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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA TWENTY-SEVENTH REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING TWELFTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1923

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-SEVENTH REPORT
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
TWELFTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30TH, 1923, AND THE FIFTY-FIRST REPORT OF VITAL
STATISTICS DEPARTMENT, BEING A SUMMARY
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1922
PRINTED   by
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1923.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1923.
To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report, of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended June 30th, 1923.
j. d. Maclean,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean, Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1923.
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Twenty-seventh Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health.
I have to report the gradual development of the different branches of the Department, and
it is a pleasure to record such progress in regard to our work. I have always pointed ont that
progress must depend upon our ability to secure the support of public opinion, and our work has
been carried along these lines by a desire to arouse such opinion as would necessitate the
carrying-out of health laws and regulations. I am very pleased to be able to report a marked
progress in the acceptance by the different voluntary organizations of the work that your
Department is doing.
It has been a pleasure indeed to meet the increased work when it was recognized that the
great number of letters that we are receiving, together with the requests for addresses to
meetings, have all been inspired by a genuine attempt on the part of the public for further
information.
New problems are constantly presenting themselves, and I am pleased to say that it has
been a pleasure to anticipate requests for co-operation and assistance, and our endeavour has
been to keep in advance of such requests, and to endeavour to show that the Government is alive
io the increasing importance of the problems.
We feel that we are at the beginning of an era where a great advance will be made by
following up the impression that has already been made.
We have found that health authorities can only go just a little bit faster than the public
will admit, but we are not able to report a reversal in this respect, and we find that the public
are now demanding that they shall be told what to do; they know what should be done in a
vague way, but they want definite instructions, and it has been our duty to comply with this
request. We have found this work most interesting, and feel that under your direction your
Department is establishing itself in the good opinion of the people of British Columbia.
Evidence of the advances that are being made in the health-work of British Columbia is
obtained by comparing the annual reports of this Department from year to year. Some five
years ago our report was taken up with what had been done in the matter of epidemics and
the subject-matter was chiefly devoted to the importance of avoiding the effects of epidemics.
I -am pleased to say that the last three years our reports have shown almost an entire absence
of epidemics, and the subject-matter of the report has been an account of the constructive work
along preventive lines.
I will endeavour to give you a report of the different branches of our work, beginning
with, first:—■
Sanitary.—Under the general work we are concerned with the larger problems of sanitation
in regard to water-supplies, sewage-disposal, transportation, public buildings, and more especially
concerned with logging and mining camps and the inspection of fruit and fish canneries.. I am
happy to say our work has been done in a very systematic manner under the able direction of
Mr. DeGrey, our Chief Sanitary Inspector. He finds that there are many new problems presenting themselves in this branch of the Department, particularly the increase iii travel owing to
the development of the tourist traffic.
In regard to the details of his work his report is appended.
In this branch of the work there has been a remarkable change; owing to the increase in
logging activities during the past year, it was presupposed that many complaints would be
received. In comparison with conditions existing five years ago the change has been phenomenal.
There has been persistent insistence on the observation of our regulations. Both employers and
employees are alive to the necessity of their observance, and it is very rare that we receive a
complaint from the employees. The employers are recognizing that our regulations are not
drastic or not intended to be neglected, and they find they must strictly comply with them if
their work is to be carried on.
The development of the motor traffic will be our most pressing problem, and I would
recommend that the Government impress upon municipalities and individuals who are in charge
of motor-camp  sites  that the  regulations  be  observed  to  the  letter.    We  are  assuming  the E 6 British Columbia. 1923
complete charge of the people who are visiting our Province, and there would be no surer way
of destroying this traffic, with the financial gain it means to the Province, than by non-observance
of the health regulations. Neglect of the water-supply in any municipality may give rise to an
epidemic of typhoid that would destroy this travel, and we must take every precaution to see
that the health laws, which are sufficiently comprehensive, are strictly enforced.
Your Department has communicated with the Automobile Associations of the Province and
they have told us that they will give us their fullest co-operation. Municipalities have been
furnished with copies of the regulations which have been adopted and these are posted in every
motor-camp site. The regulations have been adopted by the Health Officers of the States of
California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, so that tourists, wherever they go, do
not find conflicting regulations.
Venereal-disease Work.—The work carried on by the Government of British Columbia in
conjunction with the Federal Department of Health has been in operation now for the past
three years. I do not think that there is any branch of our work that is giving more satisfactory
results, both from the splendid awakening of public opinion to the seriousness of this question
and also owing to the manner in which the work of the Government has been carried out through
its clinics and Provincial laboratories.
We receive splendid co-operatiou from prominent and leading citizens in different sections
of the Province in our educational campaign, with the result that the present accommodation of
our clinics is being taxed to the limit.
If the economic cost of the work is considered, it will be shown that the expenditure made
in our efforts at prevention is a mere bagatelle compared to the saving that we are making and
will continue to make for the taxpayer.
The facilities provided by the Government are sufficient for our present needs, and our
endeavours now are directed along the line of follow-up work, in order, if possible, to deal with
the floating population, who are a continual source of infection.
Our larger cities are headquarters for mining and logging operations and all industrial work
that is going on in the Province, the terminus of five transcontinental railways, and the port of
call of the Pacific Ocean steamship liners. It is these phases of the problem that we are meeting
as they arise and in which we differ greatly from the other Provinces which are inland Provinces.
We, however, are meeting them, and the provisions made for the handling of the sailors and
floating population are such that any one needing treatment is obtaining it.
Public-health Nursing.—Under the assistance that we have received from yourself, we are
able to report most satisfactory progress. The policy, as outlined by yourself, has been that
this work must develop by local support through taxation, and in order to assist in this an
amendment was passed to the " Public Schools Act," which practically places the appointment
of the nurse on the same basis as the appointment of the teacher to the school staff. This,
together with the privilege of grouping schools, makes the cost upon each School Board very
small.    The grant from the Government towards the salary is the same as that to the teacher.
There is no part of our work that is giving us greater satisfaction than the progress that
we are making in the establishment of our Public Health Nurses. AVe have at present in British
Columbia sixteen nurses.
We are constantly in receipt of requests for nurses and the greatest drawback is the
difficulty of obtaining those properly trained. Our work is such that probably the report that
I have received from Mrs. Lucas, Nurse Superintendent of the Saanich Health Centre, of her
work will give you the best idea of the work that is being carried on. I may say that the
success of the Saanich Health Centre is shown by the fact that three years ago we had one
nurse with headquarters in a small room; now we have a $25,000 building with a staff of four
nurses and assistants.
The course for Public Health Nurses in our University is becoming increasingly popular.
AVithin the past three years we have graduated fifty-six nurses and still the cry is for more.
Following is the report of the Saanich Health Centre:—
"Saanich Municipality.—Square miles, 55; population, $12,000; schools, 15; class-rooms,
58;   school-children, 2,222.
" Public Health Nursing Service being directed from Health Centre.
" Nursing Staff.—Superintendent Nurse, one School Nurse, and one District Nurse.
" Transportation.—Two Ford cars.    Approximate mileage covered monthly, 2,000.
" Well-baby Clinic.—Three each month;  348 babies registered to date. 14 Geo. 5 Board of Health. E 7
" School-work.—Individual class-room inspection once each month, except in case of an
outbreak of communicable disease, when the nurse makes a daily examination of the pupils until
the danger of communication is passed. The teachers are instructed in observing signs and
symptoms and reporting to the Health Centre.
" Pupils are weighed every month and measured once in the school-year; subsequent months
the children are encouraged to weigh themselves and record the result under the supervision of
the nurse.   Charts are placed in every class-room for this purpose.
" After each inspection the nurse gives a health talk to the class upon such matters as
personal cleanliness, care of the teeth, etc.; the talks are made suitable to the grade. Roll
of honour being given each year to pupils who observe health rules.
" Little Mothers' League classes are for girls between the ages of 10 and 14 years. A definite
course on infant hygiene, which includes the proper dressing and feeding of the babe, with
practice on a baby doll. The classes cover a period of twelve weeks, with examination, badge,
and certificate issued by the Provincial Board of Health.
" Attractive health posters are placed in every class-room. Children are encouraged to
make health posters themselves about fruit, vegetables, sunshine, teeth, nails, etc. Prizes are
given by the Provincial Board of Health for the best health poster.
" Dental Work.—The dentist works at the Centre three hours, from 9 a.m. to 12. In this
way twenty-five pupils approximately have dental care weekly.
" Tonsil Clinic.—The last Friday of each month at least five tonsil operations are done.
The children are put to bed and cared for, and remain from six to thirty-six hours, until quite
recovered.
" Tuberculosis—Chest Clinic.—Once each month all suspects are encouraged to attend and
supervision is maintained at intervals by visiting the homes, or arrangements are made for
transfer to sanatorium.
" Social Service.—Social-service work is an important part of the programme, as there is
no organization in Saanich for this purpose.
" Infant-welfare.—All babies born in Saanich are followed up. All through the pre-school
period supervision is maintained.
" Home-nursing and Hygiene.—These lectures are conducted through all the fall and winter
months, the classes covering a period of twelve weeks, with examination and certificate issued
by the Provincial Board of Health.
" Addresses on various phases of public-health nursing, child-welfare, etc., are given as part
of every month's programme.    Health Centre activities are shown on coloured slides.
" District.—The district work includes maternity-work and all nursing which is not communicable. A certain amount of education-work and distribution of health literature. This
service is heavy owing to night calls.
" At the Health Centre six beds are utilized for a certain type of patient, such as malnutrition, tonsilectomy cases, etc.
" Extension of Work.—We are organizing pre-natal and eye and ear clinics, this latter being
a vital necessity for the school-children. The difficulty which presents itself, a very real one,
is the limited staff and transportation facilities. The nurses are working to the limit of their
strength. An increase of staff is a matter which requires very serious consideration, with an
additional car; the two in use being inadequate for present requirements and will certainly not
meet our further needs if a proper public-health nursing programme is to be carried out. The
work has increased with surprising rapidity during the past year, as the following figures will
show, which includes individual attention to cases, nursing, school, welfare, etc.: Year ended
December, 1922, 13,053;  half-year ended June, 1923, 12,989.
" All of which is respectfully submitted."
Laboratories.—Since the adoption of your policy in regard to carrying out public-health work
in the laboratories of the Vancouver General Hospital and Jubilee Hospital, which have become
Provincial laboratories, we find an increasing demand for the Government to establish facilities
for such work in other parts" of the Province. The outlying points are moving for the establishment of laboratories, and I would respectfully recommend that their requests be given favourable'
consideration.
In connection with laboratory work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out on request. There
were 250 doses of typhoid vaccine sent out, 1,759,000 units of diphtheria antitoxin, and 4.210
points  of  smallpox vaccine,  all  distributed  free.    Following your  instructions,  arrangements E 8 British Columbia. 1923
were made to carry out the policy of free distribution of all  biological products in use in
preventive medicine.
I would like to pay a tribute to the co-operation that we have received from the voluntary
organizations, and particularly the Women's Institutes of British Columbia. The increased
co-operation of the institutes is manifested by the continued demand for expansion of the work,
and it is particularly manifest in the work of the committees and those who are devoting their
time to public-health and child-hygiene work. They have also started a Crippled Children Fund;
a general committee has been formed and within the past six months sufficient money has been
raised to enable them to undertake the treatment of fourteen patients, who would otherwise have
been doomed to lifelong handicap of physical deformity. I hope to be able to report within the
next two years the establishment of an institution for the treatment of this class of cases.
Child-hygiene, tuberculosis, and venereal-disease work are all Dominion-wide questions and
British Columbia is well to the forefront in carrying out this work.
In regard to tuberculosis, we have been active in regard to this question following definite
policy laid down by yourself, and the appointment of a specially trained man in tuberculosis-
work as Travelling Diagnostician has met with a splendid reception and will lead to the
establishment, as intended, of clinics in different parts of the Province, where patients at an
early date will be able to receive treatment before continuing to work until a break-down and
then going to a sanatorium.    The integral idea is prevention.
During the past summer, through your co-operation, we have been able to carry out a
survey in some of our schools, and in South Vancouver 907 children were examined. When we
consider that 28 per cent, of these showed reaction to the tests, the wisdom of carrying out this
work throughout the Province becomes very manifest. Twenty-eight per cent, of these pupils
require watching, and if neglected would ultimately develop tuberculosis. Prevention is better
than cure.
A table of infectious diseases reported during the year is incorporated in this report, in
addition to which epidemics were reported as follows:—
Chicken-pox—Sandon, Chilliwack, Rossland, Duncan, Edgewood District, Kelson, Point Grey,
Cranbrook, Langford, South Vancouver, New Denver, Ocean Falls, Burnaby, North Vancouver,
Cumberland, Saanich, Victoria, and Vancouver.
Whooping-cough—Port Coquitlam, Edgewood District, Point Grey, Cranbrook, Trail, and
Burnaby.
Mumps—Chilliwack, Duncan, and Point Grey.
Scarlet fever—Rossland, Grand Forks, Nelson, Point Grey, Mission, Trail and District,
South Arancouver, Kaslo, Burnaby, Victoria, and Vancouver.
Measles—Cowichan District, Cranbrook, Smithers, Oak Bay, Saanich, and Victoria.
Influenza—Keremeos, Field, Duncan and District, Williams Lake, Creston, Mission, North
Vancouver, and Cumberland.
Diphtheria—Rossland (mild), South Vancouver, Courtenay, and Esquimalt.
Smallpox—North Vancouver and Vancouver.
Cemeteries approved: East Arrow Park, Nanoose, Stewart, Naramata, West Vancouver,
Williams Lake, and Boswell.
Water-supplies approved: Grand Forks, Arernon, Anyox, District of North Arancouver,
Extension, Kimberley, Vancouver Extension, and Prince Rupert Extension.
I am appending the report of the medical examination of the school-children.
The report of the Arital Statistics Branch is also appended and the figures given in this report
are satisfactory evidence of the general conditions of the health of the people. Our death-rate
of children under 1 year of age shows continued improvement. In the City of Arictoria the rate
is 41 per 1,000, which is the lowest in the Dominion of Canada.
The work of the Department has been increasing from year to year and has necessitated
strict attention on the part of the members of the staff, and I wish to take this occasion to
express to them my appreciation of their worn.
I also wish, on behalf of tne staff and myself, to express our appreciation of the encouragement that we received from you, as Minister of the Department.
1 have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG, Provincial Health Officer. 14 Geo. 5 Board of Health. E 8a
The following article on "Dental Clinics," written by the President of the Cowichan
Electoral District Health Centre to be read at the annual conferences of the AVomen's Institutes,
was received at too late a date to allow of incorporation in the body of our report.
The account of the difficulties encountered and the success obtained is of such importance
that we decided to print the paper and include it as an inset to our report.
Provincial Boabd of Health.
THE COAVIOHAN ELECTORAL DISTRICT HEALTH CENTRE.
Rural Dental Clinics.
The Cowichan Electoral District Health Centre had been at work for less than a year
when it was borne in on all concerned that something must be done for the children's teeth.
The nurses, in writing up the children's health cards for the parents' information, made the
same depressing remark from month to month, " Defective teeth," " Defective teeth," and. advised
a visit to the dentist.
But owing to indifference or lack of money, or both, no action was taken by the parents,
and the nurses advised their committee that unless something was done their work in the
schools was of little avail, as so many of the children's ailments could be traced to defective
teeth.
It might be discouraging to others were it stated here all the obstacles the Health Centre
Committee had to overcome before accomplishing the task they had set themselves.
Cowichan is a large and scattered district, with Duncan as centre, and nearly all the outlying
schools are inspected by the Health Centre Nurses.
School Boards, on being consulted, declared that the financial strain could not be borne by
them, and that, after all, it was the parents who were responsible for the children's teeth;
others spoke of the Interruption to school routine were clinics held and the difficulty and expense
of finding accommodation outside the school; the impossibility of finding a dentist who would
undertake the work was cited; and after all these pessimists had been heard came the chorus,
" And where is the money to come from."
Nothing daunted, the committee set about finding the money, while to strengthen their
hands Dr. H. E. Young, Provincial Officer of Health, secured the services of an eminent Victoria
dentist who made a survey of the Cowichan schools and confirmed the worst reports of the
nurses—the children's teeth were very bad indeed!
The local dentist, Dr. D. G. Kerr, was consulted as to the possible cost of holding school
clinics, and he agreed to take up the work and estimated that it would cost about $100 per
month.    Before the work was started this sum was guaranteed as follows:—
From Health Centre funds   $  200 00
From North Cowichan Red Cross         200 00
From Provincial Red Cross          240 00
From Government grant for dentist         260 00
From possible fees        300 00
Total   $1,200 00
Dr. Kerr's contract provided :—
(1.)  That he would furnish all dental supplies and instruments;  the Health  Centre
finding suitable quarters:
(2.)  That he would furnish transportation to and from outside points:
(3.) That clinics should be held on not more than three days in one week and on daj's
chosen by mutual agreement:
(4.)  That the remuneration should be at  the rate of $4 per hour from the time of
leaving Duncan:
(5.)  That the work would be carried out by his partner, Dr. French.
Dr. Lewis Hall, of Victoria, presented a dental chair to the Health Centre Committee, and
this has proved a great boon as it can be placed in the dentist's car.
From the time that the first idea of a clinic was mooted till a clinic was actually held
many months elapsed and eighty-seven letters were placed in the dental-clinic file.    It is also of E8b British Columbia. 1923
interest to note that 444 appointments were made by the nurse in regard to the children attending these clinics.
But all this labour was well worth while, and to-day we hold the proud record of establishing the first rural dental clinic in British Columbia.
To secure the Government grant, application was made to the Education Department through
the Duncan School Board, as no Government grant ean be paid by the Education Department
direct to a Health Centre.
As the dentist had arranged to work half the school hours a grant of $260 was available,
but this grant is only paid over to the School Board when the dentist has submitted a signed
statement to the Education Department that he has worked these hours. So it will be noted
that the dentist has to be paid $4 for every hour he works befpre the grant can be earned.
Hence the necessity of having a sum on hand before starting a financial venture with a dental
clinic.
The policy of the Health Centre was to make the charge for dental work as moderate as
possible and the rate was based on the time the dentist spent on the work.
In Work in a clinic no time is wasted. One pupil following another in quick succession and
fewer interruptions take place than would be the case in ah office; also the dentist has the
attendance of an experienced nurse who prepares the child for the chair and sees that everything is ready.
As was stated before, Cowichan is a large and scattered district and it was deemed advisable
to get as much work done as possible in the summer holidays, and all through June and July
the dentist and the nurse held their clinics in Duncan.
The dentist made an examination of the mouth of each child and the nurse filled in a card
showing what work was necessary and the estimated cost of the same. These cards were
forwarded to the parents and they were asked to state on the cards if they wished their children
treated at the dental clinic or if they preferred the work done by their private dentist. If the
former, they were asked to state if they were prepared to pay the full cost of the work or make
partial payment, or if they were unable to pay anything. These cards were returned to the
nurse and the instructions noted by her.
Her decision was final in all cases where no payment could be made, and no child was
refused treatment on this account.
Dr. French, by his winning personality and thorough understanding of child psychology, soon
won the confidence of his young patients. The work was done with the greatest skill and the
minimum of pain. In fact, the clinics were conducted without tears and the chair, dreaded
of grown-ups, held no terrors for young Cowichan.
After the holidays work was begun in the outlying schools, and before the end of June,
1923, clinics had been held in ten more schools as well as in the schools in the City of Duncan.
Without certain papers it is impossible to give the exact figures, but approximately 700
children were examined and some 300 to 400 treated, and 79 per cent, were found to have
defective teeth. The cost to the Health Centre was over $1,100 and the cost per pupil averaged
$3.43. The fees greatly exceeded our estimate of $300 and are still coming in. Though the
clinics cannot be said to have paid this year from a monetary point of view, yet as a help to
our welfare-work and as a benefit to the children they have paid a hundredfold.
But as in business so it is with a dental clinic. Capital is needed to start^with and the
interest on the same does not always accrue in the first year.
Our first year has been safely passed and the work goes steadily on. The dentist finds that
there is much less to do, as so much was done in the past year, and the committee! expects that
the fees and Government grant will now go far towards paying all expenses.
We have won the confidence of children, parents, trustees, and the general public.
When one considers that our dental survey disclosed 79 per cent, of the Cowichan children
had defective teeth, one realizes that something urgent must be done for children in general.
Sir James Cantlie, one of England's foremost physicians, says that there are no finer children
at birth in the world than those of British stock, but their teeth are ruined to begin with; and,
as he adds, " You cannot raise a nation on rotten teeth."
" Look after your teeth and your health will look after itself," is an axiom that parents
and nurses should lay to heart. 14 Geo. 5 Board of Health. E 8c
The diseases rising from neglected teeth are manifold, and as a " robber of industry " it
has been proved by the Prudential Approved Societies that neglect of the teeth is the cause of
half the ill-health found among the industrial classes.
If we estimate the value of a sound tooth compared with a diseased one as $5, we come to
realize that the loss to the nation from decayed teeth is represented by hundreds of millions of
dollars.
To all who have the welfare of children at heart, start dental clinics and give them a
chance in the race of life.   With bad teeth they are heavily handicapped.
If our work in Cowichan is to bear fruit, it must widen its borders to include the Province;
therefore this outline of our work has been written.
Last year we laid our foundations. Lay yours now, and may help and hope and courage
be given you to carry on the good work.
Margaret Moss,
President, Cowichan Electoral District Health Centre.
November 6th, 1923.  14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 9
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE PROVINCE.
to .2
||
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o
p
53
H
£*
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° c
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OQHH
9
0
"a
ci
S3
P.
S
■A
0
c.
c
.M
.0
6
1
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P. S
O ~
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33
rf
rf
rf
a
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3
13
a
ix M
-  :/>
.33 v
a, 0
U2W
3
10
4
5
4
1
28
2
4
1
2
37
3
27
3
1
16
44
1
2
1
40
2
15
1
2
3
4
1
I
7
1
6
4
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
51
4
1
48
3
2
45
1
2
2
3
3
5
1
14
32
'"i
1
1
1
Esquimalt and Highlands Dist.
Esquimalt Municipality	
1
1
"'2'
2
2
1
20
4
1
15
4
55
1
2
1
1
5
2
12
10
41
4
1
3
5
1
10
1
4
1
10
5
13
6
66
7
14
1
5
1
1
1
3
1
100
40
53
1
15
115
10
1
2
2
1
10
3
11
1
2
1
Oak Bay 	
1
4
2
69
15
4
2
1
37
1
1
30
35
12
1
3
45
2
4
2
6
1
7
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
....
1
5
2
12
1
6
4
23
6
193
1
1
1
2
150
6
2
1
3
1
1
64
30
285
2
90
2
28
1
"2'
22
128
47
8
20
6
3
143
3
108
2
2
1
259
60
6
46
2
60
74
11
30
10
1
1
idi
9
2
1
47
6
25
20
'"2
3
18
6
157
13
5
778
11
2
2
1
3
90
8
134
Totals	
2
261
1   1  64
996
232
289
1,027
32S
4
1,363
19 E 10 British Columbia. 1923
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1923.
II. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Medical Officer of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your consideration my Thirteenth Annual Report on
Sanitary and Quarantine Work for the Provincial Board of Health.
From an industrial standpoint the past year has been a record-breaker for British Columbia,
and in consequence a greater need for sanitary service has been brought about and dealt with
by this branch of your service.
Logging, mining, and fishing are the principal industries, and the majority of these are
scattered along the vast coastal line of British Columbia.
Taking on the whole, the sanitary conditions of our industrial camps are not excelled in
any part of the civilized world, and the fact that no industrial strife exists in British Columbia
is very good evidence of a healthy and contented people.
This Department does not presume to take credit for this condition, because the means of
attaining this state has been through the co-operation of employers and employees. We have
simply acted as a medium of persuasive demand where and when necessary. During the past
five years I have only had to resort to the Courts once, and I think that speaks volumes for the
vision and broad-mindedness of our captains of industry.
The inspection of these industrial camps often entails much hard travel and danger. The
logging operations are now being carried on miles from the coastal entrance or booming-ground.
and consequently much time is consumed on the trail or the chute or the logging-railway, or
whatever means can best be found to get to the camp.
We have been made aware of the existence of typhoid-carriers at some of our outlying
industrial camps, but by intensive and persistent propaganda with our inspection no serious
outbreak has occurred. The use and value of typhoid prophylactic serum does not seem to be
taken advantage of or appreciated to the extent foreshadowed and desired.
There have been a few outbreaks of smallpox, but fortunately these have been isolated and
checked without difficulty.
Fish-cannebies.
The salmon industry this year bids fair to surpass the supply of several years past. The
canneries are all operated and equipped in a manner that brings surprise and unstinted praise
from the many tourists and visitors who are allowed to inspect without restraint the numerous
salmon-canneries of British Columbia.
So perfected and ingenious is the mechanical means of handling and cooking the fish that
from the time the salmon are caught in the sea to the time they are canned and ready for the
consumer's table the fish are scarcely touched by human hands. Yet, in spite of that, our
regulations governing fish-canneries are very strict in regard to the premises and employees.
Following the visits of tourists, we have been frequently asked for copies of our regulations
which our visitors have noticed posted around the cannery premises. We are informed that
these will be used as a standard for similar food-preserving plants in various parts of the
world.
Fruit-canneries.
Regulations along the same lines are used by the fruit-canneries of the Okanagan, which is
now dubbed by tourists as " the world's most luscious fruit orchard." To speak of the Okanagan
fruit and its future would be to romance, and its development has scarcely begun. The present
operators and growers are simply pioneers of what will ultimately advertise British Columbia,
just as the quality of British Columbia salmon has done all over the world.    The fruit is grown, 14 Geo. 5 Board of Health. E 11
picked, packed, or canned under perfect sanitary conditions and in such increasing quantities as
to cause some doubt as to a ready market.
Summer Resorts.
British Columbians are naturally inclined for the open-air life, and her seaside camps and
resorts are never altogether deserted, but this summer seems to surpass all years for crowds.
The majority of these summer camps are located at coastal points in unorganized territory,
and consequently under the sanitary supervision of this Department, and require considerable
attention in order to emphasize the necessity of proper attention to the disposal of refuse and
protection of drinking-water.
We have found it necessary to make special journeys in order to insist upon an occasional
evader observing our sanitary regulations. All of the summer resorts have so far been free
from any outbreak of infectious nature.
Auto Tourist Camps.
With the advent of the automobile and the invasion of tourists in ever-increasing numbers,
it became evident that some regulations for governing the same be adopted, and regulations
have been gazetted to meet the demand. These will probably be amended slightly to meet
conditions that may appear. The tourist travel by auto bids fair to become au important factor,
and it is quite apparent already that we must be prepared to take "the stranger hi" by
providing sanitary conveniences without annoyance or the possibility of becoming a nuisance.
By agreement of the State Medical Health Officers of California, Oregon, Washington, and
■the Provincial Health Officer of British Columbia, uniform regulations have been adopted and
tourists will find these rules and regulations posted in all motor camping grounds from the
Mexican border to the northern boundary of British Columbia.
Watebsheds.
The sanitary protection for our watersheds, provided for some years ago by special health
regulations, has proved its worth. The regulations are being observed and the drinking-water
for our largest city and its environs protected against pollution by logging operations and
others. The regulations are elastic and amendments made when necessary through changing
conditions.
It is gratifying to note that no water-borne disease has been recorded in the district served
by the water from the health area under protection.
Survey-inspection for water-supply extensions has been made for the City of Vernon and
the City of Duncan.
In the matter of nuisances, we have been called upon to make thirty inspections and take
remedial action for foreshores, slaughter-houses, hog-farms, open drains, oil, fish, chemical, and
fertilizer plants in various parts of British Columbia. In no case has it been necessary to
prosecute and in many instances the alleged nuisances did not exist to a point where it could
be termed an annoyance.
The inspection visits to logging camps during the past year approximate 300; to mining
camps, 35;   to cauneries, 125; to industrial plants, 25; summer resorts, 30; and nuisances, 30.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGeey,
Chief Sanitary Officer. E 12 British Columbia. 1923
REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1023.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg leave to hand you the Twelfth Annual Report of the Medical Inspection
of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
Apparently on the face of it, the reports with the accompanying tables seem to be a repetition year after year of the same matter, but an analysis of the results of the medical inspection
of schools in British Columbia, which has been in force now for eleven years, will show what
very material progress has been made in the work.
On examination it does not appear as if the percentage of defects of the pupils shows any
marked decrease; in fact, some years it shows an increase; but examining this in the past
five years it must be noted that there has not been an increase in the percentage of defects when
you take into consideration the fact that the school population is growing by a number of
thousands each year. We find on investigation from those who have been a number of years in
a particular school, also from parents and from the voluntary organizations who are taking
an interest in school-work, that the object of this inspection is much more thoroughly understood.
We also find that when parents are notified of the existence of defects there is a very much
larger number who see to it by consulting their family physician that these defects are remedied,
and teachers particularly of long standing report that the correction of the defects is manifest
in the educational work of the pupils, that there are fewer retarders, and that when the delects
are corrected the pupils make gains in their classes much more qftickly than they have heretofore.
The work of our Public Health Nurses is becoming understood, and in their follow-up work,
using the medical man's card and records of the pupils, they are able to visit the home with this
as a card of introduction, explain to the parents just what neglect of the defects will mean to
the pupil in after-life, and as a result a better understanding is arrived at and better attention
is given to the pupils.
During the past two years more particular attention has been given to the needs for dental
attention, and in the face of great obstacles we have succeeded in establishing dental clinics
in some of the outlying districts. We found that on an average about 90 per cent, of the pupils
are suffering from dental defects, some very serious and of irreparable nature owing to neglect.
The question of cost for dental work for people living in outlying districts has been a very
serious one, necessitating an absence from the home for a day or two or longer for a visit to
the dentist, and this expense, added to the dentist's fee, has been felt in the majority of cases
to be prohibitive. In one section of the Island we have carried out dental work for two years,
and we have, in the number of schools in that particular district, been able to first make a
complete survey of the pupils to find out just what was needed; this was carried out at the
expense of the Department. Then a dentist was employed to undertake the work. The first
work, of course, has been comprehensive, for the coming season this will be much lighter, as
it will be practically only attending to defects that have developed since the first work has been
done. We found that with the Public Health Nurses taking charge of the work we get better
results than for an anxious parent to accompany the child. The nurse is trained and knows
how to handle the child. The dentist employed has proved exceptionally good at the work and
we have found that the average cost per pupil was .$3.30. A full report of this work will be
published shortly by the Department and distributed to all of the voluntary organizations and
to all of the School Boards, and we hope will form, a basis of knowledge that will enable all of
these bodies to see that dental attention to the children is within the reach of all.
I would point out in this connection that Government aid is paid to the dentist on the same
basis as we pay teachers; that is, for rural schools a grant is made of $580 toward the salary,
the balance to be made up by the fees from those who can pay either full fee or partial fees,
and by contributions from voluntary organizations. In this way the burden is very light and
those who can not pay are attended, as there will be enough received to enable us to do this. 14 Geo. 5 Board of Health. E 13
The sanitary condition of the schools is being improved very remarkably. The Medical
Inspector has to report on the conditions found in all school buildings and in special reference
to the outhouses. On receipt of the report, where it is necessary we immediately write to the
School Boards, calling attention to any defects, and we find they are immediately remedied.
The medical profession are doing good work, although some of the members as yet do not
quite realize the idea of the Government's policy of prevention; but there has been a very
great improvement in this respect, and we are pleased to say that the co-operation received from
the medical men, together with their comments and suggestions to the Department, has been
very helpful.
Details of the examination for each school follows.
I have, etc.,
H. E. Young,
Provincial Officer of Health.
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors:  153.
Reports from Medical Inspectors:  130.
High Schools.
High schools. 1921-22, 52: Reported, 27; not reported, 25. 1922-23, 61 : Iteported, 27;
not reported, 34.
Pupils inspected :  1921-22, 3,908;  1922-23, 4,783, an increase of 875.
Graded City Schools.
Cities. 1921-22, 35: Reported, 26; not reported, 9. 1922-23, 35: Reported, 26; not
reported, 9.
Pupils inspected:  1921-22, 30,218;  1922-23, 32,181, an increase of 1,963.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities. 1921-22, 25: Reported, 22; not reported, 3. 1922-23, 27: Reported, 20;
not reported, 7.
Pupils inspected :  1921-22, 21,617;   1922-23, 21,103, a decrease of 514.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected:  1921-22, 506, at a cost of $11,364.80;  1922-23, 540, at a cost of $12,364.
Schools not inspected:  1921-22, 152;   1922-23, 149.
Pupils inspected : 1921-22, 13,395;  1922-23,-14,080, an increase of 685.
Cost of inspection per pupil:  1921-22, 84 cents;  1922-23, 87 cents.
Percentage of defects:  1921-22, 94.01;  1922-23, 110.35, an increase of 16.35. E 14
British Columbia.
1923
HIGH
"3
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3     .
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£   .
to tc
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Name
of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
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Burnaby:
Burnaby, North .
Burnaby, South .
Chilliwack...
Cranbrook ..
Cumberland
Duncan 	
Esquimalt.   .
Fernie 	
Grand Forks.
Kamloops . .
Kelowna .  ..
Ladner	
Langley   	
Mission	
Nakusp	
Nelson	
New Westminster:
Duke of Connaught.
Ocean Falls	
Peachland	
Point Grey:
King George V..
Prince of Wales.
Revelstoke .
Robson ...
Rossland ...
Trail	
Vancouver:
Britannia	
Junior	
King Edward.
King George ..
Kitsilano	
High School of Commerce.
Technical	
Vancouver, North   	
Vancouver, South
Vernon	
E. J. Foster	
G. deB. Watson.
J. C. Elliot	
G. E. L. MacKinnon
G. K. MacNaughton
H. N. Watson .. .
J. S. McCallum..
D. Corsan	
W. Truax 	
M. G. Archibald .
W. J.Knox	
A. A. King	
B. B. Marr	
A. J. Stuart ....
E. H. S. McLean.
Isabel Arthur ...
D. A. Clark
A. E. II. Bennett
Wm. Buchanan...
T. II. Lennie .
J. II. Hamilton	
J. E. H. Kelso	
J. W. Coffin   	
Drs. Thorn and Williams
T. E. P. Gocher.
G. A. Lamont ..
W. Arbuckle .  .
Miss Hall	
Miss Morrison ...
T. P. Donald
Miss C. W. Thorn
May Ewart .
M. P. Campbell.
50
136
177
110
32
43
38
IIS
69
131
27
53
16
219
17
17
103
17
102
83
572
127
38
81
177
102
32
42
38
118
67
131
91
36
18
52
16
217
17
15
91
17
102
81
444
62
253
154
252
49
280
568
127
4
10
4
3
2
8
20
i
12
4
4
9
1
4
7
3
9
3
7
36
3
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
7
1
4
2
2
7
2
2
6
5
4
4
3
11
5
8
18
11
1
1
4
25
2
3
23
8
1
2
4
1
25
2
i»'
1
28
14
1
5
6
2
5
i
2
10
0
3
is
27
1
17
11
10
23
25
17
4
12
1
3
7
13
4
40
30
10
1
3
4
8
27
3
1
1
1
20
2
2
2
3
1
1
2
3
3
4
4
24
56
2
GRADED CITY
Alberni 	
Chilliwack	
Cranbrook:
Central 	
Kootenay Orchards .
South Ward	
Cumberland	
A. D. Morgan
J. C. Henderson .
G. E. L. MacKinnon
G. K. MacNaughton .
121
114
1
1
5
1
1
389
372
2
1
26
4
2
16
507
507
56
2
16
16
1
3
67
67
3
2
469
445
187
3
49
15
96
17
1
21
103 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 15
SCHOOLS.
9
>
8 fi
QEH
rf P
13
oj
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
u
>
GO
0)
a
o
on
d
0)
|
8
o
bo
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
2
6
"2'
2
2
20
18
2
1
3
24
2
45
9
6
Seborrhea, 3; heart, 2; blepharitis, 1; nervousness, 1
Deafness, 1; rhinitis, 1; spinal
curvature, 1
Fair	
12
26
Overcrowded   	
Good 	
Good.
1
1.3
Anaemia, 5; Cardiac, 1 ; wax in
ears, 1; skin disease, 1; thyroid, 1; defective septum, 1
O.K.
5
Satisfactory	
Crowded   	
Modern and up-to-
date
Good 	
Fair	
O.K	
Satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
8
9
Orthopaedic, 2; nephritis, 2
7
Clean ; adequate.
Clean.
30
4
Nervous and sleepless, 7; Anaemia, 7;   blepharitis, 3;   appendix,   1;    menstrual  disorders, 3; acne, 5; catarrh, 3;
round shoulders, 3; flat feet,
4 ;   eczema, 2 ;   bronchitis,
chronic,  2;  cleft palate,  1 ;
stammering;, 2
Sanitary;   adequate.
Good.
2
2
Adequate.
4
18
1
65
41
3
45
18
3
14
14
11
5
47
O.K.
20
Cardiac,   12 ;  pulmonary,   2 ;
orthopaedic, 4; anaemia, 2
1
Satisfactory.
Ample.
14
Pulmonary,   2 ;   cardiac,   30 ;
orthopaedic, 7; anaemia, 2
Nervous, 1; pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 18; orthopaedic, 5; anaemia, 3
10
3
Good 	
Very good	
Good.
Yes.
5
2
i
8
3
4
65
2
4
3
10
37
49
17
Anaemia, 4; cardiac,"9; eczema.
1; blepharitis, 1
4
16
156
Vaccinated, 30;  not vaccinated, 51
Adequate.
27
84
Vaccinated, 76;  cardiac, 2	
Vaccinated,   134;   cardiac,   1;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 133	
Vaccinated, 32; cardiac, 2....
Heart-disease, 4; lung-disease,
1; orthopaedic, 2; vaccinated,
86
Diphtheria, 1;   chicken-
pox. 1
Scarlet fever,  2 ;    diphtheria, 1
44
78
106
24
*
25
l
1
2
Smallpox, 2; pertussis, 1
Chicken-pox, 1
Bronchitis, 1;  heart, 8 ;
Hernia, 1
Good 	
Clean ; adequate.
181
Crowded   	
Ml
factory.
quate.
SCHOOLS.
22
2
22
40
2
54
63
Cardiac, 2	
3
2
9
306
218
4
Anaemia, 34 ; wax in ears, 94 ;
blepharitis,  19; orthopaedic,
2; skin-disease, 15; conjunctivitis,   2 ;   stammering-,   3 ;
cleft palate, 1; defective septum, 12
Good  	
V e n t i 1 ators   not
working properly
Good 	
Clean.
Yes.
Clean.
O.K. E 16
British Columbia.
1923
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
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Duncan	
Enderby 	
Fernie:
Central	
Fernie, West	
Fernie, Annex	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops	
Kaslo   	
Kelowna	
Merritt	
Nelson :
Hume	
Public 	
New Westminster:
Central	
Lord Lister and Lord Kelvin
Richard McBride	
Queensborough	
Herbert Spencer	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam :
Central	
James Park.	
Port Moody   	
Prime George	
Revelstoke:
Central
Selkirk.
Rossland ...
Slocan    ....
Trail:
Central
Tadanac...
Trail, East.
Vancouver:
Aberdeen
Alexandra.
H. N. Watson   Miss Hall
H. W. Keith.
1). Corsan ...
W. Truax     	
M. G. Archibald .
D. J. Barclay.
W. J. Knox...
G. H. Tutill ..
Isabel Arthur.
D. A. Clark.
C. T. Hilton .
D. C. Clark .
C. R. Svmmes
C. Ewert	
J. H. Hamilton
J. W. Coffin   ..
Wm. E. Gomm
Drs.    Thorn,   Coghlin,   and
Williams
C. S. Williams .
J. B. Thorn  .   .
T. F. Donald.
Miss C. W. Thorn
M. P. Campbell...
0. B. Stevens.
396
360
4
1
14
o
22
21
188
166
1
27
6
6
734
734
1
1
14
7
7
74
77
448
794
74
77
440
739
I
2
8
65
4
70
i
4
1
20
29
1
S
20
67
170
ISO
492
is
1
2
17
39
4
7
18
19
18
15
440
430
4
15
1
11
15
259
231
2
1
26
30
782
712
25
2
78
14
50
84
794
780
71
9
72
9
4
192
647
640
73
2
57
2
4
183
450
439
70
3
44
3
2
103
91
422
76
411
12
65
12
8
54
1
2
1
16
110
175
168
3
26
1
1
173
86
187
306
164
79
179
306
5
i
9
5
7
3
3
20
12
11
35
7
2
10
33
24
6
25
29
21
9
319
313
443
61
298
286
443
59.
9
8
18
10
9
1
'2'
5
8
2
7
17
6
612
600
134
133
8
100
51
48
3
9
5
45
42
4
2
2
3
414
20
7
2
10
4
612
135
6
8
31
18
40
234
83
40
111
190
183
16
112 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 17
SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
t»
-a
OH
WO
o
Other   Conditions,   specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
d
o>
6
a
O
H
93
>
w
B
s
Acute Fevers whicli
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.  State
if  crowded,
poorly  ventilated,    poorly
heated,   etc.
Closets.    State
if  clean   and
adequate.
21
82
411
407
384
51
233
32
3
1
45
1
224
9
so'
102
14
6
145
ii'
130
17
64
67
2
46
10
158
458
67
437
47
260
33
54
236
2
31
4
29
20
18
'27"
12
3
13
50
io'
7
22
14
7
21
53
233
1
4
1
4
4
2
12
Cardiac,   4 ;      orthopaedic   4
nervous, 1; stammering, 1 ;
pulmonary, 1; rheumatism, 1
Endocarditis, 1	
Chorea, 2 ; bronchitis, 1;
fan tile paralysis, 1; vaccinated, 25 ; stammering, 1 ;
conjunctivitis, 10
Conjunctivitis, 3 ; vaccinated,
4
Valvular heart-trouble, 2
Blepharitis,   3;   curvature   of
spine ;     chorea ;     asthma ;
niitrat systolic
Chorea, 7 ; anaemia, 18 ; bleph
aritis, 5; hernia, 2; spinal
curvatures, 3; cardiac, 7;
catarrh, 5; stooping shoulders, 13; acne, 7; flat feet, 7;
deformed feet, 2 ; bronchitis,
6 ; toxic goitre, 2 ; stammering, 4
Cardiac, 5	
Heart,   1;   infantile  paralysis,
1
Heart, 2 ;   infantile paralysis,
2; defective speech, 2
Cardiac, 21; pulmonary, 2;
nervous, 5 ; orthopaedic, 20 ;
anaemia, 4
Cardiac, 22 ;
nervous, 3;
anaemia, 5
Cardiac, 20; nervous, 2 ; orthopaedic, 21;  anaemia, 1
Cardiac, 4 ; orthopaedic, 2  	
Cardiac, 20; nervous, 1; orthopaedic, 20
Healed T.B., right lung, 1;
anaemia, 4 ; cleft palate, 1;
heart, 1
pulmonary,   1
orthopaedic, 14
Unkempt, 2 .
Blepharitis, 11; fistula over
hyoid, 1; contracture of right
small finger, 1; cardiac, 1
acne, 3 ; deformity of left
elbow, 1 ; tunnel-chest, 1
nasal catarrh, 3; conjunc
tivitis, 1; soft palate slough'
ed away, 1; lordosis, 1
Chorea, 1; cardiac, 6*
Cardiac, 3;   nervous,  1;   epi
lepsy, 1
Anaemia, 69 ; acne, 4 ; cardiac,
20; eczema, 2; blepharitis, 3;
orthopaedic, 80
Cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 14 ....
Cardiac, 1; eczema, 5 ;  orthopaedic, 1
Vaccinated, 160; cardiac, 2 ...
Vaccinated,  251';   cardiac,  2 ;
pulmonary, 2
Scarlet fever, 2; chicken
pox, 25
Chicken-pox,
Chicken-pox,  7..
Scarlet fever, 20 .
Scarlet fever, 24	
Scarlet fever, 7; chicken
pox, 11; measles, 3
Scarlet fever, 13	
Scarlet fever,35; measles,
1; chicken-pox
Chicken-pox, 19; scarlatina, 17 ; diphtheria, 1
Smallpox, 2;   pertussis,
28; measles, 1
Mumps, 1 .
Scarlet fever	
Scarlet fever	
Scarlet fever, 12 .
Scarlet fever, 1; vaccinated, 300; not vaccinated, 300,
Vaccinated, 20; not vaccinated, 28
Vaccinated, 18; not vaccinated, 24
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
2 ; chicken - pox, 17 ;
whooping-cough, 3
Scarlet fever, 4; diphtheria, 2; chicken-
pox, 17; whooping-
cough, 9;  smallpox, 9
Satisfactory .
Good
Crowded   ,
Adequate .
Modern
Satisfactory .
O.K	
Crowded
Satisfactory .
Good  ."
Fair..
Good
Satisfactory .
Satisfactory.
Yes.
Clean.
Good.
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
O.K.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Fair.
Good.
Yes.
Slightly inadequate.
Adequate. E 18
Beitisi-i Columbia.
1923
GRADED CITY
Name of School
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
u
Oj
M
p.
3    .
o
<D
•a
Ph-O
s
Li
t- g
t»
>; tu
t> .5
3
§s
K'g
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3
c
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W
QS
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WH
Vancouver—Continued.
Bay view	
Beaconsfield	
Block 70	
Cecil Rhodes	
Central	
Charles Dickens	
Dawson	
Fairview	
Florence Nightingale
Franklin 	
General Gordon	
Grandview	
Grenfell   	
Hastings	
Henry Hudson	
Kitsilano	
Laura Secord	
Livingstone	
Macdonald	
Model	
Mount Pleasant	
Nelson	
Roberts	
Seymour	
Simon Fraser	
Strathcona	
Tennyson	
H. White.
D. Shields.
I. Smith...
M. K. Cruikshank.
L.   1.   Oliver  and
D. Bellamy
M. P. Campbell...
0. B. Stevens.
L.   I.   Oliver  and
D. Bellamy
V. B. Stevens	
M. K. Cruikshank
and D. Shields
M. P. Campbell, E.
G. Breeze, and
V. B. Stevens
I. Smith	
M. K. Cruikshank.
E. G.  Breeze and
D. Shields
D. Shields	
I. Smith	
M. D. Schnltz....
M. K. Cruikshank
D. Bellamy and L
I. Oliver
M. D. Schnltz....
I. Smith.
H. Jukes .
M. A. McLellan.
M. D. Schultz ..
M. A. McLellan.
D. Bellamy and L.
I. Oliver
380
213
79
563
635
534
298
399
530
119
542
500
678
1060
779
511
972
718
17 14 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
E 19
SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
<o   .
QH
ac
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,   etc.).
a
a
a
6
p.
L<
O
fe
So
**
w
a
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
49
34
3
152
175
99
227
127
128
80
64
108
23
137
116
71
31
117
148
116
167
165
94
250
397
2
11
1
Y
4
2
1
5
4
15
6
16
4
25
4
11
i
3
3
2
6
7
7
7
2
6
5
5
5
6
2
10
6
5
•
5
3
3
14
3
3
25
Vaccinated, 137.
Vaccinated, 64..
Vaccinated, 15	
Vaccinated, 259; Cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 273	
Vaccinated, 216; cardiac, 3.
Vaccinated,  450;
pulmonary, 6
Vaccinated,  196;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   283 ;
pulmonary 3
cardiac, 10;
Cardiac,  1 :
cardiac,   2;
Vaccinated, 140.
Vaccinated, 197
Vaccinated,   ISO;
pulmonary, 3
Cardiac, 80  	
Vaccinated,   244 ;
pulmonary, 4
cardiac,   2
Vaccinated,   276
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 187;
;   cardiae, 1
cardiac. 1 ..
Vaccinated, 117
Vaccinated,   119 ;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   256 ;
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,   185;
pulmonary, 4
Vaccinated,   305 ;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   195;
pulmonary, 2
cardiac, 2
cardiac, 2
cardiac, 2
cardiac, 5
cardiac, 5
Vaccinated, 548 ; cardiac, 3 .
Vaccinated, 371; pulmonary, 3.
Vaccinated,   228;   cardiac, 2:
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   679;   cardiac,   4 :
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 278; pulmonary, 1;
Scarlet fever, 10 ; measles, 3 ; mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 39
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 7; whooping-
cough, 21
Chicken-pox, 36; whooping cough, 3
Scarlet fever, 9; diphtheria, 4 ; chicken-pox,
4;   whooping-cough, 4
Scarlet fever, 2 ; mumps,
1 ; chicken - pox, 10 ;
whooping - cough, 5 ;
smallpox, 1
Scarlet fever, 4 ; diph>
theria, 4 ; measles, 2;
mumps, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 31
Scarlet fever, 1; chicken-
pox, 10
Scarlet fever, 1; diphtheria, 1; mumps, 1 ;
chicken-pox, 2; who>p-
cough, 2
Diphtheria, 1; chicken-
p o x, 5 ; who oping-
cough,4
Scarlet fever, 3; measles,
2; mumps, 1; chicken-
pox, 17 ; smallpox, 15
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
2; diphtheria, 2; chicken-pox, 19 ; whooping-
cough, 6 ;   smallpox, 2
Scarlet fever, 7; diphtheria, 7; chicken-pox,
1; whooping-cough, 1;
mumps, 1
Scarlet fever, 10 ; chicken-pox, 3 ; measles, 2
Scarlet fever, 6 ; mumps,
1 ; whooping-cough, 1;
chicken-pox, 3
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, l; measles, 4 ;
chicken-pox, 11
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 4 ; measles, 2 ;
chicken-pox, 3
Scarlet fever, 1 ; whooping-cough, 7; chicken-
pox, 2
Diphtheria, 3 ; mumps,
4 ; chicken-pox, 3
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 1; chicken-pox,
5;   whooping-cough, 3
Scarlet fever, 3; diphtheria, 4; chicken-pox,
3; whooping-cough, 6;
smallpox, 7
Scarlet fever, 4; diphtheria 3 ; mumps, 2 ;
whooping- cough, 24,
chicken-pox, 7
Diphtheria, 4; mumps,
2; chicken-pox, 13 ;
whooping-cough, 23
Scarlet fever, 4; measles,
1; whooping-cough, 2;
chicken-pox, 2
Scarlet fever, 5 ; whooping-cough, 6; chicken
pox, 6
Scarlet fever, 9; small
pox, 1 ; chicken-pox.
54 E 20
British Columbia.
1923
GRADED CITY
Name of Sehool.
Medical Inspector.
School   Nurse.
rt
to
(/3
5
a; t*-.
01
4)
Ch-6
° a
d
1,1
O H-
■a
'c
6 |
<<5   0)
rt
QJ   OJ
V>.s
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^5
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ew
DM
<
s-t —
rt w
Vancouver, North:
Lonsdale	
Queen Mary	
Ridgeway	
Vernon	
Victoria:
Bank Street	
Beacon Hill	
Burnside	
Boys' Central	
Cook Street..   	
Sir James Douglas.
Girls' Central	
George Jay	
Margaret Jenkins".
Kingston Street ...
North Ward	
Oaklands	
Quadra	
Quadra Primary ...
South Park	
Spring Ridge	
Victoria West	
Burnaby:
Armstrong Avenue
Barnet	
Douglas Road	
Edmonds Street ...
Gilmore Avenue ...
Hamilton Road....
Howard Avenue ...
T. E. P. Gocher
W. Arbuckle .
D. Donald....
G. de B. Wat-son .
E. J. Foster	
G. de B. Watson.
Mrs. J. A. Osborn.
Miss I. E. Adams .
Miss E. J. Herbert
Mrs. J. A. Osborn.
Miss E. J. Herbert
Mrs. J. A. Osborn.
Miss L E. Adams.
Mrs. J. A. Osborn.
Miss I. E. Adams.
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams.
410
372
37
55
13
5
36
671
521
89
....
51
7
1
53
516
487
42
24
9
35
918
886
106
6
40
4
45
45
116
116
9
138
200
352
127
198
270
2
2
2
9
17
19
i
l
1
'3
1
18
511
18
359
1
1
32
"2
1
451
323
28
4
480
340
144
261
13
20
1
177
172
5
1
1
1
350
95
13
526
299
2
13
260
184
6
18
147
147
12
1
1
1
295
154
75
154
7
5
2
376
222
8
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
E. J. Foster .
G. de B. Watson.
E. J. Foster ...   .
29
27
21
19
91
70
496
427
24
35
24
33 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 21
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition of
Building.   State
Other Conditions, specify
a
Closets.    State
>
■g
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Car
o
o
during the Past
if clean and
bL cc
U *3
CJ
diac Disease,  etc.).
|
o>
B
fe
Year.
lated, poorly
adequate.
.~
P.
a
heated, etc.
DH
ac
O
Oi
VI
a
K
Heart-disease, 4;   orthopaedic.
1; pulmonary, 2; lateral cur
vature,   2 ;    vaccinated,  66
tuberculosis, 1
Heart-disease, 7;  orthopaedic:
1 ;   pulmonary, 1;  stammer
ing, 1 ;   deaf, 1; vaccinated.
126
Heart, 4 ; lung 4 ; orthopaedic,
5; vaccinated, 197
Nervous, 3; cardiac, 3; impediment of speech, 3; infantile paralysis, 2
Cardiac, 1	
Nervous, 1 ; cardiac, 3	
Nervous, 2; cardiac, 6; impediment of speech, 5; dwarf,
1 ; deformity of left arm, 1;
deformity of chest, 1
Cardiac, 2  	
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 5; impediment of speech, 2; deformity
of chest, 2
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 5; deformity of left leg, 2; deformity
of left forearm, 1; deformity
of left foot, 1
Cardiac, 1; rickets, 1 	
Nervous, J ; cardiac, 4; malformation of right ear, 1;
asthma, 1
Cardiac, 3; deformity of left
wrist, 1; deformity of chest, 1
Cardiac, 3; hernia,!; asthma,!
Nervous, 2; cardiac, 3; hernia, 1
Cardiac, 3; contracting sterno
mastoid; impediment of
speech, 2; deformed chest, 1;
infantile paralysis, 1
Cardiac 1; deformity of spine, 1
Cardiac, 2; club-foot, 1 ; deformity of chest, 1; Impediment of speech, 1
Cardiac, 2; infantile paralysis, 1
1
5
1
4
15
12
5
5
3
20
6
3
1
1
1
10
2
1
3
7
5
3
13
2
8
13
6
7
5
7
2
2
3
27
1
12
9
25
2
2
4
6
2
1
4
7
30
1
1
5
10
3
6
17
1
9
23
Smallpox, 1; pertussis,
24; chicken-pox, 48:
mumps, 4
Smallpox, 12 ; pertussis,
4; chicken-pox, 7
Smallpox, 9; pertussis,
26 ; chicken - pox, 24 ;
mumps, 1; scarlet
fever, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; chicken-
pox, 25
Measles; chicken-pox...
Measles; chicken-pox...
Measles	
Scarlet fever, 1; measles
chicken-pox
Measles	
Mumps ; measles ; chick'
en-pox
Measles	
Measles; chicken-pox...
Measles; whooping-cough
Measles ; chicken-pox...
Measles ; chicken-pox...
Scarlet fever ; measles ;
chicken - pox ; whooping-cough
Measles ; chicken-pox...
Measles; scarlet fever, 1:
chicken-pox
Measles ; scarlet fever, 1
Measles ;   scarlet   fever ;
chicken-pox
Measles ; scarlet fever ;
chicken-pox; whooping - cough; diphtheria, 1
Satisfactory
Satisfactory .
Clean ; adequate.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Out of date but
being improved
Clean ; inadequate.
Clean; adequate.
SCHOOLS.
9
1
1
2
14
52
1
Good 	
7
1
Whooping-cough, 24 ...
Scarlet fever, 4 ; whooping-cough, 5
Catarrh, 1; heart, 4; nystagmus. 2 ; strabismus, 4 ; conjunctivitis, 1; wax in ears, 1;
rhinitis, 3 ; thickened nasal
septum, 1
Cardiac, 8; seborrhoDa, 21; un-
cleanliness, 11; blepharitis,
21; wax in ears, 10; rhinitis,
10; mumps, 1 ; squint, 1 ;
ichthyosis, 1
9
3
5
1
68
Crowded	
Good  ,
Good.
Clean ; adequate.
6 E 22
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
o:3
A 0)
ft
3   .
CH -o
o
o ~
G
a
a
u
33
rt
cu >.
cd o>
0
>
<H.X
"3.2
0)
& «
cj -3-
v. ~
0j cu
OK
co
53
z; .
a &*
> .33
"33 S3
CH *-
CH  S-
OS
3
'0
g
■a
to i2
Si
Burnaby—Continued.
E. J. Foster	
161
153
505
312
80
77
24
77
26
69
48
62
70
55
42
16
15
82
131
149
45
25
10
10
30
25
61
18
25
107
77
32
12
27
13
28
35
30
24
21
197
14
18
39
33
26
534
156
18
62
59
33
36
29
141
153
468
140
77
68
19
77
24
69
44
57
67
52
42
14
13
76
129
141
35
22
10
10
26
21
56
18
24
74
67
30
12
21
10
28
34
20
23
21
185
13
17
36
31
24
534
139
15
44
52
29
30
25
4
1
1
i
i
11
12
42
11
3
7
3
1
1
1
i
7
16
3
1
1
4
15
3
51
1
9
4
2
2
9
4
6
5
2
8
2
13
10
12
3
2
1
5
3
6
3
5
7
5
1
1
2
4
1
2
3
6
IS
3
2
7
4
0
46
28
6
20
-
10
70
14
5
14
4
5
2
Chilliwack:
9
Camp Slough.... #	
9
1
1
i
1
2
12
10
5
8
3
i
i
i
1
3
3
1
1
8
2
9
1
13
15
R. McCaffrey	
J. C. Henderson	
23
3
3
2
1
Coldstream:
3
5
2
2
5
2
3
Coquitlam:
6
3
3'
1
1
7
5
1
1
2
1
1
4
1
1
2
3
1
2
3
3
13
2
3
5
2
2
46
17
5
3
5
Cowichan, North:
H. B. Rogers	
E. E. Farrer	
10
14
Genoa Bay	
2
8
Delta:
2
1
3
1
7
1
2
1
2
3
10
2
i
"1
4
2
"2
7
2
1
2
6
6
1
4
25
1
4
4
2
9
6
'2
....
i
1
8
3
3
8
3
5
4
9
26
Mosher Siding   	
3
6
Sunbury 	
	
7
1
4
Esquimalt:
Miss Morrison ...
82
Kent:
63
10
Langley:
4
5
1
1
1
3
1
2 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 23
SCHOOLS—Continued.
an
>
cj j5
OJ %
QH
■a
cu    .
J- T3
co a
a£
HO
oj
u
a
Oilier Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
a
u
1
S>
lo
d
CJ
W
©
be
o>
ft
a
a"
©
a
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
11
15
4
38
2
3
11
5
1
1
2
4
1
3
i
2
11
1
7
6
12
6
4
6
2
"s
4
15
6 '
Seborrhea, 4;   cleft palate, 1 ;
heart, 5 ; squint, 2 ; rhinitis,
3; uncleanliness, I
Uncleanliness,  1;   rhinitis,   2;
thickened nasal septum,  1;
lichen urticatus, 2
Cardiac, 9;   seborrhea, 14;
blepharitis,   14 ;    uncleanliness,  2 ;   pulmonary,  3 ;
ansemia, 1; rhinitis, 5
Uncleanliness, 1; heart, 1; wax
in ears, 3; rhinitis, 3
Catarrh, 1;   heart, 2 ;  wax in
ears, 3
Seborrhoea, 5; heart,!; blepharitis,   1 ;     palpitation,   1 ;
pharyngitis, 1
3
1
o
Good      ..  .
Clean; adequate.
38
38
Whooping-cough, 1
Fairly good	
Good.
29
1
5
2
22
7
Good
Clean ; adequate.
5
28
Rhinitis, 2; cleft palate, 1	
Pharyngitis, 1; wax in ears, 1 ;
uncleanliness, 1
1
Chicken-pox, 3 ;  scarlet
fever, 1
2
Good 	
Clean ; adequate.
5
Fair.
10
Yes.
16
,,
10
Ventilators out of
order
Ventilators out of
order
No  	
Good	
8
3
3
Good.
3
,,
4
No  	
Good 	
Yes	
Boor ventilation ..
Good 	
Yes.
?:■>,
,,
10
Good.
18
Yes.
3
No.
1
Good.
1
No.   .
6
1
1
Clean; adequate.
'»
,,
Clean.
1
1
Whooping-cough	
Dingy	
Well defective	
Good	
Satisfactory ...    .
Temporary   	
Good 	
Good ventilation..
Good  	
Stove inadequate.
Good ventilation..
Conditions fair ...
Satisfactory	
No  	
Good    	
Water from creek.
Good   '.
Poor	
»
4
3
6
1
Whooping-cough	
Influenza, 1; mumps, 1..
Measles   	
,,
33
Clean ; adequate.
Poor plumbing.
1
Clean ; adequate.
1
2
Temporary.
4
Good.
17
3
....
1
1
1
2
2
1
10
Good.
12
2
1
32
2
3
6
Measles, 22; chicken-pox,
30
Good.
4
"fi
2
1
Good.
5
i
10
"2
8
23
3
Orthopaedic, 2	
15
2
6
7
Leaky heart-valves, 1	
Cardiac, 2; infantile paralysis, 1
1
Fair.
216
41
10
Measles,  94;   whooping-
cough,   20;    pneumonia, 2
Clean; adequate.
Clean.
6
7
Good.
5
2
3
3
2
Scarlet fever	
Good.
4
2 E 24
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
CO
■ ft
p
Ch rC
•H.2
Si
CO
<H   PI
n
d
o
*3
0J t*.
> ~
o*oa
OJ 33
0J OJ
OS
CD
».§
'oj Hi
oj  .
if
PM
oi
CO
CCO
73   .
oj So
> ~
cj +3
o CO
0) 33
fin
CO
"3
q
OJ
■o.
■<
T3
ih a
= §
HH
Langley—Continued,
81
145
33
19
80
130   -
47
30
30
30
47
63
65
17
14
32
23
93
38
18
53
58
33
42
57
304
30
17
21
15
17
321
243
81
13
349
471
237
416
471
412
422
143
275
120
60
60
79
168
57
52
78
36
42
77
135
24'
16
65
120
42
21
25
26
41
49
57
16
11
32
20
88
34
14
46
55
30
40
56
297
30
17
18
12
17
304
222
66
12
349
471
250
444
467
389
428
134
248
109
47
55
74
140
56
44
70
32
40
1
1
9
1
2
2
4
8
1
4
8
2
"i
2
1
1
1
2
13
Otter    .
2
3
2
Matsqui:
1
R. H. Port	
l
1
1
3
4
3
S
7
"a
l
o
1
i
2
3
3
25
1
1
i
3
2
5
1
1
2
3
16
2
2
5
2
1
1
3
2
21
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
i
2
1
4
8
2
3
4
4
2
3
2
3
2
3
4
16
2
fi
4
10
10
4
7
9
Mission:
A. J. Stuart 	
6
7
9
	
49
5
3
1
3
1
26
17
1
1
10
22
2
3
2
Oak Bay:
5
3
32
47
25
41
40
26
36
i
4
4
16
13
12
1
46
59
Peachland:
9
Point Grey:
T. H. Lennie	
2
1
1
21
18
7
20
33
16
19
5
7
10
6
1
4
3
7
2
3
1
6
7
9
5
11
10
8
7
9
14
7
21
12
5
8
3
8
11
12
10
16
15
9
16
6
10
2
41
41
26
45
20
21
J. P- Vye 	
42
Saanich :
10
26
Gordon Head	
	
23
3
2
1
6
1
2
2
1
12
1
2
4
	
....      1
1
1 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 25
SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
>
cj A
o73
•H   OJ
OJ oj
«H
-a
OJ    -
U co
co a
•as
HO
oj
CH
o
o
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
U
fi
00
OJ
CJ
W
a
OJ
ft
B
a'
u
o
a
W
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.    State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
If clean and
adequate.
10
2
2
2
3
1
1
Scarlet fever	
Chicken-pox 	
Good	
Good.
13
5
4
Good 	
Fair.
4
3
Building   in poor
repai r
Poor	
Good 	
Dirty.
1
1
1
2
8
1
4
1
1
2
2
17
3
7
22
3
Good.
15
Yes.
8
2
16
Good 	
4
5
3
4
,      .
12
Scarlet fever, 2	
6
"      	
5
8
2
15
1
1
1
8
11
Adequate	
Rather old and dilapidated
Adequate	
Too small	
Adequate	
New     building
needed
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Modern ; O.K	
Ventilation fair...
7
Adequate.
9
5
10
63
6
4
1
1
Scarlet fever, 1	
3
Not good.
Adequate.
4
3
41
18
14
30
69
43
62
_70
56
57
2
19
23
62
11
13
32
14
45
29
27
28
1
4
Anaemia, 5 ;    Orthopaedic, 3 ;
pulmonary, 1; nervous, 1
Orthopaedic,   2 ;    anaemia,   8;
speech defect, 2
Clean; adequate.
58
Satisfactory.
3
13
15
15
50
Nervous, 1; pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 19; anaemia, 2
Nervous, 2; pulmonary, 1; cardiac,   24 ;    orthopaedic,   11 ;
anaemia, 5
Nervous, 1; pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 9;   orthopaedic, 2;
anasmia, 2
Nervous, 2; pulmonary, 3; cardiac, 27;   orthopaedic, 8;
anaemia, 10
Nervous, 1; pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 22 ; orthopanlie,3;
anaemia, 5
Nervous, 1; pulmonary, 2; cardiac, 20;  orthopaedic, 4;
anaemia, 6
Nervous, 1; pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 22;  orthopaedic, 8;
anasmia, 3
2
1
1
5
1
2
5
2
2
2
2
5
8
5
10
0
3
12
1
1
3
1
Scarlet fever, 1; whooping cough, 2
Measles,   1;    whooping,
cough, 1; chicken-pox.
24 ;   scarlet  fever,  2;
smallpox, 1
Scarlet fever, 1 ;   whooping-cough,   12;    diphtheria, 1; chicken-pox,
30
Ample,
ii
Not adequate.
Ample.
it
20
20
16
61
Scarlet fever, 9; diphtheria, 1 ; chicken-pox, 11
Chicken-pox, 46;  smallpox, 1
Chicken-pox, 11; whooping-cough, 1
Modern;  crowded
Good	
103
24
11
i
"s
6
12
61
1
Good	
2
26
9
8
11
i E 26
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
frv
£>
.~ -c
Saanich —Ct-ntinued.
Strawberry Vale.
Tillicum..'	
Tolmie	
Normal	
Summerland	
Surrey:
Anniedale .
Clayton ..
Cloverdale.
Colebrook   	
Crescent Beach....
Elgin    	
Grandview Heights ,
Hall's Prairie	
Johnston Road	
Kensington, East...
Kensington Prairie
Newton	
Port Mann .  	
Springdale	
Strawberry Hill ....
Surrey Centre   	
Tynehead 	
Westminster, South.
White Rock   	
Vancouver, North :
Capilano	
Keith Lynn  .
Lynn Valley
North Star .
Princess Avenue.
Roche Point	
Vancouver, South :
Brock	
Carleton
Connaught.
Gordon	
Moberly	
R. McBride	
Sir A. Mackenzie
John Norquay, ..
Laura Secord.
Lord Selkirk..
Sexsmith..
Tecumseh .
I. P. Vye
A. E. McMicking.
F. W. Andrew .. .
F. D. Sinclair
R. V. McCarley.
G.  A. Lamont.
Miss Buckley.
E. Edwards
E. Bell.
E. Edwards
E. Bell	
E. Edwards
no
88
242
218
364
321
243
240
338
321
9
7
38
38
168
153
34
28
36
27
31
27
34
31
78
68
54
44
52
40
36
33
72
68
41
34
48
33
49
40
24
24
42
38
93
81
162
145
97
97
71
71
274
274
161
161
13
13
31
31
460
460
854
842
57
56
412
406
455
465
623
623
624
624
343
339
224.
220
1017
993
269
269
707
701
205
154
210
189
151
79
491 14 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
E 27
SCHOOLS—Com tinned.
Condition of
Other Conditions, specify
fl
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
Closets.    State
>
■a
0J    •
CX «!
oi
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
<8
CU
o
00
CU
J-
o
SB
if clean and
adequate.
«w oj
OJ cu
~ 3
o
OJ
03
a
£
heated, etc.
OH
WO
.333
>
3/1
24
4
Good 	
23
93
i
6
i
1
Tvphoid, 1	
97
55
39
120
New frame	
Yes.
152
Anaemia, 7; cardiac, 6; nervous,
2 ; orthopaedic, 2; chorea, 2 ;
12
16; flush.
granulated   lids,   1;    cuta
neous, 5
1
1
1
Inadequate  ..	
Satisfactory   ....
Inadequate.
3
7
11
33
11
Chronic neuritis, 1;   defective
4
Scarlet  fever, 3;   small
Adequate.
palate, 1
pox, 1
■>.
3
Satisfactory
4
3
17
1
8
Adequate	
1
3
10
11
4
Chicken-pox	
Whooping-cough	
Adequate.
1
3
3
7
Satisfactory	
Adequate.
7
1
4
16
1
Defective   palate,   2;   chronic
tl
neuritis, 1
4
4
1
2
Good 	
Adequate	
Satisfactory	
7
2
5
Satisfactory.
2
4
8
11
2
2
Poor   	
Room crowded ...
5
2
2
2
Scarlet fever; whooping-
Fair.
19
Anaemia, 2; defective palate, 2
Poor.
cough
13
30
4
a
1
12
Chicken-pox ; whooping-
cough
,,
Adequate.
12
1
7
Valvular heart-disease, 2 ; blepharitis, I
5
	
Yes.
9
9
2
29
Bronchitis,  1 ; valvular heart-
4
6
5
"• 	
50
1
,,
disease, 5; psoriasis,1; ortho
paedic, 1
20
6
13
Valvular  heart-disease,   2;
orthopaedic, 2
Whooping-cough	
i,
1
1
1
ii
4
Smallpox, 1;   whooping-
cough ; chicken-pox
i,
196
58
41
Pulmonary, 1; heart, 10; nasal
and throat swabs, 76
6
3
1
Diphtheria,  2;   mumps,
1;   chicken - pox,   11;
vaccination, 1; , scarlet
fever, 2 ; measles, 15
Fair	
Satisfactory.
304
58
51
Nasal   and   throat   swabs,   1 ;
heart, 9 ; hernia, 6
5
3
12
6
Mumps,   1;     whooping-
cough, 2; chicken-pox,
11; scarlet fever, 1
Main, satisfactory;
annex, fair
39
10
1
Nasal and   throat swabs,  30 ;
pulmonary, 1; heart, 1
1
Diphtheria, 1 ;   chicken-
pox, 2
Furnace smokes ..
,r
205
22
37
Pulmonary, 2; heart, 2;
hernia, 1
1
1
7
7
Diphtheria, 1; whooping-
cough, 1; scarlet fever,
4
Chicken-pox, 3;   scarlet
Satisfactory	
ii
168
22
38
Pulmonary, 5; heart, 8;
1
5
6
Satisfactory;
Adequate ;  satis
hernia, 1
fever, 4
d rinking   fountains needed
factory.
276
24
22
Nasal and throat swabs, 331 ;
pulmonary,   1 ;  -heart,   14 ;
hernia, 1
2
3
1
Diphtheria, 14 ; carriers,
32;   scarlet fever, 14;
measles, 3
Satisfactory	
Adequate; satisfactory.
287
33
42
Nasal  and  .throat  swabs,   3;
pulmonary, 2 ;   heart, 6 ;
hernia, 1
4
9
5
6
Chicken-pox, 6; whooping-cough,  7;   scarlet
fever, 4
Fair condition	
Inadequate.
195
23
18
Pulmonary, 3 ; hernia, 1	
1
2
2
2
Chicken-pox, 6;   whooping-cough, 2 ; typhoid,
1
Chicken-pox, 4;   scarlet
Satisfactory.
129
7
11
Pulmonary, 1; heart, 2; hernia, 1
1
6
1
tt
n
fever, 1
517
54
71
Nasal and throat swabs,  194;
pulmonary, 7;   heart, 8;
hernia, 3
9
4
17
Diphtheria, 5 ;   carriers,
13 ; mumps, 3; whooping-cough, 11;   chick-
e n - pox,   41;   scarlet
fever, 3
Main, satisfactory;
annex, fair
it
117
8
20
Pulmonary, 1; heart, 4	
3
1
Measles, 1	
Adequate ; satisfactory.
364
27
41
Nasal   and   throat   swabs,   3 ;
pulmonary,  10 ;   heart,  11 ;
hernia, 1
1
1
6
7
Chicken-pox, 3;  scarlet
fever, 3; vaccination, 2
Adequate ; satis-
factorjr. E 28
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
Chh3
c-5
= a
73 OJ
sd
rd
o
£
4-1
4> *J
0
§ 3
is
5 A
>  bB
T3 43
3
"o
"$ fl
*a
Q^
«r>
Qffi
CM
<
"Vancouver, South—Continued,
Van Home	
Wolfe	
Vancouver, West;
Capilano	
Cypress Park	
Dundarave	
Hollyburn	
Twentv-seeond Street
Wbitecliff 	
G. A. Lamont
F. Stainsby
E. Bell.
390
702
6
21
78
114
13
389
702
16
76
110
13
41
44
12
34
1
5
17
8
14
"i"
1
5
2
2
141
221
RURAL AND
T. A. Swift   	
228
26
10
8
10
17
9
31
12
22
16
13
14
13
9
36
11
15
17
24
75
8
25
8
9
21
20
32
17
33
11
11
24
14
9
6
18
18
21
24
IS
43
9
7
221
19
10
8
10
16
8
31
12
17
16
13
12
12
9
35
11
14
17
24
75
9
20
8
9
20
17
32
16
29
11
11
23
14
7
6
18
10
20
23
17
40
9
7
1    ..
1
3
1    ...
3
1
1
3
4
41
3
R. W. Irving .          	
4
1
1
i
1
1
4
1
1
4
"i
1
1
R. Felton	
Miss Kelly	
1
..    i
2
1       1
1
6
7
8
YV. H. YVoort    	
..      2
1
9
Miss Thorn	
5
Anderson Creek	
M. G. Archibald	
9
2    ..
1
5
1
2
'.'       1
....
1       4
..      3
..    16
1
7
8
4
"«'
1
2
5
2
2
5
30
3
E. H. S. McLean	
3
6
S. E. Beech.:	
31
Ashton Creek	
Atlin	
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
1
1    ..
1     ..
4
1
2
"i"
1
6
1
2
8
C. T   Hilton	
6
6
3    ..
i    ..
'.'.      2
..      1
2
1
2
1
7
1
Beaver Lake	
2
3
3
5
2
E. M. Sutherland	
1
Betrbie	
i
2    ..
1    ..
18    ..
2       3
..      7
..      1
..      6
..      3
13
i
3
9
5
E. II. S. McLean 	
(School closed).
Miss Farrer	
Miss C. W. Thorn .
(School closed).
8
1
2
F. T. Stanier	
M. G. Archibald	
2
10
11
Rig; Bar Mountain	
9
5 14 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
E 20
SCHOOLS—Continued.
|
Condition  of
Other Conditions, specify
a
Acute Fevers which
Building.   State
Olosets.    State
V
«
f Nervous, Pulmonary, Car
O
Li
have occurred
if  crowded,
if clean and
£   .
diac Disease,  etc.).
d
m
!=
during the Past
poorly venti
adequate.
aj"£
k<
F
0)
to
Year.
lated, poorly
CH
e3
c
O
u
>
o
a
s
heated, etc.
182
282
19
45
3
2
18
36
12
6
16
49
Nasal and   throat swabs,  47 ;
heart. 5 ; hernia, 3
Nasal  and   throat  swabs,   4;
pulmonary,   4 ;    heart,   13 ;
hernia, 1
4
4
1
3
8
"l
Scarlet fever, 1	
Chicken-pox, 13;  small-
p o x,   10 ;   whooping-
cough, 1; vaccination,
10 ; scarlet fever, 2
Adequate; satisfactory.
Adequate; satisfactory.
10
25
4
63
whooping-cough, 6
Measles, 7 ;   influenza, 3 ;
whooping-cough, 5
13
Heart, 3	
2
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
55
23
12
1
6
3
1
Yes.
5
Good 	
1
Good.
4
Good 	
3
Dirty; inadequate.
Clean; adequate.
4
18
8
1
"2'
5
1
2
1
1
5
7
11
Adequate hut not
clean.
Clean; adequate.
3
Good    	
Good	
Poor floor	
Good 	
10
2
Yes.
9
1
Vaccinated, 5 ;   not vaccinated, 4
Fairly good.
Adequate.
Not very clean.
Good.
11
4
Good 	
11
"8
2
11
4
6
3
8
9
1
1
20
9
9
Intestinal indigestion, 1;  kidney case,  1 ;   cluh-feet and
hands, 1
33
Anaemic, 3; cardiac, 2; nervous,
1; digestive, 1
Satisfactory	
Poorly ventilated.
Yes.
4
2
Good.
Defective heart-action, 1 ; wax
in ears, 1
Clean.
1
9
Crowded	
9
14
Crowded	
Good   	
Good 	
Clean ; adequate.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
2
6
2
2
Clean.
8
Good    	
Good 	
Poor repair; lighting and ventilation good
Heating poor  	
Satisfactory   . ,.   .
Fair 	
7
Yes.
3
1
1
"i
27
3
Clean ; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Good.
7
3
4
6
2
3
1
6
1
14
Anaemic, 1; cardiac, 1;   nervous, 1
Bad.
11
Good.
6
Poor repair; dirty
O.K.
'4
Nervous, 1;   anaamic, 6;   skin-
disease, 6 ;   stammering, 3 ;
wax in ears, 13
9
Yes.
4
Requires a door. E 30
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
to
a
Ch
OJ
3
^"8
£
0)
O —•
o
is
/-I   0)
° a
(j «
*S§
cj -r
CJ    ■*-!
o
a
o >-
cd
<D   CJ
».3
V) 5
*3
PS
Dt>
QW
OK
<fl
23
18
10
15
8
10
13
6
11
10
9
15
18
18
19
16
19
12
22
21
110
15
50
12
42
62
15
22
12
52
30
56
34
7
6
16
8
36
12
53
26
11
24
39
34
55
11
34
53
11
76
25
21
138
10
100
12
13
13
16
7
11
21
15
28   ■
6
52
106
22
21
17
13
13
50
19
15
10
15
7
9
13
6
11
9
9
11
17
18
18
15
18
12
21
20
100
12
44
9
38
50
15
22
12
44
30
44
34
7
6
16
5
28
12
67
26
11
23
33
33
51
7
33
53
8
71
23
18
123
9
98
12
13
13
14
7
10
21
15
24
-.6
52
106
19
19
16
12
13
44
"i
1
1
Big Lake	
6
2
1
2
3
12
1
3
2
1
7
Black Canyon	
S. E. Beech
l
13
3
Blind Bay	
Blueberry Creek	
2
1
3
4
3
1
5
1
5
1
27
1
1
2
3
6
8
3
4
7
2
1
2
3
3
1
1
6
5
2
20
1
1
2
3
7
5
3
4
7
2
4
1
2
3
Blue Springs	
G. YVilliams
2
1
S. E. Beech
7
4
H. R. Fort	
3
2
1
2
2
3
2
1
1
'i'
5
1
Boundarv Falls	
Bowen Island	
W. H. YVood    	
9
J. H. Hamilton    	
L. T. Davis   	
E. H. S. McLean	
N. J. Paul	
Miss Gawiev	
3
2
6
6
1
2
2
4
i
5
1
2
1
2
i
3
1
1
2
4
4
1
4
2
4
2
1
6
1
2
i
4
1
1
2
1
3
5
T. J. McPhee	
12
W. II. YVood	
6
15
F. E. Coy	
2
13
20
J. J. Gillis 	
8
4
1
14
E. M. Sutherland   	
5
C. H. Hankinson	
E. H. S.  McLean	
15
8
S. E. Beech	
5
Cahilty 	
H. H. Murphy	
1
C. J. YVilloughby	
4
Campbell Range   	
YV   F. Shaw 	
"2'
1
2
3
7
2
11
3
2
2
2
4
14
1
13
2
14
8
11
3
3
2
2
2
1
6
1
1
2
9
4
5
29
11
J. J. Gillis	
4
3
E. Buckell	
2
E. H. S. McLean	
2
3
1
5
2
2
5
3
2
i
2
3
6
1
6
1
6
1
1
6
2
3
1
2
5
4
T. J. McPhee	
5
8
M. D. McEwen	
T. J. McPhee	
Miss Purcell	
13
1
9
2
Celista	
Chase   	
5
29
T. J. McPhee   	
N. J. Paul	
1
1
5
2
4
20
10
13
2
2
YV. R. Stone	
3
4
4
6
I. H. YVright	
R. W. Irving	
"2
5
3
2
"2'
5
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
3
2
1
2
Christian Valley    	
W. H. Wood    	
1
YV. Truax	
D. S. Dixon 	
3
1
M. G. Archibald	
Mrs. J. Johndro ..
i
6
8
1
2
1
7
4
6
1
1
3
1
33
8
3
6
C. J. YVilloughby	
?
S. E. Beech 	
40
15
10
Cobble Hill	
F. T. Stanier 	
YV. R. Stone	
Miss Farrer	
6
1
5
1
5
4
1
5
C. S. Williams 	
6
R. Felton	
2 14 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
E 31
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
I5'
OJ oj
OB
03
ffoS
to -
S3
oj
0
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
d
S
u
OJ
>
m
CJ
d
01
0,
a
a
>--
o
%
ha
a
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
6
Good 	
Good.
9
l
6
1
4
1
No.
2
4
2
Poor ventilation..
Clean; good repair
Clean ; adequate.
ing.
2
2
O.K	
Good 	
No    	
O.K	
Good    	
Well ventilated...
Good
O.K.
5
2
Vaccinated, 3;   not vaccinated, 3
Adequate.
Only one toilet.
"3
"2'
1
1
3
2
7
2
3
5
Yes.
7
7
Influenza	
Clean ; adequate.
1
6
Yes.
O.K.
4
Good.
5
1
1
2
12
"2
24
3
3
1
3
8
1
1
4
3
16
6
13
"2'
4
4
3
4
1
1
"i'
■2
2
5
9
10
2
1
41
Satisfactory	
Good  	
Yes.
8
Orthopaedic   defect,   1;    cleft
palate, 1
Not clean ;   pits
shallow.
Good.
7
Smallpox, x ;   whooping-
cough, 5
Crowded  	
Fair	
Satisfactory   ,   ...
Good        	
Clean ; adequate.
28
6
4
5
8
5
Good.
17
Clean ; adequate.
Satisfactory.
11
18
2
Otitis, 1	
Poorly   ventilated
and heated
Requires cleaning
Satisfactory	
3
Needs cleaning.
Satisfactory.
6
2
3
Good
Healthy.
6
2
i
4
6
5
1
9
5
i
"6
2
3
6
4
3
4
1
fl
1
9
Adequate	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
7
9
12
Scarlet fevT2r, 2	
Crowded  	
Good  	
17
2
Yes.
Inadequate.
Dirty.
Yes
19
5
'18
1
1
8
72
8
13
2
Excellent	
24
3
28
9
"      	
8
52
1
24
2
Yes
5
2
Good.
6
"      	
1
4
2
1
7
1
Satisfactory	
Good 	
W el 1   ventilated
and heated
8
5
No closet.
Clean; adequate.
3
2
2
Satisfactory.
Yes
16
9
4
"i
4
15
2
5
24
Cardiac, 1; lateral curvature, 1
Chorea, 1; valvular murmurs, 7
3
1
Clean.
7
Good 	
9
S
..
Clean.
6
6
13
1
10
Cardiac, 2 ; orthopaedic, 3 ....
Vaccinated, 6 ;  not vaccinated, 7
Repairs needed ...
Satisfactory .....
No covering.
Clean ; adequate. E 32
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
te
ft
°o
HH  OJ
o V,
73 "
o
"u
3
d
.5
0) >>
> 333
fig
OS
Defective
"Vision.
Defective
Heariug.
OS
OJ
CO
73
oj ti
> .33
333 !a
OJ *-
0J rt
a3 £
w
to
o
0J
03
-a
erj   EG
= §
73
12
8
6
14
55
65
23
11
7
28
13
19
218
8
13
19
15
18
21
17
19
12
49
12
9
11
12
10
15
8
25
13
14
11
21
10
19
46
14
28
32
13
35
12
53
6
47
17
85
17
18
6
36
26
23
14
14
8
14
15
13
29
9
60
64
10
50
16
73
13
S
6
14
50
46
21
10
7
25
11
18
202
7
12
19
10
18
18
16
17
12
49
12
9
8
12
10
14
8
18
12
14
9
21
10
14
44
13
27
32
11
27
12
52
6
47
14
85
17
18
5
36
26
19
14
13
8
12
11
12
26
9
56
60
7
42
14
2
8       7
2       2
1       1
6
1
2
1
6
1
2
1
2
5
10
4
17
J. C. Elliot  	
5
1
9
4
3
1
3
1
6
R. Elliot	
8    ...
3    ....
1    ...'.'.
7
3
3
7
Cowichan	
H. N. Watson 	
16
10
Craigellachie	
9    ....
1
6
7
8
7
3
11        1
3
M. G. Archibald	
R. Elliot	
3    ....
1
1
1
1
1
1
J. C. Elliot    	
7
2       1
1
1
A, G. Beale   	
II. W. Keith	
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
....      1
1    	
2 1
i
Y
1
1
3
2
2
4
7
E. H. S. McLean  	
3
1    ....
1    ....
3
T. J. McPhee  	
2
1
J. Sandilands  	
2
1
2    ....
1
3
1
1
1
3
6
6
3
"s'
4
3
2
1
1
i
3
6
6
2
9
3
4
3
J. Sandilands	
1
1    	
3
3
2
T. A. Briggs	
3
1
4
1
4
;V
l
3
1    ....
1 ....
2 1
o
2    ....
1
1     ....
5       1
4     	
2
J. H. Hamilton  	
J. E. II. Kelso   	
(School closed).
Miss Gawley ....
1
1
Eholt                           	
W H. Wood	
2
Elk Bridge	
6
W. R. Stone 	
Mrs.  Pope  	
10
5
W. J. Knox	
3
6
W. R. Stone	
5
II  W. Keith *	
6
3      ...
7    ....
2
4
4
4
4
7
J. B Thorn    	
Errington	
L. T. Davis   	
2    ....
1
2
2
3
20
6
3
36
Miss A. Hayhurst.
1
Fanny Bay	
Fauquier	
3
J. E. H. Kelso   	
i
1     ....
1        1
1
1     ....
i
4
2
3
1
2
4
3
1
3
3
1
2
1
12
Fife	
J. E. II. Kelso	
9
1
M  G. Archibald	
Miss Thorn	
5
H. A. Christie	
4
4
1
3
5
1
"l
1
2
1
1     ....
1     ....
1    ....
2
4
0  J   Willoughby .
2    ....
....      1
6 2
7 3
5    ...
2
9
2
3
5
2
1
2
9
2
3
5
2
"i
0
W. R. Stone	
12
5
Fort George	
in
8
W. R. Stone         	
2
Fort Steele	
M M. Williams     	
9
2 14 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
E 35
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
OjTH
*H   OJ
oj £
fiEH
to
OJ    .
be «
t. to
a -5
HO
oj
£
o
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
u
fi
tn
O
3
ed
CJ
W
6
So
<U
ft
a
a
u
p
&
0
8
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
1
2
Darli 	
Very good	
Good    	
Yes.
13
2
3
i
2
18
38
2
3
1
Very clean.
Satisfactory.
Adequate.
Good.
22
28
Ana-mia, 13; cardiac, 3; orthopaedic, 14
Vaccinated, 30; not vaccinated, 31
Whooping-cough	
2
3
Good 	
Yes.
10
Satisfactory.
Clean.
10
3
Fair	
5
Osteomyelitis lower end right
femur
Clean; adequate.
4
8
i
l
5
2
2
3
5
9
12
1
3
1
9
3
Asthmatic, 1;   tubercular
knee, 1
Very comfortable.
Satisfactory	
Adequate; modern
Satisfactory	
Unsanitary.
Bad.
Yes.
27
1
3
Pigeon - chest 1 ;   anajmia, 3 ;
cardiac, 1; amputated limb,
1; eczema, 1; stammering, 2
Clean; adequate.
1
Satisfactory.
Yes.
1
S2
Cardiac, 1; eczema, 3 ;  stammering, 1
Scarlet fever	
Scarlet fever ; mumps ..
2
Clean; adequate.
Good.
5
5
2
•63'
"i
T
5
4
9
13
1
38
1
5
Yes.
6
Good 	
Poorly ventilated.
Good 	
Both satisf actor v.
Good 	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
23
3
24
1
Yes.
1
Good.
8
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
173
5
i
1
Adequate	
Excellent	
New  bldg. needed
Well ventilated...
Fair	
Good	
Crowded   	
Good 	
Satisfactory   	
Healthy	
Good    	
Both satisfactory.
Very good	
Good 	
11
Bronchitis, 1; chorea, 1.	
3
8
4
S
4
1
8
3
Clean; adequate.
7
4
16
5
Satisfactory.
1
5
2
2
2
Healthy.
4
Clean ; adequate
Yes.
in
n
2
i
i
2
6
1
Good.
32
4
Adequate	
8
Yes.
5
4
3
1
8
1
1
Cardiac, 2 ; cleft palate, 1....
Adequate	
Good 	
Adequate.
18
9
Good.
57
O.K	
Good 	
O.K	
Poorly ventilated.
Adequate	
Good 	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Excellent	
O.K	
O.K.
4
2
Yes.
6
1
O.K.
4
Yes.
3
Clean; adequate.
8
1
Yes.
6
1
3
i
14
Good.
5
2
i
Yes.
3
4
O.K.
1
99
Clean; adequate.
2
i
1
5
4
2
11
Poor   	
Clean; fine school.
Inadequate.
Clean; adequate.
4
Anaemia, 1; nervous, 1; stooping shoulders, 1
4
1
i
Influenza	
Good 	
Clean ; adequate.
2
5
3
Good 	
Good. .1
E 36
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School   Nurse.
ED
D
~ o
°£
7. oj
oo
"S .
Ph oj
°g
73 OJ
"cO
0J >.
i> £
So
qj  0J
OS
0J
>
ii
OJ
> tt
oj £*
o OJ
OJ
73   .
0J tB
> c
OJ ™
OJ oj
f oj
OJ   &.
QB
2
'c
a
o
to
wis
HH
W. J. Knox   	
M. D. McEwen	
Wm. Truax    	
VV. H. Wood	
Miss Purcell	
6'J
86
7
31
12
14
87
7
13
21
115
21
17
21
14
10
54
12
36
14
13
54
39
36
11
17
14
11
12
44
57
41
23
10
15
33
21
19
63
28
20
10
19
6
12
16
11
68
30
101
173
30
31
45
7
6
45
58
86
7
29
12
13
76
6
10
20
113
20
13
14
10
10
48
11
21
14
10
61
34
34
11
16
14
11
12
40
56
37
23
10
9
32
20
17
58
20
8
9
18
6
12
13
11
55
26
151
160
26
28
45
7
6
43
4
1
4
1
4
8
1
1
i
3
8
1
i
l
l
8
1
4
14
Kettle River, North	
1
3
2
6
1
10
1
6
9
3
1
1
5
3
1
1
' Y
5
2
8
4
Miss Farrer	
4
2
Y
i
' Y
2
i
"i
i
1
3
6
"i"
i
i
i
1
2
1
3
C. J. Willoughbv	
4
2
R. Felton   	
Miss Kelly	
1
i
3
1
5
7
1
8
W. Scatchard 	
8
7
2
4
1
9
2
7
?,-
3
2
1
1
2
Longwrorth	
4
s
C. J. Willoughby	
i
6
2
1
2
1
6
4
2
1
"i
9
is'
8
2
4
'22'
5
3
6
7
W F Shaw	
23
7
G. Williams   	
3
3
6
3
4
2
3
3
J. H. Hamilton   	
VV. F. Shaw	
Miss Gawley  ....
i
2
2
9
1
■y
"i
i
3
3
4
2
3
6
8
Mara
H. W. Keith	
28
1
1
H. N. Watson	
5
3
2
15
28
Y
16
' Y
9
i
2
l
l
3
4
3
3
19
16
3
3
8
5
3
W. R. Stone	
i
3
2
3
4
1
5
47
69
4
2
2
5
44
US
4
2
W. F. Shaw	
2
13
69'
Mill Bay..     ..                 	
91
7
F. T. Stanier '.	
i
3
8
3
4
4
4
6
12
3
W. J. Knox 	
4
2
3
1
5 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 33
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—CowM/wed.
9)
Is
"W   OJ
OJ  oj
an
or
OJ   .
ws
oi a
SS
HO
oj
*o
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
•
d
a
u
ED
CU
s
M
tS
CO
6
CJ
I
a
u
o
U)
a
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if cleau aud
adequate.
19
i
2
3
2
1
1
"i
6
8
2
3
3
1
4
Valvular lesion of heart, 1	
1
Clean; adequate.
6
1
11
Good	
None.
15
6
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
9
4
Satisfactory.
14
25
4
3
2
1
1
1
1
Good 	
8
u
21
Anaemia, 1;   chronic appendicitis, 1
Clean; adequate.
3
4
10
Small	
Bad	
Poorly ventilated.
Good'	
Poorly ventilated.
Good 	
.r      except basement
Good 	
8
Cardiac, 1	
Yes.
4
2
i
i
l
2
1
2
2
i
' Y
2
5
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
5
Yes.
4
F ir.
S
Yes.
5
3
Mitral regurgitation, I; wax in
ears, 1; club-foot, 1
1
4
Good  	
O.K	
Adequate.
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
7
Irregular heart, 2 ; nervous, 1.
2
7
3
Inadequate.
Yes.
3
3
Overcrowded   	
Well   heated   and
ventilated 	
Satisfactory	
Good 	
Influenza, school closed.
Chicken-pox	
Good.
Yes.
4
1
2
1
Cardiac, 1; defective speech, 1;
anasmia, 1
10
Adequate; clean.
Adequate ; fairly
clean.
Yes.
M
4
2
3
3
Enlarged surbinate bones,  1;
eczema, 1 ; anajmia, 1
Well   heated   and
ventilated
Crowded   	
Good	
14
1
6
Inadequate,
Yes.
6
10
1
5
Good 	
Unsatisfactory	
Very good	
7
3
3
3
Vaccinated, 2 ;   not vaccinated, 4
Inadequate.
Very clean.
Yes.
9
4
1
1
1
i
Cardiac, 1	
Psoriasis, 1	
Anamria, 2; growth on tongue, 1
68
4
3
1
Fair	
Good 	
Rather crowded ..
Building dirty	
Very good	
Fair	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
2
14
Much improved.
Yes.
10
4
3
3
9
Scarlet fever, 5;   chicken-pox, 1; mumps, 1
Two ; O.K.
Chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
Yes.
8
Poor repair.
Clean; adequate.
6
3
1
1
2
2
1
3
2
Good 	
Satisfactory	
Good 	
4
Satisfactory.
Y«s.
9
3
16
5
7
6
Atrophy muscles of right
shoulder and arm, 1 ;  uvula
absent, 2 ; blepharitis, 2
Fair condition	
Good 	
Clean; adequate.
10
2
Yes.
6
1
5
4
7
Yes E 34
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL AXD
Name of School
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
_
DO
Oj
CO
o
a
£ .
oj K
CO
CO
09
cu
H
t WH
l> tr.
w*
=3
o 3
o 63
"5 -2
~ .3
o
dS
*3»
oi aj
cu S
'S cu
•H   1)
»s
fc s
S
Qsa
Pt>
QS
flw
*<
Fraser Lake .
French Oreek.
Fruitlands....
Fruitvale	
Galena Bav	
Galley Bay	
Ganges Harbour
Gill	
Gilpin 	
Giscome	
Glacier...
Glade	
Glenbank.
Glenemma.
Glenmore.  .
Glenora ...
Glenrosa...
Glentanna.
Golden.  ..
Coldstream	
Gowland Harbour	
Grande Prairie	
Grandview Bench	
Grantham	
Grant Mine	
Gray Creek	
Grindrod	
Hall's Landing	
Happy Valley	
Harewood	
Harpers Camp.	
Harrogate	
Harrop    ...
Hatzic Prairie	
Hazelton	
Hazelton, New	
Headcmarters	
Headquarters, Camp 2.
Hedley	
Heffley Creek	
Heffley Creek, Upper .
Heriot Bay	
Heywood's Corner	
Highlands	
Hillcrest	
Hilliers	
Hilltop	
Hilton 	
Hope   	
Hope Station	
Hornby Island	
Horse Creek	
Hosmer   	
Houston .   ....  	
Howe Sound	
Hulatt	
Hunter Island	
Hupel	
Huscroft	
Hutton	
Ingram Mountain	
Invermere	
loco 	
Irving Landing	
Isabella Point	
Jaffray	
James Island  ....
Jesmond	
Joe Rich "Valley	
Johnson's Landing
Jordan River	
Jura	
Kaleva	
Kedleston    ,
VV. R. Stone	
L. T. Davis 	
C. J. Willoughby
C. S. Williams
J. H. Hamilton  ..
VV. F. Shaw	
E. M. Sutherland
A. D. Morgan
Wm. Truax
C. Ewert   	
J. H. Hamilton   ..
11. H. MacKenzie
E. H. S. McLean .
P. D. van Kleeck
W. J. Knox	
H. N. Watson ...
Wm. Buchanan .
C. H. Hankinson.
Paul Ewert 	
R. Felton	
W. F. Shaw	
R. W. Irving   	
H. W. Keith	
T. A. Briggs	
T. J. McPhee   ....
D. J. Barclay
H. W. Keith  ...   .
,1. H. Hamilton   ..
R. Felton	
T. J. McPhee  ....
F. V. Agnew	
Paul Ewert  	
H. H. MacKenzie
A. J. Stuart	
W. C. Wrinch ....
T. A. Briggs
M. D. McEwen...
C. J. Willoughby
W. F. Shaw	
P. D. van Kleeck
R. Felton	
H. W. Keith	
L. T. Davis  	
Wm. Truax 	
G. Williams	
J. C. Elliot   	
H. Meadows	
Paul Ewert 	
D. Corsan	
C. H. Hankinson
F. Inglis	
W. R. Stone	
G. E. Darby	
II. W. Keith	
G. B. Henderson ..
J. Sandilands  ....
W. H. Wood 	
F. E. Coy	
C. R. Symmes
A. Henderson ....
E. M. Sutherland
H. A. Christie ...
F. R. Pollock 	
S. E. Beech  	
W. J. Knox  	
D. J. Barclay  ....
R. Felton	
Lee Smith	
A. W. McCordick
G. Williams	
Miss A. Hayburst.
Miss Kelly.
Miss Kelly.
Miss Corbett ,
Miss A. Hayhurst.
Miss Kelly	
Mrs. Pope.
7
46
86
61
24
9
16
19
41
13
11
20
11
19
10
36
64
11
71
13
25
367
9
8
25
19
23
18
36
20
16
10
9
13
22
II
19
62
8
15
11
31
13
99
12
11
11
22
11
7
23
90
17
13
44
40
8
11
12
17
7
10
15
46
78
61
7
9
37
24
9
16
21
19
40
8
26
20
11
16
10
32
62
9
60
12
21
345
8
6
19
16
16
IS
21
19
54
15
5
16
10
9
13
22
11
19
60
9
15
8
29
13
93
12
11
9
19
11
6
21
90
16
13
41
38
8
11
11
17
7
10
15
1
Y
1
"7
1
1
2
2
7
25
19
32
2
1
1
3
22
4
2
1
3
1
2
2
3
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
2
4
1
1
4
2
5
5
10
1
2
3
3
2
1
3
3
4
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
5
8
5
16
....
1
1
2
3
3
3
2
"4
9
1
5
1
2
1
1
4
8
4
3
1
14
I
6
3
3
8
1
3
3
35
3
3
1
1
i
1
35
2
8
5
93
30
44
1
i
3
1
1
'Y
6
3
3
10
2
8
6
1
2
2
2
4
2
2
'  5
8
3
2
3
3
4
1
12
1
2
1
1
1
3
7
i
1
1
9
1
3
5
3
7
18
2
3
3
2
"2
1
8
1
i
1
1
3
2
9
20
18
4
1
i
4
6
1
4
5
6
1
5
2
3
' i
3
i
1
2
i
2
I
4
1
ii
4
4
17
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
5
7
15
2
2
2
4
8
7
1
1
2
1
3
2
2
2
2
"9
3
1
1
i
2 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 37
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
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OJ  °
03
OJ    .
o: a
as
HO
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Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Car*
diac Disease,  etc.).
a
a
0J
>
oa
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CJ
W
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cu
p.
a
i
o
f
M
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S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
2
2
5
18
1
8
"is"
i
Stooping   shoulders,   3;    bad
curvature of spine, 1 ;  slight
curvature of spine, 1; bronchitis,  1;   flat-feet,  1;   diabetes, 1; eczema, 2; anaemia,
2; scrofulous skin, 1
27
Chicken-pox, 5; measles,
1; scarlet fever, 4
Good
Yes
2
Poor huilding	
Good  ..
14
Yes
3
3
Pertussis; scarlet fever.
Crowded	
Crowded;    poorly
ventilated
Adequate	
Unsatisfactory	
A. 1	
Good 	
Good    .
18
Clean ; adequate.
2
4
5
7
1
"7
3
Vaccinated, 4 ;   not vaccinated, 6
Inadequate.
Clean; adequate.
A 1
3
10
7
Clean; adequate.
10
Endocarditis, 1	
1
Bad.
2
Good	
Both satisfactory .
Satisfactory,
Yes.
1
2
1
9
Asthma,  2 ;   cardiac,  1 ;   dry
skin, 2; eczema, 2
Clean; adequate.
•>,
6
5
5
1
2
7
9
4
Two pits.
Yes.
32
Good    .
3
3
1
1
Adequate	
Very crowded	
Excelleni	
Good  	
Clean; adequate.
Need cleaning
and repairs.
8
3
4
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
5
' Y
i
5
3
4
Overcrowded   	
Good    ...
quate.
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
10
Measles, 2	
9
I
3
20
Yes
10
5
9
3
10
2
No        	
Clean; adequate.
Good.
1
5
Log	
Two pits.
3
Good    ,
4
1
14
3
Good 	
Yes.
32
2
Good 	
Good	
Frame	
Good      ....
2
5
6
'Y
' Y
3
1
5
Clean; adequate.
4
2
Vaccinated, 2 ;   not vaccinated, 4
Scarlet   fever;   chicken-
pox
Adequate.
Yes.
5
7
2
Good.
8
2
"i
28
20
2
1
22
S
1
Valvular lesion of heart, 1....
2
i
1
Scarlet fever,   2;   influenza
Both satisfactory .
Overcrowded  	
Good 	
Clean; adequate.
89
108
50
63
14
Y
6
5
Anaemia,   1;     blepharitis,   4 ;
eczema, 3 ; acne, 1; internal
strabismus,1; heart-disease, 3
Anaemia,   5;     blepharitis,    5;
eczema, 1 ; defective speech,
2 ;   internal   strabismus,  5 ;
stye, 1; orthopaedic, 1
1
Adequate ; fairly
clean.
Adequate; clean.
Yes.
17
30
Blepharitis, 11; anaemia, 3; defective speech,l;stammering,
1; conjunctivitis, 1; nervous,
1; skin-disease, 1 ; pulmonary, 1; orthopaedic, 3; wax in
ears, 18
Good.
O.K.
4
Poor  ventilation
and lighting-
Very   complete
school
Yes
9
5
Eczema, 2; anaemia, 3; nervous, 1
Clean; adequate.
1 E 38
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
EB
"S.
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ici  OJ
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Mitchell Bay	
A. W. McCordick	
12
13
15
15
9
15
10
14
15
58
10
12
8
12
96
96
17
69
22
7
102
7
27
27
8
18
36
7
71
21
26
150
32
11
42
54
10
11
10
19
12
26
17
15
72
19
17
7
12
13
57
7
26
16
6
11
7
24
33
7
24
8
60
23
16
21
306
12
13
15
14
8
15
10
13
13
56
10
12
7
10
93
93
17
66
21
7
100
7
18
27
6
16
16
6
61
20
20
147
30
11
40
52
10
7
7
17
11
22
17
15
70
17
6
6
9
13
57
3
22
12
6
11
7
22
28
7
18
8
56
24
16
21
298
1
1
1
?
A. C. Nash     	
li. W. Irving	
Y
i
1
2
1
1
E. H. S McLean	
F. W. Green	
C. Ewert	
W. H. Wood	
3
2
2
3
1
1
3
2
2
3
5
5
....
8
3
5
3
II. A. Christie      	
5
9
15'
T
1
i
2
1
4
9
ii
1
i
1
1
19
19
4
5
2
1
4
2
3
18
10
'is"
5
1
1
2
1
4
2
Paul Ewert 	
E. II. S. McLean	
1
18
Naniimo Bay	
Nanoose Bay	
9
16
W. R. Stone  	
8
1
i
1
' Y
20'
i
2
5
1
' Y
2
32
Newgate	
H. A. Christie     ....
2
3
J. J. Gillis	
3
6
5
H. II. Murphy	
1
Northfleld	
T. J. .McPhee	
5
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
15
1
1
2
3
2
2
3
1
i
17
3
2
1
5
3
3
1
2
1
9
3
1
1
9
9
7
2
2
4
2
3
1
2
9
4
1
1
1
7
Notch Hill         	
W. H. Wood	
8
9
96
W. J. Knox	
4
2
Okanagan Landing	
3
YV. F. Shaw	
Miss Purcell	
5
3
1
4
4
2
1
....
2
11
M. M. Williams     	
5
VV. R. Stone	
Miss Payne	
7
4
4
6
2
W. F. Shaw	
1
1
A. C  Nash	
C. H. Hankinson	
J. B. Thorn.	
5
i
1
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
"i"
i
2
2
1
1
7
4
C. J. Willoughby	
N. J. Paul 	
?
4
Pemberton Range   	
"3
9
1
1
2
1
1
6
9
4
3
1
6
1
1
'2
1
1
3
2
3
1
1
2
10
J. C. Elliot	
9
5
8
29
2
6
2
13
21
54 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 39
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
>
oj ho!
oj oj
QH
OJ    -
t. 03
sd n
£5
oj
FH
"3
Q
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a*
a
fi
CO
CJ
O
02
d
ft
a
a
o
a
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
5
i
Y
i
l
l
Y
7
11
2
3
14
2
Yes.
7
Very poor 	
9
Slight heart-murmurs, 3	
2
6
4
3
5
1
Clean; adequate.
Yes
6
Satisfactory	
O.K	
Good	
Better   building
needed
Satisfactory	
4
O K
20
Clean; adequate.
3
8
2
4
2
10
11
Clean ; adequate.
2
3
Good	
Good
Adequate.
38
2
Chicken-pox, 1 ; whooping-cough, 1
28
Yes.
5
Well ventilated...
Good frame	
Crowded   	
Good	
No   	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good
14
18
36
2
22
Acne, 1 ;  cardiac, 1;  granular
lids, 1; nervous tremor, 1
10
Eight; flush.
6
1
Cardiac, 1	
Vark-eila, 21	
Clean ; adequate.
Adequate.
4
"i
1
2
3
4
15
3
2
	
2
5
3
1
1
2
1
14
5
11
2
2
4
6
1
3
1
Good.
9
3
4
3
Satisfactory	
Good
Clean; adequate.
5
Scarlet fever. 2	
11
Yes.
12
Satisfactory	
17
Anaemia, 1; cardiac, 2 ; effects
of infantile paralysis, 1
Spinal curvature, 1; anaemia, 2;
nervous, 1
Chicken-pox, 38	
Few cases impetigo	
One pit and  one
pail system.
Yes.
12
Good	
4
Fine school 	
Clean; adequate.
Fairly clean; adequate.
Dirty.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
1
19
Nervous, 2; chronic bronchitis,
1; cardiac, 1; bladder, 1
6
Very complete	
1
6
2
2
2
6
3
12
4
Cardiac, 1	
Poor light	
Satisfactory	
Poorly ventilated.
Good 	
Healthv	
Good    	
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Very good	
Good 	
Yes.
9
4
3
3
4
Very dirty;  adequate.
2
6
5
6
1
Sf-arlet fever, 2	
Good.
3
6
5
4
Y
Y
Yes.
1
6
1
ii'
5
....
1
Vaccinated, 3 ;   not vaccinated, 3
Adequate.
6
Inadequate.
Insanitary pits.
Good.
11
4
2
Satisfactory,
6
Debility  	
O.K.
3
O K.
8
2
1
5
Good	
Fair	
Excellent	
Yes.
3
5
1
7
4
quate.
Clean pits; shallow.
1
16
Uvula absent,   2 ;   atrophy of
muscles, right shoulder and
arm, 1; blepharitis, 2
Clean; adequate.
14
Rather small ..   ,
Good	
O.K	
9,
Clean; adequate.
5
ii
1
14
Anaemia, 2 ; cardiac, 3	
40 E 40
Beitisli Columbia.
192S
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
p.
a
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£°
73 OJ
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12
137
28
36
18
71
16
8
10
12
11
20
10
8
32
9
11
11
19
19
17
14
32
17
10
14
13
14
10
21
7
32
114
72
17
24
8
45
14
6
58
10
40
22
16
9
11
21
11
10
14
26
16
16
15
10
7
14
14
135
24
91
24
12
130
28
36
17
71
16
8
10
10
11
20
10
8
25
9
11
11
16
19
15
14
29
14
10
9
13
8
10
21
5
30
114
72
13
22
7
45
14
6
58
9
36
22
15
6
11
15
11
7
14
22
16
15
13
9
7
12
12
126
21
90
21
....
5
2
4
34
4
14
1
2
2
5
4
5
1
4
1
6
1
1
1
1
' i
19
8
14
2
"2
4
57
14
17
4
L. T. Davis	
1
2
2
3
2
6
Red Gap	
W. F. Shaw	
5
2
2
1
J. E 11. Kelson    .   ..
2
4
5
7
1
i
1
2
2
W. F. Shaw
3
5
2
1
5
o
1
2
3
l
l
6
5
1
1
5
2
8
W. H. Wood    	
2
3
M. G. Archibald	
1
J. E. H. Kelso    	
1
W. W. Birdsall	
W. H. Wood	
10
1
R, Felton	
Miss Kelly	
2
1
Rosebery	
1
2
1
1
9
M. G. Archibald	
Miss C. W. Thorn .
1
4
3
H. H. Murphy	
10
10
3
4
i
2
3
9
5
16
1
2
6
1
3
S
1
1
7
2
1
5
1
1
1
9
8
6
W. J. Knox 	
11
A. G. Beale 	
12
Miss Farrer	
J. C. Elliot    	
4
F. W. Green	
4
C. S. Williams	
38
Miss A. Hayhurst.
5
Salmon Valley    	
2
5
2
5
1
1
"3
1
1
1
5
8
13
2
9
8
M. G. Archibald	
1
1
2
W. F. Shaw	
1
3
3
3
3
5
6
F. Inglis   	
6
ii
Shawnigan Lake	
F, T. Stanier   	
W. F. Shaw	
Miss Farrer    	
1
9
2
2
1
1
"2
.2
4
1
1
5
6
13
Shirley	
R. Felton 	
3
5
1
Shutty Bench 	
D. J. Barclay   	
E. Buckell    	
1
1
4
1
5
4
1
2
1
1
1
A. G. Beale	
14
1
13
1
i
16
E Buckell      	
3
21 14 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
E 41
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
>
OJ A
OJ oj
OH
T3
OJ     ■
Cl. ck
H. 03
HO
oj
c-
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Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,   etc.).
|
u
r>
to
cu
a
CJ
d
to
OJ
ft
|
1
0
M
a
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
'Y
i
2
i
3
39
10
36
2
"s
2
2
Windows too low .
Good 	
Good    	
Very good	
,38
screened.
9
12
Scarlet fever, 1   	
7
Blepharitis,   1 ;    anaemia,   1 ;
nervous, 1
O.K.
15
3
Clean; adequate.
Good.
1
3
Good 	
Not sufficient heating
Healthy	
Well  heated   and
ventilated
Good	
Overcrowded   ....
Good	
Crowd ed   	
Yes.
4
2
Healthy.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
3
4
1
Good.
1
6
7
2
i
2
4
2
i
6
11
4
Good.
7
O.K	
O.K.
7
i
1
Y
9
Adequate	
Satisfactory	
No  	
Good 	
Satisfactory	
Excellent school..
Good	
Good 	
Good 	
Yes.
9
Adequate.
Yes.
13
8
4
Clean; adequate.
8
1
1
12
7
"i
4
Yes.
1
Fairly good    repair.
Yes.
4
5
3
1
12
1
1
1
Anaemia, 3; nervous, 1; wax in
ears, 6; stammering, I
Blepharitis,   3;   appendis
chronic, 2; eczema, 3; curvature of spine, 2 ;  anaemia, 8 ;
stooping shoulders, 8 ;   flat-
feet, 3 ; irritable bladder, 3 ;
cataract of eye, 1; bronchitis,
chronic, 2; nervous, 6; nasopharyngeal ; catarrah, 3
11
O.K.
13
Clean; adequate.
Good.
10
6
Poor buildings.
14
1
32
2
l
l
l
17
2
3
Acne, 1; orthopaedic, 20 ; cardiac, 1
4
Vaccinated, 18 ;  not vaccinated, 27
Adequate.
Yes.
35
Tuberculosis, 1; endocarditis, 1
Typhoid, 1; scarlet fever,
5; mumps, 4
Poor   	
Poorly lighted....
O.K	
Good 	
Heating  not   sufficient
Clean; adequate.
Poorly placed.
Clean ; adequate.
4
10
7
Valvular heart-lesion, 1	
3
10
i
2
"i"
1
3
Poor repair.
1
4
9
8
i
O.K.
Yes.
6
5
2
10
14
5
Healthy,
1
Y
2
"2
12
Y
35
2
5
quate.
8
Two pits.
2
Good 	
8
2
Good 	
Satisfactory	
No 	
Dark 	
Yes.
9
Good.
4
Yes.
Pulmonary, 1; nervous disease,
1; skin-disease, 1
3
quate. E 42
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
£h
«
ft
3
o
OJ tA
eg
a, W
DO
Ph 13
u
* ^
o —
o
a
G
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8TJ
3 .q
O
a
<*  CJ
5 M
a
QS
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QK
QN
■a
<
a ©
Skidegate
Slocan ^outh ,
Smithers	
Sointula 	
Solsqua	
Sooke 	
Sooke, East ..
Sooke, North.
Sorrento	
Southbank 	
Spencer 	
Spences Bridge .
Sproat	
Squamish	
Squilax	
Squirrel Cove.   ...
Streatham	
Stuart	
Stuart River	
Sullivan Hill 	
Sullivan Valley ...
Sunnybrae	
Snnnyside	
Swift Creek	
Sylvania	
Syringa Creek ....
Tappen  	
Tappen Valley....
Tata Creek	
Tatalrose	
Tchesinkut Lake .
Telkwa	
Three Forks  	
Three Valley ....
Thrums	
Tonkawatla	
Topley	
Tranquille	
Tranquille, Upper
Trapp Lake	
Trinity Creek..
Tulameen	
Turtle Valley..
Ucluelet	
Ucluelet, East.
Uncha Valley.
Union Bay	
Usk.    	
Valdes Island    ..
Vananda 	
Vanderhoof	
Vavenby	
Vesuvius	
Vesuvius, North.
Waldo	
Walhachin	
Wardner	
Wasa	
Waterloo	
Wattsburg	
Webber Lake	
Wellington  	
Wellington, East ...
Wellington, South ..
Westbank	
Westbank Townsite.
Westbridge	
Westsyde	
Westview	
Whaletown	
White Lake	
Williams Lake	
Williams Siding	
Guy Palmer	
H. H. MacKenzie .
C. H. Hankinson .
A. W. McCordick.
.1. H. Hamilton...
R. Felton 	
W. Scatchard....
M. M. Williams ..
W. Truax    	
J. J. Gillis	
J. H. Hamilton..
N. J. Paul	
W. Scatchard...
W. F. Shaw ....
vi. M. Williams .
W. R. Stone
D. P. Hanington
R. W. Irving ....
E. Buckell	
G. Williams	
Thos. O'Hagan ..
F. T. Stanier 	
J. E. H. Kelso ...
E. Buckell	
F. W. Green ...
M. M. Williams .
G. C. Paine	
E. E. Topliffe	
J. H Hamilton ...
H. IT. MacKenzie .
J. H. Hamilton . ..
C. H. Hankinson .
C. J. Willoughby .
M. G. Archibald ..
H. W. Keith...
Lee Smith	
W. Sf-atchard .
Chas. Maclean.
M. M. Williams	
G. K. MacNaughton
G. H. Bleecker....
W. F. Shaw	
A. Henderson	
W. R. Stone	
M. G. Archibald   .
E. M. Sutherland .
H. A. Christie
S. E. Beech ...
H. A. Christie.
F. W. Green...
T. J. McPhee .
F. W. Green...
W. R. Stone ...
T. J. McPhee .
AV. J. Knox	
W. Buchanan 	
W. H. Wood..'....
R. W. Irving	
A. Henderson ....
W. F. Shaw	
E. Buckell	
F. V. Agnew .
H. H. MacKenzie
Miss Corbett ...
M. B. Campbell.
Miss Gawley.
Miss Gawley.
Mrs. Pope ,
10
8
16
15
12S
123
12
12
15
15
63
6D
17
10
10
10
18
12
7
6
23
23
22
21
10
6
81
80
10
9
10
10
13
10
10
10
9
9
10
8
9
9
8
8
11
11
14
14
34
31
7
7
19
15
17
15
8
8
8
8
12
12
34
34
11
11
81
SO
58
43
8
8
18
16
13
13
12
11
16
16
10
11
13
10
14
13
10
10
15
15
10
7
106
101
49
49
20
20   ,
34
32
104
97
/
6
32
31
15
14
79
76
12
12
42
30
11
9
54
51
36
28
9
9
59
53
51
44
180
166
15
14
65
56
13
13
15
15
11
11
15
15
20
20
39
37
21
20 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 43
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
9>
J-S
o> oj
OH
03
OJ   .
u 03
CO C
c; w
ho
oj
CH
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Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
CJ
9)
Cd
V
w
d
cu
ft
a
a"
u
o
&
to
c
«
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
If  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
"i
19
Neither	
Clean; adequate.
9
2
1
34
Chorea, 1; T.B. suspect, 1	
Incontinence, 1; hajmophylia, 1
5
2
4
2
6
2
1
1
10
4
2
3
4
3
2
Good 	
Good    	
Good.
16
1
2
4
quate.
Two pits.
9
3
8
Fair 	
Good 	
30
T.B.   knee,   1;    curvature  of
spine, 1
6
Two pits.
3
Adequate	
5
3
3
4
3
Variola	
1
3
i
4
i
2
2
i
3
2
2
Satisfactory	
Good     	
Yes.
1
Good.
8
15
4
6
Ceiling too low..
2
Clean.
4
Yes.
6
1
2
8
6
1
10
Satisfactory	
Good 	
Yes.
2
17
2
Good.
Good       	
4
Satisfactory .....
Good 	
4
Good.
8
4
1
3
Rather poor repair
Poorly ventilated.
Good 	
7
good repair.
Yes.
H
7
Good    ...
O. K	
Well kept.
4
47'
3
1
3
Scabies; impetigo	
6^1
Blepharitis, 4; anaemia, 8; wax
in ears, 23; cardiac, 2; orthopaedic, 2; pulmonary, 1; skin-
disease, 4
O.K.
14
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
"9
Y
8
20
3
....
1
3
2
3
1
1
1
2
3
11
4
1
3
6
29
2
56
1
Healthy.
5
O.K.
29
Good      	
Yes.
1
Wooden building .
Satisfactory	
Poorly heated ....
Satisfactory   ....
Good 	
8
25
6
Anaemia, 1; indigestion, li
Otitis, 1
16
1
15
Yes.
4
3
Yes.
19
2
3
18
Crowded   	
Good	
Commodious   	
O.K	
Good 	
Satisfactory	
Good    	
Excellent	
68
2
6
Nervous, 1; eczema, l;anaemia, 1
Clean; adequate.
S tisfactory.
5
2
Y
1
1
3
"5
O.K.
7
Good.
5
Bad; adequate.
Yes.
16
Cleft palate, 1	
10
Good. E 44
British Columbia.
1923
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
"3.
a
rH-6
0;=:
O
m
c* oj
CO
'£,
•" g
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11
HH
H. H. MacKenzie      ...
30
11
11
16
6
25
38
61
11
41
9
53
52
45
27
26
28
11
10
12
5
20
33
59
11
41
9
52
48
44
27
26
1
1
3
2
2
10
Willow River
1
'2
1
1
3
2
4
W. R. Stone	
4
F. E. Coy	
2
3
1
1
3
10
W. J. Knox
4
1
1
6
3
1
1
1
1
6
5
M. M. Williams	
4
4
Y
2
2
7
1
"i°
6
3
6
5
3
4
"i"
13
2
Wycliffe	
F. W. Green	
10
Yahk                             	
2
Yale       	
P. McCaffrey	
6
C S. Williams
10 14 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
E 45
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Gontynued.
OJ
>
0> S3
OJ   _
OJ oj
OH
■C3
oj   .
c 03
n c
c ~
BO
oj
F->
'3
a
Other Conditions, specify
{Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
|
>
H
V2
6
ba
ft
g
£
o
to
g
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
9
"i"
3
6
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
6
3
Good.
3
O.K	
O.K.
Good.
15
i
3
is
4
6
3
1
3
7
2.
8
5
Hernia, 1; spinal curvature, 1;
blepharitis, 2; eczema, 1
Nervous, 2; cardiac, 1;   rapid
heart, 4
Chicken-pox	
Fine new school ..
Crowded   	
Good	
Adequate	
Rather crowded ..
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
17
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
4
7
9
Clean; adequate.
4
4
2
1
2
12
Pott's disease, 1; paralysis, 1..
Cardiac, 2 ; rupture, 1; orthopaedic, 4; anaemia, 1
Yes.
12
Adequate. E 46
British Columbia.
1923
REGISTRAR'S REPORT UNDER THE VITAL STATISTICS ACT.
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1923.
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sib,—I have the honour to submit the Fifty-first Report of Vital Statistics for the year ended
December 31st, 1922.
In connection with the tables issued iu this report, it may be remarked that the statistics
given in previous reports for the six months 1918, 191S-19, 1919-20, 1920-21, and the six months
ended December 31st, 1921, have been rearranged so that it is now possible to give statistics
by the years 1918, 1919, 1920, and 1021. This rearrangement entailed a considerable amount
of time and work, and inasmuch as it has been impossible up to the present time to thoroughly
revise the work, absolute accuracy is not claimed for the figures, though it may be assumed that
they are approximately correct.
Population.
The Preliminary Report, Vital Statistics of Canada, issued by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, estimates the population of British Columbia for the year 1922 at 539,000, an increase
of 14,418 over the census figures of the year 1921. This estimate of the population will be used
in this report for striking the rates per 1,000 of population for births, deaths, and marriages.
Registrations, 1920, 1921, and 1922  (exclusive of Indian Returns).
The following table shows the number of registrations in the Province for the years 1920,
1921, and 1922;   also the rates per 1,000 of population for births, deaths, and marriages:—
Registered births	
Registered deaths	
Registered deaths less still-born .
Registered marriages	
1920.
Population, 502,205.
11,067 22 03
5,063   10.08
4,779  9.51
4,857  9.67
1921.
Population, 602,205.
11,659.....  23.21
4,489     8.93
4,214 8.39
3,994  7.95
1922.
Population, 514,256.
10,834 21.06
4,748 ....    9.23
4,504   8.75
3,709   7.19
Registrations, 1922  (including Indian Returns).
Indian returns are included iu the following table, which shows registrations for the year
1922 only :—
Registered births	
Registered deaths	
Registered deaths less still-born.
Registered marriages	
1922.
Population, 539,000.
11,197   20.7
5,118  9.4
4,871  9.0
3,813  7.0
Registrations by Divisions, 1920, 1921, and 1922 (exclusive of Indian Returns).
The following table shows  the number of registrations  in  the  various  divisions  of  the
Province for the yeai-s 1920, 1921, and 1922:—
Births.
Deaths.
Marriages.
Division.
•
1920.
1921.
1922.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1,799
646
4,446
1,234
237
1,142
561
1,002
11,067
1,526
699
4,729
1,405
343
1,250
592
1,115
11,659
1,360
671
4,282
1,307
296
1,299
683
1,036
790
279
2,200
561
78
526
198
431
659
246
1,891
577
112
426
194
384
4,489
6S4
309
1,696
641
100
426
235
358
4,748
722
181
2,460
427
69
490
145
363
568
164
i,97b
389
79
392
152
280
3,994
522
169
1.S05
373
70
321
134
265
Totals	
10,834
5,063
4,857
3,709 14 Geo. 5
Boaed of Health.
E 47
Births.
An analysis of the birth registrations for the years 1921 and 1922 gives the following
results:—■
Of a total of 11,659 registrations during the period January 1st to December 31st, 1921,
there were 9,4S5 registrations of children born olive and registered during the year 1921.
During the period January 1st to June 80th, 1922, registrations were effected of 1,121 living
children born in 1921, making a total of 10,606 living births for the year 1921.
During the year ended December 31st, 1922, the number of birth registrations was 10,834,
and of these 8,959 were registrations of children born alive and registered during the year 1922.
During the period January 1st to June 30th, 1923. the births of 967 children born alive were
registered, making a total of 9,926 living births for the year 1922.
The rates per 1,000 of population for living births for the years 1921 and 1922 are 21.12
and 19.30 respectively.
Of a total of 10,836 birth registrations for the year 1922, 4,950, or 45.64 per cent, of all
registrations, show both parents of British origin or nationality, and 8,274 registrations, or
76.30 per cent., show the fathers to be British.
The number of Japanese registrations of birth durings the year 1922 was 745 and the
number of Chinese registrations of birth was 264.
The natural increase—excess of living births over deaths, not including still-born—was
5,422 for the year 1022, as against 6,392 for the year 1921.
Deaths.
The rate per 1,000 of population for death registrations for the year 1922 was 8.75, a slight
increase over the year 1921 (8.39), but lower than the rate in the year 1920 (9.51). The number
of deaths of children under 1 year of age (exclusive of still-born) in the year 1922 was 627,
or 13.92 per cent, of all deaths (exclusive of still-horn), as compared with 617, or 14.64 per cent.,
for the year 1921.
For children under 1 year of age, the rate per 1,000 of living births was 63.16 for the year
1922, as against 58.17 for the year 1921.
Of the total number of decedents (still-born excluded), 3,261, or 72.4 per cent., are described
as being of British origin; 1,183 males and 757 females are given as married; 1.254 males and
534 females as single; 273 males and 374 females as widowed; 10 males and 4 females as
divorced;  and the balance not given.
MUrriages.
The number of marriages continues to show a falling-off, being 285 less than in the year
1921 and 1,148 less than the year 1920.
Classified List of Deaths.
The following is a classified list of deaths which have occurred in British Columbia for the
years 1918 to 1922 :—
General diseases	
Diseases of nervous system and organs of special sense	
Diseases of the circulatory system	
Diseases of the respiratory system	
Diseases of the digestive system	
Non-venereal diseases of the genito-urinary system and annexa.
The puerperal state	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue	
Diseases of the hones and organs of locomotion.	
Malformations   	
Diseases of earlv infancy	
Old age	
Affections produced by external causes.
Ill-defined, including executions	
1,197
444
533
2,284
225
202
35
14
4
39
414
77
467
37
5,972
1,056
417
543
1,096
203
205
41
22
11
52
474
84
402
93
4,759
1920.
1921.
1,193
1,107
422
447
646
656
840
487
285
269
278
223
47
61
10
17
8
14
37
25
627
586
88
84
544
476
38
37
6,063
4,489
1,222
424
667
249
57
20
7
29
546
74 E 48
British Columbia.                                                   1923
The results of the foregoing table have heen segregated for the purposes of comparison, and
each mining division has heen credited with what it is responsible for during the year 1922.
No. 1, " General Diseases," includes returns-for " tuberculosis," " cancer," and " influenza."   These
three items are responsible for 910 deaths, or 20.22 per cent, of all deaths.
Allotment of all Causes of Death to each Mining Division for the Yeae 1922.
Mining Division.
'rf   HJ
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221
32
24
11
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1
8
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301
34
9
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44
94
64
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61
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93
102
6
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135
9
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27
50
29
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44
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34
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1
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59
3
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29
8
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1
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6
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51
10
23
169
23
17
132
425
151
14
1   113
14
17
309
1
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32
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35
1
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11
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93
13
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111
10
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133
12
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5
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17
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50
9
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474
41
39
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95
10
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1577
160
120
61
17
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1,996
1
1
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117
8
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3
1
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32
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4
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135
16
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37
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23
1
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576
119
4
1
54
12
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48
133
10
2
10
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2
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227
76
70
268
041
514
41
18
16
22
49
24
2
4
7
5
2
3
4
1
3
8
24
1
150
I
3
11
6
33
1
8
1
1
5
1
3
4
183
35
1
4
"3'
684
57
79
15
14
6
S5
13
42
13
2
26
1
5
358
17
16
2
6
1
22
4
10
4
1
5
1
3
2
1
i
1
2
2
2
2
1
36
2
31
1
4
3
3
18
2
4
3
3
.43
3
37
45
89
10 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 49
Allotment op all Causes oe Death to each Mining Division for the Year 1922—Continued.
Mining Division.
■a |
a I
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8
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2
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1
4
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Hudson Hope      	
2
22
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2
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2
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625
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13
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496
2
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4
26
72
1
1
8
1
9
306
14
424
Totals	
65
14
4
57
1
20
1
29
235
1,222
249
7
Specified Diseases.
The following table of specified diseases  (exclusive of Indian returns)  has been compiled
from returns for the whole Province from the year 1905 to the year 1922:—
Disease.
»0
O
OJ
34
CD
O
at
39
1
2
6
4
15
2
178
36
20
0
CJ
63
io
4
26
21
26
243
68
47
CO
O
OJ
72
1
6
5
9
29
5
180
49
44
33
152
OJ
0
Oj
55
i
16
18
14
10
137
79
36
46
153
0
102
1
7
14
15
23
5
172
113
42
61
164
rH
OJ
<M
CJ
rH
OJ
H
OJ
H
42
10
OJ
CO
OJ
23
OJ
24
3
6
21
19
17
413
248
36
92
224
00
OJ
15
20
2
26
16
138
444
279
37
81
265
1,839
58
OJ
OJ
0
CM
OJ
CM
OJ
OJ
CM
OJ
rf
0
H
Typhoid fever	
62
99
85
32
8
2
2
2
8
34
163
411
309
39
91
226
615
51
1,961
8
13
9
26
32
64
444
320
41
220
147
300
58
1,682
20
4
8
6
27
34
414
373
50
222
132
17
42
1,349
11
1
2
11
12
23
85
401
424
49
146
249
109
57
890
11
Whooping-cough	
1
4
4
10
7
167
34
16
11
31
23
68
10
316
148
60
85
237
13
12
15
30
10
368
180
63
124
258
11
18
27
35
11
422
159
51
66
195
1
3
23
11
11
403
205
47
64
183
14
9
11
IS
425
221
47
62
157
12
1
37
18
36
367
259
49
140
228
138
178
324
479
Cancer (all forms)	
669
6,160
3,681
817
1,523
100
110
217
3,616
2,880
Pneumonia follow'g influenza
Diarrhoea and enteritis ....
48
426
46
458
53
778
33
618
59
624
74
783
53
130
1,308
113
108
1,101
72
1,068
35
1,205
53
1,212
Totals	
1,134
1,193
1,163
3,220
1,580
22,478
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining Division for the Year 1922.
Mining Division.
2
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18
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1
1
1
1
1
3
150-Mile House	
1     1
1
2
Yale   	
1
11
2
4
4
4
Totals 	
K
3
2
33 E 50
British
Columbia.
1923
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining Division fob the Year 1922—Continued.
Mining Division.
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10    ..
31    ..
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1
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6
7
54
10
1
2
1
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22
4
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1
2
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8
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1
20
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72
571
67
51
18
5
2
11
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729
80
21
23
88
212
187
0
8
3
7
14
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234
Alert Bay	
1
1
1
1
4
1     1
1
1
7
3
1
15
89
11
7
6
1
1
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1
1
2
1
1
2
5
4
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2
6
22
"2
14
155
12
20
4
i'
1
193
18
2
4
18
42
47
3
1
8
161      1
18
8
3    ..
1    ..
3       6
3 51
4 10
2       9
1        3
1
8
40
4
3
3
17
4
1
1
i
25
1
1
5
7
14
12
2 ..
195     2
25
6
8    ..
15
54
70
1      .
3 ..
2
0 76
1 9
1       1
2
4      11
6     23
9      12
..   .„.
1    ....
1        1
1        1
1    ....
3     15
1
2
117
16
2
1
13
32
24
1
2
2
1
1
5
1
6
15
i
1
2
1
3
2
2
52
23
6
4
2
14
4
3
5
1
1
1
Totals	
26
12
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
"2'
1
54
2
6
3
85      1
1
1
1
3
2
1
16
1
1
I
1
1
31
13
3
2
6    ..
4
3
1     ....
3
8
1
1
1
2
5
1
1
2
17
26
3
7
2
28
6
13
4
1
2
1
1
111
9
9
1
1
2
1
2
1
3
1    ..
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
3
11
1 ..
4
2 ..
1        3
i    ....
3
2
4
1
1
1    ..
Trail	
2
1
1
21
1
2
4
3
2
1
4
2
2
18
1
2
34
4
3       7
1    	
1
3
11
2
Atlin	
2
1
2
3    ..
1
..      2
3
11
1
2
1    ..
1
1
1
"3
1
8
1
3
20
2
4
3    ....
"i
1
1
1
2
Totals	
1
2
11
15
13
4       4
6
240
60
2
2
11
109
57
1,580
~ 14 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
E 51
Cancer.
The number of deaths from cancer during the year 1922 was 424, or 9.41 per cent, of all
deaths (exclusive of still-born), as against 373, or S.85 per cent., in the year 1921.
Tuberculosis.
The number of deaths from tuberculosis during the year 1922 was 401, or 8.90 per cent,
of all deaths (exclusive of still-born), as against 414, or 9.82 per cent., for the year 1921.
The foregoing figures do not include 99 deaths from tuberculosis received under the Indian
returns.
The following table assigns deaths from tuberculosis to the various races:—
Race.
Population.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Per Cent, of Deaths
from Tuberculosis.
Rate per 1,000 of
Population.
1922
(estimated).
1921
Census.
1922.
1921.
1922.
1921.
1922.
1921.
23,600
15,200
24,744
1,000
474,456
23,533
15,006
22,377
961
462,715
64
23
102
4
307
500
49
32
114
5
322
12.8
4.6
20.4
0.8
61.4
9.3
6.1
21.8
0.9
61.7
2.71
1.51
4.12
4.00
0.64
2.08
2.13
5.09
Other races	
5.25
0.69
Totals	
539,000
524,582
622
100.0
99.8
Ages of Decedents.
The following is given as a comparative statement re the ages of decedents for the years
1920, 1921, and 1922 :
Age.
Under 1 year (excluding-still-born).
Under 1 year (including still-born) .
1 to 2 years	
2 to 5 years	
5 to 10 years	
10 to 20 years	
20 to 30 years	
30 to 40 years .  	
40 to 50 years	
50 to 60 years	
60 to 70 years	
70 to 80 years	
80 to 90 years	
90 years and upwards	
Age not given	
Totals..
4,489
685
617
627
969
892
871
77
63
83
133
91
96
123
93
86
213
159
186
429
280
297
647
469
479
642
563
565
570
582
622
517
593
663
460
417
530
209
215
205
41
42
42
33
30
23
1922.
4,748
Indian Retubns.
The following were the number of registrations received at this offio during the year 1922:
Births, 390;  deaths (including 3 still-born), 370;  marriages, 112.
" Adoption Act."
Ninety-one certificates of adoption were received and filed in this office during the year 1922.
Genebal.
The cash receipts during the year 1922 were as follows: Vital statistics, $1,970.46; marriage
licences, $260.
The number of searches made re vital statistics was 2,206 and the number of certificates
issued was 2,421. E 52 British Columbia. 1923
The number of letters received and answered during the year 1922 was 4,944.
In conclusion, our thanks are due to all officers connected with this branch of the Health
Department for their unfailing courtesy and promptness on all occasions.
I have, etc.,
IIerbeet B. Fbencii,
Deputy Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.
victoria, B.C. :
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1923.

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