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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THIRTY-FOURTH REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING NINETEENTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1931]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIRTY-FOURTH REPORT
OP   THE
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
NINETEENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF
SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1930
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1929.
To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Provincial Board of Health
for the year ended June 30th, 1930.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1930.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Thirty-fourth Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended June 30th, 1930.
The Annual Report of the Provincial Board of Health is primarily engaged in reporting the
statistics of communicable diseases which come within the purview of the Department, and, by
comparing the number of cases as reported from year to year, gauge the results of the work of
the Board. This is the general conception that the public has of our work, but as we progress
we have endeavoured to show the public that the number of cases of infectious diseases reported
is more a criticism of, not the Department, but of the conduct of the community itself in regard
to their non-observance of the law of the land.
Our whole effort has been directed along the lines of the awakening, in the public conscience,
of a sense of their responsibility, and that the results from the enforcement of the health laws
can only be brought about by co-operation on the part of the public. Governments may make
laws, but they can only keep a step or two ahead of what the public desires, and to get at the
desires of the public necessitates a long-continued propaganda in an effort to educate them to
their responsibilities. I am pleased to say that during the past few years there has been a
remarkable awakening of the public conscience in this matter. They are beginning to realize
what the individual as regards his relation to the community means, and as regards the efforts
he must make individually in the prevention of disease by attention to personal hygiene, the
education of himself and others in the idea of the prevention of disease as distinct from its
cause. The inculcation of this idea has been our aim, and our efforts have been to create a
broader outlook by the health-work as carried on by the Government.
Formerly it was the highest ambition of public-health workers to show each year a
diminished morbidity and mortality rate from certain named diseases. If the Public Health
Officer could show that in a brief period of his incumbency he had cut the typhoid death-rate
down to one-fifth of its former proportions and had a steadily diminishing rate for scarlet fever
or diphtheria, he felt that he had done a great deal. But within the past few years we have
had a higher ambition. We have felt that we must deal with more than the negative side of
health, and that it was most distinctly within the province of a Health Officer to put forth every
effort to raise the vitality of every human unit in his community to the highest point of efficiency.
He must no longer be satisfied with the knowledge that from the result of his efforts a number
of individuals have survived who might have died from some preventable disease, but he must
also feel that he must lay a foundation for the robust citizens of to-morrow, and so our ideals
have advanced, taking in not only the previous field of sanitation, but also that of personal
hygiene. ■
How to reach the individual, however, has been the problem. Health Officers could not
personally supervise the daily life of each individual in the community, and he recognizes, therefore, the necessity for educational measures, directed both to the end of securing better understanding, and hence better support, to the Health Department, and also to so educate the
individual: as to furnish him with the knowledge of how to promote his individual health and
with the incentive to put that knowledge into effect.
That we are accomplishing our purpose is largely due to the fact that a sufficient number
of the citizens have beeome thoroughly interested, and through them, as individuals, organizations
have been reached, and public-health work in British Columbia is able to show milestones of
-progress from year to-year. " .......
The greatest advance which we have made is to be noted in the establishment of full-time
health units. We have now, in British Columbia, six, and for three of these we are indebted
to the Rockefeller Foundation for financial assistance. I would refer you to the report of the
Medical Health Officer published in the school division in this Report, as it is evidence of
what has been accomplished at Saanich.    The school report from Kelowna gives an itemized R 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
account of the public-health work as carried on by the Public Health Nurse under the Medical
Health Officer, and is most comprehensive.
The work preceding the establishment of these units was wearisome, to say the least of it,
but by concentrating on some points of the districts, where we were endeavouring to establish
the unit, produced its results, and during the past year what has been accomplished has verified
all our predictions and has satisfied the local authorities that they have made a really worthwhile investment.
The Municipal Councils appreciate the great falling-off in the costs of the health-work as
carried on previously, and the satisfaction of the parents in regard to the examination and
management of the school-children, while they cannot be evaluated in dollars and cents, is
a sure indication that these units are upon a permanent basis.
I would suggest that any one reading our Report would turn to the pages where we deal
with the school-work, and the account of the results obtained, and particularly the outline of
the work as being carried on, will be illuminating.
The establishment of a full-time Medical Health Officer results in his being surrounded by
a useful organization, and the influence of a competent man on the job, just as in any other
business, is rapidly reflected in better water-supplies, increased sewerage facilities, better protection of milk and food, with resulting lower mortality rates.
There is also a great co-operation from the medical profession. Where part-time men are
employed as Medical Health Officers the disadvantages are very apparent. As a rule, the part-
time Medical Health Officer has no training in public health, except what he gains by experience;
often he loses practice in cases of communicable disease; people find that they are " shut in "
by the Medical Health Officer, but may escape if the case is seen by another doctor. Ph5rsicians
are singularly reluctant to report cases of communicable disease to one who is in competition
with them in practice. All these factors—the poor pay, want of co-operation, lack of educated
public opinion, and, above all, lack of funds—contribute to render a part-time health service of
little value to the community.
We have made a good beginning in British Columbia in the establishment of these and are
carrying on the educational work.
INFECTIOUS DISEASES.
In regard to infectious diseases, there has been a much more marked falling-off in the
number reported than last year.
Diphtheria is a third less; there were about 1,600 cases of mumps, as compared with 4,260
the year before; measles shows a 50-per-cent. reduction in the number of reported cases.
In regard to scarlet fever, I can quote from a speech made by a local physician at the
congress of teachers at Kelowna, when he says:—
" Our pupils have been exceptionally free from epidemics during the year. Just one
disease—namely, scarlet fever—for a couple of weeks threatened last autumn to break out, but
prompt methods of isolation of the affected ones, close subsequent observation of all contacts,
and inoculation of the vast majority of the pupils against the disease who showed by the Dick
test a sensitiveness to scarlet fever, enabled us to escape with only seventeen cases in all. This
was very creditable and very fortunate, as in a city to the south of us the schools were all closed
for weeks, and scores of cases of scarlet fever occurred."
In Kelowna scarlet fever has been a very prevalent disease, but in 1929 immunization was
carried out and 1,050 children were immunized, and at the beginning of 1930, 797 children
were immunized. There occurred twenty-three cases of scarlet fever in Kelowna and district,
all in children who were not immunized on account of refusal of the parents to do teo. None
of the children, who were not immunized on account of a negative Dick test, fell ill with the
disease.
This is being followed in Kelowna by immunization for diphtheria, which was begun
immediately on the opening of the schools in September. Slips were sent to the parents asking
for their consent, and 85 per cent, of the slips were returned asking that the immunization be
carried out. We attribute this splendid result to the fact that the public recognized that scarlet
fever had been practically wiped out in the district owing to the immunization against it. We
are receiving splendid support from the public. Vaccination against smallpox is being carried out in the face of much opposition from our
good friends the anti-vaccinationists, and we are pleased to report a decided falling-off in the
cases of smallpox—from 738 last year to 157 this year.
There were forty-two cases of poliomyelitis reported, with six deaths, as against 116 cases
last year.    We were very fortunate in this respect.
It is to be noted that, with the improvement in our epidemiological branch during the past
year, the cases of contagious diseases were very much better reported, and consequently the
decreases this year, in view of the better reports, mean a great deal more than simply noting
the difference as between the number of cases reported in both years.
It is a splendid indication that, in spite of our " anti " friends, the people are recognizing
more and more, from our closer contact with them and our educational campaigns, the remedy
for epidemics lies in their own hands.
During the early part of this year the public press were reporting, particularly in California,
the development of a number of cases of psittacosis, which is an infectious disease transmitted
through parrots. The crews of ships from the Orient make a business of bringing over birds
in an effort to make a little money, and these are sold to various people at the points of landing.
In March two cases were reported by Dr. Ridewood, of Victoria. This was followed in
April, 1930, of a report by the Medical Health Officer of Burnaby, Dr. Mcintosh, on the Mainland, of seven cases. A number of people became infected and we had to request the Federal
Government to place an embargo on the landing of these birds. This was done immediately, at
the request of the Provincial Government. After the embargo came into effect there were no
further cases shown.
Dr. Chisholm, our Epidemiologist, reported fully, and copies of his report were sent to the
United States authorities, who had shown a great interest and assisted in a most courteous
manner in our attempts to control the condition.
TUBERCULOSIS.
As regards tuberculosis, we have a slight falling-off this year in the number of cases reported.
At the same time, we are seriously concerned with the question of T.B.
When consulting the figures, in the report of our Travelling Diagnostician, for T.B., the
large Indian population, the fact that the climate in our Province invited demobilization of our
army, a privilege which was granted by the Government, which accounts for 400 cases at the
Sanatorium, all must be taken into consideration. Further, the climatic conditions induce
many people who are affected to come to British Columbia.
In discussing this matter with the Superintendent of our Sanatorium, I asked if he would
give us suggestions as to such changes that might be brought about to enable us to assume a.
larger control of the incipient cases. People suffering from the disease will not go to the
Sanatorium until too late. The result is that we have many advanced cases there that should
not be in the institution at all. While we recognize that an advanced case in the home is a
great menace, yet under the scheme which has been suggested these advanced cases would have
to be taken care of by the local hospitals, and we would concentrate our work on an educational
programme.    Dr. Lapp, the Superintendent of the Sanatorium, reported as follows:—
" It is quite apparent, from the high death-rate and the long waiting-list for admission to
the Sanatorium, that more active and vigorous methods should be adopted to deal with tuberculosis in the Province.
" Under the present arrangements, only a small percentage of the active cases can receive
treatment at the Sanatorium. Many of these remain for long periods (from one to several
years), becoming homeless while there. They also lose all ambition and gradually become more
and more discontented and unappreciative of the costly care and treatment provided for them.
Those patients who are kept waiting for admission have had no training in the proper methods
of treatment. Therefore they usually become worse and are often in the incurable stage by the
time we are able to admit them. This is not true of Tranquille alone, but all large Canadian
sanatoria have the same experience.
" There are two ways in which the situation may be met. The first, a very expensive way,
would be the building of more and more Sanatorium accommodation to admit all diagnosed cases R 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
and provide long periods of treatment. The other is not so passive and much less expensive.
It is the limitation of the stay of all patients in the Sanatorium and the establishment of a'
Field Service sufficient to supervise all patients and contacts before and after their period of
Sanatorium education. I feel convinced that the latter is the method which will do the greatest
good to the greatest number and would strongly recommend that such a plan be put in operation
at an early date.
" I recommend this plan for your consideration because it involves no capital expenditure,
promises to produce the quickest return, and can be dropped at any time if it is not found to
be satisfactory. It should postpone the need for additional Sanatorium beds for a long time,
reduce the cost of treating each patient, shorten the period of treatment, and be of great
educational value.
" Briefly, the plan is to create a new department at the Sanatorium to be known as the
Field Service Department, and the Sanatorium would become the centre of all Government antituberculosis activities. The Medical Superintendent might be called the Director of Tuberculosis
Work. It is most important that the Sanatorium and Field Service work be under one direction, so that uniform policies can be formulated to guide the patient, both in the Sanatorium
and in the home.
" The Field Service Department would be composed of a central office at the Sanatorium, in
charge of a competent Public Health Nurse with tuberculosis training, and extension clinics
and visiting nurses working out from the Sanatorium.
" Each clinic would be composed of a doctor and a nurse. They would require a portable
X-ray outfit. They would work with the family doctor, diagnosing new cases, examining contacts, studying home conditions, and advising about treatment while the patient was in the home.
A visiting nurse for each district should supplement the work of the clinic. To give adequate
service the Province should be divided into districts of such a size that one clinic could cover
a district each month.
" Instead of being, as at present, a resthaven for a few of the tuberculous, the Sanatorium
would become an educational centre and a much more active institution than at present. All
newly diagnosed cases would be sent to it for a period of education and treatment varying
according to the particular needs of each. No patient would be kept in the Sanatorium for more
than four to six months unless some special treatment made it advisable.
" After the period of education and treatment at the Sanatorium the patient would be
returned to the home, where he would continue treatment under the guidance of the field-
workers. During the time the patient was in Sanatorium the people at home would be advised
regarding preparations for receiving the patient back. The Sanatorium officials would be
familiar with home conditions and therefore in a better position to advise the patient.
" Other advantages of this plan would be: First, the amount of valuable data which could
be gathered by the field-workers; second, a great many more people would assume their responsibilities towards the sick members of their families; third, an increased revenue for the
Sanatorium would result from the investigations of the field-workers; and also from the
knowledge that treatment in Sanatorium would be necessary for a few months rather than
a few years.
" The cost of such a plan would depend on the number of clinics necessary. I believe that
three clinics could do the work. The cost of each clinic, including salaries and expenses of the
doctor and two nurses and the X-ray expenses, would amount to about $13,000 per annum.
It is already costing the Government over $6,000 for the inadequate service provided by one
clinic, so that the increased cost would not be more than $35,000 at the most. This is very
cheap compared with the cost of providing more beds. Fifty beds would mean a capital expenditure of at least $125,000 and an annual maintenance of $50,000, and-would do very little
towards dealing with the tuberculosis problem.
" Under present conditions we can treat at the Sanatorium only 330 patients. Estimating
conservatively by standard methods, there are over 2,000 active cases of tuberculosis in the
Province. Also under present conditions 330 patients are reaping the entire benefit of the
Sanatorium. The remainder of the active cases, whose need is just as great, do not get any
chance whatever which might come to them from a period of education and treatment in the BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 9
Sanatorium. This is most unfair. An institution designed to serve all the taxpayers should not
be restricted to the few who, by good fortune, manage to gain admission and remain for
indefinite periods because there is no other provision made for them. For the Sanatorium to
do the greatest good for the greatest number it will be necessary to institute some plan whereby
all diagnosed cases can receive the benefit of its education.
" This plan is not entirely new, as I find it is being successfully carried out in parts of the
United States and a somewhat similar plan is to be instituted in the Maritime Provinces. An
active field force is engaged in Saskatchewan chiefly in diagnostic work and gathering material
for statistics. Saskatchewan provides more Sanatorium beds and does not stress home treatment. I favour home treatment, but only after a suitable period of education at the Sanatorium,
and, I might add, only under skilled guidance.
" Now that I have a good, well-organized staff at the Sanatorium, I feel capable of assumine-
the duties entailed in directing this extra department which seems to me to be so necessary at
the present time. I would recommend that it be given a trial for either three or five years
and feel confident that the results would be very gratifying."
Accompanying our Report is a graph showing and contrasting the death-rates from tuberculosis and cancer. It may be noticed that the tendency of the cancer results is consistently
upwards.
LABORATORIES.
In regard to our laboratories, we have arrived at the parting of the ways. We have been
subsidizing two laboratories connected with our largest hospitals.
The public-health work has increased to where 5S per cent, of the work done in these
laboratories is public-health work. The clinical side is suffering consequently, and the laboratories are not large enough nor sufficiently well staffed to meet this great increase. Consequently, a determination has been arrived at to establish a Provincial laboratory in Vancouver,
our commercial capital, in which we hope that we will be able to look after the work of the
City of Vancouver should such an arrangement meet with the approval of the city authorities.
In connection with the laboratory-work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out free on
request, and for the year ended June 30th, 1930, the following have been furnished: 8,955 points
smallpox vaccine, 8,144,000 units diphtheria antitoxin, 2,855 doses diphtheria toxoid, 31 packages
Schick test for diphtheria, 511 packages 2 cc. (prophylactic) scarlet fever antitoxin, 219 packages 15 cc. (curative) scarlet fever antitoxin, 166 packages Dick test for scarlet fever, 898 doses
scarlet fever toxin (for active immunization), 620 doses typhoid vaccine, 92,500 units tetanus
antitoxin, and 23 packages 20 cc anti-meningococcus serum.
HEALTH UNITS.
We are pleased to say that we have had another unit established, under a most capable
full-time Medical Health Officer, in the District of North Vancouver.
The progress and the work carried on at the points already established is being fully
reported on in this Report, and I would suggest that they be read over carefully, especially by
those in official positions who have the handling of the taxpayers' money.
Where we have established the units, the present expenditure is much below the cost of a
most inefficient service which was being carried on previous to the establishment of the unit;
that is, in actual money. The benefit to the health of the community, and particularly the
benefits to the children, the decrease in the loss of school-time, and the reduction in the number
of retarders in the schools, is hard to evaluate in dollars and cents, but these results are the
most valuable contribution to the work.
PUBLIC-HEALTH NURSING.
The establishment of the full-time health unit is the outgrowth of the educational work
following the establishment of the Public Health Nurses. We now have thirty-two Public
Health Nurses in the Province, in addition to the twenty-five or thirty School Nurses in the
cities.
There is a class at the University graduating in the spring of 1931 of eighteen, and we feel
confident that we will be able to place the majority of these. R 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CANCER AND TUBERCULOSIS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1920-1929.
TOTAL   DEATHS.
1910.       I3Zt.      192Z.     /9Z3.      1924,      1925.      1926.     1927.    1928.    1929.
Canccr,
Tu&zftcuuasiS.
zoo
RATE      PEP        1,000      OF      POPULATION.
CftNCER.
TuBEDCULOSIS. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 11
Our extension of the nursing service has been hindered by the fact that we have been
unable to obtain nurses that come up to our requirements. Our one basic requirement in our
public-health work is a trained personnel.
The nursing-work is carried on at present as a generalized work; that is, there is a certain
amount of nursing visits to people, but the nurse does not go in her capacity as a nurse, other
than to advise; she makes a call the same as a physician does, and the people are rapidly
grasping the fact that the nurses are teachers—" public-health teachers " is what we prefer to
call them.
I am including in the Report the report from the Kelowna Health Unit, submitted by Anne
Frances Grindon, R.N., nurse in charge, and it will in a general way give the basis of our work
in the schools.
We are incorporating a graph in this Report showing infant mortality rates in each Province
and the Dominion. British Columbia has a very enviable position during the past ten years,
as having the lowest infant mortality rate in the Dominion of Canada.
VENEREAL CLINICS.
Our venereal clinics are carrying on their work in a most satisfactory manner. Their real
purport is being better understood by the people and we are producing markedly good results in
rendering the syphilitic patients non-infective.
It has been ten years since we began the work in our clinics and the reduction in the cases
in our mental asylums suffering from the after-effects of syphilis has been more than 50 pet-
cent. ; but the preventive side is a problem which requires very earnest work to bring about
appreciable results.
As a result of the ten years' work, we feel that there has not been any appreciable difference
made in the incidence of syphilis, and we believe that concentration of our efforts on treating
and curing, or at least producing a non-infective condition, is our only hope for the future,
to prevent the transmission of the disease. This may be read as an admission of defeat in
regard to the results of prevention, but the question of prevention is so large and deals with the
control of forces that we consider does not come within the purview of the Health Departments.
Home influences and religious teaching are the means that would produce the greatest result in
regard to prevention. The responsibility for effecting a change through these influences does
not rest with the Health Departments.
Until the public realizes that venereal disease does not differ from any of the other infectious diseases, other than in the lasting effect which they produce, and should be treated as such
and not considered something that should be referred to only in whispers, can we hope to
produce any material effect in regard to prevention.
SANITATION.
With increased population, both permanent and transient, the work of this division has
increased to such an extent that it is continuous the year round, without observance of holidays.
New industries to develop our natural resources have called for more field-work, and in
this respect we are very fortunate indeed in the co-operation that we are receiving from the
management of the larger companies, and also of the individual workers, in the appreciation of
the fact of their appreciation of the value of good health as an asset in carrying out their work.
Briefly, our work comprises supervision of auto tourist camps, bathing camps, fruit-canneries,
fish-canneries, oyster-beds, mining and logging camps, and nuisances, and there is included in
this Report the Chief Sanitary Inspector's report of his activities during the past year.
Cemetery-sites approved.—Pemberton Meadows. Gellatly (private), and Harrop.
Sewage-disposal Systems approved.—Vancouver (extensions), Chilliwack City (extensions),
Burnaby Municipality (extensions), Kelowna (extensions), North Vancouver City (extensions),
and Oak Bay Municipality  (extensions).
Water-supply Systems approved.—Vancouver (extensions), Cranbrook (extensions), Burnaby Municipality (extensions), New Westminster (extensions), Glenmore Municipality, Coquitlam Municipality (extensions), Quesnel, Nanaimo (extensions), and Oak Bay Municipality
(extensions). R 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
INFANT MORTALITY BY PROVINCES AND CANADA AS A WHOLE, 1920-1929.
PATE    PER   1000 LIVING  XBlPtTHS.
1920.      1921.     1922.      1925.    1924.     1925.     1926.     1927.      19X8.   1929.
loo. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 13
, EDUCATIONAL.
Our educational efforts are carried out through a constant and increasing number of talks
to different organizations, and this is supplemented by our bulletins and pamphlets on various
subjects.    During the year we have distributed 240,000 pamphlets.
We have constant requests for these, and we use every avenue of distribution possible, and
in this connection, in reference to the advance of our work, I must express the Department's
great appreciation of the co-operation that we are receiving from the Women's Institutes of
British Columbia, of which there are 138 in the Province.
These institutes have made public-health work the most important branch of their programme and we are particularly pleased with the great interest they take in the work in the
schools. The individual members of these institutes have many calls upon their time, but they
have never varied in their interest nor in their co-operation with us in the health-work in
British Columbia, and we consider that the advances that we have made are largely due to their
interest, and what is particularly pleasing is the knowledge that this interest has never waned
and our outlook for the future in this respect is very promising.
We are appending a full report of the Medical Inspection of Schools, and I think any one
reading it will find it very interesting in the demonstration that we are able to give of the
improvements and the splendid manner in which our nurses are handling the work.
In conclusion, Sir, permit me to express for myself and staff our appreciation of the
co-operation which we receive from yourself, an interest that is based upon the idea of understanding the policies and details of the Department and lending to our success your help and
encouragement, and I would especially recommend for your consideration my own appreciation
of the splendid co-operation that I receive from the members of the staff. They have been with
us for a number of years, thoroughly understand the details of the work, and devote not a
perfunctory few hours a day, but an intelligent interest in the work that has been of great help
to me, for I feel that without their co-operation I should have felt very much lost.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial Health  Officer. GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1930.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour the present my Twentieth Annual Report on General Sanitary
Inspection for the Provincial Board of Health.
During the past year this branch of the Health Department has found its most arduous
duties that of dealing with nuisances, chiefly the result of industrial expansion adjacent to
thickly populated areas.
Every good citizen encourages and shouts for more factories and pay-rolls until smoke and
odour clouds his serenity;   then the Sanitary Officer must abate it or be damned!
Our flies have volumes to show where investors looking around for a site to start a tannery
or other such factory are invited and welcomed by Trade Boards and citizens to locate in their
midst; then after a season or so neighbours protest and petition for their removal because of
smoke or smell.
Fox-farms, abattoirs, fish-oil and fertilizer factories seem to be the chief offenders, and it
must be admitted are not desirable in a residential or business district.
Regulations are now being put into effect which will effectually check the trouble by
reasonable isolation.
SUMMER RESORTS.
About 95 per cent, of the numerous British Columbia summer resorts are located in unorganized territory. Order and sanitation rest almost entirely upon the hands of our Police-
Sanitary Officers. Every summer camp and swimming-beach has been well crowded this year
and without break or trouble of any nature at these health resorts. This, of course, is the
result of intelligent and cheerful co-operation on the part of our city visitors in quest of
recreation and health.
LOGGING CAMPS.
The logging industry is not as active as last year, but all camps comply fully with our
Industrial Camp Regulations. They are periodically visited by Provincial Police Sanitary
Officers and reported upon to this Department. The camp of twenty years ago would not be
tolerated by employer or employee to-day. The food supplied at industrial camps is equal to
the best hotels and the sleeping accommodation superior to the average city lodging-house. No
industrial strife exists in British Columbia to-day. We do not claim credit for such condition,
but it is fair to assume that the enforcement of regulations for improved health conditions for
the industrial workers must have had some part in the peaceful conditions now existing in our
logging and mining camps, and also in our company towns, where the sanitary conditions are
always commented upon most favourably by passing tourists or visitors.
FRUIT- AND VEGETABLE-CANNING ESTABLISHMENTS.
The majority of these establishments are located in sunny Okanagan. Our departmental
regulations governing the operation of these canneries have proved to be satisfactory and the
operators have co-operated most fully in observance. Train-loads of delicious fruit and vegetables are being shipped to growing and appreciative markets in Canada and overseas. This is
undoubtedly the result of the excellence of flavour and care in packing and handling. Grown,
picked, stored, and prepared with most exceptional climatic and sanitary conditions under
Government supervision, it would indeed be difficult to predict the future for such a desirable
and favoured food.
FISH-CANNERIES.
The salmon-fishing season just closing has been one of the best on record, quality and size
being all that could be desired.    The total pack amounts to 1,813,604 cases.    Fishermen have -1').* i'^tn
I  BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 15
reaped a rich harvest owing to high fixed price per fish. Approximately 135 canneries and fish
plants were operated this season. The regulations for the sanitary handling of fish have been
strictly observed by the canners throughout the season. Salmon landed on the cannery wharf
fresh and firm, and from then on to the time they are canned and cooked they are handled by
gloved human hands only for washing and cleaning the entrails from the fish; the balance of
the operation—cutting, filling, weighing, and cooking—is all performed by ingenious machinery.
Employees are furnished with clean linen uniforms and gloves whilst handling the raw fish.
The cannery floors, trays, and troughs are thoroughly washed daily during the canning season,
and all knives and machinery are under constant watchful eyes of mechanical experts to guard
against rust or fish cuttings, and thus the enviable reputation of British Columbia canned
salmon is maintained. It might also be added that these plants are also subject to frequent
visits by Provincial Board of Health Officers and also Federal Fishery Overseers.
OYSTER-CULTURE.
The cultivation of oysters at several points of our coast-line is now established and being
carried out with gratifying and profitable rewards. The quality is such that the demand from
outside points is beyond the supply. Every oyster-bed in British Columbia is located in waters
absolutely free from contamination and operated under sanitary conditions prescribed by this
Department and subject to frequent inspection.
During the past year we have been called upon to advise many of our progressive municipalities on matters of sewage-disposal, water-pollution, and nuisances.
The number of industrial camp inspections total 370; visits to canneries total 110; watershed visits total 9;  and visits to various sections for the abatement of nuisances total 23.
The foregoing gives an outline of the work of this branch of your Department. The service
has been carried out systematically and I have received cordial co-operation from employers and
employees alike. I have not had to resort to the Courts, and it would ill become me to conclude
without an expression of official gratitude to our Provincial Police for their generous and cheerful assistance throughout the length and breadth of British Columbia.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Chief Sanitary Inspector. R 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COMBINED REPORT OF TRAVELLING MEDICAL HEALTH OFFICER
AND INSPECTOR OF HOSPITALS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1930.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Seventh Annual Report as Travelling
Medical Health Officer and Inspector of Hospitals for the Province.
You will see from the statements given below that there has been a very great increase in
the number of cases examined at our clinics this last year, in comparison with other years. In
fact, the increase was so great that the clinical part of our work overshadowed the other
divisions of our activities—namely, the Educational and the Hospital Inspection Services. This
will be seen when these are dealt with later in this report. This condition of increasing numbers of examinations yearly is just a recurrence of what has taken place each year since the
work was started in 1923.    The increase is greater, however, in 1929-30.
This condition, I take it, is an evidence of the appreciation by the medical profession and
by the public in general of this line of public-health service. It was only made possible by the
hearty co-operation of the above named, along with the local Health Officers, Public Health
Nurses, but especially by the valuable assistance of the Travelling Nurse and X-ray unit provided
out of funds from the Christmas-seal sale.
It has been possible to cover the entire Province pretty thoroughly this last year and at the
same time to carry out our programme of clinics at stated times. Thus, Victoria has had regular
clinics of a week's duration—sometimes longer—every two months; Nanaimo, Ladysmith, and
Duncan, about three times a year; and clinic at New Westminster, begun early in 1929, has
been continued at three- or four-month intervals. This clinic appears to be a much appreciated
service, not only by the doctors of New Westminster, but by those from the Lower Fraser Valley
as well.    This clinic will be continued.
It is now our fixed policy to hold all clinics at hospitals instead of partly at doctors' offices,
as in the past. This was made necessary on account of our portable X-ray service, and I would
here like to express my appreciation of the hearty co-operation of the hospital lady superintendents and staffs in our work, often at considerable inconvenience to them. It, however,
has this advantage to the hospital, in that it makes it more or less a unit in public-health work
—a position I am convinced all our hospitals should occupy.
The total number of examinations made during the year was 1,779. Of these, 1,222 were
new cases and 557 were re-examinations.
The 557 cases returning for re-examination may be classified as follows: Pulmonary tuberculosis, 201; T.B. joints, 11; suspects, 95; 142 as various non-tuberculous findings (the most
important of which are pleurisy, mixed infection, bronchitis, bronchial asthma, bronchiectasis,
pneumonia, mediastinitis, empyema, silicosis, anthracosis, cervical adenitis, abscess lung, etc.) ;
and 108 as negative.
The 1,222 new cases may be classified as follows: 220 as positively tuberculosis, of which
186 were pulmonary tuberculosis and 34 non-pulmonary tuberculosis; 137 as suspects; 316 as
other chest conditions ; 6 non-tuberculosis bone conditions ; 49 other diagnosis ; and 494 negative
findings.
Of the above 1,222 cases, 233 were examined on account of contact only with open cases of
tuberculosis. Of these 233 cases, 18 were classed as positively tuberculosis, of which 11 were
pulmonary tuberculosis and 7 non-pulmonary tuberculosis; 34 as suspects; bronchitis, 4;
pleurisy, 7; mediastinitis, 11; cervical adenitis, 4 ; mixed infection, 2; other diagnosis, 3 ; and
negative findings, 150.
The pleurisies above mentioned were practically all of a chronic type, consequently presumably tubercular.
Classifying the new positive T.B. cases (pulmonary and hylus T.B. only) according to
nationality, making 186 in all, gives us the following': Born in British Columbia, 54, of whom
15 were Indians; other Canadian Provinces, 30; British Isles, 48; other European countries,
21;  United States of America, 9;  Japan, 4;   China, 3;  Hindu, 1;  and doubtful, 16. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 17
Of the 186 positive cases of T.B. diagnosis, 23,  or 12 per cent., had resided in British
Columbia less than three years.    The origin of these is as follows:—
Under 1 year—
Other Canadian Provinces      5
British      5
Foreign       6
From 1 to 2 years—
Other Canadian Provinces      2
British      2
Foreign       1
       g
From 2 to 3 years—
Other Canadian Provinces 	
British      2
Foreign  	
—      2
Total     23
NURSING AND X-RAY SERVICE.
The total X-ray examinations were 1,179. This X-ray work has been done for the most part
by our nurse, Miss J. B. Peters, whose services, as well as the X-ray equipment and upkeep, was
made possible through the Christmas-seal sale. As stated last year, a portable X-ray has many
advantages over using equipment available in each town, the most important of which is the
uniformity of the films, hence greater ease and accuracy of interpretation.
Miss Peters has been of great assistance also in making and filing reports of cases examined.
Aided by portable typewriter, all our reports to doctors are sent out in form of a letter instead
of on cards as formerly.    Records consequently are much more valuable than formerly.
Comparative Report. lo^s-'^g 1999-30
Total examinations      991 1,779
Re-examinations ."     290 557
New cases      701 1,222
Positive T.B. (new)       117 186
T.B. other organs       10 34
Suspects      95 137
Non-T.B     479 865
The number of clinics held during the past year has been 83. The new cases of tuberculosis in Greater Victoria during 1929-30 was 42.
You will notice in the figures above that there is a large number classed as suspects. This
is accounted for in many ways. We might say that in a goodly number we " suspect " they are
not tubercular. Any case that it was felt should be followed up and returned for future examination was put in this category, to assure that they would not be overlooked. Again, most of
the cases of pleurisy were so classed. Of these there were a particularly large number, more
than the year previous, and in 1928-29 I made special mention of it. These, with the large
number of cases classed as mixed infection, for want of a better name, cases which show peribronchial irritation on X-ray films and a history of a good deal of disability extending over long
periods of time, seem to be an ever-increasing number. At times it is very difficult to distinguish
these cases from tuberculous disease.'
In view of the great increase in clinical work, thus lessening time available for other
branches of the service of equal or greater importance, I would suggest that the question of
increasing the personnel of this branch be very seriously considered. A suggestion that I have
already made in a previous report seems to me feasible and would work to the benefit of the
public, also the institution. I refer to the suggestion of having one of the medical staff at Tranquille Sanatorium take part of clinics, in the Interior. I believe the Medical Superintendent,
Dr. A. D. Lapp, is prepared to give the matter consideration at least. There will probably be
sufficient funds available from the seal-sale to provide another nurse for such clinics. In fact,
there is sufficient work now to employ another nurse, and this has been seriously considered by
the Tranquille Publishing Society. R 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
One sees the necessity for greater education of the public when one comes in contact with
the irreparable damage that is being done by the indiscriminate use of heliotherapy or " suu
cure." The sun is a very powerful curative agent, but for that very reason should only be
taken in very well-regulated dosage. Every summer brings its quota of cases that had been
making good progress towards recovery. A short holiday at the beach and they return home
with a fairly quiescent lesion whipped into activity from which the patient may or may not
recover.
While for the last two years we have had to report an increase in our mortality statistics
from tuberculosis, a very marked increase in 1928, I ventured to suggest that this large rise was
probably only temporary or accidental, as it had happened in most of the other Provinces of
Canada a year or two previously. This is partly borne out by a moderate drop in the death-rate
for 1929.
There is some evidence that the type of disease is changing. We appear to be getting more
of the acute type of disease in the young adolescents. From information to hand, that does not
seem to be confined to British Columbia, but reports from other parts of Canada and also of
Europe are the same.
When the new 100-bed Greaves Building at Tranquille was in course of construction, we
believed that on occupation it would relieve the congestion there for some years to come. This,
however, has not proved to be the case to any great extent, as there is now almost continually
a waiting-list, making it difficult to get cases admitted when diagnosed, and some, at least, of the
early cases become moderately advanced ones before admission to the Sanatorium. This condition obtains not because of the increased number of tuberculosis cases, but the readiness with
which people accept Sanatorium treatment. It is very seldom that we now have a case that
refuses to go to Sanatorium when advised to do so, whereas a few years ago this was a very
common condition. Thus it would seem that we already should be considering how best to
extend our facilities for taking care of these unfortunate people. If the recommendations of the
Hospital Commission with regard to Vancouver should be carried out, it will tio doubt relieve the
condition partially, but this is a development that is going to take some years to fulfil.
The following analysis of deaths from tuberculosis is of interest:—
Chinese, British Columbia.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate pel-
Cent.,
all Deaths.
Chinese
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921                  	
49
64
44
40
44
59
50
45
43
220
232
228
211
195
224
211
224
258
22.26
27.58
19.29
18.95
22.56
26.34
23.69
20.08
16.66
23,533
23,.-)33
23.533
23.533
23,533
23.533
23,533
23.533
20,000
■>.os
1922	
1923                  	
2.72
1.87
1924    	
1.70
1925            	
1.S7
1926    	
2.55
1927              	
9 JO
1928  	
1.91
1929           	
2.15
British Columbia Indians.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate per
Cent..
all Deaths.
Indian
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921           	
104
99
133
125
155
145
151
175
170
364
370
432
457
436
416
524
497
540
28.57
26.76
30.79
27.35
35.55
" 34.85
28.81
35.21
31.48
25,694
25,694
25,694
25.694
24,316
24,316
24,316
24,316
25,107
4.05
1922            .'	
3.85
1923                      	
5.18
1924	
1925             	
4.86
6.37
1926	
5.96
1927                  	
6.20
1928....,	
7.19
1929       	
6.77 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 19
Japanese, British Columbia.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate per
Cent-
all Deaths.
Japanese
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921               .'...
33
22
24
23
33
28
35
27
39
142
190
158
150
195
161
209
170
191
23.24
11.58
15.19
15.33
16.92
17.39
16.74
15.88
20.41
15,006
15,806
16,004
17,418
18,226
19,048
19,048
19,048
19,455
2.19
1922	
1.38
1923	
1924 ,	
1.49
1.32
1925	
1.81
1926	
1.47
1927	
1.83
1928	
1.41
1929	
2.00
Races other than Chinese, Japanese, and British Columbia Indians.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate per
Cent.,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921              	
326
322
324
339
306
300
315
386
363
3,846
4,115
4,179
4,186
4,119
4,673
4,806
5,019
5,408
8.47
7.82
7.75
8.09
7.42
6.42
6.55
7.69
6.71
460,349
474,917
478,769
486,355
494,925
501,103
508,103
516,103
526,438
0.70
1922	
0.67
1923	
0.67
1924	
0.69
1925	
1926	
0.61
0.59
1927	
0.61
1928	
0.74
1929 ,	
0.68
British Columbia, all Races included.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate per
Cent,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921	
1922	
512
507
525
527
538
532
551
633
615
4,572
4,907
4,997
5,004
4,945
5,474
5,750
5,910
6,397
11.19
10.33
10.50
10.53
10.87
9.72
9.58
10.79
9.61
524,582
539,000
544.000
553,000
561,000
568,000
575,000
583,000
591,000
0.97
0.94
1923	
0.96
1924	
0 95
1925	
0.95
1926	
0 93
1927	
0.95
1928	
1.08
1929	
1 04
THE EDUCATIONAL PART OF THE WORK.
As stated earlier in this report, due to the great increase in the clinical service, educational
propaganda was of necessity neglected.
Addresses were given to one class of high-school pupils,; one District Convention of Women's
Institutes at Chilliwack; one Gyro Club ; one Rotary Club; one Public Health Nursing class
at the University of British Columbia; six classes of' nurses-in-training. I also attended the
annual meeting of the Tranquille Publishing Society.
HOSPITAL INSPECTION.
As Hospital Inspector, fifty-five private hospitals were inspected ; in one case four inspections
were made; in another, three; and still another, two. Also forty-one public hospitals and two
isolation units.
Twelve meetings with Hospital Boards were held ; twenty-three with committees of Boards;
and seventeen interviews with Superintendent and Secretary. R 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Private hospital licences issued during year, 51, of which 7 were new licences. Private
hospitals licences refused, 3.
During the past year I have attended meetings of the British Columbia Hospital Association ; the opening of the new wing of the Lourdes Hospital, Campbell River; interviewed Provincial Fire Marshal, Mr. Thomas; three visits to Tranquille Sanatorium; one staff luncheon,
St. Joseph's Hospital; four interviews, Mr. Winn and others of the Workmen's Compensation
Board; attended annual meeting of the British Columbia Medical Association, as well as
Summer School under the auspices of the same society; attended several meetings of the
Victoria Medical Society; three meetings of the Vancouver Medical Society, at which new
by-laws and new policy of the Vancouver General Hospital were discussed; also attended meeting of the Vancouver General Hospital Board, at which the representatives of the Vancouver
Medical Society presented their views to the Board re the change in policy from an open to
partially closed hospital; also attended inaugural meeting of the Hospital Commission on
November 4th at City Hall, Vancouver.
New hospitals or extensions have been made during the year as follows: New Nurses'
Homes at both the Royal Jubilee and St. Joseph's Hospitals in Victoria; the Tuberculosis
Pavilion at the Jubilee Hospital is being remodelled and added to; new Nurses' Home is in
course of construction at St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver; also a new one at the Royal Columbian
Hospital, New AVestminster, recently occupied; new wing has been added to Lourdes Hospital,
Campbell River, which brings that institution up-to-date and more than doubles the bed capacity;
new wing has been added at Penticton Hospital; and a new unit is in course of construction at
Trail, which when completed will about double their bed capacity and give some modern
facilities for isolation cases; a new hospital, very much needed, is in course of construction at
Hazelton; a small cotttage hospital has recently been opened at Creston. Burns Lake, I understand, has not yet got beyond the negotiation stage. Smithers still needs a hospital badly and
it is to be hoped that some arrangement of financing can be made shortly.
No questions of sufficient importance for a formal meeting of the Board of Arbitration were
submitted, but some informal discussions took place between the Inspector of Municipalities
and myself.
Once again I would like to express to you my keen appreciation of your cordial co-operation
and helpful assistance at all times in this particular line of health-work; also for much timely
advice in connection with hospital-work. I would also like to express my sincere thanks to the
doctors and nurses, and especially to nursing and clinical staffs of the many hospitals in which
clinics were held, for their ever-ready and willing co-operation.
I have, etc.,
A. S. Lamb, M.D.,
Travelling Medical Health Officer and Hospital Inspector.
KEPOET OF EPIDEMIOLOGIST.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., September 19th, 1930.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith a report of the epidemiological work for the
year 1929-30.
As there are many factors to be considered in the epidemiology of infectious diseases in
addition to the time, location, and number of cases, it was decided that every effort should be
spent in the beginning of our activities to establish a system of receiving reports of infectious
diseases which would quicken the Department's knowledge of their presence and at the same
time provide direct and periodic communication with the individual physicians of the Province,
or where there is a full-time urban or municipal health officer, indirectly through his department
with the physicians who are practising in his district. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 21
Accordingly, just as soon as the necessary arrangements could be made, a card system of
reporting was established toward the end of November. These cards were franked and stamped
with our return address and sent to the physicians of the Province every week, who in turn
entered the infectious diseases experienced in their clientele for the past week and returned to
the Department. These cards called for the number of individual cases, age, race, sex, and
location. Of the total number of cards sent out during the year, about 90 per cent, have been
returned, which illustrates that our information of infectious diseases is obtained from a source
which represents approximately 90 per cent, of the total population. It also shows that the
physicians have taken an active interest in supplying the Department with specific data.
By the use of graphs and further analysis of these statistics the rise and fall of the
infectious-disease incidence, collectively and individually, has been recorded for every month of
the year. The seasonal variations are also shown, and through the co-operation of the Department of Vital Statistics the fatalities from the diseases reported have been recorded. All of
which has provided the Department with a general view of health conditions and a numerical
evaluation of the communicable-disease incidence. It will also provide the Board of Health
with a greater wealth of material and data, which will be of benefit in the control of these
diseases in the future.
STANDARDIZED LIST OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASES.
In compiling this list the Dominion Council of Health has included all the infectious diseases
that may occur in Canada. The Provincial Board of Health has adopted this list as the notification standard for the Province, and it is from reports on the individual diseases comprising this
list that we have compiled our morbidity statistics.    The diseases included in the list are as
follows:—
Anthrax. Pellagra.
Actinomycosis. Plague.
Botulism. Pneumonia—
Cerebrospinal meningitis. (a.) Acute lobar.
Chicken-pox. (6.) Bronchial or lobular.
Cholera, Asiatic. Poliomyelitis.
Conjunctivitis (acute infectious, includ- Puerperal septicaemia,
ing ophthalmia neonatorum). Rabies.
Diphtheria. Scarlet fever.
Dysentery, amoebic and bacillary. Septic sore throat.
Encephalitis.    - ■           Smallpox.                 •
Erysipelas. Tetanus.
German measles. Trachoma.
Influenza, epidemic. Trichinosis.
Glanders. .            Tuberculosis.
Leprosy. Typhoid fever.
Malaria. Typhus fever.
Malignant cedema. Undulant fever.
Measles. Whooping-cough.
Mumps. Yellow fever.
Paratyphoid fever.
It is the intention of the Dominion Council of Health to standardize the reporting of these
conditions throughout Canada. On receipt of information by weekly and monthly reports from
the various Provincial Boards of Health regarding the prevalence of infectious diseases, the
Dominion Council of Health forwards its analysis to the Public Health Bureau of the League of
Nations. This system has been established in practically every country in the world, so that
in the end returns can be made up of the universal prevalence of infectious diseases and the
individual countries notified every week. Once a month this weekly report is followed by an
acute analysis of the epidemiological prevalence of the major infectious diseases. In adopting
this list of reportable diseases we are not only establishing a standard type of information for
the Province and Canada, but we are becoming indirectly associated with the department of the
League of Nations which has as its objective the consideration of infectious diseases from a
universal standpoint. For the year 1929-30 the infectious diseases reported to this Department are as follows:—
Diseases.                                                                                             Cases. Deaths.
Cerebrospinal meningitis          21 10
Chicken-pox      2,214 0
Conjunctivitis       351 0
Diphtheria       667 24
Dysentery         52 2
Dysentery   (amoebic) ...          1 0
Dysentery  (bacillary)             4 0
Encephalitis           2 4
Erysipelas          140 7
German measles  , ,       181 0
Influenza        1,224 88
Malaria ,           2 0
Measles     2,142 51
Mumps        1,688 Q
Paratyphoid  fever            11 1
Poliomyelitis          42 6
Scarlet fever j       616 8
Septic throat (including tonsillitis and quinsy)          191 11
Smallpox .'...'        157 0
Tetanus           1 1
Trachoma          10 0
Tuberculosis   '.       384 584
Typhoid fever          70 10
Undulant fever           3 0
Whooping-cough        1,701 14
Totals   11,875 821
Owing to the irregular manner in which pneumonia has been reported and also due to the
fact that our larger centres of population have not provided us with information regarding its
prevalence, it was felt that no good purpose would be served by quoting figures which represent
an indifferent picture of the prevalence of this condition. Accordingly, in our infectious-disease
total pneumonia is not included. Pneumonia deaths for the year, however, were 226.
The above list of reported diseases and deaths are shown in Graph A. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 23
GRAPH A.
Monthly Incident op Infectious Diseases reported for Year 1929-30.
July.    f\oc. Sett,   Oct.    Nov.   2>£C    J/i/v.    Fss.   Ha*,   fl?*.   /*7AY   June.
rOVQ
IS0O
Soo
Total diseases (less pneumonia), 11,875;   morbidity-rate per thousand, 20.
Monthly Deaths from Diseases reported above.
Jt"-r   fiua.   Sept.   Oct     Nov.  Xbe.c.  J**.    Feb.    H»n.    Am   /%*-  June.
Total deaths (less pneumonia), 821;   case fatality, 6.9 per cent. ;   crude death-rate per thousand, 1.4. R 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
As illustrated in Graph B, the year 1929-30 does not present an extraordinarily large number
of infectious diseases. The high peak in 1926-27 is due to an epidemic of measles and mumps.
The high peak of 1928-29 was due to a large number of measles reported. The new system of
reporting is not long enough established to provide satisfactory statistics for detailed comparison.
GRAPH B.
Infectious Diseases reported for Six-year Period, 1924-25 to 1929-30.
It>, 000
I A, OOO
IZ.000
to, ooo.
8,000
6,000
4.000
Z.000
192* IS.
1925-26.
/926Z7.
/9Z7-28.
1928-29.
1929- 30.
Although all of the diseases embodied in the notifiable-disease list must always be considered in public-health administration, there are some that rarely, if ever, occur in the Province.
They must, however, be constantly watched for and guarded against because of our economic
relations with countries in which they are more or less endemic. Of the remaining diseases
reported to the Department, it may be said that, with the exception of malaria, amoebic
dysentery, and psittacosis, their occurrence is relatively common. Of these, tuberculosis,
cerebrospinal meningitis, poliomyelitis, typhoid, diphtheria, and scarlet fever occasion a major
public-health problem, either because of their high mortality or because of the potential danger
and complications that are associated with them. But because of the great number of persons
affected and the danger which is always associated with them in epidemic formation, measles,
chicken-pox, mumps, whooping-cough, and smallpox occupy an important position also.
TUBERCULOSIS.
Graph C shows the monthly number of cases and deaths from tuberculosis reported for the
year 1929-30, together with the average monthly deaths for a six-year period, 1924-25 to 1929-30.
This graph shows that the greatest number of cases and deaths are reported for the months of
February, March, April, and May. The average deaths for the six-year period closely follow
the monthly mortality trend for the year 1929-30.
Graph D is a comparison of the deaths and cases for a six-year period. It will be seen that
the trend of reported cases is decidedly upward. This upward trend is not due so much to an
increase in the disease as it is due to a great improvement in the reporting of tuberculosis by the
physicians of British Columbia. The year 1929-30 shows the largest number of cases reported,
but it will also be seen that for this period the deaths show a decided decrease. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 2
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRAPH D.
Yearly- Tuberculosis Cases and Deaths reported for Six-year Period,
1924-25 to 1929-30.
1924-25. - 1925-26.     1926-27.      1917-28.     1928-29.    1S29-30.
^
^
\
500
^~^_^
x^
s"
/
\
/
\
/
Zoo
 Cn-s£s.  Deaths-
TYPHOID FEVER AND POLIOMYELITIS.
There is nothing extraordinary about Poliomyelitis and Typhoid Graphs E and F. We
have been extremely fortunate in only having to contend with forty-two cases of poliomyelitis
and 70 cases of typhoid for the year. For the previous five years cases of typhoid reported are
as follows:—
1924-25   109
1925-26   109
1926-27      64
1927-28  ..,     67
1928-29      89 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 27
GRAPH E.
Poliomyelitis Cases and Deaths for 1929-30.
Jat.Y      Aoa.   So>r.    Oct.     Nov    J>£jC     J/)r-i.   ft^B.   tftm     fipp.    M/\r   June.
CftSES
X>£Lftrt1S.
Total cases, 42 ;  total deaths, 6 ;  case fatality, 14.5 per cent.
GRAPH F.
Typhoid Cases and Deaths for 1929-30.
July     ftoa   Sept.   Oct.   Nov.    2>£c    £>w.    ^b.    m**.   /h>*     /"*,>'    June
f X
lo ■
11
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Cases.
3>£»TH-&-
Total cases, 70 ;  total deaths, 10 ;  case fatality, 14.2 per cent. R 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Graphs G and H illustrate the monthly occurrence of the more common infectious diseases
that are generally found amongst pre-school and school children. It is interesting to note that
by far the greatest number of cases occur during the school term, and during the summer holidays these diseases reach a very low level;  and, further, Graph H shows the peak of infection
GRAPH G.
Number of Cases of Whooping-cough, Chicken-pox, and Smallpox reported by
Months for Year 1929-30.
Fes       Hrrp      F\rn      Hay     -June    July.
too
300
ZOO
100
—  Chicken-pox.
Sr-°LL-POY.
VJrtoovt/t/G - Couati.
Whooping-cough :   Total cases, 1,701;   deaths, 14.    Chicken-pox:   Total cases, 2,214 ;   deaths, nil.
Smallpox:  Total cases, 157 ;  deaths, nil. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 29
GRAPH H.—Cases of Measles, Scarlet, Diphtheria, Mumps, and Septic Throat reported by
Months for Year 1929-30.
Oct.       -%v.        Dec.     3ftn.       Fes.       tf/tTt       ft-PTt       flnr      -June.     -July.
July      ftu&.      Sept
400
zoo
/oo
-Dt-PTH£.Ttlrt.
 Scn-RLcr Fe-vti-R.     Scmic .Sane Turtatrr.
Measles : Total cases, 2,142 ; deaths, 51.     Scarlet: Total cases, 616 ;  deaths, 8.    Diphtheria :  Total cases, 667 ;
deaths, 24.    *Septie throat:  Total cases, 191 ;  deaths, 11.     ('Includes tonsillitis and quinsy.) R 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
for measles, scarlet, diphtheria, and mumps as occurring during the month of November,
approximately three months after the beginning of the school term. It will also be seen that
the monthly trend of scarlet, diphtheria, and septic sore throat follow each other very closely.
These diseases (Graph H) alone account for ninety-four deaths. Measles, which is considered
by the parent as harmless and a trifling matter, was responsible for fifty-one deaths. If it were
possible to instil in the lay mind the impression that measles is a dangerous condition, a greater
effort would be taken by the parents to avoid infection and they would more closely confine
such of their children who are affected with it. Of the three, scarlet and diphtheria have the
highest mortality, but, nevertheless, measles accounted for more deaths than scarlet and
diphtheria combined.
In Graph G whooping-cough and chicken-pox show a peak occurring much later in the
school term than in Graph H. The reason for this is not clear, and it will only be after an
analysis of monthly morbidity statistics over a long period of time that an opinion could be
formed.
Aside from the fatalities associated with the diseases of Graphs G and H, the loss from
school attendance alone represents an economic factor worthy of serious consideration. Couple
this with the economic loss, the grief and worry of the individual householder, and it represents
a still greater deficit.
Following the introduction of the card system of reporting late in November, a record was
kept for the last half of the year of the race and age of the cases reported. The age was
classified into groups as follows:—
A     0-1 year.
B      2-5 years.
C   6-16 years.
D , 17 and over.
This represents the infant, pre-school child, school-child, and adult. For this period of the
year there were 5,133 whites, 44 Orientals, 5 negroes, and 490 Indians affected with infectious
diseases.   The age-groups reported are as follows:—
A         176
B     1,094
C    -■-  2,576
D    :.  1,069
Unclassified     757
Total   5,672
These figures represent the infectious diseases reported from all portions of the Province,
with the exception of Vancouver, from where, unfortunately, we have been unable to obtain data
of the individual cases respecting race and age-groups. This total (5,672) represents the return
for the six-month period of all the infectious diseases which are listed and considered for the
year. An analysis of the above returns shows that by far the greatest number of infectious
diseases occur in Group C. However, when we consider only such diseases as measles, mumps,
chicken-pox, whooping-cough, diphtheria, and scarlet, we get the following returns :—
A.
B.
C.
D.
Unclassified.
31
12
36
68
1
7
154
112
276
399
10
46
270
366
755
425
56
97
73
119
57
21
13
38
23
39
68
117
0
Scarlet fever  ...—	
4
Totals	
155
897
1,969
321
251
The analysis of race and age-group statistics will be more valuable when considered over a
long period of time.
In the interest of public health and communicable-disease control for the year, the undersigned travelled a total of 9,895 miles and was absent from the office for a period of eighty-nine BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 31
days. These activities included investigations of outbreaks of infectious disease, talks, and
radio broadcasts.
During the first week in May an investigation of an outbreak of psittacosis was concluded.
A full report of this investigation has already been forwarded.
From the returns of the Medical Inspectors of Schools published in the annual reports for
the years 1927-28 and 1928-29, the prevalence of goitre amongst the school-children of the
Province was calculated. Of the 99,006 pupils examined in 1928, 6,526 were reported as suffering
from goitre. This gives a morbidity rate per hundred of 6.6. Of the 96,036 pupils examined
in 1929, 6,473 were reported as having goitre, which gives a morbidity rate per hundred of 6.7.
These two figures show that there has been little change in the goitre incidence for the two
years considered. In addition to this, an attempt was made to locate the areas in the Province
in which the prevalence of goitre was most marked. Accordingly, the per cent, of goitre in
each school was calculated and they were located on the map by pins of various colours, each
colour representing a group of per cent, from 0-1, 1-5, 5-10, and so on up to 100. In this way
the percentage of occurrence of goitre was grouped about the Province. The pins occurring
within the borders of the various mining divisions were grouped and the percentage of goitre
was then calculated for that division. The highest percentage of goitre was found in the mining
divisions of Grand Forks-Greenwood, Ainsworth, Osoyoos, Alberni, and Slocan. This scheme is
to be followed for the succeeding years in order to establish the goitre trend.
I have, etc.,
A. R. Chisholm, M.D.,
Epidemiologist. R 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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Cumberland and District	
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Grand Forks and District	
Greenwood  and  District.	
Halcyon Springs and District—
IS BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 33
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Oliver and District	
Parksville and  District	
Penticton  and   District	
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Port   Alice   and   District	
Port Coquitlam and District
Port Hammond and District
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Robson and District	
Rock Bay and District	
Rossland and District	
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IP BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 35
REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1930.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg leave to hand you the Nineteenth Annual Report of the Medical
Inspection of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
Nothing succeeds like success, and I can truly apply this to the advances that are being made
in the school-health work throughout the Province. Particularly are we sensible of the increasing interest taken by the School Boards.
When we began the work, we often found opposition from the people whom we hoped would
have been our greatest helpers, and it was some time before, aided as we were by the efforts of
the Women's Institutes, that we were able to convince officials that we were not simply trying to
increase taxes, but that we were doing our best, and succeeding, in reducing taxes, and that the
service that we were offering them, while on the face of it would apparently cost more money,
would produce results financially, and more especially in keeping up school attendance and
reducing expenditure by saving money by the diminution of the number of retarders. There has
been a change in the picture, and now we find, in attending meetings, that whereas formerly the
audience was made up of women with one or two lone men, now we find at least half of our
audiences are men who are becoming increasingly interested in the work and give their time
and lend their influence to carrying it on.
We are controlling epidemics through the work of our nurses, who are specially educated
for their positions, and we do not permit of a school being closed unless an epidemic, which
fortunately has not occurred, is of such proportions as to materially affect the attendance when
it would be better to close. If a suspicious case develops, the nurse is there immediately, sends
the child home, and examines into the home conditions and contacts, and the nurse repeats the
visits to the school daily and contacts are watched. The result, is there is no epidemic; one
pupil may lose, after he has become infected with the disease, the time necessary to effect a
recovery, but the class as a whole is saved from interruption of the work. In former years a few
cases of scarlet fever or diphtheria would result in the closing of the school for two or three
we?ks, and any teacher will tell you that as far as the term is concerned the children have lost it.
That means repetition and consequent expense. This does not occur now and medical men who
closed the schools are very promptly informed that there is no necessity for this.
This has done more to attract the attention of officials than possibly anything else.
Our work is systematized under the various heads, and this is set forth very clearly in the
report which follows of the work done in the Kelowna District, which is an outline of the work
as carried out in the different districts of the Province:—
THE SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL PUBLIC HEALTH
NURSING   SERVICE  FOR  THE  KELOWNA  RURAL  DISTRICTS,
JULY, 1929, TO JUNE, 1930.
I have much pleasure in presenting for the approval of the Kelowna Rural Schools Health
Association the Second Annual Report of the Provincial Public Health Nursing Service for the
Kelowna Rural Districts.
The report embraces all phases cf school-work, child-welfare, and public-health organization
in the Rural Districts of Okanagan Mission, Benvoulin, East Kelowna, South-east Kelowna,
Rutland, Ellison, Winfield, Okanagan Centre, Westbank, Westbank Ferry, and Ewings Landing,
an area of some 100 square miles, with an estimated population of approximately 3,625 adults,
725 school-children, and 360 pre school children.
In January, 1930, the work of the Westbank District was taken over by the Victorian Order
of Nurses, leaving some 583 children entered during the year on the school registers for the
remaining nine schools. R 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Section I.—School-work.
The school-children have been regularly visited and inspected by the School Nurse during
the year; records kept of defects found by the School Medical Health Officer in his examinations ; home visits made to prevent the spread of communicable disease; the correction of defects
and promotion of health ; and healih education g'.ven in the schools by personal talks to the child
and class instruction. In co-operation with the teachers and parents, a Health Crusade has been
organized in Okanagan Mission, Okanagan, East Kelowna, South-east Kelowna, and Rutland
schools, in which 150 children have kept a daily chart of health chores done during a period of
ten weeks. Two hundred and twenty-two Health Crusaders' badges have been distributed and
many children have taken home their charts to work on in the summer holidays. In this way
splendid health habits are inculcated which we hope will never be forgotten.
Three prizes were presented by Dr. G. A. Ootmar. S.M.O., to pupils in East Kelowna School
and Rutland School for the best progress in healthy development due to the faithful keeping of
health rules.
Number of visits to schools by nurse     233
Number of inspections of children by nurse  3,799
Number of weighings and measurings by nurse  1,167
Number of weighings (gaining)  1,108
Number of weighings (underweight)      221
Number of health talks given        89
Number of home school visits     178
School Medical Examination.
Number of children examined by doctor  561
New defects found  218
Old defects improved  361
Old defects not improved  260
An itemized account for each school of all defects is to be found in the classification report
of the School Medical Officer.
Defects found Improved.
An interesting item is the number of defects found improved during the past year :—
Tonsils:  90 children found improved;  22 children had diseased tonsils taken out.
Teeth:  53 children went to the dentist.
Goitre :  43 children found improved.
Malnutrition:  22 children 7 to 10 per cent, underweight made gains from 4 to 12 lb.
Eyes:  8 children obtained glasses.
Much improvement has taken place in communicable skin conditions (pediculosis, impetigo,
ringworm, and scabies) ; 19 exclusions (affecting 11 children) were made, as compared with 48
exclusions last year.
Defects which should be Improved.
Malnutrition and Undericeight.—During the school-year there have been 66 children in our
rural schools 10 per cent, and more underweight and 46 children from 5 to 10 per cent, underweight ; 9 of these children have gained their normal weight for age and height, 66 have much
improved in weight, and 21 children have not gained in weight. In spite of careful instruction
and emphasis laid on proper weight by the giving of weight-tags, many children do not like
milk and vegetables and refuse to take cod-liver oil or enough rest. When co-operation has been
obtained the results have been excellent, some of the children gaining from 5 to 12 lb. in the
nine months.
It is purposed next year to have a routine test for all persistently underweight children, as
diabetes has been found by Dr. Ootmar to have been the cause in several of the children coming
to the pre-school clinic.
In the dental survey, recently made by the dentists of Kelowna, 51S children were examined,
and 359 were found to need attention for their teeth in the nine rural schools listed for underweight conditions. A large percentage of this work should be done on the permanent teeth.
No doubt dental caries accounts for a certain amount of malnutrition among the children. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 37
Underweight Children.
School.
'Border-line,
5-10 per Cent,
under.
Malnutrition,
10 per Cent.
and over.
Not
improved.
Improved.
O.K.
Winfleld	
4
1
18
3
1
8
7
3
4
5
25
5
2
16
3
4
1
8
2
3
3
4
5
5
24
5
1
13
5
4
Rutland	
Ellison                      	
4
3
2
Okanagan	
Totals.    .
46
06
21
66
9
Defects of Vision.
One hundred and nine children were found by the nurse to have defects of vision, ranging
from a slight maladjustment to very serious defects.
It is purposed to hold an eye clinic at an early date under Dr. McNamee, the eye, ear, nose,
and throat specialist of Kamloops. Children with the most serious defects will be attended to
first of all, and we hope in time to have all defective eyes checked by the specialist.
In connection with the correction of defects, 145 notices were sent to parents, referring the
children to their own physicians for care.
Communicable Diseases.
The rural schools have been remarkably free on the whole from communicable diseases
during the school-year 1929-30.
Disease and School. No. ot Cases.
Measles—
Okanagan   1
Rutland   3
East Kelowna   12
Winfield  4
Okanagan Mission   2
Diphtheria—Mission Creek   1
Scarlet fever—
Mission Creek   1
Rutland  ,  4
East Kelowna   2
Chicken-pox—Rutland  1
Whooping-cough—Ewings Landing   8
Total cases  39
Children in contact excluded from school numbered 36, and in the various districts a total
of 95 cases and contacts were reported to the Medical Officer of Health, thus preventing the
spread of disease and protecting other children. Nineteen throat-swabs were taken by the nurse
of suspicious cases.
Our thanks are due to parents and school-teachers who co-operated with the health authorities by reporting cases and keeping quarantine. Only by the co-operation of every one concerned
can the spread of communicable disease be prevented.
Campaign for Active Immunization against Scarlet Fever.
In November, 1929, a scarlet-fever epidemic of a mild type was prevalent in a city some 40
miles south of Kelowna. Schools were closed and the epidemic was spreading into the surrounding districts. Kelowna and districts, as central points in the valley, were daily in clanger of
infection. A campaign for active immunization against scarlet fever was organized in Kelowna
and the surrounding districts. R 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The District Medical Health Officer and Rural Health Nurse addressed ten gatherings of
parents in the rural districts. The Health Nurse explained the theory of active and passive
immunity and the real meaning of " resistance" to disease; the Health Officer, the value of
active immunization and the present need of protection. Some 1,800 pamphlets, written by the
Health Officer, to be read and signed by parents, were distributed at the meetings and in the
schools, the Health Nurse explaining the contents of the pamphlets to the teachers and older
children. This pamphlet was also published in the Kelowna Courier through the courtesy of the
editor.
The results were most encouraging. Very many parents gave their consent for their children
to be protected by active immunization.
At the close of the campaign in February, 1930 :—
In the Rural Districts 77 clinics were held; 562 children (school, pre-school, and infants)
were tested by Dick test as to whether they were susceptible to scarlet fever; 1,957 inoculations
of scarlet-fever toxin were given.
In the City of Kelowna 32 clinics were held: 688 children were tested for their susceptibility to scarlet fever; 1,931 inoculations of scarlet-fever toxin were given; 597 children completed their full five inoculations to obtain complete protection, and many others who were
inoculated with three or four doses of toxin obtained a partial immunity to the scarlet-fever
germ.
It is interesting to note that, though more than 100 cases of scarlet fever were reported and
schools were closed in the city and districts where the epidemic originated, in the City of
Kelowna twenty cases only occurred among children who had not been protected by immunization and nine cases in the rural districts.
When we think of the serious after-effects of scarlet fever on the heart and other organs of
the body, it is a great satisfaction to know that so many of our local children have been
protected.
Dental Survey in the Rural Schools.
A dental survey by Drs. Shepherd, Mathison, Wright, and Day was made in May, 1930, in
the schools of Okanagan Mission, Okanagan, Mission Creek, East Kelowna, South-east Kelowna,
Rutland, Ellison, AVinfield, Okanagan Centre, Joe Rich Valley, Westbank, and AVestbank Ferry.
Five hundred and eighteen children were examined in the first ten schools, with the following
results:—
School.
Children
examined.
Found with
Defective Teeth.
Cost of Work.
East Kelowna	
South-east Kelowna
Okanagan Mission....
Okanagan	
Hutland	
Ellison..	
Winfleld	
Okanagan Centre	
Joe Rich Valley..	
Mission Creek	
Totals	
46
8
41
38
188
31
59
17
15
75
518
41
7
25
29
168
29
38
13
9
48
$387.00
70.00
208.00
275.00
1,371.00
1S1.00
453.00
109.00
31.00
325.00
407
$3,408.00
Of the 407 children found with defective teeth, 338 were found to have permanent teeth
needing repair.
It was surprising to find the number of sixth-year molars which needed attention among
the 7-year-old children. This first permanent tooth, which many parents think is a temporary
tooth, is perhaps the most important tooth in the mouth. It is the cornerstone of the dental
arch and has to last for very many years of life.   It is most important (hat it sh uld be pressrvel.
Three hundred and sixty-one individual dental cards with the results obtained by the survey
were sent to parents, to be sianed if they wished the work to be done. Fifty per cent, of these
cards came back unsigned. Sixty-eight per cent, of the unsigned cards came back with letters
from parents saying that they would much like the work done, but could not afford it.    This BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 39
means that probably 50 per cent, of our children with defective teeth will not be in a position
financially to have attention given to this most important work, which means so much to their
health.
Section II.—Child-welfare.
Perhaps one of the most interesting and valuable phases of the work has been the development of the child-welfare programme during the past year. This has taken the form of free
advisory clinics, in which the pre-school child and infant have been especially considered.
In such a large area it is impossible with one nurse on duty to find time to make as many
home visits as we should like, but we are getting into touch with children and parents at clinics
held in the various districts.
There have been a total of 1,240 children (school, pre-school, and infants) attending clinics
during the past year, making a total of 3,241 attendances at 108 clinics in the rural districts
alone.
Eighteen well-baby and pre-school clinics have been held in Rutland, AA7infield, Benvoulin,
and East Kelowna Districts under the auspices of the local AAromen's Institutes and Benvoulin
AVomen's Club, with Dr. G. A. Ootmar as attending physician.
In addition to the clinic work, 109 advisory visits re feeding, etc., have been made by the
Health Nurse, together with many letters of advice, instructional consultations over the telephone, and detailed written reports to the family physician.
Much time is taken arrang'ng clinks, writing Ltters and reports, but the result is well
worth while when we see the improvement in the babies and children.
There is a total of 131 children on the pre-school and infant register, ill of whom have
attended well-baby and pre-school clinics.
Other free clinics include chest, orthopaedic, eye, ear, and nose and throat. Schick test to
determine susceptibility to diphtheria : Dick test to determine susceptibility to scarlet fever;
active immunization against scarlet fever;  and school clinics of the dental survey.
Summary of Free Clinics held July, 1929, to July, 19S0.
Type.
No.
Physician.
Children
attending.
No. of
Attendances.
Chest     	
2   1 Dr. Lamb. Government Chest Specialist	
9
12
3
25
562
111
518
11
1
1
1
12
Dr. Frank Patterson, Specialist, Vancouver...
Dr. Ootmar, District M.H.O	
3
Schick test (for susceptibility
25
Dick test and active immunization against scarlet fever.
77
18
8
108
Dr. Ootmar, District M.H.O	
Dr. Ootmar, District M.H.O...	
Drs. Mathison, Wright, Shepherd, and Day...
2,519
153
518
1
1,240                 3,241
Section III.—Public-health Organization and Development.
Meetings addressed.
(1.)  East Kelowna.    Subject:   Active immunization against diphtheria.
(2.)  AVestbank.    Subjects:    (a) Active immunization against scarlet fever;    (6)  organization of a local branch of the Victorian Order of Nurses.
(3.)  Peachland.    Subjects:   (a) Active immunization against scarlet fever;   (&) organization of a local branch of the Victorian Order of Nurses.
(4.)  South-east Kelowna.    Subject:   Active immunization against scarlet fever.
(5.)  Benvoulin.    Subject:  Active immunization against scarlet fever.
(6.)  Mission Creek.    Subject:  Active immunization against scarlet fever.
(7.) Rutland.    Subject:  Active immunization against scarlet fever.
(8.)  AVinfield.    Subject:  Active immunization against scarlet fever.
(9.)  Ellison.    Subject:  Active immunization against scarlet fever.
(10.)  Okanagan Centre.    Subject:  Active immunization against scarlet fever.
(11.)  Kelowna Women's Institute.    Subject:  " The Kelowna Health Unit—Its Organization
and Aims."
\ R 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Letters written, Interviews, and Prenatal Hygiene.
Letters written :   155.r  Interviews :  420.
Prenatal hygiene :   Cases opened, 4;  number of visits, 11.
Health Exhibit.
A health exhibit for the Kelowna Fall Fair of 1929 was planned in conjunction with Miss
Frances Lyne, R.N., Kelowna School Nurse. In the school section a proper lunch for a school-
child was demonstrated by means of food models supplemented by suitable posters and literature.
In the infant-welfare section stress was laid on the importance of properly modified cow's milk
for feeding, as compared with condensed milk, which is a favourite standby of rural mothers.
Models were used, together with large posters showing a letter from Dr. Alan Brown, well-known
pediatrician of Toronto, Ontario, supplemented by a copy of his well-known book, " The Normal
Child," and other suitable literature.
In the public-health section attention was called to the free Government chest clinics by
suitable posters and literature. The need of vaccination was stressed by striking posters
" adorned " with real photographs of different types of smallpox taken from " Vaccination and
Smallpox," obtained from the Federal Department of Health, Ottawa. These aroused much
interest and many copies of this publication were distributed, together with some 3,350 booklets
dealing with various health subjects.
Many questions were answered by the two city and rural nurses who were on duty at the
booth during the one and a half clays of the fair.
The Kelowna Rural Schools Health Association, Kelowna Women's Institute, and the
Kelowna Board of School Trustees contributed towards the expenses of the booth.
Other Activities.
(1.) In April, 1930, the AVestbank AArell-baby and Pre-school Clinic was opened under the
auspices of the newly formed AATestbank Branch of the Arictorian Order of Nurses. Dr. G. H.
Ootmar was the attending physician, assisted by Miss Olive Ings, R.N., Victorian Order Nurse
in charge; Mrs. A. F. Griudon, R.N., Provincial Health Nurse, Kelowna ; and the members of
the local branch of the AT.O.N. Thirty-four infants and children were present at a well-attended
clinic. In May and June clinics were also held at which the Provincial Health Nurse assisted
the Victorian Order Nurse in charge.
(2.) In co-operation with Dr. Frank Patterson, orthopaedic specialist, Vancouver, an attempt
is being made to send two of our local children suffering from the results of infantile paralysis
to Vancouver for treatment. Free transportation has been obtained from the Canadian Pacific
Railway. Dr. Patterson, when visiting in Kelowna, very kindly examined these children and we
hope that splendid results will follow the treatment.
A'isitors to the District.
(1.) Mrs. Appleton, from the Royal Alexandra Solarium on A'aneouver Island, arrived in
Kelowna in April to visit old patients and prospective patients. She was much pleased by the
continued progress at home made by one of our local children, who through the kindness of the
Rutland AVomen's Institute was enabled to spend some years under treatment at the Solarium.
Another child assisted by the same institute is to come home soon after a year's treatment, very
greatly improved.    This is splendid work that the institute is doing to help the children.
(2.) Miss Margaret Kerr, B.A.Sc. (British Columbia), A.M. (Columbia), Instructress in
Public Health Nursing at the University of British Columbia, visited the district in May on a
visit of observation. Miss Kerr has been making a tour of the public-health centres of the
Province, and expressed herself as much pleased with the child-welfare work being done in the
Kelowna Rural Districts.
(3.) The Provincial Health Officer was a most welcome visitor in Kelowna in April. He
interviewed many local people interested in health matters, and as a result of his visit we were
able to organize the dental Survey of the rural schools, a report of which will be found in the
school section of the report.
To conclude, I would express my appreciation and thanks to the local physicians; to the
members of the Women's Institutes; to the Executive of the Kelowna Rural Schools Health
Association ; to the teachers in the schools ; to Dr. G. II. Ootmar, District Medical Health Officer, BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 41
and School Medical Officer for the rural schools; and to all others who by their kindly interest
and co-operation are helping to promote the work of the Provincial Public Health Nursing
Service in the Kelowna Rural Districts.
Anne Frances Grindon, R.N.,
Provincial, Health Nurse in Charge, Kelowna Rural Districts.
Following are the reports from the full-time Medical Health Officers in Saanich Municipality
and Kelowna City. The Saanich report gives us a resume of the work carried out, including the
school-work. The Kelowna report deals more particularly with the work as Medical Health
Officer in reference to the work in general.
SAANICH FULL-TIME HEALTH UNIT.
In reply to the many requests received from widely separated parts of the country, we are
publishing for the first time a full description of the history, organization, and results accomplished by the Saanich Health Centre from the time it became a full-time unit. The directors
of the centre have been frequently criticized for not seeking more publicity for the work of the
centre and for not putting on a more attention-drawing programme. It has been the belief of
the centre that work along public-health lines carried on continuously produces greater and
more lasting results than much energy spent to make a few splashes, the memory of which is
soon a thing of the past. Now that the centre is entering upon its fourth year, we feel that
our policy has been justified and that we have concrete data on the benefits of organized public-
health wrork as evidenced by improved health, fewer cases of infectious disease, more public-
health education, and decreased costs to the municipality. The great impetus to public health
was given by the war, which opened the eyes of the world to the appalling number of men unfit
for service due to defects which may have been corrected in childhood. Since then research
has shown that in Canada alone the annual cost to the nation of preventable disease is in excess
of one hundred million dollars. This does not take into consideration the cost of invalidism
due to causes preventable in childhood, or the cost of State institutions for the care of defectives. This does not take into consideration the infant and maternal mortality due to preventive
causes and lack of education.
The realization by our public men that conservation of health is just as important as conservation of natural resources, even more so, has initiated public-health programmes throughout
the country. In 1919 public-health work was begun in Saanich with the employment of four
nurses to carry out bedside and school nursing. There were also a part-time Medical Officer
of Health and School Medical Officer who worked independently of each other and under
separate governing bodies. As frequently occurs under such arrangements and without co-ordination, the health-work was incompletely carried out and at too great a cost for the results
accomplished. Gradually, however, through education and the untiring efforts of the municipal
leaders and the Provincial Health Officer, appreciation of the possibilities of public-health work
was brought to such a stage that a demand for an efficient full-time unit as opposed to the
inefficiency of part-time work resulted in the organization. In September, 1927, the School
Board and the Municipal Council pooled their health activities under a single control and a full-
time health unit began to function with the same number of nurses on the staff and a full-time
Medical Officer.
A comprehensive survey of the district and schools was made and the following conditions
found:—
Saanich is a rural and suburban district about 55 square miles in area and. 14,000 inhabitants. The great majority of the population is comprised of wage-earners living near the city.
The rural areas are intensely farmed. There are over 180 dairies supplying the district and
the city.    Other industries are conspicuous by their absence.
Infectious diseases were prevalent owing to a loose control, and as a result schools were
frequently closed on account of epidemics. Attendance at the schools was poor for the same
reason. For the above reasons it was decided to direct attention to the control of communicable
diseases and improvement of the health and supervision of the school population, which has
since increased from 1,900 to 2,200. The environment of the school-children was carefully
examined and errors in lighting, heating, and sanitation were pointed out and corrected.    We R 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
next turned our attention to the school population and upon examination of their health-cards
were impressed by their health and apparent freedom from defects such as are found elsewhere.
This we soon learned was due to the fact that under the part-time system the children were
hurriedly inspected at the rate of about 250 in a single morning. AAre now proceeded to examine
each child as thoroughly as possible, and whereas in the previous year only 562 defects were
found, we located 1,977, and secured the correction of 989, as compared with the correction of
80 in the previous year. Every parent is notified of these defects and the correction urged,
often necessitating five or six visits by the nurse. So well, apparently, has this medical examination and the nurses' work and child-welfare work succeeded that this year only 371 defects have
been found. In fact, the beginners' class of last year showed 40 per cent, fewer defects than
any beginners' class in previous years. Our schools have a dentist who has a portable outfit
and moves from school to school; excellent results have been obtained with little loss of time
to pupils.
This certainly means that the children of to-day will be entering upon adult life with fewrer
handicaps than their parents and are assured of a better and more efficient life.
We now turned attention to controlling infectious diseases and lessening their cost to the
municipality and decreasing the absenteeism of children for this reason.    This necessitated
frequent inspection by the nurses, and the following figures show what has been done:—
Children inspected—
1926   1,517
1927  1,649
1928 (full-time unit)     8,164
1929   9,022
1930   5,968
We next ruled that every child absent from school three clays or longer must be visited by
a nurse and then present a certificate signed by the Medical Officer before readmission. From
this we have as complete a knowledge and control of infection as is possible. Under nursing
supervision the children are allowed to attend school during the incubation period of a disease,
thus saving time which under another system would have been lost. The teachers co-operate and
send home every child that shows suspicious symptoms. As a result the number of infectious
diseases dropped markedly and the attendance increased in the manner shown in the chart
appended.
Percentage of Attendance of Enrolled  Pupils,   Saanich  Schools.
School-year.
CJ
4J
CJ
o
>
c
-:;■
*
a
JJ!
rr
-:j
n
CJ
4-
r-J
<
r-\
cj'
a
1*
< JS
1924-25     	
4
93.08
'94.3
93.3
93.5
94.7
94.7
89.1
89.7
91.3
91.6
93.9
93.1
88.1
90.3
87.2
93.2
92.5
92.9
85.3
88.7
84.2
89.2
93.3
94.1
84.3
80.2
78.4
9,1.2
88.6$
87.6
70.7
77.8
79.9
92.4
90.5
88.3
76.8
76.7
81.7
92.9
94.01
93.0
74.7
79.4
77.7
92.8
93.6
93.2
74.02
76.8
79.2
95.8
90.8
93.2
74.1
75.9
76.9
92.2
92.9
93.8
%
81.94
1925 26                           	
83 98
1926 27                      	
82.98t
1927-28 (full-time unit)
1928-29	
93.48t
92.48
1929  30                          	
92 40
* Winter colds, measles, etc. f Strawberry-picking. i Flu.
Fifty per cent, of defects corrected of pupils.    Pre-school.    Entrance this year 40 per cent, less defects
than any previous Entrance class.
At the same time the costs of isolation in the hospital, which were borne by the municipality,
toboganned as follows :—
1923   $2,110.00
1926   5,535.00
1927   1,181.00
1928 (full-time unit)        140.00
1929        795.00
1930         350.00
(The increase for 1929 is due to the isolation of a diphtheria carrier.) BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 43
From this point alone the Health Centre has justified its establishment. As a result of our
efforts to decrease disease we have in the past two years immunized 600 children against diphtheria, and we are very pleased to report that hot a single one of these, though exposed, has
contracted diphtheria. The improvement in attendance has raised the scholastic achievement
of the pupils, and from the report of the Municipal Inspector of Schools we read that "while
the tardation has cost Saanich over $ 17,000 in 1928, last year (that is, 1929) the cost of
repeaters has been kept down to $11,000."
Our next effort was directed to the pre-school population. AATe have registered about 850
children who receive frequent visits by the nurses, and the mothers are given regular instruction in their care and protection. AA'herever the members' of the staff visit they always leave
some public-health education. This has gradually resulted in the lessening of sickness, as shown
by the ever-decreasing bedside-nursing visits and the increasing number of visits along preventive
lines such as child-welfare and home school visits.    The following table illustrates this well:—
Tear.
Nursing
Visits.
Child-welfare
Visits.
Home School
Visits.
1926	
2,893
2,966
2,355
1,853
1,721
1,714
1,360
1,979
2.200
1,946
200
1927	
148
1928 (full-time unit)	
1929	
1,314
3,015
1930	
2,055
AVe now have three baby clinics a month where mothers receive instructions and the babies
undergo thorough examination. This year we have also established a pre-school dental clinic
which has proved a great success.
Along educational lines, in addition to our work in the homes, we have introduced a standard
text-book which has been adopted in our schools, and regular instruction is given in all the
grades and high school. Children are encouraged to give self-expression along public-health
lines by means of posters and essays, for which six prizes in the grade schools and two prizes
in the high school are offered. Physical education and sports are given attention. Classes in
home-nursing are given where practicable. Addresses to various organizations are given too.
Demonstration or exhibit of some phase of public health is given whenever possible. Along the
lines of sanitation we have achieved considerable success. AATe have carried out regular inspections and improvement of the many summer resorts located in Saanich. The dairies, of which
there were only thirty registered prior to the establishment of the full-time Health Centre, have
now been brought under an efficient supervision by the Health Centre, no licence being granted
unless the sanitation and the safety of the supply is approved by the Health Officer. One of
our great problems—that is, sewerage—has been receiving considerable attention in the past two
years and much improvement is noted. This year an addition to the staff of a Sanitary
Inspector, wTho is also Building Inspector, has been made.
Taken as a whole, the establishment of the Health Centre and its present appreciation by
the municipality is something that those responsible for the organization of public health in
this municipality may be justly proud of.
D. Berman,   M.D.,   D.P.H.,
Medical Officer and Medical School Inspector,
Saanich Municipality.
KELOAVNA HEALTH UNIT.
Typhoid Carriers.
It was our experience of the last four years that when typhoid epidemics occur in Kelowna
and district they were always strangers who fell ill first. In January we had a case of typhoid
in a family residing in Rutland District for a few months. In April a man who came from
the Prairies died. In August we had a case of typhoid in a girl coming from AVinnipeg (six
weeks ago), and one case, which is still in the hospital, is in a child whose family came lately R 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
to Kelowna. A woman coming in March from the Prairies was for months in the hospital. All
cases (except the one from AVinnipeg) were traced to contact with typhoid carriers, some of
whom have lived in the valley for a long time. The man, who died in April, was, after his
arrival from the Prairies, living close to his sister, who had typhoid years ago. I told the
woman to be careful, but the supply of domestic water to a family near by whose well was
dry was the cause of the disease in the woman, who came in March from the Prairies.
AVe have now listed thirteen carriers—two in Rutland and two in Glenmore (cause of two
cases, one death), one in Okanagan Mission (one case, one death), and seven in Kelowna, of
which one is still employed in a restaurant.
As I have no power to forbid a carrier being employed in a restaurant, I promised the
restaurants which did not employ a carrier a clean bill of health, refusing one to the restaurant
which still employs a carrier and to which two cases were traced. I certainly hope that we
will find a way to prohibit the carriers to be employed in restaurants.
The macroscopical widal was of great value in detecting carriers, followed by a culture of
faeces and urine.
We are trying now to get the history of a carrier by testing his blood, faeces, and urine at
weekly intervals.    It is of very little value to detect carriers when we are unable to control them.-
This is impossible without proper help.    Being overloaded with work in the laboratory and in
the field as Health Officer, a Sanitary Inspector is badly needed.    He would have to control
the carriers, take regular blood and fceces samples, and supervise the dry closets.    There are
over 400 dry closets in town, unprotected against flies; the contents are emptied about once a
month without being disinfected.
Carriers.
Mrs. C.—Had typhoid fifteen years ago, when she lived on the Prairies. A few months after
she came to Kelowna her daughter, 11 years old, developed typhoid. AVidals were taken from
the whole family, and Mrs. G. was found to be positive in agglutination and complement fixation test and also had a positive fceces culture. Two weeks afterwards she entered the hospital
with tubair pregnancy. She left the hospital with a still positive agglutination test, but with
negative faeces culture.
Mrs. W.—Had typhoid twenty-two years ago. She was positive in blood and faeces. Her
brother, who came from the Prairies, developed typhoid and died. Several months later a
woman, who got temporarily her drinking-water from the farm where Mrs. W. is living,
developed the disease.
Miss B.—Waitress in a hotel. AVas positive in agglutination and faeces. Her father, a milk-
dealer, Grade A, in whose house the girl lived, delivered milk to a patient with a lung abscess.
The patient fell ill with typhoid and typhoid germs were cultivated from the milk.
Mrs. W.—AAraitress in a hotel. Had typhoid twelve years ago. Some months ago typhoid
cases occurred in the hotel (a newly arrived porter and his wife). She was strongly positive
for typhoid, with negative fceces culture.
Miss S.—Waitress in a restaurant. Had no history for typhoid. AA'as repeatedly found
positive for typhoid, with negative faeces culture. In the same restaurant was found a cook,
positive in blood and fceces.    He returned to China.
Mr. M.—Entered the hospital on December 29th. AAras found positive in blood and fceces
and was the cause of a case of typhoid in the district in August. He reported every fourteen
days, but escaped from control and acted as a cook in a lumber camp, where ten cases of
typhoid occurred.
Mrs. A.—Was found to be a carrier in July. There was a history of typhoid fourteen years
ago. In August there was one death from typhoid in that part of the district, due to contact
with the carrier. There are at present thirteen known typhoid and one paratyphoid carriers residing in Kelowna and district. These carriers have to be visited at regular times, and specimens
of blood and urine have to be taken. Systematic educational propaganda should be made to
make people understand how to protect others.
SaniTjArt Conditions.
The sanitary conditions in canneries and packing-houses are asking loudly to be improved—
changing the dry closets into water-closets, with facilities to wash hands, etc. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30. R 45
Canneries.
In the canneries 200 women stood ten and more hours (sometimes twelve) without an
opportunity to sit down. It is true that when asked to be allowed to sit clown it was never
refused, but the few chairs that were present were far too few to comply with the demand. I
ordered a box to be placed near every woman, allowing her to sit clown when she wished.
Exhibits.
The Health Centre conducted exhibits at six country fairs—Armstrong, AVestbank. Kelowna,
Peachland, Okanagan Falls, and Oliver—as well as at the Hospital Convention at Arancouver.
The results of these exhibits were found to be far-reaching and stimulated widespread interest
in prevention of disease, and the Health Centre has already been asked to exhibit next year at
several country fairs.
Septic Sore Throat.
An outbreak of septic sore throat occurred in Kelowna, clue to the use of raw milk. Tw»
cows of the herd were found to have streptococcic mastitis. The bacterial count of the milk
was 800,000.    Immediately the milk was ordered to be pasteurized.
A'enereal Disease.
The educational work that we have been enabled to do has consisted in the distribution of
literature dealing with the entire venereal-disease question. AVe intend to give lectures dealing
with this to different groups. The minister of the United Church has invited us to speak about
this disease to the oldest boys and we are arranging a date when these lectures will be held.
Lectures.
Several lectures for parents were held, when smallpox cases in the neighbourhood made it
urgent to vaccinate children. Two lectures for adults dealing with this matter were held.
The Rotary Club of Kelowna was also addressed. The subject was : " The Fate of the Typhoid
Carrier"; and one we held in Vancouver for the British Columbia Hospital Association in
joint meeting, with the name:   "The Forgotten Room."
This last lecture dealt with the fact that many hospitals have very restricted laboratory
facilities (often only one bottle of nitric acid and two with Fehling's solution), and with the
fact that in our small laboratory we started a training-school for laboratory aids.
Baby Clinics.
During the months of July and August the baby clinics were suspended, partly on account
of the absence of the Health Nurses and partly due to the fact that the busy times for the
mothers come in these months and the attendance would be very small. However, the children
who needed supervision, and for whom it was not advisable to do without this, were visited at
home each month.
As a rule, we have two afternoons each week occupied with baby clinics; seldom is the
attendance less than ten—sometimes we have about thirty attendants. In my yearly report
I shall give a more complete report on these clinics, which are of great value, as several times
a slight defect was found and soon corrected which would have been hard to correct in later
years. Two children at the age of 2 and 3 were found to suffer from diabetes and referred to
their family physician.
Vaccination Clinics.
These were held the end of July and the beginning of August in all parts of the district
and for a week each day in the city. A total of 385 persons were vaccinated, of whom eighty-
three were revaccinated. Two cases due to anaphylaxis occurred. One wTas a veterinarian
who as a child was immunized by milking cows with smallpox pustulae on the udder; one
was a farmer who was several times revaccinated (last time without result).
G. A. Ootmar,
Medical Officer and Medical Inspector of Schools,
Kelowna. R 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Much interest is being shown in regard to the dental work, and we are very pleased to
say that we have made arrangements with the Canadian Dental Association to carry out a
survey of the Province as a whole. This will be given effect to in March, 1931. The British
Columbia Dental Association is sponsoring this work and it is to be financed without expense
to the Province, but by Federal grant and by grants from the insurance companies of Canada.
A complete survey will be made of the school-children. Two days' free service will be
given by the dentists to demonstrate the work in each district. All organizations in the district
will be asked to form a committee to assist in carrying this out, and we believe that, as an educational measure, this is one of the greatest things that we have as yet attempted. Particularly
we would appeal to those who read this Report that, when the time comes, they will lend their
assistance in helping us.
Details for the examination for each school follow.
I have, etc.,
H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial Health Officer.
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors:   163.
Reports from Medical Inspectors :   161.
High Schools.
High schools.    1928-29, 67:   Reported, 38;   not reported, 29.    1929-30, 67:   Reported, 43;
not reported, 24.
Pupils inspected :   1928-29, 9,725 ;   1029-30, 10,759;   an increase of 1,034.
Junior High Schools.
Junior high schools.    1928-29, 4:   Reported, 2;   not reported, 2.    1929-30, 5:   Reported, 3;
not reported, 2.
Pupils inspected : 1928-29, 3,065; 1929-30, 4,568; an increase of 1,503.
Graded City Schools.
Cities.    1928-29,   33:   Reported,   32;   not   reported,   1.    1929-30,   33:   Reported,   32:   not
reported, 1.
Pupils inspected: 1928-29, 48,898; 1929-30, 48,860; a decrease of 38.
Rural Municipality' Schools.
Municipalities.    1928-29,  24:  Reported,  23;  not  reported,  1.    1929-30,  24:  Reported,  23;
not reported, 1.
Pupils inspected: 1928-29, 16,030; 1929-30, 16,925; an increase of 895.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected:  1928-29, 654, at a cost of $15,255.65; 1929-30, 663, at a cost of $15,755.40.
Schools not inspected: 1928-29, 71; 1929-30, 106.
Pupils inspected: 1928-29, 18,318; 1929-30, 18,391; an increase of 73.
Cost of inspection per pupil:  1928-29, 83 cents;   1929-30, 85.6 cents.
Percentage of defects: 1928-29, 103.13; 1929-30, 104.24; an increase of 1.11.  R 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NORMAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
BD
S
3
. o
e '-
"S
o-s
, a
6 3
g
o
5
in "3
'qj   QJ
s a
£ 3
o
fl
•a
■0
11
d o
at.
8^
JJ.J
Oh
T3
t,  TJJ
«J*
_+J
O
O
221
140
230
141
 1	
14
19
2        a
7
19
22
27
0
6
14
1
i
11	
1
1
HIGH
68
23
105
2<>
63
23
103
oo
3
6
2
6
1
o
1
4
6
2
5
9
2
an
3
2
15
4
7
20
8
15
Anyox:
12
1
o
1
5
15
1
IS
40
al      1
1
151     15
1
k     an
9
Burnaby:
1461   145
334|   319
I
285|  285
1
75      68
1
1701   170
50      49
1
89       89
7
3
10
11
3
9
2
4
10
1
1
1
14
23
4
6
3
7
2
110
15
3
9
9
16
2
10
10
4
20
Courtenay	
J   McKee	
G. F.. L. MacKinnon.
G. K. MacNaughton.
7
4
1
2
3
2
1
2
1
Delta:
Duncan	
H.  P.  Swan	
Miss  B.  Mitchell..
94
73
112
75
88
73
112
75
5
D.  Corsan	
Miss W.  Seymour.
3
1
2
11
3
0
3
2
1
	
1
3
1
2
2
7
58
57
14
9
1
8
6
Ladysmith	
H.  B.  Maxwell	
B.  B.  Marr	
Miss H.  Peters .   .
1
60|     57
97|     94
!
51	
2
4
0
Maple Ridge:
Miss H. E. Fawcett.
G.  H.  Tutill	
501     48
59]     59
1
1
4
4
4
19
1
30
5
13
80
33
1
3
t
20
14
	
6
8
24
56
IS
60
1
4
14
Dr. Mclntyre	
W.  F.  Drysdale	
TC. C. Arthur	
MissH. E. Fawcett.
Miss N. Armstrong
14
33
2
6
1
6
1
181      3
227
21
New  Denver	
20
1
16
5
New Westminster:
Duke  of  Connaught.
Miss A.  Stark	
	
1
1
30
P.  P.  Smyth	
Wm.  Buchanan	
Miss M.  Twidrty...
Miss M   Osborne..
61        6
1931   190
111     11
1461   146
1161     90
1321   132
831     80
91        8
36|     36
921     92
Prince Rupert	
Queen Charlotte	
31
191    30
1
K/J,
28
G.  A,   C.  Roberts....
	
1
J. H.  Hamilton	
16
5
4
7
29
10
7
2
1
3
AV.   K.  Hall	
D.   Berman	
Miss E. Naden
2
3
141     251     12
Drs. Beech & Beech
A.   Francis	
8
	
12
1
21        2
7
F.  V. Agnew	
4
F.   D.  Sinclair	
1
2
. ..
Terrace:
R.  B. Brummitt	
1
6 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 49
SCHOOLS.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Scarlet fever, 4; eczema, 4; fractures,
3; rheumatic hearts, 2; nervous
break-downs,  3; pneumonia,   10
Pulmonary, 2; heart-murmur, 2; tonsils incompletely removed, 2; acne,
2; rickets, old, with deformed chest,
1; deformed wrist (old fracture),
1; students not allowed to register
(due to defective vision that could
not  be corrected),   1
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Heating, ventilation
and"- accommodation,  good
Good	
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Clean; adequate.
SCHOOLS.
i
Tes.
Hard to heat in cold;
weather
O.K	
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
Yes.
Orthopaedic,    1;   heart,    2;   corrected
vision, 22
Yes.
Mumps;   measles;   scarlet   fever;
chicken-pox
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Fair  ventilation not
overcrowded
Good	
O.K.
Clean.
O.K	
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Good.
i
Mumps,  2; chicken-pox,   1; tonsillitis,  2
Mumps,   1; chicken-pox,   1; rubella,   6
General     conditions
excellent
0K	
Good	
Overcrowded   in  two
rooms,  which will
be   relieved    next
term    by    use    of
Junior High building ; heating good;
ventilation    good;
building   in   good
repair
Well  ventilated  and
heated
Twelve; clean;
i
i
adequate.
O.K.
Clean;  adequate.
.
....
	
0
5
Measles,    2;    scarlet    fever,    2:
acute appendix,  2
Sanitary:  modern;
bronchitis,   2; cardiac,  2; flat feet,
4; psoriasis,  1
adequate.
Yes.
Clean.
1
Good	
Good.
Whooping-cough    (held   in   control by keeping affected from
school)
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Eczema,   1;   pulmonary,   1;   pyorrhea,
1; cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 2
Good	
Good.
1
1
1
Scarlet fever,   1; chicken-pox,  2
Poorly    heated    and
ventilated
Crowded  when  more
than 30 in class
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
.
Good.
Orthopaedic, 5; heart-defects, 5; anae
4
mic, 2; pulmonary, 1
Good	
Good.
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Good.
O.K	
2
	
Good	
Good.
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Good.
1
1	
Clean; adequate.
I
1 R 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
si
cj 6
Q>
IS
9.-71
pff
Ph
Topley	
Trail	
Vancouver:
Britannia	
Lord Byng	
King Edward	
King George	
Kitsilano	
Magee	
John Oliver	
Prince of Wales	
School of Commerce
Technical	
Vancouver, North	
Vancouver, West:
Inglewood	
Vernon :	
Kamloops	
S. Eaton	
White	
White	
MissM. MacNaugh-
ton
White	
White	
White	
Lamont	
ton
Miss I. Smith	
183
106
S66
640
367
371
749
812
6
183
671
500
729
400
348
647
986
170
i50    537
I
892J1036
358|   377
129]   127
140|   138
171
102
118
108
33
90|
235
24
116
126
4
20
14
11
30
26
16
20
61
31
15
33
S
1
4
1
JUNIOR HIGH
Nelson	
Vancouver:
Fairview..
Point Grey..
Templeton...
M. G. Archibald and
and K. Terry
E. C. Arthur..
H.   White	
H.   White	
G.  Lamont..
H.   White....
Miss O. M. Garrood
MissM. MacNaugh-
ton
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss M. Ewart	
Miss V. B. Stevens
I
3181   292
I
I
I
349|   307|
1751   154
I
154611620
247|..
12311   8961   1901.
1307|1299
' 16|
SO
4)    44
I
62    446
I
I
45]   164
94|   430
I
I
69
11|   125
I
GRADED CITY
Alberni	
Armstrong..
Chilliwack..
Courtenay..
Cranbrook:
Central-
South Ward	
Kootenay Orchards..
Cumberland	
A. D. Morgan..
R.  MeCaffery..
J.  McKee	
G. B. L. McKinnon.
G. E. L. McKinnon..
G. E. ti. McKinnon..
G. R. MacNaughton.
Miss P. Charlton...
114
106
507
2
512
19
4
36
406
399
7
4
23
550|   539|.
46
12
417
451..
12|..
4071
41
50'..
It..
181
16|     40
218    244
33
105
14
27|   193
I
4|     16
58    163
188
11
9 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 51
SCHOOLS— Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
jj
>
i
IS
«
1
a
a
a
a
I
8
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Good ...
Yes.
Yea.
tions, 2; pulmonary, 1
tions, 3
tions, 2
Scarlet   fever,    1;    measles,    1;
mumps,   17
tions,  10; pulmonary,   1
tions,  4
tions,  7
tions, 4; pulmonary, 1
tions, 2
Good ...
3
quate.
SCHOOLS.
Heart,  3; bronchitis, 2..
V.D.H.,   1	
No. vaccinated, 43..
No. vaccinated, 896; cardiac affections,  11
No. vaccinated, 510; cardiac affections,  15; pulmonary,  1
No. vaccinated, 480; cardiac affections, 4
Few cases measles and chicken-
pox
Measles; varicella .
Diphtheria, 1; diphtheria carrier, 1; mumps, 2; chicken-
pox,   3
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps, 82;
whooping-cough,   1
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 2:
diphtheria carrier, 1; mumps, 1
Is a new brick building
attached to former
High School, comprising one large
assembly-hall and
six class-rooms for
Grades VII. and
VIII., art-room,
and manual-training room in basement ■ all well ventilated and heated
Overcrowded	
Sufficient and modern lavatory accommodation.
SCHOOLS.
Chronic mastoid, 1; congenital dislocation of hips, 1; harelip and cleft
palate, 1; stuttering, 2; asthma, 2 ;
hay-fever, 1; blepharitis, 12; chorea,  2; endocarditis,  1
Partial paralysis, 1-
Cleft palate, 1; cardiac, 1; mentality,
1; curvature of spine, 1
Artificial   eye,   1	
Nervous, 3 ; pulmonary, 2 ; cardiac, 3 :
orthopaedic, 3; anaemia, 23; nasal
catarrh, 21; skin-disease, 18; wax
in ears, 65
3|     19
I I I
Meningitis, 1; scarlet fever, 1;
chicken-pox, 62; pneumonia,
2; appendectomy, 2
There has been chicken-pox and
mumps early in the year. At
present there are some cases
of whooping-cough. This is
very likely to become worse
Epidemic mumps 	
Whooping-cough
Condition of buildings good; well
kept, heated, and
ventilated
The very best
Imperfect  condition.
Fair ventilation
crowded
Good	
not
O.K.
Good	
Good	
O.K	
Clean; adequate
Good.
Clean; adequate. R 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
c ■-
c>
■?*■ I
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie:
Central	
Annex	
West	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops:
Lloyd George	
Stuart Wood..
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith:
Centr.il	
Merritt	
Nanaimo:
Middle Ward	
North ward	
Quennell	
South Ward	
Nelson:
Central	
Hume	
New Westminster:
F. W. Howay	
Lord Lester	
Lord Kelvin	
Richard  McBride
Queensboro 	
John Robson	
Herbert Spencer...
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam:
Central	
James Park	
Port Moody	
Prince George:
King George V	
Baron Byng	
Connaught	
Prince Rupert:
Booth Memorial...
H.   P.   Swan...
H. W. Keith..
D.  Corsan	
D.  Corsan	
M. G. Archibald and
Kingsley Terry
M. G. Archibald and
Kingsley Terry
D. J. Barclay..
W. J.  Knox....
H.  B.  Maxwell..
G.  H.  Tutill	
. F. Drysdale..
. F. Drysdale—
. F. Drysdale...
F. Drysdale..
C. Arthur	
C. Arthur	
A. Clark	
A. Clark	
A. Clark	
A. Clark	
A. Clark	
A. Clark	
A. Clark	
A R. Wilson..
W. Sager	
W. Sager	
C. R. Symmes-
C. Ewert. .
C. Ewert..
C. Ewert..
J.   H.   Carson..
Miss B.   Mitchell.
Winnifred Seymour
Winnifred Seymour
Winnifred Seymour
MissO.M. Garrood
Miss O. M. Garrood
Miss E. Tisdale-
Miss H. Peters..
Miss N.
Miss N.
Miss N.
Armstrong
Armstrong
Armstrong
Miss N. Armstrong
Miss A.
Miss A.
Miss A.
Miss A.
Miss A,
Miss A.
Miss A.
Stark..
Stark-
Stark..
Stark-
Stark..
Stark-
Stark....
MissM. E. Grierson
Mrs. G. Bond-
Mrs. G. Bond-
Mrs. G. Bond-
Miss M. Osborne.
431
112
546
SO
390
107
546
80
I
60|  00
107
156
560
121
577
187
2741 271  18!
3071 295   II
167
156
559
121
522
171
4331 4331
5381 538]
I I
1461 146|
I
398| 3981
1 I
457] 457|
398
581..
]
691..
I
171..
45|..
I
60]
160
99
156
85
218| 218
291| 284
92| 87
69]  64
464| 4501 1081
I
408| 4081  63| |
I    I    I    I
3471 3471  42] I
2S6I 280|   41   3|  10
1    I    I
291 2801  681   4l  47
I
2961 2841 75|        21     17
I ■    r ■   I   • I
101| 921       2|       31
1 I          I
7701 770] 20!       49!
141
101-
31     42]
15|-
1
101
I
121
I
61
I
17!
I
4'..
I
191
I
91
4
	
2
3
3
5
8
1
]fi
2
1
8
4
1
3
81     181     69
I
111
41
281
I
171
301
a'
12|     351   250
I
31        4|     30
I I
21        Cl     20
201        8
8      17
I I
301-   551     20
1|     33|     85|     71
I
48
91 91     271     31
I I
391 30|     41
I I
I I
I
HI
41
101    105
69    105
25]     53
I
25]     38
411   232
55
6S
10
6
811
501
831
871
28|
I
511
1231   161
13
4
4
391
14
86
20
I
871
64
95
100
35
68
961
235
51
13
11
220
34
323
82
I
!
I I
.1 87!
I I
..I 1021
1 I
.. 311
I
4 521
I '       1
..I 95]
9
07
61   137
I
21     SO
I
931     31
68
20
40
6
44
30
206
25
12'
301
140 1
31 1
411	
I
1911   165
I
3
4
16
22
6
12 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1829-30.
R 53
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Fatigue posture, 115; asthma, 1; cardiac, 3; pronated feet, 7
14
Measles,   212;  scarlet  fever,   2;
rheumatic  fever,   1
Good.
Cardiac,  3; impediment in speech, 2..
Chorea,  2; cardiac,  1; impediment in
speech, 1
Anosmia, 1; cardiac, 1; chorea, 1
Cardiac trouble,  2	
Cardiac, 4; D'espine's, 6; bronchial, 3
Cardiac, 2; D'espine's, 8; bronchial,
Part   of  bone  from  head,   1;  partial
paralysis,. 1
Nervous,   24;   pulmonary    (not   incl.
T.B.),   3;   curvature   of   spine,   9
flat feet,  11
Defective chests,  11; cardiac,  6
Cardiac,   1  	
Conjunctivitis,   1;   blepharitis,   4;   catarrh,   1
Pulmonary,   1; blepharitis,  1	
Asthma, 1; nervous, 2; blepharitis, 8
conjunctivitis; cardiac, 1; hip-disease.  1; fractures,  2
Blepharitis, 4 	
Valvular disease of heart, 2 ;   nervous, 4
Valvular  disease of the heart,   1	
Orthopedic defect, 8; heart-defects,
5 ; nervous, 2; pulmonary,  1
Orthopaedic defects, 5; anemic, 5;
pulmonary,   3
Orthopaedic defect, 5 ; heart-defects, 4 ;
anaemic, 3 ; nervous, 2; pulmonary, 1
Orthopaedic defects, 4; heart-defects,
2; anemic,   1; pulmonary,   1
Orthopaedic defects, 5; heart-defects,
2; anaemic,  3
Orthopedic defects, 6; heart-defects,
4; nervous,  1
Orthopedic defects, 8; heart-defects,
6; anemic, 1; nervous, 3; pulmonary,  1
1
6)
Cardiac, 6 	
Cardiac,  5  	
Whooping-cough, 24; chicken-pox, 21;
measles, 4
Cardiac,   1; blepharitis,  11; eczema, 5
Conjunctivitis,  1; blepharitis,  5  	
Blepharitis,   5   	
Heart,   15;   angemia,   1;   asthma,   2;
rhonci,   2; skin,   12; orthopaedic,  1
Mumps, 32 ; chicken-pox, 1; ru
bella,  80; scarlet fever, 2
Mumps, 32; chicken-pox, 22
rubella, 34; diphtheria, 4
scarlet fever, 2; poliomyelitis, 2
Mumps, 20; chicken-pox, 2 6
rubella, 26; diphtheria, 3;
scarlet fever, 3; poliomyelitis, 2
Smallpox	
O.K..
O.K..
Fair..
6
18|
Diphtheria, 1; 40 per cent, of
children immunized against
diphtheria;     clinic     held    in
schools
Chicken-pox; a few cases of
measles
This building is of
brick, a comparatively new school,
but poorly ventilated and heated
This school is housed
in brick building;
fairly well ventilated and heated
O.K.
O.K.
O.K.
Clean;  adequate.
Adequate number
of closets which
are kept clean
and sanitary.
Adequate number
of closets which
are kept clean
and sanitary.
Mumps, 3 ; typhoid, 1; pinkeye,
23; scarlet fever (light), 11;
measles,   6
Poliomyelitis, 1 	
Whooping-cough (held in control by keeping affected from
school)
Excellent and modern in every way;
no crowding now
since the Junior
High has come
into  use
Efficient	
Satisfactory..
AVhooping-cough, 3; chicken-
pox,  5
German measles, 1; chicken-
pox,   16
Scarlet   fever,   3;  chicken-pox, 9
Chicken-pox,   6  	
Measles;  varicella
Varicella; measles
Good-
Fair...
Good-
Good..
Adequate, modern,
sanitary, and
kept clean and
neat.
Yes.
Yes.
Clean;  adequate.
Heating   good;   ventilation poor
All rooms  overcrowded
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Good condition.
Diphtheria, 3; scarlet fever.
■ 5 ; smallpox, 1; pertussis.
44 ; measles, 1; mumps, 8
chicken-pox,  66
Mumps,   2;   cardiac,   1;   whooping-cough, 2; chicken-pox, 54
Measles; chicken-pox 	
Measles; chicken-pox; diphtheria
Heating by stoves
not adequate; well
ventilated
Satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
Excellent	
Mumps;    whooping-cough;
scarlet fever
Measles .
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Excellent.
Clean; adequate. R 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
S3 x
to
JJ   .-
o -
rt fl
"tS     r\\
'r.3
OH
HO
155
123
35
41
5
12
1
12
1]
70
121
Prince Rupert—Con.
Borden Street	
Seal Cove..
Westview..
Revelstoke:
Central	
Selkirk	
Rossland:
MacLean...
Salmon Arm....
Slocan City	
Trail-Tadanac:
Central	
East Trail...
Tadanac	
Vancouver:
Aberdeen	
Alexandra. .
Bayview..
Beaconsfleld..
Block 70..
Brock	
Carleton	
Edith CavelL.
Central	
Dawson	
Charles Dickens..
Douglas	
Fleming...
Franklin-
Simon Fraser-
General Gordon..
Grandview	
Hastings	
Henry  Hudson..
Kerrisdale	
Lord Kitchener..
Kitsilano	
J.  H.  Carson..
J.  II.  Carson..
J.   H.   Carson..
J. H. Hamilton..
J. H. Hamilton..
E.   E.   Topliff..
E. S. and A. Beech.
A. Francis	
F. S. Eaton..
F. S. Eaton..
F.  S.  Eaton..
H.   White....
G.   Lamont..
W.  Dykes-
H. White....
G. Lamont..
G. Lamont-
W. Dykes...
H. White..
H. White..
G. Lamont..
G. Lamont..
G.   Lamont..
H. White	
H. White..
H. White..
H. White..
W.  Dykes..
W.  Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
Miss M.  Osborne.
Miss M.  Osborne.
Miss M.  Osborne.
64|
21|
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss Aske	
Miss F. Innes..
Miss I. Smith-
Mrs, Schultz	
Miss E.  Bell....
Miss E. Edwards..
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss J. Aske...
Miss Olmstead..
Miss D. Olmstead.
Mrs.  Schultz	
Miss L. Drysdale-
Mrs. Schultz.
Miss 0.
rick
Miss  F
E. Kilpat-
Innes
Miss F.
Innes	
Miss G.
Jeeves	
Miss G.
Jeeves	
Miss F
Innes	
1461   146
2951   295|
437|   432|
180]   180
491     47
338
69
338
69
601
6|-
41.
sol,
139 .
124
105
20
428
445
35
933
932
193
299
244
54
494
457
79
687
658
138
6921
233
493
453
564
940|
456|
5471
I
1961
4201
I
349
636
132|..
I
13L
56
85
7751
I
4931
159
57|-
I !
8761   8841   1491..
5271
632|
571|
348|
491|
I
6551
594
275
901.
106\
98|.
58 [.
I
16|        1
54 1
51
5..
331     11
I
I
5 1
24
45
351.
I 33
I I
I 18'
35
.1 19
I
..I 14
I I
121.
7 ■
[
3J
12|     25|
I I
171     141
 I I
71!
I I
30|     44l
9]        21
HI
461
14
15
18]
171
61
4|
261
32]
141
441   205
79      28
2 0
3S
.|       3]     50
5]     23
24
46
27
104
262
37
40!   120
I
48|     69
39       951
I ]
551     211
40
I
12]   140
41     21
37|   1151        5
1
22
159
4
22
12
2
3
22
35
22
12
11
24
5
11
1.'       11
21     25
29
24
10
41       7
3 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 55
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
1
>
S
IS
o
m
d
to
■*3
V
Pi
a
M
o
.5
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Heart, 24; pulmonary, 5; orthopaedic,
3; skin, 14
1
Good	
Good.
Measles 	
Good	
Good	
Good.
Measles; mumps; whooping-cough
Scarlet  fever,   60;  measles,   30;
mumps, 2
Good	
Good.
Good	
O.K.
5; paralysis, 3
Good	
Good.
Fair	
Fair.
Cardiac,  7; nervous, 8; pulmonary, 3
Cardiac,  4; nervous,  3; pulmonary,  4
32
16
24
22
17
14
12
8
Yes.
Yes.
No.   vaccinated,    261;   cardiac   affec
Diphtheria,   1;   whooping-cough,
1; chicken-pox, 5
Scarlet   fever,   1;   measles,   10;
whooping-cough,   12; chicken-
pox,  16
Scarlet  fever,   1;  diphtheria,   7;
mumps,    8;    diphtheria    carriers, 5; whooping-cough, 17;
chicken-pox,  1
tions,   1
tions, 7; pulmonary, 1
tions,  2
mumps,    3;    whooping-cough,
13; chicken-pox,  2
Mumps,   2;   whooping-cough,   7;
chicken-pox, 8
Diphtheria,    3;   diphtheria   carriers,   1;   whooping-cough,   8;
chicken-pox,  4
Diphtheria,   3;   diphtheria   carriers, 1; whooping-cough, 23;
chicken-pox,   2
Diphtheria,    1;   diphtheria   carriers, 19; mumps, 54; whooping-cough,   17; chicken-pox, 7
tions, 5; pulmonary, 1
tions, 6
No.   vaccinated,   291;   cardiac   affec
tions, 3
No.   vaccinated,   336;   cardiac   affec
rier,    1;   mumps,    1;   whooping-cough,  9; chicken-pox,  1
Scarlet fever, 6; diphtheria, 16;
mumps,    1;    diphtheria    carriers, 16; whooping-cough, 21;
chicken-pox,   8;  smallpox,   1
Scarlet   fever,    8;   measles,    1;
mumps,    4;   whooping-cough.
30; chicken-pox,   24
Scarlet fever,  2; diphtheria,   5;
diphtheria carriers. 3; whooping-cough, 9; chicken-nox, 30
Whooping-cough, 1; chicken-pox,
21; smallpox,   2
Scarlet fever,   2; diphtheria.   4;
whooping-cough,  28; chicken-
pox,  4; smallpox, 23
tions,  1
No.   vaccinated,    205;   cardiac   affec
tions,  4
No.    vaccinated,    62;   cardiac    affec
tions,  1
No.  vaccinated,  170	
No. vaccinated,   150	
No.   vaccinated,    314;   cardiac   affec
tions, 5; pulmonary, 1
No. vaccinated,  259; pulmonary,  1....
diphtheria carriers, 7 ; mumps,
22;   chicken-pox,   3;   whooping-cough,   7
Scarlet     fever,     4;     whooping-
cough,  23
Scarlet fever, 1; whooping-cough,
3; chicken-pox,  9
Scarlet fever, 4; diphtheria, 12;
mumps,    1;   diphtheria   carriers,     23;    whooping-cough,
14; chicken-ox,   18
Diphtheria,   2;  whooping-cough,
1; chicken-pox,  1
Scarlet  fever,   1;  diphtheria,   3;
measles,   32;   diphtheria  carriers, 9; mumps,  67; whooping-cough,  4
Scarlet   fever,   2;   mumps,    17;
whooping-cough,  39; chicken-
pox,  3
Diphtheria,   2;   chicken-pox,   2;
smallpox,   1
Vo. vaccinated, 215; pulmonary, 2	
No.   vaccinated,   353;   cardiac   affec
tions, 1; pulmonary, 10
tions,  2; pulmonary,  2
No.   vaccinated,   346;   cardiac   affec
tions,  1; pulmonary,  1
No.   vaccinated,   237;   cardiac   affec
tions,  2; pulmonary,  1
tions, 1 R 5G
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
d
o ~
fe §
p  .
H
d a
ot
St
£
$ -2.
QJ
CJ   QJ
rt
g.jj
QJ rt
■qj  S
3
"o
fl
<
T3
to ^2
11
QJ
"-.J    ■
QJ-S
Oh
r3
rt fl
Tt ci
S3
qj"
u
'o
a
Vancouver—Continued.
W. Dykes	
Miss G. Jeeves	
Miss D. Shields-
Miss M.  Ewart
Miss M.  Ewart
Miss B. Jenkins
Miss L. Drysdale-.
Miss D. Shields....
Miss B. Jenkins
Mrs. Schultz	
Miss I. Smith
Miss D. Shields
Miss D. Olmstead..
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss D. Shields
Miss L. Drysdale-.
Miss G. Jeeves	
Miss M. Ewart	
Miss L Smith	
MissM. MacNaugh-
ton
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss 0. Kilpatrick.
Miss J. Aske	
MissE. Bell	
449
461
578
659
5SS
521
596
G90
558
710
868
612
654
166
71
280
471
287
335
586
850
647
866
379
740
1270
761
809
459
488
406
493
572
455
586
759
501
621
942
598
437
146
84
255
494
252
354
499
815
748
805
376
766
1257
631
710
68
60
90
97
97
111
107
176
88
165
200
121
91
36
19
9
14
21
7
14
4
15
22
30
49
26
41
28
26
61
74
36
58
21
40
13
0
10
59
17
3
36
101
37
120
00
29
80
43
72
83
70
05
49
91
80
95
125
34
109
202
20
100
10
1
22
04
10
59
00
173
64
54
93
187
253
146
123
3
8
7
8
15
4
1
1
4
3
4
11
7
9
David Lloyd George—
W. Dykes      	
0
W. Dykes	
8
Moberly and Annex...
Model	
7
1
2
4
1
1
3
3
29
4
5
19
8
15
2
10
29
10
G. A. Lamont	
G. A. Lamont	
G. A. Lamont..	
H. White	
16
19
5
10
11
9
1
	
2
2
4
2
3
23
15
0
8
10
1
44
18
 1     20
1
1     o
 1     48
15
11
H. White	
6
2
20
Florence Nightingale..
Norquay and Annex...
G. A. Lamont	
G. A. Lamont	
4
6
5
20
10
7
1
15
29.......
8
18
13
9
18
41
i
5
1
3
Queen Mary	
98
55
77
52
142
...
3
W. Dykes	
3
G. A. Lamont	
H. "White	
H. White	
	
7
5
2
7
2
2
4
4
6
2
2
4
3
11
1
2
	
1
	
2
..
1
63
30
10
3
34
16
4
17
20
H. White '—~
1           1
1231 1     38
26
G. A. Lamont	
G. A. Lamont	
H. White	
150)	
56
2
43
64
12
18
36
58
83
159
119
69
	
19
Miss 0. Kilpatrick.
Miss M. McLellan..
Miss D. Olmstead..
MissM. MacNaugh-
ton
23
H. White	
45
30
H. White	
29 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 57
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
e,  etc.).
No.   vaccinated,    192;   cardiac   affections,  1; pulmonary,  1
No.   vaccinated,   380;   cardiac   affections,  2
No.    vaccinated,    160;   cardiac   affections,   4;  pulmonary,   7
No.   vaccinated,   239;   cardiac   affections,  2
No.   vaccinated,   219;    cardiac   affections,   1; pulmonary,  1
No.  vaccinated,   151	
No.   vaccinated,   253..
No. vaccinated, 264; cardiac affections,   4;  pulmonary,   2
No. vaccinated, 245; cardiac affections,   1;  pulmonary,   2
No. vaccinated, 270; cardiac affections, 2; pulmonary, 2
No. vaccinated, 332; cardiac affections,  1; pulmonary, 3
No. vaccinated, 242..
No. vaccinated,  169 .
No.    vaccinated,    69;    cardiac    affections,   1
No.   vaccinated,   29	
No.   vaccinated,   172	
No.   vaccinated,   235;   cardiac   affec
tions, 7
No.    vaccinated,    118;   cardiac   affec
tions,   3
No. vaccinated, 152..
No. vaccinated, 274..
No.   vaccinated,    423;   cardiac   affec'
tions,  1; pulmonary,  1
No.    vaccinated,    300;   cardiac   affec
tions,   1;  pulmonary,   1
No.   vaccinated,   218;   cardiac   affections, 2; pulmonary, 2
No. vaccinated, 193..
No.   vaccinated,   500;   cardiac   affec
tions,  3
No.  vaccinated,  1,155; cardiac affec
tions,  3
No.   vaccinated,   236;   cardiac   affec
tions, 8; pulmonary, 1
No.   vaccinated,   354;   cardiac   affec
tions,   1; pulmonary,  1
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps, 5;
whooping-cough, 43; chicken-
pox,   1
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 1;
mumps, 5; whooping-cough,
4; chicken-pox,  8
Diphtheria, 2; diphtheria carrier, 1; mumps, 41; whooping-cough,  30; chicken-pox, 6
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps, 11;
whooping-cough, 2; chicken-
pox,   10
Whooping-cough,  3  	
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 2;
whooping-cough, 4; chicken-
pox,   12
Scarlet fever, 3; whooping-cough.
4; chicken-pox,   6
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 4;
diphtheria carrier, 1; whooping-cough,  6; chicken-pox,  3
Scarlet fever, 4 ; whooping-cough,
6 ; chicken-pox, 1; smallpox, 1
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 22;
whooping cough, 4 ; diphtheria
carriers, 23
Scarlet fever, 6; diphtheria, 3 ;
mumps, 4; diphtheria carriers, 2; whooping-cough, 23;
chicken-pox,  17
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 1;
measles, 1; diphtheria carriers, 5; whooping-cough, 24;
chicken-pox,   20
Scarlet fever, 5; measles, 1;
mumps, 1; whooping-cough,
14; chicken-pox,  3
Scarlet fever, 3; mumps, 3;
whooping-cough,   6
Mumps,   1;  chicken-pox,   2	
Diphtheria, 1; mumps, 17;
whooping-cough, 1; chicken-
pox,  3
Diphtheria, 3; diphtheria carriers, 6; mumps, 4; whooping-cough, "28; chicken-pox,
73
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 2;
mumps, 1; diphtheria car-'
riers, 2; whooping-cough, 4;
chicken-pox,   2
Diphtheria, 2; diphtheria carriers, 4 ; whooping-cough, 1;
chicken-pox,   3
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps, 15;
whooping-cough, 5; chicken-
pox,   1
Diphtheria,   1   	
Diphtheria, 5; diphtheria carriers, 6 ; whooping-cough, 1;
chicken-pox,   12
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 5;
diphtheria carrier, 1; mumps,
1; chicken-pox, 11; whooping-cough, 13
Mumps, G; whooping-cough, 18;
chicken-pox,  7
Diphtheria, 4; diphtheria carriers, 3 ; rubella, 2 ; chicken-
pox,   19
Diphtheria, 5; diphtheria carrier, 1; whooping-cough; 10
chicken-pox,   7
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 6
mumps, 3; diphtheria carriers, 8; whooping-cough, 3
chicken-pox,  32;  smallpox,   2
Scarlet fever, 2; mumps, 2
whooping-cough, 1; chicken
pox,  27;> smallpox,   1 R 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
P.
p
fc   .
. o
c Jj!
Z S
ta
ft
a  .
°i
d «
S.  QJ
s
o
fl
fl
a
11
2. a
QJ   QJ
OS
6
il
Rt*
4>    .
V a
8 "3
Hi   (U
aw
"rt
e)
S5
> .5
CU   rt
*& 9
je
'3
fl
QJ
%   .
il
fl o
OJ
>
si
ct fl
BJS
SB
QJ
'o
o
Vancou ver—Continued.
Miss E. Bell	
412
535
386
476
529
828
141
144
306
246
508
144
373
381
23
151
246
540
263
132
48
334
160
320
415
526
355
479
554
820
141
144
806
246
508
144
373
381
23
151
246
540
263
132
48
334
160
320
52
87
22
21
10
4
1
5
6
10
25
34
28
10
1
2
3
3
4
3
4
1
2
1
10
20
37
48
60
59
50
10
8
8
15
10
21
7
8
12
2
3
10
14
11
69
148
12
9
6
23
1
12
20
11
Wolfe	
Miss E. Bell	
28
Vancouver, North;
H. Dyer	
Miss E. Lowther-..
Miss E. Lowther....
Miss E. Lowther....
Mrs. S. Martin
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss I. E. Adams-
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss I. E. Adams
Miss C. Mowbray—
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss C. Mowbray—
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss I.  E. Adams.
Miss I. E. Adams.
Miss I.  E.  Adams.
H. Dyer	
H. Dyer	
o
Vernon:
6
1
9
4
5
5
6
8
4
2
4
1
o
6
10
7
Victoria;
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
1
6
7
15
12
5
8
1
3
7
19
3
2
o
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
	
1
1
	
i
2
D. Donald	
	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
Kingston Street	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
1
	
i
i
	
	
Quadra Primary	
Railway Street	
1
13
1
9
1
10
13
20
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
i
6
9
17
1
	
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Burnaby:
Armstrong Avenue..
Barnet	
Capitol Hill	
Douglas Road	
Edmonds Street	
Gilmore Avenue	
Hamilton Road-..
Inman Avenue	
Kingsway, West....
Kitchener Street-
Nelson Avenue	
Riverway, East....
Riverway, West.-.
Sehou Street	
Seaforth	
Second   Street	
Sperling Avenue...
Stride Avenue	
Windsor Street	
Chilliwack:
Atchelitz	
Camp Slough	
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
J. G. McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
McCammon..
Mc Gammon -
McCammon..
D. Moore..
D.  Moore-
Miss W. Green-
Miss W. Green..
541
291
54.
29|.
257! 244|
198] 194L
5501 »39|
I
I
742| 721|.
20'
1871
20
178
617
313
416| 409|
691
38|
96|
31..
38|..
951..
21
21
134
134
47
45
09
67
263
263
101
101
19
19
I
21
131
150
116
71| 319
23|  26| 102] 414 103
I
41
1!
1
10
31  23
9
104
353
185
257
37
19
51
10
74
20
37
152
16
1
3
13
7
7
102
49
73
10
5 .
13
2 .
22   4
41   1
121	
48   8 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R sy
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
{Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
No. vaccinated, 184; cardiac affections,   2
No. vaccinated, 180; cardiac affections,   2;  pulmonary,   1
Cardiac, 8; nervous, 3; respiratory, 3
Cardiac, 8 ; nervous, 1; respiratory, 4 ;
orthopaedic, 2
Cardiac,   11;  nervous,   2; respiratory,
6; orthopaedic,  3
Cleft palate,  1; asthma, 3; stammering,   1;  cardiac,   5
Nervous,   1;  impeded   speech,   1;  deformed arm, 1   (accident)
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 2 ;
defective speech, 1; deformed arm,
1 (accident) ; deformed leg, 1 (accident )
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 3; spine, 1; orthopaedic,   1
Cardiac,   1	
Cardiac, 2; deformity of chest,  1..
Orthopaedic (left leg), 1;   torticollis, 1
Cleft palate, 1	
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 3; spine, 1; orthopaedic,   1
Nervous, 2; cardiac, 3; pulmonary, 1 ;
orthopaedic,   2
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 2; orthopedic, 4
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 4	
Pulmonary,    1    	
Orthopaedic,  1; cleft palate,  1..
II
n!
161
el
I
21|
I
5|        6
4j        4
51        1
I
71       1
i
— I	
-I      -2|
81-.
I
51..
Whooping-cough, 9; chicken-
pox,  11
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 1;
diphtheria carrier, 1; mumps,
16;  whooping-cough,   11
Mumps,   9;   whooping-cough,   5
Measles, 1; mumps, 10; chicken-
pox; whooping-cough,  1
Measles, 2; mumps, 20; chicken-
pox,   1; whooping-cough,  6
Chicken-pox, 40; pneumonia, 2;
whooping-cough, 6; rubella, 1
Chicken-pox, 9; mumps, 4	
Chicken-pox, 3 ; mumps, 6; diphtheria, 1
Chicken-pox, 4; mumps, 3; scarlet fever, 1
Good-
Good	
Good	
Old building; clean.
Chicken-pox,   39;
scarlet fever,   1
Chicken-pox,     9;    mumps,
whooping-cough,   7
Chicken-pox,     1;    mumps,
scarlet fever,   2
Mumps,   6;   whooping-cough
scarlet fever,   2
Chicken-pox,    18;    mumps,
whooping-cough,   2
mumps,   25; Good.
5;
Whooping-cough, 6; chicken-
pox,   4
Chicken-pox, 39; mumps, 25;
scarlet-fever,    1
Chicken-pox,     1; mumps,     5;
whooping-cough, 1
Whooping-cough, 7; scarlet
fever,   2
Chicken-pox,   22; mumps,   6—
Mumps, 2; scarlet fever, 1	
Mumps,   7;  whooping-cough,   1;
diphtheria,   1; measles,   18
Chicken-pox, 12 ; mumps, 10....
Good-
Good-
Good-
Old building; not in
good condition
Old building, but
clean
Good	
Good-
Good-
Good	
In good condition
Old    building,    but
clean
Old    building,    but
clean
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean.
Clean.
Clean;
Clean;
Clean;
Clean ;
Clean.
Clean;
Clean.
Clean;
adequate,
adequate,
adequate,
adequate,
adequate.
adequate,
adequate,
adequate,
adequate,
adequate.
adequate.
SCHOOLS.
i     i
 1 1	
Good	
Yes.
 1         21	
Good	
Yes.
2|-
31..
 |        1
Good	
Yes.
..  J	
	
Good	
....   -J         21 1 	
vision,   16
1
13|
1
 L.
|           1
il      i     i
.'.... i	
Good ....         	
Yes.
vision,   22
Good  .
Yes.
 I | |	
Yes.
- .  j-I       1 ......     	
Orthopaedic, 2; corrected vision, 8    . ,
sl
 L.
ii
.         1!	
 |.        J.. .     | ....
Good	
 1 j j	
Yes
1|..      ,|     1 ....
Good	
Yes.
...1-        |-        1 ..
21 |    |	
 1 1 1	
Good
11           1... .    L-j-
31
 1
2|
SI 1 	
 1 1 .1	
Good 	
1
1 R CO
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
II
PK
PH
■3 fl
KB
Burnaby—Continued.
Cheam	
East Chilliwack..
Fairfield Island...
Lotbiniere	
Promontory Flats..
Robertson..
Rosedale....
Ryder Lake..
Sardis	
Strathcona..
Sumas	
Yarrow No. 1..
Yarrow No. 2..
Cold stream;
Coldstream....
Lavington	
Coquitlam:
Central	
Glen —
Maillardville..
Silver Valley-
Victoria Drive. .
Cowichan, North:
Chemainus.	
Crofton	
Westholme..
Delta:
Annacis Island..
Annieville	
Boundary Bay...
Canoe Pass	
Delta, Central-
Delta, East..
Kennedy	
Sunbury	
Trenant	
Westham Island...
Esquimalt:
Lampson Street....
Kent:
Agassiz	
Harrison Mills...
Langley:
Aldergrove	
Belmont.	
County Line	
Langley, East.—
Langley, Fort—
Glenwood	
Glen  Valley	
Langley Prairie..
Milner	
Murrayville	
Otter	
Otter, South	
Patricia	
Sperling	
J.
J.
I.
I.
J.
J.
J.
J
J
J.
J.
•T
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
TV
Moore	
Moore	
S. G. Baldwin..
S. G. Baldwin-
Bruce Cannon..
Bruce Cannon-
Bruce Cannon-
Mountain View  Bruce Cannon
Bruce Cannon-
Bruce Cannon..
H. B. Rogers..
H. B. Rogers..
H. B. Rogers..
A. A. King..
A. A. King..
A. A. King..
A. A. King..
A. A. King..
A. A. King..
A. A. King-
A. A. King-
A. A. King	
G. S. McCallum-
P.   McCaffrey	
P.  McCaffrey.
B. Marr..
B. Marr..
B. Marr..
B. Marr..
B. Marr..
B. Marr..
B. Marr..
B. Marr..
B. Marr...
B. Marr...
B. Marr...
B. Marr...
B. Marr...
B. Marr...
Miss W.
Miss W.
Miss W.
Miss W.
Miss W.
Miss W.
Miss W.
Miss W.
Miss W.
Greeii..
Green..
Green..
Green..
Green..
Green..
Green..
Green..
Green..
Miss W. Green-
Miss AV. Green-
Miss W. Green-
Miss W. Green-
Miss A. Yates..
Miss A. Yates..
Miss A. Yates..
Miss R Morrison.
75
22
11
22
1501
167
17
200
49|
52,
15
71
84
31
67
19
134
150
167
17
200
51 46
7
13  11
175| 166
27|  25
I
201  18
18
19
31
16
273
23
251
I
431
29|
84|
24
78
28
24
135
1061
127|
68
23|
281
33|
1
I
548
I
1
1611
25
40-
271-
73L
241..
711..
251..
23|-
1291-
961-
12lL.
02|..
20|-
261..
30..
00
19|	
129   3
1|.
131
I
111..
31..
II..
II..
4|-
II
13|  29|
51
30
13| i;
I
II    ]
1
II   3
1
2|   2
5|   5
2   2
24  24
3
5
2
3
Xi
35
51
....|
41
3
15
6
4
5
30
27
31
14
7
1
15
16
3
3
59
51
29!
15
0
9
o
21
85
11
5
17
1
V
51
)l     36
1
-1        3
1
1     . ..
3
8
51
141	
!        •".
5
8
1
31
91
4|
1 2
I 1
l
2
 I
18| ...
1        2
.1	
13
18
8
8!
101	
8!
I        1
1 1
1
*>
5!           I	
3
5
31
5	
- 1
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1920-30.
R 01
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
'i
I?
oj
jo
eg
JJ
m
o
.SP
p.
|
S
o
Si
S
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Tonsils and adenoids, 5; birth injury,
■ 1; corrected vision,  1
1
3
Whooping-cough,     6;     chicken-
pox,  23
Good	
Window-lighting    in
one "room poor
Good	
Good.
noids, 3
Whooping-cough,      1;     chicken-
pox; mumps,   12
Good.
1
1
9
7
Good	
Good.
1     .
Good	
Good.
removed,  7
1
1        1
Measles,   7;   chicken-pox,   9
Whooping-cough,     1;     chicken-
pox,  23
1;  orthopaedic  corrected,   1
9
Good	
Good.
tonsils  and  adenoids,   9
Ventilation poor
Good	
Good.
Chronic appendix,  1; cardiac,  1; right
hip  deformity,   1;  defective  speech,
1;  corrected  vision,   2;  tonsils  and
adenoids removed,  8
o
Good.
i
1
1
 .__■__	
I
1!	
Chicken-pox,  2; mumps,  12
AVindow-lighting    in
one room poor
Good	
2
1
Good.
nephritis,   1
	
	
Good	
1 I                     1
Good	
noids removed,   1
|
Crowded	
Good	
quate.
 i. .
 1	
i
 i	
o
i
i
Good	
Good	
Good— _ 	
1
Clean, adequate.
bronchitis,  1; granular lids,  5 ; seb-
orrhosa,   1;   sties,   1;   mastitis,   1;
acne,  1
i
I
Chicken-pox   	
 i i i	
 .....I i i	
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean
I
Scarlet fever, 2; dysentery, 1....
Not crowded; good repair;  heating  fair
Not crowded;   poorly
heated;    draughty
Not crowded; good repair; well  heated
Good	
feet,   1
I
 I	
i
2
i
 i	
i
 i	
Chicken-pox,   2  	
Chicken-pox,    78;   mumps,    37;
whonping-cough,   13; measles,
1; German measles,  1
Good .  .
i
7
6
i
Good
Good     .
	
1
Whooping-cough,  9  	
Chicken-pox,   7   	
Mumps,     2;    chicken-pox,     10;
Whooping-cough, 4
Mumps,   6;  whooping-cough,   2..
Whooping-cough, 6; mumps, 38;
chicken-pox,    35
Good
Good
 i  .
i
3
12
2
General      conditions
good
Twenty-two;  adequate;  clean.
Asthma,   1;   anemia,   2;  cardiac,   1;
orthopaedic deformity,  1
1
1
i
1
	
 i	
4
 i	
 i	
2
1
Clean.
i
1
Clean.
Clean.
.     :   !	
Crowded	 R 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse-
m
"S
a
ft  .
ol
si
2
'a.
<« =
°s
6 g
fl
o
3
3
a
'3
a
fiJ £
tj d
Jj-h
li
o>.2
jj -~
3t»
SI?
|> g
oj 3
"3
9
M
ej -m
aj cj
'o
fl
0J
-UJ1
■<
^n  0J
oh
ft fl
H
'3
a
Langley—Continued.
B. B. Marr !	
21
71
23
136
197
295
74
OO
"
21
85
104
54
72
61
26
19
137
45
28
60
30
63
56
392
34
27
29
11
12
356
264
52
744
156
407
475
21
24
102
116
146
242
107
55
68
67
131
74
21
67
23
136
192
295
74
22
21
85
104
52
65
56
25
19
ISO
45
25
56
30
63
56
392
34
27
29
11
12
353
255
52
744
142
360
400
20
23
91
90
140
242
107
55
68
67
131
74
3
4
3
6
2
25
72
48
12
5
3
19
13
10
10
23
10
6
28
15
6
20
9
7
11
79
7
3
9
4
7
41
55
18
179
32
31
40
6
2
9
3
22
33
17
9
11
14
17
3
3
ii
10
55
77
94
11
0
6
41
33
6
8
6
2
3
12
5
9
19
8
27
24
151
11
9
17
6
8
20
18
13
190
50
35
53
6
8
6
i
B. B. Marr —
Miss H. Fawcett....
3
11
13
18
10
1
2
18
4
5
1
8
3
2
4
3
1
3
1
12
6
51
3
3
3
3
2
4
l
l
i
i
l
l
l
2
i
2
1
1
3
4
1
8
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
4
9
15
6
1
3
]
l
l
4
5
2
1
1
3
Maple Ridge :
o
9
55
18
9
1
4
13
4
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss H. Fawcett....
MissH. Fawcett—
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss H. Fawcett.—
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss H. Fawcett...
3
1
1
2
1
2
3
2
5
3
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
8
12
10
6
6
8
10
5
15
9
	
12
8
5
61
1
1
3
3
Matsqui:
Gifford	
3
4
5
3
4
3
3
19
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
4
1
2
5
3
1
4
1
4
5
22
1
5
3
30
14
S
1
11
1
2
5
4
35
5
6
5
3
3
2
1
60
16
2
3
5
1
3
5
30
2
2
1
Ridgedale	
Mission:
W. H. Mclntyre
W. H. Mclntyre
W. H. Mclntyre
W. H. Mclntyre
W. H. Mclntyre
W. H. Mclntyre
W. H. Mclntyre
W. H. Mclntyre.	
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss H. Fawcett...
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss H. Fawcett...
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss H. Fawcett....
Miss Bradshaw
Miss Bradshaw
Miss M. Twiddy
Silverdale	
Silverhill	
Stave Falls	
	
2
1
	
o
16
7
6
51
16
0
12
1
1
3
5
2
21
2
1
5
3
1
1
	
1
1
30
2
1
	
Oak Bay:
14
7
J. N. Taylor	
Wm.   Buchanan	
27
42
10
2
20
1
38
Richmond:
W. K. Hall	
3
5
12
30
1
1
3
3
5
Lord Byng	
W. K. Hall	
W. K. Hall	
1
1
W. K. Hall	
1
1
Saanich:
Cedar Hill	
Miss M. Harvey....
Miss M. Harvey....
Miss E. Naden	
Miss M. Harvey....
Miss M. Harvey....
Miss M. Harvey-
Miss E. Naden
Miss M. Harvey
2
1
1
2
1
2
8
11
3
2
8
3
13
7
21
3
1
2
2
11
1
2
38
69
22
8
9
10
54
8
23
40
18
1
5
7
22
7
12
4
Craigflower	
2
1
1
1
1
3
3
'     1
5
8
Lake Hill BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 63
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify.
(Nervous,  Pulmonary.  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
I
3
CJ
ta
s
I
a
g
O
|
fl
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
2
2
1
4
5
12
3
2
Crowded	
Old    building;   very
good
Good (one room poorly lighted)
Very good (one basement room)
Good	
Clean.
1
2
1
1
Yes.
Epilepsy,   1;   sore   mouth,   2;   orthopaedic,  1
7
6
1
2
3
Good.
Pulmonary,   1
Pneumonia, 1; cleft palate, 1; strabismus,  1
Good	
nervous,  1
1
Good	
Good.
Orthopaedic, 1; asthma,  1; eczema,  1
2
5
4
ways clean.
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
4
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.*
5
2
3
2
4
6
18
2
3
1
1
One room dark,
crowded; other
room  O.K.
Good	
Good.
diac, 1; skin (dry scalp), 3; sties, 1
1; granular eyelids, 2
Cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 1; asthma, 1;
one eye only, 2
o
1
Blackboards poor to
fair
Good	
Poor;  improved.
Skin,   3    (of   long   standing) ;   eczema
(?) ;   (psoriasis   (?)
Good
1
	
Good	
Fair
Chicken-pox; mumps; whooping-
cough;  measles
Chicken-pox;    measles;    whooping-cough ; mumps
Well heated and ventilated ;   no   overcrowding
Well heated and ventilated ;   no   overcrowding
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
3; ana>inia, 4
1
 I	
1; diabetes, 1; acne, 2 ; conjunctivitis,   1 ; cleft palate,   1
1
1
orthopaedic, 7
2
1
25
1
	
5
1
5
3
Mumps, 21; measles, 5; whooping-cough, 25
Measles,  2; whooping-cough,   30
Measles,   17; whooping-cough,  2
Whooping-cough,   10  	
Whooping-cough, 2; smallpox, 2;
chicken-pox, 5 ; measles,   17
O.K	
O.K	
	
	
	
O.K-
Clean
1
3
2
O.K—
Clean
O.K.
Clean.
1
1
51
6
4l
1
	
4
Mumps,   5;   whooping-cough,   6;
scarlet fever, 2; measles,  1
mus,  2
3
whooping-cough, 6; measles, 1
Mumps,  52; chicken-pox,  5; typhoid,   2
2
 1	
Whooping-cough,   4 ;   scarlet
fever,   1
Mumps,   1;   whooping-cough,   1;
scarlet fever,  3
1
41
21
1
2
Cardiac, 5; pulmonary, 3; strabismus,
2
2; lues,  1
Mumps, 1 	
Good
Excellent.
1           1 R 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of- School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
rU       •
O >—
. o
<.   OJ
£•8
•>.-  CJ
°1
6 «
jjJ. 0J
fl
o
C
rt
J fl
OJ
II
Of-
33 fl
OK
03
s i
oj rt
■8 g
as
fl
•uJ
OJ .J;
la
HH
0)
»   g
Oh
OJ   J
tc 2
rt   fl
B.3
HO
o
0
Saanich—Continued.
Miss E. Naden
Miss M. Harvey
Miss M. Harvey
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden
Miss E. Naden	
Miss E. Naden
56
87
28
50
90
297
255
20
70
28
30
22
37
43
71
40
27
133
330
17
74
204
24
32
22
34
88
27
51
40
48
115
61
34
53
28
60
153
155
37
5
58
297
350
56
87
28
50
90
297
255
22
63
27
30
20
36
38
69
38
24
127
310
15
71
191
24
31
21
31
79
20
44
44
45
108
55
31
53
26
50
137
150
33
5
48
283
331
1
3
1
2
9
6
4
3
2
3
8
7
13
i
i
2
2
7
14
1
5
3
i
	
7
22
4
6
12
70
65
4
22
~5
12
5
4
6
4
9
3
15
80
1
ii
25
9
11
19
73
85
9
21
11
14
6
11
10
8
0
2
12
165
3
8
15
2
4
7
41
48
4
7
3
7
2
1
4
1
3
2
8
81
2
1
4
1
3
Royal'Oak	
o
1
2
20
18
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
34
2
3
4
5
7
2
2
2
2
4
3
9
65
•
Salmon Arm:
o
2
2
3
3
4
Larch Hill	
1
3
2
o
3
1
4
29
3
7
5
3
3
1
1
1
o
2
4
5
2
3
1
5
30
1
6
3
1
1
4
3
5
49
Sumas:
4
Surrey:
F. I). Sinclair	
3
5
21
1
2
1
5
10
3
10
4
1
3
10
1
F. D. Sinclair	
1
2
F. D. Sinclair	
2
10
3
0
2
4
5
5
3
2
1
1
2
	
1
2
	
	
3
2
3
5
2
8
5
2
1
0
10
1
Kensington, East	
o
F. D. Sinclair	
1
2
2
4
5
1
F. D. Sinclair	
o
F. D. Sinclair	
1
3
8
2
19
1
1
Surrey Centre	
Tyne Head	
4
2
4
5
2
1
1
3
2
1
3
29
155
135
3
4
7
6
F. D. Sinclair	
F. D. Sinclair	
6
F. D. Sinclair	
2
1
Vancouver, AVest:
A. C. Nash	
1
12
22
23
A. C. Nash '	
9
48
71
A. C. Nash |	
A    C   Naah   1  	
	
	
1
3
1
3
1
1
	
RURAL AND
215
11
14
15
196
10
12
15
9
12
2
1
1
12
19
21
4
6
1
17
4
2
14
3
1
5
1
2
5
1
5
8 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 65
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
1
OJ
QJ
j3
rt
o
W
c
OJ
|
a
y
o
i
2
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
5
	
ticollis; T.B.  arthritis,  1; stammering,  1; conjunctivitis,  16
Mumps, 14; German measles, 1;
chicken-pox,   18
2
2
7
3
2
1
AV hooping-cough,     7;     chicken-
pox,  1
Mumps,    6;    chicken-pox,    19;
whooping-cough,   3
Mumps,   1;  German measles,   1;
chicken-pox,      4;     whooping-
cough,   1
2
2
cardia,   1;  pulmonary,   1;   conjunctivitis,  1
mus,  1
Good	
Good.
Crowded	
Good	
Good.
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good.
Good	
Good        	
Good.
/
	
Good.
.
	
1      corneal opacity,  1; kyphosis,  1
\
27
Whooping-cough;   chicken-pox....
Mumps;  measles  	
Chicken-pox;       whooping-cough;
mumps; measles
Measles;  mumps; chicken-pox	
Good; frame on concrete ;       standard
construction
Yes.
eczema, 4; nervous, 3
1
	
	
Good	
	
	
Good	
chest,  1; chronic poliomyelitis,  1
	
Good       	
Chicken-pox; mumps; measles.—
Good        	
2
1
Good	
systolic
Good       	
Chicken-pox; mumps; measles	
loss of weight, 1; anaemia, 1
	
3
3
3
1
Mumps; chicken-pox,  measles....
Measles;  mumps;  chicken-pox	
Good       	
Good       	
tion,   1
Mitral   systolic,   1;   D.A.H.,   1;   mar
8
1
..."
Good	
ginal   blepharitis,   1
Chicken-pox; mumps; measles....
Mumps;  measles  	
Measles; mumps chicken-pox
Measles;  mumps;  chicken-pox....
 ■	
1;   deviated   septum,   1;   functional
systolic,  1
	
1
10
20
functional   systolic,    1;    endocarditis, 1
Good        	
...
Good         ....
Good	
Both.
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
Good condition.
Poorly heated and
ventilated
Rather crowded; ventilation fair only R 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
rU      .
o —i
. o
ft
B   .
■m d
°i
S3 Sj
a
o
a
'rt
3
tj a
QJ "JJ.
"qj  0J
J J
oj .2
QJ    .
■-   fcfl
JB C
®  oJ
OJ  0J
osa
"rt
rt
(3
ti
oj +J
JJ rt
OJ   j,
OP3
'o
a
OJ
TJI
TJ
OJ „;
bu.22
la
as
OJ
>
OJ jS
OJ   g
OH
Tjt
g|
rt C
1.3
HO
oj
'3
o
Miss H. Kelly
13
55
13
9
29
16
25
49
12
11
8
14
28
16
7
18
12
12
104
20
10
97
16
10
8
15
24
10
20
29
11
19
8
10
28
7
15
19
24
17
11
9
10
16
33
24
21
16
8
43
10
8
19
9
17
9
9
7
56
100
16
7
20
34
13
24
7
8
23
16
14
13
53
12
9
29
16
22
44
12
11
8
13
21
15
7
18
12
12
102
20
10
93
14
9
8
15
22
9
18
28
11
18
8
10
28
7
15
17
24
17
11
9
10
16
33
1
1
2
i
1
4
1
6
1
4
2
2
4
2
1
10
3
1
4
3
6
14
3
1
2
1
2
G. A. Charter	
2
6
1
1
2
6
1
3
5
3
3
2
1
3
5
5
5
2
3
2
1
3
2
1
1
R  B. White  . ..
l
1
2
7
10
2
1
1
1
6
14
3
2
i
2
1
1
1
4
4
4
4
37
2
2
5
2
1
2
3
9
2
8
3
4
6
2
4
21
2
5
23
10
5
1
1
2
1
2
2
i
1
3
1
4
3
19
1
24
4
3
1
7
1
5
2
3
1
6
2
1
1
5
2
5
3
1
J. H. Shotton	
1
2
2
6
5
2
4
10
5
1
1
3
1
	
7
7
2
2
3
8
2
Miss B. Mitchell—.
2
4
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
3
1
2
4
3
4
5
4
1
6
1
2
3
4
2
4
3
7
1
1
8
3
1
13
5
4
4
10
9
2
SS
3
5
22
7
6
4
1
C J. M. Willoughby...
3
5
5
3
1
11
1
6
i
4
4
1
3
5
 I	
 I	
1
17
10
3
1
1
6
1
3
17
11
3
3
10
1
5
1
2
2
3
10
17
11
2
2
16
241      10
6
Cowichan Health
Centre
17
16
fl
41
8
8
19
5
18
9
8
7
16
97
14
7
19
34
13
24
7
8
17
16
11
2
2
2
1
1
2
3
8
10
2
10
4
2
17
1
2
2
1
...v...
6
2
6
4
2
6
2
1
21    .
1
11
1
1
3
1
6
3
1
6
6
N j. Paul  	
Black Canyon	
2
2
2
1
12
5
6
14
5
7
30
8
1
3
6
9
6
3
9
7
1
5
3
10
1
5
2
2
2
o
2
4
8
4
2
2
3
3
5
2
8
4
4
1
1
	
1
	
2
1
4
1
1
	
1
1
1
3
4
3
6
18
2
2
7
1
2
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 67
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
ri
1
§
>
2
u
m
6
S
I
EJ
o
a
g
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Good               	
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated and
heated
Fair	
Fair.
Satisfactory	
Good               ..    .
Yes.
Good.....                	
Number     of     desks
need readjusting
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Fair	
	
adequate.
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Clean; adequate.
	
...A	
Good
O.K.
Poorly   heated   and
lighted
O.K.
Poorly ventilated
Clean;  adequate.
Good.
 i	
Good	
Yes.
|
Good	
Good.
 i	
Yes.
Good
Yes.
Good	
Good.
i
0 K.
0 K.
Clean;  adequate.
Adequate.
	
Good
Good.
 i	
Yes
 i._ '
Adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good
	
Two pits full.
Clean;   adequate.
Good....-
2
Adequate.
Good-
Good—
Clean;  adequate.
	
....
Clean;  adequate.
Two; fair repair.
	
 i	
Wooden building in
good repair
teeth,  1
i
 i	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
O.K
 i	
O.K	
Good
	
scarlet fever, 8
Good
Adequate.
Well kept.
Not   crowded;   well
heated and ventilated
 i 	
Clean;    well    ventilated
1
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Good
     	
'        1
Good
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
1
Everything fine	
Good
 |
 i	
1
i     1 R 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
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N. J. Paul	
2
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1
1
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91        R
7
9
20
12
129
18
01
121
19
11
9
19
1
1
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,T. C. Stuart	
2
11
119
15
61
118
19
11
1
6
3
7
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1
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1
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36
4
27
5
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9
1
1
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15
1
3
15
1
21
31
2
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74
6
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14
G. H. Tutill	
1
2
2
91        7
38|     38
14|     14
581     58
1
36|   .36
61        0
2
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4
4
3
9
8
1
1
23
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30
22
11
60
9
6
1
1
2
4
9
1
1
2
7
2
5
1
1
4
4
Castlegar	
791      77
3
15
26
11
47
14
21
11
45
Mrs. B. Thompson.
1
3
1
1
1
6
4
	
	
2
3
4
4
7
1
1
1
 |	
o
21
. ....   1    .....
1
2
1
18|      18
14|     12
18|     15
211     20
39|     39
90|     88
191     15
501      50
	
2
3
1
5
	
3
3
1
3
1
1
	
1
1
1
2
	
2
	
8
4
4
20
4
6
	
10
20
4
23
2
2
3
1
2
4
5
1
16
	
1
H.   B.  Maxwell
Miss H. Peters
1
1
	
3
	
6
4
12
12
12
5
10
1
01	
    1	
1
3
1
3
1
Chilco...               	
W   R   Stone  	
18I      18
8
 1	
9
7
16
13
16
11
56
12
35
75
45
9
0
15
12
16
11
56
12
	
1
.  .
1
2
1
	
	
	
2
	
2
2
4
19
6
6
19
13
6
5
1
3
2
3
5
4
11
4
6
1
1
8
W  Truax          	
	
2
5
2
	
	
1
	
6
11
	
	
3
	
	
	
2
M. G Archibald	
2
32
75
43
1
3
2
1
1
	
4
12
1
3
1
3
3
4
11
6
4
1
11
7
7
5
3
5
7
1
Cowichan Health
Centre
28|     25
91        7
61         6
2
1
	
1
	 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 69
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
1
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Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good ,	
Fair;    some    crowding ;   poor   system
for ventilation;
wood box stove
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
No.
1
Fair.
1
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
"          .
   Good	
Good	
3
Yes.
orthopaedic, 1; anaemia, 1; chorea, 1
Good	
O.K.
	
2
Whooping-cough,      10;     scarlet
fever, 1;   measles, 2
Good	
cleaner.
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
2
2
Good	
1; scarlet fever, 1
Good	
Good	
Pertussis 	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
i
Adequate.
I
O.K.
Mumps   	
Good	
Fair	
Good	
|
1
	
Mumps, 5 	
Good	
 ! l	
Very poor 	
Good	
1     .    |          |	
Round   shoulders,   3;   orthopaedic,   1;
Good	
Yes.
ana-mia,  1
1
21	
[     .
Gnnrt.
1
1               [
Measles 	
Measles 	
lation good
Good	
Good	
Good	
i
|
1
	
Satisfactory	
4
No.
	
Good	
I
Chicken-pox,   2   	
1
31 1	
Chronic mastoid,  1  	
j
Good.
3
Good	
Satisfactory	
Overcrowded	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
1
	
Two; fair.
.. |.    .    1 j   	
Accommodation;
ventilation and
heating
Clean;  adequate.
tive posture,  3
Diseased gums, 2; poor posture, 3	
1           1
 | 1 |	
1
1           1           1
repair; good lighting
Clean; adequate.
Fair.
Good.
Good.
.     | . . .
2
1
 |	
mumps,  16; measles,  5
Scarlet   fever,   11;   measles,   1;
whooping-cough,  1
Good	
Good	
Good
1
      | ...
1
 I	
Rubella,   1  	
 1	
Fairly good	 R 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
S=
Ph   .
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147
14
45
57
58
40
17
28
24
226
10
11
14
10
8
15
11
35
17
7
22
33
11
14
28
11
38
82
22
12
10
16
17
9
9
10
14
13
8
9
7
27
11
18
32
15
16
11
17
11
25
45
24
18
22
13
■28
fl
57
22
17
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57
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42
65
13
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144
14
45
57
53
40
15
24
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207
7
11
14
10
8
14
12
35
17
7
16
30
10
14
26
11
31
77
22
12
9
16
17
7
9
10
14
13
8
9
7
24
11
11
32
15
10
11
10
9
24
39
24
18
21
13
28
6
52
21
14
8
55
39
52
l
1
7
7
4
7
54
4
12
13
26
6
1
8
5
35
3
1
3
8
3
48
2
15
18
27
12
3
3
11
28
4
2
3
3
4
1
Miss H. Kelly	
2
12
.2
31
3
54
4
8
12
6
4
2
8
2
18
2
3
1
1
5
3
1
7
5
1
1
7
3
5
13
5
Robt. Elliot	
5.
11
2
3
3
1
5
Miss A. Yates	
Cowichan Health
Centre
2
11
1
4
2
8
1
9
1
3
8
2
36
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
	
	
2
1
4
4
5
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
1
6
3
6
7
7
3
W. A. Watson	
	
1
5
3
1
1
2
8
3
3
1
2
19
6
5
4
10
2
4
8
2
10
16
10
0
	
4
1
3
1
	
2
1
1
H  W. Keith	
1
2
1
1
7
11
2
2
3
2
17
32
2
3
2
3
17
23
5
3
o
1
1
1
o
1
7
3
1
1
1
8
8
	
3
	
1
3
8
	
1
8
10
a
23
Miss H. Peters	
2
...     1           !           1
	
	
	
1
1
3
8
4
4
4
8
7
1
3
5
9
4
4
4
1
7
4
2
4
12
29
16
	
 1   x! !	
1
2
2
1
7
	
	
	
	
	
1
7
	
	
2
 1 1 1	
1
2
1
7
	
	
1
M. F. Lucas	
	
	
....
	
	
	
	
.
1
2
2
1
5
6
	
0
2
	
1
2
1
 I	
1
1
1
5
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
2
	
.
4
4
2
	
	
	
Elk Bay	
	
	
	
1
i
	
	
	
	
2
	
2
	
4
10
4
10
5
8
3
9
10
1
10
4
fl
3
11
3
6
2
21
1
15
7
2
1
Elko	
	
	
1
Mrs. A. Grindon...
5
1
I	
6
2
1
7
5
1
17
H W  Keith	
	
6
1
.    ..
	
	
	
2
4
4
2
4
4
10
6
15
1
10
6
8
2
41
1
21
5
1	
1
1
	
 1	
2
4
1
8
5
5
3
4
35
1
Miss M. Griffin
1
	
1
1
6
Mrs. A. Grindon...
5
2
2
|	
5
4
2
7
2
3
H  B  Maxwell	
6
1
Miss M. Kittering-
ham
2
5
2
3
1
........
6
	
9
1
11
1
9 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 71
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
1
OJ
OJ
S3
03
CJ
CO
6
bfl
OJ
P.
a
6
g
0
&
bo
g
tf
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
1   ..
die,   1
V.D.H.,    1;   asthma,    1;   St.    Vitus's
1
Crowded	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Adequate.
dance, 1; ichthyosis, 1
Good.
Good.
Cardiac,  2; nervous,  4; pulmonary,  3
Flat feet, 1; cleft palate, 1
10
0
Scarlet    fever,    3;    mumps,    6;
measles, 6
Good	
Good.
.  |
Good	
Yes.
Good.	
Good.
.   i
Good	
Good	
Good	
Poor repair	
Good.
 ....:
Good	
i
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
O.K.
Good	
I  •-   1
Good	
Yes.
I   -  i
Measles	
Fair	
Well ventilated;
heated; not overcrowded
Good
i
Yes.
1
Satisfactory	
Yes.
2
Yes.
Pertussis 	
1
Good
1
O.K..           	
O.K.
Heating, etc., good—.
i
i
Good                    	
Adequate.
Clean; adequate.
1
Fairly satisfactory ...
Mitral  stenosis,   1;  curvature  of   spine
and rickets, 1
Fair
Clean
Fair
Satisfactory	
Clean;  adequate.
Heating, etc., good-
Yes.
Yes
Clean
Satisfactory ...
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Not   crowded;    well
heated and ventilated
1
1
Scoliosis,  2   	
[
Good.
Very bad.
5
Cardiac,    2;    pulmonary    disease,    1;
2
Overcrowded	
Well     heated     and
ventilated;     not
overcrowded
Clean.
Two;  sanitary.
every child in school has a cold, explaining high percentage of enlarged
cervical glands R 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"S
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J. E. H, Kelso	
11
76
15
9
12
12
13
8
12
8
45
37
70
16
49
8
11
12
16
26
11
46
100
50
58
10
14
12
6
19
19
20
8
60
16
26
50
11
37
32
9
37
12
13
103
22
179
17
12
9
9
15
23
9
22
67
21
35
8
241
19
9
27
23
36
11
76
15
9
12
12
13
8
9
8
45
37
64
16
42
7
11
7
14
26
11
38
86
50
50
8
14
12
4
15
17
19
7
60
15
23
50
11
1
2
3
5
!
2
9
3
7
7
1
5
2
Field	
1
4
3
1
3
7
1
4
1
7
4
5
1
Fife	
Firvale	
Flagstone	
W. Truax	
i
3
1
3
1
4
2
1
2
H. A. Christie	
	
1
5
1
5
Foch	
2
1
T. C. Holmes	
1
2
3
A. K. Connolly	
Ford	
1
2
2
10
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
12
14
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
3
3
1
17
25
7
9
4
6
5
4
Fort George, South	
C. Ewert	
3
1
1
1
3
3
10
2
0
2
5
4
6
Fort Steele	
F. W. Green	
e
4
9
1
6
4
1
3
3
4
1
1
1
Francois, South	
T. C. Holmes	
3
3
2
8
2
5
25
8
8
6
3
2
Fraser Lake, North	
2
13
1
4
"ii
29
16
28
3
6
5
2
44
5
8
3
4
K. Terry	
9
10
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
3
19
3
2
2
1
23
2
2
3
3
2
Fruitova	
10
J. H. Palmer	
Gabriola, East	
Gabriola, North	
3
2
1
Galena	
P. Ewert	
1
6
1
1
5
1
3
16
12
15
5
2
9
10
1
E. M. Sutherland	
1
1
C. H. West	
2
II. A. Christie	
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
8
13
8
2
12
9
2
11
3
2
13
4
10
11
5
4
4
8
8
6
1
22
E. M. Sutherland	
1
1
2
8
1
2
3
Gill	
6
6
1
1
1
1
Glade	
31
32
9
30
12
13
99
22
167
17
12
9
9
15
22
9
22
57
21
35
8
238
15
9
27
23
31
5
2
3
3
1
1
9
3
P. S. Tennant	
3
Miss B. Mitchell....
	
1
1
2
9
3
12
5
1
23
8
1
4
8
19
1
20
11
10
5
6
3
15
2
4
30
4
1
7
31
fl
11
3
2
2
1
72
	
2
6
1
9
4
1
4
1
3
2
4
1
4
2
3
2
5
29
1
H. W. Keith	
F. H. Stringer	
H. A. Christie	
T. C. Holmes	
1
4
1
1
1
1
Great Central Lake	
4
2
1
6
2
H. W. Keith	
4
3
3
Miss H. Kelly
1
3
6
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
3
5
4
3
9
7
4
25
3
3
9
9
15
16
7
10
2
2
10
F. H. Stringer	
10
A. K. Connolly	
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
15
fl
19
21
8
12
2
4
12
8
1
1
2
9
o
3
7
2
13
2
3
7
5
5
L. B. Wrinch	
Hazelton,   New	
L. B. Wrinch
341     31
241      23
1
1
T. A. Briggs ....
45
13
13
44
13
11
4
5
2
2
Heffley Creek	
K. Terry	
1
P. S. Tennant	
2
1
4
3 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 73
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
1
Oi
et
y
co
f
a
a
s
6=
he
3
tf
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Yes.
Scarlet fever,  1; chicken-pox,   1
Crowded	
Fair	
Good	
O.K.
Two;  fair.
Poor.
Satisfactory	
Greatly improved....
Clean; adequate.
Good.
O.K.
Two; clean.
i
Clean;  adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Good.
1 ...
Good	
Clean; adequate.
|	
Fair	
1 	
Good	
Yes.
3
Good	
Clean.
Good	
Good.
 |	
Good	
Two; clean.
:
Good	
Two;  clean.
j	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Good.
i
Good	
Good.
Well ventilated and
heated; not
crowded
O.K	
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
Good	
Two; clean.
Yes.
.   |—.
Good	
Clean.
[
Good	
Clean.
1
Good	
Clean.
i
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Clean.
Adequate.
Measles; influenza; rotheln	
Good; not crowded;
well ventilated
and heated
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
2
Adequate.
Good	
Two; clean;
adequate.
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Good  	
Not clean.
Good	
Yes.
Require cleaning.
3
Clean; adequate.
Ventilation    and
lighting poor
Insanitary and in
1
adequate.
Clean.
Clean.
Nervous,    1;   slight   systolic,    1;   flat
Yes.
chest,    4;    apical    murmur,    12;
tachycardiac, 6
One needs clean
ing.
Clean;  adequate.
Good	
Two; clean.
Poor.
Good.
Good	
Clean; adequate.
       p	
Good	
No.
Good	
Yes.
Satisfactory.
Good	
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Good    	
Clean.
Spinal curvature,  1	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Good.
Good     	
Good.
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Tachycardia,   1 	
Not   crowded;   good
ventilation;   stove
heat
Yes.
Suspicious  chest,   1	
Crowded	 It 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
3
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3   .
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R. E. Ziegler	
23
7
18
34
9
80
14
14
19
33
20
90
8
23
7
6
32
9
78
12
12
19
29
20
88
8
1
1	
2
3
2
3
2
4
2
7
1
18
5
3
2
■?
5
11
2
P. S. Tennant	
1
4
1
1
3
3
12
1
10
3
5
4
10
5
42
*j
1
H. W. Keith	
Miss M. Griffin
8
Hilltop	
W. Traux	
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
5
1
3
2
3
1
5
1
18
1
o
10
1
2
J. E. Knipfel	
3
9
3
1
1
1
1
6
1
2
F. Inglis	
2
Hulatt	
W.   R.   Stone	
H. W. Keith	
20
8
8
19
8
7
10
1
1
3
2
2
3
2
6
3
2
2
7
3
2
3
15
13
8
17
26
5
1
3
6
1
9
4
13
3
o
J. T. Steele	
i
l
2
7
2
H.  F.   Tyerman	
W. H. Wood	
0
3
J.   E.   H.   Kelso  ...
121     12
C. R. Symmes	
3
2
2
4
4
	
	
12
	
4
..
15
19
25
43
13
6
14
17
8
32
9
11
18
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15
18
23
40
13
6
14
13
8
28
9
11
18
5fl
E. M. Sutherland	
 1..
	
1
	
H. A. Christie	
.
2
1
8
1
5
	
2
10
4
3
S. W. Leiske	
2
1
Mrs. A. Grindon.-.
3
2
3
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
	
4
5
G. H. Tutill     	
1
	
R. B. White
3
2
2
3
10
15
1
4
4
3
20
4
2
4
A. E. Kydd  	
1
1
1
16
2
7
3
1
1
1
3
2
10
1
Mrs. A. F. Grindon
Mrs. A. F. Grindon
161
2|
1 I
47
7
11
4
4
5
2
68
13
5
15
G. A. Ootmar  	
23      20
1
Kettle Valley	
W. H. Wood	
11
9
13
7
448
10
8
7
11
8
5
Kidd	
1 —
 I	
2
3
3
7
438
10
8
7
12
1 ...
 1	
1
1
1
5
3
7
28
75
1
o
2
3
2
4
71
1
1
o
6
9
1
6
1
10
10
3
1
2
1
2
5
	
20
1
	
2
1
1
9
3
81
1
3
1
14
13
1
2
4
2
3
4
	
	
1
H. W. Keith	
3
1
6
13
3
2
3
31
I. H. Palmer	
131     13
201     18
1601   160
12|        5
12|        9
10|     10
2fl|     23
31      22
91        0
131     13
9|        9
21|     21
54|     54
25|     24
61        6
1
61        6
121     12
81        8
141     14
7|        7
....
2
2
..
58
31	
171        1
1
2
10
8
19
V. E. B. Ardagh	
1
2
	
1
2
1
3
	
1
1
11
2
	
1
2
1
1
Miss V. Miller
2
5
6
A. K. Connolly	
2
2
4
6
	
1
1
i
3
3
4
2
2
3
	
Langford	
I. B. Hudson	
Miss H. Kelly
1
2
5
2
F. W. Green	
	
1
4
chuck)
2
3
5
3
6
Lasqueti (Maple Grove).
	
1
2
5
	
1
1
5
6
2
..
1          1          1          1          1
1           1           1           1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 75
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
d
1
OJ
s>
OJ
S3
eg
CJ
VI
6
SB
p.
a
|
o
u
c
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Poor ventilation	
Excrement not
covered.
1
New    school;     well
heated    and   ventilated
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Good.
Well     heated     and
lighted; not overcrowded
Bad 	
Few   cases   mumps;   whooping-
cough, 4
Good	
Good	
Lighting  and  ventilation poor
Heating, etc., good-
Good	
Yes.
2
Yes.
Fair.
Fair	
J	
2
21	
Poorly ventilated	
Satisfactory	
	
	
1
'
Fair	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Influenza, 4   (afflicted at home)
Yes.
 1	
...J	
Both.
 1	
Yes.
1
well ventilated
Good	
Poor   ventilation   in
winter
...
2
O.K.
Scoliosis,   1   	
Measles, 12;   scarlet fever, 2	
Good.
lation   fair;   stove
heat
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Heart, 1 	
Good.
Good	
In good condition	
Yes.
2; enuresis, 2 ; undescended testicle,
1;    hydrocephalis,    1;   cardiac,    3;
pulmonary,  2
Yes.
clean.
Yes.
0 K.
Very poor building....
Flat   chest,   1   	
2
Satisfactory	
Anaemic,   1   	
6 R 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
A
3
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J. C. Stuart.
64
16
30
23
12
27
16
16
14
10
24
42
82
21
27
9
17
56
55
9
12
14
51
62
16
27
22
10
27
17
14
11
10
24
42
80
20
27
8
16
50
46
9
12
14
50
13
10
17
23
16
13
43
14
8
5
8
8
13
13
6
11
24
340
40
27
61
7
8
82
9
9
18
0
13
10
7
9
10
9
44
13
8
02
16
12
7
i
1
2
1
3
3
i
4
4
1
4
6
1
8
12
3
5
4
5
5
7
10
6
2
4
4
1
6
5
3
2
1
2
15
3
3
6
5
1
1
19
8
4
3
2
3
1
2
38
1
3
3
2
2
	
6
7
8
3
1
3
7
2
9
5
1
7
1
J. T. Steele  .
1
3
2
3
4
3
4
5
3
1
4
2
10
J. T. Steele	
4
K. Terry	
3
3
1
1
F. W. Green	
4
2
4
i
i
2
2
5
40
3
9
9
4
1
1
10
15
5
5
8
A. E. Kydd
2
2
12
...
6
1
3
1
1
1
3
2
2
5
	
1
1
2
1
i
1
... ...
1
1
3
2
A. W. McCordick    .
o
2
R. Ziegler	
W. R. Stone
2
i
i
2
1
1
2
1
G. Baker	
13
10
19
25
19
13
44
14
8
7
8
8
13
13
6
12
24
"
350
40
29
64
7
10
83
12
9
20
6
13
10
8
16
9
45
14
8
64
17
12
8
2
2
1
1
6
1
1
1
2
1
25
12
4
1
5
6
3
1
Miss A. Yates	
o
8
3
1
3
2
3
3
27
1
1
i
2
1
1
3
3
Menzinger Creek-	
1
2
4
4
0
4
5
i
5
1
1
5
1
1
15
1
2
5
59
14
5
30
2
1
14
3
1
1
1
5
1
3
172
17
6
42
2
27
18
1
9
2
2
6
11
Mill Bay	
F. T. Stanier	
Cowichan  Health
Centre
14
	
8
3
1
1
s
1
1
7
3
28
6
1
1
1
6
2
1
1
4
2
13
4
1
11
7
3
2
1
4
65
2
22
P. Ewert	
1
 1	
1
 1	
K. Terry	
2
5
	
5
2
1
3
P. Ewert	
1
1
1
1
3
2
3
2
5
2
3
5
7
3
3
8
2
1
3
F. W. Green	
F. W. Green	
11
C. Ewert	
 1	
1
.1           I
1
3
3
5
W. H. Mclntyre
21 ..      1         8
1
5
2
2
7
2
2
1
?,
K. Terry	
1
1
3 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 77
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
1
OJ
OJ
S3
rt
CJ
tn
6
.5?
OJ
p.
a
a
u
p
to
C
9
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good .   .
Good.
with  otorrhcea,   1
Good
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Two;  clean  and
adequate.
Good... .
Good
	
 i	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good
 1	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
 i	
 I	
Satisfactory	
In good condition.
Adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Good condition.
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
Light on south side...
 !	
Satisfactory	
6
 |	
meningitis,  1
 I	
2
	
Good	
Good	
Adequate,
Yes.
Need  cleaning.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Adequate; not
clean.
Clean; adequate.
 |	
 1	
Good	
Good	
 |	
 I	
 1	
Not   crowded;   well
ventilated;     suitably heated
5
Satisfactory	
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
Requires repairs.
Yes.
Yes.
Good condition.
Clean;  adequate.
Adequate.
Poorly heated	
Frame; fair	
Good
Tachycardia,   1;   stammering,   1;   calcium deficiency, 1
 1 1	
Conjunctivitis, 3; some chicken-
pox
Diphtheria, 22; measles, 10
Fairly good	
Adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
Eight closets.
Clean;  adequate.
1
 1	
2
dumb,  1; nasal deformity,  1; orthopedic; cardiac   (light), 5
1
Lower room crowded;
needs more light
1
 1	
One room crowded....
Satisfactory	
Good
1
1
Condition of
closets  improved.
1; congenital abnormality, 1
not  well  cleaning
school; afterwards
went better
Two; clean.
 1	
0 K
Poor repair	
Good
Adequate; clean.
Infantile paralysis	
1
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
O.K.
Good	
0 K
Plu	
Good
Clean; adequate.
Only one toilet.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Crowded; inadequate
Very  poor  school
building  in  every
way
Good
*  ,
0 K
Two; in good condition. R 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
3
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McMurdo	
P. Ewert	
13
7
108
76
0
51
8
14
9
8
24
41
8
12
27
9
85
40
100
10
25
195
52
22
33
60
12
124
13
8
8
7
15
14
12
34
72
41
8
24
12
10
18
21
80
27
35
8
13
8
22
44
7
9
25
8
8
11
25
50
19
16
45
16
8
13
44
18
12
7
108
73
0
51
8
12
9
8
24
39
8
12
22
9
S5
44
95
10
20
188
50
20
33
60
10
115
12
7
8
7
12
14
12
34
68
39
8
24
8
9
17
21
67
27
24
8
13
8
20
44
7
9
18
8
8
11
25
49
16
16
45
16
8
13
44
18
25
i
T. C. Holmes	
1
14
5
2
12
9
4
6
20
2
2
2
4
1
2
12
16
2
4
1
1
3
4!
6
.. .    .
6
1
5
3
9
1
2
5
2
3
13
34
2
5
3
4
13
	
9
12
2
Newgate	
H. A. Christie	
6
3
1
3
1
2
6
	
3
Nickel Plate Mine	
L. G. C. D'Kasum
G. H. Tutill	
2
9
1
6
1
14
W. H. Mclntyre	
9
1
16
G. Baker	
2
D. B. Lazier	
2
3
1
7
8
2
12
3
20
11
19
5
10
69
20
3
13
16
4
29
3
2
1
2
2
6
4
5
2
19
3
10
2
5
12
4
Miss A. Yates	
1
1
3
1
2
3
3
8
' 3
43
8
29
4
11
64
3
13
12
25
2
11
1
3
	
6
3
17
5
1
8
1
33
3
1
35
4
1
3
3
1
1
A. E. Kydd	
1
1
1
2
3
1
3
W. H. Moore	
1
W. H. Wood	
3
Notch Hill	
	
.      2
30
10
28
2
3
9
5
1
5
1
P. P. Smyth	
14
3
3
2
3
5
1
49
3
3
10
17
14
3
Mrs. Grindon	
Mrs. Grindon	
Miss G. Kittering-
ham
Mrs. Grindon	
9
7
R. B. White	
2
1
9
16
Olalla	
L. G. C. D'Easum....
3
G. H. Kearney	
Miss Kitteringham.
1
20
2
1
6
16
150-Mile House	
1
1
1
1
6
2
3
3
7
3
3
1
2
1
1
1
4
3
o
1
8
1
4
	
G. H. Kearney	
Miss Kitteringham.
1
	
 i
2
3
7
3
3
Otter Point	
1
8
1
4
1
10
H. B. Maxwell	
T. A. Briggs	
2
4
1
15
2
11
4
6
17
11
1
H. B. Maxwell	
1
3
	
3
V. E. It. Ardagh	
1
4
1
2
1
	
7
7
2
2
4
11
1
1
1
2
o
1
2
1
2
7
6
2
5
20
2
7
3
6
12
1
1
3
1
J. C. Stuart	
N. J. Paul	
 1	
2
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
	
E. M. Sutherland	
7
	
1
4
6
7
6
3
	
1
1
1
i
G. H. Tutill	
 1	
	
	
2
1
11
3
26
4
2
12
3  C  Stuart     	
1
...1	
1
.
4
8
	
4
29
1
2
34
3
1
7
8
3
4
3
1
	
17
	
5
10
6
J. C. Dunn	
A. W. McCordiek	
 ! 1	
1
1
1
10
	
2
19
4
3
34
11
2
9
12
7
8
1
19
1
8
1
	
3
	
4
1
Port Mellon	
Port Simpson	
4
	
2
3
1
8
6
2
4
7
7
2
3
6
W. A. Watson	
3
Pouce Coupe, Central—
Pouce Coupe, East	
W. A. Watson	
11
11        1
1
	
	
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 79
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
ri
|
>
3
est
02
6
JOB
Oi
P.
a
o
ba
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Clean.
One; clean.
Yes.
Good	
O.K.
Whooping-cough	
Fair.
	
Clean;  adequate.
Typhoid fever 	
Fair.
Ventilation fair;
stove heat
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
One only for boys
and girls; clean.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
12
Scarlet fever,   5;  mumps,   3
Good	
Good.
 1	
Influenza,  4  	
Mumps 	
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Clean.
Clean.
1
Clean;  adequate.
Yes.
Require repairs.
Good	
Crowded    {only   one
class-room
Cold in winter	
Not overcrowded.
Good.
acne,  1
2
2
Good.
Good.
Fairly clean; ade
quate.
pulmonary, 2; cardiac, 3; paralyzed
arm,  1
Not overcrowded;
ventilation    good;
stove  heat
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good.
Well ventilated	
Not    crowded;    efficient
Good	
Good	
Good	
quate.
quate.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Adequate.
Good	
quate.
Good	
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Cardiac,   1;   pulmonary,   1;   orthopae
dic,   2
Heating, etc., good...
Yes.
1
Good	
Two; good.
1          1          1 R SO
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
. *o
slg
P.
£. TJ
OJ
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34
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9
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32
27
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11
11
14
12
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250
32
30
15
18
7
11
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10
39
17
16
20
9
9
10
10
15
10
65
21
9
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51
8
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473
16
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229
14
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73
20
31
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87
5
22
13
19
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32
17
10
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31
26
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11
10
14
11
8
10
17
11
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26
243
28
27
15
14
7
8
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16
36
17
16
19
8
9
10
50
4
13
2
1
2
3
2
5
1
3
8
1
13
9
66
2
13
33
4
20
11
7
14
5
9
12
14
10
72
2
28
20
10
18
4
3
5
10
2
10
1
3
11
11
W. E. Stone...
5
1
2
8
5
8
8
0
15
3
5
3
3
	
1
15
G. A. C. Roberts	
G. R. Baker	
2
2
A. K. Connolly	
..
1
1
8
10
1
	
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
M. G. Archibald
..
1
1
J. E. H. Kelso
3
3
1
2
11
2
1
1
3
14
7
2
3
1
6
1
1
3
3
1
2
4
67
8
8
1
5
1
3
5
3
	
6
4
4
8
9
1
5
5
14
1
8
5
3
11
168
15
6
8
5
4
1
11
5
1
7
3
2
1
13
W. H. Wood	
12
2
1
1
2
6
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
4
3
K. Terry	
8
J. E. H. Kelso     .
W. H. Wood..
13
11
1
1
17
W. H. Wood
	
5
1
1
1
2
1
 |	
H. A. Christie
 |	
2
A. E. Kydd...
	
 1	
7
11
7
7
1
2
4
17
5
1
2
	
1
1
10
1
3
6
2
3
	
2
2
1
 1	
2
2
1
19
2
8
E. II. Hicks	
1
25
1
	
4
25
11
Mrs. Grindon	
Miss A. Yates	
1
2
55
l|
 1	
fl
W. E. Henderson	
2
 |	
1
1
1
21         1
	
2
4
C. Ewert
 !	
4
31	
1
2
2
1
Sand Creek, Big	
11	
1
1
2
6
3
1
3
6
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
4
4
17
1
1
2
G. A. C. Roberts     .
	
2
3
	
1
1
3
11	
3
1
1
A. W. McCordick
 I	
 1	
 I	
	
8
14
10
63
21
..    L___.
!
i
	
1
	
5
1
2
5
1
4
1
	
5
2
22
1
4
3
21
5
2
1
1
F. T. Stanier	
J. T. Steele	
Cowichan  Health
Centre
	
1
2
3
4
3
4
1
	
1
	
2
5
2
3
9
13
44
7
18
4
3
3
9
2
1
5
1
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 81
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
d
1
OJ
(*
S3
rt
CJ
d
a
a
s
g
0
s
H
C
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
O.K.
orthopaedic, 3
	
disease)
Well ventilated  and
heated
adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Closets adjoin and
are poor.
Good	
Clean; adequate.
0 K
	
Well ventilated; not
crowded
Good condition.
Heating, etc., good...
Rickets,   1  	
G ood
1
* df quate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
1
	
	
Satisfactory	
No   shade;   light   on
south
	
	
i
Good	
1
	
	
1
	
	
4
Measles,    3;    scarlet    fever,    4;
chicken-pox,  1
nervous, 2
1
	
 1	
 1	
	
Heating poor	
	
	
Clean:  adequate.
Excrement not
covered.
Satisfactory	
	
	
Clean;  adequate.
 !    .
	
Buildings good; ventilation and heating good
1
1
1
	
1
	
Clean;  adequate.
Two pupils with mumps seen in
home;  one contact examined
in  home;  one  pupil  with  influenza seen in home
 1
 1
 1. 1
Adequate.
Yes.
2
Heating, etc., good...
	
 1	
Junior  school
crowded
Janitor  service
required
I
3
1
1
Satisfactory  building;   no   playground
Need alteration.
Clean;  adequate.
No;  dirty.
Good condition.
	
 .1 1
Well ventilated; not
crowded
1 R 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
3
rU      .
.   V
. o
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218
10
23
63
13
13
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16
12
14
20
15
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21
114
14
63
26
S
12
8
12
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109
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66
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28
36
214
9
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112
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28
1
16
1
8
2
48
4
1
2
4
2
3
2
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3
8
E. Buckell	
W. H. Moore	
2
1
4
8
9
1
1
i
l
1
1
4
E. Buckell           	
44
1
1
1
F. E. Coy	
1
3
2
J. T. Steele	
3
4
3
1
10
4
40
4
s
7
2
4
2
0
8
8
5
1
2
14
15
4
27
8
1
fl
3
5
2
1
1
7
1
G. R. Baker	
i
3
G. A. C. Roberts	
!
1
12
15
3
o
8
6
3
3
3
9
11
3
8
1
24
8
1
1
2
9
7
6
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
5
1
	
2
1
3
	
.     1	
0
5
1
1
1
8
1
3
2
4
1
1
7
G. H. Tutill
1
H. W. Keith       	
3
1
3
1
4
8
4
15
2
1
4
3
1
40
2
11
2
2
6
2
5
11
8
1
10|        1
3
8
4
15
o
Squamish	
N. J   Paul
2
2
3
1
2
2
4
3
1
1
1
2
!
2
2
1
1
1
1
	
2
1
3
3
3
10
4
8
8
2
13
5
4
17
3
5
1
7
0
3
0
10
2
.
1
4
2
....
1
1
!            1     . ...
13
16
1
14
1
1
13
	
Cowichan  Health
Centre
21        2
12
32
17
14
8
18
10
35
58
24
8
7
7
47
fl
7
17
10
14
12
12
184
lfi
11
30
17
13
5
14
10
12
53
21
7
1
6
42
6
7
17
16
14
12
12
179
14
9
2
1
1
4
2|       1
!
4
7
Tappen Siding	
1
i     .......
I
1
2
...
1
7
4
T. C  Holmes
2
s
	
1
1
3
6
21
1
1
5
	
1
6
14
4
3
2
28
2
3
1
2
16
3
4
5
5
3
3
1
1
	
7
4
4
ll
1
1 I        1
2
3
1
1
1
1
3
o
	
Three Valley	
	
2
1
4
7
7
3
	
11     1
.
1	
12
o
2
2
4
8
2
8
1
i
...
	
2
1
o
2
	
11     	
1
4
a
	
	
2
6
	
2
6
1
2
2!
et
1
1
	
Trinity Valley	
1
	
1 1
11
10
47
2
72
2
72
6
60
5
1
2
12
 ] |	
1
	
Turtle Valley	
 I       ...1	 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 83
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
d
>
Oi
ot
m
6
1
S
O
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1            1            1
Yes.
1
Satisfactory	
Yes.
 1	
O.K.
Building   needs
repair
Good          	
Good
Yes.
Heart,   1   	
1
adequate.
3
adequate.
	
Satisfactory	
 1	
I   .   .!   	
Chicken-pox, 25 to 30	
orthopfedic, 3; calcium deficiency, 3
1    1
 i i	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good
 1	
of past anterior poliomyelitis)
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good.
Yes.
 1	
Two   rooms   are
crowded
1
clean.
O.K.
 1	
 1	
Good
Yes.
 1	
Good
Yes.
 !	
 1	
Not   crowded;   heat
and   ventilation
satisfactory
Well   ventilated;
not crowded
Good	
Yes.
 1	
1
3
Good	
Good.   ■
Satisfactory	
1
Good.
1
Good
 !	
1
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
adequate.
Yes.
 1	
1
 1	
 1	
 1	
 1	
Poorly  heated  and
ventilated
Lighting   and   ventilation poor
Good	
O.K	
No.
i
 i	
quate.
 i	
O.K.
 1
 1	
Good; ventilation
O.K.
Yes.
No.
Cardiac,  2  	
 1	
Good
1
quate.
Good	
!
.... .i i	
0 K
0 K.
1
.. 1........
 1	
11    1
1
1
 1	
Good                . - .    .
heart, 2; hip-joint trouble from infancy, 1
Influenza, 3; septic throat, 1....
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good.
 i i	
Requires repairs. R 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
n
3
-d
o~
, o
c £
y. §
OJ
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a  .
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90
18
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120
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25
36
63
34
9
9
9
9
47
41
148
13
46
6
14
82
30
13
13
9
76
103
31
31
10
15
24
66
56
7
2
87
17
22
53
91
24
26
17
33
10
14
59
69
18
26
12
1
1
3!
3 	
 1	
7
5
7
5
7
5
8
14
10
5
7
6
7
fl
7
40
48
5
2
9
7
3
65
3
10
4
2
12
10
38
21
1
5
7
Underwood	
10
2
E. R. Hicks
13
9
1
3
4
2
H. W. Hill	
Mrs. C. A. Lucas...
...
Usk	
....
1
5
6
5
8
o
R. E. Ziegler	
1! ...
1
1
3
Thos. O'Hagan	
20
21
8
120
e
26
11
8
23
34
62
32
9
8
9
0
46
40
130
13
45
fl
13
80
29
12
13
9
73
99
30
30
10
14
23
63
50
7
o
	
1
	
6
6
1
T. H. Loueheed	
1
—.
2
1
W. R. Stone....:	
3
2
2
211         4
8
10
33
5
1
3
7
13
23
11
3
2
4
	
	
K. Terry	
1
3
3
1
4
	
	
E. M. Sutherland	
2
3
3
E. M. Sutherland	
	
K. Terry	
1
2
2
3
3
2
1
1
7
1
18
2
1
4
9
9
2
3
2
2
3
Waldo	
H. A. Christie	
	
2
10
3
3
3
H. B. Maxwell	
3
1
4
	
.. |...
2
W. R. Stone....i	
1
31	
2
G. It. Baker	
	
1
2
6
2
3
	
t
5
4
7
3
40
3
11
2
3
9
15
1
1
13
13
9
4
2
10
8
42
5
9
2
2
5
1
4
2
4
31
13
6
6
3
7
30
31
3
1
28
2
	
0
3
2
10
9
4
Wellington, East	
1
7
T
3
H. B. Maxwell	
5
Mrs. Grindon	
Miss M. Twiddy
4
Wm. Buchanan	
W. H. Wood	
3
41
21        1
1|	
3'	
21        2
... .1....   -
3
K. Terry	
15
1
1
3
2
1
1
3
5
1
3
*>
1
1
1
2
1...
1
5
3
10
5
1
	
9
1
<j
F. M. Auld	
..
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
6
2
 1...
1
F. E. Coy	
1
2
F. E. Coy	
1
4
5
1
1
Winfield	
Wistaria..	
Mrs. Grindon	
4
8
17
16
1
1
	
0
6
	
8
11
	
1
2
	
	
87
17
2°
48
85
23
25
17
1
2
2
2
1
5
4
1
2
1
1
131        1
3
7
21
11
4
8
14
11
6
11
1
4
6
n
	
11
4
8
11
17
14
4
18
5
	
4
1
Yahk	
G. B. Henderson	
81        1
31        3
1
4
Ymir	
..  .
<>
Miss A. Yates	
2
2
1           1
1           1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1929-30.
R 85
ASSISTED SCROOPS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
d
Oi
>
Oi
IS
ot
u
03
d
«
o
ft
1
o
a
a
2
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
Skin,  1
1
Good.
1
1
Good	
Heating   and   ventilation  require  attention
Good	
Clean;  adequate.
Clean;     fairly     well
ventilated
Not   crowded;   good
ventilation;    well
heated
Two; clean; ade
quate.
Very good	
O.K	
O.K.
O.K.
Satisfactory	
O.K	
O.K.
Good	
1
1
i
1
Good	
j
Yes.
1
Yes.
1,
iood	
Good	
Good.
1
1
Cardiac,  2  	
o
11
Efficient	
Fair.
Good.
1
1            1
1
) K	
O.K,
1	
1
Good.
1
Yes.
6
O.K.
Old   building   poor;
new building good
fair.
Poor ventilation	
quate.
|
Yes.
.... I.
O.K.
1
0 K
1            1
pulmonary,  1
quate.
1
Clean; adequate.
Clean;  adequate.
Nervous,   1;  pulmonary,   2;  poor  pos
4
G
quate.
ture,   1
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Bantield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.
825-1230-2928 

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