal place of business in the Province
a true and correct record of the wages paid to and the hours worked each day by each of his
employees, together with a register of the names, ages, and residential addresses of all his
employees.
"(2.) Every employer shall, on demand of the Board or any person authorized in writing
by the Board, produce for inspection all records kept by him relating to the wages, hours of
labour, or conditions of employment affecting any of his employees."
NEW LEGISLATION.
New legislation affecting working men and women which was passed at the last session of
the Legislature may be summarized :—
The "Civil Service Act" is amended and provides for the validation of all appointments
made since the 1st day of July, 1918, which has been approved or in any way recognized by any
Order of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and validates every appointment hereafter made to
the Civil Service which is approved by any Order of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 9
the validity of any appointment so made and approved shall not be open to question in any
Court upon any ground whatsoever.
The " Hairdressers Act" will apply to cities, towns, and villages with a population of 750
or more persons. It requires that all hairdressers shall be registered members of the Hairdressers' Association of British Columbia. There shall be a Board of Examiners appointed by
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council who shall hold office for one year from the date of their
appointment. All future Boards shall be elected by the association. The Act provides that the
Board shall hold examinations at least four times a year. Certificates will be issued to persons
desiring to be registered. Special reference is attached to the applicant's ability as a hairdresser—his knowledge of sanitary regulations in connection with the occupation of hairdressing,
the antiseptic preparation and sterilization of tools and appliances, and the protection of the
public from infectious and contagious diseases.
The Board has power to revoke certificates upon conviction of crime, habitual drunkenness,
or the use of drug-forming habits, gross incompetency, or for having any infectious or contagious
disease, or for failure to keep the place of business in a clean and sanitary condition as required
under the " Health Act." Penalties are provided for against any person not holding a certificate
of registration who engages in the business of hairdressing.
The amendments to the " Hours of Work Act " have already been fully explained.
Details relating to the '.' Male Minimum Wage Act " will be found in the section of this
report dealing with that question.
The " Teachers' Pensions Act" guarantees to school-teachers in the Province the same terms
regarding superannuation that is given to the Provincial Civil Service.
The " Coal-mines Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1929," gives the Court appointed under
section 48 of the " Coal-mines Regulation Act" power to suspend the certificate of any manager,
overman, shiftboss, fireboss, shotlighter, mine surveyor, or coal-miner " for negligence leading to
or resulting in loss of life or serious injury to any employee."
The " Barbers Act Amendment Act, 1929," gives the Barbers' Association power to grant
special certificates of registration for haircutting only to qualified persons, who shall be thereby
qualified to engage in the occupation of haircutting if he is also duly qualified in hairdressing.
It is unlawful for any one not holding such a certificate, unless he is otherwise qualified under
this Act, to engage in the occupation of haircutting for hire, gain, or hope of reward. J 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
STATISTICS OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIES.
With each succeeding year the Department of Labour is able through this section of its
Annual Report to supply information which is of great value to the industrial life of the
Province, showing as it does a varied number of aspects bearing upon labour conditions for the
period under review. The year 1928 created a record both in the number of employees and the
total amount paid in wages.
In order that the questionnaire may be as simple as possible, and at the same time not
reduce the value of the information supplied, two unimportant questions were eliminated from
our 1928 return.
RETURNS FROM 4,846 EMPLOYERS.
Returns were received this year from 4,846 industrial employers, which is a record number
and an increase of 267 over the previous year. The increase over last year is striking and we
desire to thank those who have made this record possible. If all employers could have their
returns in our hands by the date printed on the form the value of our statistical information
would be greatly increased.
Every year since the Department was formed has shown an increase in the number of firms
reporting. In 1918, the first year when records were made, the number received was 1.047. This
increased to 4,597 in 1927, and now 4,846.
WORKING CAPITAL AND VALUE OF PRODUCTION.
For the second year we have endeavoured to get an accurate statement of the capital
invested and the value of production in British Columbia, and although we realize this question
may present difficulties to some employers, we feel that a great many more could complete this
question without any great inconvenience. Last year 2,328 firms completed this question and
this year the number has increased to 2,558. The 2,558 firms reporting place their fixed capital,
which includes land, buildings, machinery, and equipment, at $696,530,892; working capital,
$124,140,343. This includes value of materials, supplies, finished products, stocks in process of
manufacture, cash and trading accounts. Under the head of " Value of Production," the gross
figures which represent the total value of all commodities produced were given as $244,812,102,
and the net amount, being the gross value less the cost of materials, was $107,717,285.
A RECORD PAY-ROLL.
The total annual pay-roll for the 4,846 firms who made returns is particularly gratifying,
reaching the splendid total of $136,784,484.18. This is a favourable comparison with a pay-roll
of $130,074,021.91 for 1927, $129,420,599.55 for 1926, and $115,942,238.60 for 1925. These figures
clearly prove that from the standpoint of a solid industrial pay-roll the future of British
Columbia is firmly established.
The payments to officers, superintendents, and managers amounted to $12,719,120.65, a
decrease from 1926 of $529,096.99. Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen received the sum of
$12,736,839.18, an increase of $1,564,724.45. The amount paid to wage-earners also increased
from $105,626,689.55 in 1927 to $111,328,524.35, an increase of $4,701,834.70. Comparing the
years 1927 and 1928, it is noted that the salaries of officers, superintendents, and managers has
decreased and that the amount paid to clerks, stenographers, and salesmen has been greatly
increased, also the sum paid to wage-earners has increased correspondingly. AVe might take
this to mean that industry is beginning to feel the effect of more efficient management, and that
through an increase in its sales and office force the effort to reach out for new markets is being
reflected by an increased pay-roll for the wage-earners.
The proportionate payment for 1928 under the headings of officers, superintendents, and
managers is 9.29 per cent.; clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, 9.31 per cent.; and wage-
earners, 81.40 per cent.    The following is the percentage figures covering the last four years :—
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.
Per Cent.
9.17
8.36
82.47
Per Cent.
9.58
8.21
82.21
Per Cent.
10.19
8.59
81.22
Per Cent.
9 29
9 31
81 40
100.00
100.00       j       100.00
100.00 FLUCTUATION OF EMPLOYMENT DURING 1928.
The tables showing the " Average Number of Wage-earners " for each month of the year
shows at a glance the fluctuations of employment for the period covered by this report.
January again stands out as the month of least employment, with the number employed at
70,492, as compared with 70,389 for 1927. The reason January maintains this position is obvious
to those acquainted with conditions in the Province. For most of our seasonal industries the
winter months is a period of inactivity, while other firms close down for a short spell to enable
a thorough overhaul of the plants to be made, preparatory to the work of the coming year.
Employment increased each month until the peak was reached in August. This was the high
month during 1927, September in 1926, and October in 1925. The total number employed during
August, 1928, was 94,136 as compared with 92,316 of the previous year. From August a
gradual decline took place for the balance of the year, December, 1928, having 79,798 gainfully
employed, as against 72,908 during December, 1927, an increase of 6,890 over the same month
last year. Only one industry reached the peak" of employment in February, five in July, seven
in August, four in September, two in November, and two in December.
The lumber industries moved the maximum employment period from September in 1927 to
October in 1928, coal-mining from November in 1927 to October in 1928, Coast shipping from
June in 1927 to December in 1928. To those not acquainted with our Coast shipping the change
of the peak month of employment requires an explanation. All stevedoring companies are placed
in the Coast-shipping group and the last four months of 1928 were particularly busy ones on
the water-front. This more than made up for the loss of employment caused by the withdrawal
of coastal passenger-boats from their summer schedules. The manufacture of food products
changed from September in 1927 to August in 1928. Seventeen of the twenty-five groups had
their month of least employment in January, as against seven for 1927. Three groups touched
their low period during February, one in June, one during September, and two in December.
INCREASE OF APPRENTICES.
Last year attention was drawn to the increase in the number of apprentices during the last
few years, and it is pleasing to again register a gain for 1928, the number being 1,628. This is
almost double the number given for 1924, which was 898, advancing to 1,115 in 1925, 1,281 in
1926, and 1,554 in 1927. These figures would seem to indicate that the youth of our Province
is determined to learn, in all its phases, the industry he has selected as his life's work, and
suggests that in the near future the apprentices of the last few years may be expected to
assume greater responsibilities in their native Province.
INCREASE  IN EMPLOYMENT OF FEMALES.
The proportion of female employees again increased to 8.75 per cent, from 6.88 per cent, in
1927 and 6.42 per cent, in 1926. The rise during 1928 is largely absorbed by the groups representing the manufacture of food products, laundries, cleaning and dyeing, printing and publishing, and the utility group. The group having the largest decrease is that of the manufacture
of leather and fur goods. The variation in the female employment in the other groups is not
sufficient to arrest attention.
The following table shows the variation in employment in each industry during the past
two years:— J 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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DO OJ        , NATIONALITY OF EMPLOYEES.
By making a study of this particular table of the report we come to the conclusion that the
wage-earners of the Province have a decided international colour—every country in the world
taking part in the activities of our industrial life.
The employees returned as natives of Canada and Newfoundland took an upward turn over
last year, as did also the natives of Continental Europe, in spite of the increase in the last-
named group. British-born—that is, natives of the British Empire—comprise 69.29 per cent, of
the total number employed. The percentage of Canadians and those from Newfoundland show
a decided rise, with 38.07 per cent, of the total, as compared with 36.01 in 1927. This is the
highest percentage recorded of Canadians. Natives of Great Britain show a slight decrease this
year, the percentage being 30.85, as compared with 31.87 in 1927. Adding together all employees
who claim the English language as their mother-tongue, we have 72.65 per cent., as against 72.51
last year.
ASIATIC EMPLOYEES STILL DECLINING.
The percentage of Asiatics shows a further reduction this year, the percentage being 9.33, as
compared with 10.20 per cent, in 1927, 11.56 in 1926, 11.30 in 1925, and 11.97 in 1924.
The actual number of Chinese employed during 1928 was 5,918, a reduction of 467 over the
previous year. The number of Hindus employed was 779, a reduction of 60 from the number
shown in 1927. The number of Japanese, however, increased by 194, from 3,859 in 1927 to 4,053
in 1928.
The number of all Asiatics employed during 1928 was 10,750, a reduction of 333 from the
figures of 1927. The groups which show an increase in the number of Asiatics employed are:
Coal-mining, laundries, cleaning and dyeing, metal-mining, miscellaneous trades and industries,
the utility group, and the manufacture of wood (not elsewhere specified). The groups showing
a decrease in the number of Asiatics engaged are headed by the lumber industries with a reduction of 316 from 1927, followed by the food products group, printing and publishing, garment-
making, pulp and paper, and ship-building.
CANADIAN AND BRITISH WORKMEN LEAD.
The groups in which native Canadians show a majority of employees are: Creameries,
builders' materials, cigar and tobacco manufacturing, contracting, manufacture of food products,
house-furnishing, manufacture of jewellery, leather and fur goods, lumber industries, metal
trades, metal-mining, miscellaneous trades and industries, oil-refining, paint-manufacturing,
printing and publishing, and the manufacture of wood (not elsewhere specified). The groups
having a preponderance of those born in Great Britain and Ireland are: Coal-mining, Coast
shipping, explosives and chemicals, garment-making, laundries, cleaning and dyeing, pulp and
paper mills, ship-building, smelting, and the public utility group. Comparing these groups with
the corresponding statement for 1927, we find that garment-making, builders' materials, miscellaneous trades and industries, and oil-refining have swung from the Canadian to the British
group, and the manufacture of jewellery from the British to the Canadian group.
In the group composing those of Continental Europe we find the number of workers of
Belgium origin has decreased by 15, the number being 242 for 1928. France is down 165 to 474.
Italy loses 70, the figures for 1928 being 2,667. Germany increases from 565 in 1927 to 775 in
1928, an advance of 210. Austria-Hungary from 989 last year to 1,135 for 1928, an increase of
146. Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and other Scandinavian countries show an increase
from 7,759 in 1927 to 9,607 for 1928. Natives of Russia staged a sharp advance to 4,055 from
2,818 in 1927. We note with satisfaction the decrease in the number of those coming under the
title of "Nationality not stated," the number being 1,042 for 1928 and 2,389 for 1927. The
natives of Continental Europe retrieve the percentage loss of last year, as will be seen from the
following table:—
1924.
1
1925.      |      1926.
1927.
1928.
Per Cent.
72.33
14.56
11.97
1.14
Per Cent.
70.85
15.91
11.30
1.94
Per Cent.
70.92
15.62
11.56
1.90
Per Cent.
72.61
15.05
10.20
2.24
Per Cent.
72.65
17.02
9.33
From other countries, or nationality not stated....
1.00
100.00
100.00     j     100.00
100.00
100.00 J 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Chart showing Fluctuation in Industrial Wages.
3or.
25r.
20%
15%
IO%
5%
I9IQ
1919
1920
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In order that a fair comparison may be made for the various years the same method has
been used for the classification of the weekly wage-rates in the various industries. In the
summary of all tables 9,430 adult males are shown as receiving from $24 to $24.99 per week.
This number no doubt includes many receiving $24 per week, some at $24.25, some at $24.50,
some at $24.75, etc., while the 13,837 who received from $30 to $34.99 would be made up in
the same manner; some receiving $30, some $31, $32, $33, $34, etc. For the purpose of making
an average it has been assumed, where steps of $1 were given in our table, that " $24 to $24.99,"
for example, meant $24.50; and, where steps of $5 were given, that of "$30 to $34.99," for
example, meant $32. Lest these assumptions were thought to err on the side of generosity,
" $50 and over " was taken in all cases to mean $50 only.
CHANGES IN WAGE-RATES.
No pronounced changes appeared in the wage-rates during the year, the principal increases
being recorded by breweries, Coast shipping, jewellery-manufacturing, laundries, cleaning and
dyeing, metal trades, miscellaneous trades and industries, printing and publishing, smelting, and
the utility group. Of the twenty-five groups, sixteen show an increase in the weekly wage, and
nine of the groups a small decrease in the average weekly rate.    (See table on page 18.) REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 17
Chaet showing Fluctuation in Industrial Wages—Continued.
192 2
1923
1924
1925
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15%
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P 09- J IS
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry  (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1922. 1923. 1924. 1925. 1926. 1927
1928.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products, manufacture of	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Jewellery, manufacture of	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries...
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building :■.	
Smelting	
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
telephones, etc	
Manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.)	
$26.62
25.61
25.30
35.96
25.43
28.06
26.13
27.39
27.28
24.23
30.90
26.11
26.67
25.29
27.73
30.97
25.91
32.63
21.79
36.23
25.88
25.55
29.91
30.41
23.12
$26.55
26.83
23.32
36.96
28.36
28.31
26.63
25.61
29.85
24.74
32.65
25.07
26.73
25.92
28.04
32.21
25.83
32.71
23.13
38.09
27.90
25.88
34.16
29.42
23.33
$26.51
26.10
24.07
35.73
29.59
27.98
26.86
25.94
28.38
25.53
31.26
25.70
26.44
26.15
26.37
31.84
25.85
33.06
24.69
39.52
27.69
26.79
35.14
29.84
22.55
$27.41
26.78
22.97
30.52
28.21
28.23
23.35
26.25
29.10
25.34
35.06
25.30
26.68
25.40
28.13
32.81
25.38
31.39
22.00
37.61
27.38
27.72
35.75
27.69
23.92
$27.32
27.38
22.24
30.06
29.59
29.06
23.79
26.20
29.48
25.67
36.69
27.00
26.90
25.56
27.92
33.34
24.61
31.48
21.94
38.25
27.47
28.74
32.90
29.26
25.26
$27.62
26.96
22.36
29.79
29.79
30.24
25.38
26.60
29.15
27.46
31.41
26.44
29.42
25.93
29.76
32.89
25.99
30.96
24.95
36.72
27.11
29.11
31.15
28.83
25.60
$28.85
26.28
22.97
30.50
31.89
30.58
26.24
27.70
28.60
27.44
32.49
26.96
27.88
26.53
31.04
33.27
27.15
30.23
23.62
40.94
26.82
28.85
32.54
30.04
25.02
AVERAGE WEEKLY INCREASES AND DECREASES.
In sixteen of the groups there was an average increase in the weekly rates and in nine
groups an average decrease. The comparison may be conveniently shown in the following
table:—
Increases.
Breweries   $1.23
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing..      .61
Coal-mining   71
Coast shipping     2.10
Contracting   34
Explosives and chemicals  86
Food products, manufacture of     1.10
Jewellery, manufacture of      1.08
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing 52
Lumber industries  60
Metal trades       1.28
Metal-mining  3'8
Miscellaneous   trades   and   industries      1.16
Printing and publishing      4,22
Smelting      1.39
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
telephones, etc     1.21
Decreases.
Builders' materials   $0.68
Garment-making    55
House-furnishing  02
Manufacturing    leather    and    fur
goods      1.54
Oil-refining  73
Paint-manufacture        1.33
Pulp and paper manufacturing 29
Ship-building  26
Manufacturing wood   (N.E.S.)    58
FURTHER REDUCTION IN LOW-PAID WORKERS.
A comparison of the following table shows a further reduction, though not to the same
extent as during the two previous years. For this purpose we have termed low-paid workers as
being those who receive less than $19 a week. We may accept the difference between the figures
of 1927 and 1928 as a fair gauge of the movement in this class of workers, because the pro-'
nounced decrease of 1927 from the figures of 1926 was made possible partly through the enforcement of the " Male Minimum Wage Act." It is, however, worthy of notice that the general
tendency has been to increase rather than decrease the wages of those receiving less than $19
per week. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 19
x\.dult Male Workers employed at Low Rates of Wages.
Weekly Rate.
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.
Under $6                                     	
49
45
37
158
1.39
297
382
1,249
867
1,454
1,635
2,695
1,796
3,806
2
3
12
53
54
97
204
359
5'28
96'5
1,438
1,311
1,952
2,520
1
11
10
9
44
72
194
171
317
619
502
1,199
1,260
$6 to $6.99               	
1
7 to    7.99	
8 to    8.99            	
10
9  to    9.99	
26
10 to 10.99	
70
11 to  11.99	
44
12 to 12.99                     	
214
13 to 13.99              	
143
14 to 14.99...           	
283
15 to 15.99	
17 to 17.99	
679
574
1,092
1,252
IS to 18.99                          	
Totals              	
14,609
9,498
4,409
4,391
INCREASE IN AVERAGE INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average industrial wage for all adult male employees for 1928 reached the highest point
since the peak year of 1920, when it stood at $31.51 per week; for the year 1928 it was $28.96
for a full week's work. This average is arrived at from the figures supplied by each employer
covering the week of the employment of the greatest number. By comparing the diagrams on
pages 16 and 17 it will be seen that there has been a steady reduction in the lower-paid adult
workers, and a corresponding increase in the number earning $25 a week and upwards since
1925, when the percentage of those earning $25 a week and upward was 54.07 per cent.; 54.46
per cent, in 1926, 56.41 per cent, in 1927, and for the year 1928, 58.96 per cent.
The average weekly wage for industrial workers (adult males only) since the compilation
of these statistics is as follows:—
1918  $27.97
1919      29.11
1920      31.51
1921      27.52
1922      27.'29
1923      28.05
1924  $28.39
1925     27.82
1926      27.99
1927     28.29
1928      28.96
EMPLOYERS WITH A LARGE PAY-ROLL.
Following the usual procedure of the Department to place on record the number of firms
whose annual pay-roll is over $100,000, beginning in 1921 there were 118 of these large operations
in the Province, followed by 164 in 1922 and 200 in 1923. During 1924 the total fell to 196 and
remained at the same figure for 1925, but in 1926 it rose to 230 and fell back to 219 during
1927. In 1928, however, the number of firms thus classified reached the record total of 254, or
35 more than the figure for the previous year. In arriving at the total we do not include any
public authorities, Dominion, Provincial, or municipal, nor does it include transcontinental railways, wholesale or retail merchants, or deep-sea shipping. Thirteen of these firms had a payroll of over $1,000,000, of which number four were between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000 and two
over $4,000,000. Of the number stated, lumbering as usual has established a commanding lead
with a total of 108 of the large firms, 10 more than the previous year. Pood products is again
second with 24, an increase of 6 over 1927. Then follows Coast shipping, and contracting, with
15 each ; metal-mining, 14; public utilities, 10; coal-mining, 9; metal trades, 7; printing and
publishing, pulp and paper, and ship-building, with 6 each; manufacture of lime, stone and
cement, and manufacture of wood (N.E.S.), 5 each; miscellaneous trades and industries, and
laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 4 each; garages, 3; house-furnishing, oil-refining, and smelting,
2 each; and one each in creameries, explosives, garment-making, jewellery-manufacturing, paint-
manufacturing, plumbing and heating, and sheet-metal works. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following", the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries.— Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc. —Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.— Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Skipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting.--Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing asa heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. "Explosives, Chemicals, etc.—Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, flsh, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Fumishings.—Comyyvises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, npholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of—Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties ; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades,—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetj'Iene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining,—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.— Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also wnite-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps. ■
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, and supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No.  1.
BREWERIES.
Returns covering 37 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $189,683.35
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     65,398.79
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    445,586.44
Total $700,668.58
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
April	
May	
June	
279
300
309
323
358
371
23
24
25
29
13
15
July	
August	
September .
October	
November ..
December...
384
375
345
324
315
317
16
11
29
32
31
29
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
3
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
1
1
1
1
10 00 to   10.99. ..
1
5
2
6
1
1
17
12.00 to   12.99...
1
1
15 00 to   15.99.   .
1
17.00 to   17.99...
1
4
17
5
7
5
20
30
9
44
302
50
27
11
8
4
2
6
2
19 00 to   19.99. ..
20.00 to   20.99  ..
2
22 00 to   22.99.
23 00 to   23.99.
1
2
4
24.00 to   24.99.
25.00 to   25.99...
20
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99.
28.00 to   28.99.
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality oi Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany	
Austria and Hungary    	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality7 not stated	
Males.
213
136
15
1
3
1
Females.
29
4 -
REPORT OP THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 21
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 100 Firms.
Table No.
CIGAR
3.
AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Pay
Officers, Superintendents, and Manage
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners (including piece-worker
ments, 1928.
263,605.47
L46.050.49
585,275.57
Salary and Wage Payments,
1928.
    $14,870.35
)	
1,
9,539.41
38,645.42
$1,994,931.53
»'63,055.18
Average Number oi Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
912
1,009
1,084
1,026
1,235
1,299
Jul;
1,339
1,387
1,306
1,312
1,302
1,211
January....
February...
May	
June	
17
■21
21
21
20
26
12
27
17
22
25
39
Jul.
27
26
19
21
22
23
39
36
September .
October	
November..
December...
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
19
April	
26
30
32
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
2
1
Under $6.00
$6.00 to  $6
7.00 to    7
8.00 to    8
9.00 to    9
10.00 to   10
11.00 to   11
12.00 to   12
13.00 to   13
14 00 to   14
1
$6.00 to   $6.
7.00 to     7.
8.00 to    8!
9.00 to     9."
10.00 to   10.
11.00 to   11.
19.
1
99
99.
)9...
)9..
4
1
99..
2
99  .
99..
19...
1
9...
1
3
2
99..
V,> 00 bi   12 99.
99.
13
2
12
2
3
4
4
4
13.00 to   13.i
14.00 to   14.<
9...
99
19...
57
5
92
19
66
116
62
136
107
61
227
52
75
87
64
27
109
98
53
62
52
5
99..
2
1
2
1
3
... .„..
1
4
3
2
2
2
15.00 to   15.99.
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99,
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99,.
19.00 to   19.99.
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
1
1
5
9
1
2
5
1
2
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99.
2
21.00 to   21.99...
1
22.00 to   22.99...
23 00 to  23.99.
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99.
27 00 to   27.99.
28.00 to   28
29.00 to   29
30 00 tn    34
99.
29 00 to   29.99.
99..
99
1
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44
45.00 to   49
1
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
577
542
36
20
2
4
15
Great Britain and Ir
United States of An
Great Britain and
United States of A
14
2
5
5
76
13
8
74
20
3
295
1
15
1
1
Austria and Hungai
Austria and Hung
1
2
- 2
Other European cou
.
Other European co
All other countries
All other countries
ed
14 J 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 26 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $224,045.75
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       315,498.06
Wages-earners (including piece-workers)    6,899,405.09
Total $7,438,948.90
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April  .  .
May	
June
5,138
6,073
6,042
4,666
4,721
4,769
July	
August	
September .
October	
November...
December...
4,781
4,773
4,870
5,176
4,969
4,327
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12 99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27 99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.  Under
& over. 21 Yrs.
47
24
70
60
52
25
77
61
109
110
466
453
274
341
305
284
775
600
609
154
124
18
9
3
25
15
5
19
6
11
2
24
7
18
10
IS Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin,
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries '.
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
966
1,666
77
1
40
13
443
65
91
119
634
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 133 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $634,798.91
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       586,2S2.42
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,735,039.42
Total $8,956,120.75
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April ...
May	
June....
Males.
Females.
6,196
14
6,044
18
6,540
17
6,622
18
6,877
20
6,523
24
Month.       Males.   Females.
July     6,919
August    6,875
September..: 6,646
October I 6,719
November.. | 7,166
December .. I 7,307
28
25
20
18
18
18
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.90.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23^99'
24.99
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
10
21
57
17
132
106
148
99
67
89
356
339
346
307
306
98
187
659
101
1,203
1,597
865
394
370
57
21
6
Femax.es.
  Appren-
18 Yrs.     Under      tices.
& over.    18 Yrs.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
2,634
4,158
200
72
7
22
123
48
25
239
34
5
364
75
"¥
4
15 REPORT OP THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 23
Table No.  6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 1,169 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,730,498.68
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,380,941.46
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 11,921,926.64
Total $15,033,366.78
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females. Month.       Males.    Femal
January.
February
March ...
Apr i 1....
May	
June
6,168
7,067
8,312
8,164
10,333
10,402
26
24
24
26
26
43
July 	
August....
September
October ...
November .
December..
11,101
11,317
10,469
9,922
9,293
8,531
65
57
49
31
27
28
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to   $6.'.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28 99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
2
3
11
62
20
93
76
313
283
415
1,617
520
2,774
783
334
1,173
291
136
1,019
1,327
2.220
709
520
Under
21 Yrs.
4
14
9
19
10
31
21
35
16
18
29
13
17
29
8
21
6
16
1
1
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
2
25
18
26
8
21
18
19
13
7
5
4
5
6
2
51
1
11
3
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France    	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
6,733
6,286
512
18
29
81
302
36
160
639
243
76
13
2
1
6
78
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering H Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $62,183.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    ....    99,620.56
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  212,564.15
Total $374,367.71
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ....
163
6
February...
166
6
166
6
April	
165
7
172
7
163
7
Month.       Males.    Females.
July	
August	
September..
October....
November ..
December ..
155
155
166
166
158
174
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.:
$6.00.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over,    21 Yrs.
3
1
5
5
23
7
11
8
7
14
12
8
10
4
13
7
17
11
6
1
7
18 Yrs.     Under
over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France.	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated   	
Males.       Females.
49
106
2
■2
21 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 516 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,528,111.09
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,692,747.81
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,819,464.09
Total $10,940,322.99
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
3,952
3,914
3,988
4,711
5,542
6,511
844
823
824
916
1,081
1,762
July	
September .
October 	
November..
December ..
6,967
7,702
7,466
6,416
5,475
4,616
2,518
3,289
3,444
2,610
1,786
1,173
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.!
and over .
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
52
11
61
10
51
193
116
165
318
488
849
294
532
330
912
1,001
237
580
257
201
1,168
562
255
309
560
Under
21 Yrs.
8
12
12
14
9
32
19
89
24
47
69
38
29
48
39
44
34
17
11
14
12
3
3
5
2
18 Yrs.
& over.
16
15
93
240
48
223
130
324
252
561
484
256
109
364
243
129
145
65
61
15
26
55
21
5
1
1
Under
18 Yrs.
28
15
25
70
34
89
87
42
12
11
18
4
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
4,113
3,234
256
22
13
82
67
81
66
581
91
45
1,367
11
700
3
373
2,656
839
93
3
6
27
48
71
22
98
54
4
10
275
167'
Table No. 9
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 88 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $184,618.85
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         87,790.21
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       732,648.01
Total  $1,005,057.07
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March	
April....
May	
June	
251
2.47
253
259
248
246
423
482
488
533
539
491
July	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
244
252
257
268
252
251
519
554
567
614
564
485
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
ES.
For Week of
Mai
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1
4
4
7
4
6
1
4
2
2
4
2
2
1
2
1
3
1
8
2
40
19
103
67
50
36
62
5
34
12
22
6
6
24
6
15
1
2
3
10
6
9
7
1
8
6
5
3
2
$6.00 to   $6.99
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8.99..
2
2
26
9.00 to     9.99
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
7
5
3
3
3
9
3
6
12
7
14
8
12
1
4
12
6
13
3
4
23
35
25
11
8
4
18
1
6
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
1
20 00 to   20.99..
21 00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99
24 00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
8
3
2
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia .'	
Belgium   	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationalitv not stated	
Males.      Females.
108
100
3
1
1
9
26
5
15
332
241
13
1
1
4
3
3
1
14
13 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 25
Table No.  10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering \5 Firms.
Table No.  11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $145,087.70
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   558,084.33
Salary and Wage Pay
Officers, Superintendents, and Manag
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc
Wage-earners (including piece-workei
tnents, 1928.
27,490.00
17,757.25
18,472.89
8)	
 1
 1
Total   $813,312.66
Total	
 $263,720.14
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
females.
446
430
448
454
463
466
49
52
56
56
54
53
Julj
Aug
Sepl
Oct
Nov
463
488
503
508
515
493
50
52 >
59
63
60
61
January....
February...
April	
May	
June .......
73
73
73
73
73
83
3
3
3
3
3
3
July 	
August	
September..
November..
December,,,
83
S3
85
77
75
75
3
February....
April	
tist...  .
ember..
)ber   ...
3
3
3
3
June	
December...
3
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under *6.00	
1
3
9
2
2
10
5
2
21
$6.00 to   $6.
7.00 to     7.
».
$6.00 to   $6
7.00 to    7
8.00 to    8
9.00 to     9
10.00 to   10
11.00 to   11
12.00 to   12
13.00 to   13
14.00 to   14
15.00 to   15
1 fi 00 to   1 fi
99
3
to
3
8
7
3
4
10
2
6
13
4
10
5
1
5
1
...
1
3
99..
8.00 to     8.99...
99.
99
2
9.00 to     9.
10.00 to   10.
)9...
»...
1
3
11
3
14
3
8
44
15
42
9
21
25
15
10
15
10
67
44
22
5
1
99.
99..
11 00 to   11.99...
1
2
9
0
11
5
2
7
2
2
1
12.00 to   12.99...
99..
.99..
1
2
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
1
2
99..
15.00 to   15.99...
1
16.00 to   16.99...
99
3
1
1
1
17.00 to   17.99...
1
1
17.00 to   17.99
1
18.00 to   18.99...
18.00 to   18
19.00 to   19
99..
1
19.00 to   19.99...
99
6
1
4
2
2
20.00 to   20.99...
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99,.
23 00 to    23 99
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99.   .
24.00 to   24
.99
1
4
1
3
1
2
1
1
15
12
7
7
2
26.00 to   26.99...
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40 00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99  .
50.00 and over ..
27.00to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
•
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44 99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
246
226
7
2
30
30
1
1
1
43
36
1
3
Great Britain and I
United States of An
Great Britain and
1
2
2
3
16
13
3
Italy	
2
Austria and Hunga
Austria and Hungj
1
1
1
2
Other European coi
Other European co
1
All other countries
Nationality not sta
All other countries
Nationality not sta
,ed 	 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES,  CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 82 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $150,092.32
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      256,390.83
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,204,898.68
Total $1,611,381.83
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
May	
June   	
493
507
623
530
529
533
954
964
982
999
1,005
1,044
July	
August  ....
September..
October 	
November..
December ..
538
649
539
550
549
541
1,107
1,130
1,057
1,044
1,018
1,035
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
16.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
17.99.
18.99.
to 19.99.
to   20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
to 27.99.
to   28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
to
to
to
to
to   49.99
and over
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
11
5
6
8
15
31
11
2
35
14
21
11
23
76
18
34
13
9
102
48
32
4
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
32
390
133
169
61
35
58
14
24
5
7
3
4
20
22
19
8
13
3
1
Apprentices.
2
1
32
19
9
3
10
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland    	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hxingary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
184
297
12
4
4
1
1
6
3
2
37
15
"s
472
544
27
1
4
21
2
11
40
29
1
7
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 61 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $ 83,882.75
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     78,254.45
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  395,057.91
Total $567,195.11
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June....
273
274
279
272
271
263
96
91
103
104
106
110
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December .
274
274
280
282
285
117
119
121
123
125
119
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00.
to $6.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99
20.99.
21.99.
22.99
23.99.
to 24.99
to 25.99.
to 26.99
to, 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34 99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
49.99
and over .
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
2
1
2
7
4
11
7
18
7
30
27
1
61
15
7
1
5
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
2
4
3
3
13
8
9
10
5
5
3
2
4
Apprentices.
2
10
3
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America ..
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Rationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
128
117
12
10
16
2
2
15
10
4
75
45
4 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 27
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 1,062 Firms.
Salary and Waste Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers §2,208,168.49
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,213,970.47
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 32,822,061.12
Total $36,244,200.08
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ....
19,803*
45
July	
24,864
55
February...
22,286
44
August....
25,720
55
March	
22,941
52
September.
25,580
58
April	
23,611
57
October...
25,744
54
Mav	
24,4-28
61
November.
25,566
54
June	
24,809
62
December..
22,411
54
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99...
3
5
19
12
9
14
70
16
63
40
63
15
41
123
30
26
2t
1
18
13
4
6
7.00 to     7.99..
1
5
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
ll.OOto   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
3"
2
18
5
34
61
67
320
278
7,271
1,414
2,937
1,279
844
3,303
1,286
1,328
1,761
1,044
728
2,938
1,932
932
851
770
1
1
4
13.00 to   13.99.   .
1
1
4
3
4
11
11
8
3
8
2
5
1
1
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99.   .
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99.   .
22.00 to   22.99...
4
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
1
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
3
2
40.00 to   44.99    .
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   ..   	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan     	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
10,932
4,411
1,685
57
84
182
432
328
530
5,648
1,544
330
3,078
725
2,085
44
285
54
4
4
1
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 678 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,570,069.52
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,638,502.33
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,067,345.99
Total     $8,275,917.84
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January ..
February.
March..   .
3,485
3,499
3,718
3,827
3,912
4,128
68
108
120
98
109
103
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November ..
December...
4,202
4,178
4,146
4,110
3,929
3,892
96
97
97
95
May	
88
68
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00.
17
15
18
50
31
57
38
62
24
25
97
31
26
22
21
23
9
11
7
7
7
4
2
2
2
1
8
$6.00 to   $6.99
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8 99 .
"3"
4
9
7
7
54
15
53
96
120
138
88
305
146
293
254
120
110
139
100
895
620
192
96
89
47
1
2
21
26
9.00 to     9.99
19
10.00 to   10.99..
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99 .
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 10   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99  .
17.00 to   17 99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99
3
2
3
54
7
13
3
3
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
14
1
21
18
24
14
12
12
15
7
25
6
2
2
2
1
2
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99
2
1
9
27.00 to   27.99 .
29.00 to   29 99
1
1
35.00 to   39.99..
1
40.00 to   44 99  .
45.00 to   49 99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.        Females.
2,769
1,816
172
15
8
7
40
15
14
66
38
11
3
26
1
75
24
2 J 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No.  16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 276 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $571,425.09
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      490,834.64
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  8,758,843.16
Total 69,821,102.89
Average Number ol Wage-earners.
January.
February
March . .
April ..  .
May	
June ....
Males.
Females.
4,101
49
4,185
50
4,215
56
4,632
58
5,036
62
5,422
66
Month.
Males.
5,430
5,777
September..
5,713
October   ...
5,743
November...
5,460
December...
4,985
60
57
57
55
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00	
to $6.99...
to 7.99...
to 8.99...
to 9.99...
to 10.99...
to 11.99...
to 12.99...
to 13.99...
to 14.99...
to 15.99...
to 16.99...
to 17.99..
to 18.99..
to 19.99..
to 20.99..
to 21.99..
to 22.99..
to 23.99..
to 24.99..
to 25.99..
to 26.99..
to 27.99..
to 28.99..
to 29.99..
to 34.99..
to 39.99..
to 44.99..
to 49.99..
and over..
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
14
11
15
71
54
214
264
80
259
451
142
569
1,912
1,861
636
206
103
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
9
3
17
3
1
3
4
6
IS
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary    	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country.	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan ,	
Japan.	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
2,129
1,885
311
13
'   14
35
237
45
69
1,083
700
25
88
1
115
2
29
38
22
2
Table No.  17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 148 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.    $580,912.15
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      568,988.15
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,765,542.57
Total  $2,915,442.87
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females
January.
February
March ...
April ....
May	
June
1,172
1,146
1,184
1,251
1,294
1,342
289
315
301
307
303
325
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December .
1,355
1,354
1,380
1,349
1,299
1,294
331
353
350
377
387
365
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
K.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99
to 11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99
15.99.
16.90.
17.99
18.99
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and over
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
7
14
13
14
55
136
182
101
91
38
61
37
33
161
72
76
12
33
Under
21 Yrs.
18
5
18
50
34
15
37
17
27
20
13
6
3
4
5
1
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
4
21
2
14
8
184
33
24
11
11
10
5
2
12
8
13
2
11
4
18
7
2
1
Apprentices.
7
1
12
'2'
1
2
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
I
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   .
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries ..  	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
713
699
48
4
6
4
H
13
17
16
14
6
Females.
234
135
6
1
12
1 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 29
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 29 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $139,359.38
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       259,823.28
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,104,486.06
Total    $1,503,668.72
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females
January.
February
March ...
April....
May	
June
490
546
566
614
730
943
15
15
17
18
20
20
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
1,045
1,120
1,178
927
771
653
22
21
25
23
22
21
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
2 J. 00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
• 40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to $6.!
to 7.!
to 8 !
to 9.!
to 10.!
to 11.1
to 12.!
to 13.1
to 14.
to 15
to 16.
to 17.
to 18.
to 19
to 20
to 21.
to 22.
to 23.
to 24.
to 25.
to 26.
to 27.
to 28.
to 29.
to 34.
to 39.
to 44.
to 49.
and ov
99..
99..
99.
99.,
99..
99..
99..
99  .
99..
99..
99..
99.
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
21 Yrs.     Under
&over.    21 Yrs.
1
3
8
2
35
68
35
55
76
26
71
8
23
156
129
218
166
37
35
45
1
16
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan      	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality tiot stated	
508
415
28
4
16
255
16
11
16
8
1
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers   $77,964.45
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc..       85,347.43
Wage-earneis (including piece-workers)    122,436.89
Total  $285,748.77
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March ..
April
May	
June
94
100
103
113
113
107
11
11
11
11
11
11
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
112
114
105
97
99
99
11
ll
12
11
10
11
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 tn   $6.99..
1
3
7
5
7
5
4
3
2
8.00 to     8.99..
10.00 to   10 99.
12.00 to   12.99..
1
1
6
1
4
1
14.00 to   14.99..
4
4
3
3
2
3
7
1
3
9
2
3
1
2
4
1
5
1
2
1
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99.
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99
20.00 to   20.99..
1
21 00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
1
1
23 00 to   23.99..
24 00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25 99..
26.00 to   26.99
27 00 to   27.99  .
28 00 to   28.99
29 00 to   29.99..
30 00 to   34.99
35 00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland ..
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries   	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
65
57
10
2 J 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No.  20.
PRIMING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 121 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $520,002.88
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,019,746.57
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      2,052,251.16
Total $3,592,000.61
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
1,073
1,089
1,102
1,114
1,124
1,137
120
124
152
135
139
141
July...	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
1,133
1,125
1,128
1,140
1,140
1,162
165
168
158
183
168
154
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Frmalks,
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
5
17
7
10
5
8
2
12
6
5
6
5
6
3
3
2
1
3
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6 00	
2
1
2
2
8
1
2
7
3
4
7
1
3
4
$6.00 to   $6.99.   .
7.00 to     7.99...
11
17
8.00 to     8.99.   .
13
9.00 to     9.99...
11
10 00 to   10.99...
ll.OOto   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13 OOto   13.99.
2
4
4
3
10
7
7
13
4
16
6
15
6
19
25
8
16
6
14
40
36
182
220
264
11
10
38
7
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
12
10
7
13
J8
2
24
33
7
2
2
1
1
5
2
18
20
5
3
3
2
3
.       I
1
24.OOto   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99 ..
2
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
1
2
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
1
1
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99.
40.00 to   44.99...
1
3
1
45 OOto   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.,
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
670
473
32
"4'
113
77
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 1/f Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $467,579.75
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      340,550.45
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     4,135,599.39
Total  $4,943,729.59
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February...
May	
2.307
2,530
2,437
2,480
2,573
2,653
62
62
61
65
62
63
2,700
2,666
2,577
2,695
2,683
2,586
71
September
October..
November
December.
72
-    71
70
66
67
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
$6 00 to   $6.99 .
1
1
1
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8.99..
1
1
8
11 00 to   11.99..
2
17
2
4
22
3
12 OOto   12.99..
7
12
11
5
381
19
274
30
342
361
266
127
73
101
53
165
283
83
25
50
2
3
1
1
■2
3
32
3
25
5
51
11
7
3
3
13.00 to   13.99
14 OOto   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99 .
17.00 to   17.99
1
19.00 to   19.99
20.00 to   20.99  .
7
1
21.00 to   21.99..
22.OOto   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
1
24 OOto   24.99 .
1
1
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
1
28.00 to   28 99..
29 OOto   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
2
2
1
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44 99
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
802
924
107
6
5
11
177
5
18
71
85
16
76
47
24
4 REPORT OP THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 31
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering JfJf Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $148,575.12
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         88,768.86
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,236,477.01
Total $1,473,820.99
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females
January.
February
March...
April	
May	
June
932
854
851
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
781
787
646
883
1,030
977
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
7.9
S.9
$6.00
to $6
to
to
to
to 10.
to 11
to 12.
to 13.
to 14.
to 15.
to 16
to 17
to 18.!
to 19.!
to 20.!
to 21
to 22
to 23
to 24.
to 25.
to 26.
to 27.
to 28.
to 29.
to 34.
to 39.
to 44.
to 49.
and ov
99.
99. .
99..
99. .
99..
99..
99.,
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
21 Yrs.  Under
& over  21 Yrs.
3
1
7
51
16
95
32
244
7
115
48
104
52
20
45
213
284
44
22
21
7
5
2
4
17
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
551
694
56
7
1
5
9
1
3
72
13
1
63
5
Table No.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $270,454.03
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        467,616.33
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,956,362.13
Total $5,694,432.49
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January .
February
March..
April
May	
June
2,716
2,786
2,830
2,887
2,938
2,979
27
27
28
28
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
2,934
3,007
3,018
2,979
2,950
2,993
29
28
28
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 	
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
54.99..
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
and over ..
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
11
3
16
4
14
3
1
34
52
228
699
27
903
670
127
74
25
73
23
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
1
10
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary 	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated 	
647
1,321
55
5
10
5
465
22
66
183
191
26
Females.
16
12 J 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 82 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $605,652.04
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,576,561.23
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     7,873,013.46
Total...    $10,055,226.73
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
March.
April	
May	
June	
3,997
3,993
4,264
4,374
4,338
4,243
1,406
1,416
1,425
1,475
1,524
1,561
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November ..
December...
4,350
4,487
4,309
4,357
4,220
3,727
1,581
1,587
1,691
1,564
1,560
1,569
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1
$6.00 to   $6.99..
1
7.00 to    7.99 ..
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
8
3
2
8
7
104
12
140
23
161
321
149
647
170
130
225
155
188
1,615
497
346
94
61
ll.OOto   11.99.  .
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16 99.
2
1
2
1
1
16
209
74
7
434
209
32
153
55
237
57
73
8
5
16
21
208
70
5
17 OOto   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99
3
9
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
5
2.
4
25.00 to   25.99...
1
1
1
27 OOto   27 99...
10
29.00 to   29.99...
3
1
18
40.00 to   44.99.
45.00 to   49 99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia   ....
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated 	
Males.       Females.
1,737
2,791
186
12
6
7
123
11
14
211
175
20
19
3
3
1
1
1,043
516
2
1
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 86 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1928.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $319,989.53
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      139,717.07
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,767,036.77
Total  $2,226,743.37
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February ...
June	
1,288
1,327
1,352
1,510
1,625
1,715
32
41
48
68
78
51
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November...
December ..
1,771
1,778
1,718
1,624
1,496
1,404
57
49
42
40
61
33
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
2
1
1
2
2
1
5
16
4
20
4
5
5
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
4
2
1
4
1
2
$6.00 to  $6.99 .
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
14
7
12
41
27
10
31
34
41
18
29
12
39
5
18
21
1
1
8
1
1
4
12
13
10.00 to   10.99
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99.
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
3
21
14
1
14
20
64
37
282
61
195
48
39
118
43
47
38
99
55
162
86
39
10
15
29
4
1
2
1
1
19.00 to   19.99
20.00 to   20.99 .
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
6
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
5
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29 OOto   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39 99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
939
551
51
1
1
11
37
9
4
119
54
9
43
10
60
43
22
Females.
80
27 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 33
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 4,8Jie Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended December 31st, 1928:—
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $12,719,120.65
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      12,736,839.18
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)    111,328,524.35
 $136,784,484.18
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary   $1,118,442.46
Estimated  pay-roll  of  employers  in  occupations  covered  by  Department's
inquiry, and from whom returns were not received   4,350,000.00
Transcontinental Railways  15,844,855.08
Dominion and Provincial Government workers :  6,000,000.00
Wholesale and Retail Firms  4,000,000.00
Delivery,   Cartage   and   Teaming,   Warehousing,   Butchers,   Moving-picture
Operators, Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation   5,500,000.00
Ocean Services and Express Companies   8,000,000.00
Miscellaneous  1,500,000.00
 46,313,297.54
Total  $183,097,781.72
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January...
February .
March..  ..
April	
May	
June	
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.
05,919
69,685
72,648
74,631
79,806
81.984
83,952
86,359
84,448
83,389
81,009
74,382
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium    	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan   	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
38,470
32,943
3,868
246
232
438
2,576
694
1,095
9,431
3,920
640
5,901
779
3,758
107
4,573
4,727
4,816
5,033
5,276
6,023
6,933
7,777
7,868
7,074
6,191
5,416
5,384
2,600
180
91
81
40
176
135
11
17
295
6
203
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only.)
Males,
Females.
For Week of
Employment of
Appren
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00 .
41
18
36
25
$6.00 to  $6.99..
1
106
16
26
113
7.00 to     7 99  .
3
82
100
58
83
8.00 to     8.99..
10
178
252
74   •
155
9.00 to     9.99..
26
204
72
78
111
10.00 to   10.99..
70
238
268
90
160
ll.OOto   11.99..
44
149
175
94
87
12.00 to   12.99..
214
425
687
75
335
13.00 to   13.99..
143
171
759
114
106
14.00 to   14.99..
283
250
1,123
137
58
15.00 to   15.99..
679
416
1,242
72
80
16.00 to   16.99..
574
232
685
22
32
17.00 to   17.99..
1,092
157
282
15
32
18 OOto   18.99..
1,262
239
737
19
45
19 00 to   19.99..
9,381
261
365
4
19
20.00 to   20.99..
3,471
173
511
2
23
21.00 to   21.99..
5,188
161
274
9
24
22.00 to   22.99..
5,280
97
215
1
65
23.00 to   23.99..
3,4--9
87
100
1
8
24.00 to   24.99..
9,948
103
122
1
26
25.00 to   25 99..
5,144
65
134
1
5
26.00 to   26.99..
3,320
21
65
1
11
27.00 to   27.99..
5,522
94
63
5
28.00 to '28.99..
4,362
35
24
12
29.00 to   29.99..
2,730
11
31
a
30.00 to   34.99
13,837
15
74
24
35.00 to   39.99..
10,884
13
28
2
40.00 to   44.99..
6,808
3,301
3,122
9
1
1
45.00 to   49.99..
	
	
Totals  	
100,103
4,014
8,423
929
1,628 J 31 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
THE " MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
The first Act passed by the Legislature of British Columbia in the latter part of 1925 was
repealed at the last session of the Legislature and a new " Male Minimum Wage Act " was passed
and assented to on March 20th, 1929. Although the bringing-in of this measure should rightfully be treated in our next year's report, it is better that all concerned should have the information as early as possible.
In our report for 1927 the different judgments for and against the orders made by the
Board of Adjustment were fully dealt with. An appeal was made to the Supreme Court of
Canada in the case of " International Timber Company versus Field," and the following judgment
was handed down during October, 1928:—
IN THE SUPREME COURT OP CANADA—INTERNATIONAL TIMBER CO. VS. FIELD.
Reasons foe Judgment.
The Chief Justice (concurred in by Mignault, Newcombe, Rinfret, and Lamont, J J.) : The
plaintiff (respondent) was engaged by the defendant company in its logging camp at Campbell
River, British Columbia, for two periods during the year 1927—first as a " dish-washer " at $3.20
per day and afterwards as a waiter, or " flunkey," at first at the same wage and later at ,$3.45
a day. He appears to have been treated by his employers as liable to contribute to the Workmen's Compensation Fund a percentage of these wages  (R.S.B.C. 1924, chap. 278, sec. 33).
By an Order of the Board of Adjustment (constituted under the "Hours of Work Act,
1923") dated September 29th, 1926, and made under the "Male Minimum Wage Act" (B.C.
Statutes, 1925, chap. 32) the " minimum wage for all employees in the lumbering industry " was
fixed at " forty cents per hour." " Lumbering industry " was by the Order defined to include
" all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging camps, shingle-mills, sawmills,
planing-mills, lath-mills, sash and door factories, box-factories, barrel-factories, veneer-factories,
and pulp and paper mills, and all operations in or incidental to the driving, rafting, and booming
of logs."
Alleging that he was an employee in the " lumbering industry " of the defendants, the plaintiff sued in the County Court to recover the difference between the amounts paid him at the
contract prices above stated and 40 cents per hour on the basis of having worked thirteen hours
per day.
" Employee " is defined by the Act to mean: " Every adult male person to whom this Act
applies who is in receipt of or entitled to any compensation for labour or services performed
for another." But by section 13 the Act is declared inapplicable to the occupations of " farm-
labourers, fruit-pickers, fruit-packers, fruit and vegetable canners, and domestic servants."
The County Court Judge found that the working-time of the plaintiff amounted in all to
only ten hours per day, and that from that time must be deducted one and a half hours to
cover meal-times, leaving only eight and a half hours as the actual working-day to which the
40-cent rate per hour could apply. He also held, however, that the plaintiff was a " domestic
servant" within section 13 and, accordingly, dismissed the action.
The Court of Appeal for British Columbia reversed this judgment, holding that the plaintiff's working-time was thirteen hours per day and that he was not a " domestic servant" within
section 13. Judgment was, accordingly, directed to be entered for the plaintiff for the sum
of $187.30, with costs throughout.
Subsequently special leave to appeal to this Court was obtained by the defendant company
on the terms of its paying the costs of the Attorney-General and of the plaintiff of the proposed
appeal in any event thereof.
As the foundation of his action the plaintiff prefers the Order of the Board of Adjustment,
and it is obvious that validity of that Order is essential to his success.
We are, with respect, of the opinion that it is apparent on the face of the Order of September
29th, 1926, that, in making it, the Board misconceived the nature and scope of its functions under
the " Male Minimum Wage Act " and that the Order, as made, is ultra vires and invalid.
The following portions of the Statute indicate the powers and duties of the Board, so far
as presently material:— REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 35
" 3. It shall be the duty of the Board to ascertain the wages paid to employees in the various
occupations to which this Act applies, and to fix a minimum wage for such employees in the
manner provided in this Act.
"5. (1.) After inquiry the Board may by order establish a minimum wage for employees,
and may establish a different minimum wage for different conditions and times of employment.
" 13. This Act shall apply to all occupations other than those of farm-labourers, fruit-pickers,
fruit-packers, fruit and vegetable canners, and domestic servants."
It is apparent that the Act deals not with the industries or businesses of employers as such,
but with the occupations of employees. The same business or industry may include many
different occupations: thus, a bread-making establishment may employ bread-makers, drivers of
distributing-wagons, book-keepers, shop assistants, etc.; and of such employees each of the
classes mentioned would have a different occupation. A fruit-rancher may employ fruit-
cultivators, fruit-pickers, fruit-packers, fruit-canners, book-keepers, drivers, etc.; yet, while the
fruit-cultivator and the driver and the book-keeper have occupations which may bring them
within the Act, the occupations of the fruit-picker, f-ruit-packer, and fruit-canner exclude them
from its operation. These illustrations suffice to make it apparent that the occupation of the
employee being what the Act is concerned with, the ascertainment of his connection with a
particular industry or business does not suffice to determine what will be for him a proper
minimum wage.
The enumeration in the Board's Order of the activities included by it in the " lumbering
industry " makes it abundantly clear that in making its Order it had regard rather to the
general nature of the industries in the carrying-on of which the employees covered by it were
engaged than to the particular occupations therein of such employees. The carpenter or painter
is not the less engaged each in a different occupation because both happen to be employed in
connection with erecting a factory, the one to build it and the other to paint it. The occupation
of the driver of a team of horses and that of the river-driver are not the less distinct because
both may happen to be engaged in handling logs. The pursuits of the stationary engineer and
the mill-hand do not cease to be separate and distinct occupations because each is employed
iii the same sash and door factory. Moreover, for men the nature of whose employment requires
them to be continuously "on call" during long hours, though not actually at work (e.g.,
messengers and watchmen), the same minimum wage per hour of employment is scarcely
appropriate as that which would be fixed for men whose employment consists of continual
physical work during stated, but comparatively shorter, hours (e.g., woodsmen or factory-hands).
That the Provincial Legislature was alive to the difference in regard to the nature and hours
of employment between men engaged in actual industrial work and persons employed in incidental work connected with industries, such as office clerks, boarding-house and bunk-house
assistants, is manifest from section 2 of the " Labour Regulation Act " (R.S.B.C. 1924, chap. 126).
In a word, what in our opinion the " Male Minimum Wage Act" contemplates is that the
Board in fixing minimum wages will take account of the nature of the employee's work, will
consider how exacting it may be, what mental and physical effort it may entail, and the conditions under which it is performed, such as the inconvenience, hardship, and risk incidental to it,
rather than the general character of the industry or business in the carrying-on of which the
work will be done or services rendered.
Just as section 3 requires the Board to deal separately with each kind of occupation—i.e.,
taking an illustration from the concrete case before us, to distinguish between such entirely
different occupations as that of the woodsman and of the dining-room waiter—so section 5
contemplates that it will classify and establish different rates of minimum wages for men pursuing the same trade or calling under different conditions and hours of employment, some entailing greater hardships and inconvenience than others—as, for instance, again using the concrete
case before us by way of illustration, between the waiter in the town restaurant and the waiter,
or " flunkey," in the distant lumber camp.
That such considerations did not influence the Board in making its Order of September 29th,
1926, but that, on the contrary, it grouped indiscriminately in that Order all employees engaged
in the manufacture or handling of wood products and fixed for all the same minimum wage
without regard to the particular occupation of each class of employee, seems to us so clear on
the face of the Order that its invalidity is beyond doubt. A contrary view was taken by the
British Columbia Court of Appeal in " Rex v. Robertson & Hackett Sawmills, Ltd.   (1926). J 36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
38 B.C.R., 222. That decision has been carefully considered. In so far as it is inconsistent
with this judgment it»must be overruled, as must also Compton v. Allen Thrasher Lntmber Co.
(1927), 39 B.C.R. 70.
The appeal will therefore be allowed and the action dismissed. Pursuant to the undertaking
given, the appellant will pay the costs in this Court of the Attorney-General and of the respondent.   There will be no costs to either party in the Provincial Courts.
This judgment at once made the Order covering the lumbering industry non-effective and
applied with equal force to the Catering Order. No effort was made by the Board of Adjustment
to promulgate new Orders as it was felt it would be better to have new legislation brought down.
A new Act was therefore introduced by C. F. Davie, member for Cowichan-Newcastle, and
passed by the Legislature. H
REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 37
TEXT OF THE NEW ACT.
CHAPTER 43.
An Act respecting a Minimum Wage for Male Employees.
[Assented to 20th March, 1929.}
IS MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative
Assembly of the Province  of British Columbia,  enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Male Minimum Wage Act." Snort title.
2. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires :— interpretation.
" Board " means the Male Minimum Wage Board constituted under the
provisions of this Act:
" Employee " means any adult male person who is in receipt of or entitled
to any compensation for labour or services performed for another in
any occupation to which this Act applies:
" Employer " includes every person, firm, or corporation, agent, manager,
representative, contractor, sub-contractor, or principal, or other persons having control or direction of, or responsible, directly or indirectly, for the wages of, any employee:
" Minimum wage " means the amount of wages fixed by the Board under
this Act:
" Wage " or '-' wages " includes any compensation for labour or services,
measured by time, piece, or otherwise.
3. For the purpose of the administration of this Act, there shall be a Male Minimum
Board known as the " Male Minimum Wage Board," which shall consist of Wage Boar<1-
three members who shall be appointed by and hold office during the pleasure
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. One of the members shall be appointed
as Chairman of the Board, and any two members of the Board shall constitute
a quorum.
4. (1.)  Upon  complaint  in  writing  addressed  to  the  Chairman  of  the Power of Board to
Board by at least ten employees engaged in any common occupation, complain-   x muumum wage-
ing that the wages paid to them in such occupation are insufficient or inadequate for the services rendered by them in such occupation, the Board shall
conduct an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the employment of
employees engaged in the occupation in which the complainant is engaged, or
in any other occupation of a similar nature; and thereafter the Board may
make an order fixing a minimum wage to be paid to all employees engaged
in that occupation and in any other occupation of a similar nature named in
the order.
(2.) The Board may, without having received any complaint, institute an
inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the employment of employees in
any occupation to which this Act applies, and may thereupon fix a minimum
wage to be paid to all employees engaged in that occupation and in any other
occupation of a similar nature named in the order.
(3.) In fixing any minimum wage under this Act, the Board may vary the
minimum wage according to the conditions prevailing in different localities in
the Province, and may define the boundaries of different localities for the
purposes of fixing a minimum wage to take effect in each locality. In fixing
a minimum wage, the Board may fix the same upon an hourly, daily, monthly,
or weekly basis.
5. In the conduct of any inquiry for the purposes of this Act, and for the Power of Board in
purpose of obtaining information, the Board shall have all the powers and DOlt,lns inquiries,
authorities   conferred  by  the   " Public   Inquiries   Act"   upon   commissioners .
J 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
appointed under that Act, and the provisions of that Act shall extend and
apply, mutatis mutandis, to every inquiry held by the Board under this Act.
All witnesses subpoenaed by the Board shall be paid the same witness fees and
mileage as are allowed by law to witnesses before the Supreme Court.
Power of Board, to
grant exemptions.
Publication and
taking effect of orders.
Power to alter
minimum wage.
Appeals
Posting of copies
of orders.
6. The Board shall have power from time to time, by writing, to grant
exemptions from the provisions of this Act to any employer in respect of the
payment of wages to any casual employee, part-time employee, apprentice
employee, or employee handicapped by reason of advanced age or physical
infirmity; but no such exemption shall be granted unless the Board is of
opinion that it is in the interests of the employee.
7. Every order of the Board fixing a minimum wage shall be published in
the Gazette and shall take effect at the expiration "of thirty days after the
date of publication, unless an appeal therefrom shall be taken pursuant to
section 9 hereof.
8. After an order of the Board fixing a minimum wage for employees in
any occupation has been in force for not less than six months, the Board may,
in its discretion, reopen the question, and may make an order fixing a minimum
wage for those employees in amendment of or in substitution for the existing
order.
9. (1.) Any person dissatisfied with any order of the Board fixing a minimum wage may, within thirty days after the publication of the order in the
Gazette, apply by petition to a Judge of the Supreme Court or to a Judge
of any County Court to review the same.
(2.) At least two days before the hearing of the application, the petitioner
shall give written notice to the Board of the hearing, accompanied by a copy
of the petition.
(3.) On the hearing of the application, the Judge applied to shall hear
and determine the matter of the minimum wage in question, and may review,
confirm, vary, or rescind the order of the Board, and his decision shall be
final and conclusive, except that on a point of law an appeal shall lie to the
Court of Appeal, provided notice of appeal shall be given to the Board within
thirty days from such decision.
(4.) Any party interested may call witnesses and adduce evidence on the
hearing before the Judge, whether such witnesses were called or such evidence
adduced at the inquiry before the Board or not.
(5.) No costs shall be awarded to any party on any hearing before a
Judge under this section.
(6.) Every order of a Judge made on a hearing under this section, or, in
the event of an appeal therefrom, the order of the final Court of Appeal, shall
be published in the Gazette, and thereupon shall as regards any minimum
wage fixed or confirmed therein be deemed for all purposes of this Act an order
of the Board fixing a minimum wage.
10. The Board shall supply copies of every order fixing a minimum wage
to any employer requesting the same, and every employer of employees affected
by any such order shall post and keep posted in a conspicuous place in his
establishment or plant a copy of the order, so that all employees affected
thereby may have ready access to and see the same.
Records to be
kept by employers
11. (1.) Every employer shall keep in his principal place of business in
the Province a true and correct record of the wages paid to and the hours
worked each day by each of his employees, together with a register of the
names, ages, and residential addresses of all his employees. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 39
(2.) Every employer shall, on demand of the Board or any person authorized in writing by the Board, produce for inspection all records kept by him
relating to the wages, hours of labour, or conditions of employment affecting
any of his employees.
12. The Board may, either by any member of the Board or by any person inspection of books
authorized in writing by the Board, inspect and examine all books, pay-rolls, anlJ records-
and other records of any employer which in any way relate to the wages, hours
of labour, or conditions of employment affecting any employees; and may
take extracts from or make copies of any entry in such books, pay-rolls, and
records; and may require from any employer full and correct statements
respecting the wages paid to his employees and the hours of labour and
conditions of their employment duly verified on oath.
13. (1.)  Every employer who contravenes any order of the Board made penalties.
under this Act by the payment of wages of less amount than the minimum
wage fixed by the Board shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a penalty
of not less than fifty dollars nor more than five hundred dollars for each
employee affected; and in default of immediate payment of such penalty shall
be liable to imprisonment for a period of not less than two months nor more
than six months.
(2.) Every employer who neglects or fails to perform any duty imposed
on him by this Act, or who refuses or neglects to permit of any inspection or
examination authorized by this Act, or who refuses or neglects to furnish any
information required under this Act, shall be liable, on summary conviction, to
a penalty of not less than ten dollars nor more than five hundred dollars.
14. If any employee is paid less than the minimum wage to which he is Eight of employee to
entitled under this Act, the employee shall be entitled to recover from his ™^fr luU minimum
employer, in a civil action, the balance between the amount paid and the
amount of the minimum wage, with costs of action; but in the case of an
employee whose services with the employer have terminated, no action shall
be brought by the employee under this section unless the action is commenced
within sixty days next after the termination of the services.
15. (1.)  Any employer who discharges or in any other manner discrimi- protection of
nates against any employee because the employee has made a complaint under c°mPlninants-
this Act or has testified or is about to testify, or because such employer
believes that the employee may testify, at any inquiry or in any proceedings
relative to the enforcement of this Act shall be liable, on summary conviction,
to a penalty of not more than five hundred dollars.
(2.) For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act without
prejudice to any complainant, the name and identity of the complainant shall
not be divulged to any person by the Board in any case where the complainant
requests that his name and identity be withheld.
16. For the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions  of this Act Regulations,
according to the true intent and meaning thereof, or of supplying any deficiency
therein, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may make such regulations not
inconsistent with the spirit of this Act as may be considered necessary, advisable, or convenient.
17. This Act shall apply to all occupations other than those of farm- Application of Act.
labourers, fruit-pickers, fruit-packers, fruit and vegetable canners, and domestic
servants.
18. The " Male Minimum Wage Act," being chapter 32 of the Statutes of Repeal.
1925, is repealed. J 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
LABOUR DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION.
The disturbance caused by labour disputes in the industrial life of the Province was again
comparatively slight during the past year. In all, there were nine disputes entailing a stoppage
of work, and they affected 2,644 employees and resulted in a loss of 20,791 working-days. These
figures are not far from the mean of the record of the last four years. In 1927 there
were 1,668 workers engaged in the disputes of the year, and the working-time lost was 17,006
days. For 1926 the figures were: Workers affected, 1,749; working-days lost, 28,016; and in
1925 there were 23,300 working-days lost by 3,572 workers. Going back to 1924, however, we
find that there were no fewer than 223,876 working-days lost in that year, and a comparison
over a longer period would doubtless show that progress has been made in the settlement of
industrial disputes without resorting to the strike or lock-out. In no case during 1928 has there
been a dispute resulting from any attempt by employers to reduce wages, though in one instance
the strikers, who were engaged in the shingle industry, contended that new conditions had been
introduced which made it difficult for them to earn as much as formerly. Most of the disputes
were caused by demands for higher pay or a shorter working-week, and in one or two cases the
observance or non-observance of " closed shop " conditions was a cause of dispute.
PAINTERS, VANCOUVER.
Painters and paper-hangers in Vancouver and district to the number of 350 put forward
a demand for an increase in wages from 87% cents to $1 an hour, and struck work on April 2nd.
The strike itself had little incident, but a conference was arranged between the parties, and a
settlement arrived at which permitted a resumption of work on April 29th.
Under the agreement, which was arrived at between representatives of the Master Painters' &
Decorators' Association and the United Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators & Paper-hangers,
wages were advanced from 87% cents to 90 cents an hour. It was also provided that hours
and other working conditions should be the same as prior to the strike, eight hours a day and
forty-four hours a week, wages time and one-half for overtime and double time for Sundays and
holidays. A committee composed of three members of the Master Painters' & Decorators' Association and three members of the Union was to form a committee to elect a chairman and work
out an agreement as to working conditions and other matters in the painting industry, " in
order to co-ordinate the whole painting industry to the material benefit of both sides, the chairman to have no vote." The agreement also provided that an apprenticeship system under the
rules of the Vancouver Apprenticeship Council be made operative at once.
Further provision was that, in case of any dispute, there should be no stoppage of work by
either party until the matter should have been considered by representatives of both parties to
the agreement. Should they be unable to agree, a Board of Conciliation would be chosen, consisting of three representatives of each side, the Board to meet within twenty-four hours of
notification by either party and to render a decision within a further twenty-four hours unless
the period be extended by mutual consent. Ninety days' notice was to be given previous to a
date to be fixed by the committee, in the event of either party desiring a change in the
conditions.
FLOOR-LAYERS, VANCOUVER.
A working agreement which had been in effect betwreen the Floor-layers' Union and their
employers expired on April 30th. Prior to this date negotiations had been going on between the
parties respecting an application by the men for a five-day week, instead of a five-and-a-half-day
week as heretofore, and this had been acceded to by some of the employers, who signed an
agreement accordingly. At the shops where the employers had failed to sign the new agreement
the men left work on April 30th, the number affected being about seventy. Negotiations were,
however, continued on their behalf, and the men went back to work on May 4th, all the employers
by this time having signed the five-day agreement to go into effect on June 1st, and to be good
for one year, and thereafter unless notice of change were given thirty days prior to date of
expiry.
The agreement set forth that there was to be no work on Saturdays without permission of
the Union; overtime to be at the rate of time and a half for the first four hours, and double
time after first four hours and on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays.    Any man working over- REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 41
time must first get permission from the business agent or shop steward.    Wages were fixed at
$1.121//3 an hour for floor-layers and scrapers and $1.10 an hour for finishers.
PLUMBERS, PRINCE RUPERT.
A dispute which was confined to one shop in Prince Rupert for two days during May
involved four employees. They demanded an increase of wages of from $8.50 to $9 for an
eight-hour day. At first the employer offered to compromise by increasing the pay to $8.80
per day, or $1.10 an hour, but, this not being accepted, a settlement was made after two days,
whereby the rate of pay was advanced to $9 a day.
SHINGLE-SAWYERS AND PACKERS, NORTH VANCOUVER.
The shingle-weavers and packers working for a company operating in North Vancouver
asked for an increase in their scale of wages, on the ground that new methods of cutting had
slowed down production and reduced their earning capacity. The Company, on the other hand,
insisted that they were paying higher than the average rate in other mills, and quoted $7 a day
as the average rate their men were receiving, while in individual cases the pay amounted to
over $9 a day. The 2 cents per thousand increase asked for by the men, the Company said,
would make the scale higher than any of which they had knowledge. On July 3rd forty-eight
employees absented themselves from work. Operations ceased until the 12th, and then the
Company resumed, with seven of their old employees remaining on the job, and the balance
of the places filled by other labour, partly that of Orientals. The Deputy Minister of Labour
arranged a conference between the management and representatives of the men, but without
result.    No definite settlement of the dispute was reported.
SHINGLE-WEAVERS, VANCOUVER.
On August 6th the shingle-w-eavers employed at a shingle-mill in Vancouver walked off the
job, the night crew refusing to go to work unless certain increases were granted because of an
order for dimension shingles having to be cut. They presented a verbal demand for a wage
increase of 3 cents to 5 cents per thousand. As the demand was said to have been presented
in a very peremptory manner, with an immediate answer insisted upon, there was no time for
negotiations before the night crew left work. On the following day they signed up as members
of the Shingle Weavers' Union at Vancouver.
A representative of the Department of Labour went over to Vancouver on the first day of
the stoppage, and interviewed both the mill superintendent and the president and secretary of the
Union. On behalf of the Company it was claimed that they had maintained a white crew of
shingle-sawyers and were eliminating the Chinese packers when white men were available; also
that they were paying the highest wages in the Province for this kind of work.
Following these interviews a meeting was arranged with the men who had left work, and,
after the position had again been explained, it was unanimously agreed that they would return
to work, pending any adjustment which might be made with their executive. After a three-days'
stoppage they resumed work on August 9th. There were twenty-four shingle-weavers affected by
the dispute, and their action also resulted in a stoppage of work by fifty-three other employees.
SALMON-FISHERMEN, FRASER RIVER.
Demanding an increase in the price of fish paid by the canners, fishermen on the Fraser
River and adjacent waters struck work on August 20th. The increase asked for was from
65 cents to 75 cents a fish for sockeye, with proportionate increases for other varieties. It was
stated that in 1927 bonuses were paid by the canners in addition to the contract prices. It was
agreed, after negotiation, that the price of sockeye be fixed at 70 cents a fish until September
15th, and that the price afterwards, of this and other varieties, be adjusted by a committee.
The fishermen returned to work on August 23rd. There were 1,500 persons involved in the
dispute.
TRUCK-DRIVERS, VANCOUVER.
A brief dispute, which occasioned the stoppage of a few truck-drivers in the employ of
a Vancouver firm for a day and a half, occurred on June 20th. The employers, who were engaged
in the transportation of building materials, paid their drivers by the hour, and some of them,
who were more in the confidence of the Company than the others, were driving trucks which
were more extensively used than the smaller ones.    Some of the men made a request that the .
J 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
driving of the trucks be more equally distributed, and went on strike when informed that such
request could not be met. After being out for a day and a half they returned to work of their
own accord.
CARPENTERS, ETC., VANCOUVER AND DISTRICT.
A dispute which came to a head in the Vancouver District in the early part of October had
somewhat unusual features, inasmuch as it affected the relations, not only between workmen and
their employers, but also between the members of rival trade-unions. For many years past the
majority of local carpenters with trade-union affiliations were members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, Local 452, but some four or five years ago another union, the
Amalgamated Society of Carpenters, opened a branch in Vancouver and enlisted a number of
members. The headquarters of the United Brotherhood are in the United States, while the
Amalgamated Society is a purely Canadian organization.
The relations between the two unions, though not always the most cordial, did not produce
an open rupture until October, 1928. On the 8th of the month the United Brotherhood withdrew
their members from work on the new Medical Arts Building, protesting against what they called
a design on the part of the employers to split the Brotherhood's ranks by fostering dual organizations. This was interpreted by the employers as an attempt to force upon them the conditions
known as the '.' closed shop," which they were not prepared to accede to. They accordingly
intimated that they would lock out all members of the Brotherhood, and mentioned Friday,
October 13th, at 8 a.m., as the time for the lockout to begin.
On the day in question, however, only a very small percentage of the 1,200 members of the
Brotherhood in Vancouver were prevented from starting work, though as time went on the
dispute grew in dimensions and a larger number of men were affected. The Carpenters' Brotherhood, it appeared, were members of the Building Trades Council, which also includes the electricians, the reinforced-steel workers, the steam and operating engineers, the pile-drivers, and
the builders' labourers, who were members of their respective Brotherhoods. Workers belonging
to these crafts were also drawn into the dispute.
As the struggle was threatening to develop to a serious extent, the Deputy Minister of
Labour went to Vancouver on October 26th, and got in touch with the parties concerned, with
a view to seeing if there was an opportunity for useful mediation. In the negotiations which
followed during the remainder of the duration of the dispute he had the advantage of the
co-operation of Mr. F. E. Harrison, Fair Wage Officer for the Dominion Department of Labour,
who arrived in Vancouver on the 29th, Mr. McNiven having in the meantime had discussions
with the Secretary of the General Contractors' Association and the Trades and Labour Council.
On the 30th Mr. McNiven and Mr. Harrison had a conference with Mr. John Tucker, President;
Mr. R. J. Lecky, Secretary; and Colonel Keen, Past President of the General Contractors'
Association. At this interview the employers' representatives made complaint that the action
of the Brotherhood members in leaving work was in contravention of an agreement made on
February 10th, 1928, under which the wages of carpenters were raised from $7.50 to $8 for an
eight-hour day. This concession was set forth in a document the first clause of which was as
follows:—
" No stoppage of work by either party until matter in dispute has been considered by representatives of both parties to this understanding, and a thorough investigation made as to the
cause of the grievance. If unable to agree, a board of conciliation to be chosen, composed of
three of each party to this' understanding, each party hereto being at liberty to select their
own representatives."
This document, it appeared, had not been officially signed, though the employers claimed
that it had been accepted as an agreement by both parties, which claim the Brotherhood refused
to acknowledge except in so far as it referred to the increase in wages.
After a lengthy discussion, Mr. McNiven and Mr. Harrison asked the representatives of the
General Contractors' Association if they would be willing to meet in joint conference with the
representatives of the Building Trades Council to discuss the matters at issue. Mr. Tucker did
not think his associates would be willing to confer with the Building Trades Council, as they had
never officially recognized that body, but if a committee of the carpenters were to request a
conference it might be a different matter. In the afternoon the two conciliators met the President and Secretary of the Trades and Labour Council, as well as several representatives of the
various crafts involved in the dispute.    The different angles of the situation were again dis- cussed, after which the officials of the various organizations were asked if they were desirous of
a conference with the General Contractors' Association. They replied in the affirmative, and
expressed a wish to have representatives present of all the crafts, failing which a committee of
the carpenters only would meet the employers.
A communication to this effect was made to the employers, who on the following day offered
to meet in joint conference with representatives of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters. On
the afternoon of the same day, October 30th, Mr. McNiven and Mr. Harrison met with the five
members of the employees' committee. The question of whether the understanding arrived at
in February last amounted to an agreement was again discussed. A letter which Mr. R. W.
Hatley, Secretary of the Vancouver, New Westminster & District Council of Carpenters, wrote
to Mr. Harrison on March 10th was read, in which Mr. Hatley said:—
" For your information I am enclosing a copy of the understanding reached between representatives of the General Contractors' Association and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters."
It was pointed out to the committee that, while the officials of the organization did not
sign any agreement, the letter above mentioned pointed to something in the nature of a contract,
and Mr. McNiven and Mr. Harrison suggested that it would be advisable for the carpenters'
committee to recognize this.
Later in the afternoon the joint conference was held, Mr. McNiven, at the unanimous request
of those present, occupying the chair. The situation was cleared somewhat by the carpenters'
representatives admitting the validity of the arrangement entered into in February, and after
further discussion the employers asked for a new agreement on the following lines:—
(1.)  Harmonious relations with other workmen on the job.
(2.) A wage contract to cover the year 1929.
(3.) Assurance that there would be no repetition of the present strike.
After the midday adjournment the employers submitted a draft agreement covering these
points, and the carpenters submitted an alternative form of contract. These having been discussed, a third draft contract was drawn up, which, it was agreed, should be submitted to a
further conference of the General Contractors' Association and a general meeting of the Carpenters' Brotherhood, Local 452.
The General Contractors' Association at a meeting on November 1st approved of the proposed arrangement. On the same evening the Carpenters' Brotherhood held a mass meeting,
about 900 men attending. They approved of the proposed agreement wTith the exception of
clause 6, which by an overwhelming majority they refused to accept. This clause was a proviso
that:—
"The members of the organization of the party of the first part (the Carpenters' Brotherhood) undertake that they will work in harmony with men employed at the various operations
carried on by members of the party of the second part."
The joint committee was called together again the following morning, when the employees'
representatives reported the decision of their members as to clause 6. They also requested
certain additions to the wage clause covering payment for overtime on Sundays and statutory
holidays, and a promise of the employers not to discriminate against members of the Brotherhood. The employers announced their willingness to concede these two points, but stipulated
for an assurance in writing that the men would not strike again for a similar cause during
the tenure of the new agreement. The carpenters asked that their verbal assurance to that
effect should be accepted, but the employers insisted on a clause being inserted in the agreement.
The draft agreement was then submitted to a further revision. The original clause 6,
which the carpenters had rejected, disappeared; it was proposed to extend the existing wage
agreement until the end of 1929, and to incorporate a clause as to overtime which the men had
requested; while a pledge was asked for by the employers to the effect that there should be
" no stoppage of work by the party of the first part for similar reasons to that which brought
about the present strike and lockout." The clause containing the words quoted proved a further
stumbling-block when the men held another mass meeting on November 3rd. This condition
they refused to accept. On the 5th it was requested from the men's side that a conference be
arranged between representatives of the General Contractors' Association and the trades then
on strike—namely, the carpenters, steel fabricators, hoisting engineers, pile-drivers, and building
labourers.
While the employers were considering this request, an interview was arranged between
Mr. P. Dowler, International Organizer of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters, and the Presi- DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
dent and Secretary of the General Contractors' Association. The main point of difference, the
insistence by the employers upon some assurance in writing from the Union that there would
not be another strike for the same reason as the present one, was again discussed. Mr. Dowler
was of opinion that the International headquarters would not consent to such action on the
part of the local Union. He further said that he could see no-other outcome than that the men
should return to work wherever employment offered, without any restrictions upon their action
by the Union.
On the morning of November 6th it was intimated to Mr. Harrison that the officials of the
local Union had had a conference that morning, and had decided that, provided the General
Contractors' Association would accept certain amendments to the agreement, they were prepared
to recommend its adoption. The proposed amendments were the further extension of the period
of the agreement to April 1st, 1930, and the inclusion in the contract of Local Union 1251 of
New Westminster. On these terms being submitted to Mr. Tucker, the employers' president, he
expressed his approval of the proposed changes and his willingness to recommend their acceptance
to the members of his association. This information was transmitted to the officials of the
United Brotherhood of Carpenters. On the same evening another mass meeting of carpenters
was held, and they approved of the contract by a vote of 396 in favour to 75 against.
Mr. McNiven and Mr. Harrison met a committee of the Brotherhood of Carpenters the following morning, when they were formally apprised of the result of the previous night's meeting.
Later in the day they had a conference with the President and Secretary of the Contractors.
The agreement, it was arranged, would be submitted to a meeting that evening of all the members
of the General Contractors' Association.
At this meeting the Contractors, after a lengthy discussion, agreed to accept the terms as
revised. Mr. McNiven and Mr. Harrison witnessed the signatures of both parties to the agreement, and it was arranged that operations should be resumed on the various buildings in the
city on November 9th by all the crafts concerned except the pile-drivers, who would resume on
the 13th.
About 550 workers in the various building trades were affected by the dispute.
The following is the text of the two agreements which constituted the terms of settlement:—
This Agreement, made at Vancouver, B.C., this seventh day of November, in the year one
thousand nine hundred and twenty-eight, by and
Between
The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners op America, Local No. 452 (hereinafter
called the "Party of the First Part"),
and
The General Contractors' Association of Vancouver  (hereinafter called the " Party of the
.Second Part").
Whereas there has been recently considerable friction between the parties to this Agreement, and
it is in the interests of both parties that there shall be harmonious working in the building industry
so far as the parties hereto are able to secure. With this in view the following agreement is entered
into:—
1. No stoppage of work by the Party of the First Part for similar reasons to that which brought
about the present strike and lockout; no stoppage of work by either party until any other matter in
dispute has been considered by representatives of both parties to this Agreement, and a thorough
investigation made as to the cause of grievance. If unable to agree, a Board of Conciliation shall be
chosen, composed of three from each party to this Agreement, each party hereto being at liberty to
select their own representatives. This Board shall meet upon notification by either party within
twenty-four hours of such notification and shall render its decision within a further twenty-four hours
of such meeting, unless the latter period is extended by mutual consent.
2. In the event of any other trade dispute on a job, the Party of the First Part shall not be asked
to work with strike-breakers attempting to carry on the said work, or to work under police protection.
If the dispute has reference to firms working Union and non-Union men, if non-Union men continue
to work when Union men are called off, they shall not be classed as strike-breakers.
3. The present rate of wages, i.e., $1 per hour, an eight-hour day, forty-four-hour week, to remain
in force for the period of this Agreement. Time and one-half for overtime for the first four hours,
after that double time. Double time on Saturday afternoons, Sundays, and holidays. The recognized
holidays are: New Year's Day, Good Friday, Empire Day, Dominion Day, Labour Day, Thanksgiving
Day, Christmas Day.
4. Unless wages be paid in cash, they shall be paid not later than Friday in any one week.
5. This Agreement shall remain in force until April 1st, 1930, and should either party wish to
change, add to, or amend this Agreement at that time, sixty days' notice in writing shall be given, REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 45
with the proposed changes, additions, or amendments attached thereto: Providing no such notice is
given by either party, this Agreement shall remain in force from year to year until such notice is given
as herein provided. When such notice has been served, the parties to this Agreement shall appoint
committees composed of five members of each party, who shall meet within ten days to come to a
decision.
6. Copy of this Agreement to be deposited with the Dominion Fair Wage Officer and also with the
Deputy Minister of Labour for the Province of British Columbia.
In witness whereof the parties hereto have hereunto affixed their hands and seals on the day and
date above mentioned, having been fully authorized so to do by their respective organizations.
•   (Signed on behalf of the Party of the First Part.)
(Sgd.)    W. Brown.
(Sgd.)    C. I. Atkinson.
(Sgd.)    G. C. Thom.
(Sgd.)    W. Hargreaves.
(Sgd.)    W. Page.
(Sgd.)    R. J. Thomson.
Witness:   (Sgd.)   J. D. McNiven.
(Signed on behalf of the Party of the Second Part.)
(Sgd.)    John Tucker. (Seal.)
(Sgd.)     J. E. Buerk. (Seal.)
(Sgd.)    Jno. F. Keen. (Seal.)
(Sgd.)    Robt. J. Lecky, Secretary. (Seal.)
Witness:    (Sgd.)   F. E. Harrison.
SHORT AGREEMENT TO END STRIKE AND LOCKOUT.
This Agreement, made at Vancouver, B.C., this seventh day of November, in the year one
thousand nine hundred and twenty-eight, by and
Between
The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Local No. 452 (hereinafter
called the "Party of the First Part"),
and
TnE General Contractors' Association of Vancouver (hereinafter called the " Party of the
.Second Part").
Whereas the friction which has recently existed between the parties to this Agreement having
been settled by the signing of an agreement to govern conditions under which members of the Party
of the First Part will be employed on the various building operations carried on by members of the
Party of the Second Part:
Now it is agreed between the parties to this Agreement that the strike and lockout are called
off forthwith and the members of the Party of the First Part will be taken back to work on all jobs
being carried out by the members of the Party of the Second Part, as opportunity offers and as they
may be required, as from Friday morning, November 9th, 1928.
It is further agreed by the Party of the Second Part that no discrimination will be shown against
any member of the Party of the First Part in consequence of the recent friction.
Copy of this Agreement to be deposited with the Dominion Fair Wage Officer and also with the
Deputy Minister of Labour for the Province of British Columbia.
In witness whereof the parties hereto have hereunto affixed their hands and seals on the day and
date above mentioned, having been fully authorized so to do by their respective organizations.
(Signed on behalf of the Party of the First Part.)
(Sgd.) W. Brown.
(Sgd.) C. I. Atkinson.
(Sgd.) G. C. Thom.
(Sgd.) W. Hargreaves.
(Sgd.) W. Page.
(Sgd.) R. J. Thomson.
Witness:    (Sgd.)   J. D. McNiven.
(Signed on behalf of the Party of the Second Part.)
(Sgd.)    John Tucker. (Seal.)
(Sgd.)    J. E. Buerk. (Seal.)
(Sgd.)    Jno. F. Keen. (Seal.)
(Sgd,)    Robt. J. Lecky, Secretary. (Seal.)
Witness:    (Sgd.)   F. E. Harrison.
Separate agreements, with terms precisely similar to the above, were entered into between
the General Contractors' Association and the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of
America, Local 1251 (New Westminster). PILE-DRIVERS, NEW WESTMINSTER.
A sequel to the carpenters' dispute already referred to was the strike of pile-drivers employed
by firms in the New Westminster District, which began on November 21st. These men had
struck work in sympathy with the carpenters, and during their absence from the job the
employers had taken on a number of non-union men for the purpose of fulfilling their contracts.
When the carpenters' strike was ended the members of the Pile-Drivers' Union were also prepared to resume work, and a number of them were started again, but found that they were
expected to work alongside non-union men who had been taken on during the dispute. This they
objected to do, with the result that on November 21st about forty union men were called off the
jobs. In negotiations which were carried on between the employers and the Union, the Deputy
Minister of Labour was asked to mediate, and did so. It appeared that the only chance of a
peaceful resumption of work lay in a return to an arrangement similar to that which existed
prior to the carpenters' strike. The dispute was accordingly settled by the employers agreeing
to take into their service none other than union men, and under these conditions work was
resumed on December 4th. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 192S.
J 47
SUMMARY OF LABOUR DISPUTES, 1928.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
CD
CD    .
<w O CD
no
2;H«
Painters—
Vancouver
Floor-layers—
Vancouver
Plumbers—
Prince Rupert
Shingle-sawyers and
Packers—
North Vancouver.
Shingle-weavers-
Vancouver ..
Salmon-nshermen-
Fraser River .
Truck-drivers—
Vancouver
Carpenters, etc-
Vancouver
trict 	
and   Dis-
Pile-drivers—
New  Westminster..
Commenced April 2nd, the men demanding an increase in pay
from 87% cents to $1 an hour. Work resumed April 29th,
under an agreement which fixed the wages at 90 cents an
hour
Commenced May 1st. The men sought a new agreement for
a five-day working-week, and left work at the shops where
this was not conceded. At the end of three days all employers had agreed that Saturday should he a non-working
day, and work was resumed
Employees of one firm struck work early in May for an advance in wages from $8.50 to $9 for an eight-hour day.
Men's terms conceded
Commenced July 3rd. Men asked for an increase in pay to
compensate for new methods which, they stated, had reduced
their earnings. No definite settlement. Work resumed July
12th, with part of the crew replaced by new men
Men at a mill in Vancouver presented a demand for an
increase of from 3 cents to 5 cents per thousand for certain
dimension shingles, and left work on August 6th. After
negotiations, work was resumed on August 9th
Commenced August 20th. The men asked for an increase
from 65 cents to 75 cents for sockeye, and a proportionate
increase for other varieties. Price of sockeye was temporarily fixed at 70 cents, with a view to a more permanent
arrangement being made.     Work resumed August 23rd
Certain truck-drivers employed by a Vancouver firm left work
on June 20th, complaining that the work was not being
evenly distributed. Work resumed June '22nd, with conditions unchanged
Commenced October 8th. The United Brotherhood of Carpenters withdrew their men from work on a new building,
on the ground that employers were fostering dual organizations by employing members of the Amalgamated Society
of Carpenters. The employers replied, declaring a lockout
of members of the Brotherhood on October 13th. Members
of other building trades were drawn into the dispute on
sympathetic grounds. Considerable negotiations ensued, in
which the services of the Deputy Minister of Labour were
called in as mediator. On November 7th an agreement was
arrived at, the men accepting the stipulation that there
should be no further strike for similar reasons. Work resumed on November 9th
Men who had struck in sympathy with the carpenters in Vancouver and District found, after the dispute was over, that
some of their places had been filled with non-union men.
They asked for a return to " closed shop " conditions and,
these being refused, they struck work on November 21st.
Work resumed on December 4th, employers agreeing to the
men's conditions
Totals	
350
70
8,000
210
48
77
1,500
384
231
4,500
550
7,000
40
450
2,644
20,791 J 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent Jas. H. McVety.
B.C. Workmen's Compensation and Labour Offices, corner
Homer and Dunsmuir Streets, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets	
Vancouver (Women's Branch), cor. Homer and Dunsmuir
Streets 	
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets.
- W.  S.  Dickson,  Superintendent.
u
„. .    , .   ,, ... Crisford, Superintendent.
Victoria (Women a Branch), Langley and Broughton Streets j
New Westminster :'M. Standbridge, Superintendent.
Nanaimo J. T.  Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops J. H. How, Superintendent.
,  Penticton A. Gilley, Superintendent.
Nelson J. M. Dronsfleld, Superintendent.
Cranbrook ; Wm. Robson, Superintendent.
Revelstoke H. N. Coursier, Superintendent.
Prince Rupert J. M. Campbell, Superintendent.
Prince George G. C.  Sinclair, Superintendent.
Handicap Section.
[ G. S, Bell, Clerk.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets .j R. L. Mavius, Clerk.
| H. Parry, Clerk.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets w. A. Turner, Clerk.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This is the tenth annual report of the British Columbia Branch of the Employment Service
of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, and covers the work for the calendar
year 1928.
There are fourteen offices in operation in the Province, as follows: Vancouver (3), Victoria (2), New AVestminster, Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Prince George, Cranbrook, Nelson, Revelstoke, Kamloops, and Penticton. Separate offices are provided in Vancouver and Victoria for
the employment of women, and separate sections for dealing with the employment problems of
men handicapped through service overseas or in industrial occupations. Temporary offices were
operated in Vernon and Kelowna from May to November to take care of the seasonal labour
requirements in those districts.
CONDITIONS DURING THE YEAR.
Although there was a surplus of labour in every part of the Province throughout the year,
employment was available in larger volume than during any part of the last decade. Newcomers,
however, continued to arrive in the Province faster than opportunities for their employment
developed, with the result that 10,812 workers were sent to employment in the Prairie Provinces,
these consisting, in the main, of harvest-labourers and experienced farm-labourers for spring
work, with a sprinkling of building-trade mechanics.
The work of the Employment Service, measured by placements, showed an improvement of
23 per cent., reflected in part by the larger number placed in other Provinces and the steady
growth of business within the Province. By close co-operation with the Immigration Department
many positions were retained for citizens of Canada which would otherwise have gone to
imported aliens.
The Handicap sections in Vancouver and Victoria carried on the work of securing employment for handicapped workers under difficulties, due to the fact that when employment is most
plentiful the men who are least handicapped are not available, and during the winter months,
when work is scarce and the competition of physically fit unemployed workers keen, the handicaps then register in large numbers.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED DURING THE YEAR.
The business transacted is shown in detail by a chart and tables, the figures showing the
business done by offices and months.   The placements increased over the previous year by 23 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 49
per cent., due in part to an increase in the number sent to other Provinces and to a more widespread use of the offices by employers within the Province. The popular impression that our
offices handle labourers only is gradually disappearing and all classes of technically trained and
skilled help are now obtained by employers through the Employment Service., With offices in
all the more important centres of the Province, the most remotely situated industry is readily
supplied with men of unusual qualifications, the Vancouver offices meeting the greater part
of this demand, having shipped 2,122 persons to other parts of the Province during the year.
To other Provinces the offices sent 10,812 persons, some 95 per cent, of this number being farm-
labourers for either spring or harvest work, the balance being building-trades mechanics and
miscellaneous workers. The number of persons placed during the year was 53,967, and of this
number 35,519 were sent to " regular " positions, the duration of employment ranging from one
week to permanence. The balance, 18,448, filled " casual" vacancies. The number of women
placed was 8,371, of whom 5,049 received " regular " positions and the balance, 3,322, filled
" casual" vacancies, the latter being practically all in the domestic service branch. The work
of the Handicap sections of Vancouver and Victoria, included in the foregoing figures, is dealt
with in more detail in another paragraph.
The chart, which appears on page 50, presents the work of the offices in graphical form.
The graph reflects the changes throughout the year and shows very clearly the surplus of applicants for employment over the vacancies to be filled. The sharp fluctuations are due to harvest
requirements in the Prairie Provinces and in the hop-fields of the Fraser Valley.
FARM-LABOURERS FOR PRAIRIE PROVINCES.
All previous records for the shipment of labour to the Prairie Provinces were broken in the
period under review. Of the 10,812 persons sent out of British Columbia, 9,737 were persons sent
as harvest-labourers. Alberta received 4,087 men and 492 women; Saskatchewan, 4,591 men
and 466 women; and Manitoba, 71 men and 30 women. All of the women, 988 in number, and
6,694 of the men had letters from Prairie farmers by whom they had been previously employed
offering re-employment, an increase of 1,995 of this class over the previous year. Three hundred
and eighty-seven rural communities in this Province were represented by 4,015 persons, the
majority of whom were settlers, an increase of 471 in this group. There has been a steady
increase in the number of land-settlers who take the opportunity of participating in the Prairie
harvest, the number in 1925 being 2,231.
The Prairie Provinces take every available man and a large number of women each season
for harvest-work and there is always a list of unfilled orders when the supply of workers is
exhausted. The past year was no exception, although, as previously noted, the number of
persons shipped exceeded all previous records. Reference has been made in a previous report
to the use of the " combine " in the Prairie Provinces. This question is of some interest in this
Province as the use of this machine affects the number of men employed and the duration of
employment. In Alberta in 1927 there were 195 machines in use and this number was increased
to 1,095 during 1928, with every indication that a similar or greater increase may be looked for
in subsequent years. Saskatchewan used 750 machines during 1928, with increases forecast in
every part of that Province. It is estimated that 9,000 men were displaced by the machines,
but our Alberta officials expect that the duration of employment will be lengthened owing to
the cost of the machine, which, except in the case of very large farms, makes the purchase
a co-operative effort, with a correspondingly longer period of employment for it and the men
engaged in its operation. As the farmers have shown a strong preference for men from this
Province, any reduction in the amount of help required is likely to be made in other directions.
As in former years, the success of the movement was made possible by the co-operation of the
Employment Service officials in Alberta and Saskatchewan and the granting of reduced rates
by the railways.
SEASONAL LABOUR REQUIREMENTS.
Throughout the Province the usual seasonal demand for help to harvest the fruit and hop
crops developed, varying in the different districts with the nature and quantity of crop. The
offices of the Employment Service played an important part in recruiting the required help and
were successful in meeting the demands in all branches of agriculture, fishing, and related
industries.
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; EMPLOYMENT FOR HANDICAPPED MEN.
Since December, 1924, the employment problems of handicapped ex-service men have been
handled by the Employment Service. By the terms of an agreement between the Dominion and
Provincial Governments special sections were created in the Vancouver and Victoria offices to
more directly handle this work, the additional expense being borne by the Dominion Government.
Under this arrangement handicapped men secure greater opportunities for employment than if
they were dependent solely on vacancies sent by employers to offices where handicapped men
were the only workers registered. Although every vacancy received is a potential job for a
handicapped man, unfortunately the age, nature, and degree of disability and lack of suitable
qualifications of the unemployed ex-service and industrial handicaps make it a task of first
magnitude to find work for them, as many are practically unemployable in our industries. It
has also to be remembered that the employers have done remarkably well in respect to handicapped men, considering the primary extractive nature of our principal industries and the
number of handicaps arising out of their operation, who, quite naturally, expect to receive
preference over all applicants for employment in the industries in which they were injured.
In order to remove any objection on the part of employers to employing handicapped ex-service
men on account of their disabilities contributing to accidents, with a consequent increase in
pay-roll assessment for compensation payments, the Dominion Government pays all awards,
either under Workmen's Compensation Board rulings or Common Law judgments, for injuries
received by ex-service men in receipt of a pension of 25 per cent, or over. The employees in
the Handicap sections, all ex-service men and some with handicaps, are continually on the lookout for openings, but despite their efforts and the many original schemes devised to maintain or
renew the interest of the citizens in the problems of finding suitable work for these men, the
supply, particularly during the winter months, greatly exceeds the demand.
Reference has been made in previous reports to the necessity of providing " sheltered "
employment for those unable to compete in the open labour market, and in order to extend the
facilities for employment and training the Dominion Government has taken over the Red Cross
workshops, with the exception of the one in operation at Victoria, B.C.
Arrangements have also been made to provide " veterans' care " in existing military hospitals
for ex-service pensioners who, because of age or disabilities due wholly or partially to war
service, are not receiving sufficient pensions to maintain them and are therefore likely to become
a charge on the community. Consideration is given each case by local boards consisting of
officers of the Department of Pensions and Health and the Employment Service, and recommendations are made either for admission to hospital or suggesting avenues of employment in which
the men may be able to succeed.
Situations were found for 1,715 men, 535 going to " regular " employment the duration of
which was known to be in excess of one week, and in many cases permanent, and 1,180 to
" casual" work lasting less than one week. Of this number, 233 were industrial handicaps,
77 being " regular " positions and the balance, 156, " casual." The Victoria office was responsible for 221 of the " regular" placements and 531 of a casual nature. Vancouver had 314
" regular " and 649 " casual " placements and in addition sent 50 handicaps to other employment zones. To place this number required an examination of 4,879 orders handled by the
Richards Street office, Vancouver, and 5,610 vacancies reported to the Victoria office by
employers. Having regard for the number of ex-service and industrial handicaps who have
congregated in the south-western portion of the Province, the sections have done creditable work.
OTHER BRANCHES OF ACTIVITY.
Although employment is the principal activity of our offices, many other closely related
questions are dealt with. Our officers are regarded as industrial barometers and are freely consulted by bankers, trade organizations, and individual workmen, with reference to present or
prospective conditions, either locally or in other parts of the Province. Many organizations
refer written inquiries regarding employment to our offices for reply, and first-hand accurate
information is sent regarding conditions in this Province to all parts of the world. A weekly
report system of conditions throughout the four Western Provinces is maintained for the benefit
of workmen who are considering moving, and this information has been the means of discouraging many of them from going to districts where no work is available, at a loss of time and
railway fare.    Close co-operation is maintained with the Employment Service officials of the DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
other Provinces and with the Immigration Department. In the latter case this has been the
means of preventing the importation of aliens and inducing employers to engage our own citizens
when the original intention was to import labour from other countries.
Now in its tenth year, the Employment Service has, by a consistent policy of fair dealing
between employers and workmen, earned the respect of all classes in the Province, and the
facilities are being used each year by a larger and more representative number of persons
engaged or interested in industrial problems.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED BY BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1928.
Office.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders,
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of
B.C.
3,089
2,120
2,083
20
84
3,649
1,905
1,620
371
1,114
1,045
719
84
3,153
2,043
2,032
18
4,401
1,317
1,207
15
551
5,087
1,682
1,642
9
943
2,728
1,553
1,417
164
1,929
1,'594
1,455
8
612
6,870
966
928
48
394
1,505
685
535
1
43
27,627
4,879
4,595
713
6,109
19,820
11,197
11,085
1,234
14,912
5,900
5,059
175
691
1,518
840
816
3
221
9,141
5,644
5,610
13
466
2,931
2,489
2,352
15
79
109,474
45,859
43,155
2,272
10,812
Cranbrook	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
Penticton	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Vancouver   (Richards Street).
Vancouver  (Powell Street)	
Vancouver  (Women)	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Victoria  (Women)	
Totals	
BUSINESS TRANSACTED MONTHLY, BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1928.
Month.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of
B.C.
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
Totals.
10
,430
,523
539
427
099
766
061
012
673
,564
525
855
109,474
1,821
2,019
3,198
3,611
3,991
5,702
4,360
6,138
6,251
3,596
3,089
2,083
45,859
1,696
1,895
2,980
3,473
3,800
5,288
4,076
5,626
5,883
3,461
3,002
1,975
43,155
33
70
141
183
248
339
231
478
257
132
105
55
2,272
11
12
296
471
160
42
36
9,475
294
9
3
3
10,812 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 53
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Chief Inspector W. T. Hamilton.
Assistant Inspector H.  Douglas.
Assistant Inspector ". Essie Brown.
The following report is submitted by the Chief Inspector of Factories:—
I have the honour of submitting herewith the annual report of the Factory Inspection
Department for the year 1928.
In presenting the annual report of this Department, it is somewhat difficult to give a detailed
account of the work performed owing to the fact that I assumed charge of this branch of the
service just one month before the close of the year under review.
Examination of the records of the office reveal that the major portion of the orders issued
consist of matters relating to the safety and welfare of the employees of factories in the
Province. Owing to the remarkable industrial expansion which is taking place throughout the
Province, the number of inspections made show a steady increase and a corresponding increase
in the number of orders issued. Through the co-operation of the employers, many of the changes
and improvements necessary to bring a factory within the requirements of the " Factories Act "
are made without the necessity of issuing written instructions from this office.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
While we have no means of gauging the success of our efforts towards industrial accident-
prevention owing to the fact that all reports of accidents are not made direct to this office,
any reports of accidents forwarded from the Workmen's Compensation Board are investigated,
and, if required, corrective measures are ordered to be taken to prevent a similar occurrence.
While it is possible for much to be accomplished through providing protective equipment for
dangerous machinery and through other safety devices, industrial accidents will never be
reduced to their lowest minimum until such time as the worker realizes the fact that carelessness and thoughtlessness are large contributing factors towards industrial accidents.
It is gratifying to be able to report the non-occurrence of any fatal or serious accidents
on passenger-elevators during the year. This record reflects great credit in the efficiency of the
operators and those in charge of the maintenance of elevators. When we consider the vast
number of persons who daily make use of this means of travel, it should be remembered that
a record of this nature has not been left to an element of chance.
ELEVATORS.
During the past year 229 permanent elevator operators' licences were issued to female
operators and 603 permanent licences to male operators. The temporary licences totalled 196
for male operators and 71 for female operators.
For various reasons quite a large number of candidates who procure temporary licences
do not appear for examination on the expiring date, and others, after appearing, do not successfully pass their examination.
SANITARY CONDITIONS.
These very important conditions in a factory are often not given the attention they deserve.
Quite frequently small premises will be leased by an employer who at the time of our first visit
employs two persons and therefore does not come within the provisions of the " Factories Act."
In a short time the business will expand to such an extent that additional help, both male and
female, is required. As the regulations require that separate toilets shall be provided for male
and female employees, we usually find, on our next visit, that these have not been provided.
Owing to the fact that.the premises occupied are on a lease or monthly tenancy, a controversy
arises between the tenant and the landlord as to whose duty it is to provide the additional conveniences. In cases of this nature a reasonable time-limit is set in which to comply with the
regulations.
CHILD-LABOUR.
During the year seventeen requests were received from persons under the age of 15 years,
asking permission to be allowed to work in canneries. These were granted, subject to the conditions as set forth in the amendment to section 4 of the " Factories Act." J 54 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
OVERTIME PERMITS.
Twelve requests were received during the past year from different firms requesting permission to work their employees overtime.   These, after investigation, were granted.
COMPLAINTS.
Many complaints received at this office refer to alleged unhealthy working conditions and
excessive hours. These are promptly investigated, and, if found necessary, orders are issued to
remedy conditions. Most of these complaints are registered against employers of labour who
are not British subjects.
Yours obediently,
W. T. Hamilton,
Factories Inspector. REPORT OF THE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
Members of the Board.
,T. D. McNiven, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Helen Gregory MacGill 1492 Harwood Street, Vancouver.
Thomas Mathews, Real-estate Broker 517 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Officials of the Board.
Mabel A. Cameron, Secretary Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Essie Brown, Inspector Dunsmuir and Homer Streets, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sib,—We have the honour to submit herewith the eleventh annual report of the Minimum
Wage Board of British Columbia for the year ended December 31st, 1928.
The minimum wage law was passed in this Province in 1918, and since that time the original
Board has been actively engaged in administering the Act and its resulting Orders. Six of the
other Canadian Provinces have since enacted laws providing for a minimum wage for women.
Manitoba placed its Act on the statute-books in 1918 also, Quebec and Saskatchewan followed in
1919, while Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Alberta inaugurated their minimum wage legislation in
1920. The Alberta Act was replaced in 1925. In Quebec a Board was not appointed for some
considerable time after the Act was passed, and in consequence the first Order did not become
effective until early in 1927. To date Nova Scotia has not named any Board under the provisions
of its Act, with the result that as yet no concrete benefit has accrued to the employees in that
Province.
The laws vary considerably in their detail, but their chief object is identical, inasmuch as
each was passed with the idea of improving working conditions for women and girls.
NINE ORDERS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Under the British Columbia Act nine Orders have been made, and these embrace practically
all women and girl employees coming within the jurisdiction of the Act. The Statute does not
cover domestic servants, fruit-pickers, farm-labourers, or their employers. A convenient summary of the Orders may be found in the Appendix to this report.
During 1928 actual pay-roll returns were received by the Board for 19,377 workers. This
should convey a graphic picture of the large number of employees deriving protection under this
important Statute.
ASSISTANCE TO EMPLOYEES.
Considering the number of workers affected by the rulings of the Board, the percentage of
employers who evaded the regulations is comparatively small. Through pay-roll inspections,
personal visits by the officials, and complaints of employees some discrepancies were found
during the year. In the majority of cases employers paid the girls the arrears due them without recourse to Court proceedings. Adjustments were effected through friendly negotiations, conducted by correspondence or interviews between employers, employees, and officials of the Board.
By these methods the sum of $3,202.11 was paid during 1928 to employees throughout the
Province. This amount represents the difference between what they should have received under
the various Orders and what they were paid by employers who were not complying with the law.
In fairness to the employers it may be mentioned that this non-compliance was not always
wilful. In some cases a slight misunderstanding of an Order led to an inadequate wage being
paid. In other instances employers coming into British Columbia from outside points failed to
acquaint themselves with the regulations governing their particular industry or occupation.
Collections for the girls were effected from proprietors of laundries, hotels, cafes, commercial
and professional offices, bakeries, garment, candy, and other factories, beauty-parlours, retail J 56 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
stores, fruit-canneries, and packing-houses.    The beneficial protection of the Act, therefore, was
felt by women and girls of many and varied callings.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.
During the period under review eight convictions were obtained, two cases were dismissed,
and one was withdrawn owing to the serious and continued illness of the material witness.
The following resumg of these cases may be of interest:—
1. A young lady making wreaths and acting as saleslady in a florist's establishment was
being paid below the proper scale. Arrears amounting to an appreciable sum were due her, but
her employer repudiated his liability. Upon the case being brought before the Magistrate
a ruling was made that the wreath-making would come within the scope of the Manufacturing
Order, which provides for a slightly higher wage than that prevailing in the mercantile industry.
A conviction was recorded and the employer fined $25. Unknown to the Inspector who had laid
the charge, the father of the employee (the complainant in the first instance) had agreed with
the employer to waive payment of arrears due his daughter. This arrangement was made just
prior to the Court being called to order, and the first knowledge the Inspector had of it was
when the Magistrate announced he would not need to order payment of arrears, for the reason
that a settlement had been effected between the parties. This lack of co-operation is one
example of some of the difficulties the Board encounters in the administration of the Act.
2. The proprietor of a photographic studio was employing a young girl at the rate of $1
a week, notwithstanding the fact that the covering Order had been explained to him some time
prior to the hiring of this employee. An information was laid, the case called, and judgment
reserved. The Magistrate later convicted the employer, imposed a $25 fine, or in default thirty
days' imprisonment, and ordered arrears amounting to $34 to be paid to the young lady.
Counsel for the defendant intimated an appeal would be taken, but it was not proceeded with.
3. The Inspector laid an information against an employer who failed to pay the legal wage
to an employee who was engaged in making and altering women's and children's wearing-
apparel. Hearing of the evidence occupied over two hours. The Magistrate found the defendant
guilty, fined him $25, and entered an order for payment of arrears. The Judge instructed the
Inspector and counsel for the defence to go into the matter of the amount due the young lady
and to appear before him for this purpose. The sum of $18.74 was eventually awarded the
employee and paid at once.
4. A cook in a hotel, who was workfng excessively long hours, laid a complaint with the
Board. When the records were examined it was found that the owners of the establishment
had been warned by previous Inspectors regarding the hours prescribed by the Order, and yet
continued to disregard the regulations. When the case was brought up in Police Court, counsel
for the defendant produced an agreement entered into between the cook and the proprietors of
the hotel, which provided, amongst other things, that the cook would in no way be deemed to be
an employee, nor would the relationship of master and servant exist between the parties to the
agreement. A decision of the Court of Appeal was cited, whereby no one could contract out of
the Act. A conviction was obtained and a fine of $25 levied, but the Magistrate announced that
he would not order payment of arrears as he considered the cook had received ample remuneration for any overtime she might have worked, for, in addition to cash, she also was provided with
living-quarters for herself and husband.
5. The proprietor of a restaurant was found to be paying an employee less than the wage
pi-escribed by the Order and requiring her to work very long hours. Several efforts to effect
a settlement were made, but the employer refused to pay the full amount due. An information,
therefore, was laid and conviction obtained. The usual fine of $25 was imposed, together with
costs of the action.    Arrears amounting to $9.41 were ordered to be paid to the employee.
6. A cashier in a cafe was employed at a rate lower than that provided in the Order. As
the employer had contravened the Act before, an information was laid against him. He was
found guilty, fined $25, or in default of payment sentenced to ten days in prison. The conviction
carried with it an order for payment of $23 in arrears of wages due the young lady.
7. An employee of a light-lunch stand complained about the wages she was receiving. The
Inspector called and the proprietor at first refused to admit her. Later he consented to talk
with her, saying, however, he could not and would not pay any back wages.   A charge was laid REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 57
against him. He was fined $25, taxed $2.50 for costs, and given one week in which to pay the
amount due the girl. At the expiration of the week he pleaded for further time, which was
granted, but he did not appear at the end of the period allowed him. The Police Court clerk
then issued a distress warrant. The defendant thereupon paid $15.40 into Court and same was
handed to the employee.
8. The most flagrant case with which the Board has had to deal since its inception was that
of a small firm of stock and bond brokers who were underpaying several of their employees and
compelling them to work excessively long hours. Upon an investigation being commenced the
managing director refused to allow the Inspector to speak with the girls. One of the young
ladies then volunteered some information, and the manager prevented the next girl from talking
to the official. The firm was charged in Police Court with violation of the law. The case was
called and remand of one week was obtained. During the interval cheques for $69.49 and
$19.25 respectively were left with the Board for the two girls, and a written apology sent to the
Inspector for the way she had been received when calling in pursuit of her duties. As a complete settlement was made and apology tendered the Chairman gave instructions for the withdrawal of the case. About a fortnight afterwards one of the girls and her mother called at the
Board's office to say that one of the partners had asked the young lady to return to him the cheque
for $49.25. As the girl had cashed the cheque and spent $15.25, he pressed her for the balance—
$34—which she surrendered on the understanding that he would re-engage her and continue to
employ her. At the end of a week she was dismissed without notice and without pay, being told
that the $15.25 which she had already spent would pay her for that week's work.
While the young lady was ill-advised to have returned the arrears that had been collected
for her, the Board felt that action should be taken against the Arm that acted in such an
unethical manner. Consequently the original charge was relaid. One of the partners then
tendered his cheque for the $34 and asked that the case be withdrawn. The cheque was not
accepted and the case went to Court. The Magistrate registered a conviction, levied a $50 fine,
and ordered payment of the $34 and a sum to cover the extra time worked by the employee
after her re-engagement. He spoke in a most emphatic manner to a crowded Court-room of the
seriousness of this case, and would not listen to defendant's counsel, who pleaded for the minimum
fine. He considered the actions of the defendant amounted to a second offence and therefore
levied the higher fine.
9. An employee in a bake-shop registered a complaint that her wages were less than the
legal minimum. The Inspector called several times to see the proprietor, but was unable to get
in touch with him. A written request that he call at the Board office or phone the Inspector
was ignored. On instructions of the Chairman an information was laid against him. The
Magistrate declined to convict, as the defendant swore there had never been any intention on
his part of paying less than the minimum wage. He also expressed his willingness to pay the
employee the amount due her—namely, $10.77—which was then handed to her.
10. A dressmaker took a young girl into her establishment and paid her $1 a week, raising
it to $1.50 after seventeen weeks elapsed. The girl continued for eleven weeks more at the
latter figure, and then her mother laid a complaint. Upon investigation the dressmaker asserted
the girl was learning the trade, claiming, further, that the money was for car-fare and was not
to be considered as wages. She refused to make any adjustment. Recourse was had to the
Court, but the Acting-Magistrate dismissed the case on the grounds that, as there was not
enough work in the establishment to keep the girl employed, she was receiving car-fare only and
not wages, and, in his opinion, did not come within the definition of an " employee " as laid down
in the Act.
11. A case of long working-hours and low wages in a hotel warranted the commencement of
an action against the proprietor, who evaded all attempts of the Inspector to have an interview
with him. Before the case was called the material witness became seriously ill, and as the
physicians advised that her recovery was doubtful the case was withdrawn. If at any time
other witnesses are available to substantiate the allegations the charge may be relaid.
STATISTICAL SECTION.
The annual request for pay-roll data was answered by 3,425 individual employers or firms.
While this is 30 less than the number who responded in 1927, their employees totalled 19,377,
as against 17,507 during the previous year, a gain of 1,870 workers. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
In addition to those whose returns are included in the following tables, forms were received
from a number of employers who delayed a little too long to have their statistics included in
the final figures.
To those who complied promptly with the request for employment data the Board is
extremely grateful. An earnest appeal for the future is made to those who are usually late in
submitting their returns.    More prompt co-operation would be greatly appreciated.
The following tables are compiled for the nine industries or occupations regulated by Orders
of the Board :—
Mercantile Industry.
1928.
1927.
1926.
1925.
1924.
478
3,563
674
$53,270.55
$6,467.50
$14.95
$9.60
15.91%
43.57
480
3,282
635
$50,231.73
$6,250.50
$15.31
$9.84
16.21%
45.35
466
2,820
456
$42,508.65
$4,222.50
$15.07
$9.26
13.92%
44.54
382
2,574
442
$39,017.26
$4,000.50
$15.16
$9.05
14.66%
43.24
335
Number of employees—
2,124
341
Total weekly wages—
$32,203.49
$3,028.00
Average weekly wages—
$15.16
$8.88
Percentage of employees under 18 years....
13.83%
42.95
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $12.75; 1,123 or
26.5 per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount,
2,204 or 52.02 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 910 or
21.48 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $12.75 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers
over 18 years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a
pro rata basis.
Laundry Industry.
1928.
1927.
1926.
1925.
1924.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees-
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—-
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years....
Average hours worked per week	
"  962
128
$14,036.49
$1,234.00
$14.59
$9,64
11.74%
45.39
59
822
137
$11,966.50
$1,396.00
$14.56
$10.19
14.29%
45.11
59
799
123
$11,484.90
$1,288.50
$14.37
$10.48
13.S4%
45.02
53
654
101
$9,545.70
$1,085.00
$14.60
$10.74
13.38%
45.46
53
625
84
859.00
.00
$14.17
$10.58
11.85%
43.69
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $13.50; 307 or
28.17 per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount,
480 or 44.03 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 303 or
27.8 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $13.50 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over
18 years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata
basis. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 59
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
1328.
1925.
1924.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years...
Average hours worked per week	
430
2,377
92
$39,267.25
$1,257.60
$16,52
$13.67
3.73%
45.73
375
1,877
$30,964.60
$918.00
$16.50
$13.50
3.50%
45.85
399
1,644
79
$27,264,81
$1,114.50
$16.59
$14.11
'   4.59%
45.54
356
1,450
67
$23
63.16
$990.50
$16.39
$14.78
4.42%
45.38
314
1,316
49
$21,493.42
$730.00
$16.33
$14.90
3.59^
45.97
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14; 442 or 17.9
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount, 1,708
or 69.18 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 319 or 12.92
per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the
$14 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years
of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Office Occupation.
1928.
1927
1026.
1925.
1924.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years....
Average hours worked per week	
1,829
4,504
164
$91,042.73
$2,131.00
$20.21
$12.99
3.51%
41.91
1,919
4,247
152
$81,380.57
$1,917.50
$19.16
$12.62
3.46%
41.93
1,636
3,609
147
$68,838.71
$1,878.00
$19.07
$12.78
3.91%
41.94
1,523
3,354
128
$66,215.99
$1,640.00
$19.74
$12.81
3.68%
41.84
$54.
$1,
1,171
2,799
92
758.49
113.50
$19.56
$12.10
3.18%
41.90
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15; 629 or 13.47
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount, 3,591
or 76.93 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 448 or 9.6 per
cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the
$15 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years
of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Personal Service Occupation.
1928.
1927.
1926.
1925.
1924.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years ....
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
96
323
26
$5,496.24
$303.50
$17.02
$11.67
7.45%
36.38
103
337
22
$5,845.03
$264.00
$17.34
$12.00
6.13%
40.33
76
266
19
$4,381.00
$214.00
$16.47
$11.26
6.67%
38.67
65
221
18
$3,824.20
$220.00
$17.30
$12.22
7.53?
36.15
34
126
22
$2,009.79
$239.50
$15.95
$10.89
14.86%
3S.14 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14.25; 35 or
10.03 per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount,
223 or 63.9 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 91 or 26.07
per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than
the $14.25 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18
years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Fishing Industry.
1928.
1927.
1926.
1925.
1924.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced ...
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
Average hours worked per week	
4
15
$292.54
$19.50
46.13
16
$250.00
$15.62
40.09
4
26
$496.25
$19.09
48.00
21
2
$23.31
$12.00
8.70%
47.13
34
5
$601.44
$55.00
$17.69
$11.00
12.829
50.59
In connection with the above table relating to the fishing industry it must be borne in mind
that the Order does not cover women and girl employees in the numerous fish canning establishments in the Province. Those coming within the scope of the regulations are engaged only
in washing, preparing, drying, curing, smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use,
or for shipment, any kind of fish except canned fish. This accounts for the few employees
included in the tabulations.
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15.50; none of the
employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount, 14 or 93.33 per cent,
of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 1 or 6.67 per cent, of all employees
reported received less than this amount. The employee receiving less than the $15.50 worked
less than the 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1928.
1927.
1926.
1925.
1924.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
Average hours worked per week	
135
1,612
254
$29,530.00
$3,024.50
$18.32
$11.91
13.61%
41.13
127
1,553
116
$27,843.94
$1,240.00
$17.93
$10.69
6.95%
41.42
103
1,373
236
$24,386.21
$2,842.50
$17.76
$12.04
14.67%
41.22
86
1,312
220
$23,605.31
$2,655.00
$17.99
$12.07
14.36%
42.64
97
1,192
218
$21,256.75
$2,555.50
$17.83
$11.72
15.46%
42.29
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15; 277 or 14.84
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount, 1,186
or 63.56 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 403 or 21.6 per
cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the
$15 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who worked
less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 61
Manufacturing Industry.
1928.
1927.
1926.
1925.
1924.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
336
2,051
473
$34,084.50
$4,729.00
$16.62
$10.00
18.74%
44.70
339
1,907
385
$31,710.09
$3,847.00
$16.63
$9.99
16.809
44.35
335
1,491
527
$25,343.79
$6,182.00
$17.00
$11.73
26.11%
44.51
296
1,471
329 .
$24,415.40
$3,409.00
$16.60
$10.36
18.28%
44.77
240
1,262
218
$20,510.60
$2,235.00
$16.25
$10.25
14.73%
43.65
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14; 690 or 27.34
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount, 1,114
or 44.14 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 720 or 28.52
per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the
$14 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who worked
less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—■
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees...
Average hours worked per week  (time-
workers)	
Time.
Piece.
1,572
212
345
30
$29,026.28
$5,176.45
$4,060.00
$263.00
$18.46
$24.42
$11.77
$8.77
17.37%
50.78
48
Time.
Piece.
1,449
264
207
31
$24,228.64
$2,647.50
$3,366.34
$339.50
$16.72
$10.03
$16.26
$10.95
45
15.12%
46.14
Time.
Piece.
1,262
255
435
503
$21,920.13
$2,520.00
$7,377.08
$3,251.50
$17.37
$9.88
$16.96
$6.46
30.88%
47.01
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14.40; 189 or 8.76
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount, 1,384 or
64.1 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 586 or 27.14 per
cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the
$14.40 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who worked
less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis. J 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Summary of all Occupations.
1928.
1927.
1926.
1925.
1924.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years, or experienced	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced.
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees  under  18  years,  or
inexperienced	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees  under 18  years,  or
inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18
years, or inexperienced	
Average hours worked per week	
3,425
17,191
2,186
£301,223.03
$23,470.00
$17.52
$10.74
11.28%
44.05
3,455
15,697
1,810
$267,787.44
$18,820.00
$17.06
$10.40
10.349
43.92
3,123
13,725
2,345
$234,001.53
$23,513.50
$17.05
$10.03
14.59%
43.82
I
2,804
12,181
1,718
$211,713.38
$17,764.00
$17.38
$10.34
12.369
43.58
±
2,287
10,355
1,242
5176,517.87
$12,644.50
$17.05
$10.18
10.71%
43.09
_L
In the nine occupations and industries 19,377 women and girl employees were reported. Of
this number, 3,692 or 19.05 per cent, were reported as receiving the actual minimum for their
respective classes of work. Turning to the higher scales of pay, we note that 11,904 or 61.44
per cent, of all those reported were listed as being in receipt of wages in excess of the legal
minimum. This leaves 3,781 or 19.51 per cent, who were paid below the minimum. This latter
class, of course, includes young girls and inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set,
aud employees of experience whose working-week was shorter than 48 hours, with a pro rata
reduction in their remuneration.
AVERAGE WAGES, 1927 AND 1928.
Figures compiled from the employers' pay-rolls for 1928 reveal that increases in average
wages of the experienced workers occurred in the laundry industry (which also includes dry-
cleaning and dyeing establishments), in public housekeeping, in the office occupation, and in the
telephone and telegraph occupation. In addition to these callings the seasonal fruit and vegetable industry and the fishing industry also recorded higher average wages for 1928 than those
prevailing during 1927.
This leaves three groups of the nine covered by the Board's Orders, in which the average
wages for experienced women and girl employees were lower than in the previous year. The
mercantile and personal service classes registered decreases, but coupled with the drop in
wages was a corresponding shortening of the length of the average working-week. In the manufacturing industry the change was so slight (a cent a week decrease in the average rate for
skilled employees) that the figures for this year and last year might be deemed to have
remained stationary.
Reference to the foregoing tables will show the actual figures for comparative purposes in
the nine classifications.
Of the non-seasonal group, the outstanding change was in the office occupation, where a very
marked rise of $1.05 a week is shown, bringing the average weekly rate to $20.21, a peak figure
in this occupation since records have been kept.
All the averages are still maintained at levels considerably higher than those prescribed
as the legal minimum in the respective orders.
MARITAL STATUS OF EMPLOYEES.
While economic conditions and woman's ambition for a wider scope of influence and participation in the business affairs of the country are contributing to an annual increase in the number
earning their own living, the relative proportions of married, widowed, and single employees have
not altered very materially in the past few years in this Province. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 63
The appended table portrays the present situation in British Columbia:—
Name of Industry.
Married.
Widowed.
Single.
Total.
Mercantile	
738
329
742
446
503
78
133
5
861
202
34
189
114
107
12
20
1
44
3,297
727
1,538
4,108
1,914
259
1,713
9
1,254
4,237
1,090
2,469
Office	
4,668
2,524
349
1,866
Fishing	
15
2,159
Totals	
3,835
723
14,819
19,377
19.79%
3-73%
76.48%
100.00%
CONTINUOUS SERVICE.
When the Board prepares to compile its statistics for the purposes of this report the payroll forms are sent out to employers with the reqliest that they be completed for the week in the
year in which the most women and girls were employed.
In the mercantile industry this peak week occurs during the busy Christmas season, when
most staffs are considerably augmented. Temporary hands are, therefore, rightly recorded as
having been employed for less than one year. It is this fact that swells the total in the mercantile industry for the short-term employment group.
In a similar way the fruit and vegetable industry records a large percentage of workers as
having been employed less than twelve months. When the fruit and vegetables are coming in
with a rush they must be attended to at once, and the women and girls rally to prepare the
perishable products so that none may spoil. Their working term in the canneries and packinghouses is brief, but they are, nevertheless, important employees. The crops were heavy during
1928 and the number of workers showed a considerable gain over the previous year. While
many of them may have done similar work in former seasons, most employers record them as
having been engaged less than a year.
The office occupation appears to hold its employees more permanently than other callings.
The following table will enable one to study the fluctuation of employment staffs in the
various industries and occupations:—
Table showing Labour Turnover in each Group—Number of Employees in Continuous
Service of Employer reporting.
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646
493
272
199
154
88
88
55
41
107
4,237
478
Laundry 	
33
428
184
148
76
68
54
20
23
21
10
25
1,090
66
Public house-keeping
15
1,304
438
243
142
92
55
44
41
32
16
47
2,469
430
Oflice 	
83
1,211
706
615
457
334
275
191
144
185
95
372
4,668
1,829
Manufacturing   	
58
989
402
324
230
147
100
79
52
42
32
69
2,524
336
Personal service	
10
167
55
39
26
21
11
10
6
2
1
1
349
96
Telephone   and   tele
*
graph  	
2
521
244
287
209
166
102
61
57
77
34
106
1,866
135
Fishing	
9
1
3
1
1
15
4
Fruit and vegetable..
402
1,246
174
147
81
58
22
12
6
6
2
3
2,159
51
Totals	
622
7,950
2,849
2,297
1,496
1,086
773
506
417
420
231
730
19,377
3,425 J 64 • DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
WAGE LAWS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA.
In commenting on a recent comprehensive publication of the Women's Bureau of the Department of Labour, Washington, D.C, relative to " The Development of Minimum Wage Laws in the
United States from 1912 to 1927," Clara Mortenson Beyer draws attention to the rise and fall of
wage legislation in that country within a brief period of fifteen years. By 1923 seventeen States
had passed minimum wage laws. In 1927, however, the only States in which they were functioning with any degree of vitality were California and Massachusetts. The laws as they applied
to women in the other fifteen States had been nullified or rendered inactive by Court decision.
After the District of Columbia law was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the
United States, other State laws were brought before the Courts to test their constitutionality,
and while actions were pending and continuing the administration and enforcement were
hampered.
The Canadian Provinces have been more fortunate in this respect, and the groups affected
by the laws have always exercised a more friendly and co-operative attitude towards the
Minimum Wage Boards than on the American side.
The British Columbia law has had ample time to prove its worth, not only to the women and
girls, but also to their employers. Many voluntary tributes from heads of large firms have
been given to the Board, in which the employers state that they have a more contented staff of
employees since wages are regulated by law. In paying higher wages than prevailed a decade
ago, when individual firms regulated their own salary and wage-lists, more care is exercised in
choosing new help, with the result that the standard of efficiency has been raised. The public
has thus shared the benefits of this type of social legislation.
To set out in a graphic way the wage-rates in 1918 before any Orders had been in effect,
and in 1928, after an interval of eleven years of practical testing, the following table for the
non-seasonal industries has been prepared:—
Mercantile Industry.
Average weekly wages— 1918. 1928.
Employees over 18 years  $12.71 $14.95
Employees under 18 years  7.70 9.60
Percentage of employees under 18 years  15.49% 15.91%
Laundry Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years     $11.80       $14.59
Employees under 18 years        9.78 9.64
Percentage of employees under 18 years  21.80%      11.74%
Manufacturing Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees     $12.54       $16.62
Inexperienced employees         9.57 10.00
Percentage of inexperienced employees  28.64%     18.74%
Telephone and Telegraph.
Average weekly wages—■
Experienced employees     $15.55       $18.32
Inexperienced employees       11.90 11.91
Percentage of inexperienced employees     8.70%      13.61%
Personal Service Occupation.
Average weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years    $13.83 $17.02
Employees under 18 years        6.96 11.67
Percentage of employees under 18 years  15.38% 7.45% REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 65
Office Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over eighteen years     $16.53       $20.21
Employees under 18 years       10.88 12.99
Percentage of employees under 18 years     7.45%        3.51%
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years     $14.23       $16.52
Employees under 18 years       11.77 13.67
Percentage of employees under 18 years     5.51%        3.73%
While the Minimum Wage Board does not take all the credit for the substantial increase in
wages during this period, to the Orders is largely due this noticeable rise. Other economic
factors have contributed in a lesser degree to these increases, but the wage-level has been raised
and maintained chiefly by this protective legislation.
As employees are also buyers, the higher their wages the more they can spend, and thus
their money goes into circulation to give impetus to trade.
The highest individual weekly wages recorded for 1928 in the nine industries were as
follows: Mercantile industry, $65; laundry industry, $32.25; public housekeeping occupation,
$40; office occupation, $75; manufacturing industry, $43; personal service occupation, $50;
telephone and telegraph occupation, $65; fishing industry, $26.54; and fruit and vegetable industry, $49.30. These peak wages were paid by firms in Victoria, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and
Penticton.
WEEKLY RATES OF 19,377 WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES.
The following table has been prepared to show the weekly wage-rates of all the women and
girl employees for whom data were received in 1928.
In studying these figures the reader is asked to bear in mind that young girls, inexperienced
workers of all ages, and part-time employees have been included. Their rates are naturally
lower than those prescribed for skilled workers and employees on full-time schedules. J 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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fe          fa REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928. J 67
CONCLUSION.
Looking back over the year just ended, the Board has reason to be gratified over the
co-operation afforded by employers and employees throughout the Province. Each year witnesses
a more intelligent understanding of the regulations by the ever-increasing body of wage-earners.
Their confidence in the powers of the Board is more apparent each year, and they seem less
diffident in seeking out the officials administering the Act when they require information or help
concerning an imagined or actual infraction of an Order.
Employers as a whole have responded readily to any requests of the Board for adjustments
in wages or hours of work. They have, with one or two exceptions, given the Inspector every
courteous facility for obtaining what data she requires when calling to make her investigations.
To all employers, employees, and the general public, who have enabled the work of the
Board to be carried on effectively, sincere thanks are tendered.
For the future the members feel that prospects are bright for a continuation of the beneficial
effects resulting from a tolerant administration of the Act and Orders.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
J. D. McNiven, Chairman.
Helen Gbegoby MacGjxl.
Thomas Mathews. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS.
For convenient reference a summary of the Orders now in force is herewith appended :-
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced
Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Tears of Age or over.
$12.75.    Hourly rate,  26 Vie cents.
$ 7 50 for 1st   3
8 00    „   2nd   3
months.
$ 9 00 for 1st   3 months.
10 00    „   2nd   3
8 50    „   3rd   3
,
11 00    „   3rd   3
9 00    „   4th   3
,
12 00    „   4th   3
9 50    „   5th   3
,
10 00    „   6th   3
,
Licences   required   in   this
10 50    „   7th    3
,
class.
11 50    „   8th   3
'
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    Maximum working-period 48 hours.
Order has been in force since January 1st, 1928, superseding Order of February 24th, 1919.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING, AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
$13.50.     Hourly   rate,   28%   cents.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
$ 8
00
for
1st
4
months.
8
50
„
2nd
4
„
9
00
„
3rd
4
,
10
00
„
4th
4
,
11
00
„
5th
4
,
12
00
„
6th
4
,
18 Years of Age or over.
$ 9 00 for 1st   4  months.
10 50    „   2nd   4
12 00    „   3rd   4
Licences   required   in   this
class.
Above rates are based on a 48-hour week. Maximum working-period 48 hours, governed by
" Factories Act."
Order has been in force since March 31et, 1919.
PUBLIC HOUSEKEEPING OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of waitresses, attendants, housekeepers, janitresses, cooks, and kitchen
help in restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, ice-cream parlours, light-lunch stands, and other places where
food is cooked, prepared, and served for which a charge is made ; and the work of chambermaids, in
hotels, lodging-houses, and apartments where lodging is furnished, whether or not such establishments
are operated independently or in connection with any other business; and the wo.rk of all female
elevator operators.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29%  cents.
$12 00
$12 00
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    In emergency cases 52 hours may be worked.    Time and
one-half shall be paid for work in excess of 48 hours and up to 52 hours. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 69
When lodging is furnished, not more than $3 a week may be deducted for such lodging.
When board or meals are furnished, not more than $5.25 may be deducted for a full week's board
of 21 meals.    A fraction of a week's board shall be computed upon a proportional basis.
As elevator operators are required by law to pass an examination before running elevators, no
apprenticeship is permitted under the Minimum Wage Order.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks,
filing clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other Orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer
operators, auditors, attendants in physicians' and dentists' offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$15.    Monthly   rate,   $65.
Hourly   rate,  31%    cents.
$11 00 for 1st   6 months.
12 00    „  2nd    6         „
13 00    „   3rd   6
14 00    „   4th    6
$11 00 for 1st   3 months.
12 00    „   2nd   3
13 00    „   3rd   3
14 00    „   4th   3
Licences   required   in   this
class.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum weekly working-period prescribed by Order, 48
hours.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring, hairdressing, barbering, and other
work of like nature, or employed as ushers in theatres, attendants at shooting-galleries and other
public places of amusement, garages, and gasoline service stations, or as drivers of motor-cars and
other vehicles.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.25.    Hourly rate, 29n/i6 cents.
$10 00 for 1st   6 months.
11 00    „   2nd   6
12 00    „   3rd   6        „
13 00    „   4th   6
*$10 00 for 1st   3 months.
11 00    „   2nd   3
12 00    „   3rd   3
13 00    „   4th   3
Licences   required   in   this
class.
* These rates for learners do not apply to attendants at shooting-galleries and other public places of
amusement, garages, and gasoline service stations, or to drivers of motor-cars or other vehicles, from whom
no apprenticeship Is deemed necessary.
Above rates are for 48-hour week, which is maximum permitted.
Wages for Ushers.
Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, or the like, engaged after 6 p.m., on legal holidays,
and for special matinees, are entitled to a wage of not less than 30 cents an hour, with a minimum
payment of 75 cents.
Ushers working more than 18 hours a week, but not in excess of 36 hours, are entitled to not less
than $10.80 a week.     (Ushers in this category may be employed only between 1.30 p.m. and 11 p.m.)
Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours are entitled to not less than $14.25.
No distinction is made for ushers under 18 and over 18 years of age. No apprenticeship considered
necessary for ushere.
Order has been in force since September 15th, 1919. J 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
FISHING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50.    Hourly rate, 32Vm cents.
$12 75 for 1st    4 months.
13 75    „   2nd   4
14 75    „   3rd    4
Licences    required    for    inexperienced
employees 18 years of age or over.
Order has been in foree since February 28th, 1920.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy, and shall also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the
operation of telephone or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.    Hourly  rate,  31%   cents.
$11 00 for 1st    3 months.
12 00    „   2nd    3
13 00    „   3rd    3
Licences    required    for    Inexperienced
employees  18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum hours permitted are 8 per day and 48 per week,
except in cases of emergency, when 56 hours may be worked. Time and one-half is payable for hours
in excess of 48.    Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m.
and 8 a.m., 10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the
number of hours of employment a week.
In cases where employees reside on the employer's premises, the employer shall not be prevented
from making an arrangement with such employees to answer emergency calls between the hours of
10 p.m. and 8 a.m.
Order has been in force since April 5th, 1920, superseding Order of .September 23rd, 1919.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use, any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$14.40.    Hourly   rate,   30   cents.
$11 00 for 1st    2 months.
Licences  required  for  inexperienced
employees 18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. For work over 48 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day,
wages shall be not less than 30 cents an hour for experienced workers, and for work in excess of
10 hours the rate shall be not less than 45 cents an hour.
For work over 8 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day, wages shall not be less than 23 cents
an hour for inexperienced workers, and for work in excess of 10 hours the rate shall be not less than
35 cents an hour.
Order has been in force since November 2nd, 1926, superseding Order of February 28th, 1920. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 71
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, and adapting for use or sale any article or
commodity, but excepting fish, fruit, and vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Schedule 1.
Schedule 2.
Schedule 3.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29%
cents.
$ 8 00 for 1st 2 mos.
10 00    „   2nd 2
12 00    „   3rd 2
$ 8 00 for 1st 4 mos.
10 00    „   2nd 4      „
12 00    „   3rd 4
$ 7 00 for 1st 6 mos.
10 00    „   2nd 6
13 00    „   3rd 6
Licences required for inexperienced workers 18 years of age or over.
Schedule 1 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-powders, molasses,
sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, biscuits,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, soft drinks, yeast, cans, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, whisks, pails, wash-boards, wooden boxes, clothes-pins,
matches, explosives, munitions, gas-mantles, and window-shades.
Schedule 2 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Cotton bags, envelopes, overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, gloves,
hats, caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, tents, awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding,
pillow-covers, loose covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made millinery,
knitted goods, blankets, brushes, machine-made cigars, and dipped chocolates.
Schedule 3 applies to the following occupations, or to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or adapted for use or sale: Bookbinding, embossing, engraving, printing,
dressmaking, men's and women's tailoring, ready-to-wear suits, paper boxes, jewellery, furs, leather
goods, hand-made cigars, boots, shoes, and hand-made millinery.
Schedule 3 does not apply to regularly indentured apprentices whose indentures have been approved
by the Minimum Wage Board.
The above rates are for a 48-hour week. No employee shall be employed more than 8 hours a
day, nor more than 48 hours a week, except when permission has been granted under the provisions
of the " Factories Act."
Order has been in force since November 20th, 1923, superseding Order of September 1st, 1919. J 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ASSOCIATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
In the preparation of the following list the intention has been to confine it to organizations
which have direct connection with the employment of labour, and not to include any which are
established purely for other business or social purposes. The list, which is numerically about
equal to that of last year, has been carefully corrected at the last possible moment before going
to press.
Biscuit & Confectioners' Section, Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, L. H. Nicholson, National Biscuit &
Confection Co., Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary,
Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Box Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, C.
J. Williams, Alberta Box Co., Ltd., Calgary,
Alta.; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
B.C. Hotels' Association—President, Wm. Gilchrist ; Vice-President, J. J. Kahn; 2nd Vice-
President, M. G. Gordon; Treasurer, P. T.
Hartney; Secretary, J. J. Walsh, 611 North
West Building, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver.
B.C. Loggers' Association—Chairman of the
Board of Directors, Norman A. English, Wood
& English, Ltd.; Vice-Chairman, S. G. Smith,
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd.; Secretary-
Manager, R. V. Stuart, 921 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver. Officers elected annually on
January 15th.
B.C. Lumber & Shingle Manufacturers' Association—President, J. G. Robson, Timberland
Lumber Co., Ltd., New Westminster; Secretary,
J. H. Wilkinson, 917 Metropolitan Building,
Vancouver. Officers elected annually on third
Thursday in January.
Builders' Supply Section, C.M.A. (B.C. Division)
—Chairman, C. McMillan, B.C. Contractors'
Supply Co., Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V.
Robinson, 701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Canadian Jewellers' Association (B.C. Section) —
President, Allan G. Carruthers; Secretary-
Treasurer, A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street,
Vancouver. Executive (District) : J. W. Duncan Victoria; M. J. Little, Victoria; H.
Thornycroft, Nanaimo; A. Clausen, New Westminster ; C J. Whiten, Vernon; W. J. Kerr,
Kamloops; J. Bulger, Prince Rupert.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division) ; Provincial Headquarters, 701-7 B.C.
Mining Building, Vancouver—Chairman, J. H.
Roaf, Clayburn Co., Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining Building,
Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (Victoria
Branch), 1008 Broad Street, Victoria—Chairman, James Parfitt, Victoria Brick Co., Ltd.,
Victoria; Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building. Victoria.
Canadian Storage & Transfermen's Association—
President, Geo. H. Chadwick, P.O. Drawer
2995 (Manitoba Cartage & Warehousing Co.,
Ltd.), Winnipeg, Man.; Secretary, E. A. Quig-
ley, Suite 10, 423 Hamilton Street, Vancouver.
This Association has Board of Directors in
each Province.
Canned Salmon Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, R. J.
Gosse, c/o B.C. Packers, Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver; Assistant Secretary of Section, R. E. Lanning, 705, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Clay Products Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, James
Parfitt, Victoria Brick Co., Victoria; Secretary,
T. J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Consolidated Shingle Mills of B.C., Ltd.—Secretary, E. M. Dearing, 907-8 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association, Inc.—President, Capt. Fred Sorensen, Pier 8, Seattle,
Wash.; Secretary, Capt. H. S. Johnson, Pier 8,
Seattle, Wash.
Garment Manufacturers' Section, C.M.A. (B.C.
Division)—Chairman, J. H. Humphries, Standard Garments, Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R.
Ar. Robinson, 701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
General Cartage & Storage Association of B.C.—
President, Elmer Johnston, 1560 Main Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, E. A. Quigley, Suite 10,
Canadian Bank of Commerce Chambers, 423
Hamilton Street, Vancouver.
General Contractors' Association—President, J.
Tucker; Vice-President, J. E. Buerk ; Secretary,
R. J. Lecky, 615 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Jam Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, C.
D. Hunter, Empress Manufacturing Co., Ltd.,
Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Meal, Oil & Salt Fish Section, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, S. A. Birks, Hecate Fish Products, Ltd.;
Secretary, R. E. Lanning, 705 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, C.M.A. (B.C. Division) —
Chairman, J. Latta, c/o Murray-Latta Machine
Works, Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Associaion—Chairman, E. W.
Izard, Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt; Secretary,
T. J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Millwork Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manu-
. facturers' Association—Chairman, T. T. Gadd,
Cedar Cove Sash & Door Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Manager, O. Phillips, 707 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Mining Association of British Columbia—President, Chas. A. Banks, Pacific Building, Vancouver; Secretary, H. Mortimer-Lamb, Birks
Building, Vancouver. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 73
Mining Association of Interior British Columbia
—President, J. P. MacFadden, New Denver;
Secretary, W. H. Burgess, Kaslo.
Mountain Lumber Manufacturers' Association—
President, J. P. Klinestiner, Lumberton; Secretary-Treasurer, I. R. Poole, 204 Trades Building, Calgary, Alta. Officers elected at annual
meeting held in January.
Printers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, H. J. Graves,
e/o G. A. Roedde, Ltd., Vancouver; Manager,
R. L. Norman, 706 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Printers' Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association — Chairman, S.
Clarke, Clarke Printing Co., Ltd., Victoria;
Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton
Building, Victoria.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Board—President, J. M. Watson, Vancouver; 1st Vice-President, R. T. Wilson,
Nanaimo; 2nd Vice-President, J. F. Scott,
Cranbrook; 3rd Vice-President, T. J. Wilcox,
Kamloops; Treasurer, Wm. Kerr, New Westminster; Dominion Representative, D. H. Kent,
Vancouver; Secretary, Geo. R. Matthews, Vancouver; Head Provincial Office at 420 Pacific
Building, Vancouver. Branches are established
at Cranbrook, Nanaimo, Revelstoke, and Vancouver. At New Westminster there is a District Branch serving the principal towns of the
Lower Fraser Valley.
Shipping Federation of B.C., Inc.—Manager and
Secretary, Major W. C. D. Crombie, Shipping-
Federation Building. 45 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver ; President, K. J. Burns; 1st Vice-President, K. A. McLennan; 2nd Vice-President,
D. M. Cameron; Executive, E. Aikman, David
Baird, L. G. Carling, F. H. Glendinning, W. M.
Crawford, H. F. Harrison, J. C. Irons, B. C.
Keeley, H. A. Stevenson, A. M. Lidley, and R.
D. Williams. Meets for election of officers in
January each year.
Shipyards' Section, C.M.A. (B.C. Division) —
Chairman, E. F. Cribb, Vancouver Dredging
and Salvage Co., Ltd.; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Vancouver Association of Electragists—President,
C. H. E. Williams, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver ; Hon. Secretary, J. C. Reston, 579
Howe Street, Vancouver; Office, 425 Pacific
Building. Officers elected annually in September.
Vancouver Association of Sanitary & Heating
Engineers—President, C. Walter Murray, 137
Powell Street, Vancouver; Secretary, James
Galloway, 425 Pacific Building, Vancouver.
Officers elected annually in June.
Victoria Bread & Cake Manufacturers' Association—President, J. J. Taylor, c/o Rennie &
Taylor, Ltd., Victoria; Secretary, Captain T. J.
Goodlake, 1008 Broad Street. Election of
officers annually in January.
A'ictoria Builders' Exchange—President, Harry
Catterall, 9211/. Fort Street; Secretary, J. W.
Bolden, 2509 Prior Street. Officers elected
annually in January. J 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
UNION DIRECTORY.
In our endeavour to present an up-to-date directory of trade-union organizations and their
officials we have been greatly assisted by union secretaries and others, to whom our grateful
acknowledgments are tendered. The number of such organizations in the Province does not show
any material difference as compared with last year's, a few local organizations having gone out
of existence and others having been initiated. The Department will appreciate any intimation
of changes in the list which may be made from time to time.
TRADES AND LABOUR CONGRESS OF
CANADA.
President, Tom Moore, 172 McLaren Street,
Ottawa; Secretary-Treasurer, P. M. Draper,
172 McLaren Street, Ottawa.
B.C. EXECUTIVE OF TRADES & LABOUR
CONGRESS OF CANADA.
Chairman, W. J. Bartlett; Secretary, Percy R.
Bengough, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver;
Victoria Secretary, E. S. Woodward, Trade
Union Hall, Victoria.
NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.
Canadian Merchant Service Guild.
Vancouver—President, Capt. Jas. Findlay, 675
Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver; Secretary, A.
Goodlad, 675 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Imperial Bank Chambers twice
monthly by special call.
Victoria—Vice-President, Capt. T. H. Brown, 408
Union Building, Victoria.
Radio Division, No. 3, of the Electrical Communication Workers of Canada—Secretary, H. A.
Hooper, P.O. Box 571, Vancouver. Meets in
Room 318, Hotel Vancouver, on the first of
each month at 8 p.m.
TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCILS.
Prince Rupert—President, S. D. McDonald, P.O.
Box 268, Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. Derry,
Box 498, Prince Rupert. Meets at Carpenters'
Hall on second Thursday in each month at 8
p.m.
Vancouver, New Westminster and District—President, James Thomson, Labour Headquarters,
Vancouver; General Secretary-Treasurer, P. R.
Bengough, Room 200, Labour Headquarters,
Vancouver. Meets first and third Tuesdays of
each month at Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m.
Vancouver Labour Council of the All Canadian
Congress of Labour—President, J. McKinlay,
Room 34, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver; Secretary, George B. Macaulay, Room 30,
163 Hastings Street West. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West on the third Wednesday at
8 p.m.
Vancouver Building Trades Council—President,
E. H. Morrison, 404 Homer Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, W. Page, Office 301, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on second and fourth Tuesdays in each
month at 8 p.m.
Victoria—Corresponding Secretary, E. S. Woodward, 1325 Carlin Street. Meets at 8 p.m. on
first and third Wednesdays in month at Trades
Building, Courtney Street.
DISTRICT LODGES AND COUNCILS.
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners.
District Council of Vancouver—President, W.
Wilson, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver;
Secretary, R. W. Hatley, Labour Headquarters,
Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on
second Thursday in month at 8 p.m.
Electrical Communication Workers of Canada.
British Columbia District Council No. 1—President, W. T. Burford, 4144 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, C. T. Foote, 745
Yates Street, Victoria. Meets in Room 132,
Hotel Vancouver, first Sunday in the month at
11 a.m.
International Association of Machinists.
Vancouver District Lodge No. 78—President,
Thomas Sills, 1352 Burrard Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, A. W. Tait, 1865 Tenth Avenue
West.    Meets at call of Chairman.
Allied Printing Trades Council.
Vancouver—President, R. H. Neelands, 529-31
Beatty Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Thomas
Carroll, 529-31 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 529-31 Beatty Street, Vancouver, on
second and fourth Mondays in month at 7.30
p.m.
Victoria—President, W. F. Emery, 1563 Gladstone Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, T. A. Burgess, Box 1183, Victoria. Meets at Room 411,
Canada Permanent Mortgage Building, at 8
p.m. on last Thursday in month.
British Columbia Federation of Civic and
Municipal Employees.
President, W. J. Scribbens, 3208 Pender Street
East, Vancouver; Secretary, H. R. Simmers,
3675 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets
at 251% Hastings Street East at call of Chair.
Civic Employees' Federation.
Vancouver—President, Chas. A. Watson, 1329
Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver ; Secretary,
H. A. Urquhart, 2015 Fourteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets, at call of Secretary, at
251% Hastings Street East, Vancouver.
Theatrical Federation of Vancouver.
President, J. R. Foster, of Pantages Theatre,
Vancouver; Secretary, E. C. Miller, The Gres-
ham, Smythe Street, Vancouver. Meets at 991
Nelson Street, at call of the Chair, at 10 a.m. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 75
TRADE UNIONS.
Ashcroft.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 210—President, J. D. Nicol,
Savona; Secretary, R. Halliday, 3481 Georgia
Street East, Vancouver. Meets at Ashcroft at
7.30 p.m. on third Saturday of January, April,
July, and October.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 23—Secretary, Chas.
B.   Brown,  2195  Linden  Avenue,  New  West- .
minster.
Central Park.
Carpenters & Joiners (Amalgamated), No. 2605
—President, F. Williams, 2469 Twenty-ninth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Muir-
head, 2572 Monmouth Avenue, South Vancouver.
Corbin.
Corbin Miners' Association, Local No. 3, Sub.
Dist. No. 1—President, David Sheen, Corbin;
Secretary, W. R. Sykes, Corbin. Meets in
Miners' Hall every second Sunday at 7 p.m.
Cranbrook.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers,
No. 308—Secretary, A. Mueller, c/o Cranbrook
Brewing Co., Cranbrook.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 559—President, R. Bartholomew,
Cranbrook; Secretary, M. H. Johns, Box 214,
Cranbrook. Meets at 2.30 p.m. on the first and
third Sundays in month at Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
563—President, Hugh J. Brock, Box 551, Cranbrook ; Secretary, G. A. Hennessy, Drawer 878,
Cranbrook. Meets at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Mondays in Maple Hall.
Machinists, International, No. 588—President, W.
Henderson, Box 827, Cranbrook; Secretary, R.
J. Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook. Meets at W. J.
Flower's residence on first Monday each month
at 3 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
229—President, John Flynn, Cranbrook ; Secretary, G. C. Brown, P.O. Box 739, Cranbrook.
Meets at Odd Fellows' Hall, Cranbrook, no set
date.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 407—President, R. H. Harrison, Box 93,
Cranbrook; Secretary, Joe Jackson, Box 215,
Cranbrook. Meets at Cranbrook on second
Sunday in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 173—President, James L. Martin,
Slateryille, Cranbrook; Secretary, J. F. Lunn,
200 Durick Avenue, Cranbrook. Meets at 8
p.m. at I.O.O.F. Hall, Norbury Avenue, on first
Wednesday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Express & Station
Employees, Baker Mt. Lodge, No. 1292—President, M. L. McFarlane, Cranbrook; Secretary,
E. G. Dingley, Box 728, Cranbrook. Meets in
Auditorium, Cranbrook, every Sunday at 3 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 585
—President, P. C. Hartnell, Box 865, Cranbrook ;
Secretary, D. S. Taylor, Box 802, Cranbrook.
Meets at Odd Fellows' Hall every Sunday at
8.30 p.m.
Duncan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
533—President, AV. H. Smith, Parksville;
Secretary, H. AV. McKenzie, R.R. No. 2, Duncan. Meets in Duncan, at call of President,
at 1 p.m.
Essondale.
Mental Hospital Attendants' Union, No. 34 (T. &
L.C.)—President, Samuel Cooling, Essondale;
Secretary, J. McD. Nicholson, Essondale. Meets
second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at
Essondale.
Fernie.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink AVorkers of
America, International Union of, Local No. 308
—President, J. AV. Gladney, McPherson Avenue ; Secretary, J. E. Robson, Box 1071, Fernie.
Meets at 96 Howland Avenue, Fernie, on first
Monday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Miners' Association (Independent), British Columbia—President, Richard Darbyshire, Fernie ;
Secretary, AV. A. Harrison, Box 568, Femie.
Meets at Grand Theatre, Fernie, every third
Thursday in summer and every third Sunday in
winter at 7.30 p.m.
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, No. 1454—President, Peter Decicco, Field; Secretary, Thomas
Barlow, Box 158, Field. Meets at Field on
first Thursday of month at 8 p.m.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
165:—President, L. Carlson, McMurdo;' Secretary, AV. Rande, Field. Meets at I.O.O.F.
Hall, Golden, on first Sunday of each quarter
at 12 a.m.
Kamloops.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
No. 1485—President, J. H. Morrill; Secretary,
Ralph Brownlee, Kamloops. Meets at Masonic
Hall, Kamloops, on first and third Thursdays at
8 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 821—President, A. Kenwood, Kamloops;
Secretary, T. J. O'Neill, Box 753, Kamloops.
Meets at Orange Hall on first and third Sundays in month at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 855—Secretary, L. Baker, Box 703, Kamloops. Meets on Sundays at Elks' Hall, Kamloops, at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 258—President, H. C. Embree,
817 Columbia Street, Kamloops; Secretary, H.
G. Keating, 410 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops, at 2.30 p.m.
on first and third Tuesdays in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 15, Mount Edith Cavell—President,
E. S. Briggs, Chu Chua; Secretary, Noel Mon-
tagnon, A7avenby. Meets in Kamloops on first
Sunday in January, April, July, and October
at 11 a.m. J 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Railroad Employees, No. 161—President, J. Begg,
Kamloops; Secretary, F. A. AVinterhalder, Box
154, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division
No. 611—President, E. S. Bongard, Box 882,
Kamloops; Secretary, A. G. Corry, Box 177,
Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops,
on second and fourth Sundays in month at
2.30 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 519
—Secretary, V. A. Mott, Kamloops. Meets at
Orange Hall, Kamloops, on second Sunday and
fourth Tuesday in month at 7 p.m.
Kitchener.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 229—Secretary, Geo. C. Brown,
Box 739, Cranbrook.
Matsqui.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 31—President, P. E. Crick, Kamloops Junction; Secretary, F. Kent, Box A, Lytton. Meets at C.N.R.
Freight Office Building, A7ancouver, at 11 a.m.
on first Sunday in March, June, September, and
December.
Michel.
B.C. Miners' Association—President, Miles Esta-
brook, Michel; Secretary, Simeon Weaver,
Natal. Meets every second Friday at 7 p.m. in
the Mission Hall, Natal.
Mission City.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
168—President, F. AV. Brunton, Hatzic P.O.;
Secretary, H. Anderson, Box 195, Mission.
Meets at 529 Beatty Street on third Sunday in
January, April, July, and October at 10.30 a.m.
Nanaimo.
Carpenters, Amalgamated, of Canada—President,
Harvey May, Nanaimo; Secretary, John Kerr,
123 Craig Street. Meets at Warden's Store on
second and fourth Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 54
—Secretary, W. H. McMillan, 410 Bruce Avenue, Nanaimo. Meets at 7.30 p.m. on first
Tuesday of month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
337—President, R. J. Stewart, c/o Free Press
Office, Nanaimo; Secretary, L. C. Gilbert, Box
166, Nanaimo.    Meets at call of President.
INelson.
Barbers' International Union of America, Journeymen, Local No. 196—President, Joshua Sut-
cliffe, Nelson; Secretary, Alex. N. Fleming,
Nelson. Meets at Nelson at 8 p.m. on last
Thursday in month.
Canadian Pacific Express Employees, No. 18,
Brotherhood of—Secretary, L. S. McKinnon,
409 Latimer Street, Nelson. Meets in Canadian Legion Building on Sundays at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, E. J.
Hoskey Division, No. 579—President, J.
Simons, 203 Silica Street, Nelson; Secretary,
E. Jeffcott, Box 214, Nelson. Meets at Canadian Legion Building on Sundays at 10.30 a.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Division No. 631—President, Chas. W.
Munro, Nelson; Secretary, Stanley Smith, Nelson. Meets second and fourth Sundays at 2
p.m. in I.O.O.F. Hall.
Machinists, International Association of, Lo^al
No. 663—-President-Secretary, Fred. Chapman,
Box 253, Nelson.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
181—President, Gust Johnson, Eholt; Secretary, C. Holm, Box 13, Grand Forks. Meets
first Sunday in March, June, September, and
December at 2 p.m. at Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 98—President, D. H. Heddle, Hall
Mines Road, Nelson; Secretary, G. B. Abbott,
Box 272, Nelson. Meets in K. of P. Hall,
Baker Street, on third AA7ednesday in month at
7.30 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 460—Chief Conductor, G. W. Allan,
Nelson; Secretary, A. B. Hall, 324 Gore Street,
Box 986, Nelson. Meets in Canadian Ivegion
Building at 1.30 p.m. on second Sunday in
month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1291—President, J. Brake, General Delivery, Nelson;
Secretary, A. T. Richards, Box 701, Nelson.
Meets in Canadian Legion Hall, Nelson, second
Thursday of each month at 8 p.m.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Kcotenay
Lodge, No. 558—President, D. D. McLean, 312
a Carbonate Street, Nelson; Secretary, A. Kirby,
820 Carbonate Street (Box 258), Nelson.
1 Meets at Canadian Legion Building at 10 a.m.
'1| on second Sunday in month.
KTypographical Union, International, Local No.
gj 340—President, Joseph Clinton, Box 766, Nel-
4 son; Secretary, L. E. Pascoe, Box 935, Nelson.
M Meets in Daily News Office, Nelson, at 5.10
p.m. on last Wednesday in month.
I
Nelson Island.
Quarry AVorkers' International Union, No. 161—
President, F. Goodruf, Pender Harbour; Secre-
j    tary, Ernest Beard, Quarry Bay, Nelson Island.
! Meets at Quarry Bay on second Friday of each
month at 6.30 p.m.
New Denver.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers; No. 98—Secretary, A. Shilland, New Denver.
New Westminster.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
-j No. 573—President, C. Moir, Bayles' Barber
Shop, New Westminster; Secretary, Geo. York-
■   ston,   35   Eighth   Street,   New   Westminster.
] Meets at 35 Eighth Street on fourth Thursday
in month at 7 p.m.
Carpenters, Amalgamated, of Canada, Vancouver
and New AA7estminster—President, H. Patterson,   332   Second   Street,   New   AVestminster;
I    Secretary, W. L. Florence, 121 Twenty-second
j Avenue AVest, Vancouver. Meets af Hart
Block, New Westminster, on the first and third
Wednesdays at 8 p.m. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 77
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1251—President, W. A.
Robertson, 224 Eleventh Street, New Westminster ; Recording Secretary, A. E. Ridgeway,
1615 Stride Avenue, New Westminster. Meets
at Labour Temple on first and third Thursdays
in month at 8 p.m.
Civic Employees of New Westminster, Union of—
President, A. Smith, 635 Sixth Street, New
Westminster; Secretary, Rees Morgan, 313
Regina Street, New Westminster. Meets in
Labour Temple at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday in
month.
Civil Servants of Canada (Amalgamated)—President, Dr. Kenneth Chester, 310 Warren Avenue, New Westminster; Secretary, F. McGrath,
316 Strand Avenue. Meets at G.AV.A7.A. Rooms
on third Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
256—President, F. Brooks, 802 Edinburgh
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, C. J.
Highsted, 355 Keary Street, New AVestminster.
Meets at No. 1 Fire Hall once every month at
8 p.m.
Fishermen's Protective Association of B.C., Local
No. 1—President, Richard Marshall, Pembina
'Street, Lulu Island; Secretary, Harold Maiden,
Box 427, New AVestminster. Meets at
G.AV.V.A. Headquarters, Columbia Street, New
Westminster, on first Saturday of each month
at 2 p.m.
Longshoremen's Association No. 1, New Westminster and District, Independent—President,
R. Butters, 608 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster; Secretary, AV. Clitheroe, 124 Fourteenth Avenue East, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 151—President, T. Kenyon, Cedar Street;
Secretary, D. MacDonald, 360 Sherbrooke
Street, New Westminster. Meets in G.W.V.A.
Hall on second and fourth Fridays in each
imonth at 8 p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 654
—President, F. Staton, 906 Tenth Street, New
Westminster; Secretary, F. C. Bass, Box 115,
New AVestminster. Meets in Labour Temple
at 2.30 p.m. on fourth Sunday in month.
Plumbers and Pipefitters, United Association of,
No. 571—President, C. Porter, 3408 Imperial
Street, New AVestminster; Secretary, Lloyd
Elrick, Room 5, Cliff Block, New Westminster.
Meets at Vancouver on first Friday in month
at 8 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 280—President, J. Huggans, 529
Ninth Street, New Westminster; Secretary, P.
Walmsley, 524 Seventh Street, New AVestminster. Meets at Labour Temple, New AVestminster, on third Friday in month at 8 p.m.
Retail Clerks' International Protective Association, No. 1306—President, W. W. Callander,
321 Pine Street; Secretary, J. Ellis, 719 Thirteenth Street, New AVestminster. Meets last
Thursday in month in Hart Block at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 134
—President, W. G. Bell, 1010 London Street,
New Westminster ; Secretary, A. J. Bond, 531
Fourteenth Street, New AVestminster. Meets
in Labour Temple at 10.30 a.m. on second and
fourth Tuesdays in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
632—Secretary, R. A. Stoney, Box 754, New
Westminster. Meets in Labour Temple at
10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in February, May,
August, and November.
Notch Hill.
Maintenance-of-way Employees .& Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 193—President, AV. Annala,
Tappen;   Secretary, AV.  Loftus,  Notch Hill.
Penticton.
Federated Shop Trades—Kettle Valley Railway—
President, AVm. J. Johnson, Penticton; Secretary, Geo. Barr, Box 41, Penticton.
Locomotive Engineers, No. 866—President, C. E.
Hulett, Penticton; Secretary, C. Cornock, Box
64, Penticton. Meets at Burtch's Hall, Penticton, on second and fourth Sundays of each
month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 884—President, C. Tupper, Penticton ; Secretary, R. O. Blacklock, Box 385,
Penticton. Meets at K. of P. Hall on first and
third Thursdays of each month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1426—Secretary, T. Bradley, Penticton. Meets
first Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
914—President, Herbert Nicolson, Penticton ;
'Secretary, W. B. McCallum, Penticton. Meets
at Odd Fellows' Hall, Penticton, on first and
third Mondays of each month at 3 p.m.
Prince George.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 843—President, AV. Kemp, Prince George;
Secretary, M. O'Rourke, Box 124, Prince
George. Meets at Odd Fellows' Hall on second
and fourth Mondays of each month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Mount Robson Lodge, No. 827—President,
R. Lawseth, Prince George; Secretary, C. H.
Olds, Box 129, Prince George. Meets in
I.O.O.F. Hall at 2 p.m. on first and third Sundays in the month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Nechako
Lodge, No. 1870—President, A. F. Kenneson,
Endako ; Secretary, T. Nielsen, Box 162, Prince
George.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
202—President, J. Wold, Box 178, Prince
George; Secretary, C. H. AVeaver, Dome Creek.
Meets at McBride and Prince George about end
of each quarter.
Railroad Employees, Local No. 28—President, F.
C. Saunders, Prince George; Secretary, H. A.
MacLeod, Prince George. Meets at Tenth
Avenue, Prince George, on first Sunday in
month.
Railway Conductors of America,- Order of, Local
No. 620—Chief Conductor, J. E. Paschall,
Prince George; Secretary, Walter Parks, Prince
George. Meets in Prince George at I.O.O.F.
Hall on second and fourth Sundays in month
at 8 p.m.
Prince Rupert.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1735—President, Alex. Cam- J 75
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
eron, Empress Hotel; Secretary, J. S. Black,
Box 694, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall at 8 p.m. on first and third AA7ednesdays of
each month.
Deep Sea P'ishermen's Union of the Pacific—
Secretary-Treasurer, P. B. Gill, Box 65, Seattle.
Meets at Seattle, Prince Rupert, and Ketchican
on Tuesdays at 7.30 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 344—President, T. B. Black, Box
457, Prince Rupert; Secretary, S. Massey, Box
457, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
at 8 p.m. on first Monday of each month.
Longshoremen's Association, No. 2, Canadian Federation of Labour—President, Sydney V. Cox,
Box 531, Prince Rupert; Secretary, Wm. T.
Pilford, Box 531, Prince Rupert. Meets in
Longshoremen's Hall on first Monday in month
at 8 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 207—President, F. A. Rogers, P.O. Box
598, Prince Rupert; Secretary, R. W. Scherk,
Box 492, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall at 8 p.m. on fourth AVednesday in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
335—President, J. E. McDonald, Caspaco ; Secretary, T. G. McManaman, c/o C.N. Railway,
Kwinitsa. Meets alternately at Usk and Prince
Rupert at call of President and Secretary.
Plumbers and Steamfitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
495—President, R. AVilson, Box 209, Prince
Rupert; Secretary, AV. M. Brown, Box 209,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at
call of President.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 426—President, J. Leach, Prince
Rupert; Secretary, E. W. Tucker, Box 527,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall,
Eighth Street, Prince Rupert, at 8 p.m. on
second Tuesday of each month.
Railway Employees, Brotherhood of, Division No.
154—President, H. Forrest, Box 679, Prince
Rupert; Secretary, A. E. Wood, Box 679,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Ladies' Waiting-
room, Station Depot, on the third Friday at
7.30 p.m.
Sheet Metal Workers, International Alliance,
Local No. 672—President, J. W. Ratchford, Box
517, Prince Rupert; -Secretary, Geo. H. Dobb,
625 Tatlow Street, Prince Rupert. Meets at
625 Tatlow Street on last Monday in month at
7.30 p.m.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Local No. 510—
President, A. A. McEwen, Prince Rupert; Secretary, James Black, Prince Rupert. Meets in
Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on first Friday of
each month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
413—President, S. D. Maedonald, Box 268,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. M. Campbell, Box
689, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
at 2.30 p.m. on last Sunday of each month.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 407—President, Alexander Spence, General Delivery,
Revelstoke; Secretary, Jas. M. Goble, Box 283,
Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on the
fourth .Saturday of each month at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
657—President, H. Carpenter, Fifth Street,
Revelstoke; Secretary, J. P. Purvis, Box 27,
Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on first and
third Tuesdays of each month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 341—President, S. J. Spurgeon,
Revelstoke; Secretary, (Financial) W. G.
Pavey, (Recording) A. McKenzie, Revelstoke.
Meets in Selkirk Hall, Revelstoke, on second
and fourth AA7ednesdays of each month at 2 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 258—President, A. W. Bell, Box 209,
Revelstoke; Secretary, Dugald Bell, Box 209,
Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8 p.m.
on first Monday of month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
208—President, A. L. Anderson, Revelstoke;
Secretary, P. Westman, Box 464, Revelstoke.
Meets in Smyth's Hall at 2 p.m. on first Sunday
each quarter.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 481—President, J. Johnson, Revelstoke ; Secretary, Chas. Lundell, Revelstoke.
Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8 p.m. on third Tuesday of each month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Mount
Stephen Division, No. 487—President, C. J.
Treat, Revelstoke ; Secretary, W. Lynes, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on second Monday and fourth Thursday of each month at 7.30
p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
51—President, A. P. Mcintosh, Revelstoke;
Secretary, W. Maxwell, Revelstoke. Meets at
Revelstoke at 2 p.m. on first Sunday and at
8 p.m. on third Monday of each month.
Smithers.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America, No.
53—Chairman and Secretary, W. Mitchell,
Smithers.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
Ill—President, F. V. Foster, Smithers; Secretary, S. J. Mayer, Smithers. Meets at Smithers on first Tuesday and third Thursday in
month at 3 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, No. 902—President, E. R. Freeman, Smithers; Secretary, J. B. Gibson, P.O. Box 105,
Smithers. Meets in Whiteford Hall on first
and third Sundays at 2.30 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
340—President, Jas. Stoynoff, Dorreen; Secretary, F. Simonds, Quick. Meets at Smithers
on third Sunday of March, June, September,
and December at 9 p.m.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 157—Secretary, Hugh Forrest, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415 (Bulkley)—President, J. S. Cathroe,
Smithers; Secretary, G. W. Smith, Smithers.
Meets at Social Hall, Smithers, on first Thursday in month at 7 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood "of, Farthest
North Lodge, No. 869—President, C. E. Doo-
little, Smithers; Secretary, J. M. Graham, Box
101, Smithers. Meets at Railwaymen's Hall,
Smithers, on first and third Fridays of each
month at 8 p.m. South Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union—President, A. W. Richardson, 5775 Prince Edward Street, South Vancouver ; Secretary, W. S. Welton, 832 Twenty-
eighth Avenue East, South Vancouver. Meets
at Municipal Hall, South Vancouver, on second
Tuesday in month at 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
259—President, James Urquhart, No. 3 Fire
Hall; Secretary, C. W. Goldsmith, 1105
Twenty-seventh Avenue East, South Vancouver.
Meets at No. 1 Fire Hall, Kingsway, on first
Monday in month at 10.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419—President, R. Wolfe, Squamish; Secretary, J. E. Holmes, Box 42, Squamish. Meets
second Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Presbyterian
Hall, Squamish.
Steveston.
Fishermen's Benevolent Society (Japanese Independent)—President, J. Yamamoto, Steveston;
-Secretary, G. Takahashi, Box 54, Steveston.
Meets at Steveston on first or second Sunday in
month.
Three Forks.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173—President, M. Dow, Rosebery; Secretary, T. H. Horner, Kaslo. Meets at Three
Forks on first Sunday at 1 p.m.
Trail.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 763—President, A. Balfour, Box 114, Trail;
Secretary, T. Meachem, Box 74, Trail. Meets
in Miners' Hall at call of Chair.
Vancouver.
Bakery & Confectionery Workers, Local No. 468—
President, A. Morris, 2834 Vine Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, Thos. Rigby, 3551 Commercial Drive, Vancouver. Meets in Labour Headquarters on second Saturday of month at 8 p.m.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 120—President, AV. F. Dawe, 562 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver; Secretary, C. E. Her-
rett, Room 304, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Room 3, 529 Beatty Street, on second
and fourth Tuesdays in month.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676—President,
W. H. Clancy, 1117 Tenth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, T. J. Hanafin, Room 14,
Flack Building, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters at 8 p.m. on last Sunday in
month.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 151—President, W. J. Bartlett, 1156 Howe Street; Secretary, A. Arman, 2048 Second Avenue West,
A7ancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters at
8 p.m. on fourth Friday of each month.
Boilermakers and Iron Shipbuilders' Union of
Canada, Local No. 1—President, A. Young, 2031
Main Sreet, Vancouver; Secretary, R. Stephen,
2136 William Street, Vancouver. Meets at 163
Hastings Street West on the second and fourth
Fridays of each month at 8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 194—President, Chas. McMillan, 1020 Hornby Street;
Secretary, A. Fraser, 5079 Ross Street, South
Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street at S
p.m. on first and third Mondays.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 105—President, Geo. Low, 441 Fifty-fifth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, Thomas
Carrall, 842 Hamilton Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Business Women's Club, 601 Hastings
Street West, on second Tuesday of each month
at 8 p.m.
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union, Local No. 505—■
Secretary, J. Griffiths, 3622 McGill Street, Vancouver.    Meets at the Labour Headquarters.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers of
America, No. 300, International Union of the
United—President, Angus McLennan, 6538 Cul-
loden Street, Vancouver; Secretary, H. F.
Swan, 2705 Pender Street East, Vancouver.
Bricklayers, Masons' International Union of
America, Local Union No. 3, B.C.—Secretary,
Wm. S. Dagnall, 1244 Twentieth Avenue East,
Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on
second and fourth Wednesdays in month at
8 p.m.
Bridge & Structural Iron Workers, Internationa]
Association of, Local No. 97—President, John
F. Burns, 2833 Turner Street, A7ancouver; Secretary, Paul Lauret, 1839 Main Street, or Box
302, Vancouver. Meets at 311 Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m. each Monday.
Bridge, Structural, Ornamental, Reinforced Ironworkers, Pile Drivers & Riggers, Local No. 1—
President, Bert. Bronson, 3004 Commercial
Drive; Secretary, Roy Massecar, Rooms 30-31,
163 Hastings Street West. Meets at 8 p.m.
every Friday.
Canadian Pacific Express Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 15—President, Ernest E.
Teal, 3307 Imperial Street, Burnaby; Secretary, H. Haines, 440 Hastings Street West,
A7ancouver. Meets at Eagle Hall, Homer
Street, on first Tuesday of each month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated, Branch
No. 1—President, Geo. Richley, 3269 Twenty-
eighth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. T. Bruce, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays of each
month.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated (Shipyard),
Branch No. 2—President, C. McKenzie, 5139
Wales Street, Vancouver; Secretary, W. Bray,
72 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets
at Flack Building, 163 Hastings Street West,
on first and third Tuesdays of month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 452—President, J. G. Smith, 529
Beatty Street; Secretary, R. W. Hatley, 529
Beatty Street. Meets at 529 Beatty Street at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Mondays in month.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of
(Floorlayers), No. 1875 — President, Geo.
Mayne, 2807 Patterson Avenue, Vancouver;
Secretary, W. D. Wilson, 1535 Fifth Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters, A7ancouver, first and third Thursdays at
8 p.m. J 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Cigarmakers, International Union of America,
Local No. 357—President, J. Halawell, 3939
Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, R. A. Shaw, 1022 Seymour Street, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday in month.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 59—President, W. H. Lewthwaite, 3615 Knight Road,
A7aneouver ; Secretary, J. Tarbuck, 3517 Twenty-
fifth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 251%
Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.<m. on
first Wednesday of each month.
Civic Employees' Federal, Local No. 28 (Chartered by Trades & Labour Congress of Canada)—President, John McRitchie, 604 Twelfth
Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, G. Harrison, 3427 Triumph Street, Vancouver. Meets
at 251% Hastings Street East at 8 p.m. on first
and third Fridays in month.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
C.P.R. System, Division No. 1—Chairman,
W. D. Brine, P.O. Box 432, Vancouver; Secretary, G. Campbell, 3749 Twenty-second Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at Room 132, Hotel
Vancouver, when necessary, at 11 a.m.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America, Local
No. 52—Chairman, J. Clark, 738 Sherburn
Street, Winnipeg; Secretary, J. A. McDougall,
1633 Twelfth Avenue East, A7ancouver.
Egg Graders' Union, No. 11—President, G. S.
Cooper, 2535 Hersham Avenue, Burnaby; Secretary, M. A. Weightman, 3905 Fraser Street,
A7ancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on
the first and third Mondays at 8 p.m.
Electrical Trades Union, Canadian—President,
W. Kent, 4865 Henry Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Jas. R. Peacock, 708 Woodland Drive,
Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street AVest
every Thursday at S p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 213—Secretary and Business Agent,
E. H. Morrison, Room 202, 531 Beatty Street.
Meets at Hall No. 1, Labour Headquarters, 531
Beatty Street, on first and third: Mondays at
8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 310—President, J. Harkness, Fourteenth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
R. J. Shannon, 4108 Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Elevator Constructors, No. 82—Secretary, W. A.
Varney, c/o Otis-Fensom, Room 37, 871 Granville Street, A7ancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters on the first Wednesday at 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, No. 18, International Association
of—President, Neil MacDonald, 1136 McLean
Drive; Financial Secretary, C. A. Watson,
1329 Thirteenth Avenue East. Meets at 251%
Hastings Street East on second Thursday at
10 a.m. and third Tuesday at 8 p.m.
Firemen & Oilers, No. 289—Secretary, H. Taylor,
1110 Nelson Street. Meets at 8 p.m. on the
first Tuesday of each month.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America—President, Robert C. Smart, 2684
Trinity Street, Vancouver; Secretary, James P.
Simpson. 2856 Eaton Street, Vancouver. Meets
on third Friday of month at Labour Headquarters at 7.30 p.m.
Hod Carriers & Builders' Labourers, International. Local No. 602—President, Sam Floyd,
952 Seymour Street;    Secretary,  James Bind
ing, 52 Twenty-fourth Avenue AVest, A'ancou-
ver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street on first and
third Fridays of each month at 8 p.m.
Hotel & Restaurant Employees & International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 28 (Cooks and Waiters) —
President, Thos. Edwards, 441 Seymour Street;
Secretary and Business Agent, John Gumming,
441 Seymour Street. Meets at 38 AVilliams
Building, 413 Granville Street, on the second
and last Mondays of each month at 3 p.m. and
9 p.m.
Jewellery AVorkers' International Union, Local
No. 42—President, Len C. Simpson, 3492
Thirty-eighth Avenue West, Vancouver ; Secretary, F. C. Yarrall, 1836 Alberni Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street on first
Friday in month at 8 p.m.
Labourers' Unit of General Workers' Union
(Building Construction)—President, L. Fillmore, 66 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, H. Catoni, 714 Main Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Room 31, 163 Hastings Street West,
on the first and third Mondays at 8 p.m.
Lathers, National Union of Canada, No. 1—
President, Frank Julian, 7594 Ontario Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, D. C. Butterworth, 1609
Tenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 163
Hastings Street West on first and second Mondays at 8 p.m.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, Local
No. 44—President, C. Addie, 217 Twenty-third
Avenue, Vancouver; Secretary, R. B. Brown,
6650 Culloden, A7ancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters at 8 p.m. on third Wedesday in
month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Kamloops
Division, No. 320—President, G. P. Boston,
1763 Third Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, H. O. B. McDonald, 1222 Pendrell Street,
Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on second
Tuesday in month at 8 p.m. and on fourth
Tuesday in month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Local No.
656—President, T. McEwan, 350 Fourteenth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, S. H.
Waterhouse, 3438 Pandora Street. Meets at
I.O.O.F. Hall on first Thursday of each month
at 8 p.m.
Lumber Handlers' Association (Independent) —
President, M. McGrath, 696 Powell Street, Vancouver; Business Agent, Jas. Greer, 696 Powell
Street, Vancouver. Meets second Thursday of
the month at 8 p.m. at 696 Powell Street.
Lumber AVorkers' Industrial Union of Canada,
Coast District—President, A. Hougaard, 66
Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary,
G. Lamont, Room 30, 163 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver. Meets at Room 30, 163
Hastings Street West, on the third Wednesday
at 8 p.m.
Machinists and Allied Shop Workers' National
Union of Canada, Local No. 1—President, D.
Horgan, 2656 Western Avenue, Vancouver;
Secretary, D. G. Walker, 41 Thirty-second Avenue East, A7ancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings
Street West on the first and third Thursdays in
each month at 8 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of. Local
No. 692-^Secretary, Donald McKay, 2740 Windsor Street, Vancouver. Meets at 531 Beatty
Street at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 81
Mailers' Union, No. 70 (I.T.U.)—President, A. R.
C. Holmes, 6439 Cypress Street, Point Grey;
Secretary, Herbert E. E. Fader, 2718 Oxford
Street, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on first Tuesday in each month at 6.15 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
167—President, C. J. Beck, 1612 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, A. D. McDonald, Box 115, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters at 11 a.m. on third Sunday in
month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1734—President, R. C. Harkness, R.R. No. 2,
New Westminster; Secretary, John Roscow,
14 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets
at Eagle Hall at 10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in
month.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, No. 7
—President, Fred Slater, 4604 AValden Street,
Vancouver ; Secretary, E. Read, 232 Thirteenth
Street AVest, North Vancouver. Meets at 319
Pender Street West every Friday at 8 p.m.
Milk Wagon Drivers & Dairy Employees, Local
No. 464—President, E. Metcalfe, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, B. Showier, 2841
Triumph Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Fridays in month.
Mill & Factory, Local Union No. 1599—President, Geo. Campbell, 1182 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver; Recording Secretary, H. G.
Avery, 7964 Montcalm Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Labour Headquarters on first and
third Thursdays of each month at 8 p.m.
Millwrights' Union, No. 1638—President, —
Campbell; Recording Secretary, J. Murray-Ure,
3007 Thirty-eighth Avenue West. Meets every
second and fourth Wednesday in Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m.
Moulders of North America, International Union
of, Local No. 281—President, John Browne,
638   Broadway   West,   Vancouver;   Secretary,
D. B. McCormack, 667 Graham Avenue, New
Westminster. Meets at Labour Headquarters,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first and third Fridays
in month.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Union), Local No. 145—
President, E. C. Miller, 716 Smythe Street;
Secretary, W. E. Williams, 5756 Wales Road,
Vancouver. Meets at G.W.V.A. Auditorium,
901 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, at 10 a.m.
on second Sunday in month.
Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers of America,
Local No. 138—President, Carl Jorgensen, 3454
Twenty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, Ed. Smith, 425 Seventh Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Thursdays in each month.
Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers of Canada,
National Union—President, A. McGillivray,
2638 Forty-fourth Avenue East; Secretary,
A. P. Walsh, 1475 Kitchener Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 163 Hastings Street West every Thursday at 8 p.m.
Pattern Makers' Union of British Columbia—
President, F. L. Coltart, 3379 Pender Street
East, Vancouver; Secretary, P. Henderson, 553
6
Sixty-second Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at 163 Hastings Street West on the first Friday
of every month at. 8 p.m.
Photo Engravers' International Union of North
America, Local No. 54—President, Wm. Wilson,
563 East Broadway, Vancouver; Secretary,
P. S. Rutherford, 754 Twenty-second Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 7.30 p.m.
on first Wednesday in month.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf & Dock Builders,
Local No. 2404—President, Harold Graham,
Box 320, Vancouver; Secretary, Wm. Reid,
Box 320, Vancouver; Financial Secretary, J.
Thompson, Box 320, Vancouver. Meets at 122
Hastings Street AVest, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
each Friday.
Plasterers & Cement Finishers, International Association of the United States and Canada, Local
No. 89—President, Wm. Broomhead, 6163
Prince Albert Street, Vancouver; Secretary,
Alfred Hurry, 861 Thirty-fourth Avenue East,
Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street at
8 p.m. on first and third Wednesdays in month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
170—President, Arthur Jane, 2158 Sixth Avenue AVest, Vancouver; Secretary and Business
Agent, Wm. Watt, 3346 Tenth Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street at 8
p.m. on second and fourth Fridays.
Policemen's Union, Local No. 12—President, Roy
A. Perry, 236 East Cordova, Vancouver; Secretary, James Reid, 236 East Cordova, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street at 7.30 p.m.
on fourth Tuesday in month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 69—President, A. G. Gray, 867 Twentieth Avenue East,
Vancouver; Secretary, Thos. S. Ezart, 1603
Fortieth Avenue East, South Vancouver. Meets
at Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m. on second
Tuesday in month.
Projectionists' Society, B.C., Local No. 348—
President, J. R. Foster, 1161 Granville Street,
Vancouver ; Secretary, G. Gerrard, 2732 Carle-
ton Street, Vancouver. Meets on first Friday
in month in the Labour Headquarters at 11.30
a.m.
Radio Division, Electrical Communication Workers of Canada, B.C. No. 3—Secretary, H. A.
Hooper,  P.O.  Box 571,  Vancouver.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood, Vancouver Division No. 189—President, N. Lack-
manec, 2022 Ontario Street, Vancouver; Secretary, C. H. Brown, 2118 Prince Edward Street,
Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West
on first Sunday every second month at 12 noon.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local Division No. 82—President, E. A. Gamble, 1998 Forty-sixth Avenue East, South Vancouver ; Secretary, T. M. Sullivan, 2715 Dundas
Street, Vancouver. Meets at Ivanhoe Hotel,
Vancouver, at 7 p.m.; no set date.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144—
President, W. E. Flood, 185 Twelfth Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, R. T. Houghton,
3825 Lanark Street, Vancouver. Meets at Odd
Fellows' Hall, corner .Hamilton and Pender
Streets, on first Tuesday and third Sunday in
month at 2.30 and 7.30 p.m. J 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 58—President, H. Warde, 1102
Twenty-third Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. R. Robertson, 637 Eighteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at Cotillion Hall,
Davie and Granville Streets, on first and third
Fridays in month at 8 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 267—President, J. R. Burton, 2597
Eton Street, Vancouver; Secretary, J. B.
Physick, 1156 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday at 2
p.m.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Pacific Division No. 59—President, T. Spring-
born, 1131 Twenty-fourth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, W. J. Wilson, 327 Eighth
Avenue AVest, Vancouver. Meets at Flack
Building, Vancouver, and G.W.V.A. Club, New
Westminster, on third Thursday each month at
8 p.m.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association—President, H.
F. Hatt, 3184 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver;
Secretary, F. W. Hitchcock, 3403 Twenty-
seventh Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets in
Room 18, Post Office Building, Vancouver, at
2.30 p.m. on last Tuesday of month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 630—President, J. Brodie, 1434 Eighth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, W. J.
Mason, 3116 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 311 Hastings Street West on
second Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Lodge 626—President, R. G. Walker, 1052 Richards Street, Vancouver; Secretary, E. Baldock, 6433 Argyle
Street, Vancouver. Meets at C.P.R. Storeroom, foot of Drake Street, Vancouver, when
necessary.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 46—Secretary, F. H. Fallows, 1504
St. Andrews Street, North Vancouver. Meets
in I.O.O.F. Hall, Vancouver, on fourth Friday
at 8 p.m.
Retail Employees' Association No. 1 (Independent), Vancouver—President, Mrs. Williams,
Suite 23, 1504 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver ; Secretary, Robert Skinner, 571 Twenty-
second Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at
Piccadilly Tea Rooms, 581 Granville Street, on
first Thursday in month at 6.30 p.m.
Sheet Metal AVorkers, Local No. 280—President,
James Strachan, 2205 Eleventh Avenue West,
Vancouver; Secretary, Daniel Macpherson,
Room 308, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Room 3, 529 Beatty Street, at 8 p.m.
on second and fourth Thursdays.
Sheet Metal AVorkers (Railroad) No. 314—President, H. H. Swindon, 2265 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, E. Anderson, 891
Fifty-second Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
second Tuesday of each month at Labour Headquarters, 529 Beatty Street, at 8 p.m.
Shingle Weavers' Union, No 17813—President, J.
Stevenson, Vancouver; Secretary, J. N. Chute,
1163 Pender Street East, Vancouver. Meets in
Labour Headquarters, Vancouver, on the fourth
Sunday at 7.30 p.m.
Steam Engineers, Sawyers, Filers & Mill Mechanics of B.C., Canadian Society of Certified—
President, W. L. Ainger, Eburne Hotel, Mar-
pole; Secretary, Robert Gray, 36-163 Hastings
Street AVest, Vancouver. Meets on second and
fourth Mondays in month at 163 Hastings
Street West at 8 p.m.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union of, Local No. 844—President, E. O.
Denis, 5211 Gladstone Avenue, Vancouver;
Secretary, Geo. Pettipiece, 641 Cambie Street,
Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters at
8 p.m. on every Thursday.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Industrial Union
of, No. 882—Vice-President, W. G. Hulbert,
1639 Fourth Avenue West; Secretary, Chas.
Watson, 871 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets every second Wednesday at 8
p.m. at Labour Headquarters.
Steam Shovel & Dredgermen, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 62—Secretary, G. D.
Lamont, 223 Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Stereotypers & Electrotypers, International Union
of, Local No. 88—President, W. Hayter, c/o
Daily Sun, Vancouver; Secretary, J. McKinnon, 3635 Fourteenth Avenue AVest, Vancouver.
Meets at Labour Temple at 4 p.m. on second
Monday in month.
Stone-cutters, Association of North America—■
President, C. T. Cassidy, Tenth Avenue AVest,
Vancouver; Secretary, E. W. Tonge, 4119
Grace Avenue, New AVestminster. Meets at
Labour Headquarters on second Tuesday in
imonth at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 101
—President, Jos. E. Smith, 1551 Thirty-seventh
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, Jack
Price, 2533 Twenty-fifth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at K. of P. Hall, Eighth Avenue
and Scotia Street, Vancouver, at 10.15 a.m. on
first Monday and 7 p.m. on third Monday.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No.
Ill—Secretary, A. S. Crosson, 3925 Fourteenth
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters on first Sunday in month.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, Local
No. 178—President, Colin McDonald, 2834 St.
George Street, Vancouver; Secretary, W. W.
Hacken, 1582 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Taxi, Stage & Bus Drivers, Local No. 151—President, A. C. Shaw, 3 Kaslo Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 2841 Triumph Street.
Meets at 529 Beatty Street on second and
fourth Fridays in month at 11.30 a.m. and 4.30
p.m.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers, No.
466, International Brotherhood of—President,
A. C. McKay, 70 Sixth Avenue East, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. P. Black, 1880 Homer Street,
Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on
second and fourth Wednesdays at 8 p.m.
Theatrical Arts and Crafts Canadian Society,
Local No. 1—President, W. S. MacKenzie, 647
Windermere Street, Vancouver; Secretary, H.
E. McKenzie, 2650 Main Street, Vancouver.
Meets every Wednesday at the Avenue Theatre,
Main Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
Theatrical Stage Employees' Federation & Moving
Picture Machine Operators of the United States
and Canada, International Alliance of, Local
No. 118—President, W. Copp, Taunton Street, REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1928.
J 83
Vancouver; Secretary, V. G. Robertson, P.O.
Box 711, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters, Vancouver, at 9.30 a.m. on second
Friday in month.
Train & Enginemen of B.C.—Secretary, D. H.
Black, Room 353, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.    Meets every second Sunday at 2 p.m.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
226—President, C. S. Campbell, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, R. H. Neelands,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 2 p.m. on last
Sunday in month.
Upholsterers' International Union No. 26—President, P. Clift, 392u Keith Road East, North
Vancouver; Secretary, J. W. Gordon, 2292
Wellington Avenue, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street on second and fourth Mondays in
month at 8 p.m.
AA7aterfront Freight Handlers' Association—President, A. E. Smith, 233 Main Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, A. T. Moore, 233 Main Street, Vancouver. Meets in rear of 233 Main Street,
Vancouver, on first and third Wednesdays in
month at 8 p.m.
Waterfront Workers' Association (Independent),
Vancouver and District—President, Harry Burgess, 4423 Belmont Avenue, Vancouver; Secretary, Allan L. Walker, 132 Dunlevy Avenue,
Vancouver. Meets at 132 Dunlevy Avenue on
second Friday of every month at 8 p.m.
Welders & Helpers, Association of, Local No. 7—
President, Thomas R. Bartholomew, 3657 Pandora Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Murwin J.
Warren, 262 Forty-fifth Avenue East. Meets
at Labour Headquarters, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
on fourth Friday in every month.
Wood-workers, Amalgamated Society of, No. 2—
President, C. McKenzie, 5139 Wales Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, W. Bray, 72 Sixteenth
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West at 8 p.m. on first and third
Tuesdays.
Vernon.
Typographical Union, No. 541—President, H. G.
Bartholomew, Box 643, Kelowna; Secretary,
W. B. Hilliard, R.R. No. 1, Enderby. Meetings held at Vernon on last Saturday in month.
Victoria.
Barbers, Journeymen, International Union of,
Local No. 372—President, G. A. Turner, 616
Avalon Road, Victoria; Secretary, Jas. A.
Green, 1319 Douglas Street. Meets at A.O.F.
Hall on fourth Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 191—President, L. Basso, 635 John Street,
Victoria; Secretary, P. W. Wilson, 1837 Crescent Road, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall,
Courtney Street, at 8 p.m. on second Monday
in month.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 147—President, W. AV. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, J. A. Wiley, 141
Clarence Street, Victoria. Meets at 203 Union
Building, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on fourth Friday
in month.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers of
America, International Union of United, Local
No. 280—President, Otto Dunaway, Chamber
lain Street, Victoria; Secretary, Ernest Orr, 58
Sims Avenue, Saanich. Meets at A.O.F. Hall,
Cormorant Street, at 8 p.m. on second Thursday in month.
Bricklayers, Masons & Plasterers of America,
International Union of, Local No. 2—President,
E. W. Mertton, 1039 Hillside Avenue, Victoria;
Secretary, J. H. Owen, 541 Toronto Street,
Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall, Courtney
Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second Monday
in month.
Canadian Pacific Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20—President, T. C. Johns, 2617
Graham Street; Secretary, F. E. Dutot, 1546
Bank Street, Victoria. Meets at Canadian
Pacific Railway Building, 1104 Government
Street, on first Wednesday in month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 1598—President, W. Elliott, 1811
Chandler Avenue, Victoria; Recording Secretary, J. Townsend, Box 26, Victoria. Meets at
Labour Temple at 7.30 p.m. on first and third
Mondays in month.
Civic Employees, Local No. 50—President, C.
Hogan, 2941 Cedar Hill Road, Victoria; Secretary, W. E. Farmer, 2948 Scott Street, Victoria. Meets at Main Fire Hall, Cormorant
Street, at 8 p.m. on second Wednesday in
month.
Cooks, AVaiters & Waitresses, Local No. 459—■
President, Charles Richardson, Box 233, Victoria ; Secretary, F. Dovey, Box 233, Victoria.
Meets at Room 7, Surrey Building, Yates
Street, on first and third Tuesdays in month at
3 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 230—President, R. D. Lemmax, 1331
Pembroke Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. Reid,
2736 Asquith Street, Victoria. Meets at
Labour Hall, Courtney Street, at 8 p.m. on first
and third Tuesdays of month.
Firefighters, City Union No. 258—President, P.
N. Guy, No. 8 Fire Hall, Duchess Street, Victoria ; Secretary, T. A. Heaslip, No. 1 Fire
Hall, Victoria. Meets at Headquarters Fire
Hall, Cormorant Street, at 8 p.m. on or about
first of each month.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11
—President, W. J. Pearson, 2253 Dalhousie
Street, Victoria; Secretary, Arch. Langford,
521 Langford Street, Victoria.
Locomotive Firemen & Engineers, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 690—President, E. S. Cottle, 309
Mary Street, Victoria; Secretary, H. Richmond,
615 Wilson Street, Victoria. Meets at A.O.F.
Hall, Cormorant Street, on first Wednesday
and third Thursday in month at 7.30 p.m.
Longshoremen's Association, No. 38-46, International—President, J. Wilson, 706 Blanshard
Street, Victoria; Secretary, Francis Older, 748
Humboldt Street, Victoria. Meets at 748 Humboldt Street on first Thursday in month at 8
p.m.
Machinists, Local No. 456—President, A. Wallace,
44 Lewis Street, Victoria; Secretary, C. B.
Lester, 3226 Oak Street, Saanich. Meets at
City Temple Hall, North Park Street, on fourth
Thursday in month at 8 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
2824—President, AV. A. Wright, 601 Kelvin
Road, Victoria; Secretary, G. E. Wilkinson, 50 .
J 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Sims Avenue, Victoria. Meets at Point Ellice
Station, CN. Railway, on third Sundays of
March, June, September, and December at 2
p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 247
—President, W. Tickle, 1046 Rockland Avenue,
Victoria; Secretary, F. V. Homan, 1707 Lee
Avenue, Victoria. Meets at K. of P. Hall on
second Sunday in each month at 2 p.m. in
winter and 10.30 a.m. in summer.
Pattern Makers' League of North America—
President, J. LeSueur, 1272 Walnut Street,
Victoria; Secretary, J. A. McCahill, 326 John
Street, Victoria. Meets on second Monday each
month at 326 John Street at 8 p.m.
Painters, Decorators & Paper-hangers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1119—President, J. H. Holland, 716 Vancouver Street, Victoria; Secretary, J. Whittle, 1747 Stanley Avenue, Victoria.
Meets at Labour Hall, Courtney Street, on
second and fourth Wednesdays in month at 8
p.m.
Photo Engravers, International Union of North
America (Auxiliary of Vancouver), Local No.
54—Secretary, Frank M. Day, 1849 Crescent
Road, Victoria.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf & Dock Builders, No.
2415—President, J. D. Murray, 318 Irving
Road, Victoria; Secretary, P. Packford, P.O.
Box 1027, Victoria. Meets at Westholme Hotel
at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays of
month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
324—President, Wm. Martin, 819 Colville
Road; Secretary, Edward Irvine, 323 Menzies
Street, Victoria. Meets at Foram Hall, Pandora Avenue, at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Tuesdays.
Policemen's Federal Union, Local No. 24—President, B. Acreman, Police Station, Victoria;
Secretary, Claude Belcher, City Police Headquarters, Victoria. Meets at Police Headquarters at 2.30 p.m. on first Tuesday in month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 79—President, Thomas Nute, 534 Michigan Street, Victoria ; Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236 McKenzie
Street, Victoria. Meets at the Amphion Hall
at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Railway Carmen of America, Victoria Lodge No.
50—President, J. Stephenson, 1640 Burton Avenue, Victoria; Secretary-Treasurer, John H.
Booth, 2915 Cook Street, Victoria.
Railway Conductors, No. 289—Chief Conductor,
E. H. Bird, Wellington, V.I.; Secretary, J.
Martin, 2109 Vancouver  Street, Victoria.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1137—President, E. J. Leonard, 1444 Begbie Street, Victoria ; Secretary, H. McDougall, 1484 Lang
Street, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall at 8
p.m. on first Thursday in month.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
613—President, W. T. Campbell, 68 Burnside
Road, Victoria; Secretary, W. H. Cross, 704
Lampson Street, Esquimalt. Meets at A.O.F.
Hall, Cormorant Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on
second Tuesday and last Friday in month.
Retail Clerks, International Association of, Local
No. 604—President, J. Talbot, 1737 Bank
Street, Victoria; Secretary, H. H. Hollins,
Trades Hall, Broad Street. Meets at Trades
Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on second Tuesday
in month.
Sheet Metal Workers, International Association,
Local No. 134—President, Samuel McMinn, 634
Rupert Street, Victoria; Corresponding Secretary, T. Brooke, 1661 Fell Street, Victoria.
Meets at Temple Hall, 842 North Park Street,
at 8 p.m. on first Thursday in month.
Steam Engineers, Sawyers, Filers & Mill Mechanics, No. 3—President, J. McKenzie; Secretary, B. Burton, Sidney. Meets at Trades Hall
at 8 p.m. on first Monday in month.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union of, Local No. 446—President, C. Maclean, 2640 Avesbury Street, Victoria; Secretary,
H. Geake, 1242 Faithful Street, Victoria (Box
502).    Meets at 8 p.m. on Tuesdays.
Stonecutters'Association of North America (Journeymen)—President, Joseph Barlow, Box 853,
Victoria; Secretary, Wm. McKay, Box 853,
Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on second Thursday
in Labour Hall, Broad Street, Victoria.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 109
—President, James P. Torrance, 2510 Blackwood Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, W. Turner,
2169 Fair Street, A'ictoria. Meets corner
Broad and Yates Streets at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
on second Tuesday in month.
Tailors' Journeymen Union of America, Local No.
142—President, R. Mowbray, c/o Fyvie
Brothers, Government Street; Financial Secretary, H. D. Reid, 3034 Washington Avenue,
Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on first Mtonday in
month at Yates and Government Streets.
Teamsters & Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers,
International Brotherhood of, Local No. 365—
President, N. Hanson, 1463 Bay Street, Victoria ; Secretary, P. G. Rabey, 2571 Graham
Street, Victoria. Meets at Veterans of France,
Douglas and Courtney Streets, at 8 p.m. on first
Tuesday in month.
Theatrical Stage Employees & Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, Local No.
168—Secretary, C. More, 949 Balmoral Road,
A7ictoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad Street,
Victoria, at 11.15 p.m. on first Thursday in
month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
201—President, J. D. Davidson, 378 Burn-
side Road, Victoria; Secretary, T. A. Burgess,
Box 1183, Victoria. Meets at Amphion Hall,
739 Yates Street, Victoria, at 2 p.m. on last
Sunday in month.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Ohaeles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1929.
3,325-729-6558

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