Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THIRTIETH REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING FIFTEENTH REPORT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1927]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0228032.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0228032.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0228032-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0228032-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0228032-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0228032-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0228032-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0228032-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0228032-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0228032.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIRTIETH REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
FIFTEENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30TH, 1926, AND THE FIFTY-FOURTH REPORT OF VITAL
STATISTICS DEPARTMENT, BEING A SUMMARY
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1925
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chahi.es F.  Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1926.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1926.
To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended June 30th, 1926.
WILLIAM SLOAN,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Boabd of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1926.
The Honourable William, Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sib,—I have the honour to submit the Thirtieth Annual Report of the Provincial Board of
Health.
Public health is quite as important as any branch of work conducted by the State. It influences fundamentally social and economic life. Its benefits extend to all and are not limited to
those of any class or age. Its aim is to prevent disease, to improve environment, and to protect
and conserve life and health.
The Provincial Board of Health has concern in human affairs not only from the cradle to
the grave, but its work and records extend from prenatal life to. the writing of mortuary
statistics.
Conditions favourable for the enjoyment of good health are the right of all our people, and
it becomes the duty of the State to provide safeguards against preventable disease and to contribute its share towards maintaining for its citizens the highest physical efficiency. If it supports this policy it will contribute much to the comfort, well-being, and happiness of all.
Recognizing the above as the fundamentals of the policy of the Provincial Board of Health,
we are confronted with the task of convincing the public that to carry out to a fruition the
purposes of the Board we must secure their co-operation.
We must acknowledge there is much to be attained and there still remains, as we all realize,
a tremendous task to be performed. The progress that is marked from year to year is not
spectacular. We appreciate the fact that progress in getting across to the people a knowledge of
the fundamental principles of hygiene is slow, yet by comparison with previous stages we are able
to demonstrate that progress is being made. And while it is difficult to describe this progress in
a material way by fixing a financial value, which is the usual way of marking progress in human
events, yet we know from continued contact with different organizations, with representatives of
the medical profession, and with results obtained through Government agencies that the public
mind is being slowly and surely influenced to the value of the work of the Provincial and
Municipal Boards of Health.
There is an awakening of a very satisfactory proportion of the people to the importance of
health-work and to its possibilities. Not in a theoretical direction, but as demonstrated by
actual accomplishment.
We are endeavouring to demonstrate by actual accomplishment the fact that we are alive to
the duty of the State in providing conditions favourable for the enjoyment of good health. In
.order to bring about such results we have to take into account the introduction of means for
prevention of disease and also to safeguard the environment of the people in order that their
surroundings will not militate against the good effects following adoption of means for prevention.
We are gradually extending our work along these lines and I have to report improvement,
and more particularly so in regard to the attitude of the voluntary organizations. The co-operation which we are receiving in the different phases of our work is such as to convince us that
the loaf has been leavened, and suggestions made by the Board of Health in regard to means to be
adopted are being accepted and given effect to. We attribute the progress made in this respect
very largely to the establishment of oifr Public Health Nursing Service.
In our two former reports we published full reports from leading health centres and we have
to report a continued increase to the extension of our work. We have now twenty-six nurses in
the field, not counting our school nurses in the larger centres.
The interest that the nursing profession at large is showing in this work, as evidenced by the
inquiries at the University in regard to the Public Health Nursing Course, is, we consider, a
distinct step in advance. Nurses are realizing that there is being created a market for their
services and a market that stands with the Government as an organization behind it, and that M 6
British Columbia.
1926
is becoming understood and more and more endorsed by the general public. This change of
opinion, that is shown by the interest taken by the nurses in the work, has been largely brought
about by the influence of those nurses who during the past five years have been taking the course
at the University, of whom many have remained in British Columbia and are filling our positions
not only with the Public Health Nursing Service, but with the Victorian Order.
The difficulties incidental to the establishment of such a service are being overcome, the
scope of the work is being enlarged, and as the development proceeds the nurses are unconsciously learning that real success can only be obtained by utilizing every avenue of approach
toward the formation of a curriculum, the object of which is the establishment of " health
habits." In other words, they are learning that a better balance in health services can be
maintained by generalization than by specialization, and it is the realization of this that is doing
more to put the work across with the general public than where the public-health work is
divided into specialties, with a nurse in each. The generalization of the service, as evidenced
by the work in the home, brings directly to the people the real meaning of public hygiene.
The medical examination of our school-children which has been in force in British Columbia
for the past twelve years was the first step in an endeavour to reach the home. Primarily
instituted for the benefit of the children, yet it was only after the adoption of the follow-up work
by the Public Health Nurse that the real effect of the legislation is being accomplished, and the
people are being taught, and are rapidly learning, that the number of defects which are being
reported by us annually as being discovered in the scholars do not originate in the schools, but
that the trouble begins in the pre-school age, and our Public Health Nursing Service is based
on the pre-natal and pre-school work. Complete records are kept of the child for the pre-school
period and then during its school-life these records are continued. So that when a child leaves
school, in each district where there is a nurse, there is a complete record of the mental and
physical condition. In the future such statistics will be of inestimable value to the scholar when
he is seeking employment and in many other ways.
We believe that we have adopted in British Columbia a very sound policy in regard to the
placing of the nurses. This policy is that the work will be developed by local support through
taxation, and in order to assist this an amendment was made to the Education Act whereby the
appointment of the nurse is placed on the same basis as the appointment of the teacher to the
school staff. The grant from the Government towards the salary of the nurse is the same as
to the teacher, being $580 a year, the balance being made up by taxes enforced through the School
Board. They are truly teachers and we prefer to call them public-health teachers rather than
public-health nurses.
We have not as yet been obliged to remove a nurse from any district, but we have been hard
put to it at times to find nurses to increase staffs in districts where the nurses are established.
The dental department of the Public Health Nursing Service has proved eminently satisfactory. We give a grant for the first thorough examination of all pupils in the district, and then
the services of the dentist are obtained to begin the actual work. The dentist, as regards
Government assistance, comes under the same category as the Public Health Nurse, receiving
the same grant and the balance is made up by the local School Board. We have found, however,
that, after the work is established and a large number of the cases found have been attended to,
the work becomes self-supporting. Parents are supposed to pay full fees if they can, or part fees.
Indigents receive the treatment free through the grant, but the fees received together with the
grant make this work self-supporting. The Provincial Board wishes to thank the Dental Association for the hearty co-operation we have received in this respect.
I will refer briefly to the different branches of the Department.
Infectious Diseases.
Last year we were under the necessity of reporting a severe criticism on British Columbia
by the enactment of a ban against our chief commercial city, Vancouver, on account of smallpox.
We dealt with this in our last report in regard to the support which we had received from the
various civic bodies and business firms, and were under the necessity of expressing, probably
freely, our opinion of the lack of co-operation which we had received. There was an entire lack
of realization of the seriousness of the action of the United States, and unfortunately the chief
effort on the part of most of the organizations and business-men was to try and hide the fact
that we were suffering from a condition that approached a serious epidemic. Portable Camp. Duncan Bay.
-$v*
4
m     |
South-east Kootenay.    Camp In winter.  17 Geo. 5 Board of Health. M 7
In the face of very active propaganda in Vancouver and the capital city of Victoria, we
succeeded in securing the vaccination of 60 per cent, of the school-children. This, with the
large number of people who had been vaccinated during the war, and also those who realized
that vaccination was a full preventive of smallpox, has placed us in a very good position, and we
are pleased to report that this year there have been only 98 cases, against 1,014 last year.
Owing to outbreaks in Los Angeles and Seattle of epidemics of a very virulent type of smallpox, we were extremely anxious for a time at the beginning of the summer that conditions might
arise similar to those existing last year. However, owing to the immediate action taken by the
United States authorities at both these places and the splendid co-operation of the business
interests, the epidemics were speedily stamped out.
After the raising of the ban by the United States there was a remarkable change in public
opinion, especially amongst the business interests. They realized in terms of money what the
ban had meant, and they went to the other extreme and asked that the Provincial Board of
Health would enact regulations that would prevent the employment of anybody unless they were
vaccinated. We recognized that this would have been impossible to carry out, but previous to
the raising of the ban we had taken up with the large mining interests in British Columbia
the necessity of them insisting upon their employees being vaccinated. We met with a ready
and favourable response.
Following this, we approached the officials of the Canadian Pacific Railway and pointed out
that their employees were probably more exposed than any other branch of business from the
fact that they were in constant touch with the public, and they were in greater danger of being
carriers of disease than others. After considerable correspondence and consultation on the part
of the company with their legal advisers, they finally agreed, and instructed their heads of
departments that " before being accepted for service, any applicant desiring to enter the service
in an employment which brings him or her into direct contact with the travelling public must
either undergo vaccination or produce a certificate of successful vaccination within the preceding
twelve months."
Immediately on receipt of this the matter was laid before the Manager of Western Lines of
the Canadian National Railway, and an immediate response was received in which the General
Manager said that he wished to advise Us that we might expect similar co-operation from his
company in the matter and enclosed us copy of a general order which had been sent out to the
heads of departments.
We think that this has been one of the greatest advances that we have made along the lines
of preventing disease. .The fact that these two large companies, the largest employers of labour
in Canada, have made this ruling will be an argument hard to answer when other employers are
approached.
A table of infectious diseases reported during the year is incorporated in this report, and the
regional report of diseases is as follows:—
Chicken-pox.—Coalmont and New Denver District.
Influenza.—Ashcroft, Creston and District, and Williams Lake and District.
Measles.—Burnaby Municipality, Edgewood District, Kimberley, Nelson, and Trail.
Mumps.—Greenwood and District, New Denver District, MeBride, Pitt Meadows Municipality, Smithers and District, and Trail.
Smallp ox.—Wynndel.
Typhoid.—Wycliffe.
Whooping-cough.—Agassiz, Creston, New Denver District, and Courtenay District.
Tuberculosis.
We are making good progress in the continuation of our campaign against tuberculosis.
A full report from our Tuberculosis Officer is appended, and it will be seen from perusal of this
report that the Government of British Columbia is very much alive to existing conditions, and is
adopting satisfactory means to meet the present conditions.
Venereal Clinics.
The results that we have obtained from our work in the venereal clinics, which are in their
sixth year, have been most gratifying. It is difficult to check improvements in such affairs unless
we have some specific body to deal with, and such we have, in this case, in our Mental Hospital. We did not anticipate being able to note any change in regard, to the cases at our Mental Hospital
for at least ten years, or probably fifteen years.
When we began, we had made a careful survey of our large Mental Hospital and found that,
at a very low estimate and counting only cases of acquired disease, there were 10 per cent,
affected. This did not take into account any congenital cases as we wished to be on the
safe side.
The report issued 'by the Mental Hospital for the past year refers to the marked change in
the percentage of cases of acquired syphilis during the year. The Superintendent places the
number at 5 per cent, as against 10 per cent., and attributes the change to the work that is
being done in our clinics.
This is definite information, and when you consider the cost of the upkeep of the eases in
the Asylum and the economic loss of these people to the community, and also the great expense
that is entailed by the support of their dependents, we have made a large saving to the taxpayers
at the small cost of maintaining the clinics. In addition, as I mentioned in my last report, the
drug trade report that the sale of patent remedies for these cases is rapidly reaching the zero
point, but also point out that there is a great increase in the sale of remedies that may be used
for prophylaxis.
Laboratories.
The best barometer of the increase in our work is the increase in the work of our laboratories.
We have now five laboratories and are proceeding with the amalgamation of the Laboratory at
our Sanatorium with the Laboratory in the adjacent city of Kamloops, in order to promote a
greater opportunity for research-work and to increase laboratory facilities for the Interior of the
Provfhce.
We are receiving co-operation from the municipalities, who are recognizing that the work
is being carried out in such a systematic manner and with lower cost to themselves, and also
that they are appreciating the results. They are manifesting their co-operation by helping us in
every way, and particularly in increasing the amounts of their grants.
In connection with the laboratory-work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out free on request,
and for the year ended June 30th, 1926, the following have been furnished: 7,560 points smallpox
vaccine, 3,935,000 units diphtheria antitoxin, 10 packages diphtheria toxin antitoxin, 9 packages
Schick test for diphtheria, 70 packages 10 cc. scarlet fever antitoxin, 74 packages 2% cc. scarlet
fever antitoxin, 29 packages Dick test for scarlet fever, 344 doses typhoid vaccine, 80,000 units
tetanus antitoxin, and 4 packages anti-strep, serum.
Sanitation.
The report from our Sanitary Inspector will give a very good general idea of the scope of
the work which is being carried on by the Department. We have in British Columbia a State,
body of police known as the Provincial Police, each member of which has been appointed as
Sanitary Inspector in his district, and the success that we are having in dealing with our lumber
and mining camps and canneries, especially in the outlying districts where such operations are
away from the municipalities and organized bodies, has been remarkable, and I would like in
passing to pay a sincere tribute to the very efficient manner in which the police have carried
on their duties, the courteous way in which they have dealt with the people, the thoroughness
of their enforcement of the Sanitary Regulations, and not only the splendid results they have
obtained, but particularly the respect which they have earned for their competence amongst
the people.
Owing to our climatic conditions our people are an outdoor people, and for thousands of
miles along our sea-coast there are unlimited numbers of places suitable for camping and for
summer resorts, and these places are being taken full advantage of. This, of course, brings
us face to face with the sanitation of these points, and I would recommend again to the Honourable the Provincial Secretary that the Provincial Board of Health receive the fullest co-operation
of the Government in regard to the definite policy which we have laid down and which will
enable us to control the situation. Not only is our own population concerned, but, with the
enormous increase of the motor traffic owing to the scenic attractions of our Province and also
with the opening-up of new roads in order to facilitate such traffic, new problems are arising
every day. The majority of the people are controlled, as sufficient facilities are furnished, but
there is a certain percentage who are very difficult to deal with as they bring their tents and Mountain Camp, 3,000 feet elevation, Goliath Bay, Jervis Inlet.
Mining Camp, 4,750 feet elevation, Slocan.  17 Geo. 5 Board op Health. M 9
make roadside camps. There is the danger from the insanitary condition which arises and also
from forest fires. Our problems in this respect do not differ from those of the States to the
south of us, but there is an accord between the health authorities on the Pacific Coast to bring
about uniformity of action and we feel that we are improving greatly in this respect.
In carrying out the work we are pleased and honoured to again express our thanks to the
women's organizations of British Columbia. The Women's Institutes, which are probably the
strongest and with the largest membership, are making health-work their main object and are
doing magnificent work in supporting the Provincial Board of Health. We have under way the
establishment of a Solarium for crippled children. When we determined upon the establishment
of the Solarium we determined to make it a public institution organized by and supported by
the people. The Women's Institutes immediately took charge and have raised sufficient money
to build the 'first unit, which will be opened during the present season by Sir Henry Gauvain,
who has done such magnificent work in the treatment of children by heliotherapy (sunshine).
I take great pleasure in publishing a full report of the work as carried out to date, and I think
that in reading this you will agree that the Women's Institutes of British Columbia are building
a monument commensurate with their intentions of making the home and child the great object
of their work.
I referred to this in my report last year, and a comparison of the work done for the Solarium
at that time with what we are aible to report this year will show that the Women's Institutes
certainly can accomplish large undertakings when they give effect to the co-operation of effort
which is so markedly one of their chief attributes.
If you will refer to the Report on Medical Inspection of Schools you will find a full report
furnished me by Dr. Wace, the Honorary Secretary of the Queen Alexandra Solarium, descriptive
of the whole project.
Cemetery-sites approved.—Burnaby (Ocean View Cemetery extension), Colwood, Houston,
Point Grey (Sacred Heart Convent), Victoria (new Christ Church Cathedral), Kent Municipality
(Odd Fellows), Alert Bay  (United Church), Clo-ooser and Westbank.
Sewage-disposal Systems approved.—Vancouver (extension), Trail (extension), South Vancouver (extension), North Burnaby, Port Haney, North Vancouver City (extensions), Lytton
Indian Industrial School, and Point Grey (extensions).
Water-supply Systems approved.—New Westminster (alteration), Salmon Arm (extension),
Merritt (alteration), Port Moody (extension), South Vancouver (extension), Nelson (5-Mile
Creek supply), Britannia Beach (Daisy and Thistle Creeks supply), Burna'by (extensions and
improvements), Trail  (extension), and Armstrong  (reconstruction and repair).
I beg leave to ask, sir, for your consideration for increased accommodation for our Department. Our Vital Statistics Branch is showing a wonderful growth and the full report of their
activities is appended. We are also appending a full report of the Medical Inspection of Schools,
and I think any one reading it will find it very interesting in the demonstration that we are
able to give of the improvements.
We have a large and growing work, and while it entails many demands upon us, yet we
feel that we are making very good progress, and I must attribute the fact that we are able to
carry on so well to the splendid co-operation on the part of my staff. No request is neglected
and overtime work is given cheerfully. I have great satisfaction in reporting the great interest
they take in their work.    It is a pleasure to carry on with them.
I would also like, sir, to express, for myself and staff, appreciation of the co-operation
which we receive from yourself. It is very encouraging indeed to find our head evincing such an
active interest in our work, not perfunctorily, but always with an idea of understanding the
policies and details of the Department and lending to our success your help and encouragement.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG, M.D., CM.,
Provincial Health Officer. M 10
British Columbia.
1926
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE PROVINCE.
"3
c   .
OS
o
P.
c
ii
o
ci
,fl
5
06
ft
11
as,
d
a
fl
Qfl
B
0
u
p.
Oi
in
p.
E
1
Oi
>
0i
0i
"u
a
0
CO
1
bj3^
•g,e
1
0
P.
Is
X
2
J3
"fl
O
fl
H
T3
'0 ^
p.=>
it,
'5 j
0 .fl
0 t«
£8
1
56
50
66
5
25
26
1
1
50
5
27
1
1
1
1
1
2
12
Bella Bella	
1
'2
1
42
127
'26'
5
io
52
0
279
11
63
4
3
64
2
3
15
2
2
2
1
17
1
15
20
6
1
4
2
4
0
1
1
2
1
1
10
14
10
3
5
1
10
1
3
4
1
6
3
18
5
2
3
90
22
3
1
10
3
32
8
1
1
5
31
15
3
15
1
21
23
1
7
5
5
1
18
50
15
36
10
17
25
2
3
2
9
41
5
4
1
15
5
2
1
2
1
2
7
Field	
6
6
2
2
2
22
20
1
10
6
12
75
10
1
3
10
10
9
3
2S
4
4
4
5
2
90
3
13
14
23
13
2
15
"3
150
1
5
9
15
48
3
10
1
1
2
5
6
2
24
4
2
25
1
2
3
8
20
7
8
40
6
62
4
151
196
20
1
4
7
2
3
40
20
79
12
10
67
8
2
6
37
6
1
163
23
4
21
14
11
2
3
14
1
29
61
50
55
6
5
1
1
"i"
2
"2
3
1
3
1
74
52
1
82
"2'
1
1
65
38
1
2
2
1
67
13
2
50
5
8
39
216
6
4
10
31
43
8
2
1
20
25
7
3
12
1
8
23
8
28
1
12
1
30
90
3
1,052
1
3
1
'50
15
10
1
3
6
15
1
24
30
6
3
75
32
50
1
3
1
10
44
9
612
•7'
5
1
19
90
4
124
1
5
217
1
2
75
60
917
1,363
67
951 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 11
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE
PROVINCE—Contimed.
"3
a   .
'§**-§
S c
£'1
OJ ^
os
o
G.
c
ii
.0
'.fl
O
S3
CJ
I
Q
124
oi
u
a
l
'£ >.
1 g
'c ^
5
c3
fl
C
247
o
u
U.
cj
1
0)
Oi
oj
g.
P
0i
>
0)
6*
4J>
Oi
et
w
612
2
2
5
7
1
10
'S.0
2
o
£•
Is
B
in
75
p
OJ
,0
fl
60
2
>, 0J
67
to
fl
°-?
o be
.fl fl
4
917
1,052
1,363
951
10
1
1
4
4
1
1
150
1
12
12
5
1
60
2
1
3
202
2
1
36
79
28
411
4
101
5
840
58
18
363
11
5
160
12
8
62
16
1
2
2
1
140
1
2
17
3
1
28
7
i'
36
12
288
2
1
57
31
2
123
13
6
28
78
78
5
31
34
12
2
2,913
2
96
4
52
l
1
13
2
200
264
5
84
3
998
7
447
2
98
278
109
Totals	
6
1,384
375
34
1
1,931
1,390 M 12
British Columbia.
1926
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1926.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Sixteenth Annual Report of the work undertaken by
this branch of your Department during the year just closed.
Briefly outlining our work alphabetically, I must commence with the auto tourist camper.
The visiting auto tourist is rapidly becoming a source of anxiety to Health Officers outside the
cities. The invasion by a few hundred has now jumped to thousands, with no sign of
diminishment.
The establishment of many properly equipped auto tourist camps in the populated districts
is helpful, but the serious problem for Police-Sanitary Officers throughout the vast unorganized
territory of British Columbia is how best to deal with the selfish and careless auto tourists who
camp at the most convenient place without sanction or leave, and make a stay of a few hours
or days without proper sanitary conveniences and very often without sufficient caution with
their camp-fires.
Canneries.
The food canning and preserving establishments of British Columbia now number over 200
and are increasing with an ever-ready market awaiting their products, which rank amongst the
highest in the world markets for purity and flavour. It may here be stated that there is
absolutely no chemical or artificial means employed in the production of British Columbia's
canned food. Our regulations governing these establishments demand purity and freshness of
good's, with strictly clean handling and sanitary surroundings.
The canneries are subject to frequent inspection, and it may be said with pleasure that every
canneryman welcomes and co-operates with the Inspector to bring about the desired cleanliness
and sanitation.
Before concluding with canneries it might be mentioned that dealing with the immense
schools of pilchard which invade the waters of the west coast of Vancouver Island for several
months in the year, some sixteen plants involving millions in dollars have recently been established, giving employment to a large number of our people and promising a rich dividend to
the operators. Every part of the fish is used fresh from the ocean. Oil and meal are the result,
with an eager market awaiting in the Orient and Europe. At this writing thousands of tons
of pilchard products are being exported.
The process of extracting oil and meal from pilchards is brought about by mechanical
cookers and extractors. The industry is in its infancy and to the visitor the smell is an abomination and nearly every plant can be detected miles away by the odour. It should be remembered,
however, that these plants are located upon the isolated west coast where nearly all of the
inhabitants are more or less employed in fish establishments and become immune to the smell.
In the meantime the pilchard operators are spending thousands to eliminate all smell and waste
through chemical and centrifugal means. In one or two cases pleasing results have been
obtained, which are being noted preparatory to the framing of such regulations governing the
pilchard industry from a sanitary or nuisance standpoint.
Logging and Mining Camps.
The logging and mining development has reached such proportions as to overshadow all
other industries in British Columbia.
The camps employ from a score to thousands per camp. The Kimberley Mining Camp is one
of the marvels of the age, and, besides being a good producer in dividends, its owners are far-
sighted enough to spend money and thought to produce a contented, healthy, and happy people Oceanic Cannery, Northern Coast.
Fisherman's   Camp,   Caulfeild.  Orion Fish Products Co., West Coast, Vancouver Island.
■■■
'":' ' ' ,....:>.:
■■
Bunk-houses, Comox Lumber and R.R. Co.  17 Geo. 5 Board of Health. M 13
around its vast workings. Nothing but the best modern plumbing is permitted on its properties,
either for industrial or housing. A modern hospital, two highly trained physicians, staff of
nurses, welfare officers, and ample provision for recreation and amusement are provided. I am
not citing Kimberley as our best camp, but simply to show the trend of our successful operators
in recognizing the value of healthy surroundings and outlook for the physical and mental welfare of their employees. Britannia, Anyox, Trail, Powell Biver, Ocean Falls, and Woodfibre are
all examples of the value of industrial peace through the mediumship of co-operative welfare-
work.
Some of the British Columbia logging camps are built on the community basis, with large
bunk-houses accommodating 100 to 200 men. Others prefer the small individual two-men shack.
The dining-rooms are all large and well ventilated and the food is the best procurable.
In starting new logging camps, operators are often so anxious to get their camp close to the
timber that they overlook fresh water and drainage facilities. With the larger companies the
tendency is to provide portable camp buildings which may be moved from time to time on
railway-trucks. These camps are well kept and sickness is rare. Virgin country and open-air
employment is no doubt an important contributing factor.
The matter of camp inspection along the coast-line of British Columbia is not an easy one.
In former days they were located on or near the foreshore, but as the best coast-line timber is
being removed, camps are now located many miles back, near to or in the virgin forest, which
often entails a long climb for the inspecting official.
One very promising mining camp on the northern part of Vancouver Island is only 14 miles
from tide-water, yet with its elevation and trails through the forest means a day's travel.
Seaside Summer Camps.
This year seems to be a banner year for those of our younger generation who are able to
vacate the cities for recreation or rest at many seaside resorts. Ideal climatic conditions and
generally good sanitary arrangements are mainly responsible for a season without any reported
infections or other sickness. Ninety per cent, of these resorts are outside incorporated limits
and are thus directly under the jurisdiction of the Provincial Board of Health. These camps
are visited frequently and health notices posted in conspicuous places.
Watersheds.
The Sanitary Regulations provided especially for watersheds are undoubtedly responsible
for the absence of water-borne diseases in British Columbia. The regulations are being enforced
not only by the municipalities affected, but by this branch of your Department. Applications are
being considered for the extension of these regulations to embrace further territory where there
exists any possibility of contamination.
Nuisances.
The abatement of nuisances throughout the year is probably the most arduous work of this
office and covers such a scope that to enumerate would entail too much ink and time. Some are
extremely petty and others most serious, and each must be dealt with, carefully. The deciding
factor is, of course, the safeguarding of public health. As an example, one good citizen in the
Upper Country complains about a neighbour's chickens and probably the same day we are
informed of another man's expensively constructed well being polluted by a broken sewer-pipe.
If variety is the spice of life, we are surely getting the spice.
It is gratifying to note the improved toilet and sanitary devices being adopted by steamship
and railway lines, also by those responsible for hotels and public stations. Soap dispensers,
sanitary towels, deoderizers, and disinfectants ensure to a marked degree the comfort and
safety of the travelling public.
I could not conclude without remarking on the extreme courtesy and help extended to me by
municipal and Provincial officers whilst on duty in their respective districts.
I have, etc.,
F. DeGrey, ,
Chief Sanitary Inspector. M 14
British Columbia.
1926
COMBINED REPORT OF TRAVELLING MEDICAL HEALTH OFFICER AND
INSPECTOR OF HOSPITALS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1926.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Third Annual Report as Travelling Health
Officer and Inspector of Hospitals for the Province.
The work as Travelling Medical Health Officer has been carried on in much the same manner
as in the former two years; that is, by notifying the doctors by mail in advance of my intended
visit, and seeing cases only as referred to me by the family physician. The district and school
nurses were also notified at this time and were encouraged to make arrangements for any cases
to come to me in the same way. When this was not practicable I examined the cases and if any
trouble was found a report was sent to the family doctor.
A clinic was held at the Vernon Public School, at which parents were encouraged to accompany their children. This was arranged by the school nurse and advantage was taken of the
opportunity to give a short talk to the parents on the method of prevention of tuberculosis,
particular emphasis being given to the care of the undernourished child.
The clinics held in Nanaimo on the first week of every third month, and which were started
last year, have been continued this year with increasing interest on the part of the doctors and
citizens. The X-ray facilities furnished by the Hospital Committee of the Western Fuel Company and operated by the Drs. Hall were liberally used at very small expense to the patients.
Several afternoon clinics have been held at the Saanich Health Centre, as was done last
year on my visits to Victoria, these cases being brought in by the district nurses in charge of
that institution.
Because of the increasing number of cases referred to me by the medical profession of
Victoria, I have felt that there was an opportunity here for the establishment of a clinic at
regular intervals, as in Nanaimo. This has been endorsed by the Victoria Medical Society, and
at the present time there is a prospect of a building being constructed in connection with the
Royal Jubilee Hospital for this purpose. The Hospital Board and the Executive have kindly
offered the use of the X-ray facilities, including technician and nurses, providing some arrangement be made for reimbursing them for the films used.
The local Bed Cross Society has generously offered to take care of this expense for one year,
so I feel that the prospects of arranging this clinic in the near future are very good indeed.
Owing to my additional work as Hospital Inspector, and other matters which will be referred
to later, I have not covered all the ground of previous years. That part still to be visited
includes the district along the Canadian National Railway from Prince Rupert eastward. The
larger centres, however, have been covered twice and in many instances three times.
In spite of the fact that the area covered was not so extensive, you will see by comparing
this report with those of the two previous years that there has been an appreciable increase in
the number of cases examined of all classes of cases. In all, there have been 426 examinations
on 390 persons (36 being re-examinations), and of these 198 were males and 192 females. Of
these 390, I have classed 155 as being positively tubercular, 66 as suspects, and 169 as non-
tubercular. Of the latter, 22 were contacts; that is, persons examined because of being in more
or less intimate contact with open tubercular cases.
As in former years, the .positive cases included every variety of case from the early to the
far advanced. I was asked to advise not only as to diagnosis, but also as to disposal and future
treatment.
Among those classed as non-tubercular were a large number of cases which we speak of as
suffering from mixed infection—basal chest conditions with moist rales and cough—but which
without confirmation through positive sputum we are not justified in classing as tubercular.
This type of case seems to be on the increase during the past few years.
The suspects include many children of school age, referred on account of undernourishment
or debilitated condition, and would include some of those classed as contacts.   These are the 17 Geo. 5
cases which could best be taken care of in a preventorium, at least where home surroundings are
not of the best.
In classifying these cases as to nationality, 125 were born in British Columbia, 115 in other
parts of Canada, 105 in the British Isles, 15 in the United States, and the remainder belonging
to other nationalities.
The Educational Part of This Work.
While the number of meetings held was much less than last year, sixteen in all, we were
able to reach some important bodies—namely, nurses in training; Public Health Nursing class
of the University of British Columbia; high-school pupils; C.G.I.T.'s; health section of the
Board of Trade of Vancouver; Public Health Nursing Council of Nanaimo, which was one of
our best meetings; Victoria Medical Society; Women's Institutes ; and the Tubercular Veterans'
Association of Victoria. The last-mentioned meeting, at which Dr. Young was chairman, was
well attended and was also addressed by Dr. Baillie and Dr. Wace.
In addition to the above, I accepted an invitation and gave an address before the Anti-
Tuberculosis Society of the State of Washington in convention at Bellingham, giving an outline
of what was being done in British Columbia to combat tuberculosis.
Indian Survey.
An outstanding feature in the campaign against tuberculosis is the survey that has been
carried on during the summer among the Pacific Coast Indians. This has been conducted under
the joint auspices of the Federal Department of Indian Affairs and the Canadian Tuberculosis
Association working through a Provincial Advisory Committee, of which Dr. Young is chairman.
The investigation was carried on in three sections—one at Bella Bella, one at Alert Bay, and
the third among the canneries at the mouth of the Skeena—and covered in all something in
excess of 700 Indians.
As a representative of the Provincial Health Department, I accompanied Drs. Hill and
Vrooman and assisted in the physical and X-ray examinations of cases at the two latter places
in order to get first-hand information as to actual conditions among the people. A report on
this will be published later.
Hospital Inspection.
As Hospital Inspector, a position conferred on me the first of the year, I have inspected
some forty-six public hospitals, as well as twenty-five private institutions.
I felt that, in addition to inspecting the buildings as to sanitation, fire hazard, and numerous
other things, I also should meet with Hospital Boards at their regular meetings if possible, but,
if not, at meetings called for that purpose. There have been nineteen such meetings; where
full Board meetings could not be obtained a meeting of the executive or a committee from the
Board was held, making-twenty additional meetings.
New hospitals have been opened at Trail and Greenwood, the former a model of all the
latest in equipment and conveniences. The unique part, however, is the heating and ventilation
arrangements. Air is delivered to all parts of the hospital after being washed and heated or
cooled to the desired temperature. Nanaimo has a new hospital in course of construction. The
Campbell River Hospital has reopened, as well as that at Smithers. Many additions and improvements have been made to others.
To my mind a very important change is the improved attitude of Hospital Boards towards
tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. Several hospitals have made some provision for such
cases, notably the new units at St. Joseph's, Victoria, and the Royal Columbian, New Westminster, for tuberculosis;  while others have under advisement changes to meet the situation.
In spite of all these and the proposed addition at the Vancouver General Hospital, the
demand for Sanatorium accommodation is and will be greater than our present facilities. So
much is this the case that complaints of lack of accommodation are not confined to the medical
profession, but extend to lay organizations as well.
In co-operation with Mr. Baird, Inspector of Municipalities, we met as a Board of Arbitration
under the amendments to the " Hospital Act" on March 1st in Victoria; at this meeting
representations from both hospitals and municipalities were made to us re liability for certain cases admitted to hospitals. Many minor decisions have been made by us from time to time,
and it is a matter of satisfaction to both, I think, that we were always able to come to unanimous
decisions.
To the doctors and the nurses throughout the Province, as well as to the different organizations that have assisted in carrying on our educational propaganda, I wish to express my hearty
appreciation of their helpful suggestions and their hearty co-operation.
I have, etc.,
A. S. Lamb, M.D.,
Travelling Medical Health Officer and Inspector of Hospitals.
■~i*m" 17 Geo. 5 • Board of Health. M 17
REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1926.
The Honourable William, Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg to hand you the Fifteenth Annual Report of the Medical Inspection of
Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
Probably the most interesting part of our Annual Report is the appended report of the
results of the medical examinations of the school-children. We are- constantly in receipt of
requests for copies of the report, and we are informed that at many meetings the subject-matter
of the report on the local school is taken up and discussions take place on what should be done
in regard to the existing defects.
On the face of it there are a very great number of defects, but we must remember that there
is a very large school population being added each year, and the principal number of defects
are found in the entering class. The opportunities that are being given to the parents to have
these corrected are being taken advantage of, but while this is being done, yet the continual
access of new cases with defects would make it appear as if very little change is taking place.
In regard to the pre-school age, this period of the child-life has always been neglected, but
the people are beginning to realize that what we report to them in regard to prevention of these
defects would in a large measure secure a better result for the entering class than if they are
allowed to go on without attention until an examination is made after they enter the school,
and our Public Health Nursing work is so guided as to begin the work on the child immediately
after birth. For two years they are carefully watched and then they enter into the second
group, which we call the pre-school age. Through our baby clinics the defects which are
beginning are pointed out to the mother, advice is given, and then they are urged to consult
their family physician in order that these defects may be corrected. This is being done more
and more, and, as is pointed out in another portion of our Annual Report, we have established
and are carrying out a plan whereby there will be a record of the child's life from the time it is
born until it graduates from school.
The medical men of the Province are not alive to the possibilities of this work as they
might be, but those who are doing the work of examination of the pupils are showing that the
real worth of the work is being more appreciated by them, and consequently they are devoting
a greater attention to bringing about improved results.
It is gratifying to receive reports from our medical officers which evince this change of
mind, and I beg leave to print a report which I have received from Dr. Maxwell, of Ladysmith,
The doctor has been very much interested in his work and I wish all medical men could have
the opportunity of reading his report.
" The Board of School Trustees,
Ladysmith, B.C.
" Deab Sirs,—I beg herewith to tender my third report on the examination of the Central
and High Schools.
" I am glad indeed to say that the great improvement, noticeable last year, in the conditions
which existed when I made my first examination have been well maintained, and the general
condition of the schools is quite excellent and, I venture to say, far ahead of most schools of
the same size.
" I believe the number of pupils examined by me is in excess of the number at present
enrolled. This is accounted for by the fact that several have left after the examination was
made.
"Defective Vision.—With regard to this, out of 17 with defective vision 10 have been
corrected with glasses, so that only 7 remain who should have their eyes attended to. The
parents of all of these have been notified, and I trust that before the next report all these will
have suitable glasses.
2 M 18 British Columbia. 1926
" Enlarged Tonsils.—The proportion of enlarged tonsils at first sight seems about the same
as last year; but of the 69 cases in the public school with enlarged tonsils, in only 39 cases is
operation advised at present. This is a very great improvement on last year, and I have not
heard of any case that we have operated on being anything but better for the operation.
" Defective Teeth.—With regard to this there is a very remarkable improvement. Last year
there were in the public school 153 cases needing dental treatment.   This year there are only 67!
" I have begun this year to mark the cards as regards ' teeth ' either A, B, or C. A means
perfect teeth; B means one or more teeth needing attention; and C those cases in which the
teeth are distinctly bad.
"Under this classification I am glad to report that in the public schools there were 115
pupils with perfect teeth; and in the High Schools 52 out of 84 pupils examined, which is
remarkable.
" In the public school there were 47 who came under the B classification and only 20
under C.
" There can be no other explanation of this very remarkable improvement than in the work
that has been done in the dental clinic, as far as it has gone, aided by the education given by
the school nurse.
" With regard to the nurse, I feel sure that the trustees, as well as the general public, have
come to realize what a great benefit she is to the public in general and the school-children in
particular. I only hope that the difficulties which have arisen with regard to the dental clinic
may soon be overcome and that by next year this great improvement in the teeth may be
emulated.
" Goitre.—You will notice that last year there were only 13 cases of goitre reported in the
public schools, whereas this year the figures are reversed and there are now 31. This is not so
bad as at first sight it appears. Last year I did not pay particular attention to this and I may
have missed a few, whereas this year I have made a note on each card, either ' Yes ' or ' No,'
as to whether or not there was any suspicion of an enlargement of the thyroid gland, and in a
great majority of these 31 cases the enlargement is so slight as not to be noticeable. I intend,
with the help of Dr. Young, Provincial Health Officer, to give all these children regular doses of
iodine next year, under the direct supervision of the nurse, seeing them regularly myself, and
I hope that in the next report there will be a great improvement in this respect.
" Scabies.—Last year there were no cases of this at the time of my examination, but it is
a thing which is always cropping up, and frequently the nurse is sending me cases to see whether
or not it is scabies. Two of these cases were absent from school on account of it and were
examined by me at my office. The third case was a very mild case which had just made its
appearance and was very quickly cured. However, this is a very remarkable improvement in
the condition in which I found the school at the time of my first examination.
" There was no other instance of any communicable disease.
" This can in no other way be accounted for than by the systematic examinations of the
school nurse, and it must be a very great comfort to the parents to know that they can safely
send their children to school without fear of them bringing home anything objectionable in the
way of skin-diseases or parasites.
" Although it does not directly concern the school trustees, I would like them to know that
we have just completed the best year on record as regards infectious diseases.
" The only infectious disease which amounts to anything that we have had during the last
twelve months is a mild epidemic of whooping-cough. This would undoubtedly have been much
worse had it not been for the co-operation which I received not only from the school nurse, but
also from the teachers, whom I met and explained to them the early symptoms of the disease,
and on the first sign of these the child in question, and all other members of the family who
had not had the whooping-cough, were kept away from school till the infection was over. Of the
other infectious diseases we have had one case of scarlet fever, three of chicken-pox, and one
each of diphtheria and measles, so that from my point of view I consider that we have had a
most satisfactory school-year.
" Yours faithfully,
" (Sgd.)    H. B. Maxwell,
Medical Inspector." 17 Geo. 5 Board of Health. M 19
QUEEN ALEXANDRA SOLARIUM.
The following is a full report regarding the Solarium and of the progress made to date.
It is evidence of what the Women's Institutes can do when they are in accord with a suggestion
for the care of our children who are innocent sufferers.
The Queen Alexandra Solarium for Crippled Children, Malahat Beach, V.I., B.C.
(Initiated by the Women's Institutes of British Columbia.)
Incorporation.
Incorporated in  British  Columbia  as  a  Society  for the  " Care  and  Cure"  of  Crippled
Children.
Management.
Managed by a Board of twelve Directors.
Objects.
The Solarium is not a hospital in the sense in which this is usually understood. No cases
of acute illness or cases requiring operation will be admitted.
Prolonged Treatment.
The Solarium is for children requiring prolonged treatment by physiotherapy, splints, and
heliotherapy, in its widest application. It will not, therefore, overlap the work of existing
hospitals, but will receive all cases, other than actual cases of tubercular lung-disease, requiring
long treatment and convalescence.
The term " crippled child " includes children crippled by cardiac or other diseases, in whom
the acute stage is passed and prolonged care can establish cure or marked alleviation.
All Deformities if a Reasonable Prospect of Cure or Alleviation.
Tubercular diseases of bones, joints, spine, glands, skin. Deformities, whether congenital
or acquired;  e.g., infantile paralysis, spastic paralysis.
Time-limit.
No limit of time will be placed on the period of treatment.
Education.
From the day of entry special educational facilities will be regarded as essential and as
part of the treatment of the child.
Handicrafts (when Funds permit).
Where alleviation only is possible and some muscular weakness and deformity must exist
for all time, systematic and prolonged training in a useful and profitable trade or handicraft
will be given to fit the child to take its place in the world as far as possible.
Age-limit for Admission H Years.
Subject to the advice of the medical advisers, the Director may admit children over 14 years
of age.
Mental Deficients.
No child suffering from a definite degree of mental deficiency or subject to " fits " will be
admitted.
Prevention of Illness in Childhood.
This, one of the most important aspects of this work, will be carried out at the Solarium.
The " tubercular child," the " delicate child," even if there is no clinical evidence of organic-
disease, will be eligible for admission, and will be under treatment until such time as the
pathological tendency is eradicated.
Hospitals of British Columbia.
British Columbia has most up-to-date hospitals and competent orthopaedic surgeons;   it is
the fixed intention of the Directors of the Solarium to encourage the use of existing hospitals, M 20
British Columbia.
1926
and the services of the surgeons of those hospitals, as is now the case. They will only accept
children after medical examination, preferably by the parents' own doctor, and after all
necessary operations have been performed.
Treatment of Children in City Hospitals.
The prolonged treatment of children in city hospitals and in the presence Of acute illness,
operations, and death is harmful alike to the mental and physical well-being of a child. All
experience has proved the benefit of the quiet country and seaside life for the delicate or
crippled child. The period of treatment is shortened; the expense of treatment is markedly
diminished.
It is unnecessary to do more than mention the great progress in the treatment of disease
that is taking place all over the world by the use of sunshine, fresh air, sea-bathing, and
artificial violet-ray lamps.
Site of the Solarium.
The Queen Alexandra Solarium is situated 30 miles from Victoria on the main Island
Highway, 4% miles from Cobble Hill Station on the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway. There is
easy access, therefore, to Victoria, all Island points, and from the Mainland via Vancouver and
Nanaimo (2% hours by boat).
Acreage.
Six and a half acres of land have been bought and adjoining land is available for purchase.
Cost.
Cost of land with small house, $5,788.20.
Climate.
Average Rainfall.—27 to 28 inches.
South End of Vancouver Island.
Average " Bright" Sunshine.—2,157 hours average for nine years. In 1925, 2,262 hours, or
over six hours of bright sunshine for every day in year.
Average Temperatures.—Average summer, 60° ; average winter, 40°.
Cost of Building.
Main structure   $22,400 00
Less paid        4,036 00
$18,364 00
Heating, lighting, and plumbing        8,000 00
Water-supply        3,000 00
Furnishing         2,606 00
  $31,970 OO
Estimated funds in hand     26,467 00
Estimated expenditure to fully equip  $ 5,503 00
Cost of Maintenance.
Impossible to estimate exactly. Allowing thirty children and necessary staff in Solarium
and office, cost per bed should be less than $2.50 a day. Of this, under British Columbia
" Hospital Act" $1 should be Government grant per bed per day on average. It is estimated
that the sum of $250 will endow a bed for one year.
Comparison of Above Figures with Similar Institutions.
Saskatchewan Junior Red Cross Hospital, per bed per day, $1.35, 12 beds.
Daughters  of Empire,  Preventorium,  Toronto,  102  beds,  including  cases  under 4  years,
$2.20 per bed per day.
Alberta Junior Red Cross Hospital, 35 to 40 beds, $1.61 per bed per day.
Average of above, $1.72 per bed per day. 17 Geo. 5 Board of Health. M 21
'Number of Crippled Children in Western Canada.
Provincial Medical Officer of Health, B.C.—" The data from the hospitals, with my general
knowledge, enables me to say without any hesitation that a 50-bed hospital would be full in a
very short time."
Dr. H. P. H. Calloway, Winnipeg.—" The general public has a very inadequate conception of
the immense number of these cases which exist in Western Canada."
Dr. Harvey L. Jackes, Regina, Sask.—" Total number of crippled children in the true sense
of the word would be about 1,000. Of these, about half would be indigent cases. At the present
time the municipalities only spend money on urgent cases. Last year the Red Cross spent
money on 92 of these cases."
Examination of 907 children in schools in section of Vancouver area showed 30 per cent,
were 10 per cent, or more underweight.
Medical Officer of the School Trustees, Vancouver, reported, in 1924, 93 cases of crippled
children attending the schools.
Recently 70O questionnaires were sent out; 112 replies were received, reporting 116 cases
of crippled children and 267 suffering from malnutrition.
It is not the intention of the Directors of the Queen Alexandra Solarium to restrict the
benefits of the Solarium to British Columbia children. The first unit built will be primarily for
British Columbia, but it is hoped that in time further units will be added by the three Western
Provinces.
The site already bought will accommodate three units of 32 beds each.
The statement is frequently made 'that there is equal sunshine in many parts of the
Western Provinces of Canada; this is true, but it is not sufficiently realized that the value
of the sun is enormously increased by exposure of the whole body naked to gentle currents of
air, as well as by sea-bathing. The climates of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba will,
either from great cold, strong winds, and great heat, preclude the systematic use of this
important adjunct of treatment.
Dr. C. Wace,
Hon. Secretary.
OPEN-AIR SCHOOLS.
Miss Elizabeth Breeze, Head School Nurse, Vancouver Schools, has kindly furnished us with
a report of the results of the establishent of open-air schools in Vancouver. The results obtained
are a splendid demonstration of the application of natural methods in correcting defects. This
work is also a demonstration of what can and "will be done at the Solarium on a larger scale.
With such agencies at work we have not only shown what can be done for the children, but have
provided an incentive for continued efforts on the part of our organizations.
" Open-air School, Vancouver, B.C.
" On February 3rd, 1926, the first open-air school in Vancouver, and I believe in British
Columbia, was opened with accommodation for seventy-two pupils.
" For several years previously an open-air class has been held at the Rotary clinic, and the
excellent results secured in this class demonstrated very definitely the value of such treatment.
" The completion of the addition to the Charles Dickens School obviated the necessity of
using a group of buildings known as ' the annex' for regular classes and made them available
for this purpose. The site was well adapted for an open-air school, being high and dry, with
trees and grass, and adjacent to a car-line. The buildings were well constructed and, with
necessary alterations, capable of being converted into a satisfactory school of this type. Large
windows, with a southern exposure, that can be fully opened, were arranged in all class-rooms.
Verandahs for use during the rest periods, also a kitchen and dining-room, were added. There
are three class-rooms, each accommodating twenty-four children. Each child has his own locker,
in which the blanket coat and blanket for use during the rest period and on cool days are kept.
Cots for use during the rest period are also supplied.
" A hot nourishing meal is served at noon. The menus are arranged by the Household
Economics Department, always with the special need of the children in mind. At 10 a.m. and at
3.30 p.m. each child is given a half-pint 'bottle of milk, which is served with individual straws
and much enjoyed. M 22
British Columbia.
1926
" All children are weighed once a week and the school nurse is in daily attendance. Special
charts are kept for each child.
" All play periods are supervised and the play organized. Special breathing and posture
exercises are also arranged.
"One of the big problems of this school is securing good home co-operation, which is so
necessary in building up the health of the child. The school nurse is in touch with every home,
and every effort is made to interest and instruct the parents in the habits essential to health and
to rouse in them an appreciation of the necessity of sufficient sleep, fresh air, and properly
selected food.
" Only pupils recommended by the School Medical Officer are admitted to the school, and no
pupil may be transferred out of the school without his approval.
" The pupils chosen are those found to be most in need of special treatment by reason of
definite exposure to infection of tuberculosis, though not showing actual symptoms; those very
much underweight and not showing sufficient gain; those showing choreiform movements or
having extreme chronic enlargement of cervical or mediastinal glands; cases of asthma, chronic
bronchitis, anaemia, etc.    No open case of tuberculosis is admitted.
" The beneficial effect of the treatment was apparent from the very first week, and was
shown by the remarkable gains in weight, improvement in colour, vigour, and intellectual
capacity.    The children are happy and enjoy being in the school.
" The school has attracted a good deal of attention and we have had many more applications
for admission than we are able to accept. These have come from parents and medical men
not only in Vancouver, but in the surrounding municipalities as well.
" Many of the children in this school are among the brightest of our pupils, and through the
special treatment and care given in this school we hope to establish them in health, and so
give to the community healthy, useful citizens.
" Daily Programme.
" 9.00-10.00—Class-work.
10.00-10.05—Milk.
10.05-10.45—Class-work.
10.45-11.00—Supervised play.
11.00-11.50—Class-work.
11.50-12.00—Preparation for lunch  (hand-washing, etc.).
12.00-12.30—Lunch.
12.30-12.40—Toothbrush drill.
12.40- 1.50—Rest period.
1.50^- 2.00—-Breathing exercises.
2.00- 3.15—Class-work.
3.15- 3.30—Supervised play.
3.30—Milk and dismissal.
" Report of Term.
(Beginning February 3rd, 1926; ending June 25th, 1926.)
" Number of pupils   72
Diagnosis—
Malnutrition     33
Anaemia   26
Enlarged glands  1
Family case  3
Pre-tubercular   2
Other causes   7
Number gaining  69
Number losing   3
Total gain  (lb.)  295%
Total loss (lb.) -  2Vi
Largest gain (lb.)  11%
Largest loss (lb.)  1% 17 Geo. 5 Board of Health. M 23
Number physically benefited      69
Number not physically benefited      3
Causes for not gaining—
One case, poor attendance.
In another, infectious disease in home.
In another, in school short time only."
The reports of the school medical examination show that there were 3,860 more pupils
examined than last year.
Details of the examination for each school follow.
I have, etc.,
H. E. Young,. M.D., CM.,
Provincial Health Officer.
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors:  156.
Reports from Medical Inspectors:   154.
High Schools.-
High Schools.    1924-25, 67:  Reported, 41;  not reported, 26.    1925-26,  71:  Reported,  43;
not reported, 28.
Pupils inspected: 1924-25, 7,419; 1925-26, 7,861, an increase of 442.
Graded City Schools.
.    Cities.   1924-25, 33 : Reported, 28; not reported, 5.    1925-26, 33: Reported, 29; not reported, 4.
Pupils inspected:  1924-25, 34,036;  1925-26, 35,653, an increase of 1,617.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities.    1924-25, 27: Reported, 25 ; not reported, 2.    1925-26, 26: Reported, 24; not
reported, 2.
Pupils inspected: 1924-25, 26,163; 1925-26, 26,547, an increase of 384.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected: 1924-25, 577, at a cost of $13,109.45; 1925-26, 616, at a cost of $14,120.75.
Schools not inspected: 1924-25, 126; 1925-26, 83.
Pupils inspected: 1924-25, 15,331; 1925-26, 16,748, an increase of 1,417.
Cost of inspection per pupil: 1924r-25, 85 cents; 1925-26, 84 cents.
Percentage of defects: 1924-25, 100.81; 1925-26, 100.65, a decrease of 0.16. M 24
British Columbia.
1926
NORMAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
H)
ft
a
ft* J
O-J
■  o
|S
*H   Oi
Tfl
ft
a   .
^  CD
°a
d g
j
"5
a
3
4) ^
ft
S fl
J!-2
•as
"3
s
ft .fl
« s
Tfl
0
a
cu
<
la
S3
a 0
262
175
278
175
25
15
36
8
4
12
33
3
HIGH
T. A. Swift	
16
110
276
211
11
138
48
76
62
94
27
175
95
10
85
62
268
263
376
33
17
362
189
215
133
150
12
81
17
120
11
125
653
159
692
16
1
Burnaby:
108
265
211
11
129
48
70
62      ..
94      ..
27
168       2
95
9      ..
84
55
260      ..
250      ..
373       1
32      ..
14
499       9
-295       3
227       4
130      ..
145
12      ..
66      ..
16      ..
98      ..
11
105      ..
646
1    ....
1    ....
5 ..   .
i    ."..
3    ....
1    ....
3 ....
4 2
6 ....
9    ....
1    ....
4    ....
16
33
4
1
12
2
6
1
4
6
6
5
1
8
7
3
37
43
4
1
40
18
22
1
4
"%
2
3
3
19
6
2
3
6
2
9
6
2
7
Burnaby, South   ....
L. A. Patten	
25
12
E. Sheffield	
6
5
Delta:
1
2
1
1
1
6
3
1
8
3
2
5
J. S. McCallum	
VV. Truax	
M. G. Archibald	
Miss Morrison ...
4
3
Miss A. J. Duncan
Miss J. Campbell..
9
6
W. J. Knox	
2
H. B. Maxwell             ...   .
Miss Hewertson...
1
8
6
15
W. P. Drysdale .
Miss D. A. Taylor.
E. C. Arthur	
18
18
New Westminster:
Puke of Connaught	
D. A. Clark ..  	
24
1
4
1
1
1
Point Grey:
W. Dykes	
Miss M. Ewart....
Mrs. C. M. Hyde..
Miss M. Ewart	
25
25
22
Prince Rupert:
J. E. H. Kelso	
"s
3
2
1
2
1
2
3
10
2
J. W. Coffin	
3
I
F. D. Sinclair	
2
1
W. A. Coghlin 	
12
Vancouver:
H. White	
Miss M. Campbell.
7
20
1
11 17 Geo. o
Board of Health.
M 25
SCHOOLS.
0)
ft
9  OJ
■a
33   ■
fen w
cd fl
HO
g3
"o
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
I
u
>
tfi
CD
ed
Xfl
6
to
cu
&
a
a
H
O
f
G
Acute Fevers which
have occurred ,
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
6S
14
3
35
20
Ansemia, 2 ; heart, 3 ; eczema,
6 ; disturbance,  4 ; pleurisy
and pneumonia recent, 4
Scarlet fever, 2 ;  smallpox, 1
Ventilation,  heating-, and lighting
good, accommodation good
Yes.'
SCHOOLS.
7
2
4
1
15
40
4
29
Good	
Yes.
56
24
1
Scarlet   fever,   measles,
chicken-pox
Clean; adequate.
Clean ; O.K.
3
Good	
5
'is'
10
5
3
6
Cardiac,  1;  wax  in ears,  1;
na»al  catarrh,   2;   irregular
teeth, 3 ; defective septum, 1
Clean; adequate.
3
5
Gymnasium and
one   class-room
as   temporary
quarters
Good	
Clean; adequate.
6
i
7
2
3-
1
17
21
6
5
Defective chest-development, 2
Satisfactory	
Two rooms in basement   not   well
lighted and not
well ventilated ;
room   on   south
side   poorly
lighted
Good	
32
4
Chorea, 1 ;    cardiac, 2 ;   bron-
_ chial, 2 ; curvature spine, 1;
fiat-feet, 2 ; dysmenorrhea, 2
3
Flu, 29 cases during year,
mostly in one room of
High, but very severe ;
mumps, 2 cases
Measles,   pertussis,
mumps
Indoor; sanitary,
adequate; modern.
Fairly clean.
O K.
3
Good	
Quite efficient....
Heating and ven-
lation good
16
1
12
1
8
1
2
3'
....
10
6
12
94
52
6
14
5
.1
1
2
7
2
11
2
18
5
42
5
65
12
3
1
Clean; adequate.
V.D.H., £ ; partial paralysis, 1;
kyphosis, 1
Heart defects, 10 ; pulmonary,
3 ; orthopaedic, 4 ;  anaemic, 2
88
Scarlet fever and rubella
Good.
54
1
Good
Clean; adequate.
1
Satisfactory	
Good	
46
Enlarged thyroid, 67 ; nervous,
3; pulmonary, 2; cardiac, 17 ;
orthopaedic, 8 ; anaemia, 9
Enlarged thyroid, 67 ; cardiac,
26; orthopaedic, 7; anaemic, 6
Enlarged thyroid, 68 ; cardiac,
15 ; anaemic, 4 ; orthopaedic, 7
Mumps, 6; chicken-pox, 1
Good.
33
21
Mumps, 1; scarlet fever, 1
3
Excellent	
Good...
Satisfactory.
Good.
3
Good
Yes
18
4
Haemophylia, 1; tachycardiac, 1
Endocarditis, 1; bifid Uvula, 1
Scarlet fever, 2; mumps, 2
Satisfactory	
Good ..  .
Good.
5
48
Sty, 1; wax in ear, 1; cardiac,
2 ; acne,  5 ; strabismus,   2 ;
eczema, 1 ; underweight, 8
Vaccinated, 404 ; cardiac, 3....
1
189
Scarlet fever, 2; mumps,
21
54
165
Vaccinated, 475 ; pulmonary, 3
Diphtheria,  2; measles,
1 ;   chicken-pox,   1 ;
mumps, 17 M 26
British Columbia.
1926
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
01
ft
>H   Oi
O ~
o
<= a
(5 §
03
ft
3    .
Hi T3
■H   O
°s
6 «
o
fl
as
0J   ftr
ftS
O   «
OJ   -
d) 53
as
0)
ft
li
i «
Q) a)
«
ft fl
s
'o
fl
o
-a
^ .
fc* —i
a o
Vancouver— Continued.
King George	
H. White	
Miss M. Campbell.
437
377
339
420
322
780
85
160
319
338
292
87
280
778
61
123
5
12
7
9
9
32
35
3
6
2
1
6
3
1
1
1
3
3
4
High School of Commerce
1
H. Dyer	
26
26
Miss E. Edwards..
12
6
Mrs. S. Martin	
3
GRADED CITY
Alberni...	
Chilliwack „	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook:
Central	
Kootenay Orchards.
South Ward	
Cumberland   	
Duncan 	
Enderby.-	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops:
Lloyd George
Stewart Wood
Kaslo	
Kelowna..,
Ladysmith.
R. McCaffrey	
H. N". Watson	
II. W. Keith	
M. G. Archibald	
Miss J. Campbell..
W. J. Knox	
H. B. Maxwell	
in
298
298
103
284
292
623
17
62
464
591
17
59
455
606
428
116
370
98
107
360
92
290
284
500
480
137
123
608
608
335
335
19
i
12
4
1
4
43
2
125
ii
42
2
3
58
18
2
30
21
31
4
24
4
32
2
1
2
1
1
1
18
20
15
1
1
2
5
16
2
5
12
6
68
2
10
1
3
123
3
13
2
1
3
2
9
1
17
17
23
18
4
21
18
28
2
17
2
5
16
97
4
25
162 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 27
SCHOOLS—Confirmed.
0>
>
is
0)   Qi
OH
at a
aa
o
a
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
a
h
0J
DO
OJ
es
m
6
£?
"5
ft
a
a
u
o
UI
ca
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
62
l
4
2
4
5
36
28
14
58
52
1
14
69
chicken-pox, 1
Diphtheria, 2 ; mumps, 1;
measles, 2
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps,
2; diphtheria carriers, 1
Scarlet fever, 5; mumps,
18; diphtheria carriers,
2; whooping-cough, 1;
diphtheria, 5; chicken-
pox, 27
80
16
Deformity, 2 ; asthma, 1; nervous, 2
Vaccinations, 4; home visits, 14
Very satisfactory..
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Yes.
240
2
Scarlet fever, 1; chicken-
pox, 2 ; mumps, 12
5
Asthma, 6; cardiac, 2 ; nervous,
3; pulmonary, 1
SCHOOLS.
68
5
302
67
Heart, 3	
Heart-murmurs, 2 .
Orthopaedic, 1	
Stammering, 2 ; nerves, 3 ; cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 5 ; orthopaedic, 3; irregular teeth,
31; wax in ears, 150 ; defective septum, 9 ; anaemia, 46 ;
blepharitis, 29; nasal growth,
8 ; acne, 3 ; skin-trouble, 22 ;
nasal obstruction or catarrh,
44 ; lisping, 1; cleft palate,
2; conjunctivitis, 3; squint,
1; trachoma, 2 ; birth-mark,
1
Cardiac, 2 ; kyphosis, 2	
Anaemia, 1	
Valvular heart, 1	
Cardiac, 4 ; pulmonary, 1; nervous, 2
Enuresis, 3 ; orthopaedic, 4 ;
asthma, 1; bronchial, 1; wax
in ears, 2 ; atopecix, 1
Enuresis,  5 ;    orthopaedic,  4 ;
bronchial 2 ;  atopecix, 1
Chorea, 14; cardiac, 7; lungs
(T.B.), 2; bronchial catarrh,
17 ; curvature of spine, 5 ; orthopaedic, 4; sq.  eczema of
face, 12
Cardiac, 2; orthopaedic, 9 .
Scarlet fever, 5 .
Measles, whooping-cough
epidemic, scarlet fever
Chicken-pox. 21; mumps,
1 ; measles, 14; scarlet
fever, 2
Measles and mumps.
Scarlet fever, 2 ; measles,
1; German measles, 1
Flu only epidemic; 5 cases
mumps, 9 cases chicken-pox, and 3 cases
whooping-cough during year
Scarlet fever, 1; chicken-
pox, 3 ; diphtheria, 1;
measles, 1 ; whooping-
cough, 15
Good.
Good.
O.K .
Poorly ventilated,
requires  ventilating fan ; awnings on windows
on west side
Stewart   Wood   in
itself   all   right,
but   class-room
in attic not comfortable ;   two
rooms   in   old
Court-house not
satisfactory
Good	
Excellent
Quite efficient.
Clean.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Clean.
Clean; adequate,
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
Satisfactory.
Yes.
Indoor; sanitary;
efficient and
adequate.
O.K. M 28
British Columbia.
1926
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
O
fl
fl   .
*-d
p, -a
'£
fl
fl
■ o
°a
53
ojj
o]
oJ
£
<U Ml
CO
3
fc bfl
Qffl
Qpa
<
Merritt	
Nanaimo:
Middle Ward
North Ward	
Quennell	
South Ward	
Nelson:
Central	
Hume	
New Westminster:
Central	
Lister-Kelvin	
Richard MeBride
Queensboro	
Herbert Spencer.
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam:
Central	
James Park	
Port Moody	
Prince Rupert:
Booth Memorial .
Borden Street...
Seal Cove	
Revelstoke:
Central	
Selkirk	
Rossland ..	
Slocan	
Trail:
Central	
Tadanac ........
Trail, East	
Vancouver:
Aberdeen	
Guy Palmer..
W. F. Drysdale.
E.C.Arthur.
D. A. Clark.
C. T. Hilton	
G. A. Sutherland .
C. R. Symmes .
H. E. Tremayne .
J. II. Hamilton.
J. W. Coffin '.'.'.'.
Wm. E. Gomm
W. A. Coghlin.
Miss D. A. Tavlor
Miss A. Stark.
Miss M. Campbell.
153
153
157
782
253
832
648
506
81
439
246
150
215
271
60
309
456
52
750
37
150
153
668
211
826
640
492
81
432
239
152
252
37
290
300
411
49
745
31
145
483
87
20
104
33
129
49
163
i
147
35 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 29
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers  which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets,    State
if clean and
adequate.
52
271
109
474
349
313
66
257
60
24
1
1
23
27
205
425
108
253
Dull, 2; T.B. hip, 1; lost one
eve in accident, 1; appendix
1
Cardiac, 1; nerves, 2	
Epistaxis, 1; deformed hand, 1;
T.B. hip, 2; double amp,
legs, 1; asthma, 1; nerves, 2
cleft palate, 1; appendec
tomy, 1
Nerves, 2; dull, 1	
V.D.H.,   3;   nervous,   1;  discharging ear, 1;   enuresis, 1
Heart, 31; pulmonary, 4 ; or-"\
thopsedic, 28 ;   nervous, 9 ;
anaemic, 5
Heart, 17 ; pulmonary, 2 ; orthopaedic, 20; nervous, 1 ;
anaemic* 3
Heart, 11; pulmonary, 2 ; orthopaedic, 13 ; nervous, 1;
anaemic, 4
Anaemic, 1	
Heart, 14 ; pulmonary, 1; orthopaedic, 18 ; nervous, 3 ;
anaemic, 1
Anaemic, 6; nervous, 1; ortho
paedic, 1 ; phthisis, 1
Cardiac, 3 ; mumps, 10 ; infantile paralysis, 2; chicken-
pox, 4
Defective speech, 1	
Orthopaedic, 1	
Defective heart, 2 ;  hydrocele,
1 ; hernia, 1; orthopaedic, 7
Cardiac, 1; epilepsy, 1.
Boils, 1; epilepsy, 1; warts, 2;
underweight, 337 ; poliomyelitis, 2; angioma, 1; cardiac,
]8; eczema, 3; wax in ears,
1; bronchitis, 1; blepharitis,
1
Underweight, 15	
Underweight, 81; eczema, 1;
strabismus, 2 ; hernia, 1; orthopaedic, 1; warts, 1; congenital wry-neck, 1 ; cardiac,
2
Vaccinated, 281	
17
Scarlet fever, mumps.
Chicken-pox, whooping-
cough, scarlet fever
Chicken-pox, whooping-
cough, scarlet fever
Scarlet fever, whooping-
cough, chicken-pox,
mumps
Chicken-pox, whooping
cough
Scarlet fever, rubella —
Scarlet fever, rubella	
["Scarlatina, 26; pertus
j sis, 21; smallpox, 1
chicken-pox, 61; diph
j theria, 1 ; measles, 1
I mumps, 12S
Chicken-pox, 50..
Chicken-pox, 18; German
measles, 1
Chicken-pox, 8	
Chicken-pox, 4	
Scarlet fever	
Scarlet fever	
Chicken-pox, 20; German
measles, 16; measles, 4,
mumps, 2; scarlet fever, 8; typhoid fever,
1; whooping-cough, 15
Whooping-cough	
Not crowded; well
ventilated and
heated; onebase-
ment class-room
poorly lighted
Heating   good ;
ventilation fair
Heating   good ;
ventilation poor
Heating   good;
ventilation fair
Heating   good;
ventilation fair
Good; some classrooms   overcrowded
Good	
Clean and adequate, except
in one class
held in room
in the Town
Hall rented
from the City.
Clean; adequate.
Poor; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Rooms nearly filled
to capacity
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
Not crowded ; well
ventilated   and
heated
Good	
Excellent.
Good...
Clean; adequate.
Excellent.
Satisfactory'.
ii
Good.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Chicken-pox, 3; mumps,
50; measles, 34 ; scarlet-fever, 1 M 30
British Columbia.
1926
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"ft
3 .
rk  "*
>w fl
a
o
a
632
143
434
58
477
91
102
11
599
93
1058
162
576
69
469
53
362
65
1130
80
755
171
583
88
99
2
913
133
667
108
429
44
502
56
550
72
750
92
668
97
938
171
709
119
£ M
~£
Vancouver—Continued.
Alexandra	
Bayview	
Beaconsfield	
Block 70	
Central	
Dawson. ..	
Charles Dickens	
Fairview	
Franklin	
Simon Fraser	
General Gordon	
Grandview	
Grenfell   	
Hastings	
Henry Hudson	
Kitsilano	
Livingstone	
Model	
Mount Pleasant	
Macdonald	
Lord Nelson	
Florence Nightingale
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss D. Shields
Miss I. Smith..
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss O. Kilpatrick.
Miss H. Jukes ....
Miss D. Bellamy ..
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss O. Kilpatrick.
Miss D. Shields ...
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss D. Shields .
Miss O. Kilpatrick.
Miss D. Bellamy ..
Miss O. Kilpatrick.
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss I. Smith	
Miss V. B. Stevens
485
112
613
1046
532
529
375
601
742
108
929
644
414
453
536
48
49
3
100
25
3
47
1
29
2
26
6
421
35 17 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
M 31
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
104
62
69
10
153
211
79
85
51
204
109
10
152
134
78
84
108
74
Vaccinated,   312;   cardiac,   4
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 251	
Vaccinated,  227 ;   cardiac,   1
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 332 ; cardiac, 2..
Vaccinated,   575;   cardiac,   4;
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,   360;   cardiac,   1;
pulmonary, 4
Vaccinated,   254;   cardiac,   1;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 167; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, P99; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 397 ; cardiac, 1....
Vaccinated, 298 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 67; cardiac, 2	
Vaccinated, 421; pulmonary) 2
Vaccinated, 348 ; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 203 ; cardiac, 2....
Vaccinated, 264 ; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 305	
Vaccinated,   382;   cardiac,  1
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 331.
Vaccinated, 433;   cardiac,  2
pulmonary, 4
Vaccinated,  358;    eardiac,  3
pulmonary, 1
Mumps, 93; chicken-pox,
26; whooping-cough, 10
Scarlet-fever, 1; mumps,
30; whooping-cough, i
Scarlet-fever, 2; mumps.
90; diphtheria carriers
1; measles, 34; chicken
pox, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps.
16; whooping-cough.
10; measles, 3
Scarlet fever, 3; measles,
32 ; mumps, 75 ; diph
theria, 3; diphtheria
carriers, 1; whooping-
cough, 2; chicken-pox,
4;  German measles, (
Measles, 22 ; mumps, 14
chicken-pox, 3; whoop
ing-cough, 5
Diphtheria, 1; measles,
22; chicken-pox, 14
mumps, 153
Scarlet fever, 2; measles.
22 ; mumps, 10 ; chick
en-pox, 11
Diphtheria, 1; diphtheria
carriers, 4; measles, 2
mumps, 27; chicken
pox, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; chicken
pox, 23; measles, 5
mumps, 20
Diphtheria, 5; diphtheria
carriers, 2; mumps, 21
measles, 33; whooping,
cough, 10; chicken-
pox, 14
Diphtheria, 3; diphtheria
carriers, 6; mumps, 49
chicken-pox, 12; Ger
man measles, 1; whoop
ing-cough, 6
Measles, 12; mumps, 182;
chicken-pox, 26; diphtheria, 10; diphtheria
carriers, 4 ; whooping-
cough, 2
Mumps, 24; chicken-pox,
13
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria carriers, 1; diphtheria, 3; chicken-pox, 19;
measles, 21; whooping-
cough, 1; mumps, 11
Mumps, 11; chicken-pox,
13 ; whooping-cough, 5
Diphtheria, 1; measles,
7; mumps, 17; whooping-cough, 3; chicken-
pox, 19
Diphtheria, 1; diphtheria
carriers, 1; mumps, 72;
whooping-cough, 4;
chicken-pox, 25
Diphtheria, 7; diphtheria
carriers, 2; mumps, 50;
measles, 10; whooping,
cough, 1; chicken-pox,
6
Scarlet fever, 2 ; diphtheria,  1;    chicken-pox,
35;  whooping-cough,
10; mumps, 97;
measles, 2
Scarlet fever, 2 ; mumps,
57; measles, ]; whooping-cough, 5; chicken-
pox, 11 British Columbia.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
SI
E s
PS
fl o
Vancouver—Continued,
Open Air	
Cecil Rhodes	
Lord Roberts	
Laura Secord	
Seymour	
Strathcona	
Lord Tennyson
North Vancouver:
Lonsdale	
Queen Mary	
Ridgeway	
Vernon	
Victoria:
Bank Street	
Beacon Hill	
Boys' Central	
Burnside	
Sir James Douglas
Girls' Central	
George Jay	
Margaret Jenkins.
Kingston Street.  .
King's Road	
North Ward	
Oaklands	
Quadra Street	
Quadra Primary..
Rock Bay	
South Park	
H. Dyer.
S. G. Baldwin.
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss D. Bellamy ..
Miss H. Jukes ....
Miss I. Smith	
Miss M. McLellan.
73
979
896
Miss D. Bellamy
Mrs. S. Martin..
Miss L. E. Buckley
Miss I. E. Adams.
Miss L. E. Buckley-
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss L. E. Buckley
539
750
131
131
215
429
Miss I. E. Adams.
Miss L. E. Buckley
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams.
301
134
84
341
539
280
138
28
293
61
547
1023
387
508
453
375
34
92
158
188
172
96
116
385
119
129
32
204
183
108
113
90
53 -
17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 33
SCHOOLS—Continued.
14
131
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
Vaccinated, 14	
Vaccinated, 827; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated,  584;   cardiac,   4;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 252 ; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 266 ;   cardiac,  1 ;
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 1,160;   cardiac,
pulmonary, 5
Vaccinated, 420 ; cardiac, 2.,
Deformity, 2 ;  respiratory dis
ease, 4
Deformity, 4 ; asthma, 1; car
diac, 3
Deformity, 5 ; asthma, 3 ; cardiac, 3
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 2; pul
monary, 1; catarrh, 1,
Nervous, 1	
Nervous, 1; orthopaedic, 1.
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 1
Nervous, 1 ; cardiac, 1; orthopedic, 2
Nervous, 3	
Nervous, 2 ; orthopaedic, 1.
Cardiac, 1 ,
Nervous, 2 ; cardiac, 2 ; orthopaedic, 3
Nervous, 1; orthopaedic, 2	
Nervous, 2; cardiac, 1.
4 I Nervous, 1; orthopaedic, 1.
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Measles, 1; chicken-pox,
1; whooping-cough, 9
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps,
12; whooping-cough,
2; measles, 6 ; chicken-
pox, 17
Scarlet fever, 3; mumps,
46; whooping-cough,
4; measles, 47; chicken-
pox, 3
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 5; chicken-pox, 7;
mumps, 147
Diphtheria, 3; chicken-
pox, 29 ; mumps, 93 ;
measles, 21; whooping-
cough, 1
Scarlet fever, 8; chicken-
pox, 2; diphtheria, 10;
diphtheria carriers, 10 ;
measles, 5; mumps, 84;
whooping-cough, 1;
German measles, 30
M umps, 1   .
Mumps,  whooping-
cough
Mumps,  whooping-
cough, German meas
les
Mumps, whooping-
cough
Chicken-pox, 61; scarlet
fever, 5 ; diphtheria, 1;
measles, 1; rheumatic
fever, 1; pneumonia, 4;
surgical cases, 2; influenza, 506
Measles, 1 ; whooping-
cough, 4
Measles, 1 ; whooping-
cough, 1; scarlet fever,
10
Scarlet fever, 2; measles,
1; whooping-cough, 1
Scarlet fever, 2; whooping-cough, 2
Scarlet fever, 6 ; measles,
33 ; whooping-cough,
11
Chicken-pox, 1; mumps,
3; whooping-cough, 10;
measles,   1; scarlet-
fever, 2
Chicken-pox, 1 ; scarlet
fever, 8 ; diphtheria, 7;
measles, 6
Measles, 1	
Chicken-pox, 1; mumps,
1 ;  scarlet  fever, 1;
diphtheria, 1; measles,
27
Measles, 6	
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
5
Measles,
Scarlet fever, 2; measles,
3; whooping-cough, 12
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
30
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Very satisfactory
Satisfactory .
Good.
An old  building ;
but  well   cared
for
Good	
Old building, but
well kept
A poor building...
An   old   building,
hut   repairs
effected
Good	
Good; new toilets
installed
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean and fairly
adequate.
Clean; adequate. M 34
British Columbia.
1926
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
3
Oh   .
•a
<H   0)
o ~
o
a
M   QJ
<H   P
°a
©
3
Q
IS
OJ |*»
OJ QJ
PS
OJ
is
O OJ
OK
rt
OQ
rt
ii be
0> rt
Qpq
oi
o
a
OJ
<a
4
—< a
ca o
Victoria—Continued.
D. Donald  	
Miss I. E. Adams..
146
318
122
171
4
7
1
1
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Burnaby:
23
$9
158
109
659
665
21
182
561
151
402
61
18
86
18
58
18
157
97
34
63
72
54
34
16
18
■77
115
149
31
27
18
49
33
78
15
74
48
18
132
26
15
18
21
25
33
23
34
18
31
178
13
51
39
484
22
25
155
109
644
666
20
182
547
145
395
50
18
85
18
53
16
161
87
31
58
70
49
28
11
16
71
112
141
29
25
17
49
33
74
12
63
39
12
121
24
13
16
20
20
27
22
33
17
31
168
13
43
38
484
1
2
2
6
23
31
1
3
19
4
9
1
2
2
7
1
11
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
8
9
33
36
2
11
33
10
31
1
2
6
1
7
2
7
11
4
6
7
9
6
1
3
14
17
17
9
6
2
3
4
1
3
1
....
i
2
2
"i'
l
"i'
5
2
"3'
5
i'
1
1
"i
1
"i'
2
1
3
"i
1
2
3
1
9
57
50
1
19
47
11
30
3
1
5
1
3
1
10
1
6
1
i
1
3
2
,,,,
2
3
....
1
i
2
Capitol Hill	
3
38
86
74
9
Sealorth	
11
5
28
Chilliwack;
19
7
9
10
1
5
21
17
23
9
11
1
2
1
1
6
Coldstream:
S. G. Baldwin	
5
5
Coquitlam :
2
Glen   	
1
6
34
7
2
5
"6
2
2
1
1
5
4
14
2
"i
a
2
7
2
'is'
3
3
1
19
1
1
3
1
1
2
5
0
3
27
2
3
1
5
2
17
3
1
5
1
"i"
3
9
6
3
14
6
20
3
13
3
1
7
5
4
4
5
4
11
22
3
14
9
20
3
Cowichan, North:
Miss N. Armstrong
43
11
9
Delta :
6
12
4
7
8
9
8
13
35
4
15
16
Esquimalt:
Lampson Street	
43 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 35
SCHOOLS—Continued.
HC
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly venti-
lated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Orthopaedic, 1 .
Nervous, 2; cardiac, 3; ortho-
"    2
Chicken-pox, 1; measles,
6 ; whooping-cough, 6;
scarlet fever, 2
Chicken-pox, 8; mumps,
3; measles, 19; whooping-cough, 11
Very old building.
Good.
Clean and fairly
adequate.
Clean; adequate.
SCHOOLS.
12       3
Good	
Yes.
7       2
2
81      16
3
2
29
34
1
13
12
3
19
"2'
3
3
It
i
t
i
i
i
61     11
343     58
1
rl
339      56
5
3
10       1
83      20
3
2
1(
276     48
1
"                 	
75     11
2
221     27
1
24       3
.
6
"        	
24       3
17
28       5
,.
6    ...
..
83     13
7
45
7
18
20
4
18
1
6
39
37
65
4
9
4
1
2
2
Heart, 1 	
1
(|
21       2
Good.
6    	
Clean; adequate.
15    ...
(1
20    	
19    	
8
..
Good,
1
8    	
,,
Good.
22       1
..
26       I
Good!	
39       1
Good.
8    	
11    	
Slightly crowded;
poorly ventilated
3     	
9    	
Yes.
5    	
Chronic bronchitis, 1; acne, 1.
Scarlet fever, 1	
tl
1    ...
1
2
3    	
Jr
1    	
2
3
3
4
T
2
1
1
4
2
1
.
2    ...
,
1    ...
56       8
13       3
Cardiac, 5; orthopaedic, 3; anaemia, 1; acne, 1
1
Scarlet fever ; varicella..
Satisfactory in all
respects
Poor in all respects
ii
it            [quate
12       1
Cardiac, 2 ; orthopedic, 2.  ..
6       1
Clean; adequate.
10    ....
4
1
i'
8       3
3    	
Chicken-pox, 1	
Whooping-couj*h, 10 ....
13    	
3
9    ...
.
2    ....
1
10       2
.
28       4
17
1
2
2
6
8
Diphtheria, 3.	
.
4    	
15       6
1
5
12
i
.
5    	
..
99     15
Measles, 32; chicken-pox,
20
Building  in   good
condition;   well
heated and ventilated ; lighting
good RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
^  O)
a>
rt
rt
"A
O M
>£
'O
Qffl
<
a o
Kent:
Agassiz	
Harrison River	
Langley:
Aldergrove 	
County Line 	
Glen Valley	
Glenwood	
Langley, East   	
Langley Fort	
Langley Prairie.....
Langley, West	
Lochiel	
Milner	
Murray ville	
Otter	
Patricia	
Springbrook 	
Willoughby 	
Maple Ridge :
Albion	
Hammond 	
Haney	
Lillooet, South	
Maple Ridge	
Alex. Robinson   ....
Ruskin	
Webster's Corners ..
Whonnock	
Matsqui:
Aberdeen 	
Bradner	
Clayburn  	
Dunach 	
Dennison  	
Glenmore	
Jubilee 	
Matsqui   	
Mount Lehman	
Peardonville	
Poplar	
Ridgedale   	
Mission:
Cardinell	
Cedar Valley	
Hatzic	
Mission City	
Silverdale   	
Silverhill	
Stave Falls  	
Stave River Gardens
Steelhead	
Oak Bay:
Monterey Avenue ..
Willows -
Peachland:
Peachland	
Trepanier	
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows   	
Point Grey:
Edith Cavell	
Dunbar 	
P. McCaffrey .
it ...
B. B. Marr...
R. H. Port .
A. J. Stuart .
J. M. Taylor.
Miss Bradshaw ,
Wm. Buchanan,
n 	
H. McGregor ...
L. Broe   	
W. Dykes	
Miss M. Ewart...
Mrs. V. M. Hyde.
158
17
62
59
29
81
144
33
19
80
130
47
30
30
30
20
109
277
20
99
84
65
74
73
54
53
81
15
20
44
23
114
38
23
58
59
47
55
336
22
16
44
15
13
295
297
47
12
650
124
597
79
152
17
44
52
29
30
25
77
135
34
16
65
120
42
21
25
26
20
102
257
19
96
56
32
66
67
51
48
74
15
19
43
22
108
25
20
55
56
41
53
325
22
15
13
10
293
286
44
9
640
123
664
71
144
28 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 37
SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
O)   QJ
Qti
O)    .
b£ re
U 13
ti a
■33
HO
u
'o
o
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
a
u
OJ
>
S
S
rt
W
6
%
a
o
0
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
20
1
1
30
1
Influenza; pertussis	
Influenza ; pertussis	
Good.
3
7
6
2
3
2
No well, using
water from creek
Poor	
Good ; no well....
3
2
Scarlet fever	
Good.
2
2
2
2
3
10
Good	
Good.
13
Chicken-pox	
5
..
1
1
3
Dirty.
1
No well;  building
o)d and in need
of repair
1
1
1
Good	
Good.
6
47
2
12
134
11
20
5
5
6
19
1
5
3
....
1
2
12
1
4
9
Good	
Yes.
2
7
.,
.,
1
..
..
,
8
2
2
M
Good	
s
15
1
4
Scarlet fever, 2	
„
2
2
1
.
7
5
2
7
1
4
3
25
2
1
9
3
3
5
M
5
.
..
6
Rough construction
Crowded	
Clean ; adequate.
17
1
16
((
70
Asthmatic, 1; neurasthenic, 1
15
1
30 cases of mild flu	
M
12
	
8
Myocarditis and endocarditis, 1
16
Old school; inadequate
,,
6
4
.
34
5
3
53
27
16
1
35
35
43
9
85
33
Cardiac,   16 ;   stammering,   1;
anaemia, 10 ; pulmonary, 4
Cardiac, 6; minor defects, 8 ;
anaemia,  13 ; orthopedic, 3 ;
pulmonary, 8 ; hernia, 1
Scarlet fever ;   mumps ;
measles;   whooping.
cough
Scarlet fever ;   mumps ;
measles ;  whooping-
cough
No overcrowding;
well    ventilated
and heated
No overcrowding;
well    ventilated
and heated
60
in
1
ii
124
77
Nervous 15 ; cardiac, 10; skin
affections,  20 ; anaemia,  20 ;
other affections, 15
8
5
Whooping-cough,   56 ;
chicken-pox, 90
Mumps,   39;      chicken-
pox, 1
Mumps, 3; diphtheria, 1;
chicken-pox, 2
Mumps, 41;   whooping-
cough, 2;    measles, 1;
chicken-pox, 19
Excellent	
In good condition.
Good	
Excellent.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
49
1
Enlarged thyroid, 75 ; cardiac,
24;   pulmonary,   1;   orthopaedic, 1
Enlarged thyroid, 2; nervous,
1 ; cardiac, 2 ; anaemia, 4
1
1
4
3
1 M 38
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
p. -a
03
SC
Point Grey—Continued.
Kerrisdale	
Lord Kitchener....
Lloyd George	
Magee	
Oak Street	
Prince of Wales ...
Queen Mary	
Strathcona Heights
Saanich :
Cedar Hill 	
Cloverdale	
Craigflower	
Gordon Head	
Keating   	
Lake Hill	
MacKenzie Avenue
Model   	
Prospect Lake	
Royal Oak	
Saanichton	
Saanich, West	
Strawberry Vale...
Tillicum Road	
Tolmie	
Sumas:
Huntingdon  	
Kilgarde	
Straiton	
Sumas, Upper	
Summerland :
Central	
Surrey:
Anniedale	
Clayton 	
Cloverdale ........
Colebrook 	
Crescent	
Elgin	
Grand View Height
Hall's Prairie	
Johnston Road	
Kensington, East..
Kensington Prairie
W. Dykes .
R. L. Miller .
J. P. Vye....
R. L. Miller .
F. W. Andrew.
F. D. Sinclair.
Mrs. C. M. Hyde.
Miss M. Ewart.
Mrs. 0. M. Hyde.
Miss M. Ewart...
Miss K. McRae...
MissM. Griffin.
Miss K. McRae.
634
431
641
610
139
476
697
169
204
41
70
56
196
60
98
285
401
65
35
10
282
19
61
172
33
35
30
25
46
43
812
267
600
727
140
622
664
205
204
41
70
56
196
60
98
285
401
61
31
14
72
270
17
47
161
32
30
26
22
78
32
25 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 39
SCHOOLS—Continued,
OJ
OB
oj   .
to re
*. "3
ti p
"d °*
BIO
o
es
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
a
a.
>
re
0i
3
«
6
be
"S
D.
a
a
u
o
a
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
57
57
11
9
36
24
7
29
16
4
1
l
l
2
5
1
2
Enlarged thyroid, 88 ; cardiac,
21; pulmonary, 2; orthopaedic,
3 ; anaemia, 5
Enlarged thyroid, 58 ; cardiac,
18; pulmonary, 2
Enlarged thyroid, 74 ; cardiac,
21 ; anaemia, 9
Enlarged thyroid, 80 ; nervous,
2 ; pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 17;
orthopaedic, 2 ; anaemia, 10
Enlarged thyroid, 16 ; nervous,
1 ; cardiac, 6
Enlarged thyroid, 68 ; cardiac,
20 ; anaemia,   3 ;   whooping-
cough, I
Enlarged thyroid, 75 ; cardiac,
24;   pulmonary,   1;   orthopaedic, 1
Enlarged thyroid, 21; cardiac,
4 ; anaemia, 2
1
1
3
2
2
3
20
20
20
10
1
8
31
2
4
2
1
1
2
2
2
Mumps, 9 ;     whooping-
cough, 2;  measles, 7;
chicken-pox, 2
Mumps,  53 ;   whoopintr-
cough, 17 ; measles, 5 ;
scarlet fever, 1
Mumps, 103 ; measles, 6;
diphtherial; chicken-
pox, 9
Mumps,  8;     whooping-
cough, 2 ;   measles 2 ;
chicken-pox, 37 ; scarlet fever, 2
Mumps, 31; scarlet fever,
2; chicken-pox, 2
Mumps, 12;   whooping-
cou^h, 2 ; measles, 2 ;
chicken-pox, 1; scarlet
fever, 11
Mumps, 14;    whooping-
cough, 8; chicken-pox,
2 ; scarlet fever, 3
Mumps, 3 ;   measles, 2 ;
chicken-pox, 3
Good	
Good.
92
69
9
32
49
7
22
Good; not crowded ; well heated
and ventilated
Ditto 	
Clean ; adequate.
80
Scarlet fever ;   measles ;
whooping-cough
Measles ; whooping-
cough
21
19
9
Squint, 1; paralytic deformity,
1
7
..
10
68
1
1
2
Paralytic deformity, 1; chronic
arthritis, 1
6
Measles ;   scarlet fever ;
whooping-cough
.,
9
Good; not crowded ; well heated
and ventilated
Ditto 	
Very good.
11
6
Measles,   whooping-
cough
Scarlet fever;   measles ;
whooping-cough
19
12
1
1
46
1
"a
2
5
3
3
1
2
....
5
2
8
3
1
8
74
1
1
5
"i'
-
12
Whooping-cough	
Measles ;   scarlet fever ;
whooping-cough
Scarlet fever; whooping-
cough
20
4
6
6
2
1
2
29
1
1
70
19
Diseased   eye,   1; cardiac,  1;
nervous, 1
2
ir
4
2
18
5
113
1
Nervous, 4; pulmonary, 3 ; cardiac, 2
Chorea, 1; defective palate, 1.
Chronic ant. poly., 1; pink-eye, 6
Ulcer cornea, 1; tongue-tied, 1;
pigeon-chest, 1_; anaemia, 2;
debility, 1; hypo, thyroid, 1;
synovitis of knee, 1; ft. systolic, 1
Chicken-pox, 12; whooping-cough, 58
Modern, frame on
concrete ; steam
heat
Unsatisfactory	
Good	
Adequate;
modern flush.
1
Diphtheria,   1;   scarlet
fever, 1
3
6
ii
3
1
2
i
i
2
4
Pigeon-chest, 2; defective
palate, 1
Imped,  speech,   1 ;   high-arch
palate, 1
6
1
Mumps; whooping-cough
Scarlet fever ; mumps...
Chicken-pox ; measles...
Good.	
4
Under repair. M 40
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
rH "S
°a
£ z!r
v '-
OK
Surrey—Continued.
Newton   	
Port Mann	
Springdale	
Strawberry Hill ....
Surrey Centre :
Tynehead 	
Westminster, South.
White Rock	
Woodward's Hill....
Vancouver, North :
Capilano	
Keith Lynn	
Lynn Valley	
North Star	
Roche Point	
Vancouver, South:
Brock  	
Carleton	
Champlain	
Connaught	
Gordon 	
Moberley and Fraser
R. MeBride	
Sir A. Mackenzie....
John Norquay 	
Laura Secord	
Lord Selkirk	
Sexsmith	
Tecumseh	
Van Home	
General Wolfe	
Vancouver, West;
Capilano	
Cypress Park	
Dundarave	
Hollyburn fc	
Pauline Johnstone..
F. D. Sinclair.
R. V. McCarley.
G. A. Lamont
F. Stainsby.
Miss E. Bell .
Miss E. Edwards.
Miss E. Edwards.
Miss E. Bell	
Miss E. Edwards.
Miss E. Bell	
45
49
23
47
126
30
109
100
288
193
24
494
18
48
434
660
529
244
941
336
737
417
679
74
34
41
23
36
101
26
109
99
286
193
24
493
18
48
430
527
241
938
335
734
417
679
50
49
211
25
18
12
26
8
8
13
18
21
41
3
7
23
13
9
27
2
4
9
1
12
27 17 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
M 41
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Oi
>
Ci £
<D 0)
OH
■a
Oi   ■
u 'd
a G
BO
*©
a
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a*
|
y
>
09
O
3
CJ
m
d
a
i
0
%
to
a
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
3
1
2
5
3
5
3
3
2
12
9
15
14
4
2
3
2
3
3
1
4
6
27
6
Chorea, 1; anaemia, 1;  cryptic
tonsil, 1; adenitis, 1; chronic
amp. poly., 1
2
Whooping-cough	
Mumps; whooping-cough
Good	
Good.
4
Unsatisfactory	
Good.
2
Mastoid operation, 1 ; rupture,
1; facial paralysis, 1; marg.
blepharitis, 1; deviated septum, 1
Anasmia, 2; defective palate, 1
5
Mumps;   scarlet-fever ;
whooping-cough
Fair.
2
6
1
1
10
2
Mumps, 4 	
Scarlet fever ;  measles ;
whooping-cough; diphtheria
Satisfactory	
Good	
16
Anaemia, 2 ; chorea, 1; defective palate, 1; fct.  systolic,
1; bifid uvula, 1
Marg.  blepharitis, 1 ;   ft. systolic, 1; high-arch palate, 1;
stomatitis, 1 ; anaemia, 8
Under repair.
Good.
8
Satisfactory	
Unsatisfactory	
5
20
21
Asthma,  1 ;  heart-disease,  2 ;
epileptic, 1
12
4
5
10
6
"4
Chicken-pox; whooping-
cough ; measles
Scarlet fever ; measles..
Clean ; adequate.
55
Heart-disease, 2;   nervous, 1;
asthma and bronchitis, 2
24
Chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
Diphtheria,  1;   measles,
1;   chicken-pox,    16;
mumps,  42 ;     whoop-
ping-cough, 6
Diphtheria,   1;     scarlet
fever, 5 ;    measles, 3 ;
mumps, 23 ;   chicken-
pox,   91 ;     whooping-
cough, 10
Measles, 1; mumps, 5 ..
Measles, 1; mumps, 6...
Measles, 28 ; mumps, 38;
whooping-cough, 9
Diphtheria,  1;  chicken-
pox,  7; scarlet fever,
1; measles, 38; mumps,
15; whooping-cough, 13
Scarlet fever, 2 ; measles,
54 ;   chicken-pox,   81 ;
mumps,   151 ;   whooping-cough, 16
Scarlet fever, 3 ; measles,
5; smallpox, 1; mumps,
31 ; chicken-pox,   20;
whooping-cough, 7
Diphtheria,   1 ;  chicken-
pox,   2;  whooping-
cough, 4 ; mumps,  39;
Measles, 1 ; chicken-pox,
5; whooping-cough, 22;
mumps, 27
Scarlet fever, 1 ; mumps,
49; measles, 14; whooping-cough, 8; chicken-
pox, 37
Diphtheria,  1; measles,
2; chicken-pox, 4
Scarlet fever, 2; chicken-
pox,   2 ;  mumps,  34 ;
whooping-cough, 10
Measles, 6; chicken-pox,
21 ; mumps, 11
Scarlet fever, 2; chicken-
pox,   28;   measles,  1 ;
mumps, 78; whooping-
cough, 4
Scarlet fever, 3 ;         1
,-measles, 22; whoop--J
ing-cough, 13
7
188
3
16
1
2
10
8
9
10
6
2
16
1
14
1
3
3
7
32
15
46
35
21
15
41
26
39
21
6
26
40
28
32
44
1
1
"3"
Conjunctivitis, 1; vaccinations,
38 ; home visits, 50
Conjunctivitis, 44; vaccinations, 33 ; swabs, 8 ; home
visits, 89
4
2
8
10
32
4
7
278
3
7
Vaccinations, 3 ; home visits, 4
Conjunctivitis, 5; vaccinations,
6 ; home visits, 46
Vaccinations, 15 ; home visits,
25; swabs, 6
Conjunctivitis, 4 ; home visits,
90; vaccinations, 28; swabs, 1
Conjunctivitis, 3 ; home visits,
83; vaccinations, 36; swabs, 1
Conjunctivitis, 20; home visits,
36; vaccinations, 33
Vaccinations, 3; home visits, 13
Conjunctivitis, 9 ; home visits,
136; vaccinations, 27
Conjunctivitis, 1 ; home visits,
16 ; vaccinations, 30
Conjunctivitis, 10; home visits,
68; vaccinations, 47; swabs, 1
Conjunctivitis, 1 ; home visits,
19 ; vaccinations, 5
Vaccinations, 21; home visits,
59
4
4
2
5
2
4
3
1
4
2
9
3
1
20
5
7
5
"9"
12
14
15
6
2
23
6
21
9
7
5
10
4
3
8
2
14
1
6
Ir
156
..
126
19S
251
142
66
275
>■   	
11
76
177
151
220
3
Good	
Yes.
6
1
2
25
.
,.
18
.
33
8 British Columbia.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
01
a
3
o zc\
o
OT
ft
P     .
ft. IB
M QJ
°1
1*
/-, a
a
o
B
ti
*3
a-.
a
>
tj B
S-.2
■S.S
fit*
QJ
> M
qj -p
^ «
ii Ci
OH
as
CD
ti
z;
0 a
a ti
nn
09
3
'0
QJ
-a
2-
2a
c 0
T. A. Swift	
221
13
12
9
15
6
46
15
10
26
30
26
28
14
10
18
8
37
9
13
13
19
83
19
59
20
8
3
25
18
14
16
29
10
12
22
20
14
12
14
26
45
20
22
11
12
35
13
10
18
14
206
12
11
9
15
4
42
15
10
24
30
22
27
12
10
16
8
34
9
13
13
19
80
19
46
18
8
3
22
17
14
16
28
10
12
22
20
14
11
14
26
45
20
19
11
12
34
12
9
18
14
T
1
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
50
Adelphi	
2
2
MissH. Kelly.
2
2
1
2
i
"i'
2
2
2
6
2
1
2
5
0
i
7
2
7
6
G. A. Charter t	
"i
3
1
1
"i
"2'
"2'
1
1
2
3
3
2
1
1
2
9
Miss A. J. Duncan
11
0
12
12
a J. M. Willoughby	
4
1
1
1
1
5
2
2
3
5
3
2
W. A. Coghlin  ..
2
11
5
3
8
1
1
3
3'
3
2
9
1
4
3
1
1
1
4
"2'
3
3
1
3
3
1
6
2
22
H. W. Keith	
8
F. E. Coy	
3
Atlin 	
H. H. Murphy	
1
Balfour	
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
2
14
1
7
"2'
2
1
4
i
14
6
8
7
H. H. Murphy 	
6
2
H. A. Christie	
6
2
i
1
1
1
"i
1
A. W. McCordick	
4
9
4
E. M. Sutherland	
3
5
Belford	
15
6
12
2
1
1
6
2
3
2
1
5
G. E. Bayfield	
IS
7
K. T. Stanier	
Miss E. Naden	
?,
Bend	
1
C. J. M. Willoughby	
3
2
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
2
1
3
fl
9
M. G. Archibald	
4
Big Eddy.	
2
2
2
3
fi 17 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
M 43
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
0>
>
M
QJ   QJ
as
QJ    ■
tC OT
ti d
= 2
HO
QJ
U
'3
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
I
QJ
>
OS
CD
CJ
6
OJ
a
a
o
fl
Acute Fevers which
have occvirred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
88
10
1
11
7
26
No	
3
Scarlet fever, 3; measles,
1
Good 	
Needs attention ..
Clean   and    fairly
well ventilated
Very good; ventilation and heating satisfactory.
Good 	
Yes.
Good.
2
4
1
No.
Yes.
12
2
4
Nervous, 1; infantile paralysis,
1; otorrhoea, 1
Influenza early in 1926;
school closed for a week
or so
Yes.
Building  in good
condition;    not
crowded;    good
ventilation;
heating fair
Adequate	
Good 	
14
6
"9'
4
ii
"2'
1
13
2
4
10
2
2
3
4
9
8
4
13
3
Yes.
13
O.K	
Bad.
1
Log   building    in
good condition ;
heating     good;
ventilation sufficient
Good 	
4
Yes.
4
10
Whooping-cough, 30   ...
Good 	
4
Yes.
1
2
4
9
11
4
3
1
2
11
31
Scarlet-fever, 1;    pneumonia, 1
8
Yes.
13
Good 	
9
Poorly   heated ;
needs painting
8
Compensated endocarditis,  1;
mitral incompetence, 1
1
one unsatisfactory.
8
1
T
"s'
1
5
3
1
'4'
8
6
2
"3'
22
5
1
3
2
1
1
4
5
1
3
3
13
9
2
"2'
1
1
6
2
1
2
Good 	
10
10
8
Improved; painted
outside
Good  	
Poorly   ventilated
and lighted
14
Good.
6
12
O.K	
Good  	
O.K.
6
3
Good.
e
2
Poor;   pits too
shallow.
Good.
16
12
12
Yes.
5
Orthopaedic, 1; tongue-tied, 1.
Frame building in
need   of   painting ; ventilation,
heating  and
lighting good
Good 	
5
22
"Wax in ears, 6;   cardiac,  1 ;
blepharitis, 1; nasal catarrh,
2 ; irregular teeth, 2 ;  nasal
obstruction, 1; orthopaedic, 1
Clean; adequate.
7
Satisfactory	
?,
Good 	
Wooden building;
ventilation sufficient ;     heating
adequate; lighting good
Good.
7
fair repair. RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ra
a
a
rH    .
<M   QJ
o
m
OT
ft
P     .
M  QJ
°'s
°s
d
S3
a
ti
s
QJ >.
QJ   QJ
OS
QJ
>
QJ.2
QJ
£ 6b
£ a
QJ •£
<M   ti
QJ QJ
OW
ti
I/J
ti
Z
oj ti
> .—
QJ rt
<W   QJ
QJ  p
on
m
'3
a
QJ
■a
-a
la
a 0
8
9
12
10
20
9
62
20
6
28
8
8
20
16
16
9
15
19
14
15
11
28
25
134
14
13
89
11
59
56
12
14
7
46
18
51
27
9
8
16
65
17
17
13
15
69
6
16
16
30
31
21
61
6
52
14
38
10
64
21
15
18
121
13
8
9
11
8
20
6
62
20
6
28
8
7
16
15
16
9
15
19
13
15
6
28
25
125
13
13
71
11
59
55
6
14
7
45
18
50
26
9
8
16
65
17
17
12
13
67
6
16
16
29
31
21
59
5
49
14
38
10
61
21
13
17
113
12
i
1
9.
1
I
4
2
1
1
1
9
4
10
3
1
2
3
i
i
i
1
7
1
3
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
i
2
1
1
3
F. Inglis	
i
7
1
3
....
3
2
6
2
2
4
"3'
1
'4
18
2
4
10
1
1
2
6
2
1
14
1
8
10
2
1
2
5
1
"2
1
1
1
4
1
4
2
8
4
1
8
5
1
Burns Lake    	
J. T. Steele	
15
17
2
T
1
2
6
3
1
2
i
4
1
3
1
4
5
1
2
3
1
1
5
1
5
3
8
3
1
2
2
1
1
3
10
3
1
7
1
3
2
1
1
10
ii'
3
3
5
1
1
6
16
6
3
1
2
1
11
.„.
2
7
1
6
14
5
Miss 0. Gawley...
2
1
3
4
'i'
3
"i"
9
1
1
6
VV. Scatchard	
7
16 t
17 Geo. 5                                       Board of Health.                                                M 45
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
is
■W   QJ
QJ   QJ
OH
r3
QJ     •
Ill ^
ti a
«!
HO
aj
'0
O
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
1
U
>
m
'B
CJ
W
6
to
OJ
a
a
u
o
bJO
fl
5
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
3
1
4
1
11
11
2
7
1
4
3
8
2
3
3
3
7
3
11
Good 	
Earth.
5
2
1
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
3
Endocarditis i ollowinf?; rheumatism
Improved;    new
heating plant
Log   building    in
fair repair; ventilation   adequate ;   heating
good
Good    	
stable; dirty.
closets; in poor
repair.
"i'
2
2
7
1
Clean ; O.K.
Yes.
O.K  	
Ventilation   poor ;
otherwise O.K.
Clean   and   fairly
well ventilated
Satisfactory	
Excellent	
2
Good.
Yes.
5
5
13
6
2
3
1
2
11
Clean; adequate.
i
Dirty.
Good    	
O.K	
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
1
1
1
5
Whooping-cough	
Clean; adequate.
21
3
1
27
4
9
18
1
4
2
21
A
7
3
1
6
7
1
5
J
4
3
12
1
5
3
4
8
19
11
1
8
10
5
24
Dumb, 1	
Chicken-pox, 8	
O.K.
0. K ....
Bad.
Underweight, 48 ;  cleft palate,
1; pediculosis, 3 ; strabismus,
2
3
Good 	
Fairly satisfactory
Kairlv good 	
Not crowded; well
ventilated
Excellent	
Clean; adequate.
10
11
1
4
6
10
Chicken-pox, 4	
Chicken-pox, 12	
Yes.
2
Clean; adequate.
Adequate; not
clean.
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory.
"i
6
5
i
6
4
20
4
1
4
13
5
1
i
8
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
.
Cardiac, 2	
Excellent	
Adequate	
Good 	
O.K.
Yes.
i
Clean; adequate.
i
Adequate	
Good 	
Satisfactory	
Good.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
"3
2
5
7
1
8
Well    ventilated;
not crowded  ...
Good ..
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Scarlet fever, 3	
i
Fair	
Good 	
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
3
Inadequate.
25
2
5
2
11
5
6
11
76
5
1
1
5
6
17
Underweight, 19 ; eczema, 1
Gocd      	
Good 	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
3
Scarlet fever;  Vincent's
angina ;   chicken-pox ;
whooping-cough
2
O.K.
3
3
3
..
	
Yes.
1
28
Pertussis, 1 ;   mumps, 1;
measles, 1
Excellent	
Good 	
Yes.
■ M 46
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft, TS
<H   fl
QJ  >i
>£
oj ti
% =
QH
Q>
OJ   OJ
OK
9g
SB
Chase River	
Chaumox	
Cheamview	
Cherry Creek Valley.
Chilco 	
Chinook Cove	
Christina Lake	
Christian Valley	
Chu Chua	
Clayoquot
Clinton ...
Clo-oose...
Coal Creek .
Coalmont	
Cobble Hill	
Cokato	
Columbia Gardens.
Colwood	
Comox	
Concord	
Coombs   ...
Copper City	
Copper Mountain.
Corbin	
Cowichan Lake. .
Cowichan Station.
Craigellachie	
Crawford Bay ....
Crawford Creek ..
Crescent Valley.,.
Creston	
Crow's Nest .
Croydon 	
Curzon.
Dashwood	
Dawson Creek	
Dawson Creek, North.
Dawson Creek, South.
Decker Lake	
Deep Cove 	
Deep Creek   	
Deer Park	
Demars, West   	
Denman Island	
Departure Ba}r	
Dewdney	
Diamond Crossing ....
Divide	
Doe Creek	
Dome Creek.
Dorr	
Doriston ...
Dove Creek ..
Dragon Lake .
Driftwood....
Ducks Range.
Dunster	
Eagle Valley .
Echo Bay ....
Echo Lake . .
Edgewater ...
Edgewood....
Elk Bridge ...
Elk Valley....
T. J. McPhee	
P. M. Wilson	
J. C. Elliot	
A. D. Morgan 	
W. R. Stone	
C. J. M. Willoughby.
W. Truax	
A. Francis	
H. H. Murphy	
D. S. Dixon	
R. Gibson ...
W. E. Bavis..
W. Workman.
E. Sheffield....
F. T. Stanier..
D. Corsan	
W. A. Coghlin.
I. B. Hudson..
T. A. Briggs	
J. C. Elliiot	
L. T. Davis	
R. G. Large	
Lee Smith	
R. Elliot	
Alan Beech	
H. M. Watson ...
.1. H. Hamilton ..
D. J.   Barclay. . . .
J. H. Hamilton ..
H. H. Mackenzie.
G. B. Henderson
R. Elliot	
J. Sandilands....
G. B. Henderson.
L. T. Davis	
W. A. Watson ...
J. T. Steele	
S. E. M. Hoops....
H. W. Keith	
J. E. H. Kelso
P. J. Emerson	
T. A. Briggs	
T. J. McPhee.  .  .
A. J. Stuart	
H. B. Maxwell....
E. M. Sutherland .
W. A. Watson
J. Sandilands.
H. A. Christie .
F. Inglis	
T. A. Briggs	
G. R. Baker	
C. H. Hankinson
C. J. M. Willoughby .
J. Sandilands	
E. Buckell	
A. W. McCordick .  ..
F. W. Green	
F. E. Coy	
.1. E. H.'Kelso	
F. J. Buckley	
Miss E. Naden.
MissH. Kelly.
Miss H. Murray.
Miss E. Naden..
Miss I. Jeffares.
Miss H. Murray.
Miss Hewertson .
16
17
13
14
10
12
51
13
27
26
15
17
50
64
11
39
10
28
50
52
50
20
29
8
31
191
12
15
12
20
13
16
30
8
77
33
14
18
8
19
12
14
9
11
11
8
11
14
26
IS
16
17
13
14
10
12
46
13
97
27
23
11
13
48
61
12
37
8
23
50
42
43
18
24
8
31
181
10
14
11
20
13
13
27
6
7
52
8
70
18
19
11
12
8
11
10
7
9
14
26
18
8
10 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 47
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
a>
>
la
*W   QJ
QJ   QJ
OH
*d
QJ     ■
t. ^
3 J
H3
oi
(-.
'0
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
u
o
>
w
<x>
d
bo
ft
a
a
C-l
o
fcfl
a
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
12
3
13
2
3
4
Good	
O.K.
i
Dirty.
Good 	
Yes.
"i
4
6
7
8
2
O.K	
O.K.
6
Improved ;   new
floor
Not   crowded;
ventilation satisfactory ;   well
heated
Great   improvement  over   last
year
Two  toilets  and
3
stable; dirty.
15
5
16
26
2
1
6
1
2
2
7
2
3
3
Chicken-pox, 8	
Not crowded; ventilation    fair ;
heated by stoves
Poor building	
Good  	
ing down; only
one closet  for
all.
Yes.
14
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
11
6
g
8
Orthopaedic, 2 ; squint, 1; nervous, 4 ; antemia, 1; dyspepsia, 1
V.D.H.. 1	
Excellent	
Good 	
Yes.
9
Clean; adequate.
6
12
1
7
"2'
"8'
1
2
6
4
1
1
1
24
Good 	
Clean; adequate.
4
2
11
Yes.
15
Mumps, 10; measles, 1..
Good.
12
'2
11
1
Good 	
Good.
11
Yes.
5
1
1
4
20
Whooping-cough    epidemic
Good 	
Yes.
3
Good.
6
Adequate	
Fair	
Yes.
6
1
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
1
2
2
4
2
5
1
Good 	
3
1
Excellent	
10
Yes.
6
i
i
2
2
1
4
4
1
10
•>,
Good	
5
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
1
Wl
Mild influenza, 10  	
Satisfactory	
Quite efficient ....
Satisfactory , -..
Good 	
O.K.
4
2
1
7
•2
Satisfactory.
Yes.
(No pupils examined; school out
early on account of prairie
fire)
6
3
Very good.
6
5
Good    	
4
quate.
Clean; adequate.
i'
8
9,
3
3
Fair..  .
Clean; adequate.
4
3
1
Satisfactory	
Good 	
Poorly heated ....
Yes.
5
One; good.
1
3
7
Clean; adequate.
Yes
3
16
3
6
O K
5 •
M 48
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
01
ft
fl
o z~\
o
7T,  QJ
on
P.
=3    .
^ QJ
°i
§1
*-.  QJ
d
o
'u
D
a
H
qj rt
fig
OS
0)
r>
Hi
os>
QJ
£ a
a 0
OR
Oi
as
z,
a ch
> a
" '£
QJ +.
QJ rt
<^i   Ci
QJ u
aa
2
'3
a
a
if
Si
31
a 0
Elko ...            	
H. A. Christie	
28
25
24
17
22
12
56
12
40
16
11
81
10
20
38
13
47
24
17
9
8
16
10
10
9
9
13
37
9
50
59
11
50
7
13
19
12
12
83
55
23
16
8
68
7
13
8
24
14
53
30
33
10
34
12
5
138
16
24
25
23
17
22
12
51
10
40
16
11
81
10
13
38
13
47
24
17
9
8
16
9
6
9
8
13
37
9
49
55
■    11
45
6
13
19
10
12
76
51
21
16
8
67
7
9
7
21
13
52
28
33
10
27
11
5
128
15
5
"i'
3
2
1
3
1
2
7
2
1
"i'
7
4
3
2
]
1
1
7
3
2
3
2
1
3
5
2
1
2
10
5
4
7
8
2
6
5
1
5
2
16
1
7
9
2
12
3
1
2
6
\V. J. Knox	
W. R. Stone 	
H. W. Keith	
W. B. Stone  	
\
W. A. Coghlin	
L. T. Davis	
Miss H. Murray...
W. J. Knox	
H. B. Maxwell	
1
2
2
Miss Hewertson..
Falkland	
1
P. D. van Kleeck	
4
6
2
2
4
6
1
2
2
2
2
1
9
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
"i
Fauquier	
Field.                    	
J. E. H. Kelso 	
Fife	
W. Truax	
G. E. Bayfield	
W. J. Knox	
1
1
1
6
Fish Lake	
C. J. M. Willoughby	
H. A. Christie	
1
1
P. Ewert	
Forestdale    	
Forest Grove	
Forks    ,	
1
3
3
12
4
12
9
5
6
i
3
2
4
18
16
10
3
C. J. M. Willoughby	
....
3
' i'
1
1
1
3
1
5
7
1
1
"2"
1
12
3
6
4
4
1
12
3
6
4
4
W. R. Stone	
•
C. Ewert	
Fort George, South	
W. R. Stone	
F. W. Green       	
1
15
2
1
13
5
1
i
1
1
1
3
3
4
1
1
3
10
16
5
4
W. R. Stone	
Fruitlands    ....
C. J. M. Willoughby	
W. A. Coghlin	
C. H. West	
E. M. Sutherland	
R. Ziegler	
1
1
E. M. Sutherland	
4
"i
i
5
4
4
1
5
1
6
4
21
10
20
3
5
2
18
5
D. J. Barclay	
Gill	
i
2
2
1
6
2
1
"7'
3
6
6
4
1
y
"3
3
3
2
2
1
3
2
H. N. Watson	
Miss I. Jeffares...
3
4
14
1
Miss H. Kelly
1 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 49
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
"cj ji
0>   OJ
h5
O
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
>
s
w
6
be
03
ft
a
1
©
bo
q
3
Acute Fevers  which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean  and
adequate.
10
4
5
Chronic bronchitis, 1; chorea,
1; cardiac, 1; eczema, 1
2
Influenza rather bad ;   7
cases  mumps   during
year
Good 	
14
Crowded   and
poorly heated
chemical;   satisfactory'.
Yes.
14
1
2
8
2
10
Adequate	
Yes.
3
"4
2
1
1
2
6
4
2
18
Clean; adequate.
5
2
3
4
6
1
1
4
1
1
2
2
5
All in good shape except two .
Still's disease, 1 ; orthopaedic, 2
Good    	
15
Quite efficient....
2
1
out.
Yes.
6
10
Adequate.
Yes.
1
1 fS
Crowded ; ventilation poor
3
Scarlet fever.  .........
1
Good	
Yes.
3
Good.
3
Curvature of spine and unequal
thorax, 1
Too airy for winter;
not   finished off
inside
Heating    unsatisfactory ; ventili-
lation,  windows
only
Satisfactory   	
New and adequate
7
equate, but
should he two
buildings.
3
clean.
Clean ; adequate.
1
i
"i
2
1
7
4
1
Deviated septum L., 1; systolic
aortic murmur, 1
Good  	
Yes.
1
Clean ; adequate.
23
5
Good    	
Yes.
20
3
2
■   8
15
Whooping-cough	
Clean ; adequate.
21
Good	
1
8
5
2
8
4
4
"
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
1
1
2
1
"    	
5
M
4
2
29
13
Asthma, 1; pyrrhcea, 2 ; hernia,
1; tongue-tied, 1
Underweight, 32;  blepharitis,
1; cardiac, 1
Clean; adequate.
22
9
Not crowded; well
ventilated ; cold
in cold weather
Unsatisfactory ;
old log building
Good 	
Ventilation poor..
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory.
O K.
7
27
1
6
3
"7"
1
1
2
1
"2
3
4
4
7
4
2
Rachitic chest, 1; stammers, 1
	
Satisfactory.
3
Clean; adequate.
One ; good.
5
1?
Onlv fair	
-
4
Girls' O.K.; boys'
needs repairing.
Rtf
Building  in good
condition, not
crowded ;   good
ventilation ;
heating fair
Good	
13
10
22
6
1
10
Heart-murmur, 3	
....
1
clean ;   ade-
quete.
13
?,
Yes.
4
1
1
Clean, adequate.
15
5
9
Nervous, 2;   cardiac, 1 ;   epilepsy, 1
Good 	
Fairly satisfactory
Clean; adequate. M 50
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
•w  OJ
fik
03
m
el
K
be
o
0)
HCQ
•a |
Gowland Harbour
Granby Bay   	
Grande Frairie....
Grandview Bench.
Granite Bay	
Grantham . .
Grant Aline..
Grasmere ...
Gray Creek.
Green Slide..
Grindrod
Hall Siding..
Hail's Landing
Happy Valley .
Hardwick Island
Harewood	
Harpers Camp
Harrogate ....
Harrop	
Hatzic Prairie	
Hazelton	
Hazelton New	
Headquarters	
Hedley	
Heffley Creek	
Heflley Creek, Upper..
Heriot Bay	
Hillcrest.
Hilliers..
Hilltop. .
Hilton....
Hope	
Hornby Island .
Horse Creek  . ..
Hosmer	
Houston	
Howe Sound	
Hudson's Hope .
Hulatt	
Hunter Island .
Hupel	
Huscroft	
Hutton 	
Ingram Mountain,
loco	
Irving's Landing...
Isabella Point	
Jaffray	
Jesmond	
Jervis Inlet	
Joe Rich	
Johnson's Landing.
Jordan River	
Jura	
Kaleden  	
Kaleva	
Kedlestone	
Keefers	
Kelowna, East	
Kelowna, South .
Keremeos	
R. Ziegler	
D. R. Learoyd.
R. W. Irving ..,
H. W. Keith....
W. W. B.rdsall .
T. A. Briggs...   .
T. J. McPhee	
H. A. Christie ...
D. J. Barclay...
J. H. Hamilton..
H. W. Keith	
H. II. Mackenzie.
J. H. Hamilton.
B. Hudson . ..
A. W. McCordick .
T. J. McPhee	
F. V. Agnew	
Paul Ewert	
H. H. Mackenzie..
A. J. Stuart.
R. G. Large .
T. A. Briggs ..
M. D. McEwen.
R. W. Irving...
R. Ziegler
H. W. Keith...
L. T. Davis	
VV. Truax	
H. G. Williams..
J. C. Elliot	
T. A. Briggs	
Paul Ewert	
D. Corsan	
0. H. Hankinson.
F. Inglis	
W. A. Watson ...
W. R. Stone	
G. E. Darby 	
H.W. Keith	
G. B. Henderson
W. Laishley	
A. Francis ....
C. R. Svmmes.
A. Henderson	
E. M. Sutherland.
H. A. Christie ....
R. Gibson	
A. Henderson	
W. J. Knox 	
D. J. Barclay	
I. B. Hudson	
Lee Smith	
II. McGregor	
A. W. McCordick .
H. G. Williams ...
P. M. Wilson	
W. J. Knox	
M. D. McEwen.
A. Francis	
Miss A. J. Duncan
Miss H. Kelly.
Miss Murray.
Missfl. K. Gawley
13
186
17
26
70
7
8
10
86
12
12
22
11
15
26
12
27
25
48
54
18
9
13
17
20
11
10
14
16
33
8
100
15
14
8
8
21
18
10
108
14
35
8
18
11
7
11
13
15
15
6
8
75
13
186
16
25
7
39
61
7
8
10
82
10
12
22
9
360
10
15
26
12
27
24
46
54
15
17
20
11
7
67
14
14
31
8
94
15
14
8
7
21
18
10
108
14
14
33
8
16
10
7
9
12
15
13
12 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 51
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
>
Is
^4 a
QJ  9,
OH
*3
QJ    •
QD»
rt fl
HO
0J
g
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
|
u
QJ
QJ
at
Cl
GO
6
b£
QJ
P.
a
a
u
o
f
to
a
3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
2
65
i
4
2
36
1
4
1
6
Small	
Satisfactory	
No	
O.K.
74
Defective chest-development, 4
chronic bronchitis, 1; tachycardia, 4; nervous, 2
2
4
i
Clean; adequate.
1
11
Yes.
4
Ample; well ventilated and heated
Good 	
Clean ; adequate.
5
16
O.K.
1
4
8
Yes.
Good.
10
4
1
54
2
2
7
17
8
4
2
3
1
1
i
Yes.
6
Good 	
quate.
Good.
5
Orthopaedic,  2;   bronchial catarrh, 1
Fair condition....
Good 	
Yes.
88
5
34
Cardiac, 3;   anaemia, 2;   nervous, 2
1
Scarlet fever, 8; chicken-
pox, ]2
O.K.
Yes.
1
4
5
12
12
2
'2
2
14
Heart condition, 1;  defective
speech, 1
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
9
18
16
Skin, 1	
"i
9
No	
Yes.
2
2
1
3
1
One nervous case showing very
much improvement over last
term
6
Yes.
8
Good	
Clean, adequate.
3
1
1
Yes.
37
1
i
4
2
2
1
8
1
2
7
Anaemia, 1; curvature of spine,
1
1
"    	
Good
3
Adequate.
17
Clean, adequate.
58
2
Good 	
Yes.
7
3
6
Good 	
6
8
O.K	
O.K	
3
6
4
Y
2
Adequate	
Building in   good
condition;    not
crowded;    good
ventilation ;
heating fair
O.K	
Good  	
8
3
6
18
O.K.
14
Infantile paralysis, 3 ;  chronic
osteomyelitis, 2
4
2
1
Good	
Good.
2
Satisfactory	
Unsatisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
17
2
2
jj'
4'
"i'
2
2
3
5
2
1
3
7
Poorly lighted	
O.K.
4
Good.
Good   	
Yes.
2
2
2
2
Good.
12
Two ; good.
Yes.
2
2
7
2
Excellent	
Good    	
Clean; adequate.
10
Curvature of spine, 2; partially
paralyzed, 1; chorea, 2 ; dietetic, 1 ; bronchially inclined,
5; suspicion of T.B., 2
5
3
Good.
6
Scarlet fever ;   mumps ;
whooping-cough
Satisfactory
O.K	
Yes.
8
6
O.K. M 52
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Kettle River, North.
Kettle Valley 	
Kildonan	
Killarney	
Kimberley	
Kingcome Inlet
Kingsgate
Kinnaird	
Kispiox	
Kitchener	
Kitsumgallum.
Koksilah.
Krestova.
Lackenby 	
Lakelse Valley.
Lakes District.
Langford	
Lang Bay ..
Larehwood .
Lawn Hill .
Lazo	
Lee   .
Lee Creek.
Lillooet	
I.indell	
Little Fort ..
Long Beach .
Longworth ..
Loos	
Loos, West..
Louis Creek .
Lumby	
Lumberton..
Lund 	
Lytton	
Mable Lake.
Magna Bay..
Malakwa	
Malcolm Island...
Manson's Landing
Mara	
Martin's Prairie...
Marysville	
Masset	
Mayne Island	
W. Truax	
A. Francis	
A. D. Morgan....
Lee Smith	
D. P. Hanington
A. W. McCordick.
G. B. Henderson.
W. A. Coghlin...
R. G. Large	
G. B. Henderson
R. G. Large	
II. N. Watson   ...
H. H. Mackenzie .
R. W. Irving..
R. G. Large...
VV. R. Stone..
I. B. Hudson.
F. W. Green.. .
G. H. Bleecker..
T. A. Briggs	
J. Sandilands.
W. Scatchard.
A. C. Nash	
J. C. Elliot	
C. J. M. Willoughby
H. H. Mackenzie....
W. Laishley	
J. Sandilands.
C. J. M. Willoughby.
H. G. Williams	
F. W. Green	
R. Ziegler 	
V. M. Wilson	
II. G. Williams	
W. Scatchard	
J. H. Hamilton	
A. W. McCordick	
R. Ziegler	
W. R. Stone 	
H. W. Keith	
C. J. M. Willoughby..
D. P. Hanington	
J. 0. S. Dunn	
C. H. West	
Mayo	
Maybrook	
Meadow Spur..
Meadow Valley
Medora Creek..
Menzies Bay...
Merville	
Metchosin
Michel	
Michel, New...
Midway ...	
Mill Bay	
H. N. Watson ..
H. A. Christie ..
W. A. Coghlin..
F. W. Andrew ..
H. G. Williams .
R. Ziegler ....
T. A. Briggs...
I. B. Hudson .
F. J. Buckley.
Miss I. Jeffares..
Miss H. Kelly.
Miss I. Jeffares.
10
18
14
16
395
10
16
9
47
124
16
28
16
10
10
62
13
10
10
on
17
32
10
24
10
17
12
76
48
32
23
10
14
34
65
15
12
67
25
16
13
22
14
12
9
8
10
9
51
29
164
175
F. T. Stanier .
10
18
12
12
12
7
45
109
14
24
14
10
10
47
13
9
10
59
16
31
10
24
10
17
12
70
45
32
23
10
12
33
64
12
12
67
25
10
13
22
7
10
9
8
11
9
48
27
153
171
37 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 5:5
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
>
S3
V   QJ
QJ   QJ
OH
a?
S3
oj
U
'c
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
a)
>
d
%
1
B
a
o
a
3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean  and
adequate.
2
1
16
i
1
O.K	
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
4
13
7
2
18
1
Good	
Excellent	
Well heated;  not
crowded;   quite
clean;    ventilation O.K.
Adequate	
'8
3
should be   enlarged.
In good condition; adequate.
Yes.
2
11
"3'
24'
4
1
6
6
1
24
5
Good    	
Clean; adequate.
3
Adequate	
Good	
73
Pulmonary, 1;  ptosis of right
eye, 1; hairlip, repaired, 1
1
Unsatisfactory.
3
i
13
9
Heart-murmur,  1 ;   laryngitis,
1
1
Good 	
Dirty.
No	
6
2
8
Poorly lighted	
Good    	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
7
12
15
1
4
Orthopaedic,  4 ; dyspepsia,  1;
cardiac, 1; anaemic, 2; nervous, 1
Excellent	
Good 	
Good.
9
S
Good 	
Clean; adequate.
Not in good position.
Yes.
6
Fair;    no    cloak-
9
5
33
Good 	
Both.
6
Satisfactory	
Good.
15
1
"i
8
1
'5'
15
1
7
2
6
4
4
3
11
1
4
1
1
1
Clean; adequate.
3
14
Building  in good
condition ;    not
crowded ;   good
ventilation ;
heating fair
Good 	
4
7
Very good 	
Satisfactory	
Good 	
Very good.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
2
Influenza, 50 per cent...
8
Clean.
5
O.K.
12
,
Fairly clean.
Yes.
5
Fair;    no    cloakroom
Good  	
Fair all round	
Good	
1
24
Two; good.
O.K.
5
Yes.
30
1
6
11
7
i
Satisfactory	
Good  	
Excellent	
Not crowded; well
ventilated; well
heated,    except
in   very   cold
weather
1
Clean; adequate.
11
1
2
"i'
i
4
2
2
1
Good 	
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
9
3
1
1
2
44
37
33
Rather small	
O.K.
12
1
89
76
22
V.D.H., 1; hip-joint deformity,
1
Clean; adequate*
Yes.
3
Crowded	
Poorly heated	
O.K	
HI
9
1
21
i
Inadequate.
164
15
Ichthyosis, 1; rickets, 1; cyst
muc, 1
O.K.
12
Good 	
Yes. M 54
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School  Nurse.
Tfl
'a
<w  QJ
O
6  g
£.  QJ
crj
a
s .
^  QJ
<h a
°a
2. QJ
a
o
'C
a
QJ   >,
QJ V,
■gas
QJ
>
3 J
QJ %
as*
QJ   .
e a
QJ "C
QJ   ~
g  QJ
OK
"3
at
oj ac
i> a
£3
QJ *-
a at
— c
QJ £
Re
o
a
QJ
■a
S|
a o
Minto ,	
Miocene	
44
7
37
8
6
11
14
9
14
43
19
9
23
66
18
22
7
15
120
10
85
14
57
14
87
12
13
12
17
25
34
30
12
18
8
11
86
65
14
21
160
39
13
27
54
10
43
6
34
7
6
9
13
8
13
39
17
8
23
66
13
22
6
14
118
8
81
14
56
13
83
11
13
12
9
20
34
27
12
17
7
11
79
64
14
20
158
36
13
27
50
10
9
4
4
3
22
3
W. J. Knox	
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
5
5
6
Aloha	
Monte Creek	
A. C. Nash	
C. J. M.  Willoughby	
6
Mount Ingersoll	
4
F. W. Green	
1
2
3
i
2
1
1
17
3
A. Francis	
2
7
2
2
1
4
1
10
7
G. E. Bayfield	
3
8
■y
3
1
2
1
2
4
5
C. J. M. Willoughby	
2
Nakusp	
12
2
3
1
9
9
3
1
3
8
4
6
8
56
G. E. Darby	
3
Nanaimo Bay	
Nanoose Bay	
T. J. McPhee	
26
1
6
1
4
1
12
1
4
1
9
J. E. H. Kelso	
27
H. A. Christie	
4
l
l
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
6
J. J. Gillis 	
1
4
1
4
2
5
Nicomen	
20
3
4
3
1
i
l
1
3
2
3
Nob Hill	
A. W. McCordick	
4
H. H. Murphy	
G. E. Bayfield	
4
1
3
7
9
3
2
1
5
2
1
1
3
2
2
4
9
8
4
10
5
6
4
3
2
4
4
4
21
Northfield	
Notch Hill         	
T. J. McPhee	
15
11
1
3
3
16
3
2
2
7
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
5
6
25
W. J. Knox	
Miss McClung	
4
2
4
W. J. Knox 	
6
1
- 17 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
M 55
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Is
«M   QJ
QJ   QJ
OH
QJ      .
5)00
j^ i:
w a
~ at
B}5
oj
t-
0
O ■
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
r*
OJ
o
m
6
bo
QJ
a
bli
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
30
31
5
1
4
Y
2
1
15
8
8
1
5
13
6
7
3
11
6
1
3
4
2
2
2
45
2
8
Wax in ears, 14, anaemia; 2 ;
blepharitis, 2; irregular teeth,
2; defective septum, 2 ; chapped skin, 1; stammering, 1;
orthopaedic,   1 ;   squint,   1 ;
lisping, 1; nasal catarrh, 2
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
3
Good 	
7
2
Nervous, 3; cardiac, 1; anaemia,
2; eczema, 2; suspicions of
T. B., 1 ; gymnastic exercises
ordered for four
3
Influenza fairly  bad   in
spring
Excellent	
Good  	
Clean; adequate.
o
Both.
7
Satisfactory '	
Building   in   bad
condition
9
2
quires attention.
7
10
Cardiac murmur, 1 ;   infantile
paralysis, 1
Good    	
6
Clean; adequate.
3
O.K	
Good 	
•>,
31
Too crowded	
Good    	
Log    building    in
, good condition ;
heating not sufficient ;    ventilation O.K.
Very good	
3
10
2
oq
7
j
O.K	
Good	
Good ;   frame and
Good	
Inadequate ;
needs a  partition and more
frequent attention.
O.K.
90
Whooping-cough	
Mumps; whooping-
cough
5
Clean; adequate.
■">3
8
1
1
i
'22'
7
14
15
3
2
2
5
21
16
2
1
2
10
3
1
3
Tabes  mesenterica,  1; mitral
regurgitation, 1
Cardiac   irregularity,   1 ;  paralysis of leg, 1
Yes.
Frame	
Building   in   good
condition;    not
crowded ;    good
ventilation ;
heating fair
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
6
9
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
2
3
Mumps; whooping-
cough
7
16
«'     •	
Clean; adequate.
2
9
Good	
Improved;   painted ; new toilet..
Good..	
4
1
3
3-
23
9
11
1
5
5
2
4
6
Clean; adequate.
3
5
Good.
37
Rooms   pretty
crowded
Good    	
13
O.K.
4
O.K	
Good	
Bad.
16
Yes.
32
Cardiac,  4; hernia,  1 ; orthopedic, 1 ; chronic skin, 1
Anaemia, 3 ; eczema, 1; chronic
bronchitis, 2
The tlu was bad in this school
last spring, causing it to be
closed for a time
Remarkably   free    from
fevers
Flu only	
Few cases of influenza ..
Clean; adequate.
6
3
5
Good.
6
Asthma,  1; chorea,  2;  Otitis
media, 1; cardiac, 2; diabetes,
1; curvature, 1
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
Good .... British Columbia.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
Hi    -
P. -3
(3
0)    r>>
OJ
>
<M   OJ
o
6 a
°a
Olalla	
Oliver  	
One Mile Creek.
Orange Valley ..
Osland	
Osoyoos	
Otter Point.  ...
Outlook	
Oyama	
Oyster Bay
Oyster, North
Oyster River	
Oyster, South	
Pachelqua..   	
Palmer	
Palling	
Park Siding	
Parksville	
Parson	
Pass Creek	
Passmore	
Pemberton	
Pemberton Range.
Pender Harbour ..
Pender Island	
Perow	
Perry Siding  	
Pinantan 	
Popcum	
Port Alice.....
Port Clements.
Port Hardy   ..
Port Renfrew.
Potcbett	
Pouce Coupe	
Pouce Coupe, Central.
Pouce Coupe, East ...
Powell River	
Prairiedale	
Princeton	
Princeton, East	
Procter 	
Puntledge	
Qualicum Beach	
Quatsino	
Queen Charlotte City.
Queen's Bay	
Quesnel	
Quick	
Raft River	
Read Island.
Red Gap	
Refuge Cove.
Reiswig ... .
Renata......
Rendezvous Island...
Rhone	
Riondel	
Roberts Creek, East .
Robin's Range 	
M. D. McEwen.
G. H. Kearney.,
Lee Smith	
W. R. Stone....
W. Sager	
G. H. Kearney.
I. B. Hudson..
W. Truax	
H. G. Williams..
T. A. Briggs.. ..
H. B. Maxwell..
R. Ziegler	
II. B. Maxwell...
A. C. Nash	
E. !.. Garner	
J. T. Steele	
W. A. Coghlin ..
L. T. Davis	
Paul Ewert	
H. II. Mackenzie.
N. J. Paul	
R. W. Irving
A. Henderson   ...
E. M. Sutherland .
C. H. Hankinson..
H. H. Mackenzie .
C. J. M. Willoughby
J. C. Elliot	
J. A. Street     	
J. O. S. Dunn  	
A. VV. McCordick .  .
W. E. Bavis .
J. J. Gillis	
W. A. Watson .
A. Henderson
W. R. Stone .
Lee Smith....
D. J. Barclay	
G. K. MacNaughton..
L. T. Davis	
J. A. Street	
J. H. Bleecker...
D. J. Barclay	
G. R. Baker	
G. 0. Paine	
M. G. Archibald..
R. Ziegler	
L. T. Davis	
R. Ziegler 	
H. G. Williams.
J. E. H. Kelso.
R. Ziegler	
A. Francis	
D. J. Barclay	
P. Inglis	
C. J. M. Willoughby.
Miss Hewertson.
Miss Hewertson .
Miss E. Naden...
Miss JI.  Murray.
Miss Murray.
Miss Murray.
19
62
12
21
7
10
9
28
64
7
41
22
13
10
12
12
70
12
19
19
16
6
21
42
15
23
24
35
18
11
11
19
15
7
375
11
160
75
18
26
.7
107
17
16
10
37
17
13
14
11
19
57
11
21
7
27
59
25
26
IS
10
11
19
15
372
11
154
6
48
9
75
14
26
7
98
17
16
21
7
10
35
10 —
17 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
M 57
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
>
Is
QJ  QJ
■a
QJ    •
o3 a
aS
HO
O
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.),
a'
1
u
>
Ol
0
2
at
o
m
d
at
P.
a
a
u
a
is
bo
a
H
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
1
13
"2
i
3
5
Acute rheumatic fever, 2
Good	
Yes.
14
17
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
9
3
10
Yes.
4
Satisfactory ,   	
Good	
Fair	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
1
2
Debility   and   ansemia after
pertussis
8
Good	
Yes.
2
Clean; adequate.
11
Quite efficient ...
O.K	
Quite efficient	
Good	
Satisfactory	
2
2
out.
O.K.
7
Both.
6
1
Good.
Satisfactory.
6
"Y
"\
"i
3
2
i'
1
1
1
3
2
24
Good	
7
Whooping-cough, 16   ...
8
Good	
No	
Clean; adequate.
2
2
1
i
5
3
Good.
10
Mild pertussis	
Satisfactory   .....
Satisfactory.
1
Two   children   sent  home on
account of elevated temperature
Whooping-cough, 15....
Good	
All-round   poor
condition
Fair ; stove ought
to heplaced nearer the center of
room and not in
the corner as at
present
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Fair.
11
1
10
Clean; adequate.
2
9
2
1
3
3
1
5
3
T
1
6
3
5
5
3
8
2
37
1
48
4
1
for   boys   and
girls; notclean;
should he
placed on level
ground and not
on side-hill  as
they now are.
5
Fair 	
Good	
Yes.
5
17
3
1
Measles and scarlatina ..
Scarlet fever, 8	
Good.
7
70
Yes.
2
9
6
1
Scarlet fever, 10	
Yes.
4
Wax in ears, 3; defected septum, 1; irregular teeth,  1;
orthopaedic, 1
Clean: adequate.
20
Poor	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Wooden building ;
heating, ventilation,  and lighting good
Fair	
Good	
8
4
i'
7
7
3
8
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
7
7
9,
poor repair.
O.K.
5
1
1
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
1
Yes.
1
Tabes mesenterica, 1; conjunctivitis, 1
Measles and scarlet fever
Overcrowded   and
poorly ventilated
Good	
O.K	
O.K.
1
17
16
13
Bad.
1
Yes.
6
Building good condition ; lighting
fair; heating satisfactory ; ventilated, window
if
2
2
clean. M 58
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Tfl
ft
a
<H  QJ
il
Tfl
ft
P      .
W  OJ
«H   P
°a
tr, c\
19
19
13
11
35
33
10
9
15
14
9
9
62
61
11
11
10
9
13
13
7
6
9
8
17
17
10
10
9
9
35
35
127
119
100
98
30
28
25
25
8
6
8
6
41
40
22
20
12
11
11
11
13
12
48
48
26
26
47
47
11
11
10
10
7
7
19
16
12
1
13
13
24
21
8
5
42
37
22
13
13
13
29
25
17
13
8
7
12
■  12
24
17
116
114
21
19
74
72
20
18
J6
26
13
13
7
7
30
28
15
14
152
150
25
23
> ti
r>
f* bD
l§
V a
a^
Cl>
PK
Robson	
Rock Bay	
Rock Creek    	
Rock Creek, Upper
Rock Mountain....
Rocky Point  	
Rolla	
Roosville	
Rosebery	
RoseHill	
Rose Lake..
Rose Lake..
Round Lake
Round Top.
Hoy	
Royston ..
Sheraton..,.
Shoreacres.
Shuswap 	
Shuswap Falls.
Shutty Bench..
Sicamous	
Sidney	
Silver Creek...
Silverton	
Simpson	
Sirdar	
Sisters Creek.
Skidegate ...
Slocan Junctio
Slocan Park ..
Smithers	
Solsqua.
J. E. H. Kelso.,
W. W. Birdsall..
I. B. Hudson	
W. A. Watson	
H. A. Christie	
W. E. Gomm	
C. J. M. Willoughby
F. V. Agnew	
J. T. Steele	
G. C. Paine	
C. J. M. Willoughby .
A. W. McCordick
G. K. MacNaughton
W. J. Knox
Saanich, North
Sahtlam 	
Saint Elmo	
St. Eugene Mission
St. Vincent Bay ...
Salmo	
Salmon Bench
Salmon Valley	
Sand Creek..
Sand Creek, Big   ..
Sandon	
Sandspit 	
Sandwick 	
Saskatoon Creek ..
Saturna Island
Savona Road 	
Savona	
Say ward	
Sayward, Upper ..
Sechelt	
Seton Lake Creek.
Shawnigan	
Shirley	
S. E. M. Hoops .
H. N. Watson .,
J. C. Elliot	
F. W. Green  	
A. Henderson ...
W. A. Coghlin...
P. D. van Kleeck
VV. Truax
H. A. Christie .
H. H. Caple ...
G. H. Bleecker	
T. A. Briggs	
W. A. Watson	
E. M. Sutherland .  ..
C. J. M. Willoughby .
M. G. Archibald   .
A. W. McCordick.
F. Inglis	
A. C. Nash ...
F. T. Stanier .
I. B. Hudson.,
J. T. Steele	
H. H. Mackenzie.
VV. Scatchard...
H. G. Williams..
D. J. Barclay	
E. Buckell	
S. E. M. Hoops .
E. Buckell	
Wm. E. Gomm..
W. Sager	
G. B. Henderson.,
G. Baker	
G. H. Bleecker...,
H. H. Mackenzie..
C. H. Ilankinson.,
J. H. Hamilton...
Miss McClung
Miss I.  Jeffares.
Mrs. Walls .
Miss E. Naden. 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 59
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
t-
is
QJ   QJ
OH
QJ     ■
« a
3.3
HO
oj
u
'0
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
a
u
OJ
>
m
IS
ZJ
m
d
tJQ
0)
ft
a
a
H
P
3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
Ample; well ventilated and heated
O.K	
4
Clean; adequate.
Bad.
7
27
6
11
4
22
5
7
19
Suspect T. B., 1	
2
O.K.
5
Good	
Log, plastered	
Good	
Lighting, heating,
and ventilation
good
Good.	
O.K	
Good	
Excellent in everything
Ample room; well
ventilated
Yes.
19
10
4
1
"i
6
5
1
5
Mumps, whooping-cough
9
4
Yes.
1
6
8
1
3
10
14
Nerves,   1;   wax   in   ears,   7;
blepharitis, 1; irregular teeth,
5 ; overweight, 1; stammering, 2 ; nasal obstruction, 1;
anaemia, 2
Chorea, 2 ; cardiac, 3 ; eczema,
3 ; anaimia, 4 ; curvature of
spine, 1
12
47
2
Flu was bad for a time..
Excellent; adequate.
Yes.
6
2
i
i
Chicken-pox, 12; mumps,
1
13
2
Poor;   going   to
build
Fair	
Good	
3
26
"i
9
S
2
Overcrowding of teeth, 1; underweight, 26
2
Good	
Yes.
4
•>,
|r
3
Good heating	
Two; clean.
31
10
5
Nephritis, 1; Acute rheumatic
fever, 1
Scarlet fever, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 1 ; acute cervical
adenoids, 2
Good.
6
Fair.
10
5
4
Good	
Fair	
Satisfactory	
Buildingin need of
repair;  lighting
poor ; heating
O.K.;  ventilation, window
Good	
4
Yes.
5
Satisfactory.
3
6
2
2
6
Two; fair.
3
O.K	
Good	
Two; clean.
5
Yes.
5
Both.
17
2
5
2
3
1
i
2
6
4
Plat foot, 1	
Crowded	
Building crowded.
Good	
Yes.
2
Orthopaedic, 3 ; anaimia, 2; lisp,
1; warts, 1; sore gums,   1 ;
debility
quate.
Satisfactory.
4
11
Anaemic, 4 ; systolic murmur, 1
i
Measles, 5 ; scarlet fever,
3
Not clean.
Yes.
7
1
12
It
3
Satisfactory   ....
,,
69
1
3
4
19
tl
5
Mumps	
Mumps; whooping-
cough ; measles
Satisfactory	
,,
4
Clean; adequate.
6
Satisfactory	
1
"5'
,,
Good	
.
1
Fair.
9
'27'
3
3
5
Clean; adequate.
3
Nervous, 1	
Aortic heart murmur, 1 ; dev.
septum
,,
3
Good	
Good. RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
>z
P-
Jltj
o P
£.2
ns
qj  QJ
Q3
Sooke.
Sooke, East	
Sooke, North	
Sorrento	
Southbank	
Spencer 	
Spences Bridge	
Springbend	
Sproat Lake 	
Squamish	
Squirrel Cove 	
Stewart	
Stillwater   	
Stone Creek	
Streatham	
Stuart River	
Stuart Station	
Sugar Lake	
Sullivan Hill	
Sullivan Valley	
Sunnybrae ...  	
Sunnyside	
Sunnyside Cannery .
Sunnyside No. 2 ....
Swan Lake, North ..
Swift Creek	
Sylvania	
Taghum	
Tappen ...    	
Tappen Valley
Tatla Lake	
Tatlarose	
Tchesenkut Lake .
Telkwa	
Three Forks	
Three Valley	
Thrums    .
Thurlow	
Tintagel	
Tofino.
Tonkawatla	
Topley	
Tranquille	
Tranquille, Upper .
Trapp Lake
I. B. Hudson.
W. Scatchard...
D. B. Lazier....
W. Truax	
J. J. Giilis	
H. W. Keith....
J. H. Hamilton.
N. J. Paul	
R. Ziegler	
H. A. Whillans .
A. Henderson ..
C. Ewert.  ....
D. B. Lazier	
W. R. Stone...
H. G. Williams ..
D. P. Hanington.
R. W. Irving	
E. Buckell	
H. G. Williams .
W. Sager	
C. R. Symmes ...
W. A. Watson .
Thos. O'Hagan.
tf. T. Stanier .. .
H. H. Mackenzie.
E. Buckell	
G. A.
D. B.
J. T.
G. C.
II. H.
J. H.
II. H.
A. W.
J. T.
Charter ....
Lazier......
Steele......
Paine	
Caple	
Hamilton...
Mackenzie .
McCordick.
Steele	
D. S. Dixon
J. H. Hamilton	
C. H. Hankinson	
C. J. M. Willoughby.
Trinity Creek
Trout Lake.
Tulameen ..
Turtle Valley
Twin Butte..
Uncha Valley
Union Bay ..
Usk	
Valdes Island
Vananda	
Vanderhoof..
Vavenby ....
H. W. Keith 	
J. H. Hamilton	
E. Sheffield	
W. Scatchard	
J. H. Hamilton	
D. B. Lazier 	
G. K. MacNaughton.
R. G. Large.
R. Ziegler ...
K. Terry	
V7. R. Stone.
M. G. Archibald .
13
14
19
9
34
Miss Haines .
Miss Naden.
13
7
104
14
43
31
9
13
16
15
10
11
9
21
22
10
10
29
34
14
8
10
11
9
49
14
8
54
8
e
39
13
17
19
22
8
9
13
14
IS
10
7
104
14
36
27
9
13
16
8
7
13
10
11
9
21
18
10
10
17
27
12
8
10
11
9
49
12
13
16
18
8
15
7
9
13
8
9
94
22
22
20
20
38
38
95
94 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 61
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
0)
k
Is
QJ QJ
OH
-QJ
QJ     •
u 'C
at a
a~
HO
OJ
'0
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
i
QJ
>
ca
3
Oj
UI
d
o
ft
|
a
o
he
a
3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
14
14
4
2
"3'
3
Orthopaedic,   4;   anaemia,   2 ;
asthma,  1; warts,  1; bronchial glands, 1
Mild pertussis and pinkeye
Septic rash	
Excellent	
Poor situation ...
Good             	
Yes.
9
Fair.
6
10
4
1
1
i
Yes.
1
4
i
Fair.
4
Yes.
Good	
2
1
8
2
1
3
3
,
O.K.
2
3
7
7
9
1
1
2
	
Yes.
4
2
2
.
Yes.
3
i
2
2
'2
1
2
1
1
1
6
"i
0
No	
Satisfactory	
Good..   	
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Clean   and well
ventilated	
1
2
Yes.
3
Clean; adequate.
3
4
5
8
2
4
4
6
5
1
2
adequate.
Yes.
2
8
8
Satisfactory	
4
Yes.
2
4
Excellent	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
2
16
i
11
Good.
8
16
2
3
1
One room crowded
Good	
Drinking   water
poor
Not crowded; well
ventilated and
heated
Good	
6
3
One ; fair.
Satisfactory.
10
6
1
5
2
5
Good.
7
Satisfactory	
Building   in  good
repair ; ventilation and heating
satisfactory
Frame in fair condition; ventilation   sufficient,
but window
lighting poor
Good '.
Fair 	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
5
4
Orthopaedic, 1; hernia right inguinal, 1; kyphosis, 1
8
Yes.
Good.
4
1
2
6
2
Good.
1
is'
3
1
9
1
1
2
4
1
5
2
1
Yes.
42
Cardiac, 1 ; pulmonary, 1 ; contagious, 1 ; anaemia, 8 ;  wax
in ears. 11;   orthopaedic,  2;
blepharitis, 4 ; nasal catarrh,
2 ; irregular teeth,  3 ; overweight, 1 ; infected septum,
2 ; chapped skin, 1; nerves, 2
1
Scarlet fever ; whooping-
cough
Primary-room
building   poorly
lighted; used as
community hall
Good	
12
1
2
8
40
Whooping-cough; chicken-pox
2
Building   in   poor
repair ;  heating
and ventilation
good
poor repair. I
M 62
British Columbia.
1926
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"ft
D
■H   OJ
O r*
O
|S
<.  QJ
TJI
"ft
a  .
^ QJ
•w a
°a
i.l
A.  QJ
a*
o
'(-.
3
a
S
QJ bl
.;>■"
as
QJ
li
0.2
Oi>
QJ
>  W
w a
QJ QJ
OB
et
ca
at
QJ SB
> a
QJ +-
Qj at
V, Ci
Qra
to
2
0
a
QJ
■o
as
2%
a 0
25
21
5
53
19
52
11
65
10
7
60
62
122
14
35
13
14
10
12
43
68
33
14
13
25
6
16
69
40
13
67
16
7
70
47
69
24
8
32
24
21
5
53
19
62
9
64
10
7
58
60
117
14
33
13
14
10
11
39
65
27
14
13
23
6
14
67
33
13
66
16
7
62
43
65
24
8
21
1
C. J. M. Willoughby...
1
"5
"i'
1
1
2
6
6
1
2
2
2
4
2
2
2
Y
5
18
5
2
1
10
9
5
2
1
1
2
5
18
4
2
1
9
7
6
2
"i'
Waldo    	
H. A. Christie   	
H. A. Christie	
20
F. W. Green	
6
T. J. McPhee...	
W. It. Stone	
3
G. Baker	
2
T. J. McPhee	
"1
1
1
2
6
4
2
8
4
'3'
Wellington, South	
19
W. J. Knox	
Wm. Buchanan	
A. Francis	
8
White Lake	
E. Buckell	
2
i
1
1
6
"«'
0
2
8
18
4
2
3
4
8
W. R. Stone	
]
F. E. Coy	
3
1
3
1
1
2
F. E. Coy	
W. J. Knox    	
1
2
1
4
3
i
Winfield 	
4
3
2
1
4
2
6
4
1
7
11
D. B. Lazier 	
C. G. G. Maclean	
Miss Haines	
6
3
"i'
"4
3
6
6
1
16
6
C. Ewert	
2
Wycliffe	
F. W. Green      	
i
2
7
10
3
2
5
3
1
5
5
2
5
'  7
5
7
Yahk ..           	
P. McCaffrey	
9
Yale	
5
G. E. Baker   	
1
W. A. Coghlin	
7 17 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
M 63
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
QJ   QJ
•a
a   ■
QC to
ca a
aS
HO
oj
M
'0
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a*
a
u
>
5
UI
d
M
0J
ft
a
a
a
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
6
1
7
2
12
22'
3
1
1
3
3
2
"f
1
Ventilation poor..
Satisfactory	
Frame building, in
good condition ;
ventilation fair;
heating  good
Satisfactory	
8
2
28
Clean; adequate.
11
33
.
1
Good	
16
1
O.K.
Yes.
1
Clean; adequate.
12
2
1
10
3
"9
5
8
8
3
33
10
5
11
O.K.
21
2
Satisfactory	
4
7
sanitary.
Clean; adequate.
Bad.
3
Very badly crowded
Good	
2
1
....
4
.„.
"4"
"4'
2
"8'
"2'
1
2
2
O.K.
6
Satisfactory	
Good	
Overcrowded	
Building   in   good
condition ;  not
crowded; good
ventilation ;
heating fair
Good	
Badly broken.
2
Measles 	
33
Yes.
4
2
2
Clean; adequate.
3
Influenza;   German
measles
9
14
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
1
1
11
6
2
1
4
2
5
Clean; adequate.
Good; sanitary.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
10
Chorea, 2; cardiac, 3 ; anaemia,
3 ; appendix, 1; crippled leg,
1; eczema
Bronchitis, 1 ; endocarditis, 1.
Influenza ; mumps, 8....
Excellent, but no
water-supply
9
1
Good	
15
Nervous,  2 ;   mitral  insufficiency, 1;   rapid heart, 3
5
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
5
4
10
Smallpox, 10	
Smallpox, 4 ; measles	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
8
1
7
8
Good	
Clean; adequate.
15
4
Underweight, 9 ; acute eolds, 7 M 64
British Columbia.
1926
REGISTRAR'S REPORT UNDER THE VITAL STATISTICS ACT.
Victokia, B.C., June 30th, 1926.
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir—I have the honour to submit the Fifty-fourth Report of Vital Statistics for the year
ended December 31st, 1925.
Population.
The census for the year 1921 gave the population of the Province as 524,582. Estimates of
the population for subsequent years as given by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics are as
follows :—
1922   535,000
1923   544,000
1924   553,000
1925   561,000
The Annual Report of the Department of Indian Affairs for the year ended March 31st, 1925,
gave the Indian population of the Province as 24,316—no change from the previous year.
Registrations, 1923, 1924, and 1925 (Indians excluded).
The following table shows the total number of registrations of births, deaths, and marriages
in the different divisions of the Province for the years 1923, 1924, and 1925 :—
Births.
Deaths.
Marriages.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1,298
832
4,2h7
1,253
262
1,245
582
1,018
1,366
869
4,507
1,376
2s6
1,144
659
1,046
1,249
819
4,734
1,509
277
1,184
645
1,187
11,604
696
322
2,011
696
85
466
236
395
662
3U0
2,035
617
107
427
220
455
650
309
1,992
679
111
4X8
'232
401
463
212
2,012
411
56
290
130
283
473
185
1,988
434
80
296
154
335
491
175
2,173
451
60
295
153
834
Ashcroft	
Totals	
10,777
11,252
4,906
4,823
4,812
3,856
3,945
4,132
Births.
The total number of registrations of births, including 273 still-births, recorded during the
year ended December 31st, 1925, was 11,604, as against 11,252 during the year 1924. Of this
total, 6,021 were registrations of male children and 5,5S3 of female children. The births of
9,053 children born alive during the year were registered in the year 1925. During the six
months ended June 30th, 1926, the births of S08 living children born in the year 1925 were
registered, thus bringing the total of living births for the year 1925 to 9,859, as against 9,717 for
the year 1924. Excluding native Indians, the population of the Province as estimated Iiy the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics was 536,684, and therefore the rate per 1,0C0 of population for
living births for the year 1925 was 18.3, the same as for the year 1924. Nearly 75 per cent,
of the births registered showed both parents to be of British origin. In the following table all
registrations of births received between January 1st, 1920, and December 31st, 1925, have been
segregated and assigned to the actual year of birth irrespective of the date of registration.
Births which occurred in 1925, but which were not registered until the year 1926, are not included
in the total for the year 1925.    The number of these births was 806. 17 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
M 65
Registrations assigned to Year of Birth  (Still-births included).
1925.
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Prior to
1920.
1920      	
9,321
1,238
107-
107
59
54
1,837
1921	
9,654
1,236
157
75
57
11,179
767
1922	
8,959
1,081
85
50
532
1923      ...
8,898
1,036
79
534
1924	
1925	
9,296
9,152
914
846
1,154
Totals	
9,296
10,066
10,013
10,175
10,886
5,669
Natural Increase.
The natural increase—that is, the excess of living births over deaths—for the year 1925 was
5,320, as against 5,185 for the year 1924.
Deaths.
The rate per 1,000 of population for registrations of deaths for the year 1925 was 8.42, as
against 8.45 in the year 1924 and 8.71 in the year 1923. Deaths from circulatory diseases show
a considerable increase over the previous year—namely, 794 in the year 1925, as against 713 in
the year 1924. Deaths from respiratory diseases show a slight increase—395 in the year 1925,
as against 371 in the year 1924. In the age period 50-80 years there was a very considerable
increase---l,849 ill the year 1924 and 1,995 in the year 1925. Deaths from external causes show
a slight decrease on the previous year. Of the total number of decedents, 1,236 males and 774
females were stated to he married, 1,153 males and 528 females as single, 286 males and 390
females as widowed, 20 males and 3 females as divorced, and the balance, 133 males and 7
females, were not stated. Still-births numbered 282 (males, 153; females, 126; sex not given, 3).
The racial origin of 71.5 per cent, of decedents was given as British.
Infant Mortality.
Exclusive of still-births (282), the deaths of 497 children under 1 year of age were registered
during the year 1925, and of these 283 were male children and 214 females. As compared with
the year 1924, there was an increase of 13 deaths. The rate per 1,000 living births was 54.8 in
the year 1925, as against 54.4 in the year 1924. The inclusion of living births which occurred in
1925, but which were not registered until the year 1926, further reduces the rate to 50.4. Of the
total number of deaths of children under 1 year of age, 129, or 25.9 per cent., died under the age
of 1 day; 228, or 45.8 per cent., under 1 week ; and 2S3, or 56.9 per cent., failed to reach the age
of 1 month. Immaturity and malformations were responsible for a large number of deaths, over
55 per cent.—whooping-cough (19), pneumonia (19), bronchopneumonia (41), diarrhoea (27).
In the following table deaths of children under 1 year of age are assigned to the different
divisions:—
Divisions.
Under 1 Year.
Still-
BORN.
Males.
Females.
Total.
Males.
Females.
Sex
not given.
Total S.B.
31
21
36
103
18
9
35
30
26
14
37
68
14
•  9
23
23
57
35
73
171
32
18
58
53
19
8
15
70
12
4
11
14
15
6
15
56
9
io
15
1
i
1
35
Nanaimo	
14
30
126
21
6
22
29
Totals	
283
214
497
163
126
3
282 M 66
British Columbia.
1926
The following table gives the rates of infant'mortality in various parts of the world:
Countries.
Year.
Rate.
Chile	
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
1922
1923
1925
1923
282.9
212.0
171.3
163 4
131.8
96.2
93.2
78.9
69.4
66.0
77.1
88.1
50.4
43.8
Tuberculosis.
Deaths from tuberculosis registered during the year 1925 numbered 402, or 8.86 per cent, of
all deaths (exclusive of still-births), as against 401, or 8.84 per cent., of all deaths for the year
1924. The foregoing figures do not include deaths from tuberculosis received under Indian
returns.
Deaths from tuberculosis among specified races were as follows:—
1023. 1024. 1925.
Chinese       44 38 44
Japanese      23 24 32
Indians  133 125 155
Other races   312 339 326
Cancer.
The number of deaths from cancer registered during the year 1925 was 441, or 9.72 per cent,
of all deaths, as against 435, or 9.70 per cent., the previous year. There were 4 deaths from
cancer under Indian returns. Deaths from cancer among the Japanese and Chinese numbered
4 and 12 respectively.
Ages of Decedents.
The following is a comparative statement re the ages of decedents for the years 1921, 1922,
1923, 1924, and 1925 :—
Age.
Under 1 year (still-born excluded)
1 to 2 years	
2 to 5 years	
5 to 10 years	
10 to 20*years	
20 to 30 years	
30 to 40 years	
40 to 50 years   	
50 to 60 years	
60 to 70 years	
70 to 80 years	
80 to 90 years	
90 years and up	
Age not given	
Still-born	
Totals	
617
63
91
93
159
280
469
563
582
593
417
215
42
30
275
627
83
96
86
186
297
479
565
622
663
530
205
42
23
244
582
87
103
284
471
576
633
706
563
258
32
22
304
4,906
484
71
112
99
189
283
451
648
633
682
534
26
291
4,823
497
73
98
90
162
310
390
553
640
754
601
280
44 17 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
M 67
Classified Deaths  (Indian Returns excluded).
The following is a list of classified deaths which have occurred in British Columbia for the
years 1921 to 1925 :—
General diseases 	
Diseases of nervous system and organs of special sense 	
Diseases of the circulatory system	
Diseases of the respiratory system ,   	
Diseases of the digestive system	
Non-venereal diseases of the genito-urinary system and annexa .
The puerperal state	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue 	
Diseases of the bones and organs of locomotion	
Malformations   	
Diseases of early infancy    	
Old age      	
Affections produced by external causes	
Ill-defined, including executions.	
Still-born	
Totals .
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1,107
1,222
1,221
1,347
1,257
447
424
515
483
463
656
667
710
713
794
487
625
477
371
396
269
306
286
317
319
223
249
254
265
241
61
57
61
60
46
17
20
17
21
15
14
/
12
5
6
25
29
55
45
55
311
302
298
231
232
84
74
96
69
98
476
496
580
576
561
37
26
23
39
48
275
244
4,748
304
291
282
4,489
4,906
4,823
4,812
For purposes of comparison the classified deaths for the year 1925 have been segregated and
assigned to the several divisions. " Tuberculosis," " cancer," and " influenza " are included under
" General diseases."    These three items number 935, or 20.0 per cent, of all deaths.
Allotment of all Causes of Death to each Mining Division foe Year 1925.
Mining Division.
"3 |
a cj
g   Vi
a a
gj
3
2
9
3
3
1
14
1
36
4
2
5
2
2
9
3
4
2
o
A S
p   01
£ ?
'Om
3
2
22
4
11
2
18
3
65
9
8
2
1
5
21
3
6
o
ti
■||
Km
1
1
5
3
7
9
3
29
13
4
2
3
10
1
5
1
QJ
•|s
aj .2
5«
ie'
3
3
13
.-T J-
ct at
a a
s--~
a a   .
"7 ■+-' o>
O  O)  >.
fc<S«
1
2
7
2
3
1
6
s
b
QJ
£■»
4> tt
2 *
P. m
1
a
OJ
a £
3 &
mo
a*
a 0 +=
* ,„ 0
S = 2
g't«.©
0 I_ 0
MOrJ
c
0
"-£
1
0
S
a
at
at
m
1
6
2
1
2
9
oj
<
5
1
"2
"2'
i
'at    .
a «
!.  OJ
qj a,
X «
BO
2
'3
23
1
7
7
12
Ol
b.sb
— 0 x
a
n
0
+j,
0
H
1
1
67
6
7
2
37
5
13
12
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
14
2
2
4
5
2
29
3
3
2
i
3
4
1
178
27
46
19
2
1
35
6
8
2
i
"2
i
2
22
22
4
2
1
5
21
4
3
1
1
1
7
1
2
4
6
"i
'3
....
66
13
8
4
4
6
12
1
3
2
2
4
5
64
1
"2'
5
1
1
4
14
3
31
126
4
438
21
10
4
2
4
23
2
6
3
6
1
1
2
"*6
1
1
3
1
2
3
2
49
Nelson   	
2
1
99
9
1
23
Trail	
6
1
3
4
2
61
4
3
42
2
1
2
6
30
2
7
1
1
5
1
22
1
5
1
1
33
1
Totals	
82
1
7
22
i
"i
3
5
401
2
2
1
2
2
i
l
l
5
3
1
i
' i
3
2
1
9
1
1
2
4
1
8
13
1
2
1
9
"2
i
5
1
2
2
1
6
6
1
5
2
2
2
4
3
3
10
Totals	
17
6
5
111 M 68
British Columbia.
1926
Allotment of all Causes of Death to each Mining Division for Year 1925—Continued.
Mining Division.
fc-S
2
3
0
~ g
a qj
1
2
0
s- a
2
QJ
>    -
QJ 4§
tt 'i,
•a •**
1
'd rt
qj a
is.
go 1
I'll
£002
13
a
£•»
3 J
J1.CZ3
oi
a
01
i«
"m qj
So
a
tJ«.g
a o-tf
rt  m O
« a g
J rt 0
s &°
0 t. 0
MO J
a
_o
rt
S
0
"rt
1
>>
QJ
a
at
a*
>,
at
a
1
1
bJJ
<
3
-at    .
a qj
hi   QJ
fig
X  at
HO
6
4
1
aj
QJ  =f 0
c.Ss
<B-d 3
«SO
T3 ,-.  QJ
3.5 s
a
0
jj
-.3
m
2
2
'at
4JJ
0
EH
10
3
1
27
15
Atlin	
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
5
3
2
3
4
2
1
2
1
19
1
2
2
i
13
1
5
25
1
17
1
4
1
1
1
6
2
1
.„.
16
56
2
i
4
3
6
72
15
5
3
I
24
136
14
16
1
"2
1
170
20
5
7
2
69
103
463
1
7
1
4
4
22
84
7
7
3
10
7
14
132
19
2
10
1
7
39
250
27
43
8
3
"7
5
343
41
10
15
4
63
123
794
1
6
1
6
2
2
2
2
15
4
8
4
4
62
32
8
1
1
1
8
4
55
15
14
26
6
14
75
116
2
4
3
4
1
6
9
145
15
6
9
1
43
74
561
' "2
6
1
1
3
21
25
3
'2
5
35
5
1
5
1
2
14
107
7
3
4
3
1
1
12
5
1
68
8
2
1
7
2
2
1
6
5
2
1
i
7
5
3
10
25
6
16
1
1
3
33
13
2
15
35
7
1
2
2
3
4
54
2
2
6
5
1
16
137
14
8
4
3
1
1
168
19
11
8
1
27
66
395
19
20
3
1
■
40
8
232
141
11
5
25
2
2
1
3
473
62
16
7
4
5
10
i
19
5
21
24
11
7
3
2
23
12?
7
8
3
1
1
142
24
3
2
1
18
1
2
30
7
3
i
1
1
6
12
1
1
1
6
2
33
11
51
Totals	
176
30
2
4
650
34
1
11
8
1
13
4
4
2
3
1
137
22
1
3
6
1
3
21
63
3
2
1
3
1
73
13
4
3
3
11
34
232
5
29
2
11
3
4
1
50
2
1
2
4
9
98
88
29
33
1
8
1
3
55
17
10
3
1
1
309
497
41
38
12
4
7
9
2
90
8
6
6
2
1
1
3
19
1
i
1
22
4
1
'2
7
55
1,592
127
136
49
24
13
33
3
18
113
10
3
4
.  1
5
13
1
1
9
1
1
6'LO
5   126
1,992
12
6
5
1
7
30
282
56
20
18
1
6
219
70
72
16
57
302
2
46
2
15
Totals	
151
48
319
23
6
7
679
1.257
241
48
4,812
Specified Diseases. *
The following table of specified diseases  (exclusive of Indian returns)  has been compiled
from returns for the whole Province for the years 1016 to 1925 :—
Diseases.
Typhoid fever	
Smallpox	
Measles    	
Scarlet fever	
Whooping-cough	
Diphtheria	
Influenza 	
Influenza with other diseases
Tuberculosis	
Cancer	
Bronchitis	
Bronchopneumonia	
Pneumonia	
Diarrhoea and enteritis	
Totals 	
1924.     1925.     Total
23
24
15
8
3
2
12
6
20
2
1
7
2
2
37
21
26
8
18
19
16
34
36
17
138
163
1839
615
367
413
444
411
259
248
279
309
49
36
37
39
140
92
81
91
228
224
265
226
35
53
58
51
1,205
1,163
3,220
1,961
8
20
13
4
9
8
26
6
32
27
64
34
300
17
444
414
320
373
41
50
220
222
147
'132
68
42
1,682
1,349
11
1
2
11
12
23
85
109
401
424
49
146
240
57
1,5S0
12
2
21
21
27
23
51
69
379
436
31
121
187
62
15
12
148
4
3
15
40
2
122
22
3
86
19
21
203
54
26
272
25
22
635
60
70
3,079
401
402
4,076
435
441
3,524
44
39
415
91
93
1,297
173.
196
2,027
47
57
520
1,430
1,387
16,419 17 Geo. 5
Board on1 Health.
M 69
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining Division for the Year 1925.
Mining Division.
X
o
p.
Is
5
m
to
V
Si
o QJ
02 £t,
a
'5;
O  CJJ
fl a
£8
rt
"E
fl
fl
P.
s
at
a
OJ
<j=
a
fl oj
£  rt
^ QJ
a 3
£ >-
a qj
<3fl
,51
o
a
o
QJ
fl
a
H
j-
QJ
O
a
rt
o
fl
CJ
a
o
pa
ai
i'l
o C
B P
o 0>
*- E
ca
'a
o
g
a
Pi
1
T3
a
rt
rt o;
83
fl'rJ
tT   Ci
C
1
3
l
i
46
3
1
8
1
2
1
8
2
22
"i'
....
l
3
2
2
5
1
5
6
1
19
5
2
1
8
68
9
10
1
3
1
1
1
l
3
15
1
66
37
3
	
—
1
3
131
1
i
1
1
2
3
3
4
2
2
1
6
2
1
1
4
1
2
7
3
1
5
2
29
18
1
2
6
i
2
3
1
1
"Y
i
2
2
1
2
5
1
1
1
1
11
1
3
29
2
1
1
10
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
2
i
1
3
3
4
6
1
27
19
3
12
1
23
13
117
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
o
2
1
1
6
"i
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
6
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
—
—
10
2
Atlin   	
Fort St. John	
1
1
1
2
1
9
4
T
1
2
2
1
1
20
Quatsino	
1
2
2
1
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
i
5
4
1
19
40
4
1
Totals ■	
9
68
4
4
3
2
4
85
14
3
2
1
20
194
17
211
1
. 5
i
l
7
i
2
3
14
1
15
4
5
2
1
2
11
2
2
1
5
31
5
36
4
18
2
"i'
3
2
26
2
3
3
8
63
8
71
1
16
3
	
	
—
Oak Bay	
i
1
1
2
2
1
4
5
1
5
49
6
5
5
Totals    	
i
188
1
	
	
13
—
1
6
3
9
2
15 '
1
16
1
8
8
6
21
4
25
16
134
10
144
60
3
3
1
1
2
506
53
18
568 M 70
British Columbia.
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining Division for the Year 1925—Continued.
Mining Division.
3
'5  la
&   V
Hi
3
X
o
£•
S
Ul
2
00
be
g
O  fcC
X! 3
£3
9
1
1
OJ
fl
4JS
fl
ft
5
16
i
rt
N
OJ
oa
a
8
■5 "J
.t^ QJ
-.   UI
> at
at  oj
N"fl
BQ
QJ   .
3 33
Cfl
25
3
1
o
"a
CJ
QJ
a
H
144
17
2
1
3
2
CJ
a
rt
O
211
11
3
3
3
6
1
238
14
0
10
13
fl
a
a
o
CC
15
3
18
1
1
1
1
rt
i'l
o a
a a
O  QJ
J- a
CC ft
36
1
i
1
1
40
5
1
ii'
rt
"a
o
g
a
QJ
a
A.
71
4
3
2
80
10
7
4
13
1
35
196
a
rt
rt oj
11
33
18
1
1
20
4
9
1
14
57
-at
o
H
558
41
North Vancouver City        	
3
15
7
1
8
9
1
Totals	
6
3
1
11
1
17
1
1
8
i
29
7
169
23
2
25
639
67
20
1
IS
1
21
2
4
26
l
8
83
1
3
2
Totals	
1
12
3
2
2
22
15
70
50
402
46
441
4
39
17
93
190
1,387
Marriages.
The number of registrations of marriages was 4,132 for the year 1925, as against 3,945 in
the year 1924.
Oriental Races.
Chinese.—The total-number of Chinese registrations of births during the year ended December
31st, 1925, was 234, as against 493 registrations for the year 1924. There were 183 Chinese
children born and registered during the year 1925, the balance being registrations of children
born prior to the year 1925.
The number of Chinese deaths registered during the year 1925, including 2 still-births, was
197, as against 207 during the previous year.
Excluding still-births, there were 8 deaths of children under 1 year of age. Deaths from
tuberculosis numbered 44 and from cancer 12.
Japanese.—There were 1,104 registrations of births of Japanese children during the year
1925, as against 949 registrations in the previous year; 687 children were born and registered
during the year ended December 31st, 1925, as against 617 during the same period in the previous
year. Deaths of Japanese during the year 1925 numbered 195, excluding 17 still-births. The
deaths of 62 children (still-births excluded) under 1 year of age, as against 40 in the year 1924
and 81 during the year 1923. Deaths from tuberculosis and cancer were 32 and 4 respectively,
as against 24 and 11 during the year 1924.
Indian Returns.
The total number of registrations of births of Indians for the year ended December 31st,
1925, was 469, and of these 227 were males and 242 females. Children born and registered during
the year numbered 433, as against 390 in the previous year. The birth-rate per 1,000 of population w'as 17.8, as against 16.7 in the year 1924.
Registrations of deaths among Indians numbered 436 for the year 1925, as against 457 in
the year 1924. The death-rate per 1,000 of population was 17.0, as against 18.7 the previous year.
The number of deaths from tuberculosis was 155, or 35.5 per cent, of all deaths. There were 4
deaths from cancer. Deaths from tuberculosis and cancer in the previous year were 125 and 6
respectively. Deaths of children under 1 year of age numbered 72, as compared with 95 in the
year 1924; 52.7 per cent, of the total number of decedents were under 20 years of age. The
number of deaths exceeded the number of births by 3.
" Adoption Act."
Particulars of births relating to 121 children adopted under the " Adoption Act" were
received and filed in this office during the year 1924. 17 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
M 71
General.
Letters inward—
1923 :  4,973
1924  6,475
1925  8,198
1926  (6 months)  4,519
Increase for 1925 over 1923, 64.8 per cent.
Letters outward—
1923 No record.
1924  5,199
1925  6,630
1926  (6 months)  3,629
Increase for 1925 over 1924, 27.5 per cent.
Searches made—
1923  2,594
1924  3,945
1925...:  5,493
1926  (6 months)......  2,867
Increase for 1925 over 1923, 117.7 per cent.
Certificates issued—
1923  2,470
1924  3,783
1925  5,450
1926  (6 months)  2,826
Increase for 1925 over 1923, 120.6 per cent.
Cash receipts—
1923  $2,179
1924     3,133
1925 .•     4,252
1926  (6 months)     2,372
Increase for 1925 over 1923, 95.1 per cent.
Marriage-licence fees—
1923  $295
1924 :...     315
1925 :     455
1926 (6 months)      250
Increase for 1925 over 1923, 54.2 per cent.
Mothers' pensions   (certificates  issued free) —
1924  312
1925  811
1926  (6 months)   378
Increase for 1925 over 1924, 159.9 per cent.
S.C.R.  (certificates issued free) —
1924 :  446
1925  398
1926  (6 months)   246
Decrease for 1925 on 1924, 10.7 per cent.
Hospital reports  (birth-lists checked) —
1924  295
1925  578
1926 (6 months) .'..'.  401
Increase for 1925 over 1924, 95.9 per cent.
The figures quoted above speak for themselves.    To cope with this increase of work has
needed a willingness and industry on the part of my staff which merits recognition.    In conclusion, thanks are due to all officers connected with this branch of the Health Department for
services rendered.
I have, etc.,
Herbert B. French, M.A.,
Deputy Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages. VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1926.
1,125-926-5288

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0228032/manifest

Comment

Related Items