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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1931]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF  THE
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
FOR  THE  YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31ST, 1929
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Eanfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Commissioner
for the year ended December 31st, 1929.
R. H. POOLEY,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1930. Office of the Game Commissioner,
Vancouver, B.C., January 31st, 1930.
Honourable R. H. Pooley, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game Commissioner for
the year ended December 31st, 1929.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. BRYAN WILLIAMS,
.   Game Commissioner. REPORT of the PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER
1929.
GENERAL SUPERVISION  (REORGANIZATION).
The Government at the last session of the Legislature amended the " Game Act," making a
number of changes, the most important of which was the separation of the Game Department
from the Provincial Police. In addition, instead of having an honorary Game Board of seven
members, the whole control of the Department was placed in the hands of a salaried official,
whose entire time and attention would be devoted to the work.
Though the Game Department is now under the control of a separate official and all the
Game Wardens take their orders and instructions entirely from such official, both it and the
Provincial Police still work in the greatest harmony. The Provincial Police, as hitherto, enforce
the game laws whenever any matter is brought to their attention, and also devote as much time
as possible to such work. On the other hand, the Game Wardens, most of whom are ex-officio
Provincial Constables, reciprocate by assisting any officers, whether Provincial or municipal,
whenever there is special or urgent need of their services.
Notwithstanding the fact that the reorganization of the Game Department is far from
complete, and giving every credit to the work hitherto done by the British Columbia Police, who
are without question a splendid and efficient body of men and a credit to the Province, there is
no doubt that the results obtained by the change have more than come up to expectations.
The Game Wardens now carry on almost continual active patrols, and this alone is a distinct discouragement to those who are prone to break the game laws. In addition, the Game
Wardens, knowing that they' can carry on these patrols and make their investigations without
being called away from them to do police-work, take a greater interest in their duties. Taking
these tilings into consideration, together with the fact that most of the Provincial Police, and
some of the municipal constables also, are giving as much assistance as they ever did, the
result has brought about an enormous change for the better. On the whole, it might truly be
said that, while there is still room for a vast improvement, there has been no time in the
history of the Province that there has been such an efficient system of game-protection as there
has been this year. That there has been better enforcement of the game laws is amply proved
by the fact that there have been 163 more convictions this year than there were last year.
AVhile we have much to congratulate ourselves on, we must not lose sight of the fact that
there is still a very big room for improvement. The northern part of the Province has not nearly
enough men. while even the southern part, especially the Coast, would be far better off for a
number of additional Game Wardens. Also a great deal of additional equipment in the way of
launches and automobiles is required to enable the men to get about the country.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
Considerable progress has been made in connection with the registration of trap-lines in the
Province, and it is hoped that within the next few months registration certificates will have been
issued to every trapper who has made application for registration of a trap-line. There is no
doubt that under the system of registering trap-lines greater co-operation is being received from
trappers, both white and Indian, in protecting fur-bearing animals.
FUR-FARMING.
As has been the case in past years, an increase in the number of fur-farms in the Province
has been noted during the year 1929, and attention is drawn to the statement covering the returns
of licensed fur-farmers on page 48.
Every possible step has been taken to encourage this industry.
EXPENDITURE  (COST OF GAME-PROTECTION).
Every year the demand for better game-protection becomes more insistent. On the Coast
there are about 20,000 men whose principal sport is bird-shooting and who advocate public
shooting-grouncfs, as well as pheasant-farms capable of raising thousands of birds.    Throughout H 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the Interior of the Province, trappers demand better protection for their lines from poachers,
while the big-game districts complain that the number of Game Wardens they have is not nearly
sufficient to properly patrol the districts. There are also some districts that are still entirely
dependent on any spare time the Provincial Police have to enforce the game laws who are loud
in their complaints at not having a Game Warden of their own.
Now, it is impossible to raise thousands of pheasants, pay the salaries of many more Game
Wardens, and furnish them with proper equipment, without a greatly increased expenditure. If
the Game Department is to keep up with the times, serious consideration will have to be given
to a very large increase in the money it has to spend. The question then arises as to where and
how this money is to be raised.
While the men who shoot or trap benefit directly from our game, there are many others who
do also, but who do not contribute toward its upkeep, amongst these being the railways, steamship companies, stores, automobile-dealers, hotels, and many others. These are all directly
affected by the stock of game. Apart from the amount of money brought into the country, and
still greater amount put into circulation by residents every year, we get a number of desirable
settlers who are attracted to the Province by its sporting possibilities. Each year hundreds of
thousands of dollars are left in the country by visiting sportsmen, and almost every year one or
more of these visiting sportsmen invests considerable sums of money in land, timber, and mines,
or some other commercial enterprise. Therefore, as our game is one of our greatest natural
assets, it hardly seems fair that the sportsmen and trappers should be called upon to pay for its
entire protection.    The general public should not begrudge a small share of the cost.
While the sportsman and trapper should not bear the entire burden, there is no doubt that
they should certainly pay by far the greatest proportion, and if they insist on more pheasants
being raised and more Game Wardens appointed, they must make up their minds to pay the
bulk of the necessary expense. Our licence fees still stand at the same figure that they were
when they were first introduced, and yet the value of the dollar is less than half of what it was
then. You have to pay more than double now for everything. Consequently, the men who shoot
and trap will have to do the same thing if they want game-protection to be carried on in a proper
manner. Most of the States to the south of us have found it necessary to raise their licence fees
and there is no doubt that we shall have to do the same, or, at any rate, allow our birds to
decrease to such an extent that it will not be worth a man's while to purchase a licence at alk
Therefore it is a matter for the sportsmen to consider whether they will pay an increased licence
fee and have proper game-protection, or run the risk of losing even what shooting they have at
present.
BOUNTIES ON PREDATORY ANIMALS AND NOXIOUS BIRDS.
The bounty question has been a very live issue during the past year, and a few words on the
subject may be advisable to explain the Game Department's views on the matter.
For years past the Government paid bounties on various predatory animals and birds, and
the money for this purpose has always been charged up against the Game Department. An exhaustive study of the results that had been obtained by paying bounties not only in this Province,
but also in the United States, led to the conclusion that the bounty on coyotes had cost an
enormous amount of money, that much fraud had been perpetrated in connection with it, and
that no lasting benefit had been obtained. Not only that, but we were spending money in this
way which had been obtained from firearms and trapping licences chiefly in the interests of a
limited number of sheep-farmers in the Interior. In view of the fact that the money so spent
could be used to far greater advantage by employing more Game Wardens and a few predatory-
animal hunters, the bounty on coyotes was eliminated.
That the coyote does a certain amount of harm to game is beyond dispute, but with the price
of pelts, even at their present level, there is not much danger of the stock of coyotes being
allowed to increase to such an extent as to be a serious menace. Moreover, the total amount of
money brought into this country through the sale of coyote-pelts amounts to a very large sum
yearly—far greater than that occasioned by any loss of game.
To the sheep-farmer the coyote is a source of trouble, but much of this damage might be
eliminated if the owners of sheep would only see that the carcasses of sheep which yearly die
from disease, accident, and other causes are not allowed to lie out on the range and act as bait
for predatory animals.
J REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 7
The wolf bounty is also a matter which needs serious consideration. During 1929 we paid
a bounty of $15 each on 441 wolves. In the last price-list issued by the Little Bros. Fur Sales
Agency, Vancouver, B.C., the price of wolf-pelts was quoted ito be from $35 to $60. With the
pelts at such a price a bounty of $15 should hardly be needed to induce the killing of wolves.
In any event, a great number of the wolf bounties paid in this Province are those on animals
which spend much of their time in the Yukon and travel south into this Province in the winter.
There has also been an effort made to have the bounty on cougars raised from $40 to $60 in
the interior of the Province. This year we paid bounty on 530 cougars, in comparison with 444
last year. It seems, therefore, that the bounty of $40 is sufficient inducement to encourage the
hunters to kill them.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.
Prosecutions.
Revenue derived
from Sale of
Game Licences,
Fees, and Furs.
Revenue
derived from
Fur Trade.
Calendar
Year.
Informations
laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Pines
imposed.
1913	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
7
21
21
17
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
•
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
1921..	
1922	
51,093.89
1923	
1924	
60,594.18
56,356.68
1925	
56,287.78
1926	
62,535.13
1927	
71,324.96
1928	
58,823.07
1929	
47,329.89
Note.—The reason for the decrease in revenue from the fur trade is partly due to the open season for
beaver and muskrats being closed on March 1st, resulting in a small catch of these fur-bearing animals.
The decrease was also due to the generally bad trapping season which was noticeable not only in this
Province, but in most other parts of Canada and the United States.
OPEN SEASONS.
After the open seasons are published there are invariably a number of people who do not
approve of them and voice their dissatisfaction in no uncertain manner. It is an absolute
impossibility to frame any regulations, either for birds or fur-bearing animals, which will be
suitable to the varying conditions of the different districts, or even to satisfy the wishes of
everybody in any particular district. Every year reports and recommendations are received
from the various Game Associations, from Game Wardens, trappers, fur-traders, farmers, and
all sorts of people, and there is always a very wide difference of opinion; at any rate, as far as
the seasons for birds and deer are concerned. ,
This year, while the seasons as a whole were probably as little criticized as they ever have
been, the open season for does and the spring trapping of water animals came in for considerable
comment.
With regard to the open season for does, experience has shown, everywhere where game
conservation has been conducted on sane and proper lines, that while the so-called buck law is
an excellent thing, it can be carried to such extremes as to he most injurious. The buck law
was carried to extremes in New Zealand and also in Pennsylvania and New Mexico on this continent. In the first-named country it was actually found necessary to employ numbers of professional hunters to kill off thousands of the females. In Pennsylvania the Game Commission
brought down the wrath of a number of people in the State by permitting the killing of does, and
yet their action in this respect has since proved to have been thoroughly justified. This year, in
New Mexico, does only were allowed to be killed, while in Arizona, where the limit of deer is
two, only one buck was allowed to be killed.    Now, in this Province, the buck law has been in H 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
force for a number of years. That it has been extremely beneficial is beyond doubt, but that the
time had come to kill off some of the surplus does—at any rate, on Vancouver Island and some
of the neighbouring islands—was also beyond doubt. Disease of at least two sorts has
developed amongst the deer on Vancouver Island, and fawns were not as numerous as they'
should have been, and it is more than likely that if a considerable number of deer had been killed
this year, more good than harm would have resulted. As it was, owing to the dryness of the
season, very few deer of either sex were killed and the proportion of does was surprisingly small.
To sum up, it may be said that while it is certainly 'not advisable to allow does to be shot
every year, it might be an advantage to allow a number to be killed occasionally.
One of the greatest problems that the Game Department has to solve is the open season for
muskrats and beaver. The fur-traders of the Coast and many of the trappers were practically
unanimous in favour of fall trapping, whereas in the Interior the trappers generally and most
of the fur-traders approve of spring trapping. Both sides have strong arguments to support
their views. Taking all things into consideration, it seems probable that it is not advisable to
have the same open season for muskrats and beaver, and that an alteration in the season for
muskrats on the Coast will have to be made next year.
While it may be possible to fix more suitable seasons for trapping, they never, owing to the
extreme variety of local conditions, can be made perfectly satisfactory over the whole Province
until all the trappers conserve their trap-lines as they would fur-farms and just trap off what
they can afford to take without danger of depleting their stock. AArhen such a happy state of
affairs comes, a long open season can be allowed. Then the trappers can make their catches at
the time that suits their particular area. AATith the new regulations regarding trap-lines having
such a beneficial effect, there Is every reason to hope that this state of affairs may come about
before very long.
THE GOVERNMENT GAME FARM.
It is greatly to be regretted that the Game Farm was ever located in its present position.
That anybody with the slightest knowledge of what a suitable site should be like should have
chosen such a place is beyond comprehension. The .first principle in choosing a location for a
Game Farm is to make sure that the soil is fertile and that there is an adequate supply of water.
The present site has neither. The land, which is rough and stony and badly cut up, is covered
with a dense growth of scrub timber, which makes a splendid refuge for vermin of all sorts.
The cost of clearing such land is so immense that it would have been far cheaper to have bought
outright cleared land with fertile soil.
Apart from the fact that the land is so stony and rough that it is impossible to raise any
respectable-sized crops or any green feed on it for the birds, there is no water that is fit for
human consumption, nor even the birds. A well was dug, but an analysis of the water showed
it to be so impure that it had to be condemned. Consequently all water has to be drawn from
a neighbouring farm.
Another enormous disadvantage to the place is that the whole of the land that has been
cleared is taken up with what few pens we have. Consequently there is no rearing-field and
one has had to be rented nearly a mile away. This, of course, adds considerably to the cost of
each bird raised.
The result is that we have a place that is, absolutely unsuitable for raising pheasants and is
not worth spending any more money on. To make matters even worse, the property is only
leased from the City of Victoria, and if abandoned the greater part of the money put into it
would be lost. As a matter of fact, it would be far more economical in the end to abandon the
present farm for rearing purposes. A new one should be started in a place where the soil is
fertile and where there is plenty of pure water. The present farm could be made use of for
holding over the winter any birds that were required for the Interior.
AVAPITI IN THE OKANAGAN AND QUEEN CHARLOTTE ISLANDS.
This winter there have again been complaints about the damage done by the wapiti that
were released in the Okanagan District. Investigation showed that the complaints received of
damage to orchards were genuine. Every effort was made to drive the marauders away, and
although at first some success was met with, it was subsequently-found that they continued to
do damage in spite of all that could be done. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 9
It was most unfortunate that whoever was responsible for the release of the animals should
have chosen to place them in the Okanagan District, when there are numerous areas farther
north where they would have thrived and been away from fruit-orchards and cultivated land.
As it was apparent that immediate action had to be taken to relieve the situation, an attempt
was made to catch the greater part of the herd and move them to a more suitable location.
Unfortunately, just when preparations were nearly complete, the weather suddenly turned mild
and the wapiti left for the high altitudes, where it was impossible to trap them. Next winter
work will again be commenced as soon as they begin their raids on the orchards.
The Department was fortunate in obtaining eight wapiti through the courtesy of Mr. J. B.
Harkin, Commissioner, Canadian National Parks, Ottawa, and these wapiti are to be shipped
from Buffalo Park, Wainwright, Alberta, for liberation on Queen Charlotte Islands. Mr. A. G.
Smith, Superintendent of the Park, in making arrangements for the transportation of these
animals.
It will be a matter of satisfaction to every sportsman in the Province that the liberation of
these wapiti will take place. The Game Department extends many thanks to Mr. Harkin and
Mr. Smith for their assistance in obtaining these animals, and also to Sir Henry Thornton,
President of the Canadian National Railways, who is kindly allowing these animals to be shipped
without charge.
Note.—Since writing this report these wapiti have been liberated on Queen Charlotte Islands.
They arrived in excellent condition, due, no doubt, to the attention given them during their
journey by Mr. W. Davison, who accompanied the shipment from Buffalo Park.
GAME-BIRD FARMING REGULATIONS.
Regulations covering the rearing of game birds in captivity for market purposes have
recently been passed, and a number of applications for permits to engage in the business of
game-bird farming have been received. Fourteen permits have already been issued, while many
others are preparing to go into the business. It is expected that in a few years' time there will
be a large number of game-bird farms in operation.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Every effort has been made to afford the game of the Province during the year 1929 as much
protection as possible, and at this time the best of thanks are tendered to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police and the members of his force for their very great assistance and co-operation.
Thanks are also extended to the Game Associations and sportsmen and public in general for
their very useful co-operation during the year.
"A" DIVISION   (VANCOUVER ISLAND AND PORTIONS OF THE
MAINLAND COAST).
By J. AV. Graham, District Game AA^arden.
I beg to submit the following report covering game conditions in " A " Division for the year
ended December 31st, 1929 :—
Game Animals.
Rear.—Black bear are apparently on the increase throughout A'ancouver Island and have
been reported as killing sheep in the Courtenay, Qualicum, and Alberni Districts.
Deer.—These animals are plentiful throughout the whole of Vancouver Island. The opening
of the season on does for a period of two weeks can have done nothing but good, as it is felt
that by allowing this short open season the surplus number of does will have been cut down
considerably, and as a result will probably prevent the spreading of disease, which has been
reported in different areas, and will assist in breeding.
Many farmers have complained of the destruction caused by deer to their crops, and it
would seem that as the does have received protection for a number of years they have become
more or less domesticated, and as a result have caused considerable damage to crops.
Disease in deer has been reported in the Alberni and Courtenay Districts.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti are to be found in the Cowichan Lake, Courtenay, and Alberni
Districts. In the Cowichan Lake area (Shaw Creek Game Reserve) these animals appear to
be on the increase, as several calves and yearlings have been observed. In the Courtenay and
Alberni Districts no definite information has as yet been obtained, but from reports gathered H 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
from trappers and cruisers it would seem that elk are increasing throughout the whole of
Arancouver Island, but that this increase is kept down to a certain extent through the damage
done by cougar killing young calves in the spring of the year.
Mountain-goat.—No reports have been received in regard to the mountain-goat liberated in
the Shaw Creek Game Reserve a few years ago, but these animals are plentiful at Seymour,
Knight, and Kingcome Inlets.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Reports on hand would indicate that beaver are not plentiful, while mink, weasel, otter,
marten, and fisher are scarce. Racoon are fairly plentiful in some parts of this Division,
particularly on the west coast. Muskrats appear to be increasing rapidly and several complaints
have been received from farmers in the Cowichan and Saanich Districts regarding damage done
to crops and agricultural lands.
Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue and Ruffed).—In the Courtenay and Alberni areas blue grouse appear to be
holding their own, while throughout the remainder of Arancouver Island these birds have been
very scarce.
Throughout the southern portions of Vancouver Island, including the Nanaimo District,
ruffed grouse have not increased, while in the Courtenay, Alberni, and northern sections they
are reported as being fairly plentiful in some areas.
Pheasants.—These birds are not very plentiful on Arancouver Island. At least this has been
the case during the past few seasons, although it is anticipated that next year the stand of
pheasants will have increased sufficiently in numbers to warrant an excellent hunting season.
Quail.—In some localities quail have increased, but, taking the whole of Arancouver Island
into consideration, they are very scarce.
Partridge.—In the Saanich and Victoria Districts partridge are reported as scarce. There
are very few of these birds in any other part of Arancouver Island.
Migratory Game Biros.
Owing to the mild weather conditions very few ducks and geese were killed during the
present -season, although on the west coast and northern portions of the island large numbers
were seen, and this also applies to Knight Inlet, Wakeman and Thompson Sounds. There would
appear to be no decrease or increase in the number of brant to be found in this district each year.
Whistling swans are to be found in small numbers in the Courtenay District, in the vicinity
of the Campbell River Lakes, and they are also to be found in small numbers in other parts of
the Division.
Shore-birds were fairly plentiful throughout Arancouver Island.
Vermin.
A considerable number of cougar have been killed in the Division, and Game Wardens have
accounted for quite a number of noxious birds and domestic cats that have become wild. For
several years wolves have been reported as nearly extinct on Vancouver Island, but it would
now seem that these animals are again putting in an appearance.
Game-protection.
The districts in this Division were continually patrolled throughout the year and the Game
Regulations strictly enforced. Seventy-nine convictions for violation of the " Game Act " were
obtained, including the five cases under section 11 of the Act, which prohibits hunting at night.
In all of these five cases prison sentences were imposed. Pit-lamping or night hunting is considered a very serious violation of the " Game Act," and, needless to say, it is very difficult to
apprehend any one who is in the habit of pit-lamping.
The members of the British Columbia Police Force have co-operated with the Game AVardens
in this Division at all times.
Game Propagation.
Elk Lake Game Farm, near Victoria, is responsible for a considerable number of pheasants
being liberated on Vancouver Island, and as a result an increase in the number of pheasants
will no doubt be noted during the coming year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 11
Game Reserves.
There are a number of game reserves on Vancouver Island, which have been carefully
patrolled. These reserves no doubt provide excellent game-breeding areas, resulting in good
hunting in the outlying or adjacent districts.
Fur Trade.
The majority of the fur trade is carried on along the west coast and most of the fur trapped
or purchased is shipped direct to Vancouver.
Fur-farms.
An ever-increasing number of fur-farm permits are issued each year. This industry seems
to be well established throughout Vancouver Island.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The system of registering trap-lines is meeting with the approval of the majority of trappers
and the system appears to be working very satisfactorily.
Special Patrols.
Several special patrols were made during the year to points on the west coast and in other
parts of the Division.
Hunting Accidents.
Eight hunting accidents were reported throughout the Division during the year 1929, four
of these proving fatal.
On September 14th, in the vicinity of Camp 3 of the Comox Logging Company, Henry Parkin
was shot in the leg by Emil Lehtonen. Both of these men were out in an area where underbrush
and willow-growth prevented them from seeing each other. A buck deer jumped out between
them and Lehtonen fired at the deer, but missed the animal, the shot striking Parkin in the leg.
Richard Coverdale was killed at Sooke by his brother, Lynn Coverdale, on September 26th.
On October 5th Joseph Krall, of Nanaimo, was accidentally shot in the right leg by his companion, Harold Odgers Brodwick.
Bernard Brown, aged 16, holder of a minor's licence under section 29 of the " Game Act,"
was out hunting with Anthony Hillyard, aged 18, in the vicinity of Maple Bay Mountain, near
Duncan. On proceeding down the mountain Brown slipped on the rocks and the shotgun which
he was carrying discharged, resulting in a wound in his left thigh ranging upwards into his
intestines.    Brown died at the hospital at Duncan on the evening of October 15th.
William W. Williamson, of Victoria, shot his right thumb off at Port Alberni on October
29th while hunting.
Louis Godtel was killed in mistake for a deer at Sooke on November 18th by the Rev. S.
Lundie, who was charged with manslaughter.
D. E. Morgan, of Ladysmith, accidentally shot himself whilst loading his rifle, a 32-calibre
Winchester, on November 19th.
Arthur Lee was shot through the shoulder while hunting by Robert Donald Tassie on
December 13th, for which Tassie has been charged under the Criminal Code.
Summary of Game Conditions.
In general, game conditions throughout the Division have been very good. Visitors to
Vancouver Island appear to have obtained good results while hunting in this district. Many of
the local hunters obtained their bag limit on deer during the season.
The hatching season for game birds was not satisfactory and this no doubt resulted in the
scarcity of all game birds throughout the Division.
Taking into consideration the fact that this Division of the newly formed Game Department
did not become organized until June, I feel that the Game Wardens did excellent work in
protecting the game in the Division. "B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Game Wardens in " B " Division.
Game Animals.
Bear.—In the Nelson District black bear have been plentiful, but owing to poor food conditions in the hills they have come down to the lowlands and become a nuisance to settlers.
They have been heavily hunted.
Grizzly Bear.—Throughout the Division grizzly bear are numerous, especially in the East
Kootenays. The nature of the country in some parts of the Division makes it very difficult to
hunt grizzly bear and very few of these animals are being killed.
Caribou.—Woodland caribou are reported as scarce in the Bayonne Range, south of Nelson,
at the headwaters of the Crawford and Granite Creeks. As far as can be ascertained, the herds
are increasing very slowly and do not appear to migrate.
The principal caribou herds are in the Big Bend District, to the north of the main line of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, where they are fairly plentiful.
Deer.—Mule-deer are plentiful, due, no doubt, to the fact that during the past few years,
owing to the late snowfall, they have not been hunted to any extent. The loss through predatory
animals also has been small.
White-tail deer are holding their own and are increasing in some parts of the Division.
No disease appears to have been noted, but one or two mule-deer taken near Canal Flats
showed signs of being diseased.
Moose.—These animals are comparatively scarce, but are found in small numbers on AVhite
River and in the vicinity of White Swan Lake. A few have been seen on Copper Lake and on
the west side of the Columbia River, near Torrent. In the Fernie District they are found in
odd numbers.
Mountain-goat.—In the Boundary District, in that portion known as the Chopaka District,
these animals are scarce, whereas in the Kootenay Districts they are quite plentiful.
Mountain-goat are very well able to take care of themselves owing to the more or less
inaccessible type of country they inhabit, and it would seem that there is very little danger of
any decrease, as they are very little hunted, except by an occasional trophy-hunter.
Mountain-sheep.—Mountain-sheep are increasing to a slight extent south-east of Penticton,
while they are numerous throughout the East Kootenay District, and are reported as increasing
throughout this area, especially in the Elk River Game Reserve, Fording River, Sheep Creek,
Lamb Creek, parts of AVhite River, and near the Kootenay.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti are very numerous on the White River and Sheep Creek and during
the year have been observed on the west side of the Columbia River. Only the oldest Indians
remember having seen wapiti on this side, but old skulls to be found over a wide area would
indicate that years ago there was an extensive distribution of wapiti in this district.
'In the Cranbrook area wapiti are on the increase, and as a matter of fact these animals
have been observed in some parts of the district where they have not been seen in late years.
In the vicinity of Dooley and Sulphur Creeks and Wigwam and Lodgepole Rivers wapiti are
to be found in fair numbers, whereas along the Elk and Fording Rivers they appear to be very
numerous and are gradually increasing and spreading over the adjoining country.
Fur-bearing Animals.
In the Nelson District the beaver are decreasing, and as they are so easily trapped in this
section it would seem that there is no possibility of any great increase being noticed in future
years.
In the Kootenay District beaver and muskrats are on the decrease, but in some sections
they are about holding their own; but both of these animals are trapped so extensively that
there is very little possibility of any great increase being noted.
Throughout the Boundary District beaver have been heavily trapped, whereas muskrats are
to be found in fairly plentiful numbers.
Fisher, fox, and otter apparently are scarce throughout the Division, while lynx, marten,
and mink have been trapped in fairly large numbers. In some areas the latter-mentioned
animals are scarce. REPORT OF PROA1NCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 13
Weasel are reported as being far too plentiful, as apparently they are doing untold damage
to game birds in most parts of the Division.
AVolverine have been scarce.
Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue and Ruffed).—The protection afforded ruffed grouse has certainly increased
the stand of these birds, but as yet they are only to be found in small numbers in the Nelson
District.
In the Canal Flats area these birds are numerous, due no doubt to the excellent hatching
season this year and the fact that a closed season has been in effect on these birds.
Blue and Franklin grouse are fairly numerous in most parts and in some sections they are
scarce.
Ptarmigan.—Ptarmigan are found in small numbers in the Bayonne Ranges, between Salmo
and Creston, and some are reported at the headwaters of the Little Slocan River. In some parts
of the Fernie District ptarmigan are very plentiful, especially in the higher ranges.
In the Similkameen Valley European partridges have increased to a certain extent, but it
is doubtful if the southern part of the Okanagan District- will ever become known as a good
partridge country. These birds are found near Osoyoos and have been the cause of some
complaint by doing damage to the canteloupe-crop.    This always happens during a dry year.
Pheasants.—In the Penticton District pheasants have decreased considerably during the
past few years, and it is suggested that, so far as this district is concerned, the season for the
hunting of these birds could very well be shortened.
In the Nelson District pheasants are scarce, while in the Creston area they appear to be
increasing slightly.
Quail.—In the locality north-east of Penticton quail are to be found in fairly good numbers,
but they eafinot be considered as plentiful in any portion of the Division.
Prairie-chicken.—These birds are to be found in small numbers in one or two portions of the
Boundary District and near Wardner, Cranbrook, and Elko, but they apparently are not
increasing.
Migratory Game Birds.
The only shooting obtained in the Nelson District on ducks and geese is in connection with
local or southern-bred birds. The northern migration during the past year was very disappointing. There is a certain amount of agitation in this district for changes in the season and bag
limits.
In the Fernie District ducks and geese are found only in the western portion to any extent
north and west of Cranbrook, in the Wasa area, and along the Kootenay River. These birds,
however, have been more plentiful in the Canal Flats District.
In the Boundary District duck-shooting has not been up to standard. Better shooting no
doubt would be obtained in this district if suitable food was planted in the various ponds and
lakes to be found in this area. The Vaseaux Lake Bird Sanctuary has undoubtedly been a great
help in conserving the Canada geese.
A'ermin.
Very few cougar have been killed in the Boundary District, although several reports of the
presence of these animals in the Ashnola and Kettle River Districts were received. A number
of cougar were killed in the Canal Flats District, but there were very few reports of these
animals being seen in other portions of the Division.
Coyotes have been hunted to a great extent throughout the Division owing to the high price
obtained for the pelts on the fur market. These animals have not been as numerous as in past
years.
Crows and magpies are reported as being very numerous in the vicinity of Canal Flats and
generally throughout the Division, while the hawks and owls have not been as plentiful as in
past years.
Game-protection.
Regular patrols have been carried on throughout the Division, and this has resulted in a
few prosecutions for violations of the " Game Act." Every effort has been made to protect and
conserve the game of the Division and many lengthy patrols have been undertaken with this
object in view.    The sportsmen and residents in general have assisted greatly in the enforce- ment of the provisions of the " Game Act" during the year, and the members of the British
Columbia Police Force have co-operated to a great extent in protecting the game.
Game Reserves.
Vaseaux Lake Bird Sanctuary is the only reserve in the Boundary District, but this
sanctuary has been greatly instrumental in the increase of the Canada goose.
Moose have put in an appearance in the Elk River Game Reserve, while other game animals
are very numerous in this reserve, which acts as a feeder to the adjacent and outlying districts
and is considered as one of the most beneficial reserves in the Province. A few lengthy patrols
have been made into this reserve.
The national parks in this Division are all excellently stocked with game, resulting in better
hunting conditions in the surrounding country. In the AArest Kootenay District there is an area
set aside each year under the Game Regulations as a refuge for game birds. Ducks visit this
area to some extent during the fall, and as this refuge has been in effect for a number of years
these birds seem to realize that they have protection there and a chance to rest.
Fur Trade.
A good deal of the fur caught in the Fernie District is shipped to Vancouver, while some is
purchased by transient fur-buyers.
The difficulty encountered last year in regard to trappers, particularly Indians, taking their
fur across the International Boundary-line, and selling to the United States buyers without
paying the necessary royalty, has been practically eliminated through the co-operation of the
various State Game AVardens to the south.
Fur-farms.
Fur-farming has increased throughout the Division and practically every fur-bearing animal
found in the Province is being farmed. There apparently has been no outstanding success in
fur-farming in this Division, although a number of farmers have been fairly successful. A number of muskrat-farms are in operation, one of the largest being located near Edgewater and
another near Revelstoke.
Registration of Trap-lines.
The best types of trappers approve of the present principle governing the registration of
trap-lines, and there is no doubt that as a result of these regulations the trappers have been
conserving the fur-bearing animals to be found on their respective trap-lines.
Most of the Division is now covered by registered trap-lines.
Special Patrols.
Two special patrols were made into the Creston and Kootenay Flats area. Owing to
excessively low water the conditions of these districts, in so far as migratory birds is concerned,
was deplorable.
A lengthy patrol was made into the Wigwam River District, and also to Long Lake and
Little Sand Creek, and into the Elk River Game Reserve.
Hunting Accidents.
On November 15th, 1929, W. George Morrow, of Penticton, was found dead in his orchard
as a result of the accidental discharge of the shotgun which he was carrying.    There were no
other hunting accidents in the Division.
Summary.
Conditions, in so far as big game is concerned, have been excellent during the past year,
as in most parts of the Division the stands of big-game animals have increased.
The breeding conditions, in so far as game birds are concerned, were not very satisfactory,
but an increase has been noted in the number of most kinds of game birds throughout the
Division.
Fur-bearing animals, especially beaver and muskrats, are on the decrease, but no doubt
this condition will change in a few years' time as a result of the regulations covering the
registration of trap-lines, as it is felt that as soon as the registered trappers become acquainted
with the fact that their trap-lines have been allotted to them from year to year, they will see
that it is in their interests to conserve the fur-bearing animals found on their respective lines. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 15
" C " DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By District Game Warden R. D. Sulivan.
I beg to furnish you with a report on game matters in " C " Division for 1929.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bears are quite plentiful throughout the Division and a steady increase can be
noticed since it was made illegal to trap these animals. Several complaints of depredations
committed by these animals against sheep were reported and on three separate occasions the
bear was destroyed.
Grizzly can be found in the Monashee and headwaters of the Kettle River, also Clearwater
River and the Quesnel Lake and Bowron Lake areas, and seem to be holding their own.
Caribou.—Caribou have been seen in fair numbers on the North Thompson, Clearwater
Summits, and Azure Lake areas, and are also quite plentiful on the summits near Quesnel and
Bowron Lakes. A few good heads have been secured. The caribou that used to frequent the
plateaus and headwaters of Kettle River in fair numbers seem to all have left this area, no
signs having been seen for several years.
Wapiti (Elk).—About twenty head of wapiti have been observed at Rocky Point, which lies
about 17 miles south of Kelowna, on the east side of Okanagan Lake. These animals are from
the herd that was liberated at Adra, on the Kettle Valley Railway, in 1927, and are increasing
and doing very well.
On the Yalakom Game Reserve the wapiti are doing fairly well.
Sheep.—In the Okanagan, on Shorts Creek, there is a band of sheep which is estimated at
about 100 head. This band does not seem to increase and there is no doubt that some of these
sheep migrate, as old ones have been seen on Bear Creek, on the west side of Okanagan Lake;
also two were seen at Squilax, near Chase, on the Canadian Pacific Railway, previous to those
that were liberated. There is no doubt also that the cougar, coyote, and eagle are responsible
for the destruction of a certain number of these animals.
The band of fifty head of sheep that were liberated in 1927 at Squilax, and were shipped
from Banff, have done very well and a number of lambs have been seen. A few of these sheep
have been observed crossing the Shuswap River, working north. The range where the sheep
were turned out is small and there is no doubt that they will continue to migrate.
There were also fifty head of sheep turned out at Spences Bridge in 1927; these also have
been reported as doing well. Although a few have been seen on the Canadian National Railway
near Spences Bridge, I think the majority have worked back towards the Fraser River.
In the Yalakom Game Reserve the mountain-sheep are reported as getting scarce.
Mountain-goat.—On the North Thompson River mountain-goat are in fair numbers; also on
the high mountains along the Clearwater and Quesnel Lake. Few of these animals are killed
owing to the rough country in which they are found.
In the Yalakom Game Reserve they are reported as being scarce.
Moose.—Moose are steadily increasing in the Silwhoiakun Plateau, north-west of Kamloops;
also on Tranquille Creek and Deadman Creek, where a few years ago they had never been seen
in this area. In the Quesnel Lake, Swamp River, and Bowron Lake Districts these animals are
quite plentiful and a number of good heads were brought out by hunters during the season.
Deer.—Deer are reported as generally plentiful practically throughout this Division, and
there is no doubt that these animals are increasing. The winter of 1928-29 and up to the
present this winter have not been hard on the deer, there not being much snow and very little
crust. There were quite a lot of deer killed throughout the Division during the open season,
but this being the first time for several years that does were opened, for a period of two weeks,
there were not as many killed as one would expect, as the deer did not come down off the higher
mountains till late owing to the light snowfall.
White-tail deer are practically extinct in this Division.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Beaver have been very heavily trapped and in most districts are very scarce, the
reason no doubt being the big demand and high prices for the pelts of these animals.
Fisher.—Fisher seem to be holding their own and, if anything, are increasing. H 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fox.—Several fox-pelts have been brought in, which were mostly cross-fox from the North
Thompson area, where it is reported by trappers that there is quite a noticeable increase.
Mink.—Mink are not plentiful.
Lynx.—Throughout the Division lynx are scarce, but are showing up a little better than
last season.
Marten.—Marten are scarce, except perhaps north-east of the Clearwater River, which flows
into the North Thompson River, one trapper having brought out thirty-seven very fine skins
from that district.
Otter.—The otter are very scarce.
Weasel.—Throughout most parts of the Division weasel are quite plentiful.
Muskrats.—Muskrats are reported as fairly plentiful.
The general fur-catch has been considerably below the average and there has been a general
drop of prices in the fur market.
Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue).—Blue grouse were fairly plentiful in the Kamloops area,.but in the Okanagan
and Lillooet Districts were reported as scarce.
Grouse (Ruffed).—Ruffed grouse were fairly plentiful in parts of the Cariboo, also in certain
spots in the Kamloops area, but are scarce in most parts of " C " Division, especially Okanagan
and Lillooet Districts.
Partridge.—These birds are not nearly as plentiful as they were in the Okanagan Districts,
but have increased considerably in the Kamloops area and have spread from this area as far
west as Spences Bridge.
Grouse (Franklin).—Generally scarce, except perhaps in the Barkerville area.
Pheasants.—Pheasants are reported as plentiful in the South Okanagan, but not as plentiful
in the Vernon District. A great number of these birds were killed in the nesting season by an
invasion of weasels in the Kelowna and Vernon areas and as far west as Chase. At Tranquille
these birds are reported as doing well and are increasing on Hat and Cache Creeks.
Prairie-chicken.—In the Okanagan prairie-chicken are very scarce, but seem to be increasing
slightly in the Kamloops area.    They are fairly plentiful in the Chilcotin and Cariboo Districts.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks, Geese, and Brant.—These birds were not as plentiful in the Kamloops area as in
past seasons, and the reason no doubt is on account of so many of the small lakes drying up
owing to the amount of dry seasons experienced in this district. Ducks were reported as
plentiful in the Okanagan, also in the Chilcotin and Cariboo.
Geese were fairly plentiful in the Cariboo and Chilcotin, but there were not as many as
usual stopped off on their southern migration as in most years in the Kamloops area.
A few swans were reported as being seen, but they are not plentiful. Snipe were reported
as scarce.
ArERMIN.
Coyotes.—Although a large quantity of coyotes have been trapped this season, there is a
noted decrease in the number brought in to that of 1928-29. A number of complaints were
received that coyotes were killing sheep and in most instances it was found that bears were to
blame. Two reports received of coyotes killing sheep were attended to and in both cases the
killers were shot. There is no doubt that in several cases the sheepmen are to blame for their
flocks being-bothered by coyotes and bear, as instead of burning the carcasses of the sheep which
die or are accidentally killed, they have been left to rot, which will naturally bring coyotes and
bears from long distances, and after getting the taste of mutton they are very liable to follow
up the main flock and kill indiscriminately.
Owls.—Practically all through the Interior owls were very numerous and were very
destructive to the grouse, and also destroy a lot of muskrats. A number of these birds have
been brought in for the 50-eent bounty, but not as many as were expected.
Crows and- Magpies.—These birds are very numerous.
Hawks.—Hawks do a great deal of damage, especially the American goshawk, and although
a number of these birds are killed each year they do not seem to decrease in numbers.
Cougars.—Seven cougars have been killed in the North Thompson area to date. Five of
these were killed by two predatory-animal hunters from AArashington, who have been hunting REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 17
cougar in the North Thompson area and Adams Lake for the last two months, and intend to
continue doing so until spring.    There have not been as many reports of cougar as last season.
Game-protection.
The interest which the officials responsible for the protection of game have taken in this
work is demonstrated to a certain degree by the number of prosecutions which have taken
place during the year, there having been in this Division 140 prosecutions, resulting in 127
convictions, seven dismissals, two withdrawals, and four gaol sentences. The fines amounted to
$2,396 and $254.50 costs.
There has been confiscated to the Government one shotgun, six rifles, thirty-three traps, six
beaver, two otter, eight muskrat, and one marten pelt, and one moose-head. A considerable
amount of venison and also grouse was confiscated and handed to the Kamloops Hospital.
In December, owing to a heavy fall of snow in the Okanagan, it was found necessary to feed
the pheasants for a short time. A Chinook wind then took nearly all the snow and the feeding
was practically all stopped.
Propagation.
The pheasants that were shipped from the Elk Lake Game Farm and liberated in the
Kamloops and AArestwold Districts have done very well, and it is to be hoped that more shipments can be obtained in the spring.
Game Reserves.
On the Yalakom Game Reserve, from reports received, neither the mountain sheep or goat
seem to be increasing. AVapiti seem to be doing fairly well, although up to the present it has
been hard to get an estimate as to the amount there are on this reserve. Deer are plentiful
as well as black and brown bear.    There are also reported to be a few grizzly.
Moose are very plentiful on the Bowron Lake Reserve and general game conditions are
reported as good. Beaver are doing well and are increasing. There has been a certain amount
of talk that the people in the Barkerville area would like to see the Bowron Lake Game Reserve
thrown open. This would seem a pity, as being the centre of a big-game and fur-bearing animal
country it makes a great place for game-protection and a breeding-ground for these animals.
Fur Trade.
The trading in general has been much lighter than usual this last season owing to smaller
catches, and also the fur market has been very uncertain and prices a good deal lower than in
the season 1928-29. There is still a certain amount of ill-feeling among the old fur-traders who
have stores, against the transient traders who have only to pay the same licence and have not
to contend with any overhead expense.
Fur-farming.
We are continually receiving applications for fur-farm permits, which are all investigated
by the Game AVardens as to the advisability of issuing these permits. This business is increasing steadily every year, and we now have a number of fox-farms in this Division, which, from
reports, in most cases are doing very well, but naturally take some time to put on a paying
basis.    There are also several mink, fisher, marten, and muskrat farms.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
I consider that the work of registering the trap-lines is going along very satisfactorily,
considering the size of the country and the difficulty of being able to get in touch with the
trappers. Now that the Department has issued pamphlets governing the regulations for registration of trap-lines, for issuing to trappers when applying for their licences, it will greatly
simplify matters.
Considering the number of applications that have been received for registered trap-lines,
very few have been refused, and the general feeling among the trappers is that registration is
the only system to regulate trapping.
The Indian Agents and Indians express themselves satisfied with the treatment they have
received in this Division and we have done our best to co-operate with them. H 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
There are now approximately 750 trap-lines in this Division. There is no doubt that the
registered trap-line holder will, in most cases, conserve his fur, and not trap too closely, so that
he will be able to take a certain number of animals each year.
Guides.—The system of registering- guides seems to be working very satisfactorily, and the
guide having to report before proceeding on a trip and on his return, giving the names of his
party and information as to game killed, is of great assistance to the Department. No complaints as to the actions of any guide have been received during the last big-game season.
Special Patrols.
A number of special patrols have been made in this Division during the last year and a
considerable amount of useful data obtained, and now that the Department has been able to
appoint more Game Wardens it will be possible to patrol the Division much more thoroughly.
Hunting Accidents.
Three hunting accidents occurred in this Division during the hunting season.
On November 29th, 1929, on Blue Nose Mountain, in the Vernon District, Peter Reed
Finlayson was shot by a bullet from a Lee Enfield 303 rifle in the hands of his hunting companion, Thomas Llewellyn Lewis.
On the day in question Finlayson and Lewis, who were good friends, went out hunting in
the Blue Nose Mountain District. They left the car at the " headgates " of the Grey Canal and
went up the mountain hunting together. They ate lunch about 11 a.m. and then decided to part.
Lewis went down to the right of a ridge and Finlayson to the left. Lewis soon jumped two
does, took a shot and followed them down to a thicket of willow and alder, saw a movement and
thought it was the does, and took another shot. On arriving at the spot he heard a moan and
found he had shot and killed his partner. Lewis carried the dead man down to the car and
thence brought him into Vernon, reporting to Sergeant R. AV. Bowden, of the Provincial Police.
Lewis has since been prosecuted and committed for trial and will come up at the Spring
Assizes at Vernon.
Silas Salvanes Malpass met his death while hunting near Hupel, B.C., in company with his
chum, Wentworth Patterson Lynes, who accidentally shot Malpass. The following is the statement of Wentworth Patterson Lynes:—
" My name is Wentworth Patterson Lynes. I reside at Armstrong, B.C., working on my
father's farm. The deceased, Silas Malpass, and I went hunting together on Wednesday,
November 27th, 1929. We went up the Mabel Lake Road in my car. We hunted on the range
back of Hupel. On the night of November 27th, 1929, we camped at the ranch of Charlie
AArallace. On the morning of November 28th, 1929, we hunted over the same country as on the
27th. On the morning of the 28th we started about 8.30 a.m. up Cooks Creek, got half-way up
the mountain and separated. Silas was supposed to go about 2 miles to the right and I was
to go straight up and meet him at the top of the mountain. About thirty minutes after we
separated I climbed up the mountain and got into a thicket.
" I heard a sound and thought it was a deer. I also saw something moving. I lost sight
of it for about 10 yards, caught sight of it again and shot. I heard a groan and went over
between 50 and 60 yards and found Silas Malpass. He was lying on his face. I turned him
over and asked him what he thought I had better do. All he said was: ' Couldn't you see the
difference, Went? ' Then "he became unconscious. I then started down the hill for help. I fired
six shots off at intervals. A farmer heard my shots and answered. I went part way down the
hill to meet him. When we got back Si was dead. I stayed beside the body while the farmer
went down the hill to notify the Coroner and Police. The morning was very foggy when I fired
the shot. I thought my partner would be 2 miles to the right of me. I did not know anything
about a wounded deer before the Police and Coroner arrived. The dead boy and I were friends
and I had known him for about four years.    I never hunted with him before."
W. P. Lynes has been committed for trial on a charge of manslaughter to be tried at the
Spring Assizes at Vernon, 1930.
Alcock Emerson McCubbin, of Merritt, B.C., was out hunting at Rush Lake on the morning
of September 15th, 1929. He had shot two ducks and to retrieve them he took off his clothing
and swam a short distance into the lake. He got the ducks and turned to swim back. His wife
and small boy (6 years old) saw him sink beneath the water, never to reappear. The body was
recovered seven days after the accident. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 19
Summary.
Game matters in general for this Division for the year 1929 have been very satisfactory.
A number of big-game hunters came into the Division during the hunting season and in most
cases good success was obtained. A large number of moose-heads were taken out of the Cariboo
and exceptionally good sport was obtained in the Swamp River, Quesnel, and Barkerville
Districts. It was noticed that not as many parties went into hunt in the Quesnel Lake
District as in previous years.
" D " DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE
RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By District Game AAtarden T. ArAN Dyk.
Game Animals.
All species, with a few local exceptions, are reported as plentiful as ever.
Moose.—I am pleased to report that moose have been seen farther west than last year, and
are now established in the Lakelse Lake and Kitimat River areas; also on the Dean (Kimsquit)
River. These animals are increasing very rapidly and may now be found throughout the
Division, with the exception of the Coast area.
Caribou.—Caribou are numerous and on the increase everywhere, with the exception of the
AVhitesail-Tetachuck Lake area, where, owing to indiscriminate killing by Chilcotins, Cluskus,
and Ulgacho Indians, these animals are now practically extinct. A close season, covering that
portion of " D " Division lying to the south of the Canadian National Railway (Prince Rupert
line) and west of the Fraser River, is recommended.
Wapiti.—Proof that wapiti were found in the Peace River area in the past has been fully
established, antlers having been found in the vicinity of the Moberley and Beatton Rivers. One
antler is now on view at Taylor Landing and a complete set at the Fort St. John Hotel.
The eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains being highly suited to the needs of these animals,
and in view of the northerly migration of the Jasper Park wapiti, prospects are that these
animals will at some future date establish themselves in the Peace River basin. In order to
assist in this natural restocking process a close season on wapiti north of the Canadian National
Railway should be maintained over a period of years.
Sheep (Mountain).—Reports received from the various guides indicate that sheep are
numerous north of the Peace River. Tracks have been seen in the vicinity of Little Parle Pas
Rapids on the Peace River, where a crossing is reported to exist. A nice band of Stone sheep
was discovered at the head of the Ottertail River, this being in the neighbourhood of the above-
mentioned crossing, so we may assume that the range of this specie extends to the south of the
Peace River.    As suggested in last year's report, a bag limit of one sheep only is recommended.
Mountain-goat.—Goats are very numerous and in no danger of extinction.
Deer.—Deer are increasing throughout the district. The open season on does has been
widely criticized. A great number of sportsmen are of the opinion that the killing of does will
never increase the number of bucks, but will be the means, if allowed to go on, of completely
exterminating the species. The killing of does was never suggested by the writer, but recommend that a reduced bag limit of two bucks for the AATestern District and one for the Eastern
District be adopted.
Bear.—Black bear are increasing. Grizzly bear are quite numerous. A bag limit of one
only for the whole Province is suggested.
Kermodei Bear.—No further data on these species.
Fur-bearing Animals.
The regulations as enacted for the current trapping season received favourable comments
from all trappers. A similar one is recommended for next season. A number of trap-lines were
visited during the year and a substantial increase in the number of fur-bearers, especially
beaver, was noticed.    Beaver signs are very numerous on the Parsnip and Upper Peace Rivers.
I am very pleased to report that the number of trappers who look upon their trap-lines as fur-
farms is steadily increasing, and when the registration of trap-line scheme is fully grasped by
all a greater increase of trapper-fur-farmers may be anticipated. H 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Birds.
Grouse.—Grouse, with the exception of the pintail, are quite numerous west of the Rocky
Mountains.    Pintail grouse, on the other hand, are in great numbers on the east of the mountain.
Regulations covering the open season and bag limits similar to the ones in vogue last year
are recommended.
Migratory Game Birds.
Eastern District.—Owing to early frosts, causing the birds to migrate in late October or
beginning of November, numerous requests have been received to advance the season to
September 1st in each year, which is recommended.
Western District.—Queen Charlotte Islands offers the best shooting in the Division.
The Mainland Coast affords good shooting in the earlier part of the season. The latter part,
although as good in so far as the number of birds is concerned, is, owing to rougher weather, not
appreciated by a great number of hunters. A request has been made by the Prince Rupert Rod
and Gun Club to open the season on September 1st in each year.
Vermin.
Cougars.—Cougars are not numerous in the Division, with the exception of the Bella Coola
and Dean River Valleys, where they are reported in greater numbers. The present bounty seems
to be sufficient incentive to the killing of these animals.
Coyotes.—Coyotes are not quite as numerous as in the past. No adverse comments have
been received at this office regarding the discontinuance of the bounty.
Timber-wolves.—Reports have been received from all districts in the Division regarding the
increasing number of wolves. The present bounty is not sufficient to induce trappers to make
any effort to exterminate the species, and I would recommend that the bounty be increased to
$40, with a proviso that the pelt be forfeited to the Government.
Eagles, Haivks, and Owls.—No complaints have been received regarding owls and hawks.
Eagles are reported in numbers on the Queen Charlotte Islands, the Skeena River (lower), and
on the Middle and Tachi Rivers (in Omineca) ; no efforts are made to kill these predatory birds
and they are therefore increasing rapidly.
Game-protection.
An impi-ovement in game-protection work is apparent in the Division. Prosecutions have
increased by 10 per cent, over last year, showing fifty-four convictions for 1929 to forty-eight in
1928, fifteen cases being brought to Court by Game Wardens, the remainder by Provincial Police
Constables : The Prince Rupert District having 25 prosecutions, against 5 in 1928 ; the Hazelton
District having 6 prosecutions, against 12 in 1928; the Fort George District having 21 prosecutions, against 30 in 1928;  the Peace River District having 2 prosecutions, against 3 in 1928.
Covering an area of approximately 300,000 square miles and owing to the small number of
Game Wardens, enforcement-work is of a necessity carried out by all Police Constables in the
Division. The average Constable may be reckoned upon to do his utmost in enforcing the
" Game Act," but one must bear in mind that, as willing as Constables may be, the very nature
of their various police duties imposes upon them limitations which they cannot ignore, game-work
being more or less neglected in consequence. Therefore a greater number of Game Wardens
should be appointed in this Division in order that game-protection may be carried out with a
greater degree of efficiency.
Propagation.
Game Birds.—Pheasants have from time to time been released in the vicinity of Smithers,
Prince George, and the Queen Charlotte Islands. The latter is the only place where the experiment proved a success and the birds are increasing to such an extent that inbreeding is reported.
The introduction of new stock in the shape of a dozen cocks or more is recommended.
Fur-bearing Animals.—As outlined in last year's report, it would be advisable to introduce
beaver and muskrats on the Queen Charlotte Islands, as conditions there are highly suited to
the needs of these animals.
Game Reserves.
Four reserves are maintained in this Division—Prince George Game Reserve, Lake Kathlyn
Game Reserve, Kaien Island Game Reserve, and Kunghit Game Reserve.    The first three named REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 21
are under constant supervision and are fulfilling the purpose of their creation; i.e., Prince George
and Lake Kathlyn as a retsing-place for migratory birds and Kaien Island as a refuge for deer.
Kunghit Island, owing to its remoteness and lack of transportation facilities, has never
been visited since it was gazetted. Being unprotected, this game reserve is of no value from a
game-propagation point of view, and as the cost of maintaining a Game AVarden in same would
be very costly, I recommend that the reserve be discontinued.
Fur Trade.
No accurate data pertaining to the fur trade are obtainable owing to the bulk of all fur
caught in the north finding its way to Vancouver.
An average catch is anticipated. The prices are expected to improve as the spring catch
of furs is put on the market.
Fur-farms.
One hundred and seventy-four fur-farms are established in this Division, as follows:—
Prince Rupert District      37
Hazelton District     54
Fort George District      62
Peace River District     21
Only a few of these are on a paying basis; the remainder are conducted as experiments.
In order to assist the industry and obtain data on all phases of fur-farming, regular inspections
should be made of the farms and all knowledge obtained should be compiled in booklet form for
distribution to all interested in the industry.
Registration op Trap-lines and Guides.
Trap-Unas.—The number of applications for registration of trap-lines on file at this office
increased by about 34 per cent, over 1928. A total of 1,520 applications are filed by districts,
as follows :—
Prince Rupert  District  637
Hazelton District   195
Fort George District  485
Peace River District    203
A further increase is anticipated for next year, when it is expected the registration will be
completed. The scheme is generally approved by all trappers and traders. The Indian Agents
in this Division have given us valuable assistance in this work, and I respectfully suggest that a
letter of thanks be forwarded to the Indian Commissioner for British Columbia.
Registration's.—The following alterations in the regulations are respectfully suggested:
Certificate of registration to be permanent, providing certificate-holder renews his special firearms licence before November 1st in each year. Special firearms licences to be issued for
specified trap-lines and number of registration certificate to be shown on licence.
Guides.—One hundred and fifty-eight guides have been registered in this Game Division
since the adoption of the regulations (1925). Sixty-three were issued with guides' licences
during the past year.
One hundred non-resident and eight resident big-game hunters, accompanied by guides,
visited different sections of the Division with varying success. The following trophies were
obtained :—
Moose  :  37
Mountain-sheep  40
Bear (black)    26
Caribou    61
Mountain-goat  61
Bear (grizzly)   19
Deer     6
The question of Alberta outfitters operating in British Columbia, in competition with our
own registered guides, has once more been brought to my attention. Legislation providing for a
resident outfitter's licence would be highly appreciated by the majority of guides and outfitters
in the Fort George District. Regulations should also be provided by which persons wishing to act as guides would have
to pass an examination. Successful applicants would be duly registered and issued with a
certificate of registration, such a certificate to be permanent, but liable to cancellation for any
infraction of the " Game Act," at the discretion of the Game Commissioner. Guides' licences
would be issued to certificate-holders only.
Special Patrols.
Numerous patrols were carried out at various periods of the year, the most outstanding ones
being those undertaken by Game AVarden J. S. Clark, Fort Nelson, B.C. This officer in his
various patrols covered in the neighbourhood of 2,800 miles, using a canoe in summer and dog-
team in winter. The Sheep Creek Pass patrol undertaken by Game AVardens J. A. Graham and
A. J. Jank is also worthy of mention. The patrol covering the Sheep Creek-AA'apiti Pass District in the Rocky Mountains was undertaken in order to check up on Alberta big-game hunting
outfits and non-resident Indians reported as hunting in this area. Owing to early snow the
patrol was somewhat curtailed.    However, some 600 miles were covered.
It has been suggested that the Alberta boundary in the vicinity of Sheep Creek Pass should
be visited earlier in the season, July 15th, and I would recommend that this suggestion be
carried out next season.
Hunting Accidents.
There were no hunting accidents reported in this Division during the year.
Summary.
Weather conditions have been highly favourable to all game throughout the year. Animals
of the deer family were in first-class condition when cold weather set in about December 1st.
The snowfall to date has been very light, ensuring a good supply of food for our grazing animals.
A healthful increase in the number of Franklin and ruffed grouse has been reported throughout the district and conditions are very promising for a further increase during the coming
season.
"E" DIVISION (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY DISTRICTS).
By District Game AA^arden J. G. Cunningham.
T have the honour to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions for the
year 1929.
" E" Division comprises that portion of the Province lying between the International
Boundary-line and the west shore-line of Bute Inlet, and from the Gulf of Georgia to North
Bend, on the Canadian Pacific Railway, and Birken, on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway,
covering the British Columbia Police Districts of Arancouver, AA'estminster, and Chilliwack.
Game Animals.
Deer.—Deer have been very plentiful throughout the Division. The Harrison Lake, Howe
Sound, and up-Coast inlets were well hunted, but owing to the exceptionally dry weather there
were very few deer killed until after October 15th. Howe Sound, as usual, was the main hunting-ground for the majority of the Vancouver and Westminster sportsmen for deer, and it is
wonderful how these islands—namely, Bow en and Gambier—stand up under the excessive
hunting. The season on does was opened for a month for the first time in several years, but I
am pleased to report that there were very few of the hunters who took advantage of the privilege
of killing a doe. During the last two week-ends practically all the hunters obtained deer, but
at least 90 per cent, of the animals shot were bucks and they were in splendid condition. I know
of several parties that had not obtained any deer until after December 1st, but obtained their
limits of three bucks by the close of the season.
The Nelson, Hardy, and Captain Island Game Reserve was cancelled just prior to the opening of the season and should have afforded wonderful sport after being a reserve for the past
seven years, but I am sorry to state that the sport in that vicinity was very disappointing, due,
no doubt, to disease having hit the islands and accounting for the death of a great number of
deer. The Coast deer have been suffering from various forms of disease for the past four years,
the deer in different districts having different forms of this disease, but in all cases they seemed
to be suffering from diarrhoea.    During the years 1926-27-28 the Bowen Island deer suffered REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 23
from what Dr. E. A. Bruce, Dominion Animal Pathologist, diagnosed as bronchopneumonia. This
disease took the form of long thin worms in the throat and lungs. The following year Gambier
Island deer were found to be diseased also, the disease in this case taking the form of worms
from 4 to 11 inches long throughout the tissues of the legs. The disease on Hardy, Nelson, and
Captain Islands took the form of parasites, a number of oastrid (fly) larvse being found in the
throat of one of the animals sent to Dr. Bruce for analysis. The doctor also stated that he
found a few lung-worms in this specimen, but I am pleased to report that this disease appears to
have died out, especially on Bowen and Gambier Islands.
Again I wish to state that we are continually receiving reports of hunters exceeding the bag
limit on deer, but it is absolutely impossible to enforce this regulation without some sort of tag
system.
Mountain-goat.—I have had good reports this season of goat being fairly plentiful through
the Division, particularly at Bute and Toba Inlets, and a few animals were taken in Howe
Sound, Pitt, Stave, and Harrison Lake Districts. The Powell Lake area has been extensively
hunted and from reports received it appears that goat are not as plentiful as in former years.
Bear.—Black bear are numerous throughout the Division, and we still receive reports of a
few grizzly being seen at the heads of our up-Coast inlets and north of Pemberton District.
Moose.—I have had a report from one of our Game Wardens that signs of moose have been
seen about 40 miles north of Pemberton, just across the summit of the Cascades, so it is evident
that these animals are working farther south and west in the Province.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—A few beaver can be found throughout the Fraser Valley and Chilliwack River up
to Chilliwack Lake, but the majority of the beaver in this Division are found in the Pemberton
District, and now that the missionary work on the registration of trap-lines is almost complete
it is hoped that these animals will increase under the protection of the registered trap-line
holders. So far as the Lower Fraser is concerned, it would be a good thing if these animals
were cleaned out, as they are a menace to the dykes. The beaver on the Burnaby Lake Reserve
do not appear to be increasing, due, no doubt, to the fact that their huts and dams are so close
to the boundary of the reserve that they are trapped out by the trappers operating along Still
Creek and the B.C. Electric and Canadian Northern rights-of-way.
Marten.—These animals appear to be holding their own, but there are very few good marten
lines in the Division. During the month of December one of the Pemberton District trappers
obtained twenty-six marten on his line and he reports that they are increasing.
Mink.—Mink is the principal fur trapped along the coast-line and they appear to be holding
their own, although they are extensively trapped.
Muskrats.—These animals appear to be very plentiful at present and signs would indicate
that they are more abundant than ever throughout the Richmond Municipality, due to the fact
that up to the end of the year there has been no open season on these animals. The muskrats on
the Sechelt Peninsula are steadily spreading southward, and it will only he a short time until
all the swamps and lakes on this Peninsula will be stocked through the liberation of muskrats on
Nelson Island. These animals have also been liberated in the valley around the Gordon Pasha
Lakes by Frank O'Connor, a registered trap-line holder, and from reports received they are
spreading around that district.
Racoon.—Racoon appear to be holding their own throughout the Division, in spite of the fact
that they are much sought after and bring a good price on the market.
Otter.—Only a few otter have been taken in this Division and from reports received they do
not appear to be increasing.
Skunk.—Skunk are very plentiful throughout the whole of the Division and should be considered as vermin along with the red fox and ermine throughout the Lower Fraser Valley.
There seems to be a great deal of dissatisfaction over the trapping season this year,
especially on the beaver and muskrats. The setting of this season is a very contentious question, and it is hard to strike a happy medium, there being so many different ideas presented by
the trappers and fur-dealers, but the general opinion is that the muskrats should be trapped
earlier than the date set this season.
Fur prices this season are very poor, racoon and coyotes being the most staple fur on the
market. All other classes of fur are very low in price and consequently the trappers are not
disposing of their fur; hence a falling-off this season in the returns from royalties. H 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—As was the case during the years 1927-28, pheasants appeared to be very plentiful throughout the Lower Fraser Valley up to the opening date, when they seemed automatically
to disappear until about a week or so after the close of the season. Personally, I feel that this
past season was much better than that of 1928, and from indications it would seem that we have
a good stock of birds left. The average hunter, not being a member of some Game Club, or
having a private farm on which to hunt, has a hard time obtaining birds, but members of clubs
or private shoots can always manage to obtain their share. The pheasants soon get wise to a
place where they are not harassed every day. I was fortunate in having an opportunity to
travel over one of these private shoots the last day of the season, and I observed at least 100
birds, a great portion of them being cocks. I am of the opinion that the shortening of the season
to a month and cutting the bag limit to four birds had the desired effect, but I believe that some
of the Game Clubs are advocating a return to the six weeks' season, with a limit of six birds per
day, two of which may be hens. I would be very sorry to see the season opened on hen birds,
as there are plenty of them killed accidentally, illegally, and by vermin, without allowing a
wholesale destruction of them by declaring an open season. We are continually hearing of the
excessive number of hen birds, but I have had the Game Wardens keep a close check and they
are of the opinion that this is not the case. Shortly after the season .opened I spent a day on
Sea Island, where hen birds were reported to be too numerous. Out of ninety-seven birds seen,
twenty-four of them were cocks and there were three birds whose sex I was unable to determine.
This would make an average of about one cock to three hen birds, which fact does not warrant
the opening of the season on hens.
Partridge.—These birds are not doing as well as they should throughout the Fraser Aralley.
AVe were allowed an open season in the Delta Municipality, but I feel that this should not have
been the case, as the birds proved to be very scarce. I had some very good reports from some
parts of the Sumas District and had the opportunity to observe a fair number of partridge
myself, but they are not plentiful enough to stand much hunting and I would like to see a closed
season for another year. There has been a few weeks of real hard, cold weather in the Sumas
District each winter for the last three years and partridge have certainly suffered in spite of the
fact that the Sumas and Matsqui Game Associations, co-operating with our Game AVardens, have
fed these birds extensively. Red fox and weasel are also a menace to these birds, but it is hoped
that we will be able to decrease the numbers of these animals this coming year.
Quail.—These birds are not suited to the Lower Mainland and it is a waste of money trying
to restock the district with them. They do well at some points for a year or so, and as soon as
we have a sharp, cold spell with snow they die off, as has been proven so many times. There
were a number of bob-white quail liberated in the spring of 1925 in Point Grey, but these birds
seem to have entirely disappeared.
Grouse.—The past season proved the best season on blue grouse for the past few years.
Practically all of the grouse-hunters on Bowen and Gambier Islands during the first two days of
the season obtained their daily bag limit of five birds. After the end of the season I observed a
great number of these birds, so it is evident that we have plenty left for breeding stock for the
coming season. I believe there is an agitation among the sportsmen to have the blue-grouse
season opened from September 1st to September 30th, and the deer season to open later, to allow
the sportsmen a chance with their dogs on these birds. I would be in favour of this, as September is too early for deer, and ta great number of the bird-hunters will not chance hunting in
the woods where there are so many inexperienced deer-hunters roaming around.
Grouse (Willow).—These birds were protected in the Western District this season, and
from reports received and from personal observation they have not been so plentiful during the
past few years. Personally, I would like to see them protected for another season, but I am
led to believe that some of the Game Associations are going to recommend a short open season
for 1930.    If this is so, I see no serious objection.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—As has been the case in recent years, mallard ducks have been very plentiful up to
the opening day of the season throughout the district, especially in the vicinity of the flats
around Ladner, but since that time they have been very scarce. Up to the latter part of
December the season was exceptionally dry and mild, and after the usual early birds the northern REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 25
 9 ; ■ —
birds did not appear until forced south by the hard weather about the middle of December.
Since that date I know personally of a good few bag limits having been obtained, especially on
private shoots, where the birds are only shot at once or twice a week. The duck-hunting in the
Sumas Prairie area has been very poor this season owing to the fact that the prairie is so well
drained and extensively hunted. Shortly after the rains appeared the Prairie District froze up
and is still in the same condition, thereby forcing the birds to the Gulf District. The days of
good duck-hunting in this district are past, except on places owned or controlled by private clubs,
where they feed the birds and hunt one or two days a week.
Wood-ducks.—AVood-ducks are still increasing, but should be afforded further protection.
Geese.—Snow-geese are as plentiful as ever along the gulf from Point Roberts to Point Grey
and they can well protect themselves as long as the present seasons prevail. AAre have about 500
Canada geese around the Pitt Lake area and a few of these birds have been killed, but so long
as the use of a rifle on migratory game birds is prohibited these birds can care for themselves.
Brant.—Brant are reported to be more numerous than for years in the Boundary Bay District and a large number of bag limits have been obtained, but in order to get these birds it is
necessary to be properly equipped with decoys and punts and to be a perseverant hunter.
Shore-birds.—Wilson snipe were very plentiful until the freeze-up early in December, but
have since disappeared. Kildeer plover and sandpipers have also been plentiful. There is no
open season on these latter birds, but a great number are killed illegally, resulting in a number
of cases being brought before the Courts.
Coots.—AArhile the district is afforded an open season on coots, the sportsmen do not consider
them as a sporting bird and very few are killed, except by hunters who crave something to kill,
and I would like to see them taken off the open list.
Swans.—A few swans have been seen during the past season, and, as usual, some hunters
through ignorance and others through lust to kill have done away with a few of these very
valuable birds.
Band-tailed Pigeons.—These birds were not so plentiful this last open season, although they
were very plentiful in the spring migration. Two weeks' open season on these birds is all they
can stand, and I would be in favour of seeing the limit dropped to six birds per day.
Vermin.
Coyotes.—A few of these animals can still be found throughout the Lower Fraser Valley,
but steps are being taken to reduce their numbers around Abbotsford and Matsqui District, where
there are two coyote and fox hunters preparing to go after them with the co-operation of Game
AVarden AArilliams. AVhile the coyotes are a nuisance in this district, I was pleased to learn of
the discontinuance of the bounty on these animals last summer. The coyote-pelt is valuable on
the fur market and is a source of revenue to the trapper, bringing prices ranging from $12 to
$28 during the season 1928-29, and while prices on fur are much lower this season, still this pelt
is priced as high as $18, and consequently are too valuable to be ruthlessly destroyed in the
summer months, except in case of damage or menace to sheep-breeders' or farmers' stock, in
which case our Department could be called upon to assist in clearing them out of that district.
Coyote bounties dropped from 253 in 1928 to seventy-four during 1929, the cause being the cancellation of the bounty on these animals last summer.
Wolves.—These animals are not plentiful in this Division, but a few are taken each year.
Between the Arancouver and New AArestminster Government Agencies, bounty was paid on 149
wolves during 1929, against 132 for 1928, showing a slight increase. At least 90 per cent, of
these animals were killed in the northern part of the Province, but Arancouver being the principal
fur centre of British Columbia, these pelts were brought to Vancouver by trappers and dealers
and bounty collected for convenience to these men.
Cougar.—This pest is ever with us and appears to -be about as plentiful as ever in spite of
the high bounty. Bounty was paid through the Division's Government Agents on seventy-nine of
these animals for 1929, against eighty-seven during 1928. These figures show a decrease on the
number killed, but this dcrease is due to more stringent bounty regulations, thereby eliminating
or lessening chances of fraud in obtaining these bounties. A large percentage of these cougars
were killed up-coast, on Arancouver Island and adjacent islands, and brought to Vancouver for
the collection of bounty. H 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Red Fox, Skunk, and Ermine.—These animals are a decided menace to the game and
domestic fowl of the farmers of the Division and should be destroyed on sight. The red fox is
spreading west to the Gulf of Georgia, and while this animal is taken off the protected list
throughout the Chilliwack and Delta Electoral District, I would advocate that he be classed as
vermin on the north side of the Fraser also, from the east boundary of the Kent Municipality
west to the gulf, and that skunk and ermine be put in the same category.
Big-horned Owls.—Big-horned owls show a decided increase if bounty payments can be taken
as an indication.    Bounty was paid on seventy-four owls in 1929, compared with twenty-six in
1928. A large number of these birds have been destroyed by our Wardens and hunters who have
not claimed bounty. The fur-farmers also are doing great work in the destruction of these
pests, they being forced to do so for the protection of their stock. Several snowy owls have also
been destroyed, but they are not very plentiful this season.
Croivs.—These birds still continue to thrive throughout the Division. Our officers have
done their best to reduce the number of these birds-, but there does not appear to be any decrease.
Steps will be taken to reduce the number of crows in this Division this coming spring.
The following is a summary of the vermin killed by Game AVardens in this Division during
the year under review :—
Crows    1,593 Dogs      57
Cats       405 Skunks      3
Hawks       94 Seals      2
Owls        77 Jays       6
Eagles        43 Coyotes        2
Game-protection.
Until May, 1929, game-protection in this Division was carried on under the Game Laws
Enforcement Branch of the British Columbia Provincial Police, with certain officers detailed
specially for game-protection with the writer supervising, and I wish to state here that I had
the whole-hearted support of the non-commissioned officers and men of the Division up to the
separation of the Departments. I am pleased to state that this co-operation continues. Inspector Dunwoody, Officer Commanding " E " Division ; Sergeant Shirras, of Vancouver District;
Sergeant Kier, of AATestminster District; Sergeant McDonald, of Chilliwack District, and the
officers under them, have done everything in their power to assist our AArardens in their duties,
and consequently these officers are partly responsible for the success of our Department this year.
Constables J. W. Chadwick, R. M. Stewart, J. D. H. Stewart, and J. J. McConnel have been untiring in their efforts to assist our Game Wardens and this Department, and I personally am
gratified for their assistance.
The following were the Game AVardens in charge of the various Districts: A. P. Cummins,
i/c collection of fur royalties, Arancouver; AV. Clark, launch P.ML. " 3," Arancouver; T. D.
Sutherland, launch P.M.L. "3," Arancouver; L. H. AValker, Vancouver; G. C. Stevenson, Arancouver; E. W. Baker, Vancouver; Frank Urquhart, Pitt Meadows; John Murray, Port Moody;
J. A. Stuart, Mission City; A. J. Butler, Chilliwack; Geo. Williams, Abbotsford ; H. C. Pyke,
Cloverdale;   AAr. J. Cameron, Ladner;   R. E. Allan, Powell River.
The Vancouver AVardens patrol Burnaby, Richmond, North Vancouver, Pemberton, and are
available and used for special patrols into other districts. Some splendid work has been accomplished by transferring strange AVardens into other districts.
In addition to the Game Wardens and Provincial Police, we have had the support of the
majority of the Game Associations throughout the Division, although there have been individual
instances of lack of support from some of the members of associations.
The combined efforts of the Game AVardens, Provincial Constables, and Game Associations
have resulted in a considerable increase in the number of prosecutions conducted under the
various Acts and regulations pertaining to the protection of game and game fish in this
Division.    The number of informations laid under these Acts increased from 239 for the year
1929, compared to 152 for the year 1928. This increase is not due to less regard for the game
laws by the public, but to the above-mentioned co-operation and vigilance of the Game
AVardens who spent their whole time on game-work. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 27
Game Propagation.
The Division has been fortunate in receiving a total of 3,100 pheasants for liberation during
the year from the Game Farm at Elk Lake, Vancouver Island. The following is a list of birds
liberated in the various districts:—
Agassiz    315 Mission-Dewdney    413
Burnaby   :     55 North Vancouver     55
Bowen Island      15 Port Moody     55
Chilliwack     312 Pitt Meadows   307
Delta  275 Powell River     25
Gambier Island      15 Surrey-Langley   370
Hope        30 Sumas ..'.  273
Lulu Island   315 Sechelt     12
Matsqui   233 Squamish       25
During January and December of the year under review it was found necessary to feed the
pheasants throughout the Division on account of the extremely cold weather. In the Sumas,
Matsqui, and Agassiz Districts the birds suffered considerably, but through the co-operation of
the farmers, Game Associations, and Provincial Constable J. D. H. Stewart at Agassiz the birds
were well cared for, resulting in few casualties. The Sumas and Matsqui Game Associations
are deserving of a great deal of credit for their support in this matter.
Game Reserves.
The following game reserves are located in this Division: Nelson, Hardy, and Captain
Islands, North Vancouver, Burnaby Lake, Trout Lake, Deer Lake, McGillivray Creek, and Goat
Island.
The Nelson, Hardy, and Captain Island Reserve was cancelled in the early fall, and I feel
that the cancellation of this reserve was a good move, as it was absolutely impossible to properly
protect the islands without having a resident Game AVarden; consequently the place was a
rendezvous for poachers and there is no need of a game reserve for the protection of deer on
this Coast.
The Goat Island Reserve was created during the year under review on the recommendation
of the Powell River sportsmen. This island is situated in such a position as to allow for protection, although I personally do not think that this reserve is essential to the wild life of that
district. It is true that it affords protection to the decreasing number of mountain-goat in the
Powell Lake area, and it is only for this reason that I consider the reserve worth retaining.
The North Arancouver Game Reserve is the playground for thousands of Vancouver citizens
during the summer and winter, and it is only through this fact, and the fact that the City of
Vancouver does not allow any hunting or trespassing on the watersheds of Capilano, Lynn, or
Seymour Creeks, that the reserve is worth keeping. The area concerned is a poor one from a
game standpoint, although if properly protected for a number of years there is a possibility
of it becoming a game country.
The Trout, Deer, and Burnaby Lake Reserves are also playgrounds, but afford a resting-
place for the migratory game birds of the Lower Mainland and are a valuable asset to the
sportsmen of the district for that reason.
McGillivray Creek Game Reserve is the best bird sanctuary of the Division, and I am
pleased to state that a lease has been obtained from the property-owners of this reserve for a
number of years, and the Dominion Government is also setting aside its property within this
reserve for the protection of game.
Fur Trade.
During the season 1928-29 prices on fur were exceptionally good, but the fur market at the
present time is badly disorganized. Prices offered by dealers are away below prices obtained
during the past few years. This set-back is no doubt due to the unsettled condition of the
money market and trappers are feeling the effects sorely.
Fur-farms.
Fur-farming is a very important branch of the Game Department and entails a great deal
of work for which the Department receives no remuneration.    I am personally of the opinion H 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
that a fee should be charged for fur-farming permits, to offset the expense of inspections and
as a further source of revenue. The silver-fox and mink farms are thriving, but the majority
of blue-fox and muskrat farmers have failed or are doing nothing in the business. A great
number of these people have been sadly disappointed in their undertakings and the prospective
large profits did not materialize, but in the case of the mink-breeders it is a different matter.
There appears to be a great future for progressive people in this industry. Profits are large
and the demand far exceeds the supply of these animals for breeding purposes. Silver-fox
breeders are also making the business pay. Several attempts have been made to farm marten,
but there is a great deal to learn along this line of fur-farming. AAre have had reports of marten
breeding in captivity, but it remains to be seen whether or not this was by accident, as from
conversation with a number of the fur-farmers it seems that they are not yet satisfied as to the
mating and breeding time of these animals. Mr. Lineham, of the Mons Valley Fur Farm, appears
to have been the most successful mink-farmer in the Division, and I am now informed that he is
experimenting with marten, and it is hoped that by another season we will know more about
these animals. It has been positively proven that muskrats cannot be properly farmed in pens.
These animals can only be raised in paying quantities in their natural haunts or marshes.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
Trap-lines.—The registration of trap-lines is the greatest and one of the most popular regulations under the " Game Act," and the registration of all available trap-lines in the Division is
almost an accomplished fact. At the close of the year under review the regulations were
amended to include all the territory outside of municipal boundaries, while heretofore we had
no registration in the Dewdney Electoral District. There are probably some forty trappers in
that area and it is hoped that these lines will all be in order by next trapping season.
There were some disputes over trap-lines between Indians and white trappers in the Pemberton area, but the majority of these disputes have been settled. I have again enjoyed the hearty
co-operation of the Indian Department throughout the past year, and it is due to this co-operation
that we are able to keep peace between the Indians and white trappers over different trap-lines.
Guides.—There is very little use for guides in this Division. During the year three guides'
licences were issued—namely, Fred Mansell, Glen Mahan, and J. R. Stanton.
Special Patrols.
The Division was continuously patrolled throughout the year. A few special patrols were
carried out, into the Skagit River, Harrison Lake, and Pemberton areas, resulting in several
convictions for trapping fur-bearing animals during the closed season.
Hunting Accidents.
Reports show three fatal and two minor accidents with firearms in this Division during
the year.
Summary.
Game conditions throughout the Division during the past season on the whole have been
satisfactory, with the probable exception of migratory game birds. The present fall was exceptionally dry and mild. AVe did not have any water in the fields until about December 15th, and
some sportsmen are beginning to realize that we would have a great deal better shooting on
ducks if the season was set back to November 1st.
The dissatisfaction over the selling of lands for private shoots is becoming more serious each
year. The need for public shooting-grounds is very pressing if we expect to increase or hold the
present revenue derived from firearms licences. During the season just past, three of the islands
at the mouth of the Fraser River, between AATestham and Lulu Islands, were bought and turned
into a very elaborate private shooting-ground. The acquiring of this land deprived the sportsmen of the best hunting-marsh in the district. The majority of this marsh was covered at
about a 10-foot tide, but the owners have had a large dyke built around the property. There
are several newly formed islands and marshes unsurveyed and still public land in that vicinity
that is liable to be taken up by the private clubs in the near future, if some steps are not taken
to prevent this taking place. REPORT OF PROVINCLVL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 29
There is very little I can add to the information contained in the foregoing paragraphs, but
I would again like to express my appreciation for the support received from the Game AVardens,
the officers of the British Columbia Provincial Police throughout the Division, and the several
Game Associations throughout the Lower Mainland, particularly the B.C. Fish & Game
Protective Association.
REPORT ON OPERATIONS OF THE ELK LAKE GAME FARM.
By Game AVarden J. AV. Jones.
I respectfully submit my annual report dealing with the operation of the Elk Lake Game
Farm and the propagation of game animals and birds thereon during the past year.
Existing conditions during the year were indeed satisfactory, as will be seen by the following
table as hereunder, covering propagation of small game, game birds, their distribution, etc.:—
Pheasants in pens, December 31st, 1929         750
Breeding stock to extent of      400
Hen pheasants     320
Cock pheasants       80
Strayed from breeding-pens during year       10
Number of eggs laid  (approximate)     6,000
Set under hens 4,550
Small late eggs used for feeding     200
Young pheasants reared     3,844
Now in pens (approximate)     350
Casualties        250
Strayed  (approximate)     100
Liberated in British Columbia     3,494
Eggs distributed        800
Wild Turkeys in Pens on December 31st, 1929.
Stock birds   3
Eggs laid       75
Hatched       40
Unfertile eggs       35
Young birds lost owing to wet weather       11
Turkeys from previous year          7
Birds liberated on Sidney Island  30
Birds liberated Vancouver parks  4
Birds liberated Arictoria parks  2
Game Animals.
Muskrats turned out owing to lack of water         30
Distribution.
Ducks liberated  :       250
Geese         16
Quail        160
Quail in pens at December 31st, 1929          50
Vermin destroyed.—Under this heading the following destructive birds and animals were
. destroyed :  Domesticated cats, 30; hawks, 20;  homed owls, 1.
As well as the various duties attended to on the farm, every effort has been made to maintain game patrols and special attention has been paid to game-law enforcement whenever
possible.
In conclusion, I may also add that the present stock and facilities on the farm are adequate
enough to ensure good progress during the coming year. H 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX.
Page.
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms licences, January 1st, 1929, to December
31st, 1929 ,  31
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences, January 1st, 1929,
to December 31st, 1929  :  32
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from fur royalties,
1929     33
Statement showing particulars of skins on which royalty was paid, 1929  34
Bounties paid, January 1st, 1929, to December 31st, 1929   35
Statement showing fur confiscated, 1929  36
Statement showing firearms confiscated, 1929  37
Statement showing estimated expenditure, fiscal year 1929-30   38
List of guides, 1929  38
Hunting accidents, 1929  40
Statement showing big-game trophy fees paid, 1929  41
Prosecutions (Game Divisions), 1929 .'  44
Statement of migratory game birds banded by members of British Columbia Game Department, 1929   46
Statement showing returns of trappers, season 1928-29  47
Statement showing returns of fur-farmers, 1929  48
Statement showing census returns on migratory game birds, 1929  58
Personnel of Game Department  60 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 31
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Revenue derived from Sale of Non-resident Licences, January 1st, 1929,
to December 31st, 1929.
Government
General
Firearms
and Anglers.
Weekly Bird.
Season Anglers.
Daily Anglers.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
5
3
23
13
1
20
3
1
28
14
117
12
13
48
2
2
13
5
6
16
82
6
26
10
6
4
$5.00
5.00
20.00
8
1
1
4
3
24
3
7
4
15
5
1
1
1
15
5
50
7
5
1
1
65
2
62
1
$80.00
57
9
23
108
245
23
406
1
2
255
104
2
4
68
118
495
187
6
4
1
6
4
32
54
17
47
30
$122.00
$202.00
10.00
10.00
40.00
30.00
240.00
30.00
70.00
40.00
15.00
25 00
Atlin	
10 00
$125.00
75.00
575.00
49.00
204.00
544.00
46.00
448.00
8.00
2.00
383.00
144.00
3.00
4.00
214 00
309 00
Cumberland	
1,359.00
76.00
Fernie	
325.00
2! 1.00
500.00
843.00
73 00
509 00
150.00
50.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
150.00
50.00
500.00
70.00
533.00
75.00
25.00
269 00
38.00
14.00
10.00
700.00
350.00
2,925.00
300.00
325.00
1,650.00
50.00
50.00
325.00
125.00
190.00
164.00
715.00
336.00
1,040.00
Nelson r	
New Westminster.
Penticton	
564.00
4,140.00
711.00
325.00
Prince George
50.00
21.00
20.00
2.00
7.00
8.00
40.00
1,721.00
70.00
Princeton	
10.00
10.00
62.00
342.00
133.00
40.00
150.00
1,525.00
2,800.00
150.00
650.00
250.00
150.00
150.00
Telegraph Creek...
1,525.00
650.00
20.00
620.00
10.00
125.00
31.00
91.00
3,575.00
Vernon	
Victoria	
206,00
1,361.00
260.00
40.00
210.00
Totals .   ...
475
$14,200.00
6
$30.00
292
$2,920.00
2,308
$3,762.00
$20,912.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 33
Revenue derived from Sale of Pur-traders'  «d Taxidermists' Licences and from Royalty
or Tax on Pur, January 1st, 1929, to December 31st, 1929.
Government
Agent.
Resident
Fur-traders.
Non-resident
Fdr-traders.
Fur-tax.
Taxidermists.
Total.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
No.
Amount.
7
1
2
3
2
1
1
25
2
6
1
2
1
1
1
33
19
13
13
12
11
32
2
5
14
1
$175.00
25.00
50.00
75.00
50.00
25.00
1
1
2
2
72
1
14
23
14
5
5
20
44
20
39
4
2
9
3
23
7
5
83
134
23
43
32
6
22
32
483
10
49
23
6
$355.45
.10
101.48
314.64
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
4
1
2
$5.00
$535.45
25.10
151.48
Atlin	
$200.00
589.64
50.00
83.74
5.62
14.25
94,67
696.00
102.96
5.00
113.74
5.62
14.25
25.00
625.00
50.00
15.00
134.67
1,321.00
5.00
157.96
150.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
246.39
4.23
1.95
13.58
12.00
279.72
7.34
11.77
5,619.40
4,814.36
524.89
10.00
406.39
29.23
51.95
38.58
12.00
25.00
25.00
304.72
32.34
11.77
825.00
475.00
325.00
200.00
6,644.40
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
5.00
5.00
5,294.36
854.89
Quesnel	
325.00
728.92
1,074.93
12.65
1,053.92
1,074.93
12.65
300.00
275.00
800.00
50.00
125.00
350.00
25.00
85.11
334.83
24,887.73
85.35
158.60
72.79
24.44
385.11
Telegraph Creek-
609.83
400.00
20.00
5.00
10.00
26,107.73
140.35
400.00
693.60
422.79
4'9.44
Totals
211
$5,275.00
6
$1,200.00
1,256
$40,769.89
17
$85.00
$47,329.89 H 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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■HH   IO   ©   IO  rH   rH
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rH O     OT +J
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"[.fHHnlUKHNN1—C*
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;. j.■ g § | a S 1 8 S B 5 § "§ \3 g
is .9 -S .3 2 > s s "3 £ S c o a a REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 35
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1929.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Big-homed
Owls.
Total.
1
37
6
2
2
23
33
74
36
1
4
3
36
6
146
1
47
3
1
3
158
23
1
3
9
48
3
2
1
25
13
19
8
1
17
8
3
14
2
2
29
59
14
14
80
3
57
149
110
51
81
111
8
32
124
36
6
9
63
172
262
58
32
1
26
36
68
44
262
2
13
170
4
63
20
218
3
7
124
47
33
108
30
89
1
6
2
29
67
353
$1,881.00
15.00
726.50
Atlin     	
572.50
552.50
1,237.50
6,412.00
920.00
865.00
564.00
977.50
2,851.50
181.50
323.50
1,032.00
1,000.00
813.50
821.50
732.50
1,007.50
3,134.00
2,840.00
614.50
860.50
87.50
323.00
810.00
1,251.00
5,074.50
923.50
2,716.50
Totals	
411
530
1,881
1,389
$42,122.00
Note.—Bounty paid as follows
owls, 50 cents each.
Wolves, $15 each ;  cougars, $40 each ;   coyotes, $7.50 each ;  big-horned
Comparative Statement op Bounties paid from 1922 to 1929.
Calendar Year.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Eagles.
Owls.
Total.
1922    	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
53,443
2,246
70
2,487
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923           	
14,840.00
1924           	
172
20,398.40
1925
24,397.00
1926
5,770
10,046
41,077.00
1927               	
65,377.95
1928                  	
1,025
1,389
50,709.25
1929           	
42,122.00
Totals	
2,494
2,406
55,045
69,431
4,803
7,204
20,211
$319,416.40 H 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Fur confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1929,
to December 31st, 1929.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Game
Division.
1929.
March 30
April    11
Nov.      23
30
2
 H9
22
Oct. 16
April    18
May
May
June
July
Nov.
Dec.
Feb.
May
Dec.
Mar.
June
July
Nov.
Dec.
7
24
21
20
19
3
10
14
18
18
16
2
7
23
14
8
6
29
4
4
9
9
Ford, W. S	
Sloman, J	
Moon, H	
Hunt (Indian)	
Brown, R. A	
Pierre, P	
Hardin, F. B '..
Travis, F	
Tennis, Leo	
Mechell, B 	
Stewart, C. W	
Peppin, Joe....	
Williams, J. F.....
Speher, J	
Hamasaki, T	
Brooks, T	
Morgan, S	
McDougall, P. R..
MacKenzie, A	
Modesti et al	
Pavich, P	
Auckland, P	
Machin, E	
Webster, E..	
Brawn, J	
Egri, Joe	
Deveney, A	
Ross, Joe	
Bauquier, J	
King, Thos	
Alexander, C	
Curtis, W .....
Phillips, A	
Totals....
Minstrel Island..
Victoria...	
Knight Inlet	
Alert Bay	
Grand Forks	
Fernie	
Waneta	
Michel	
Blue River..:	
Nazko	
Spillimacheen	
Vernon	
Stanley	
Nazko	
Wales Island	
Kitwanga	
Kitwanga	
Nadina.....	
Vanarsdol	
Parsnip River....
Prince George....
Port Simpson	
Smithers	
South Sumas	
Yarrow	
Sumas Prairie....
Bond Sound	
Owl Creek	
Skagit Valley	
Vancouver	
Agassiz	
Abbotsford	
Harrison Mills...
"A'
"A'
"A'
"A'
"B'
"B'
"B'
"b:
" c
"C
"C
"C!
"C
"C
"D'
"D'
"D'
"D'
"D'
"D'
!!D!
"D'
"D'
"E'
" E'
"E'
"E'
" B '
"E'
"E'
" E '
"E'
"E'
26
84 |    6
15
63
44
Note.—Revenue derived from sale of surrendered coyote-pelts and confiscated fur during 1929, $2,788.72. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 37
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1929,
to December 31st, 1929.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Game
Division.
Kind
confiscated.
1929.
March 9
June 6
Sept. 20
22
22
30
13
23
21
24
30
April 21
21
15
15
19
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
21
19
3
17
Oct.
Nov.
Sept.
Oct.
Sept.
Oct.
8
Sept.
30
Oct.
15
,,
17
Nov.
20
20
}J
19
,,
30
„
30
Sept.
3
Feb.
4
,,
1
March
19
April
4
Oct.
14
Feb.
May
June
Aug.
Oct.
18
18
18
25
18
14
30
2
2
4
16
Hawthorne, F	
Lindaner, L	
Bechtel, A. J	
Cuzner, Wm	
Francis, W	
Pontoppidan, H	
Hannay, George....
Carmichael, G	
Shepherd, U	
Green, H.....	
William, E	
Peterson, V	
Brousquet,  F	
Graham,  H	
Corsi, G...'.	
Ahlsen, H	
Roberts, G	
Shannon, E. R	
Taylor, J	
Andrew, J	
Derby, T	
Fagal, J	
Gahre, V	
Tolley, J	
Scott, S..	
Johnson,  O	
Jodouin, J. A	
Newman, J	
Disdero,   F	
Vanbuskirk, J. M..
Roberts, J	
Berg, A	
Knopf, L	
Witzke, W	
Lonsdelle, P	
Wines, O	
Teigur, O. J	
Nishi, K	
Hamasaki, T	
Intermelia,  L	
Garvey, T. R	
Hawse, T	
Kennedy,  S	
Strong, S	
Witfield,  E	
Mitchell,  G	
Kishuyana, D	
Tateyama,  I	
Olsen, A 	
Lister, N	
Rusk, J. L	
Carllson, G	
Williams, H. P	
Nimpkish Lake	
Vancouver	
Duncan	
Duncan	
Duncan	
Cowichan Station..
Nanaimo	
Campbell River	
Nanaimo	
Nanaimo	
Cumberland	
Grand Forks	
Grand Forks	
Copper Mountain...
Copper Mountain...
Copper Mountain...
Cranbrook	
Cranbrook	
Cranbrook	
Cranbrook	
Cranbrook	
Cranbrook	
Cranbrook :	
Fernie  	
Procter	
Sicamous	
Kamloops	
Sicamous	
Kamloops	
Vernon	
Clinton	
Vemon	
Lumby	
L-avington	
Coquihalla	
Sicamous	
Wales Island	
Wales Island..	
Alice Arm	
Anyox	
Prince George	
Ocean Falls	
Ocean Falls	
Toronto	
Chilliwack	
Stave Falls	
Mission :	
Seattle	
Bowen Island	
Bowen Island	
Laidlaw	
Washington, U.S.A..
A"
1
rifle.
A"
1
shotgun ; .22 rifle
A"
1
shotgun.
A"
1
shotgun.
A"
1
30.30 rifle.
A"
1
shotgun.
A"
1
shotgun.
A"
1
Mauser rifle.
A"
1
.22 rifle.
A"
1
.22 rifle.
A"
1
rifle.
B"
1
.22 rifle.
B"
1
rifle.
B"
1
Luger pistol.
B "
1
.22 rifle.
B"
1
.22 rifle.
B"
1
rifle.
B "
1
shotgun.
B "
1
rifle.
B "
1
shotgun.
B"
1
rifle.
B"
1
rifle.
B"
1
shotgun.
B"
1
.22 rifle.
B"
1
.22 rifle.
C"
1
.22 rifle.
C"
1
shotgun.
C"
1
rifle.
C"
1
.22 rifle.
C"
1
rifle.
C"
1
rifle.
C"
1
.22 rifle.
C"
1
rifle.
C"
1
.22 rifle.
C"
1
rifle.
C"
1
rifle.
C"
1
.22 rifle.
D "
1
pump-gun.
D "
1
shotgun.
D"
1
pump-gun.
D"
1
.22 rifle.
D"
1
rifle.
D"
1
rifle.
D"
1
rifle.
D"
1
rifle.
E"
1
.22 rifle.
E"
1
rifle.
E"
1
shotgun.
E"
1
rifle.
E"
1
shotgun.
E"
1
rifle.
E"
1
rifle.
E"
1
shotgun. H 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Estimated Expenditure, Fiscal Year 1929-30.
Game Department—
Salaries and expenses   §190,000.00
Bounties   on   and   extermination   of   noxious   animals   (including
salaries and expenses of predatory-animal hunters)      45,000.00
Total estimated expenditure   $235,000.00
Estimated expenditure, fiscal year 1927-28  $194,618.00
Estimated expenditure, fiscal year 1928-29     219,973.00
Jack, H Atlin.
Murphy, N      „
List of Guides, 1929.
Atlin District.
Moreau, N Atlin.
Noland, J. W      „
Barkerville District.
Armstrong, Mrs. E. E Barkerville.
Cochrane, J. D  „
Campbell, J. H	
Iverson, H  „
Landers, P. M	
McColl, M. A	
Porteous, AV  „
Cassiar District.
Ball, G. B. Telegraph Creek. Jimmy, L Telegraph Creek.
Brooks, N  „ Landecker..
Reed, F. de W Barkerville.
Sparring, E. W	
Thompson, N	
Thompson, R	
Thompson, TV	
TVendle, J	
Callbreath, R..
Dunstan, T	
Dennis	
Drogan	
Fann, B	
Lawrence, C...
McClosky, P....
Simpson, J. C.
Williams, M....
Pidcock, G..
Cumberland District.
..Campbell River. Pidcock, H. H..
.Campbell River.
Fort George
Allgeier, L Dunster.
Hegre,  S        ,,
Blackmail, T. II Aleza Lake.
Barney, P Hazelton.
Gun-a-noot, S         „
Jack, T	
Blackman, TV Valemount.
Carr, S. J Tete Jaune Cache
Caus, E. P Prince George.
Ceal, A. G	
Tabert, I  „
Wayant, I. L  „
Colebank, G Hixon.
Colebank, G. A     „
Dennison, G. M Red Pass.
Dale, J Woodpecker.
Dayton, M Dome Creek.
Hooker, J. B  „
Hooker, L. J  „
Jensen, A  „
Jensen, E. H  ,,
District.
Hargreaves, F. M Mount Robson.
Hargreaves, G. E  ,,
Hargreaves, R. F  ,,
Saladano, J  „
Hughes, C. II Mud River.
Harrison, B Wistaria.
Lebeck, O Swift Creek.
Lee, S Vanderhoof.
Minaker, G Taylor.
McNeill, J. TV Ootsa Lake.
Mc-Gaghran, J Salmon Valley.
Nelson, E Colleymount.
Read, A. E. C Longworth.
Smith. J. M Snowshoe.
Sykes, B. S Penny.
Sunderman, S Tupper Creek.
Turner, G Kleena Kleene.
Goodell. TV. R McBride.
Holem, E. J        ,,
Wilson, B	
Williams, M        ,, Kamloops District.
Anderson, D Clearwater Station.     Glover, G. M Clearwater Station.
  „ Ray, J. B	
Lillooet District.
Case, D..
Archie, G Canim Lake.
Archie, T  „
Hansen, R. L Bridge Lake.
Larson, O Roe Lake.
Mahan, G Pemberton Meadows.
Ogden, P Lac la Hache.
Prosser, G Lillooet.
Rioux, E Fawn.
Scott, J. R 100-Mile House.
Baker, M. C Natal.
Boiven, TV       „
Couilard, H      „
Krivensky, J       „
Valasak, J       „
Butwell, F. H Golden.
Feuz, TV	
Conover, II. TV Castledale.
Thomas, G. A  „
Soles, M Harrogate.
Kootenay District.
Gilbert, F Field.
Adrian, T Athalmer.
Capilo, L        „
Washburn, L. F        „
Yearling, W         „
Kain, C Wilmer.
Miller, H. F Canal Flats.
Stevens, C Wasa.
Woodrow, F Rosebery.
De Boer, P..
Prince Rupert District.
..Terrace. Edwards, R. A..
Atnarko.
Peace River District.
Anderson, C. A Hudson Hope.
Thomas, J. M  „
Cameron, P South Pine River.
Noske, N Rio Grande, Alta.
Brammer, C Likely.
Gaugh, A. II     ,,
Johnson, J. TV     „
Maxwell, T     „
Parminter, R      ,,
Stephenson, A      ,,
Gaspard, F Horsefly.
Hooker, F. C	
Hooker, T. O	
McLeese, P       ,,
Quesnel District.
Patenaude, G. B Horsefly.
Walters, G	
Walters, L. E	
Goetzen, C Black Creek.
Hockley, G	
Reid, W. H	
Olson, A Quesnel.
Tibbies, J      „
Turner, G. F       „
i
Vancouver District.
Mansell, F North Vancouver. Phillips, F. A North Vancouvc H 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
OS
CM
to
to
a
H
o
o
<l
o
to
to
P
W
3
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M
CU—'03
S3 a
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S§.£
O    QJ   S           (U
t«   to
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QJ    OJ
S   q "£   B _§j £   o»  a)
(3 Z to (3 Z Z
QO      P Z Zee f5 Z R P Z P P Z
a .i
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ei m
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a w
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M h Iri
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tj t* t-l      U       t-l
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5   fe REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 41
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1929, to December 31st, 1929.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
CJ.S
mo
3«
Wo
Amount.
Ashcroft-—
Pyle, R. M., Hugo, Oklahoma	
Aloe'rhi—
Babcock, G. D. B., Seattle, Wash	
Barkerville—
"Taylor, L., McDermott, Ohio	
Cabot, Dr. H., Ann Arbor, Mich	
Young, G. A., Medford, Ore	
Iienkert, O. W, Canton, Ohio	
Pfouts, D. R. E., Canton, Ohio	
Orcutt, W. W., Los Angeles, Cal	
Kammerer, G., Anaheim, Cal	
Dyer, A.  J., Nashville, Tenn	
Cumberland—
Brento, P., Bellingham, Wash	
Hollingsworth, O. R., Bellingham, Wash..
_ Martin, J., Bellingham, Wash..	
*Ward,  R.,  Seattle,  Wash'	
Purdy,  Geo.,   Seattle,  Wash	
Kesling, Dr. 0. G., Arlington, Wash	
Healy, J. A., Arlington, Wash	
Compton, E., Eveeson, Wash	
Smitherberg, 0., Eveeson, Wash	
Cranhrook-^— '
Sparrow, Col. R., Essex, England 	
Clinton—
Hudkins, Dr. B. I., Wolf Summit, W.Va..
Stokely, N. F., Del Rio, Tenn	
Mumma, T. H., Arbuckle, Cal	
McCullough, V., Dunnigan, Cal -	
Fernie—
Taylor, B.,  Calgary, Alta	
Careless, W. D. S., Calgary, Alta	
Stacey, G., 'Lethbridge, Alta - --.
Kinsolvint, Dr. D. L., Abinton, Va	
Jones, J. W., Bristol, Tenn ....'...
Gill, R. R., Spokane, Wash	
Golden—
Hibbert, Col., New York, N.Y	
Cox, E„ New York, N.Y	
Yan Sycle, F., New York, N.Y	
Buckle, S., Cadillac, Mich	
Wright, W. J., Hackensack, N.J...:	
Greenwood—
Fairbanks, F. M., Seattle, Wash	
Lillooet—
Hodge, E., Hodge, Cal	
Brisbane, S., New York, N.Y	
Warren, Dr. H. C, San Francisco, Cal	
New Westminster—
Stanley, G. E.,  Bellingham, Wash	
W'hited, H. E., Lynden, Wash..	
Harris, G. S., Bakersfield, Cal 	
Ponton, H. S., Bakersfield, Cal	
Roux,  F.,  Bakersfield,   Cal :	
Weaver, F. O., Seattle, Wash :	
Whitcomb, C. M., Seattle, Wash	
Hubel, .1. J., Seattle, Wash	
De Vaughan, T. J., Huntington Park, Cal
$25.00
10.00
15.00
25.00
65.00
80.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
45.00
5.00
15.00
15.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
15.00
10.00
25.00
90.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
5.00
5.00
10.00
65.00
50.00
25.00
15.00
80.00
65.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
60.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
5.00
40.00
15.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
40.00 H 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1929, to December 31st, 1929—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Stecies.
aa
3W
W o
0) ZJ
at
o 1
*H O
Amount.
Nanaimo—
Nelson, S. C, Seattle, Wash	
Christen,  P.,  Seattle, Wash	
Wilgress»E. J., Seattle, Wash	
Schafer, P., Aberdeen, Wash	
Smith, O., Aberdeen, Wash	
Low., B., La Conner, Wash *	
Ashland, G., La Conner, Wash	
Schafer, A., Montesano, Wash	
Mead, R., Montesano, Wash	
Tyler, E.  P., Aberdeen,  Wash	
Penticton—
Baners, Mrs. E., Seattle, Wash	
Jilg, J. II., Seattle, Wash	
Prince Rupert—
Williamson, Dr. J. C, Fanlon, 111	
Prince George—
'    King, Dr. B. T., Seattle, Wash	
Midgley, Mr. and Mrs. D., Pond Creek, Okla.
McKay, W. A.,  Seattle, Wash	
Loving, M. W., Chicago, 111	
Schoenover, Dr. H. F., Seattle, Wash	
Lange, W. W., Milwaukee, Wis	
Bartlett, A. G., Louisville, Ky	
Swanns, J. T., Tampa, Fla	
Moore, Mrs. J. H., Wichita, Kansas ,
Wright,  A.  S., Toledo, Ohio	
Bayer, E. I., Toledo, Ohio	
Horrman, A., New York.	
Husler, C, 'Saskatoon, Sask	
Kellar, C, Lead, S.D	
Pierson,  F.  B.,  Bremerton,  Wash	
Siegmund, F. F., New Buffalo, Mich	
Marx, Jos., New Buffalo, Mich	
Martin, M. D.,  New York, N.Y	
Rose, Dr. H, D., Marcellus, Mich	
Baekeland, G., New York, N.Y	
Becker, C. B., New York, N.Y	
Fisher, C. L.,  Peru, Ind	
Fisher, D., Peru, Ind	
Fisher, D. L., Peru, Ind	
Fisher, ,L. E., Peru, Ind	
Fawcett, W. H., Paquot, Minn	
Fawcett, R. R., Paquot, Minn	
McKay, T. H., Philadelphia, Pa	
Scott, J. H., Philadelphia, Pa	
Pouce Coupe—
Chatbourne, F. A.,  Suisun, Cal	
Clark,  F.,  MacDoel,  Cal	
Boyd, W. C, Grande Prairie, Alta	
Cowdry, Jos., Ithaca, Mich	
Quesnel—
Rose, Dr. H. D., Marcellus, Mich	
Thomas, W. A., Long Beach, Cal	
Clancy, J. P., St. Helens, Ore	
Ulrich, H. M., Spokane, Wash	
Belt, Wm., Yamhill, Ore	
Waterhouse, S., Spokane, Wash	
Gray, A.  G.,  Morgantown, N.C	
....   |   ...
$10.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
15.00
10.00
10.00
30.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
95.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
30.00
90.00
15.00
50.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
40.00
40.00
50.00
30.00
80.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
60.00
80.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
40.00
90.00
25.00
23.00
25.00
50.00
25.00
50.00
25.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 43
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1929, to December 31st, 1929—Continued.
Name and Address
(Government Agency).
Species.
pqcjj
S a
**&
bW
W o
Smithers—
Munson, C. B., Edmonton, Alta	
Phelps, A. T, Caracas, Venezuela	
Phelps, W. H., Sr., Caracas, Venezuela
Phelps, W. H., Jr., Venezuela	
Phelps, A. T., Caracas, Venezuela	
Telegraph Creek—
Weems, F. C, New York, N.Y	
Vernon—
Grif, K., Sand Point, Idaho	
Victoria—
Harris, O. W., Seattle, Wash	
Templeton, C. L., Seattle, Wash	
Christenson, W. H., Bremerton, Wash
Vancouver—
Marshall, E., Augusta, Ga	
Fifft, R. H., Buffalo, N.Y	
Wolf, C. A., Niagara, N.Y	
Bonner, C. G., Los Angeles, Cal	
Barr, C. H., Springfield, 111	
Lukeman, G. T., Jacksonville, III	
Anderson,  S., Los Angeles, Cal	
Cobbs. T.. Santa Barbara, Cal	
Low, R. B., San Diego, Cal	
Bartlett, P., San Diego, Cal	
Leadbetter, F. W., Vancouver, Wash..
Mudge, E. W., Pittsburgh, Pa	
Tobin, C. R., San Francisco, Cal	
Mudge, L. S., Pittsburgh, Pa	
Kollock, W. G., Los Angeles, Cal	
Jones. R. E., Santa Barbara, Cal	
Taylor,  H., 'St. Louis	
Frost, &., Seattle, Wash	
Kergarise, R. R., Newcastle, Pa....	
Ely, A., New York, N.Y	
Whited, H. E., Lynden, Wash	
Culliton, W. M„  Seattle, Wash	
Heater, F. F., Seattle, Wash ,
Hummer,  F.,  Seattle, Wash	
Hilen, A. R., Seattle, Wash	
Barte, T. C, Seattle, Wash	
McAllister, W. J., Bellingham, Wash..
Hooke, A., Bellingham, Wash	
Henderson, C. B., San Francisco, Cal...
Gregerson, T., Long Beach, Cal	
Murzburger, G., Los Angeles, Cal.-.	
Wilmcr—
Everett, R. W., Bervard, N.C	
Lynch, G. B., Bervard, N.C	
Cromwell, H. G., Banff, Alta	
Carpenter, R. E., Newport, Wash	
Williams Lake—
O'Mara, J. A.,  Carmel,  Cal	
Brown, D. C, Risedo, Cal	
Totals	
1
~25
31
39
0%
I ...
17
83  I  44
....   |   ...
51   |   11
Amount.
$25.00
105.00
130.00
185.00
80.00
100.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
5.00
50.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
50.00
50.00
75.00
50.00
75.00
15.00
50.00
40.00
50.00
50.00
75.00
10.00
15.00
30.00
25.00
10.00
15.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
15.00
5.00
15.00
10.00
55.00
75.00
105.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
70.00
$5,070.00 H 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions  (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1929, to December 31st, 1929.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
-     GO
: S
z R
•>     OS
s 0
OS
: 0
; P
Z o>
 , m
T3 a
So
Ho
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed.
Game Animals.
Game on premises of logging camp, etc	
Hunting deer between sunset and sunrise	
Killing or having in possession game animals of
female sex  [	
Killing or having game animals in possession during close season ....'.	
Possession of deer under 1 year of age	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals during
close season	
Possession of live game animals without a permit....
Possession of beaver castors illegally	
Running deer with dogs	
Removal of evidence as to sex of a game animal	
Selling or buying game animals	
Game Birds.
Allowing  dogs  to  hunt  game  birds  during  close
season   .:	
Buying or selling game birds 	
Exceeding daily bag limit on game birds 	
Game birds' on premises of shop, etc	
Hunting game birds from power-boat 	
Hunting or molesting game  birds in a prohibited
area  	
Hunting  upland   game   birds   between   sunset   and
sunrise 	
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle 	
Killing or hunting game birds during close season..
Possession of game birds during close season 	
Possession   of   migratory   non-game   birds   during
close season 	
Possession of eggs of game birds	
Trapping game birds 	
Using game birds as bait on a trap-line 	
Licences.
Buying fur without a licence 	
Carrying firearms without a licence 	
Doing taxidermy-work without a licence 	
Failing to produce licence on request of Game
Warden   	
Killing big game on an ordinary firearms licence.-..
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied by an adult	
Making false application for a licence 	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence	
Non-resident angling without a licence 	
Non-British subject carrying firearms without re-
1 quired licence : !	
Firearms.
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same
from an automobile, etc	
Carrying unplugged pump shotgun or possessing
automatic shotgun  ..'. !	
Carrying firearms or traps in game reserve	
Discharging firearms on or across highway in a
municipality  	
14
2
1
1
2
5
2
3
13
3
1
4
6
2
1
2
9
2
19
15
1
1
2
8
41
3
3
5
11
1
1
13
2
5
3
3
108
1
10
39
3
112
1
5
1
10
7
7
15
42
$165.00
25.00
655.00
595.00
210.00
615.00
10.00
50.00
45.00
10.00
30.00
130.00
20.00
75.00
45.00
25.00
90.00
20.00
30.00
660.00
680.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
300.00
1,228.50
15.00
40.00
50.00
70.00
60.00
260.00
132.00
10.00
415.00
185.00
95.00
45.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 45
Prosecutions  (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st, 1929, to December 31st, 1929
—Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
: R
W.5
; fl
at
-. a
^ fl
Z   1>
.wCJ
E-i o
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Trapping.
Allowing traps to remain set after end of open
season   	
Interfering with licensed trapper's trap-line	
Trapping or carrying traps w-ithout a licence 	
Trapping during the closed season 	
Trapping on other than a registered trap-line 	
Miscellaneous.
Carrying firearms in automobile, etc., during close
season without a permit 	
Exporting pelts of fur-bearing animals without
payment of royalty 	
Failing to keep record-book of furs purchased 	
Obstructing or furnishing false information to a
Game Warden 	
Trespassing 	
B.C. Special Fishery Laws.
Catching redfish (Kokanee) in stream where fish
ascend to spawn or during close season	
Exceeding daily bag limit on trout 	
Fishing with salmon-roe 	
Fishing with nets and selling fish illegally	
Fishing for trout in non-tidal waters other than by
angling	
Fishing during the closed season or in prohibited
area  	
Jigging salmon 	
Taking trout under 8 inches in length	
Obstructing Fishery Guardian   	
Gaol Sentences.
Carrying firearms without a licence 	
Killing game of the female sex  ,	
Killing or selling game animals during close season
Carrying loaded firearm in automobile	
Obstructing Fishery Guardian 	
Pit-lamping 	
Possession of game during close season 	
Possession of deer from which evidence of sex has
been removed  	
Trapping without a licence 	
Trapping during closed season	
Totals 	
79
10
68    134  |  64
I
11
224
33
569
10
20
602
$30.00
140.00
740.00
60.00
90.00
80.00
115.00
191.00
45.00
7.50
152.00
10.00
15.00
32.50
179.50
1,008.00
2, 14 days ; 1,
15 days; 2,
30 days.
2 months.
30 days.
14 days.
2 months.
5, 30 days ; 1,
45 days; 1,
90 days.
6, 30 days ; 1,
60 days ; 1,
7 days.
30 days.
30 days.
1, 60 days ; 1,
3 months.
Note.—" A " Division : Vancouver Island area and part of mainland. " B " Division : Kootenay and
Boundary areas. " C " Division : Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division :
Atlin, Skeena, Omine"ca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon .Boundary areas. " E " Division : Vancouver,
Coast, and Lower Mainland areas. H 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement showing Migratory Game Birds banded by Members of Game Department, 1929,
and Returns received of Birds killed.
Date of
Banding.
No. of
Band.
Kind of
Bird
banded.
Sex of
Bird
banded.
Place where
banded.
Returns.
Date.
No. of
Band.
Killed at.
1924.
April    7
1928.
Nov.     9
1929.
Jan.      1
1
„        1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
5
Aug.   29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
.,      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„     29
„      29
„     29
„      29
„      29
„      29
„      29
Pin
Aid
tail	
M
F
ale	
Lulu Islanc
1   .
1929.
Jan.   12
„     13
305433
A-602607
Colusa Co    Cal
lard
A-624140
A-624141
A-624142
A-624143
A-624144
A-624145
A-624146
A-624147
A-624148
A-624149
A-624150
A-624151
326316
326317
326318
326319
326320
326321
326322
326323
326324
326325
326326
326327
326328
326329
326330
326331
326332
326333
326334
326335
326336
326337
326338
326339
326340
326341
326342
326343
326344
326345
326346
326347
326348
326349
326350
,,    	
'        	
Elk Lake, V
.1.
M
F
imale....
Male	
Female
Male
Female
*
Oct.   15
	
M
Fe
ale	
326318
Thetis Lake,  V.I.
male....
Male
Female....
M
Fe
lie	
Male
Female	
Male
Female....
Male
Female	
»
'   	
1
~
•'. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929. H 47
Returns from 1,226 Holders of Trappebs' Licences, showing the Big Game, Fur-bearing
and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1928-29.
Big Game.
Bear  245
Moose  '.  294
Goat   100
Sheep   11
Caribou    74
Deer   619
Wapiti  (elk)    5
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver   3,099
Fox   469
Fisher     232
Lynx  748
Marten ,.  3,747
Mink  2,087
Muskrats   14,452
Otter  347
Racoon   199
Skunk  1,099
Weasel     29,651
Wildcat   127
Wolverine   163
Predatory Animals.
Coyotes    293
Cougar   24
Wolves   19
Badger  ... 9 H 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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H 49
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Connor, E. E., 1242 West Tenth Avenue, Vancouver..
Considine, Frank A., R.M.D. 1, Duncan	
Continental  Blue  Foxes,   Ltd.,   1949  Albert   Street,
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Cranbrook Silver Black Fox Ranch, Cranbrook	
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DeRoon, Martinus J., Buena Vista Road, White Rock...
Dewdney,   Alfred,   Kelowna	
Dowsett. Ed. S.. Pavilion	
Duggan, Joseph S., Wlnfield	
Dushevsky, H. E., Pouce Coupe	
Dvorak, Wenzel, P.O. Box 873, Fernie	
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Foote, Howard Roy, Stellaco	
Forbes,  Douglas, Cowichan Bay	
Forbes, F. Gilbert, 122-Mile House, Lac la Hache
Fowler, J. J., Great Glacier, via Wrangell, Alaska....
Freding,  E.  N.,  Princeton	
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H 51
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H 53
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Green Lake via Alta Lake....
rrington	
nd.  V.T.          ....
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Mollett, P. C, Fulford
Mons Valley Fur Farm
Morrison, Mrs. M. C, I
Morrison, W. B., Colwo
Mortnn.   R    S .   Atlin
Mountain View Pox Fa
Mullen, ,Tos., Sr. and J
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Newnham, Thomas, Po
Nichol, Charles, Vandei
Nicholas, Anthony, Cla
Nord, 0. A.,  McMurphy
Nord, Olaf, McMurphy
Norie, Evelyn H., Cow
Norie, Henry A., Cowic
Norris, C. B., and Turn
Norris, Joseph, New W
Oben, A. R., Lasqueti I
Okanagan Silver Fox F<
Oulton, Geo., Smithers
Owen, C. N. and Mary
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II 55
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H 57
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bird Census, 1929, showing Monthly Census
Game
Division.
Ducks.
Month.
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95
11
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3
125
11
3
1
45
62
90
15
8
11
93
56
6
15
84
9
8
38
55
11
22
80
'106
25
10
41
3
30
36
26
50
64
15
30
5
17
5
5
11
32
26
60
12
6
5
4
35
21
80
3
506
31
139
1
3,073
100
19
1
52
440
58
196
4
851
208
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871
352
175
9
4
47
20
30
10
102
300
150
350
150
209
200
110
100
200
80
195
33
2,500
150
8
11
8
9
10
45
9
23
20
200
15
20
16
75
102
9
123
12
12
150
4
18
200
47
250
24
250
133
71
58
2,031
4
17
4
56
10
5
8
50
12
7
25
1,500
105
2,011
5
March	
3
165
240
31
1
40
31
36
199
175
13
465
11
309
686
1,500
45
245
3
6
May	
488
84
419
66
24
388
71
141
6
221
40
22
50
6
6
7
17
12
25
52
July	
665
22
67
8
200
75
50
87
55
300
337
276
657
20
350
3,209
162
151
95
3
55
120
20
August	
28
80
300
114
16
108
20
400
184
223
40
250
100
September	
50
300
150
430
5,927
243
78
554
1,185
465
100
290
120
527
60
1,630
7
15
35
150
300
57
225
289
3,000
20
243
45
Totals
1,447
327
24,869
5,326
273
5,055
8,128
3,641
152
4,872 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER, 1929.
H 59
TAKEN BY GAME WARDENS IN EACH  GAME DIVISION.
Ducks.
Geese.
Swans.
'5
3
fa
•a
cd
o
S3
-a
o
fa
CJ
«
A
ED
ej
fl
1
— <*
-a a
a 3
3 o
liW
o fr.
3 02
O CO
fr. o
Ofa
o
V
o
a
to
a
fa
d
3 <?
.a b
cfa
o-a
So
-cJO
tx
-a
•o
a
fa
-a
o
o
fe
o
o
CJ
fe
o
B
CO
3
-a
3
B
3
CJ
fa
a
3
fr.
fa
tb
a
S
Total.
200
100
149
6
3
9
80
100
5
100
25
150
35
33
54
4
21
212
25
62
17
4
55
4
11
2
30
15
116
612
8
206
560
726
175
510
35
142
74
10
8
4
42
13
19
350
270
1
3
1
8
40
165
150
9
27
20
35
57
216
11
63
17
46
206
38
248
3
43
175
59
20
3
200
19
150
150
20
75
170
72
300
30
12
75
3
80
125
475
15
158
100
400
12
12
6
86
100
8
125
17
150
210
14
85
20
2,500
3,000
3
2
60
800
7
88
2
33
202
15
12
87
36
1
5
124
200
97
25
250
7
12
400
7
15
90
146
300
67
18
11
600
22
56
100
600
700
2,500
6
20
00
20
1
20
16
5
3
17 ■
40
3,235
31
3,000
3,580
27
4,001
14
42
200
11,523
1,277
28
46
881
4,547
26
2
81
1
800
1,861
177
1,159
45
1,471
87
50
10,826
1,257
27
1,377
3,811
11
318
1,110
1,350
2
84
20
37
10
340
2,674
580
1,278
1
20
131
491
998
511
6
297
689
26
8
181
300
1,624
427
90
328
52
175
1,305
200
400
800
30
31
400
100
365
245
939
1,987
8
9
500
1,023
1,500
106
331
1,359
182
500
2,415
1,205
48
20
174
73
1,550
293
4,975
1,287
76
150
3,279
3
2,590
11,831
1,233
40
300
146
50
246
108
57
1,387
7,287
2,330
152
79
1
3,462
15,262
577
851
3,764
53
3,740
500
825
10,610 1 5,565
1
3,735 1
4,057
81
103,710 H 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Personnel of Game Department as at December 31st, 1929.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General (Minister) R. H. Pooley, K.C Victoria.
Provincial Game Commissioner A. Bryan Williams Vancouver.
Chief Clerk P. R. Butler Vancouver.
Game Warden-Clerk T. H. M. Conly Vancouver.
Game Warden-Clerk R. P. Ponder Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss N. Bryce Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss T. Jones Vancouver.
" A " Division (Vancouver Island and Portion of Mainland Coast).
District Game Warden J. W. Graham Nanaimo.
Game Warden B. Harvey Courtenay.
Game Warden P. P. Weir Cowichan Lake.
Game Warden R. Marshall _ Duncan.
Game Warden O. Mottishaw Alert Bay.
Game Warden A. Monks Alberni.
Game Warden R. Gidley Victoria.
Game Warden S. H. McCall Victoria.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Thompson Nanaimo.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Game Warden R. M. Robertson Penticton.
Game Warden N. Cameron Cranbrook.
Game Warden I. J. Brown Natal.
Game Warden H. J. Broley Fernie.
Game Warden D. Greenwood Canal Flats.
Game Warden W. J. Nixon Invermere.
Game Warden A. S. Cochran Windermere.
Game Warden H. H. Creese Nelson.
"C" Division (Kamloops, (Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
District Game Warden R. D. Sulivan Kamloops.
Game Warden W. O. Quesnel Kamloops.
Game Warden G. D. McKenzie Clinton.
Game Warden F. E. Aiken Williams Lake.
Probationer F. D. Kibbee Barkerville.
Game Warden W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden C. F. Kearns Salmon Arm.
Game Warden A. E. Farey Lillooet.
Game Warden C. F. Still Vernon.
Probationer Leon Jobin Kamloops.
Game Warden N. L. Robinson Quesnel.
Game Warden J. F. Ritchie Merritt.
Stenographer Miss C. M. Turner Kamloops.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
District Game Warden T. Van Dyk Prince George.
Game Warden C. D. Muirhead Telkwa.
Game Warden T. S. Clark Fort Nelson.
Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden L A. Graham Prince George.
Stenographer Miss J. C. Smyth Prince George. fe
REPORT
OF
PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSIONER,
1929.                      H
61
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
District Game Warden J. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Game Warden  AV. Clark   Vancouver.
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden....
 T. D. Sutherland	
 A. P. Cumjmins	
 L. H. Walker	
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
...Vancouver.
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden-
 H. C. Pyke	
...Cloverdale.
 J. A. Stuart	
 W. H. Cameron	
 A. J. Butler	
Mission City.
Ladner.
Chilliwack.
...Port Coquitlam.
 Frank Urquhart          	
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden...
 George Williams	
Abbotsford.
Powell River.
Vancouver.
...Vancouver.
 R. E. Allan	
 G. C. Stevenson	
 E. W. Baker	
Game Warden
Game Warden
Probationer	
tory
Elk Lake Game Farm.
 J. W. Jones	
...Victoria.
 E. Boorman	
 G. Cuthbert	
 W. Mudse	
Victoria.
Victoria.
...Victoria.
Probationer	
Special Game W
Special Game W
Special Game W
Preda
arden	
animal Hunters and Special Game Wardens.
 J. C. Smith    Comox.
arden	
arden	
 G. Aikman	
 C. Shuttleworth	
Millstream.
Penticton.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chart.es F. Banfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.
825-730-599 

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