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EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FIRE MARSHAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STATISTICS, 1929 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1931

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 EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE FIRE MARSHAL
FOR   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS, 1929
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Xour Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Eighth Annual Report of the Fire Marshal
for the year ended December 31st, 1929.
R. H. POOLEY,
Attorney-General.
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1930. ■
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Fire Marshal      5-7
Table I.—Inspections made and Orders issued     8, 9
Table II.—Fires reported 10, 11
Table III.—Causes of Fires 12, 13
Table IV.—Classification of Property ,  14-22
Table V.—Summary        23
Table VI.—Loss of Life '.         24 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL.
Office of Fire Marshal,
Vancouver, B.C., March 31st, 1930.
The Honourable R. H. Pooley, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Eighth Annual Report as Fire Marshal for the year
ended December 31st, 1929.
The total value of buildings and contents destroyed by fire during this period was §4,190,100.
Five adult persons lost their lives. The increase in losses over the same period in 1928 was
approximately $1,500,000. Nearly one million of this increase was contributed by seventeen of
our cities, the balance being principally in the unorganized districts where no Are protection
is available.
The total loss from fire in 1929 nearly reached that of 1923, which was the peak year since
records have been kept by the Department.
This increased loss for 1929 was not unexpected. Early in the year warnings were broadcasted by the Dominion Meteorological Service to the effect that owing to the lack of rainfall the
fire hazard would be a serious one. In an endeavour to cope with the situation, early in the
year notices were sent to the assistant fire marshals advising them to see that all fire hazards
were cleaned up and special care taken to prevent fires starting. Pursuant to this over 56,000
inspections were made and nearly 7,000 orders to remove hazards and improve conditions were
issued and enforced. Yet in spite of this our losses have mounted. What they would have
been had this action not been taken we must leave to the imagination.
There appears to be a tendency on the part of some officials to piously attribute their increased fire losses to an act of God. Our investigations, however, reveal that they are usually
from another source. In one city, the stream which was the only source of supply to their
reservoir was, owing to the extreme cold, frozen solid. Under these conditions the elderly
labourer, who was glorified with the title of " Foreman of the Waterworks," decided to drain
the reservoir and clean it. This was done. At this time a fire occurred. The only water available was in the pipes and a 25-gallon chemical tank. The result, a conflagration and a property
loss of $157,000. To make the situation more interesting, the Deputy Fire Marshal, while investigating the fire, made an inspection of what was left of the city and reported over seventy serious
fire hazards consisting of highly inflammable trash located in dilapidated buildings and rear
yards. While this condition existed the local assistant fire marshal, whose duty under the Act
is to attend to just such matters as this, was busy in the fire-hall cleaning paint off an old wagon.
Another case is that of a city which has been carrying on a very laudable campaign to
attract industries and with very considerable success. For years the fire chief has been asking
for larger water-mains and better equipment for their protection from fire. In this city during
1929 four major fires occurred. Two were industrial plants, one a school, and in the other
several public buildings were involved. The total loss for the four fires was $575,000. Their
fire loss for the year increased from $10,000 in 1928 to over half a million in 1929. They have
since purchased a pumping-engine, but the pipe for the enlarged water-mains is still piled in
the city yards.
Our chief city of Vancouver shows a loss total of $1,089,730, being an increase of $387,717
over the 1928 loss for Vancouver, Point Grey, and South Arancouver combined.
The conditions existing on the Burrard water-front of Vancouver are such that a serious
conflagration is long overdue. For the past eight years the attention of councils and citizens
generally has been called to the serious hazards existing here and the entirely inadequate fire
protection available. Surveys have been made, public meetings held, and wide publicity given
by the press of the city. A committee was appointed by the president of the Board of Trade,
but at the time of writing there have been no results. The chief of the fire department put an
item for fire-boats in his 1930 estimates, but it was struck out before it reached the council. G 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
When the conflagration happens it will probably involve the major portion of the Water Street
wholesale district.    I presume it will be referred to as an act of God.
A fire in this city which involved a loss of life is worthy of note. It occurred in an industrial plant. Our investigation showed that it was caused by a defective electrical heating
apparatus which had been installed in an oven used for baking enamel. This was installed
without the knowledge or consent of the city officials, and, as above stated, the resultant fire
caused the death of a young man employee of the company. For this act the persons responsible
were convicted and fined $10. An amendment to the " Fire Marshal Act" passed last session
provides an adequate penalty for this sort of thing, which has been altogether too common in the
past.    In the future the law will be strictly enforced.
Provincial Government Buildings.—Regular inspection of Government buildings has been
made during the year. With a few minor exceptions, conditions were found excellent. Only
two serious fires have occurred in these institutions during the year—namely, at the Colony
Farm, Essondale. Both were undoubtedly due to spontaneous ignition of oily rags. One
occurred in the new addition to the farm cottage while under construction and the responsibility
was entirely that of the contractors in charge of the work. The promptness and efficiency of
our Essondale Fire Department under Chief Hughes prevented a serious loss. They cannot be
too highly commended for their excellent work. As a result of these fires, steps were at once
taken to furnish these institutions with adequate fire protection equipment. A 40-gallon chemical
extinguisher was at once purchased and put in commission. Later a 500-gallon LaFrance combination pumper hose and chemical was purchased and installed. Plans were prepared and approved
for a pumping plant and distributing-mains with a rated capacity of 1,000 gallons per minute
for the protection of the farm buildings. This will be put in commission in the very near future.
I wish to express my appreciation of the support and co-operation I have received from the
departments responsible in bringing the fire protection of this important institution to such a
high standard of efficiency.
Public and Private Hospitals.—Co-operating with the Department of the Honourable Provincial Secretary, a close check has been kept on all hospitals throughout the Province. Orders
for alterations and improvements of conditions were issued and enforced where such were
necessary. Owing to the tragedy that occurred in a clinic at Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A., where
over one hundred persons lost their lives as a result of inhaling the gases of burning nitrocellulose film used for X-ray purposes, a prompt survey of our hospitals and clinics in this
Province was at once made. The conditions under which niti-o-cellulose X-ray film was stored
and used were found to be exceedingly dangerous. Acting on your instructions, I proceeded to
Ottawa, where a conference had been arranged by the Canadian Fire Marshals to discuss the
question of the best method of preventing such a catastrophe in our Canadian hospitals. Attending and addressing this conference were a number of the leading radiologists and experts on
nitro-cellulose film in Canada and the United States. As a result of attending this meeting I
was in a position on my return to inaugurate an educational campaign among the hospitals in
this Province with a view to providing for the safe-keeping of the nitro-cellulose film in use and
to arrange for the use of the acetate safety-film in the future. In carrying out this work I was
ably assisted by Mr. J. H. McVety, president of the British Columbia Hospitals' Board, and
members of the Executive, and by Drs. F. C. Bell and H. Mcintosh, of the staff of the Vancouver
General Hospital. Without the co-operation and advice of these men my work along these lines
would not have been so successful as it proved to be. I am glad to report that to-day over 95
per cent, of our hospitals and clinics are using the acetate safety-film, and that in the very near
future the use of the nitro-cellulose film for X-ray purposes will be entirely prohibited in this
Province.
Fire Districts.—It having been found that the practice of creating fire districts in the towns
of our unorganized districts was not working out satisfactorily, I consulted Colonel McMullin,
Commissioner of Provincial Police, and we decided to make all the unorganized territory in each
county a fire district and appoint the staff-sergeants and sergeants of the force as assistant fire
marshals in charge. This we believe will make for efficiency in the work of fire prevention in
the districts where there is no fire protection available. This act on the part of Colonel
McMullin is in line with the fine co-operation and assistance I have always received from him
and the officers of the force. Without it it would be almost impossible to carry on the work of
fire prevention in the unorganized districts. REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1929. G 7
During the year Mr. A. A. MacDonald, Deputy Fire Marshal, resigned to take the position
of Fire Chief at Trail, and Mr. W. A. Walker, a former sergeant on the Provincial Police Force,
was appointed in his stead. As a trained investigator he has taken over the work of fire
investigation and is having splendid success along that line.
Moving-picture Theatres Act.—The work of theatre inspection has been actively and efficiently carried out by Mr. W. A. Oswald, Assistant Fire Marshal in this office. During the year
he has inspected nearly all theatres in the Province, many of them several times. In sixty-four
of them changes and improvements were ordered. Plans for remodelling seventeen existing
theatres for the installation of synchronized sound equipment were approved and the remodelling
carried out. Twenty-one installations and inspections of synchronized sound equipment were
made during the year. One hundred and eighty-six machines were inspected and repairs ordered.
The new high intensity reflector arc lamp installed in some of the larger houses was found to
have increased the temperature in some cases as much as 600° F. over the former reflector lamp.
This called for greater precautions to prevent fire.    No new theatres were built during 1929.
The revision of film at the exchanges has been closely checked and as a result our fire loss
due to defective film was only $1,064, compared with $4,226 in 1928. Our film report system
revealed the fact that approximately 175,000 feet of film-was defective and it was ordered out
of service.    This was a decrease of 297,000 feet from 1928.
In addition to his work of inspection, Mr. Oswald conducted or assisted in conducting
thirty-one projectionists' examinations throughout the year. Eighteen inspections were made of
the film exchange building which houses ten exchanges. In eight instances orders were issued to
improve conditions. Film exchange managers through their fire inspection department have
given splendid assistance in keeping conditions up to a proper standard in these exchanges.
I wish to express my appreciation to the members of my staff, who have made it possible to
carry out the work of the office in compiling the fire statistics, and also to the members of the
Provincial and Municipal Police Forces, who have acted as assistant fire marshals in their
several districts.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. A. THOMAS,
Fire Marshal. G 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
Alberni	
City Municipalities (33).
8
45
43
1,020
46
40
50
530
13
10
412
27
30
661
1,289
1,845
821
43
48
225
445
405
240
23
1,615
37,619
7,515
3
1
Chilliwack	
2
Cranbrook ■_ 	
77
3
Enderbv	
2
Fernie	
33
Orand Forks	
2
Greenwood	
4
23
Kaslo....     	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Merritt :	
19
14
63
New Westminster	
261
154
Port Alberni	
23
Port Moody	
0
98
Prince Rupert	
210
2
Lossland	
113
Salmon Arm	
Slocan :	
Trail	
5,181
259
Totals	
-55,068
6,637
District Municipalities (28).
75
14
24
72
10
3
5
66
23
6
134
174
3
28
44
Delta	
1
Fraser Mills	
Glenmore	
Kent	
2
Maple Ridge	
2
1
Oak Bay	
8
Pitt Meadows	
60
J REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1929.
G 9
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS.—'Continued.
31
480
31
40
10
1
269
.
Oliver	
2
8
2
Rolla	
Telkwa	
1
Totals	
918
48
Grand totals	
56,954
6,832
Grand totals, 1928....	
43,075
47,221
52,134
49,880
4,938
4 437
Grand totals, 1927	
Grand totals, 1920	
5 003
Grand totals,  1925	
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
District Municipalities—Continued.
57
40
5
Totals
734
123
Village Municipalities (S).
2
9
213
4
6
3
21
Smithers	
Totals	
234
24
Fire Districts C&k)-
13
4
22
12
5
12
1
6
loco	
1 G 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED.
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Doss.
Alberni	
City Municipalities (S3).
1
1
8
4
17
2
5
2
8
5
1
18
1
9
7
5
3S
17
75
35
16
6
3
11
14
6
39
14
13
1,012
10
180
$10
13
Chilliwack	
2,410
1,782
545
69
315
Enderby	
197
2,894
195
Kamloops	
25,098
Kaslo	
135
4,566
4,529
26,600
20,743
17,918
671,833
107,173
4,127
830
10,280
13,361
3,485
11,555
166,834
17,101
Trail	
10,754
1,089,730
1,251
46,838
Totals	
1,583
$2,264,496
District Municipalities (28).
63
17
8
9
9
9
21
14
11
7
0
32
41
2
11
14
28
1
1
9
6
20
19
20
$67,832
15,534
12,601
Delta	
20,728
855
33,942
12,969
16,272
5,999
2,737
18,770
Oak Bay	
78,757
143
4,640
17,845
15,647
125
47
10,990
3,368
32,187
10,090
4,145
Totals 	
370
$391,798
J REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1929.
G 11
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED—Continued.
Note.—Construction of buildings—
Fire-resisting ;  31, ioss
Brick or concrete  235
Frame  2,120
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Village Municipalities (8).
3
i
7
1
0
$6,070
500
6,000
6
808
14
$13,384
Fire Districts (%k).
Anyox          ..         ....
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
2
3
2
3
2
1
4
Burns Lake         ..        	
Dawson Creek _	
$35,029
1,000
Hazelton	
Hedley	
2,440
150
1,381
32.205
361
3,016
Port  Essington	
10 725
3,676
40
Rolla	
Sandon  	
Stewart	
5,110
Telkwa	
850
Totals.	
32
$111,788
Unorganized Districts (15).
Boundary	
22
12
4
14
18
12
52
46
11
08
15
47
18
42
6
$40,297
Fort George.	
Fort St. John	
10,910
38,999
17,359
21,846
Hazelton	
Kamloops	
Kootenay,  North-east	
Kootenay,  South-east	
Kootenay, West	
167,072
21,326
176,485
32,511
230,465
26,881
165,470
11,260
Lillooet	
Nanaimo	
Prince Rupert	
Vancouver-New Westminster	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Yale	
Totals.	
387
$1,408,634
Grand totals	
2,386
$4,190,100
2,386,
$178,342
411,276
3,600,482
$4,190,100 G 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Alcohol ignited by hot soldering-ircn	
Ashes against wood	
Boiler insufficiently protected ...
Brushes ignited in  oven	
Candle carelessness	
Carburettor back-firing	
Car upset -
Children playing w4th fire....	
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe.	
Coal-gas explosion...	
Coal-oil carelessness	
Coat falling on hot-air register .'.
Curtains from candle	
Curtains from electric light	
Curtains from lamp	
Curtains from stove	
Defective acetylene welder	
Defective boiler	
Defective chimney -	
Defective electrical installation	
Defective film	
Defective fireplace ,	
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe	
Defective gas connection —
Defective heater	
Defective lamp	
Defective matches.	
Defective motor	
Defective oil-burner	
Defective oil connection	
Defective oil-stove	
Defective sawdust-burner	
Defective stove or stove-pipe	
Defective wiring 	
Dutch oven back-firing ,	
Electrical appliances	
Engine back-firing -..
Exposure	
Fire-crackers..	
Friction in drying-machine	
Friction in stand-roll	
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected
Gas-furnace back-firing	
Gasoline carelessness	
Gasoline explosion - -	
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe	
Gasoline-stove explosion —	
Gasoline-torch carelessness	
Gas-plate insufficiently protected	
Grease on stove	
Hot biscuits wrapped in paper	
Hot bolt fell into barrel	
Hot brick put in bed	
Hot pan placed on verandah-rail	
Ignition of floor-wax	
Incendiary	
Incense-burner  upset.	
Lamp explosion	
Lamp upset	
Lantern upset	
Lightning	
Live coals	
Match carelessness	
Matches, children with	
Matches, mice with	
1
35
1
3
15
35
2
4
32
4
4
1
2
1
4
4
1
1
122
1
4
1
43
10
1
81
1
143
15
1
1
14
1
29
9
14
19
1
1
1
1
1
18
10
o
12
29
26
$8
27,848
100
162
393
14,037
876
711
15,S45
43,920
2,191
73
151
4
50
128
513
25
132,830
20,686
1,064
6,235
4,793
24,250
275
8,782
18
85
5,990
2,000
2,116
5
35,002
31,299
95,858
35,431
478
380,239
2,143
21
53
18,682
56
55,723
2,350
6,661
2,256
6,885
344
9,524
22
10
40
14
68
37,434
74
10,201
11,500
6,291
152,540
871
2.521
12.899
1,508 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL,  1929.
G 13
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES—Continued.
Causes of Fires.
Amount of
Loss.
Mattress too near stove	
Oil-furnace back-firing	
Oil-stove explosion —
Overheated asphalt	
Overheated dry-kiln..	
Overheated electric motor -	
Overheated elements	
Overheated vulcanizing-machine	
Overheating of machinery bearings	
Paper from fireplace ."	
Paper from stove	
Pitch bein^ melted, ignited.	
Rubbish too near stove	
Short circuit	
Smokers' carelessness    	
Sparks from acetylene welder 	
Sparks from boiler „	
Sparks from bonfire	
Sparks from burning rubbish,	
Sparks from bush fire	
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from engine ,	
Sparks from fireplace	
Sparks from forge 	
Sparks from furnace	
Sparks from locomotive	
Sparks from mill burner 	
Sparks from motor	
Sparks from slash fire „	
Spa-.-ks from smelting-pot	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe	
Spontaneous combustion	
Static electricity	
Stove explosion 	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Sulphur burning	
Sun's rays	
Tar boiling; over	
Thawing pipes 	
Trolley broke 	
Unknown	
Wood too near furnace	
Wood too near stove	
Totals 	
400
6
0
1
16
19
232
3
112
1
12
1
14
1
4
1
36
4
119
1
1
6
27
1
313
3
$144
332
19
58,038
96,408
840
2.276
9,686
70
10
99
24
633
120,044
295,607
275
4,763
347
10,461
63,821
233,128
6,237
6,803
800
279,067
50
21,388
80
9,738
46
18,864
187,537
13,876
187
168,900
142
13
837
2,543
1,331
1,327,126
9,241
2,927
2,386
$4,190,100 G 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES.
Property.
Amusement-parks
Apartments   	
Automobiles
Bakeries
Banks
'Barber-shops
Barns
Blacksmith-shops
146
50
Short circuit  1
Ashes against wood  2
Clothes too near stove   1
Curtains from electric light   1
Defective chimney   1
Defective fireplace  ;...'  2
Defective gas connection   1
Electrical  appliances  5
Grease on stove  1
Live   coals     1
Match carelessness   1
Matches,  children  with   1
Oil-furnace back-firing   1
Smokers' carelessness   31
Sparks from chimney   2
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected  3
Unknown     5
Carburettor  back-firing    34
Car upset  2
Defective heater   1
Defective wiring  1
Fire-crackers     1
Gasoline carelessness   4
Gasoline on exhaust-pipe   14
Gasoline-torch carelessness -  1
Match carelessness   1
Short circuit   42
Smokers' carelessness   16
Sparks from chimney   1
Unknown  28
Defective wiring   1
Gasoline-torch carelessness   1
Matches,  children with   1
Short circuit  -  • 1
Unknown .'  1
Wood too near stove   1
Defective  oil-burner   1
Exposure     1
Electrical   appliances    2
Exposure    3
Smokers' carelessness   1
Defective wiring   1
Gasoline carelessness   1
Lamp upset   2-
Lantern upset   1
Lightning  1
Match carelessness   1
Matches,  children with   2
Short circuit  2
Smokers' carelessness   7
Sparks from burning rubbish   3
Sparks from bush fire  6
Spontaneous  combustion    2
Stove insufficiently protected   2
Unknown  28
Gasoline carelessness  :  1
Gasoline  explosion    1
Gasoline-torch carelessness  —.... 1
Amount of Loss.
$25
7,973
4
49
184
202
82
80
20
17
20
150
912
91
1,372
1,400
$11,537
876
275
15
15
1,383
6,661
65
150
10,416
1,596
40
13,179
$8,312
175
32
10,500
17,767
1,058
$460
1,173
$9.33
8,195
$1,000
936
1,695
800
1,854
599
1,605
10,355
10,499
705
6,926
9,427
700
43,807
$879
2,250
1,455
$894
12,581
46,208
',844
1,633
9,153
90,90S REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1929.
G 15
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Boarding-houses      17
Boat-building  sheds    1
Boat-houses      1
Bottling-works   3
Breweries     1
Bridges  2
Bunk-houses  5
Canneries    3
Carpenter-shops   2
Chemical  plants    1
Chicken-houses     20
Churches
Clubs
Coalyards  ..
Cooperages
Incendiary  1
Smokers' carelessness  3
Sparks from forge   - -  1
Curtains from lamp   1
Defective fireplace   1
Defective furnace-pipe   1
Defective wiring  1
Electrical   appliances  1
Match carelessness   1
Smokers' carelessness   2
Sparks from chimney  4
Sparks from fireplace  1
Sparks from furnace   1
Sulphur burning  1
Unknown      2
Incendiary  1
Unknown  1
Sparks from chimney  2
Unknown     1
Unknown  1
Lightning  1
Unknown  1
Gasoline carelessness   1
Gasoline-torch carelessness   1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected  2
Ashes against wood   1
Sparks from boiler   1
Unknown  1
Candle   carelessness  1
Lightning  1
Exposure  1
Ashes against wood    1
Defective stove    .'.  3
Lamp explosion   1
Lamp upset  2
Matches,  children with  2
Sparks from burning rubbish  2
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected  1
Unknown      8
Furnace insufficiently protected   1
Incendiary     1
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Thawing pipes   1
Unknown      1
Defective stove-pipe  1
Exposure     1
Smokers' carelessness  1
Sparks from chimney   8
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Unknown    =  1
Sparks from mill-burner  1
Spontaneous  combustion  1
Sparks from mill burner   1
$1,460
5
800
$14
23
100
2,487
498
14
55
4,885
20
123
142
6,058
$6,566
4,340
$107
309
$300
4,000
250
886
$4,151
1,331
153,264
$125
2,666
110
7,166
107
95
985
7,058
$587
4
381
463
5,150
$250
18,709
65
737
111
3,370
$29
500
$6,849
630
10,906
4,019
1,066
5,436
15S.748
315
41,067
18,312
0,585
23,242
529
175 G 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Dairies
Dredges  -	
Dry-cleaning  establishments..
Dwellings .1,360
Defective motor  ■     1
Exposure  1
Overheating of machinery bearings  1
Short circuit  1
Static electricity   1
Exposure       1
Gasoline carelessness   1
Gasoline  explosion  1
Sparks from chimney   1
Static electricity  :  1
Ashes against wood  17
Brushes ignited in oven  3
Candle   carelessness  13
Children playing with fire  4
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe   30
Coal-gas   explosion  1
Coal-oil carelessness  3
Coat falling on hot-air register     1
Curtains from candle    2
Curtains from lamp   3
Curtains from stove   2
Defective   chimney     100
Defective   fireplace    -   24
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe  1
Defective gas connection  2
Defective lamp    1
Defective  oil-stove    4
Defective stove or stove-pipe  33
Defective wiring   9
Electrical  appliances    62
Exposure     69
Fire-crackers     8
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected 7
Gas-furnace   back-firing     1
Gasoline carelessness  6
Gasoline-stove  explosion  2
Gasoline-torch carelessness   2
Gas-plate insufficiently protected   1
Grease on stove  12
Hot biscuits wrapped in  paper   1
Hot brick put in bed  -  1
Hot pan placed on verandah-rail   1
Ignition of floor-wax   1
Incendiary     11
Incense-burner  upset    2
Lamp explosion   4
Lamp  upset   12
Lightning   7
Live  coals  26
Match carelessness  17
Matches, children with   26
Matches, mice with   1
Mattress too near stove   2
Oil-furnace back-firing  : 1
Paper  from fireplace     2
Paper from stove :... 1
Short circuit   12
Smokers' carelessness   1S8
Sparks from burning rubbish   4
Sparks from bush fire   7
Sparks from chimney   193
Sparks from fireplace   100
Sparks from furnace   6
$85
392
70
674
117
$20,000
100
4
S9
$7,706
102
298
711
7,870
15
2,151
73
151
30
64
90,990
4,296
1,946
43
2,650
2,111
21,694
14,779
7,446
87,055
475
1,183
56
1,932
2,256
584
28
2,760
22
40
14
68
6,262
74
2,445
2,639
5,326
731
956
8,186
2
144
25
10
20
20,684
45,476
601
5,988
93,657
6.292
2,430
$1,338
600
20,193 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1929.
G 17
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount
of Loss.
1
2
1
2
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
3
1
40
1
2
32
10
3
92
3
22
132
3
5
1
$23
3,852
11,741
8,105
162
120,989
614
1,730
225,886
9,241
1,518
Sparks from slash Are 	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Thawing pipes 	
Wood too near furnace 	
Wood too near stove 	
$847,654
1,968
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
1
2
7
1
.      1
$400
546
946
47
$130,353
8,210
Defective electrical installation 	
Sparks from mill burner 	
Spontaneous combustion 	
138,563
20,686
Factories (bed and mattress)
$13,700
217
175
602
Defective furnace 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Sparks from furnace  .........
14s694
14,082
50
2,791
15
Factories   (broom)   	
$13,082
1,000
Factories (furniture)    	
Factories (hardwood floor)....
24,005
335
Factories (roofing material)..
Sparks from boiler 	
Tar boiling over 	
$217
118
$200
980
103
Sparks from chimney	
Static electricity  ;	
1,283
957
Factories   (suspender)   	
Factories  (tent and awning)
20,589
159
Static electricity	
Gas-plate insufliciently protected 	
Factories (varnish and paint)
314
Fences 	
#6
672
55
Gasoline carelessness	
Friction  in  stand-roll   	
733
$425
900
4,325
58
Flour-mills 	
Freight-cars 	
Spontaneous combustion  	
Trolley broke  _	
Unknown   	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Ashes against wood 	
$200
1,331
20
1,551
10
Gaols 	
Garages	
$213
40
5,790
3
545
987
276
9,686
Defective chimney	
Defective wiring 	
Exposure   	
Gasoline carelessness 	
Gasoline-torch carelessness 	
Overheated  vulcanizing-machine  	 G 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Gasoline-stations   4
Gas plants   1
Golf club-houses   1
Greenhouses ....1  1
Halls   12
Hatcheries  (chicken)    1
Hay-stacks  1
Hop plants   1
Hospitals     7
Hotels
90
House-boats          1
Knitting-mills            1
Launches           8
Laundries
Logging camps        10
Causes.
Short circuit   9
Smokers' carelessness   2
Sparks from bonfire   1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Spontaneous combustion   1
Unknown  7
Short circuit   1
Spontaneous combustion   1
Unknown     2
Unknown     1
Spontaneous  combustion  1
Defective  sawdust-burner  1
Defective  fireplace    1
Exposure     3
Smokers' carelessness   2
Sparks from chimney   1
Sparks from furnace   1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Tar boiling over   1
Unknown     2
Coal-gas  explosion    1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Unknown     1
Grease on stove   2
Short circuit   1
Sparks from chimney   3
Spontaneous combustion   1
Ashes against wood   1
Defective  chimney    4
Defective matches   1
Defective wiring   1
Electrical  appliances   2
Exposure  4
Furnace insufficiently protected   1
Incendiary     1
Lamp explosion  1
Live coals   1
Match carelessness   2
Matches, children with   2
Short circuit   1
Smokers' carelessness   55
Sparks from chimney   5
Sparks from fireplace  1
Stove insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     6
Defective stove-pipe   1
Short circuit  1
Carburettor back-firing    1
Gasoline carelessness   2
Sparks from stove   1
Unknown     4
Defective  fireplace   1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Defective acetylene welder   1
Engine back-firing   1
Short circuit   1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Sparks from engine   1
Amount of Loss.
$3,516
55
847
1,100
8,792
16,158
$35
5
2,181
$952
9,635
1,854
190
3,943
71
80
5,323
$353
38
28
7,900
$72
14,649
8
8
390
4,685
257
4,730
5,400
100
67
70
55
13,157
36,626
4
35
12,224
$2,500
1,100
1,750
5,091
$25
1,157
$513
478
925
16,316
762
$47,508
2,221
1,031
47,977
5
22,048
30,500
400
95
8,319
92,537
976
39,779
10,441
1,182 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1929.
G 19
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
2
Sparks from slash fire 	
Sparks from stove 	
Unknown	
Smokers' carelessness	
        2
        1
        2
        1
        1
$5,886
1,513
1,480
$27,873
$125
763
3
        1
888
$3,500
1,599
1
Sparks from mill burner 	
         2
         1
5,099
1,100
$8,934
5,491
50
23,892
Machinery plants 	
1
8
18
2
4
4
2
Smokers' carelessness	
         1
         2
350
Sparks from locomotive	
Unknown   	
         1
         1
        4
         1
38,367
$50
721
2,100
13,957
2
1,522
222
59
1,930
Defective furnace 	
Defective lamp  	
         1
         1
         6
         1
         1
Smokers' carelessness	
        5
         1
Spontaneous combustion	
Unknown	
Sparks from bush fire 	
Matches, mice with 	
Smokers' carelessness	
Thawing pipes 	
         1
         1
         1
        4
         1
         1
         1
         1
         2
20,563
267,908
45,406
3,691
454
Paper-mills 	
$267,902
6
Pole camps 	
Pool-rooms 	
$2,186
1,480
10
15
$193
35
264
73
380
1
Overheated  elements  	
Gasoline carelessness 	
Sparks from chimney	
Spontaneous  combustion 	
Unknown	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Defective  lamp  	
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
        3
        1
        3
2,276
5
1
14
1
945
5
Railway-stations  	
Restaurants  	
$282
238
4,032
1,223
324
78
264
15
272
Grease on  stove	
        2
1
Smokers' carelessness 	
Sparks from chimney 	
Wood too near stove	
Unknown	
Defective  chimney  ;.:	
Defective fireplace  	
Defective  matches   :	
Electrical appliances 	
         1
         1
        1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
6,728
14,453
$37
58
10
10
2,850
72
36
20
19
Rooming-houses 	
      30
Furnace insufficiently protected 	
         1
Incendiary  	
         1
         1
         1 G 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE XV— CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Sawmills
Schools
Sheds.
Shingle-mills
40
20
17
Ships   1
Skating-rinks   2
Slaughter-houses   1
Smelting plants   18
Causes.
Paper from stove  1
Smokers' carelessness   14
Sparks from chimney   1
Sparks from fireplace   1
Stove insufficiently protected   .1
Thawing pipes  :  1
Unknown     2
Defective stove-pipe   1
Dutch oven back-firing   1
Gasoline-torch carelessness   1
Lightning   1
Overheated dry-kiln   2
Overheated electric motor   1
Short circuit  ,  2
Smokers' carelessness   2
Sparks from boiler   1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from bush fire   1
Sparks from engine  1
Sparks from mill burner   3
Spontaneous combustion   1
Static electricity   2
Unknown     19
Defective  chimney    4
Incendiary    1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Sparks from chimney   3
Sparks from furnace  1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1.
Unknown     9
Ashes against wood  1
Exposure  1
Furnace insufficiently protected   1
Match carelessness  _  1.
Matches, children with   .1
Smokers' carelessness   3
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from engine   1
Sparks from mill burner   1
Spontaneous combustion    1
Unknown     5
Boiler  insufficiently protected  „  1
Exposure     1
Match carelessness   1
Sparks from boiler   1
Sparks from mill burner  2
Sparks from  motor   1
Unknown     1
Defective oil-burner   1
Unknown    _  2
Unknown    _  1
Defective oil connection   1
Defective wiring   1
Hot bolt fell into barrel   1
Short Circuit  1
Sparks from acetylene welder  6
Sparks from boiler   1
Sparks from smelting^pot   1
Spontaneous combustion   2
Amount of Loss.
$79
3,992
3
434
50
10
496
$500
95,858
330
14,000
95,518
440
2,422
8,185
1,131
7,000
550
5,400
524
77
366
375,593
$1,599
20,586
9
88,402
1,871
361
31,821
$150
100
47
65
100
845
350
75
3
100
930
$100
10
573
1,750
2,329
80
3,027
$2,000
15
10
100
275
100
46
100
$8,176
607,894
144,649
2.765
7,869
5,530
60,218
200 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1929.
G 21
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount
of Loss.
1
$25
3
7,015
$9,686
1
Spontaneous combustion 	
1
31,767
1
1
2
$7,637
22
Stores  	
93
Coal-gas  explosion  	
1
13,205
1
1
1
3
150
5
17,015
Electrical  appliances 	
Exposure   	
22
63,862
B-ire-crackers  	
3
54
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected
2
824
Gasoline carelessness 	
1
347
"
1
4,131
1
2,246
1
379
Rubbish too near stove 	
2
633
Short circuit 	
2
93
30
138,869
2
38
1
6
2,981
25,905
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected	
1
13
1
10
•
8
18,833
297,235
Stores and apartments 	
...     14
1
$130
Clothes too near stove 	
1
2
1
572
1
1
51
26
1
1
1,561
7
Match carelessness 	
1
80
Oil-furnace back-firing 	
1
157
1
15
?.
328
Thawing  pipes   	
1
315
1
599
3,843
Stores and dwellings 	
..     34
Ashes against wood 	
1
$285
Candle  carelessness  	
1
30
Curtains from stove 	
1
20
1
5,946
1
82
1
105
9
63,612
1
5
1
2,019
Grease on stove 	
1
6,000
1
82
3
515
4
1,259
Sparks from fireplace 	
2
23
1
3,679
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected	
3
4,177
2
3,076
90,915
Stores and offices 	
..     18
Alcohol ignited by hot soldering-iron 	
1
$8
1
1
44
1,170
1
250
2
3,122 G 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES— Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Stores, offices, and rooms
Stores and rooms
Wharves
Wood-working plants
36
Swimming-pools     1
Theatres   5
Tug-boats   3
Veneer-panelling plants   2
Warehouses  22
Totals 2,386
Friction in drying-machine   1
Pitch being melted,  ignited   1
Short circuit   1
Smokers' carelessness  6
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from chimney  1
Spontaneous combustion   1
Exposure     1
Furnace insufficiently protected  :  1
Smokers' carelessness   2
Ashes against wood   1
Defective boiler  1
Defective fireplace  1
Defective furnace  1
Defective stove  1
Electrical appliances    2
Exposure :  3
B'ire-crackers  1
Matches, mice with   1
Short circuit   1
Smokers' carelessness   14
Sparks from stove  1
Spontaneous  combustion    2
Stove explosion   1
Stove insufficiently protected  1
Unknown  3
Wood too near stove   1
Smokers' carelessness  1
Defective film    4
Exposure  1
Short circuit   1
Unknown     2
Sparks from boiler   1
Static electricity   1
Ashes against wood   2
Defective   chimney  1
Defective wiring   1
Exposure     2
Gasoline carelessness   1
Matches, children with   1
Overheated asphalt   1
Smokers' carelessness   2
Sparks from bush fire  ,  1
Sparks from chimney  ......  1
Sparks from furnace  1
Spontaneous combustion ,  1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected  3
Unknown  4
Sparks from mill burner   1
Unknown  1
Defective stove  1
Sparks from chimney   1
  2,386
$21
24
2,245
10,852
50
30
11,732
$7,219
15,712
38,027
$1,064
8,499
$15,500
9,200
$234
12,013
$5,982
202
10
25,027
4,791
2,400
58,038
666
4,218
10
7
22,714
12,153
139,065
$25
95,155
121
$29,548
60,958
63,552
303
9,563
24,700
12,247
275,283
95,180
189
$4,190,100 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1929.
G 23
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CO G 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE VI.—LOSS OF LIFE, 1925-29.
Occupancy.
Cause of Fire.
Loss of Life.
Adults.
Children.
1
1
1
1
1
Totals, 1929	
5
16
8
8
5
Totals, 1928 :	
Totals,  1927	
4
Totals, 1926	
10
Totals,  1925	
4
VIOTOKIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Bakfibld. Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1930.
825-630-358

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