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TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1931]

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 TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1929, TO MAECH 31ST, 1930
TRIXTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Trinter to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.  =  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1930.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office.
Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1929, to March 31st, 1930.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
DAVID  B.  BRANKIN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. S. L. Howe, Provincial Secretary.
P. Walker, Esq., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Brankin, David B., Superintendent. Brankin, Mrs. M., Matron.
Hughes, R., Assistant Superintendent.
Sparrow, Miss M., Stenographer and Book-keeper.
Workman, Miss E., Assistant Supervisor and Storekeeper.
Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor. Osborne, J., Shoemaker Instructor.
Stewart, D. R., Carpenter Instructor.
McDowell, J., Farm Instructor. Scott, W. J., Plumber and Engineer.
Holroyd, H., Poultryman.
Blackledge, Miss V., Senior Teacher. Scott, Miss G. M., Junior Teacher.
Blagburn, E. W., Male School-teacher. Trerise, W. J., Night Watchman. left: kitchen block,    centre: administration building,    right: no. 1 cottage.  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Hon. S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour of submitting to you the Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, B.C., covering our activities for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1930, and in the compilation of same I have of necessity been compelled to
devote a great deal of space to essential statistics and figures. I do feel, however, that this
report would not be complete without some reference to the human, moral, and spiritual side of
our work, which has proved to be a great factor in the reformation of boys. To fully understand what this means it is necessary to know something about the type of boy we handle, also
how and why they are sent to us. In the first place, every boy is committed to us by a Juvenile
Court or other Courts of competent jurisdiction, for offences against the law. None come here
from choice, or because they are orphans, nor are innocent boys ever sent here. We do not get
boys from well-regulated homes, or where churches or public schools have full influence. In the
second place, we have nothing whatever to say regarding a boy's commitment, nor can we refuse
to accept a boy who is sent to us, no matter what his physical, moral, or mental handicap may
be, nor have we the right to expel those who become unruly or troublesome, like private societies
can do.
There are a number of factors that contribute to a boy's delinquency, and it is part of our
business to find out, upon a boy's arrival here, what those causes are, and to deal effectively
with them requires a great deal of thought and consideration on the part of every member of
the staff. For instance, a boy backward in school-work may be suffering from a disability
over which he has no control, or he may have merely lost desire for study or work. If
it is the former, then our Medical Officer gives him the necessary attention; and if it
is the latter, then we all unitedly do our best to create within him a desire for learning
something. We work on the assumption that a boy who has neither the opportunity nor the
inclination to be mechanically or constructively engaged is sure to fall into degenerate ways.
We also recognize that our institution, to function properly, must be more than a place of
detention; it must be a home, where a standard of living and morality is taught, where a boy
can keep his name and individuality and develop along natural lines. It must be a school, where
all distorted and misshapen views of life are torn down, and their place taken by wholesome
thought and ideas, and where the right conception of citizenship is g'ven. It must also be a
vocational institution, where industrial training is given, and where boys are taught that all
work is honourable, and that no one has the right to I've as a non-producer, or sponger on others.
I would respectfully draw your attention to our sports section, which shows that we teach
how to play, as well as to work, and our whole system combines in giving every boy under our
care the correct idea of how to play the game of life.
I desire to express my appreciation for the co-operation and assistance rendered by service
clubs, Provincial Police, municipal authorities, clergymen of the various denominations, officers
of the Salvation Army, and other mission workers, and also for their personal interest and the
services they have conducted during the year. The advice and assistance rendered by Juvenile
Court Judges and Probation Officers has been a great help to me, especially in following up boys
who have been released from our care.
To yourself and members of the Provincial Secretary's Department, I express my sincere
thanks for the whole-hearted and sympathetic support rendered during the year, without which
we could not have accomplished what we did. POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1930.
On roll, March 31st, 1929  151
Boys admitted during year, March 31st, 1929, to March 31st, 1930     59
210
Released as wards of Juvenile Court     27
Released by order of Attorney-General ,	
Paroled by Department of Justice, Ottawa	
Completed sentence    49
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm       1
Transferred to Essondale Mental Hospital       1
Deaths      1
Deported to Old Country       2
    81
Total in school, March 31st, 1930  129
Number of escapes during year     19
Number captured and returned     15
Number whose whereabouts are known      2
Number still at liberty      2 left: no. 2 cottage, back: greenhouses, right: NO. 3 COTTAGE.  REPORT OP INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1929-30.
N 7
LIST OP BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1930.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
being admitted to
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
855
898
911
917
922
955
966
967
975
978
979
980
982
983
984
985
986
989
990
992
993
994
995
996
997
998
1000
1001
1004
1005
1006
1007
1008
1009
1010
1011
1014
1015
1016
1017
1018
1019
1021
1022
1023
1024
1025
1020
1027
1028
1029
1030
1031
1032
1033
1034
1035
1036
1037
Vernon, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Tide Lake, Alta	
England 	
Lillooet, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C.
Welland, Ont	
Vancouver, B.C	
San Francisco, Cal	
Duncan, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C.	
Armstrong, B.C	
Parkbeg, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Assiniboia, Sask.	
Morris,   Sask	
West Vancouver, B.C.
West Vancouver, B.C.
Bast Burnaby, B.C	
Prince George, B.C	
Point Grey, B.C	
Courtenay, B.C	
Keremeos,   B.C	
Nelson, B.C	
Bellis,  Alta	
Saskatoon,   Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
D,uncan,  B.C	
Golden, B.C 	
Calgary, Alta	
Tabor,  Alta	
Grand Forks, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria,  B.C	
Wetaskewin, Alta	
Seattle,  Wash	
Glasgow, Scotland 	
London, England	
Port Moody, B.C	
Chatham, Ont	
Vancouver, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C.
Winnipeg,  Man	
Vancouver, B.C.	
London, England  ..
Sechelt, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
London, England 	
Chilliwack, B.C	
Chilliwack, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C. 	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C. 	
Abbotsford,   B.C	
New Westminster, B.C
Victoria, B.C	
Berne,   Switzerland  ....
Galicia 	
Burks Falls, Ont	
English	
French	
American...	
Scotch	
Quarter-breed.	
Spanish	
Canadian..	
Canadian	
American ....
English	
Irish-English	
Lithuanian -	
American	
Scotch	
Canadian	
Scotch-Canadian	
Canadian	
English 	
English --	
Scotch..:	
Canadian	
Canadian 	
Irish-Scotch 	
Indian	
Polish	
Ukranian 	
Canadian 	
Canadian	
English --	
Canadian -	
Canadian	
American...-	
Italian	
Canadian-English	
Canadian-English	
German - 	
Canadian-English	
Scotch-Canadian	
English.- -	
American	
Irish-Canadian	
English-Canadian	
Swedish	
Canadian-.	
Italian  	
English  	
Indian	
Canadian 	
English	
Indian	
Indian	
Canadian-American..
English-Irish	
English-Irish...	
Canadian	
American...	
Canadian-English	
Canadian-English	
Swiss	
Ukranian	
Welsh-Canadian	
Tears.
16
14
14
8
17
14
14
7
12
16
11
16
14
16
14
15
15
16
15
15
15
16
14
4
11
13
15
11
14
6
14
10
11
0
1
11
10
16',
10
16
15
9
14
15
17
18
17
15
14
16
17
14
7 I
14
Years
16
14
14
8
17
14
14
15
12
16
17
16
14
10
16
16
15
16
15
15
15
16
14
14
15
13
15
11
16
10
14
10
11
14
1
11
11
16%
8
12
10
3
16
15
9
14
15
17
18
17
15
14
16
17
15
7 mos.
15 N 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1930—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
PREVIOUS  TO
BEING  ADMITTED  TO
School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Years.
Years.
15
15
16
16
16
17
17
17
3y2
17
5
17
13
13
14
14
4
14
12
17
15
15
15
15
7
7
9
0
15
17
14
16
15
15
15
13
13
15
15
16
16
16
16
13
13
5
15
14
14
12
12
8
16
17
17
5
5
16
16
17
17
16
16
14
14
16
16
16
16
13
13
5 mos.
17
16
16
-%
13
13
13
14
14
8%
12
15
lo
0
3
1 mo.
10
16%
16%
15
15
17
17
11
11
6
0
13
13
10
16
15
15
2-5 mos.
3%
17
17
5
16
15
15
2
13
1038
1040
1041
1042
1043
1044
1045
1046
1047
1048
1049
1050
1051
1052
1053
1054
1055
1056
1057
1058
1059
1060
1061
1062
1064
1065
1066
1067
1068
1069
1070
1071
1072
1073
1074
1075
1078
1079
1081
1082
1083
1084
1086
1087
1088
1089
1090
1091
1092
1093
1094
1095
1096
1097
1098
1099
1100
1101
1102
1103
1101
Vancouver, B.C	
Decker Lake, B.C	
Casano, Italy	
Pendenrith, Wales 	
Vancouver, B.C	
London,   England   	
Lynn,  Ont	
North Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Regina,   Sask	
Penetanguishene, Ont	
Vancouver, B.C	
Alberni,   B.C	
Bucks,  England	
Vancouver, B.C	
Porcupine Heights, Alta.
Peachland, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Athabaska Landing, Alta.
Victoria, B.C	
Yale Road, Surrey, B.C. ..
Esquimalt, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C	
Ilumbolt,   Sask	
Victoria, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
London, England 	
Vernon, B.C	
Liverpool,  England 	
Victoria, B.C	
North Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C -	
Vancouver, B.C	
Vancouver, B.C	
Scotland   	
Scotland	
Nanaimo,  B.C	
Britannia,   B.C	
Winnipeg, Man	
Vancouver, B.C	
Tabor, Alta	
Penticton,   B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C. '	
Hanna,  Alta	
Vancouver, B.C.  	
Poland	
Calgary, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Duncan,  B.C	
New Westminster, B.C	
Prince Rupert, B.C	
Newcastle,   Scotland  	
Kamloops,   B.C '-	
Toronto, Ont	
Armstrong. B.C -	
Pontriprid.  Wales  	
Victoria, B.C	
Pine River, Man	
Enderby, B.C	
Red Deer, Alta	
Italian	
Indian 	
Italian	
Welsh	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Canadian 	
Norwegian-Chilian	
Italian	
Canadian-German	
French-Canadian	
English	
English	
English  	
Canadian	
Swedish....	
English	
Porto Kican-French....
American  	
Irish-English	
English	
English-Scotch	
English-Canadian	
Canadian	
American	
Canadian	
Greek	
English	
Canadian 	
New Zealand-English..
English	
Canadian-Scotch	
English	
Serbian	
Canadian-American	
Scotch	
Scotch....	
English	
Japanese	
Irish-English	
Canadian	
Welsh-Canadian	
Half-breed-Indian	
French-Canadian	
English	
Canadian	
Ukranian	
Canadian 	
French-Canadian	
Quarter-breed-English
Quarter-breed-Indian..
Scotch	
Scotch	
English	
Canadian	
Canadian..	
Welsh-English	
English-.-	
Ukranian	
Scotch  	
Irish-Canadian	 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1929-30.
N 9
LIST OF BOYS IN SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1930—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous to
beixg admitted to
SCHOOI,.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
1105
I
Years.       |       Years.
13            t           13
1106
Calgary, Alta  	
Calgary, Alta	
Maillardville, B.C.
7
5
15
11
13
5 mos.
10
1107
12
1108
15
1109
11
1110
Malllardville, B.C	
Ardmore, Alta __	
13
1111
Norwegian-Canadian	
14
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
American  (both)     6
Austrian (both)  1
Canadian   (both)     23
English  (both)    22
French (both)   2
German (both)  2
Greek (both)   1
Indian  (both)    5
Italian (both)  ;  4
Japanese (both)   1
Lithuanian (both)   1
Norwegian  (both)    1
Polish   (both)     1
Quarter-breed  (both)    2
Roumanian (both)   2
Scotch  (both)    6
Serbian  (both)    1
Spanish (both)  1
Swede  (both)     2
Swiss  (both)   1
Ukranian  (both)  4
Welsh (both)   1
Canadian-American    3
Canadian-English   8
Canadian-French  7
Canadian-German   1
Canadian-Quarter-breed   1
Canadian-Irish     2
Canadian-Scotch   3
Canadian-Welsh    2
English-Irish    5
English-Scotch   1
Norwegian-Chilian   1
Norwegian-American   1
Hawaiian-English   1
Half-breed-Indian  1
Hawaiian-French   1
New Zealander-Irish   1
Total 129
WHERE BOYS WERE BORN.
Alberta     15
British Columbia   79
Saskatchewan     6
Manitoba      3
Ontario       7
England     7
Scotland        4
Wales      2
United  States     2
Switzerland
Italy 	
Poland 	
Galicia 	
Total 129
WHY THEY CAME TO US.
Theft    67
Incorrigibility    14
Receiving     4
B.E. & S  29
False pretences   3
Damage to property  3
Indecent assault ....... 1
Assault with intent to rob  2
Forgery   2
Vagrancy   3
Unlawful   obstruction   of   C.N.R.
property     1
Total 129 N 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Abbotsford    1           Port Alberni  :  1
Armstrong  1           Nanaimo   2
Burnaby    2           Nelson  2
Chilliwack     2           North Bend  1
Crofton    1           Penticton     7
Cranbrook  2           New Westminster   12
Enderby  1           North Vancouver  4
Floods  2           South Vancouver   7
Gibsons Landing  1           Maillardville     3
Invermere   1           Mission   .:  1
Kamloops    2           Sechelt   1
Keremeos     2           Smithers   1
Kimberley   1           Ruskin   1
Kelowna    1           Vancouver  41
Prince George   1           Vernon   1
Prince Rupert   3           Victoria   18
Pouce Coupe  -  1 	
Port Haney   1 Total 129
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 1908  61 2y2  years      1
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929     9 Indefinite     22
2 years   23 Sec. 17 J.D.A., 1908      4
3 years       5 	
4 years       3 Total 129
5 years      1
AGES OF BOYS IN INSTITUTION.
9 years   2    16 years  29
10 years   3    17 years   22
11 years   4    18 years   15
12 years   10    19 years  2
13 years   6 	
14 years    18 Total 129
15 years   IS
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Roman Catholics   42 Lutheran      3
Methodists    12 Salvation Army     2
Presbyterians   20 Latter Day Saints     1
Church of England  21 Pyramid Temple      1
Baptist        9 Seventh-day Adventists     1
United   16 	
Buddhist      1 Total 129
BOYS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  83
Number who have both parents dead     5
Number who have father living and mother dead  17
Number who have mother living and father dead  13
Number who have stepfathers     7
Number who have stepmothers .'     4
Total 129 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1929-30. N 11
HOW ALL ARE EMPLOYED.
Farm and dairy .:.'.  10 Blacksmith      1
Poultry     13 Plumbing     4
Carpentering     8 Garage     1
Shoemaking      4 Gardens     3
Tailoring      3 General outside work  20
Painting        1 School all day   47
Cottage duties      5 	
Kitchen and bakery          5 Total 129
Dining-rooms     4
MEDICAL AND DENTAL REPORTS.
The following reports of our Medical Officers, Dr. Stanley Paulin, M.D., who had charge
until October 31st, 1929, and Dr. C. R. Symmes, who took over on November 1st, 1929, and our
Dental Surgeon, Dr. Emery Jones, D.D.S., show that every effort is put forward to remove the
physical handicap of every boy:—
Medical Report.
" The Superintendent,
Industrial School for Boys, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—The following medical report applies to the period from March 31st to October 31st,
1930 :—
" During the seven months under review the general health of the boys was good. We had
one outbreak of diphtheria which did not extend, as all those showing positive or suspicious
throat cultures were taken to Vancouver General Hospital Infectious Ward. About the same
time a couple of cases of measles developed, and of the above ' diphtheria ' cases two developed
measles while in hospital—probably all from the same source.
" There was one death from tuberculosis in the Vancouver General Hospital—an Indian boy
admitted during the previous fiscal year.
" Admission to the General Hospital was as follows: Diphtheria, 5; measles, 2—developed
in hospital; abscess of axilla, 1; appendicitis, 1; inguinal hernia, 1; gonorrhoea, 1; postpneumonic pleural effusion, 1;  for removal of tonsils, 9.
" There was about the usual run of minor injuries and ailments not calling for hospitalization, and the following were noted: T.B. glands of neck, 1; pityriasis rosea, 1; dislocated
patella, 1; endocarditis, 1; otitis media, 4; measles, 2 ; anal fissure, 1; hematuria, 1; inflamed
haemorrhoids, 1; tenosynovitis of foot, 1; accidental amputation of part of finger, 1; traumatic
synovitis of knee, 1;   cerebral concussion, 1;   pneumonia, 1—later sent to hospital.
" One boy, apparently suffering from post-encephalitic symptoms, was sent to the Mental
Hospital for treatment.
" There were thirty new boys admitted during the seven months, among whom examination
disclosed the following conditions : Defective vision, 5; heart-murmurs, 2; enlarged tonsils, 5 ;
scabies, 1.
"(Signed)    Stanley Paulin, M.D., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P."
" The Superintendent,
Industrial School for Boys, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
" Sir,—I have the honour of submitting to you the medical report of the Boys' Industrial
School, ' Biscoq,' Coquitlam, ending the period from November 1st, 1929, to March 31st, 1930.
" We have had a very clean bill of health and exceptionally free from infectious and contagious diseases, when you taken into consideration the number of visitors who may act as
carriers, as in cases of diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, etc. It is our practice, when admitting
new boys to the institution of a suspicious infectious disease, to segregate and keep them under
observation before allowing them to intermingle with other boys. Culture swabs from nose and
throat and specimens of sputum from these suspects are forwarded to the laboratory for confirmation. Boys admitted to the Royal Columbian Hospital and St. Mary's Hospital, New
Westminster, during the term were for the following ailments: Appendicitis, 1; infected hands,
1;   rheumatic fever, 1;  herniotomy, 1. N 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" The following conditions have occurred which did not necessitate hospital treatment:
Foreign bodies in eye, 3; conjunctivitis, 10; influenza, 7 ; sprained- ankles, 5 ; ears, 10; nasal
catarrh, 3 ; infected hands which necessitated opening under local anaesthetic, 5; slivers causing
infected hands, 3; hernia, 2; indigestion, 10; epileptic, 2; rheumatism, 3; boils, 6; scabies, 6;
enlarged tonsils, 6;  eczema, 2;  wax in ears, 3;  hemorrhoids, 1;  fracture of clavicle, 1.
" Three examinations were held dealing with Mental Hospital cases. Physical examination of
twenty-nine new boys and re-examination of two others and one received from Oakalla Prison
Farm were made, two having defective sight, two strabismus, eight enlarged tonsils, three with
heart-murmurs, three were found to be subnormal and two undersized, one varicocele, one ulcer
of the leg, and four with defective feet.
" In conclusion, from personal observation of boys examined, I would say a large proportion
are criminalistic (being delinquent and wayward) and subnormal of a particular type and grade.
" I have, etc.,
: C. Ritchie Symmes, M.D."
Dental Report.
" Since very few of the ninety-two boys examined during the past year had ever had the
attention of a dentist previously, it was not surprising to find in their mouths much disease and
destruction.
" I have tried to inculcate habits of regular cleaning of the teeth and proper care to produce
mouth-health.
"Using local anesthetic for the reduction of pain, it was necessary to remove over seventy
abscessed or pulp-infected teeth. Many amalgam, silicate, and cement fillings were inserted and
several cases of severe gingivitis were treated.
" The benefit of the clinic will be of lasting benefit to the health of these patients.
" Emery Jones, D.D.S."
EDUCATIONAL.
Report of Divisions I. and II.
" Sir,—The following reports show the movements of the pupils in Divisions I. and II. for
the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1930:—
" Division I.—
Pupils on register April 1st, 1929     28
Pupils admitted during year      4
Pupils received from Division III      1
33
Pupils  discharged     8
Pupils sent to Division II     2
Pupils sent or promoted to Division III  12
— 22
Total number of pupils on register, March 31st, 1930    11
" Division II.—
Pupils on register, April 1st, 1929  17
Pupils admitted during year  13
Pupils received from Division I  2
32
Pup:ls promoted to Division 1     3
Pupils   discharged     9
— 12
Total number of pupils on register, March 31st, 1930     20 auditorium at biscoq.
A CLASS-ROOM AT BISCOQ.  REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1929-30. N 13
"During the school term 1929-30, I am pleased to report that satisfactory progress has
been made in the school studies in Divisions I. and II. A great number of the boys have taken
a keen interest in their studies and are undoubtedly ambitious to acquire all the education that
can be offered them.
" Certain boys in Division II. who at first appeared mentally deficient are now taking a fair
amount of interest in their work and are learning the fundamental studies. These pupils seem
to have benefited from the teaching and Will soon progress as favourably as the others.
" The Music Course, introduced this year, has met with fair success and was enjoyed by all
pupils. The bigger boys especially seemed to take an interest in it, as it was an entire change
from their daily routine.
" Discipline has been well maintained with the indispensable co-operation of the institution,
which we have heartily appreciated.
"(Signed)    V. Blackledge."
Division III. Report.
" Pupils on register, March 31st, 1929 ,  21
Pupils admitted during the year  7
Pupils received from Division I., September 5th  9
Pupils received from Division I., January 29th ,  4
31
Pupils removed for various reasons     18
Pupils on register, March 31st, 1930     13
" During the past year the usual elementary school curriculum has been followed out, particular attention being given to the more fundamental subjects.
" A higher type of inteH'gence seems to have been shown among the old boys than amongst
those newly arrived.    No doubt these will settle down to the work as time goes on.
" Sign-writing was started amongst the trades boys early in February. Some of the pupils
showed great aptitude for the work, but unfortunately most of these have left the school.
" The new school-room is very well equipped and has proved a great help to both pupils
and teacher.
"(Signed)    E. W. Blagburn."
Educational Standing of all Boys in School.
Grade I  1
Grade   II  8
Grade  III  7
Grade IV » 15
Grade V  20
Grade VI  20
Grade VII  25
Grade VIII.    15
High School  :  10
Special Class   8
Total  129
School Inspector's Report.
" Sir,—I spent March 14th and part of March 13th in the three divisions of your school, and
am pleased to be able to state that conditions are favourable and progress definite.
" The class-rooms are bright, sanitary, and suitable to the special conditions under which
the teachers and pupils are working.
" The general progress has been disorganized during the present year. The death of Miss
Edyth Mutrie deprived the school of a devoted and effective teacher. Miss Jean A. Mutrie, who
was acting-principal, has also been absent through sickness since September. Her absence is a
distinct loss to the school as she had a remarkable influence for good over her pupils. N 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"The necessity of having one of the teachers acting as principal and responsible for classification, organization, and unifying of the school-work is quite apparent.
" Your present teachers are working faithfully and doing very well considering the difficult
nature of their work.    The quality of the instruction observed was satisfactory.
" The discipline is better than one would expect, considering the restless nature of the pupils
comprising those classes.    The majority of the pupils display interest in their work.
" Yours very truly,
"(Signed)    J. F. Pollock,
Inspector of Schools."
KITCHEN AND CULINARY SECTIONS.
Meals served:—
Boys     152,698
Staff     32.993
Total   185,691
In an institution where the population is growing boys and young men, there must be provided substantial, wholesome, and appetizing foods. We pride ourselves in having a menu that
compares favourably with any institution or home in this or any other country; and submit the
following as proof:—
Staff Menu.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Cornflakes, toast, fruit, bacon and eggs, grapefruit, brown and white bread,
butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, potatoes peas, brown and white bread, butter, steamed
pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, potato salad, cold meat, shredded cabbage, fruit, cake, and tea.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Mush, poached eggs on toast, hot cakes, marmalade, butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, chicken with dressing, potatoes, cabbage, brown and white bread, butter,
apple pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, cold chicken, lettuce or boiled eggs,
salad, fruit, jam, cake, and tea.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon and eggs, toast, hot cakes and marmalade, brown and white bread,
butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, potatoes, carrots, brown and white bread, butter, milk pudding,
tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, sausage and mashed potatoes, or salad,
fruit, cake, and tea.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, poached eggs on toast, hot cakes, marmalade, brown and white bread,.
butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast pork with apple sauce, potatoes, canned tomatoes, brown and white
bread, butter, apple pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, fried fish, chip potatoes, or cheese,
fruit, cake, and tea.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Mush, boiled eggs, toast, hot cakes, marmalade, brown and white bread, butter,
tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, beef and vegetable stew, potatoes, beets, brown and white bread, butter,
bread pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, pork chops, mashed potatoes, fruit,
cake, and tea. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1929-30. N 15
Friday.
Breakfast.—Mush, bacon and eggs, toast, brown and white bread, butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast mutton, mint sauce, potatoes, beans, brown and white bread, butter,
rice pudding, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, salmon salad, cold meat, fried potatoes,
fruit, jam, cake, and tea.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Mush, poached eggs on toast, hot cakes, marmalade, brown and white bread,
butter, tea or coffee.
Dinner.—Soup, roast beef, gravy, potatoes, carrots, brown and white bread, butter, raisin
pie, tea.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, haddie, baked potatoes, or boiled eggs,
cheese, fruit, cake, and tea.
Fresh fruits and green vegetables when in season.
Boys' Menu.
Sunday.
Breakfast.—Cornflakes, boiled eggs, brown and white bread, butter, milk for small boys,
coffee for big boys.
Dinner.—Sausage, Spanish onions, mashed potatoes, brown and white bread, steamed
pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, jelly and custard, iced cake, milk for
small boys, tea for big boys.
Monday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, stewed figs, milk for small boys,
tea for big boys.
Dinner.—Roast beef, gravy, potatoes, beans, brown and white bread, sago pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, macaroni and cheese, stewed fruit, milk
for small boys, tea for big boys.
Tuesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, stewed raisins, milk for small boys,
coffee for big boys.
Dinner.—Vegetable, meat and potato pie, paste crust, brown and white bread, cream of
wheat pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, egg omelette, syrup, milk for small
boys, tea for big boys.
Wednesday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, jam, milk for small boys, tea for
big boys.
Dinner.—Roast beef, gravy, potatoes, peas, brown and white bread, raisin pie.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, beans with tomato puree, stewed fruit,
cake, milk for small boys, tea for big boys.
Thursday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, stewed apples, milk for small boys,
tea for big boys.
Dinner.—Fish, white sauce, mashed potatoes, brown and white bread, bread pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, cheese, beets, stewed fruit, milk for
small boys, tea for big boys.
Friday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, marmalade, milk for small boys,
coffee for big boys.
Dinner.—Meat and chicken stew with vegetables, brown and white bread, rice pudding.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, baked potatoes, fried eggs, stewed fruit,
milk for small boys, tea for big boys. N 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Saturday.
Breakfast.—Mush, milk, brown and white bread, butter, peanut butter, milk for small boys,
coffee for big boys.
Dinner.—Roast pork, potatoes, vegetables, brown and white bread, rhubarb pie.
Supper.—Brown, white, and raisin bread and butter, head-cheese, stewed rhubarb, milk for
small boys, tea for big boys.
Fresh fruits and green vegetables when in season.
Cost of Provisions.
Fish  $134.30
Groceries   6.542.09
Meat from butcher  2,874.64
Bread  3,493.70
Flour, rolled oats, etc ,  352.08
Milk from farm   2,018.14
Eggs from poultry-farm   2,222.63
Vegetables from farm  869.40
Poultry from farm   708.25
Veal from farm  31.00
Beef from farm  45.00
Pork from farm   408.30
Potatoes from Colony Farm   369.75 .
Fruit from farm '.  62.80
Carrots from Colony Farm   9.00
Parsnips from Colony Farm  8.75
$20,179.83
Average cost per meal, 10% cents.
Cash Expenditure.
The actual cash expenditure during the year for all purposes, including salaries, repairs,
and poultry extensions, is as follows:—
Expenditure   ,  $90,377.05
Less cash credits from sale of poultry, eggs, stock, etc     10,746.79
$85,630.26
Per capita cost per month per boy   $51.31
Per capita cost per day per boy     1.69
TAILORING DEPARTMENT.
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time) —
Overalls, 420 pairs   $630.00
Tweed pants  (large)     126.00
Tweed pants (small)    307.50
  $1,063.50
Value of work for other departments (time only) —
Tea-towels,  103    $5.15
Sheets,  42  10.50
Table-covers, 23   5.75
Aprons, 64   16.00
Pllow-covers, 54   13.50
Mattress-covers, 29   7.25
Curtains, 26 pairs   27.00
Curtains, 3 sets  :  14.00
Carried  forward      $99.15 $1,063.50 *	
BISCOQ FARM BUILDINGS.  Credits—Continued.
Brought forward     $99.15 $1,063.50
Value of work for other departments—Continued.
Aprons, shingle, 4  2.00
Aprons, carpenter, 5   7.50
Aprons, blacksmith, 2   3.00
Cushion-covers  1.00
Concert-clothes   15.00
Seed-bags   5.00
Repairs (general)—        132.65
Mackinaws  $33.00
Coats, aprons for kitchen   11.50
Caps  4.00
Overalls     235.00
Aprons, carpenter   20.75
Mattress-covers   20.25
Raincoats  14.00
Carpets  15.00
Sheets   16.00
Cow-blankets   .50
Uniforms pressed and repaired   65.00
Table-cloths  4.00
Gymnasium tights   12.00
Sweaters  3.00    ■
Shirts pressed and repaired  '.  24.25
Dining-room repairs  11.00
Car-curtains  3.00
Pants altered and shortened  6.00
Shirts    5.00
Mats for cottages  5.00
Small repairs   181.00
       689.25
Value of time spent on other duties  -       270.00
Total credits   $2,155.40
Debits.
Salary and rent allowance of-Instructor  $1,620.00
Material used as follows :—
Denim, black, 1,047% yards   $316.63
Patent buttons, 2 great gross         8.73
Button tacks, 2 great gross         1.94
Black buckles, 2 great gross       15.52
Rubber tissue  '.         1.75
       344.57
Total debits   $1,964.57
SHOEMAKING DEPARTMENT.
Credits.
New shoes made, etc.—
229 pairs at $7  $1,603.00
Boots repaired, 1,591 pairs      2,027.25
1 football ;  2.00
Total credits  ;  $3,632.25
2 N 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Debits.
Salary and rent allowance of Instructor  $1,440.00
Material used as follows :—
Leather, etc  $1,707.50
Oil, etc  5.94
Laundry  1.36
Awls, rasps, knives, etc         22.75
Repairs    ,  6.27
    1,743.82
Total debits   $3,183.82
CARPENTERING DEPARTMENT.
This department was kept very busy during the year doing considerable construction-work,
and has to its credit four poultry-houses, 215 by 20 feet, and one brooder-house, 60 by 30 feet, the
completion of a building used as a class-room, and a greenhouse. In addition to repairs to furniture, floors, etc., in the various buildings, the boys also did considerable fretwork, which is
deserving of credit.   This alone has a cash value of many thousands of dollars.
PLUMBING, HEATING, AND BLACKSMITH DEPARTMENT.
The work of this department is varied, and it is rather difficult to estimate the amount of
work accomplished during the year. It completed the installation of the sprinkling system on
the front lawn, put in a water-supply to the new poultry buildings and new class-room, additional
water-supply to gardens and playgrounds, besides repairs to farm implements, tools, chains,
saws, etc., ranges and ice-machine in kitchen, lawn-mowers, shower-baths and urinals in cottages,
looking after fires in all buildings, and erecting of a new flagpole in front of the Administration
Buildings.
PAINTING AND GLAZING DEPARTMENT.
Considerable work was done by this department last year, such as painting of the farm
buildings, new poultry buildings, new class-room and greenhouse, painting and kalsomining
farm-house inside, renovating furniture in the several buildings, whitewashing, glazing windows
in new buildings, in addition to repairing broken windows in all buildings.
GARAGE.
Credits for truck outside of usual work, as hauling eggs for shipment, etc., $355.75; repairs
and work done at service station, $389.74; gasoline for all purposes, $258.40; oil and grease,
$50.61;   total, $698.75.
FARM DEPARTMENT.
For administration purposes the following sections are shown under this department: (a)
Dairying; (b) piggery; (c) general farming and kitchen gardens; (d) land-clearing, teaming,
hauling, and road-work.
Dairying.
We purchased during the year three pure-bred Jersey cows from the University of British
Columbia to add to our milk-supply.
Credits.
Milk, 51,871.1 lb. at 4 cents per pound   $2,074.84
Service of " Brampton Rosebay Prince " re Oakalla stock   50.00
Beef furnished to kitchen, 300 lb. at 15 cents   .     45.00
Veal furnished to kitchen, 155 lb. at 20 cents .'        31.00
$2,200.84 hi
-
_
o  REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1929-30. N 19
Dairying—Continued.
Debits.
Feed purchased during year   $871.23
Veterinary attention  69.60
Cows purchased  425.00
Medicine for stock   6.25
$1,372.08
Piggery. '   '   :
In harmony with the policy inaugurated by the department that each institution should
specialize along certain lines, we transferred our breeding stock to Colony Farm, and we now
purchase from them sufficient young pigs to use up own wastage and supply us with pork for
our own use.
Credits.
Pork to kitchen, 2,722 lb. at 15 cents       $408.30
Sale of pigs during year        206.70
Young pigs born, 24, value  :         24.00
$639.00
Debits. '       '
Feed purchased during year     $205.16
Veterinary attention          12.50
$217.66
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens. '   '   :
Our potato-crop was a failure, which necessitated us purchasing our requirements from
Colony Farm for nine months out of the year.
Vegetables- Credits-
Potatoes   $399.90
Lettuce  8.25
Green peas   36.06
Swiss chard    3.60
Turnips   14.66
Onions   20.25
Beets ■_   70.61
Carrots  85.54
Cucumbers  8.90
Cabbage    88.09
Parsnips   23.42
Corn on cob   19.50
Tomatoes    37.74
Broad beans   11.16
String beans   9.95
Runner beans  10.50
Leeks   3.20
Cauliflower  6.45
Pumpkin  11.62
Fruit—      $869.40
Rhubarb  $15.00
Red  currants  4.00
Blaclj currants   4.68
Raspberries    34.32
Apples   4.80
         62.80
Carried forward      $932.20 General Farming and Kitchen Gardens—Continued.
Credits—Continued.
Brought forward   $932.20
Miscellaneous—
Timothy-hay grown on farm, 15 tons at $20 per ton   $300.00
Red carrots, 4,226 lb. at $5 per ton        10.56
White carrots, 2,800 lb. at $5 per ton         7.00
Mangolds, 8 tons at $6 per ton       48.00
Feed-potatoes, 2% tons at $18 per ton  :      45.00
Wood, 14 cords at $8 per cord      112.00
  522.56
Total credits   $1,454.76
Debits.                                                 ' '          =
Feed purchased during year   $877.29
1 Cockshutt harrow   41.90
1 scraper   15.50
1 Wilkinson ditch-plough  _•_  4.90
1 Cockshutt hill-plough   39.20
Repairs to harness   36.36
Repairs to implements   71.11
Oil, gasoline, and grease  21.13
Glass   repaired     3.67
Seed   ,  354.81
Medicine,  etc  22.02
Black Leaf for spraying purposes  10.25
Laundry, soap, etc : ,  20.47
Tools, rope, etc  137.13
Brushes, etc  12.30
Coal, 6 tons  ... 62.10
Horseshoeing    188.25
Veterinary attention -  27.00
Total debits   $1,945.39
_ ■   i    __
Land-clearing, Lawn-making, and Road-work.
It is somewhat difficult to show the actual cash value of the work performed by our officials,
boys, and teams in connection with land-clearing, lawn-making, and road-making.    The following
figures are shown for the purpose of giving an idea what it would have cost in actual cash for
hauling and team-work if we had to have hired same.    The value of the manual labour in the
aggregate amounted to a large sum, but is not shown.
Single cart, hauling stone, cement, etc., 13 days at $4   $52.00
Team hauling lumber, trees, snow, shrubs, etc., 23% days at $8  188.00
Single cart grading, etc., for poultry-field, 33% days at $4   134.00
Team grading, etc., for poultry-field, 32% days at $8   260.00
Single cart hauling gravel, 20 days at $4   80.00
Team hauling gravel, 31% days at $8   252.00
Team clearing land of rocks and stumps, etc., 4% days at $8   34.00
Single cart hauling soil for garden, 7% days at $4  30.00
Single cart hauling screened soil for lawn in front of Administration
and No. 2 Cottage, 110 days at $4   440.00
Team hauling screened soil for lawn in front of Administration and
No. 2 Cottage, 16% days at $8   132.00
Team and single cart doing chores, hauling manure, ashes, etc., for
farm, 365 days at $1.50   547.50
Single cart to Coquitlam, 1% days at $4   6.00
$2,155.50 ■■■■■i iwh 'Bin I'limn mmmi
:-'■_■
Bill:
I_____H_BnSS_l_'
s
n___HH ft «:._:-V _tH
:              ;               :    -  REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1929-30. N 21
Farm Credits and Debits by Sections.
Credits. Debits.
Dairy    $2,200.84 $1,372.08
Piggery       639.00 217.66
General farming, kitchen gardens      1,454.76 1,945.39
Land-clearing, etc     2,155.50 	
Salary of Instructor and Assistant  1,840.00
Credit balance   1,074.97
$6,450.10 $6,450.10
POULTRY DEPARTMENT.
During   the  year  this   department   was   reorganized   and   extended   in order   to   supply
Tranquille  Sanatorium,  New  Westminster  and  Essondale  Mental  Hospitals,   and   Home  for
Incurables. Two buildings, each 215 by 20 feet, were erected and our stock increased accordingly. This department is now on a sound footing, and in addition to meeting all its own
expenses it offers an opportunity for a large number of boys to learn a vocation, which will be
useful to them in the future.
Credits.
Eggs produced during year, 28,077 dozen, and disposed of as follows:—
Eggs for own use and hatching purposes, 6,351 dozen at 35 cents   $2,222.63
Eggs shipped to Tranquille Sanatorium, 18,006 dozen at 41 cents  7,382.46
Eggs shipped to New Westminster Mental Hospital, 540 dozen at
37% cents   202.50
Eggs shipped to Essondale Mental Hospital, 3,180 dozen at 40 17/52
cents   1,282.20
Poultry supplied to kitchen, hens and cockerels   708.25
Poultry shipped to Tranquille Sanatorium, 5,628 lb. at 25 cents and
30 cents per lb  1,574.93
Poultry sold elsewhere   48.00
Total credits   $13,420.97
Debits.
Feed purchased during year  _  $7,798.98
Express on eggs to Tranquille Sanatorium  794.85
Salary and rent allowance of Instructor for year and Assistant from
December     1,647.50
Transportation of eggs to station by own truck   315.00
Express on empty crates returned  77.48
Coal for brooders, etc  64.00
Coal,  anthracite   49.05
Laundry, etc  37.71
Eggs and day-old chicks bought  143.80
Egg-crates, fillers, and pads bought  -  178.35
Lime, etc  6.90
Coal-oil  22.26
Egg-scales  12.00
Gasoline  1.05
Cauldron and coop   27.00
Medicine   17.05
Chick-founts   1.35
Glass replaced   8.80
Total debits   $11,203.13 N 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CEMENT AND GENERAL WORK GANGS.
During the year this sub-department satisfactorily performed the following services :—
Completion and grading west section of front lawn, replacing old dead shrubs and trees,
making new flower-beds, and shrubbery; completion of excavation, concrete and plastering work
of new school-room, also put in septic tank and built new chimney; excavating and grading and
putting in new piers and sinks for the new poultry-houses, covering an area of 430 feet long by
25 feet wide; built a brick incinerator for use at poultry-farm; excavating basement for building, 60 by 30 feet; excavating and putting new basement under carpenter-shop, 30 by 18 feet,
and rebuilding chimney; excavating and doing all cement for building to be used for fire apparatus ; putting in 270 feet of cedar culvert drains, besides grading and gravelling roads.
In the aggregate this work had a cash value of several thousand dollars.
FLOWER-GARDENS.
In spite of the backwardness of the season, the gardens at Biscoq last year were better than
ever. The pansy section of over 3,000 roots made a very attractive picture. The roses also were
exceptionally nice, and the same may be said of the gladiolas, rockeries, and shady nooks.
Above all things, we love our gardens, because of the encouraging influence they have upon
our boys and the value of the lessons nature teaches through flowers.
BOYS' BRASS BAND.
During the year the usefulness of this band was very apparent, and credit is due our bandmaster, Mr. J. W. Rushton, for his patience and ability in teaching the rudiments of music to
boys who are not always the easiest pupils to instruct. The band plays at the institution
mornings and evenings of each day, which, in addition to affording them practice, also acts as
an inspiration to all boys of the institution.
During the year their services were in demand by outside organizations, and among the
engagements undertaken was the Surrey Agricultural Fair, held on September 25th, 1929. Very
favourable comments were received from the officials of that Board.
We believe that music is not merely a hobby, but is uplifting, and its influence of untold
benefit to boys such as we handle.
SWIMMING AND AQUATIC SPORTS.
Our swimming-tank, 70 by 34 feet, is one of the greatest assets we have at Biscoq. It not
only teaches boys to swim, but it is beneficial from a health standpoint. Visitors seeing it for
the first time are amazed at its workmanship.
CONCERTS' AND ENTERTAINMENTS.
In April a concert was given by the Kiwanis Club of New Westminster. This was real
classical, especially the magician's part. They brought a number of friends, who were both
delighted and happy to be with us.
Boys from First United Church, Vancouver, came out on Good Friday, and gave us a programme of boxing, wrestling, etc., which was real good.
Armistice Day Banquet, Royal City Branch, Canadian Legion, held on November 9th; about
200 present.    The programme consisted of cards and dancing.    Everything went off splendidly.
Ladies' Aid of Rotary Club were out and much impressed by everything they saw.
Annual concert, December 13th, was affected by bad weather, but otherwise was a success.
Mr. P. Walker, Deputy Provincial Secretary, Victoria, who came specially from Victoria, representing Hon. Nels Lougheed, made a good chairman, and his words of appreciation were welcomed by both staff and boys.
Rev. L. Sloat, of New Westminster, held a Christmas service here on Christmas morning;
this was followed by a wonderful turkey dinner, which, needless to say, was thoroughly enjoyed
by all.
Salvation Army came out and gave their annual concert and gifts to every boy.
Father and Son Banquet, Rotary Club, was attended by a number of our boys. All had a
good time and their conduct was good.
Scotch concert by Miss Annie Lamont was real good in every way. Concert by Boy Scouts
of New Westminster was much enjoyed. gym at biscoq.  REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 1929-30. N 23
SPORTS SECTION.
Football.—In April a team from the Cavell Club, Vancouver, came out to play a game. It
was a good game and resulted in a fifty-fifty score of 2 to 2.
On November 2nd Port Coquitlam visited us and a good game was played; the visitors tried
hard to win, but without result, and the score ended in our favour.
On November 9th Port Coquitlam again visited us, as they apparently were not satisfied
with the referee-coach on the previous visit, but had to acknowledge defeat again.
On November 16th Port Coquitlam came back for more. They did much better on this
occasion and the game resulted in a tie, 3 to 3.
In February a game was played between the Shamrocks of Vancouver and our boys; Biscoq
again won by a score of 4 to 2.
Port Coquitlam Seniors and our Seniors had another game; this proved to be real interesting ;  the result was 2 to 1 in Biscoq's favour.
Hastings News, Vancouver, came out and played our Bantams. In this game penalty kicks
were scored on both sides.   Our boys won by a score of 2 to 0.
Basketball.—Two teams from Cavell Club, Vancouver, played our boys. Biscoq won one
game and lost the other;  an even break.
Two games were played between the Coquitlam team and our boys;  another even break.
On November 4th Port Haney were invited to Biscoq. This team had a reputation of being
top-notchers. Our boys trained hard for this game and played a splendid game, the result being
that we won again.
On November 28th Haney came back for revenge, but our boys did not play as well as in the
previous game, and the visitors won by a score of 24 to 19.
On February 13th Coquitlam High School played Biscoq Intermediates; this game resulted
in a score of 30 to 23 in our favour.
On February 18th two teams from Burnaby came out to visit us. In spite of the fact that
the Intermediate team has been champions of Vancouver for two years our Intermediate team
won easily by a score of 16 to 5. The other game was between the Senior teams; this game
resulted in our loss by a narrow margin.
Jubilee United, Vancouver, were next to come out. They played three games with the
Intermediates, Seniors, and Juniors. Our Intermediate team won by 18 to 9, our Seniors by
16 to 14, and the Juniors by 7 to 6.
On February 25th a team from Vancouver came out and this was perhaps the poorest game
played yet; neither team seemed to have any life.    Biscoq managed to win by a score of 14 to 10.
An Intermediate team from New Westminster played our Intermediates and won from
Biscoq by 3 points.
On March 21st Coquitlam Intermediates and Seniors came up to play us. The game between
the Intermediate teams resulted in a tie of 19 to 19. The Senior game resulted in a win for
Biscoq by a score of 34 to 16.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES.
During the year religious services were held every Sunday and occasionally during the"
week.    The Salvation Army, Baptist, Anglican, Apostle Faith, and Christian Mission alternated
with each other.    The Roman Catholic priest of Port Moody attended to the boys of his faith,
at, times convenient to himself.
We find the unselfish work of these Christian people beneficial and their services are much
appreciated.
INTERESTING VISITORS.
Colonel F. Lister, M.L.A., of Creston; Mrs. M. Cook, Dominion Y.M.C.A. Secretary; Mr. P.
Walker, Deputy Provincial Secretary, Victoria; Mr. J. E. Carpenter, Vancouver School Board;
Mrs. E. Skeen, Matron, Protestant Orphanage, New Westminster; Mrs. E. Hopkins, School
Trustee, Vancouver; Rev. H. Atkinson, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba; Rev. M. Campbell, North
Vancouver; Colonel R. Napier, Victoria; Mr. W. J. Cox, Victoria; Mr. and Mrs. Duncommun,
Alhambra, California; Mr. J. Sutton, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba; Major and Mrs. McKay,
City Prosecutor, Vancouver; Captain W. R. Creston, California; Mr. J. S. Foran, Roman
Catholic Children's Aid Society, Vancouver;  Mr. A. Capon, Vancouver;  Mr. W. G. McQuarrie, N 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
M.L.A., New Westminster; Colonel E. Peplar, Victoria;  Mr. Simon Taylor, Cranbrook;  Messrs.
Roy Shields, R. Gunn, Bruce Dixon, and Lute Rogers, all of New Westminster.
A WORD ABOUT THE BOY WHO HAS PASSED FROM UNDER OUR CARE.
I have often felt the need of some organized system for the after-care of boys leaving Biscoq,
in order that there might be a follow-up system of visitation, where assistance could be rendered
in the way of finding employment and giving advice and help when needed. This work, of
course, can only be done by some one familiar with the boy and his circumstances, and consequently should be one attached to this institution. At the present time the best we can do is
to keep up a correspondence with the boys after they leave us, and this at times is considerable.
Their replies indicate that many of them feel that the institution haos done much for them, and
in consequence is held in very fond memory.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.
600-830-1802

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