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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1928

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT   OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
or THE
SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL
POLICE
FOR   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31st, 1926
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Trinted by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1928.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Superintendent of Provincial
Police for the year ended December 31st, 1926.
A.  M.  MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1921. I
Office of Superintendent of Provincial Police,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1927.
Honourable-A. M. Manson, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report for the year which ended December
31st, 1926.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Superintendent of Provincial Police. REPORT OF
SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1926.
Hon. A. M. Manson, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to forward herewith my Annual Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1926.
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
At midnight of December 31st, 1926, the strength of the Force stood as follows: 10 officers;
218 non-commissioned officers and men; 59 automobiles; 10 motor-cycles; 7 launches; 19
power-boats.
The following table shows the distribution of the Force as at December 31st:—
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Liquor Enforcement Br..
Totals	
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176
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The Criminal Investigation Branch was definitely established from the beginning of 1926
and for the commencement of the new fiscal year a separate allotment was made to cover the
expenses of this Branch, which includes the Identification Bureau and Records Office at
Headquarters.
The Motor Licence Branch at Vancouver was placed directly under the supervision of
Inspector Hood and responsible to Headquarters direct, and not as formerly through the Officer
Commanding " E " Division. This arrangement also applies to New Westminster and a great
deal of unnecessary duplication of control has thereby been eliminated.
ENLISTMENTS, DISCHARGES, ETC.
The following are the particulars regarding enlistments, etc., during the year 1926: Enlistments, 41;   resignations, 3 ;   dismissals, 13 ;   invalided, 1;   deaths, 5.
Taking over the policing of six cities and municipalities has necessitated fourteen extra men
being engaged. The increased business in the Motor Licence Branch has necessitated three new
men being engaged. A detachment was opened at Fort Nelson to try to put a stop to the illicit
fur-trading, which was becoming pronounced. An extra clerk was taken on at Headquarters to
take care of the increasing clerical work, largely created by the policing of municipalities. I
had to place another Constable at Princeton, where the work was becoming too much for one
Constable, and at Nelson District Headquarters likewise additional help was found necessary.
OBITUARY.
It is with a great deal of regret that I have to report the loss of five of my most valuable
officers through death: January, Constable J. P. Eggleshaw at Terrace; February 23rd, Constable A. T. Regan at North Bend;   May 11th, Constable W. J. Mcintosh at Langley;   August S 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
2nd, Sergeant TV. J. Voisey at Victoria; September 27th, Constable A. TV. Mable at Kamloops.
The last named was the victim of an unfortunate accident which occurred while he was proceeding to answer an urgent call.
APPOINTMENTS.
April 1st, Sub-Inspector Geo. A. Hood appointed Inspector; April 1st, Acting-Inspector TV.
Spiller appointed Inspector.
NEW BUILDINGS.
" A " Division.
The police buildings in the Victoria District are in a good state of repair with the exception
of the lockup at Sidney, the roof of which needs repairing.
An addition to the police building at Courtenay, consisting of a general office and Court-room,
private office, and toilet and wash-room, was made during the latter part of 1926. The office is
now suitable for District Headquarters work and is bright and roomy. A new garage was constructed at District Headquarters, Courtenay, capable of holding two cars and a motor-cycle.
The garage was much needed at this District Headquarters, there being two cars and a motorcycle attached there which had to be left out in all weathers previous to the construction of the
garage. The Alert Bay Detachment was thoroughly overhauled both inside and out; the fence
was also repaired.
No new buildings were erected for police purposes in the Nanaimo District during the year
1926. There has been an exchange of offices between this Departmnt and the Department of
Mines and Department of Public Works, and the British Columbia Police offices are now on the
second floor of the Court-house instead of the ground floor as formerly. This exchange has given
a little added office accommodation, but the quarters still seem to be inadequate to the needs
of the district. In view of the fact that the Provincial Police are now policing the City of
Nanaimo, it would appear tulvisable to have all the officers and accommodation under one roof.
" B " Division.
A new police office and Constable's residence was erected at Natal and is at present occupied
by the Officer i/c that detachment.
" C " Division.
One new building has been completed in this Division during the year, a standard-type
lockup having been erected at Blue River. This lockup is very well finished and has a splendid
police office and quarters for a married officer. Electric light is supplietl by a Delco plant,
which was installetl in the basement of the building: this plant also supplying light to an
adjacent house owned by the Provincial Forest Branch.
The interior of the Old Gaol Building at Kamloops is. being remodelled. The work of
demolishing the interior of this building has been done by prison-labour under the supervision
of an experienced carpenter. A portion of the building will contain the prisoners, male or
female, and the remainder of the building will have quarters for two married officers. Tenders
are at present being accepted for this work by the Public Works Department and it is hoped
that the building will be ready for occupation early in 1927.
I regret to report that the Clinton Police Building, which was nearly ready for occupation,
was destroyed by fire on January 12th, 1927.
Provision has been made in the Estimates for 1927-28 for the erection of a house at Likely
for the Game Warden at that point. In the past large rentals have been charged for poor
accommodation, it being very difficult to obtain a house of any kind.
At Ashcroft there have been several ideas brought forward as to alterations, but nothing
definite has been decided. The present police office is not entirely satisfactory for a District
Headquarters, it being much too obsolete.
" D " Division.
A new lockup is in course of construction at Burns Lake.
The present lockup at Port Essington is, through decay, uninhabitable and cannot be
repaired.    A new building has been recommended by the Public Works Department. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1926.
S 7
The lockup at Bella Coola is very small antl has been badly strained by being moved. It
now stands on a site threatened by erosion. . It is recommended that a new lockup be erected on
a new and more convenient site.
The lockup at Telegraph Creek consists of two buildings—cells and office, which have been
erected over twenty-five years and need replacement. The Public Works Department recommends a new building.
" E " Division.
No new buildings were constructed in this Division during the year 1926, although repairs
were effected by the Public Works Department at Squamish and Powell River. The site for a
lockup at Rivers Inlet to be built at some future date was confirmetl by the Lands Department
survey, covering Lot 1503, Range 2, Coast District, containing 2.3 acres.
The lockup at Vananda is still unused by the Police Department, and while rented
irregularly from time to time, it would seem advisable to dispose of this building, if possible,
rather than allow it to become subject to deterioration. Whether it will ever be required again
as a lockup is of course a matter of conjecture, but in any event the Vanantla and adjacent areas
can very effectually be policed as now, from Powell River.
At the present time the only detachment in " E " Division possibly requiring more suitable
quarters is at Agassiz, which includes the Harrison Lake District. This has been more particularly emphasizeEl since the opening of the new summer resort at Harrison Lake, producing
a greater need for a permanent officer at that point.
UNIFORMS.
After a year's experience with the uniforms I am able to remedy a number of faults that
have become apparent antl also to effect changes that will be of benefit to the men. The material
in the second issue was very much superior to the first and the tailors find their task of fitting
simpler on that account. Also it has been fountl to be much longer wearing and should stand up
through the year better. TowarEls the end of the first year's wearing some of the uniforms
bee-time extremely shabby and in some cases did not last out till the new issue was receiveEl.
This can be accounted for by the fact that as the men only had one issue they were obliged to
use it for all occasions, rough work and patrols in the bush. This year, however, they will be
able to use their old issue for any work that is likely to damage their clothes, and this will give
them an opportunity to keep the new issue in a better condition. There has been a general
demand for an issue of slacks, and for the comfort of the men I hope to be able to effect this
issue in the coining year.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES.
" A " Division.
Since my last repoi't the policing of the Municipality of North Cowiehan has been taken
over by the Provincial Police, antl Constable Cline was appointed to the new detachment thus
formed, and has since performed his duties in a thoroughly efficient manner. The City of
Duncan is still being policed by the Provincial Police, which is represented by Corporal Russell
and Constable Shepherd, who are enforcing the law in Duncan and the surrounding district in
an energetic and capable manner to the satisfaction of both resitlents and officials.
The City of Courtenay has been policed by the British Columbia Police since April 1st, 1926.
Various officials and citizens of the city have expressed their appreciation to me of the satisfactory manner in which the police duties have been carried out. When the Department came to
the agreement with the city to police the city, there was about 30 per cent, of the citizens who
were opposed to the Department policing the City of Courtenay, but I can safely say that now
there are 100 per cent, in favour of the British Columbia Police.
On September 1st, 1926, this Force undertook the policing of the City of Nanaimo. I must
say that the Nanaimo City Detachment under Corporal A. D. I. Mustart is doing excellent work,
and the citizens generally seem to appreciate the fact that they have a. most satisfactory arrangement with the Province.
"B " Division.
Although the Cities of Fernie and Nelson have expressed a wish for some particulars with
reference to the question of policing of municipalities by the Provincial Police, no further steps
have been taken by these places to adopt the new plan, with the consequence that Rossland is the
only city in this Division which has availed itself of the provisions of the Act. A new agreement was signed in July by the Superintendent anEl the City Council of Rossland
to continue the service for another year. " It was rather gratifying to me to note," writes
Inspector Dunwoody, " that when I met the Council for the purpose of discussing an advance in
the allowance which we were getting from the city, the Mayor and some of the Councillors who
had opposed the arrangement originally were now its greatest ailvocates." Matters in Rossland
are going along in a very satisfactory manner.
" 0 " Division.
No municipalities have been taken over for police administration in this Division since the
introduction of the " Police and Prisons Regulation Act." Municipalities appear to be watching
those which have, within the past year or so, been taken over by our Department so that they
may be guided. In time I expect a number of municipalities will approach the Department
with a view to having our Force take over the administration of their police departments.
" D " Division.
The policing of the City of Prince George by our Force has been in effect since June, 1925,
and is still a subject of favourable comment by citizens and the public generally.
On June 1st, 1926, the City Council of Prince Rupert entrusted the policing of the city to
our Force in spite of strong opposition on the part of different factions. A plebiscite at the
recent municipal elections endorsed our retention by a majority of 104. It might be mentioned
that the four Aldermen elected for the Council for the years 1927-28 were known to favour the
British Columbia Police, whilst those who most strongly advocated a return to the old system
found themselves at the bottom of the poll. Much credit is due to Sergeant Hannah and his
staff for the manner in which law and order is now maintained in this city.
" E " Division.
The Provincial Police took over two additional municipal areas in 1926—namely, Port
Coquitlam and Coquitlam—making, with Matsqui, three important areas coming under our
charge.     The matter of policing Sumas Municipality also came up, but was not proceeded with.
In all cases the policing of the municipalities referred to has been very satisfactory, at Port
Coquitlam particularly, the number of cases prosecuted speaking well for the vigilance of the
Provincial officer.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BRANCH.
This Branch of the Service under Inspector Cruickshank has been working very effectively.
In Vancouver alone, where the Inspector has his headquarters with two men under his direction,
32,345 miles have been travelled in attending to 1,880 matters of various kinds—missing persons,
all manner of complaints, and numerous investigations into criminal matters. In the course of
investigation journeys have had to be made as far east as Winnipeg, north to the British
Columbia border, and south to San Francisco. During the year the C.I.B. investigated the
operations of several stock-selling concerns in antl around Vancouver, which led to the prosecution of a number of promoters, while hazardous patrols were undertaken in the untravelled
portions of the Province to investigate the mysterious disappearance of a number of trappers
and prospectors. In his report to me and referring to the Eggers case (pending) and the
" Beryl G." murder, Inspector Cruickshank writes: " It may be felt by the Department that the
cases referred to have been very expensive, but I submit that the results obtained have had a
good effect, in that it has been a warning to organized gangs of criminals that a rigid investigation could be expected into any criminal activities in the Province."
CRIMINAL IDENTIFICATION BUREAU.
This is part of the Criminal Investigation Branch and comes under the supervision of
Inspector Cruickshank. I quote hereunder the report for the year 1926 made to the Inspector
by the N.C.O. i/c :—
" Inspector Cruickshank,
i/c Criminal Investigation Branch, B.C. Provincial Police, Vancouver, B.C.
" Sir,—I have the honour to submit a report on the work of the Finger-print Bureau and
Records Office for the year ended December 31st, 1926. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1926.
S 9
" FlNGER-PBINT BUBEATT.
" The following table shows the number of finger-prints received during the year and the
source:—
"B.C. Provincial Gaols   637
B.C. Penitentiary _  55
Victoria City Police  153
Calgary City Police   225
Alberta Provincial Police  85
1,155
Added to Bureau from accumulation at Provincial Gaols    829
Total   1,984
" In addition to the above figures we received 146 prints of men who were identified as
having previous records and already on our files.
" At the beginning of the year there still remained to be classified and filed a total of 829
prints from the accumulation that was taken from the Provincial Gaols at the time of the
inauguration of the Bureau. It is very satisfactory to be able to report that the whole of this
number has now been classified and filed and record-cards made for each subject. This task
was completed just prior to the close of the year and we shall in the coming year be able to
devote more time to improving the service of the Bureau.
" Provision has been made for the installation at the Oakalla Prison Farm of a photographing system, so that prisoners can be photographed in conjunction with the taking of their fingerprint records. This service will undoubtedly be of inestimable value to the officers of the
Criminal Investigation Branch. I am endeavouring to obtain a greater number of each
prisoner's prints so that our exchange with other Identification Bureaus may be enlarged,
thereby affording greater opportunity for obtaining past records of criminals operating in this
Province and at the same time greatly increasing the possibilities of fugitive offenders being
caught.
" In only one case during the year has finger-print evidence been introduced, and I am
sorry to say that in that case apparently the jury did not care to accept the evidence as
they brought in a verdict of ' not guilty.' It is, however, gratifying to find so much interest
taken in finger-print clues by officers investigating cases—exemplified by the number of articles,
glass, bottles, etc., received at Headquarters for the purpose of locating finger-print impressions.
In a number of cases, while ridges are present, they are not sufficient in number to be of much
value; in some cases we have been able to bring out very good impressions, have photographed
them, and have retained the photographs at Headquarters, which can be used should a suspect
be apprehendetl.
" With the 1,984 prints added last year, the total number on file at the end of 1926 was
6,958. This number makes the British Columbia Provincial Police Bureau the second largest
in the Province.
" Recobds Office.
" Under this heading I include all the crime reports received; reports regarding deaths by
drowning, miscellaneous accidents, and deaths through natural causes; reports re petty complaints and all inquiries relative to missing persons.
" The crime reports received during 1926 show a very big increase over those received during
1925, there being a total of 4,937 cases entered against a total of 3,623, an increase of 1,314.
'Government Liquor Act' cases increased to the extent of 415; ' Game Act,' 120;. and 'Motor-
vehicle Act,' 369. A detailed analysis of all classes of crime and infractions of Provincial
Statutes by Divisions accompanies this report.
" During the year we received 271 inquiries from all parts of the world for information
regarding the whereabouts of relatives or friends, necessitating a great deal of inquiry and
correspondence. In a large number of these inquiries we were successful in locating the missing
persons. Eighty-seven cases of drowning were reported to the Provincial Police and 166 fatal
accidents of various causes, such as falling timber in a logging camp, automobile accidents,
accidental shootings, etc. The Police also attended and made investigation into ninety-six cases
of death from natural causes. The tluty and mileage analysis with this report gives in detail
the number of various matters attended to by Provincial Police officers during the year 1926. S 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" In conclusion, I should like to bring to your notice the very able manner in which the
crime reports have been recorded and filed by Constable Ockenden. There are on file at the
present time some 12,000 crime reports, any one of which is available at a moment's notice. To
maintain a system that will produce such a result requires great care and attention and unceasing labour. Of Constable Bailey's work in the Finger-print Bureau I cannot speak too
highly. He has shown himself to be a capable finger-print man and is at all times striving to
improve the service of the Bureau in the interests of the whole Force."
CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.
I should like to quote from the reports of the Inspectors commanding Divisions:—
" A "Division.—" The conduct and discipline of the Force in this Division is excellent. The
officers all work together in a very satisfactory and harmonious manner."
" B " Division.—" The conduct antl discipline of the members of the Force in this Division
have been exemplary."
" G " Division.—" The conduct of the officers in ' C ' Division has been very good."
" D " Division.—" The conduct and discipline of N.C.O.'s and men under my command has
been of the highest order antl a cretlit to our Force."
" E " Division.—" The conduct of all ranks has been gooEl antl the discipline of the Force
acknowledged at all times."
During the year I have been pleased to commend in General Ortlers the following N.C.O.'s
and men:—
" A " Division.
Constable TV. V. Shepherd, commended for prompt handling of the complaint of a stolen car,
which resulted in the arrest of two men, who were sentenced and.escorted to Oakalla Prison
within forty-eight hours of the commission of the offence.
Corporal J. Russell and Constable TV. V. Shepherd, commended for excellent work resulting
in the arrest of Lawrence Ryan, wanted for theft.
" B " Division.
Constable Thos. Smith, commended for prompt action in effecting the arrest of Charles
Johnson at Natal on a serious charge of shop-breaking at Fernie, the accused afterwards being-
found guilty and sentenced to five years in the Penitentiary.
Constable Thos. Smith, commended for the ability displayed in the arrest of Edward J. Perry,
a parole violator from Dorchester Penitentiary, Nova Scotia. The only intimation the Constable
had that this man was wanted was from a general circular issued by the C.I.B. Perry is now
serving the unexpired portion of his term at New Westminster Penitentiary.
Constable TV. B. Stewart, highly commended by the District Forester at Nelson for his
prompt action in extinguishing a fire at Dry Creek, thus saving the Department very considerable trouble and expense.
Constable R. C. B. Foote and Constable F. F. Dougherty, commended for the very diligent
and zealous manner iii which they carried out a prolonged search for Miss Mary Warburton,
who was lost in the Hope Mountains. Miss Warburton was found in an exhausted condition
nearly a month after the search began.
Constable F. G. Brown and Constable G. II. Soles, commended for the efficient manner in
which they handled a house-breaking case in their district, resulting in the arrest and conviction of two accused. In this case a letter of appreciation was received from the owner of
the premises.
" C " Division.
Constable H. P. Hughes, commended for his timely aid in locating Rev. A. D. McKinnon
and wife, of Williams Lake, who had become lost in the bush near the summit of Morshead
Mountain.
Constable H. P. Hughes, commended for the courage displayed in effecting the arrest of
Louie Larson, who was in a dangerous frame of mind and threatening with a double-edged axe.
Constable TV. Greenwood, commended for prompt action in recovering a watch which had
been lost at Lytton. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1926. S 11
" D " Division.
Sergeant McNeill, Sergeant Service, Constable Cline, and Constable Carr, all commended for
attention to duty and efficiency in various cases in " D " Division.
" E " Division.
Corporal G. J. Duncan, commended for the efficient manner in which he handled a hold-up
case at Mission, when a Chinese storekeeper wees heltl up by two armed men, one being arrested
twenty minutes after the occurrence. Constables Corrigan ami Condon were also mentioned
in connection with this case.
Corporal J. G. Cunningham and Constable TV Clark, commended for an excellent piece of
salvage-work off Texada Island, when a disabled launch was sighted and assisted to safety in
the face of a stiff gale. But for the timely arrival of these officers in the launch " Watla," the
other craft and its occupants would undoubtedly have been lost.
Constable G. F. Elliot, commended for the able manner in which he conducted a patrol to
the head of Pitt Lake in a search for a missing prospector. Guided by one Roy McMartin, who
has received the thanks of the Department, the Constable succeeded in locating the man, with
both feet frozen and little or no food, and in spite of inclement weather brought him safely to
hospital at New Westminster.
ASSISTANCE RENDERED OTHER DEPARTMENTS.
From the duty and mileage analysis at the end of this report (Appendix II.) it will be seen
that a large amount of work done by the Provincial Police during the year has been of a noncriminal nature for other departments of the Provincial Government. " Health Act " and camp
inspections ; insane persons ; " Mothers' Pensions Act " ; Provincial Home ; Industrial Schools ;
sick and destitute—all come unsler the Provincial Secretary's Department. With special regard
to the " Health Act," Inspector Fernie writes that, as every Provincial Constable is a Health
Officer, there will have to be some special attention given to the sanitary arrangements at the
many new auto camps which are springing up along the routes of tourist travel, and unless
properly untler control might become a menace.
Other departments that have been assisted by us include the Department of Agriculture,
Education, Fisheries, Labour, Mines, Lauds, Public Works, and Treasury.
In the erecting and testing of road-signs we have been able to give assistance to the Public
Works Department in their administration of the " Highway Act," while we continue to check
closely the weights of vehicles on certain restrictetl portions of highways. Information receiveEl
from the Public Works Department has enabled us to prosecute a number of cases under the
" Highway Act."
The Provincial Police collectetl the sum of $22,560 for the Provincial Fisheries Department
during the year 1926 in taxes and licences.   This is an increase over the previous year of $5,870.
DOMINION STATUTES.
A total of 851 cases were prosecuted under Dominion Statutes during the year 1926. Of
this number, 455 were under the " Iinlian Act," 260 under the " Railway Act," and 104 under the
" Opium and Narcotic Drug Act."
GENERAL.
During the year I visited Divisional Headquarters at Victoria, Nelson, Kamloops, Prince
Rupert, and Vancouver. I also took every opportunity to visit as many District Headquarters
and detachments as possible and in every instance I found the men carrying out their duties
creditably.
Seven additional cities and municipalities have signed agreements to be policed by ■ this
Force—namely, Prince Rupert, Nanaimo, Port Coquitlam. District Municipality of Coquitlam.
Matsqui, Courtenay, and Chemainus. At December 31st, 1926, there were ten cities and municipalities being policed under the terms of section 34 of the " Police and Prisons Regulation Act."
From reports received there seems to be every satisfaction on the part of the officials in the
arrangements made. In Prince George the arrangement made on June 1st, 1925, was reaffirmed
by a special vote of the citizens. The agreement with the City of Prince Rupert was also endorsed by the citizens by way of plebiscite. Towards the end of the year a survey of the road-liouses in the municipalities surrounding
Vancouver was made by special officers and conditions found to be such that justified measures
by the Provincial Police. Very careful preliminary preparations were made and on the night
of March 13th-14th simultaneous raids were made on the " Narrows," " Bungalow," and
" Kingsway " road-houses with such success that a total of seventy-five people were prosecuted,
and a sum of approximately $10,000. in fines, bail estreatments, and moneys forfeited was
collected. In all these instances the raids were a complete surprise and not only the organizers
but also all ranks taking part are to be congratulated on the operations. I may say that the
work of the Provincial Police was the subject of a lot of favourable comment in the press and
also from the community as a whole.
In conclusion, I should like to express my warm appreciation of the whole-hearted and loyal
support I have received during the year from Assistant Superintendent Walter Owen and each
Inspector. To yourself I express the appreciation of myself and all ranks for the sympathetic
and considerate manner in which you have dealt with all matters touching the work and welfare
of the Force.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
,T. H. McMULLIN,
Superintendent, British Colunibia Provincial Police.
CRIMINAL STATISTICS.
Appendix I. at the end of this report gives in detail the cases dealt with by Provincial
officers. This table does not give the full total for the Province, but includes all indictable
offences where the accused was committed for trial and summary convictions dealt with by the
Force. The number of all cases entered amounted to 4,937, with convictions amounting to
4,267, or 86.43 per cent. This shows an increase of cases entered over last year of 1,674. The
number of escorts of prisoners made during the year was 1,954 and 154,311 miles were travelled
in the course of these escorts. The following is a short summary of the most important cases
occurring during the year:—
MURDER AND ATTEMPTS.
Rex vs. Yoshio Kinoshita.—This man was accused of murdering one of his countrymen at
Port Alice, and appeared before the Magistrate for preliminary hearing on July 21st, 1926, and
committed for trial. September 29th, 1926, he came up for trial at the Nanaimo Fall Assize
Court, pleading " not guilty," and stating that he killed the deceased in self-defence. He was
found " not guilty " and discharged.
Rex vs. Aaron Kosta.—Committed for trial on October 18th at Quesnel for the murder of an
old Corsican pioneer named Morice Orioli. Arrangements were made for his trial to take place
at the Prince George Fall Assizes, but the case had to be postponed until the Spring Assizes
owing to its becoming necessary, two days before the Assize opened, to suddenly operate on a
witness whose evidence for the Crown was absolutely indispensable. One rather unusual
feature of this case is the fact that the accused, a Roumanian, was the first to give any information to the Police that a violent death had occurred. Kosta vehemently protested his innocence
from the first, and when he was asked to explain the blood-stains on his clothing and boots, he
remarked he could not explain it, but that it was " up to the Government." The search for the
body was attended by some difficulty, as the tragedy occurred in a very isolated district and
the character of the country was broken and thickly covered with underbrush. The medical
and other evidence will bring out clearly that the deceased had been carried at least half a mile
from the place where he met his death.
Rex vs. Ruby Dolan.—At Stewart on January 1st, 1926, a man named Donald was shot
during a brawl in a road-house. Ruby Dolan was arrested forthwith and, at the Spring Assize,
Prince Rupert, found " guilty " of manslaughter and sentenced to five years with hard labour. Rex vs. Pasquale.—The accused in this case was a patient at the Vancouver General
Hospital and ran amuck with a razor, killing his nurse. He was sentenced to be hangetl and
paid the penalty on July 14th, 1926.
Rex vs. William James Pilkington.—The evidence in this case was to the effect that a man
went to a notorious resort in Vancouver and on being refused admittance called the bar-tender,
who had refused him, foul names. The bar-tender, incensed at this, opened the door and went
out with the intention of assaulting the man, but came back almost immediately stabbed, and
died later in the hospital.    The jury found the prisoner " not guilty."
Rex vs. Alex. Anderson and Harry Bruce Howard.—In this case two men entered a shop
to rob the till and on the proprietor coming in he was shot dead. Evidence of identification was
meagre and the two accused were found " not guilty."
Rex vs. Wesley George.—This man murdered his partner at Wark Channel on April 2nd,
1926. It appears that the two men had a quarrel and George threw the man into the water, to
which he confessed and was committed for trial. While waiting for his trial he was found to be
insane and removed to a mental institution.
Rex vs. Alexander Debortoli.—On the night of November 26th, 1925, the accused escorted a
girl named Perl Traversy home, and before leaving her at her house had some heated argument
about the girl having been drinking, which ended by the accused sticking a knife into her right
side about 6 or 7 inches. ■Debortoli carried the girl into the house and framed a story to be
told to the effect that the accused happened to be about to enter the house when he met the girl
coming out stabbed by a man who had been trying to take her purse; he had been chased for
some distance but had been lost. The girl told this story in the hospital and also to the Police
and stuck to it until January 15th, 1926, when her condition became worse and she gave up hope
of recovery, and she made a dying declaration telling the true story. She died the following
morning after making the statement. At the subsequent trial there was some argument as to
the admissibility of the statement, but His Lordship admitted it. Prisoner was found " guilty "
and sentenced to be hanged on July 14th, 1926, a penalty which was carried out on that date.
Rex vs. Suiteu Furukawa.—In this case a Japanese woman and her child, a boy, were
murdered in a Japanese house in Vancouver on May 19th, 1926. Accused gave himself up and
appeared elated over his act, being under the impression that the murdered woman was unfaithful to her husband, his brother. He was found " not guilty " on grounds of insanity and was
ordered to be detained during the pleasure of the Lieutenant-Governor.
Rex vs. Baboo alias Bob Reid (Hindu).—This case was the result of a dispute over the
possession of a woman, and accused was alleged to have struck Billy Costa with a heavy stick
on meeting him on a street in South Vancouver, killing him. The evidence for the Crown rested
chiefly on Hindu witnesses who were all friends of the accused, and he himself strongly denying
the act-in the witness-box, the jury found him "not guilty" after forty-seven minutes'
deliberation.
Rex vs. Charles Alfred Moore.—This was the outcome of a long-standing enmity between
two prisoners at the Oakalla Prison Farm. The accused struck another prisoner, Harry Higginbottom, with a heavy club, Higginbottom dying the following day from the effects of the blow.
At the trial prisoner's evidence, and that of a number of defence witnesses, inmates of the
prison, was to the effect that the blow was struck in self-defence. Jury returned a verdict of
" not guilty."
Rex vs. Joseph Sanlcey.—On May 24th, 1926, the body of the school-teacher at Port Essing-
ton was found in a lonely spot about one mile out of the town. The condition of her wearing-
apparel indicated attempted rape. The girl had been brutally beaten about the face and head
and was suffocated by having moss forced down her throat. After investigation it was found
that she had been murdered the day previous and an Indian named Joseph Sankey was arrested.
He was tried at the Prince Rupert Fall Assize, found " guilty," and sentenced to be hanged on
February 16th, 1927.   Later on appeal he was granted a new trial, which is pending.
Rex vs. Jean Bowers.—This was a case involving a dispute among inmates of a disorderly
house in Victoria, in which the accused stabbed a man named La Marr with a knife, killing him.
The defence showed that Mrs. Bowers had been living in constant terror of the deceased, and
on this occasion he came towards her as though to attack, and the accused alleges that she was
afraid from his attitude that he was going to kill her and she raised the knife in self-defence.
La Marr, not heeding the knife, pushed upon her, the weapon entering a vital spot. An indictment for murder being presented to the grand jury, " no bill" was returned, but a charge of S 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
manslaughter being preferred against the accused went to trial and the jury founEl Mrs. Bowers
" not guilty."
Rex vs. 0. E. McMann.—On the morning of November 20th, 1926, the above named shot and
killed George Michie at the Chemainus Logging Company's Camp 9 near Ladysmith. The event
leading up to this murder happened in the previous month, when McMann fit a fire in the bush
and the smoke obstructed Michie's view of his cables, interfering with his work. A dispute
arose, two other men taking Michie's part. On October 15th McMann resigned his job,
obtained his time-check, burned his clothes, note-books, etc., telling some of the men at the camp
that he would not need them any more, but that he would return and " get " the three men with
whom he had had the dispute. McMann then left for Vancouver. He seems to have spent the
intervening month planning the deed, which he eventually carried out, making a number of
personal arrangements that woukl indicate that he contemplated at least leaving this part of
the country permanently. On November 19th, 1926, McMann left Vancouver, arriving the same
evening at Nanaimo, where he took the Ladysmith jitney and asked to be dropped off at
the Camp 9 crossing. The driver of the jitney stated that he was carrying a long brown paper
parcel, and when questioned about the long walk he would have to the camp that night, said he
intended sleeping near the beach for the night. He was seen at 2 a.m. the morning of November
20th, walking along the logging-railway in the direction of Camp 9. At 6.50 a.m. one man
arrived at the camp and found McMann there, who asked if the same crew was on the donkey-
engine that was there when he worked at the camp. On seeing Michie coming towards the
donkey-engine, McMann approached him and after speaking a few wortls shot him in the
stomach, and after, while Michie lay on the ground groaning, placed his rifle behind Michie's
right ear and fired again. He then disappeared into the bush and some time later one of the
men in the camp reported hearing a single shot in the distance. A diligent search was made
of the vicinity until the beginning of December, when it had to be abandoned owing to the batl
conditions prevailing. A warrant has been issueEl for the arrest of McMann, but at the end of
the year his capture has not been eft'ectetl.
Rex vs. Margaret Catherine McRae.—On the 17th day of November, 1926, this woman shot
and killed her husband, Albert Frederick McRae, in Victoria, B.C. The relations of this
couple had been very strained for some time and finally McRae announcetl that he was leaving
Mrs. McRae. Finding he had some property at the house and fearing violence at the hands of
his wife if he returned alone, he requested the escort of a policeman. This was given and while
McRae was packing his personal belongings Mrs. McRae left the room, returning a short time
later with a revolver, with which she immediately fired upon her husband, killing him instantly,
giving the Constable no time whatever to prevent the deed. Mrs. McRae was committed for trial
and will appear at the next Spring Assize Court.
Rex vs. Patrick Hanley.—This man had been previously tried twice in Nelson, the jury
disagreeing both times. He was again tried at Nelson Spring Assizes, 1926, when a verdict of
" guilty " was returned and Hanley was sentenced to be hanged on August 6th, 1926, which
sentence was afterwards commuted to life imprisonment.
Rex vs. John Johnson Sumpton.—At Hardwicke Island, which is about 40 miles from the
nearest Police Detachment, Campbell River, a man named Christian Knudson had been drinking
in the accused's shack on the afternoon of November 25th, 1926. Towards the end of the afternoon, accorEling to the story given by the accused, Knudson pulled his nose to such an extent
that he made it bleed. Sumpton lost his temper and took a 44-40 rifle, which was standing alongside his bed, and shot Knudson, but diEl not kill him. He stated that he and Knudson had been
good friends for the past four years and he did not know why he had shot him. The accused
has been committed for trial and will be brought up at the Spring Assize Court.
Rex vs. Paul Van Damme.—This case arose in the City of Vernon. Van Damme had been
quarrelling with his wife for a number of years and on September 16th, 1926, it was alleged he
fired at her from a revolver. The accused was found " guilty " of common assault and sentenced
to one year in Oakalla Prison.
Rex vs. Lee Foon.—On the night of September 9th, 1926, at Captain Cove Cannery, this man
laid in wait for one of his countrymen and slashed him about the face and head with a razor.
He was found " guilty " of wounding and sentenced to four years.
Rex vs. Sidney Wiekes.—At Colleymount on Nevember 4th, 1926, a lad named Sidney TVickes
put strychnine in a jelly which was eaten by a man with whom he was living. TVickes was
arrested and found to be insane and committed to the Hospital for the Insane. MISCELLANEOUS CASES.
Rex vs. Johnny Jamieson.—Theft of post letter from the Postmaster-General containing
money. The evidence in this case was very meagre, the postmaster who handed the letter to the
accused being unable to identify him, but the accused signed a name in the registered receipt-
book at the post-office, and this signature, together with books seized in the accused's home
which he admitted contained his handwriting, were proved to be written by the same hand by
handwriting experts. On this evidence a conviction was obtained and Jamieson was sentenced
to three years in the Penitentiary.
Rex vs. John McDonald and Albert G. Langthorne.—Breaking and entering a store at
Golden. The two accused were located at Regina and were brought back to Golden for trial.
Pleaded "guilty " and were sentenced to one year each in the Nelson Provincial Gaol.
Rex vs. Henry Doney.—Possession of stolen goods. The iiccused was charged with the
theft of one bronze strutt for propeller, 6 feet of 1-inch shafting, and one bronze propeller. This
charge was dismissed, but on a charge of having the above property in his possession, knowing
same to have been stolen, he was committed for trial. At the Nanaimo Spring Assizes he was
found " not guilty."
Rex vs. John Lyle.—Theft by misappropriation. The theft- in this case was committed at
Kimberley and the accused tried at the Fernie Fall Assizes, resulting in the acquittal of Lyle on
evidence which he gave himself. Subsequently, on further investigation, sufficient evidence was
obtained to place Lyle in custody on ;i charge of perjury. On this charge the prisoner was
again acquitted, the Judge holding that the oath had not been properly administered to Lyle
at the Assizes.
Rex vs. Joseph Ordano.—Theft. This man was arraigned in Provincial Police Court on
Monday, May 17th, 1926, charged with the theft of a diamontl ring from one Millie Turton at
the Arlington Hotel, Nanoose. Committed for trial, he appeared at the Nanaimo Spring Assizes,
when the jury founil him " guilty " with a strong recommentlation to mercy. He was releasetl on
suspended sentence.
Rex vs. Charles Johnson.—Shop-breaking. Although occurring within a municipality, this
case is mentioned on account of the part taken by the Provincial Police in the arrest of this man.
He was arrested at Natal after having broken into two garages at Fernie and had stolen a
considerable amount of money. His arrest also cleared up another very serious case of shopbreaking which occurred about a year previously in the City of Nelson, when the premises of
the Western Grocers were broken into and about $800 in Victory bontls, money, and other
valuables stolen. Johnson etmfessed to Chief Constable Long (Nelson) and Inspector Dunwoody, informing them where the missing bonds were. The information supplied resulted in the
arrest antl prosecution in Vancouver of two men foisj^'eceiving bontls knowing them to have been
stolen.    Johnson was sentenced to five years in the Penitentiary on the Fernie offence.
Rex vs. Paul Van Damme.—Incest. This is the same man who was charged with the
attempted murder of his wife. After his conviction for that offence a charge was laid against
him for the above offence, and he elected for speedy trial on his committal by the Police Magistrate at Vernon. He was found " guilty " by the County Court Judge and sentenced to five years
in the Penitentiary. From the evidence it appeareEl that Van Damme had been cohabiting and
interfering with his daughter, a girl of 17% years of age, for a period of over two years.
Rex vs. Joseph Statham,—Arson. The accused was chargeEl in connection with a fire which
occurred at Section 5, Range 2, Cedar District, resulting in the destruction of a dwelling-house
occupietl by one Sarah Williams. Accused pleatled " guilty " and was releaseEl on suspended
sentence.
Rex vs. Sarah Williams.—Arson. The accused was committed for trial on a charge of
arson arising out of the aforementioneEl fire. She appeared for trial at the Nanaimo Spring
Assizes and found " not guilty."
Probably one of the most serious cases which occurred in 1926 was when a Chinaman ran
amuck at Waldo, and after barricading himself in a house expended over fifty cartridges on
officers endeavouring to effect his arrest, Constable G. C. Sharpe and a man named McNab being
very seriously wounded on this duty. The Chinaman, when he was finally secured, had inflictetl
a wound on himself from which he died later in the Fernie Hospital. S 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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SSSSS^Palnaj^PH APPENDIX III.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA PROVINCIAL  POLICE.
Superintendent—Lieut-Colonel J. II. McMullin. Victoria.
Assistant Superintendent—W. Owen, Vancouver.
Headquakteks Staff, Victoria.
Superintendent's Office— Eegt. No.
Acting-Corporal C. Clark     80
Acting-Corporal  J.   C.   Lowe   (Vancouver)     204
Constable T.  Kennelly  303
Constable M. Kelly  276
Criminal Investigation Branch—
Inspector    F.    Cruickshank   (Vancouver)        93
Acting-Corporal R. Peachey  133
Acting-Corporal J.  IV.  Cruickshank
(Vancouver)     177
Constable C. O. Ockenden  273
Constable A. II. Bailey  290
Constable F. Swanson (Vancouver)	
Accounts Branch—
Inspector G. A. Hood     28
Constable H. II. Clarke     84
Constable A. O. Cooke  292
Constable .1. F. PaulEling  289
Game Branch— Hegt. No.
Inspector M. Furber	
Staff-Sergeant F. Butler     72
Constable T. II. M. Conly  120
Constable W. H. Vickers	
Miss A. McGregor (stenographer)	
Motor Licence Branch, Victoria—
Sergeant W. H. Handley  103
Corporal P. Pentecost     16
Constable W. H. Greenwood  283
Miss M. Mackie  (stenographer)	
Miss D. Hicks (stenographer)	
Motor Licence Branch, Vancouver—
Sergeant W. T. Gale  294
Acting-Corporal H. E. Baker  198
Constable G. L. AsEiuith  258
Constable .1. R. Shannon  172
Constable J. S. Lord  320
Constable E. McArthur  104
Miss E. A. Beattie (stenographer)	
" A " Division.
Inspector—Thos. W.  S. Parsons, Victoria.
Divisional Clerk—
Victoria District— Eegt
Sergeant R. Owens, Victoria	
Constable R. Harvey, Victoria	
Constable C. C. Jacklin, Victoria...	
Constable R. Meadows, Victoria	
Constable W. J. Thomson, Victoria....
Constable F. Philp, Victoria	
Constable S. Cline, Chemainus	
Corporal J. Russell, Duncan	
Constable W. V. Shepherd, Duncan..
Constable R. Marshall, Ganges	
Game—
Constable G. B. Simpson, Cowiehan
Lake 	
Constable R. Gidley, Victoria	
Constable H. Bishop, Sidney	
Nanaimo District—
Staff-Sergeant A. T. Stephenson,
Nanaimo 	
Constable F. E. Bradner, Nanaimo....
Constable W. J. M. Telfer, Nanaimo..
Probationer C. V. Embleton, Nanaimo  	
Corporal A. D. I. Mustart, Nanaimo
City        53
No.
31
221
265
280
293
150
78
44
122
159
183
19
261
13
164
281
Nanaimo District—Continued. Regt. No.
Constable Alex. McDonald, Nanaimo
City     298
Constable G. S. Blaney, Nanaimo City 317
Constable D. O. Tweedhope, Nanaimo
City  318
Constable Geo. Williams, Port Alice.. 141
CEMistable II. N. AVood, Alberni     73
Game—
Constable A. Monks, Alberni  284
Constable H. C. Pyke, Nanaimo  101
Motor—
Constable A. .1. Collison, Nanaimo.... 275
Courtenay District—
Corporal R. L. Matthews, Courtenay 76
Constable M. J. Condon, Coui-tenay.. 124
Constable G. A. Johnson, Courtenay.. 202
Constable  S.  W.  Dawson,  Campbell
River    185
Constable W. H. Hadley, Alert Bay..    97
Game—
Constable W. V. Fenton, Courtenay.. 117 S 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" B " Division.
Insjiector—W. R. Dunwoody, Nelson.
Divisional Clerk—Acting-Corporal C. K. McKenzie, Nelson, Regt. No. 195.
Boundary District— Regt.
Staff-Sergeant J. A. Fraser, Penticton
Constable C. H. Martin, Coalmont....
Constable G. F. Killam, Grand Forks
Constable W. B. Stewart, Greenwood
EConstable A. E. Spall, Keremeos	
Constable D. A. McDonald, Oliver	
Constable J. J. McConnell, Penticton
Constable R. C. B. Eoote, Princeton-
Probationer J. Kershaw, Princeton....
Game—
Constable R. M. Robertson, Penticton
Fernie District—
Sergeant Geo. H. Greenwood, Fernie
Constable H. S. Clark, Corbin	
Corporal A. J. Smith, Cranbrook	
Constable G. D. Mead, Fernie	
Constable E. T. Davies, Fernie	
Constable J. Renner, Kimberley	
Constable R. S. Nelson, Kimberley....
Constable T. Smith, Natal	
Constable G. W. Donohoe, Wardner..
Constable G. C. Sharpe, Elko	
Constable C. E. Davidson, Yahk	
Game—
Constable G. Thomas, Cranbrook	
Constable I. J. Brown, Elk Prairie....
No.
5
98
140
39
110
125
152
215
143
57
286
170
201
285
50
262
309
155
153
304
187
182
North-east Kootenay District— Regt. No.
Corporal H. W. King, Golden     69
Constable J. P. Brown, Golden  306
Constable F. G. Brown, Athalmer  100
Constable F. Brindley, Revelstoke.... 1S9
Game—
Constable G. H. Soles, Athalmer  178
Staff-Constable   M.   G.   Rutherford,
Athalmer	
Constable D. Greenwood, Canal Flats 266
ConstEible F. H. Butwell, Golden     92
Constable G. B. McDermott, Golden	
Staff-Constable   C.   AV.   A.   Smythe,
Revelstoke   	
Staff-Constable AV. J. McKay, Athalmer 	
AA'est Kootenay District—
Staff-Sergeant E. Gammon, Nelson.... 108
Constable H. McLaren, Creston     37
Constable C. F. Oland, Kaslo     41
Constable P. AV. Jupp, Nakusp     62
Constable H. McKenzie, Nelson  311
Constable R. H. Hassard, Nelson  313
Constable AV. H. Laird, New Denver.. 105
Constable J. Urquhart, Rossland  145
Constable AV. R. Henley, Salmo     63
Corporal J. F. Johnston, Trail     54
" C " Division.
Inspector—AA7. L. Fernie, Kamloops.
Divisional Clerk—Acting-Corporal E.
Kamloops District— Regt. No.
Sergeant AV. Kier, Kamloops  18
Constable R. Pritchard, Chase  51
Constable F. N. Emmott, Kamloops.. 48
Staff-Constable J. O. McCabe, Kamloops	
Corporal P. Badman, Merritt  87
Constable E. A. Vachon, Blue River.. 22
Game—
Corporal R. D. Sulivan, Kamloops.... 222
Motor-
Constable Thos. Herdman, Kamloops 315
Lillooet District—
Corporal F. AV. Gallagher, AVilliams
Lake  68
Constable L. AV. S. Brown, Williams
Lake   319
Constable H. C. Clarke, Quesnel  142
Game—
Constable G. F. Turner, Barkerville.. 165
Probationer F. Kibbee, Barkerville	
Patterson, Kamloops, Regt. No. 134.
Lillooet District—Continued. Regt. No.
Game—Continued.
Constable Ian McRae, Hanceville  90
Constable II. P. Hughes, Likely  225
A'ernon District—
Sergeant G. C. Mortimer, A'ernon  119
Constable J. M. Green, Vernon  321
Constable J. M. Smith, Enderby  35
Corrigan, Kelowna  203
F. Kearns, Salmon Arm 162
A. Quesnel, Lumby	
R. Maxson, Kelowna..
Constable P.
Constiible C.
Game—
Constable J.
Constable AA'.
Yale District—
Sergeant R. AAr. Bowen, Ashcroft	
Constable G. F. BraElley, Ashcroft....
Constable D. A. Hazelton, Hope	
Constable F. F. Dougherty, Lillooet..
Constable AA7. Greenwood, Lytton	
Constable AV. E. Giles, North Bend....
Game—
Constable G. D. McKenzie, Lillooet....
269
323
36
207
74
308
55
191
194 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1920.
S 23
" D " Division.
Inspector—AA'. V. E. Spiller, Prince
Divisional Clerk—Acting-Corporal R
Prince Rupert District— Regt. No.
Sergeant A. McNeill, Prince Rupert..    71
Constable AA'. Smith, Anyox  270
Constable It. Webster, Atlin     14
Constable J. A. Williams, Bella Coola   59
Constable A. Dryden, Ocean Falls     77
Constable R. Gibson, Port Essington.. 99
Constable J. M. Bella, Prince Rupert 146
Constable G. H. Clark, Prince Rupert 186
Constable T. A. Camm, Prince Rupert 272
Constable H. Raybone, Prince Rupert 307
Constable A. F. Sinclair, Queen Charlotte City  179
Sergeant  JC  P.  M.  Hannah,  Prince
Rupert City   180
Corporal   F.   D.   Markland,   Prince
Rupert City   131
Constable J. H. Smith, Prince Rupert
City  264
Constable J. A. Anderson, Prince Rupert City   138
Constable C. Kench,  Prince Rupert
City  190
Constable R. McKinlay, Prince Rupert City   290
Constable    L.    A.    N.    Pattenden,
Stewart   297
(Nonstable S. Service, Terrace  126
Constable  G.  E.  Ashton,  Telegraph
Creek   113
Game—
Sergeant T. Aran Dyk, Prince Rupert 128
Constable   Chas.    Stephens,    Prince
Rupert  :  325
Probationer J. Hayes, Prince Rupert 	
Rupert.
F. Ponder, Prince Rupert, Regt. No. 04.
Fort George District— Regt. No.
Sergeant    AV.    A.    Walker,    Prince
George   200
Constable   H.   L.   McKenny,   Prince
George   205
Constable P. Carr, McBride     85
Constable M. Martin, Prince George
City     282
Constable    H.    McGlinchy,    Prince
George City   299
Constable A. G. Crate, Prince George
City     301
Probationer   AAr.   E.   Lewis,   Prince
George City  .	
Constable AA'. A. Huggard, Red Pass.. 268
Constable H. H. Mansell, Vanderhoof   79
Game—
Constable C. Muirhead, Prince George 236
Constable E. Forfar, Fort St. James.. 136
Hazelton District—
Sergeant AA'. J. Service, Smithers     66
Constable A. H. Silk, Burns Lake  188
Constable G. A. AVyman, Hazelton.... 287
Constable A. Fairbairn, Telkwa     33
Constable O. L. Hall, Smithers  278
Peace River District—
Sergeant  AA7.   A.   S.  Duncan,  Pouce
Coupe      60
Probationer A. T. Batchelor, HuElson
Hope	
Game—
Corporal C. G. Barber, Fort Nelson..    43
Staff-Constable Isaac Gunnell,  Fort
Nelson  	
" E " Division.
Officer Commanding—Staff-Sergeant S. North, Vancouver, Regt. No. 27.
Divisional Clerk—
Vancouver District—                              Regt. No.
Sergeant O. J. J. AA'ilkie, Arancouver.. 163
Constable    Sidney    Marshall,    Arancouver       26
Constable T. R. Baker, Vancouver.... 135
Constable R. A. Sims, \rancouver  193
Constable F. AA7. R. Rigby, Vancouver 274
Constable A. C, Sutton, Powell River 199
Constable   F.   AV.   B.   Boyt,   Powell
River    310
Corporal A. AV. Stone, Rivers Inlet.... 45
Constable J. AV. Chadwick, SEpiamish 110
Regt. No,
A'ancouver District—Continued.
Game—
Corporal   J.   G.   Cunningham,   Vancouver    Ill
Constable A. P. Cummins, Vancouver     8
Constable D. C. Campbell, Vancouver 206
Constable AV. Clark, Vancouver  214
Constable   John   Moir,   North   Vancouver    300
Miss N. Bryce  (stenographer), A'ancouver  	 " E " Division—Continued.
New Westminster District— Regt. No.
Sergeant J. MacDonald, New AA'est-
minster        65
Corporal J. Kelly, New Westminster   49
Constable J.  S.  Pilling,  New AVestminster    277
Constable F. Broughton, Abbotsford..    42
Constable A. AA7. Collins, Agassiz  121
Constable AV. J. Hatcher, Coquitlam.. 210
Constable  E.   Pare,   Coquitlam   Municipality   	
Constable C. LeEloux, Matsqui  253
Corporal J. G. Duncan, Mission     75
Constable Geo. Elliott, Mission  267
New Westminster District—Continued.
Game—      ' Regt. No.
Constable R. M. Stewart, Chilliwack 148
Constable AA7. H. Cameron, Ladner.... 107
Constable    E.    G.    SteElham,    Pitt
MeaElows   147
Constable J. Murray, Port Moody  130
Probationer   F.   Urquhart,   Langley
Prairie 	
Motor—
Constable C. H. Dawson, New AA7est-
minster     173
Constable S. Pattenden, New AA'est-
minster     295
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Trinter to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1028.
573-128-470

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