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FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1925-26 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1927

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   17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 121
APPENDIX A.
RESULTS OF THE HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY MATRICULATION
EXAMINATIONS, 1926.
The following are the names of the winners of His Excellency the Governor-General's silver
medals:—
Student.
High School.
Percentage.
86.2
85.8
84.4
83.6
83.4
The winners of the Royal Institution Scholarships of §100 awarded by the University of
British Columbia on the results of the Matriculation Examinations were:—
District.
Student.
High School.
Percentage.
No. 1
82.0
No. 2
80.3
No   3
84.4
No. 4
85.8
No. 5
76.3
No. 6
83.0
A Scholarship of $150 was awarded to Roderick A. Pilkington, King George High School,
Vancouver, the student obtaining the highest standing in the Province in the Junior Matriculation Examination.
A Scholarship of $75 was awarded to Walter Henry Hickman, Vernon High School, the
student obtaining the highest standing in the Province in the Senior Matriculation Examination. R 122
jublic Schools Keport.
1926
Number of Successful Candidates at each Centre.
Examination Centre.
d
01
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i
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
6
1
1
4
2-
1
1
3
1
5
2
6
29
1
17
3
6
1
9
5
2
1
1
1
6
1
2
6
1
2
5
1
2
1
2
2
8
6
2
4
3
6
3
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
Armstrong:
High                   .. -                      	
0
Private Study 	
2
1
2
7
Bridgeport:   High  	
Burnaby:
North 	
South                   	
7
8
38
1
Burns Lake:
Public                     	
1
2
2
2
3
Chilliwack:
High                   	
28
3
Coalmont:
3
1
Cranbrook:
High                                                  	
8
1
1
11
9
2
Duncan :
High 	
2
Queen Margaret's Private 	
1
Esquimalt:    High   	
1
12
Ganges:
8
1
Mrs. Halley's Private 	
Golden :
High	
2
4
McMurdo  Public   	
2
2
Grand Forks :   High	
Greenwood :
Superior   	
10
6
Ingram Mountain Public 	
1
1
Hazelton :   New Hazelton Public 	
1
3
Howe Sound :
High 	
1
Private Study 	
1 Part III.—Appendices.
R 123
Number of Successful Candidates at each Centre—Continued.
Examination Centre.
H
\X
01
*_.
•Q-
ri
d
u
fc.
O
a
siS
iMD
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rt5hi
loco :    Superior   	
Kamloops :
High 	
Clinton   Public  	
St. Ann's Academy	
Kaslo:   High  	
Kelowna:
High 	
Private Study 	
Keremeos :   High 	
Kingcome Inlet:   Public 	
Kitsumgallum :   Superior 	
Ladner :   High 	
Ladysmith :   High 	
Langley:    High  	
Lawn Hill:   Public 	
Lumby:    Superior  	
Maple Ridge :   MacLean High .
Matsqui:    High   	
Menzies Bay :   Private Study .
Merritt:   High 	
Mission :    High   	
Mackenzie:   Public  	
Nakusp :   High 	
Nanaimo :
High 	
North Cedar Public 	
Private Study 	
Nelson :
High 	
Private Study 	
New Denver :
High	
Private Study 	
New Westminster :
High 	
Technical   High   	
Columbian College Private
St. Ann's Academy 	
Private Study 	
Oak Bay:
High 	
Rhodes' Private 	
St .Michael's Private  	
Private Study 	
Ocean Falls :   High 	
Oliver:
Superior 	
Osoyoos Public 	
Oyama :  High 	
Parksville:    Superior  	
Penticton :
High	
Private Study 	
Point Grey:
King George V. High 	
Lord Byng High 	
24
1
38
3
1
10
31
12
13
1
13
1
1
1
6
15
1
1
1
1
1
1
11
7
12
1
5
3
4
4
1
2
1
3
4
3
1
10
8
20
2
3
38
1
3
1
1
58
6
3
1
2
39
1
3
1
1
1
2
11
1
40
12 R 124
Public Schools Report.
1926
Number of Successful Candidates at each Centre—Continued.
Examination Centre.
S3
&
EH to
a
H
Ort2
tt 3
d o
S.2
rt5(-.
Point Grey—Continued.
Prince of Wales High	
St. Anthony's College Private
Vancouver College Private ....
Private Study 	
Port Alberni:
High 	
Kildonan Public 	
Port Clements :   Public 	
Port Coquitlam :
High 	
Pitt Meadows Superior 	
Powell River:   High 	
Prince George :
High	
Dome Creek Public 	
Loos   Public   	
Prince Rupert:
High 	
Private Study 	
Princeton :   High 	
Procter :   Superior	
Revelstoke :
High	
Galena Bay Public 	
Robson :   Deer Park Public 	
Holla :
Public 	
Pouce Coupe Central Public .
Swan Lake North Public 	
Rossland:
High 	
Private Study 	
Ruskin :    Superior  	
Rutland:    Superior  	
Saanich, North :   Superior	
Salmon Arm :
High  ,	
Sunnybrae Public 	
Private Study 	
Silverton:   Superior  	
Slocan :   High 	
Smithers :   High 	
Private Study	
Soda Creek:   Macalister Public 	
Sooke :   Superior 	
Squamish :   Public 	
Stewart:    Superior  	
Summerland:    High   	
Surrey:    High  	
Trail:
High 	
Fruitvale  Public  	
Private Study 	
Union Bay :   Superior	
Vananda:
Public   	
Gillis Bay Public	
23
2
23
4
2
4
2
2
2
1
4
4
4
2
2
11
1
1
6
12
1
1
8
1
1
3
1
3
2
11
3
1
7
2
2
1
1
2
2
5
10
1
1 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 125
Number of Successful Candidates at each Centre—Continued.
Examination Centre.
X
ri
01
a
CJ
rn
•a
a
fc.
in
01
•a
a
rt
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•a
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01
B
S
a
U
rt
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EH 03
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rt
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rt
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03
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03
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ri
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s_,
c s
d 0
■rt'-E
J tg
®s
ci u
a.2
Kb
3
rt,
O
En
Vancouver:
4
2
2
4
1
1
2
2
4
1
1
10
1
3
1
10
1
2
1
4
2
3
14
2
2
■54
81
47
6
23
15
13
1
1
5
6
9
2
3
1
1
3
5
7
1
2
10
2
2
1
1
66
93
49
35
23
38
5
14
6
1
1
4
25
2
1
72
3
8
2
67
1
1
3
2
1
6
4
8
2
5
1
....
1
10
Correspondence School Private
1
24
14
2
6
4
2
9
Vancouver, North :
30
4
2
1
95
Vancouver, West:   High 	
Vanderhoof:
4
2
1
2
2
Vernon:
High        	
15
10
1
i
Victoria :
High       	
91
Collegiate Private 	
1
4
3
5
1
30
1
2
8
3
2
1
Totals, June, 1926	
149
140
98
71
837
924
62
48
66
33
5
10
6
10
158
278
50
71
1,431
Totals, June, 1925   	
1,585 R 126
Public Schools Report.
1926
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1926.
The following are the results of the examination for entrance to high school held in the
public schools of the Province at the end of June.
The names of the winners of His Excellency the Governor-General's bronze medals are:—
Dial
rict
No.
1.
No.
2.
No.
3.
No.
4.
No.
5.
No.
6.
No.
7.
No.
8.
No.
9.
No.
10.
Name.
School.
Marks.
Kenneth Ross MacKenzie ..
Gordon  Nelson Carter  	
Helen  C.  Lockhart 	
Mary Lamberton 	
Charles Gwynne Fothergill
Marjorie MacLennan 	
Verna Vina Demerling 	
Joy Susan Henshaw Kemp
Margaret Elizabeth Fraser
Helen Mary Walker 	
North Ward School, Victoria 	
Nanaimo  School  	
General Gordon School, Vancouver	
Walter Moberley School, South Vancouver.
Gilmore Avenue School, Burnaby 	
Raft River School 	
Enderby School 	
Central School, Trail 	
Erickson   School	
Booth Memorial School, Prince Rupert	
416
435
412
434
422
404
419
387
439
405
Number of Successful Candidates at each School.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.
Total.
16
9
20
23
38
9
61
43
15
54
26
2
12
3
1
8
1
1
10
2
4
1
3
1
1
2
1
■5
2
3
12
21
6
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
2
5
1
3
1
1
2
12
16
Alberni	
9
20
3
1
Armytrong-Spallumcheen	
31
1
1
10
9
Bella  Coola	
4
1
3
1
1
2
Bridgeport,   Richmond	
39
9
2
3
73
66
15
66
Nelson  Avenue	
28
Schou  Street	
3
1
1
Palling	
1
Arrow Park, East	
1
Arrow Park, West	
1
2
3
2
Cassidy	
Cassidy	
9
1
3
1 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 127
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.
Total.
33
7
13
18
50
10
17
6
1
12
6
7
3
3
4
7
1
2
6
4
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
3
5
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
4
2
5
1
8
4
2
2
1
1
6
3
6
3
2
4
3
4
2
1
1
4
2
1
6
Turtle  Valley	
1
33
12
Camp  Slough	
Cheam	
5
7
3
Fairfield Island	
3
4
7
7
13
1
Popcum	
2
6
4
Little  Fort            	
1
Raft River	
2
1
Clinton	
2
1
1
2
1
2
3
Langford	
5
2
William Head (Federal)	
1
Courtenay	
20
1
1
Lazo	
2
2
Nob Hill            	
1
Oyster River	
Royston	
Chemainus	
1
1
4
2
1
58
Bull River Bridge	
4
Fort Steele	
2
2
Lumberton	
Moyase	
Wycliffe	
1
1
6
3
6
13
7
2
4
3
21
2
1
Deroche	
1
4
2
1 R 128
Public Schools Report.
1926
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.
Total.
22
59
13
13
27
22
40
6
1
5
3
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
9
1
2
1
1
1
4
40
1
2
3
3
io
1
2
1
1
1
1
6
4
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
5
i5
1
2
•1
6
1
2
1
8
1
3
13
1
1
1
6
3
1
28
1
Cobble  Hill	
Cowichan Lake	
3
Glenora	
1
Q
1
Needles.	
3
Roberts Creek, East	
1
9
1
9
1
1
Hlllcrest.   ..    .                	
1
4
Lampson Street	
40
60
2
3
3
1
2
Golden	
Field                       	
1
13
Horse Creek	
1
1
1
31
Fife	
1
Christian Valley 	
■ 1
1
1
1
5
5
1
Hope	
St Elmo	
Yale	
2
Howe Sound	
Howe Sound	
6
Invermere	
1
2
1
loco	
8
1
Kamloops	
25
53
Stuart Wood	
Adelphi	
Chinook Cove	
Criss. Creek	
1
1
Fruitlands	
6
Grande Prairie	
3
Heffley Creek, Upper	
1
' lEO.
'art ill.—Appendices.
R 129
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.
Total.
13
2
20
23
14
22
3
1
1
1
1
1
6
3
2
1
2
1
1
34
3
1
2
8
1
1
1
2
6
5
■5
8
4
2
2
1
2
1
4
1
■5
10
2
12
11
1
1
2
3
5
2
1
1
1
1
'5
8
4
3
3
8
3
32
1
1
1
3
7
3
Martin  Prairie                            	
1
1
Squam Bay	
1
1
Trapp Lake	
1
6
Zetland Private	
Kaslo	
3
15
Ainsworth	
1
Argenta	
2
1
Shutty Bench :.
1
Kelowna	
Okanagan	
36
3
1
Cawston	
2
8
21
Sullivan  Hill _	
Ladner	
1
24
Mosher Siding _
9
Trenant	
Ladysmith	
6
19
8
Oyster, North	
4
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Private
Lang Bay	
2
2
Myrtle Point	
Aldergrove	
1
2
1
County Line	
4
1
Langlev Fort	
10
Langley, West	
9
Milner	
12
11
Otter	
South Otter	
Springbrook	
1
1
9
3
Lumby    ....
2
1
Kaleva	
Malcolm Island	
Port Hardy	
1
1
1
Maple Ridge	
Haney	
22'
Maple  Ridge	
8
4
Masset 	
Matsqui	
Masset	
Clayburn	
Matsqui	
Ridgedale	
3
3
8
3
32
Brookmere	
1
1
Elk Bridge	
1
3
New Michel	
7 'ublic Schools Keport.
1926
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.
Total.
Mission	
Silver Hill.	
Mount Lehman	
28
96
6
28
8
63
17
67
75
47
30
10
33
23
12
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
6
2
3
9
2
1
3
2
2
3
1
1
4
10
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
11
1
2
1
2
1
3
2
3
2
1
11
3
1
o"
2
1
1
1
1
4
13
o
4
6
30
Mount Lehman, Matsqui	
2
3
1
Bend	
1
Dome Creek „
MeBride	
Correspondence School, Educ. Dept
Box Lake	
Glenbank	
1
1
1
1
3
2
102
6
North Cedar	
2
South Cedar	
3
9
South Gabriola	
2
Grant   Mine	
1
Harewood	
28
3
2
Northfleld                         	
2
3
9
1
4
73
18
Belford	
2
Johnson's Landing	
1
1
Salmo	
1
1
Taghum	
1
Willow   Point	
1
2
11
Three  Forks	
1
69
76
49
31
Trapp Technical.
10
•
Hamilton Road, Burnaby	
3
Blue Mountain,  Coquitlam
2
Central, Coquitlam	
3
Sunbury, Delta	
Ladv of Lourdes Private	
2
1
St. Ann's Private	
11
3
Private Study	
1
North Bend	
Notch Hill	
Blind Bay	
2
Lee Creek	
1
Magna Bay	
1
Notch Hill	
I
White  Lake	
Oak Bay	
37
12
5
4
Oyama	
Oyama	
Winfleld	
5
1 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.
Total.
61
43
27
44
20
78
SO
59
3
10
20
30
29
18
47
1
'5
2
1
5
2
9
1
1
.1
1
3
1
1
8
4
8
5
6
10
1
1
2
2
5
1
9
1
7
4
2
2
1
1
6
3
1
1
4
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
2
7
2
1
7
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
2
1
Errington	
5
,
French Creek	
2
1
Red Gap	
2
Peachland	
9
1
1
1
1
64
1
1
51
Edith Cavell	
31
Kerrisdale	
52
25
84
60
60
3
1
10
2
2
5
1
9
1
27
34
2
2
South Fort George	
1
1
35
21
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
7
9
Bouchie Lake 	
1
7
2
Revelstoke	
51
1
1
1
Mount McPherson	
1
2
Rock Creek	
1
1
3
2 R 132
Public Schools Report.
1926
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.
Total.
Rolla                                        	
28
18
8
26
2
7
1
'5
5
13
'7
5
4
2
7
2
2
1
5
4
16
12
9
6
4
2
3
1
1
2
2
2
2
4
1
1
5
5
1
3
3
6
2
4
2
4
2
1
5
1
3
1
1
1
11
3
4
6
4
3
4
3
2
3
2
6
9
Rolla _...                        	
7
29
5
Rutland -	
Cedar  Hill        	
5
13
7
4
Lake  Hill                -	
9
7
Prospect Lake	
2
2
1
5
4
16
12
Model  	
9
6
3
99
9
3
1
1
Larch Hill                    	
9
■
Mount Ida -	
9
9
9
1
5
Skidegate -	
1
Slocan City	
3
14
Otter Point	
9
Sumas, Upper	
°
Summerland	
Lindell....             .            	
29
1
11
3
Surrey _	
Colebrook--   -	
Hall's Prairie	
6
East Kensington	
Kensington Prairie  	
3
2
3
9
Port Kells	
Strawberry  Hill	
Tynehead	
South  Westminster	
R 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 133
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.   •
Total.
White Rock	
7
49
41
57
45
20
34
55
32
30
24
4'3
66
39
2
69
55
45
25
63
58
18
60
66
74
81
44
44
64
72
1
13
43
47
3
24
15
27
101
39
39
47
7
2
1
2
1
1
16
1
1
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
2
2
4
4
3
2
m    x
2
2
4
9
2
1
4
7
8
1
2
2
1
11
1 .
1
5
22
1
2
12
22
21
3
2
1
3
1
1
7
7
11
7
Swift Creek                              	
Swift Creek	
1
Thurlow -	
1
65
Trail
Trail-Tadanac	
1
1
3
1
Ucluelet	
Tofino	
Union Bay _	
Vananda	
42
59
48
Bavview ._    __..
Beaconsfield -	
Central	
36
59
36
33
24
47
67
41
Simon Fraser	
General  Gordon	
Grenfell ..	
Hastings	
69
57
49
34
65
59
Henry Hudson	
Model	
Lord Nelson                     	
Florence Nightingale 	
74
75
83
65
Lord Tennyson	
83
1
Crofton House Private -	
1
Holy Rosary Private	
Matriculation Correspondence Private.
22
1
2
12
99
34
46
49
3
2o
North  Star	
15
3
1
27
102
46
46
58 R 134
Public Schools Report.
1926
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Promoted on
Examination.
Total.
Vancouver, South..
Vancouver,  Wes't
Vanderhoof	
Vernon	
Victoria-.
Waldo	
Webster's Corner	
William's Lake.	
Wistaria	
Woodflbre	
Yahk	
Totals, June, 1926
Totals, June, 1925
Sir A. MacKenzie	
Norquay	
Secord	
Lord Selkirk	
Sexsmith	
Tecumseh	
Van  Home ._	
General Wolfe _	
St.  Joseph's  Private	
Pauline   Johnson	
Finmoore -	
Fort Fraser	
Vanderhoof	
Vernon -	
Coldstream.	
Lavington	
Trinity Valley	
St.  Michael's Private	
Boys'  Central	
Sir James Douglas	
Girls'  Central	
George Jay	
Margaret Jenkins	
North  Ward	
Oaklands	
Quadra	
South Park	
West	
St. Louis College, Private
St. Margaret's Private	
Private  Study	
Baynes Lake	
Waldo -	
Private  Study	
Webster's Corner	
Big Lake	
Lac la Hache	
Williams Lake	
Streatham	
Woodflbre	
Yahk	
51
37
25
84
16
59
34
52
35
40
27
32
34
58
23
36
44
18
37
27
4
6
1
2
2
1
9
4
19
8
12
2
2
4
10
2
2
6
2
5
1
7
1
1
1
1
4
4
oo
41
25
86
23
6S
34
55
3
35
1
2
4
46
1
1
36
36
53
66
35
38
46
22
47
27
4,468
2,130
1,743
3,568
6,211
5,698 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 135
APPENDIX B.
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1926.
Arithmetic.    (Time, 3 hours.)
Part 1.
[Note.—The questions in Part 1 can be solved mentally, out candidates who find any of th&
problems too difficult to perform mentally may ivork them out with pen and ink. The answer
to each question must be placed on the blank to the right of the question.']
Answer. Value.
1. How many yards are in 1,269 feet? 	
2. How many feet in 1,269 yards? 	
3. If a man walks south from his home 13 miles and then walks
north 7% miles, how far is he from his home? 	
4. 13% X 7= 	
8?
5. What simple fraction is equal to —* ?  __	
7
6. What simple fraction is equal to   -— ? 	
10|
7. .7%-s-S = 	
8. Arrange in order of magnitude:   3.7, .275, and 2.1	
9. .2x.lX3i= 	
10. 4-H.05— 	
11. 7.63 X 1000 = 	
12. 7.63 h- 1000= 	
13. The least common, multiple of 8, 15, and 40 is 	
14. The highest common factor of 18, 45, and 63 is 	
15. Find the cost of 8 pencils at 75 cents a dozen. 	
16. What decimal fraction is equivalent to 9%%? 	
17. What common fraction is equivalent to 33'y3%? 	
18. 7% of $85= 	
19. Find the cubic contents of a brick 9 inches long, 5 inches wide,
and 4 inches thick. 	
20. A room is 20 feet long, 15 feet wide, and 10 feet high.    Find
(ft.) The perimeter of the room, 	
(6.)  The area of the walls, 	
(c.) The area of the ceiling, 	
(d.) How many strips of paper 18 inches wide, laid vertically, will be required to paper an end wall of
the room.        1
21. How many square yards are in a path 4 yards wide and 2 rods
long?        2
22. How many acres are in a rectangular field 20 chains long and
7 chains wide? .       2
23. What is a piece of scantling 20 feet long, 9 inches wide, and
2 inches thick worth at 4 cents a board-foot?       2 R 136
Public Schools Report.
1926
Answer. Value.
24. My account for gas and coal for December was $13.    If I was
allowed 5% discount, find the amount I had to pay to
settle the account.       2
25. If coal is bought at $8 a ton and sold at a gain of 40%, find
the selling price per ton.       2
26. A furniture dealer made a profit of $8 on a chair which he
sold at a gain of 40%.   At what price did he buy the chair?           2
27. I bought a piano on February 5, 1925, and gave in part pay
ment a promissory note due in 9 months.    On what date
was the note legally due?       2
28. What premium must a person pay to insure his life for $4,500
at $30 a thousand?        2
29. What premium must a person pay to insure his house for
$4,500 at 70c. a hundred?        2
30. If a boy can run 8 feet in % of a second, how long at that rate
will it take him to run 100 yards?       3
31. My property in 1925 was assessed at $3,000.    If the tax rate
was 23 mills on the dollar, what was the amount of taxes
on the property?        3
32. A, B, and O bought a house which they rented for $360 a year.
If A paid $1,200, B $1,000, and C $800 towards the cost of
the house, what sum is B entitled to as his share of the
rent for a year?       3
Part 2  (Written Work).
Value.
8        1. Find the cost of a pile of wood 42 feet 8 inches long, 12 feet wide, and 7 feet 9 inches
high at $7.50 a cord.
8        2. A piece of cloth 7 decametres long was sold in Paris at 39 francs a metre.    Find the
value of the piece of cloth in Canadian currency when 1 franc is worth 3.54 cents.
12-      3. The owner of a square field containing 40 acres put a 3-strand wire fence around it.
What did the wire cost at 4%c. a foot?
12 4. A cylinder has a diameter of 28 inches and a height of 39 inches. Find the number
of gallons of water it will hold, if a gallon of water occupies approximately 277.274
cubic inches of space (give answer to 2 places of decimals).
10 5. On June 30, 1923, H. Miller deposited in a Savings Bank $2,S0O on which interest
at 4% per annum was to be added to the principal every 6 months. How much
money was to Mr. Miller's credit at the bank at the end of two years?
Drawing.    (Time, 2% hours.)
18        («•)  Select three examples of the following from your drawings:—
(1.)  An example of nature drawing.
(2.) An example of colour-work  (design).
(3.)  An example of shading in pencil.
25        ("■)  Freehand object-drawing.    Draw one of the following:—
(1.) Any object that will bring in the ellipse and a handle.
(2.) A match box partly open.
(3.) A group of two models, composed of a square prism and a cylinder, with
shading. 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 137
Value.
30
27
(c.)  Draw any simple scroll, and put the word "Excelsior" on it.
Or
Copy the following in a rectangle 5" by 7":—
The cuckoo comes in April,
Stops all the month of May,
Sings a song in midsummer,
And then he goes away.
(d.)  Make a sketch of any design you have studied during the year, and if time permits,
complete a portion of the design.
Geography.    (Time, 2% hours.)
57        !• In each blank, fill in the word or words needed to make the statement complete.
(a.) In   the region   between  the   trade-winds   the  prevalent   direction  of  the  air
is     This region encircling the earth is called
the	
In a region where the prevailing winds are from the water to the land, summers
will be and winters	
(6.) The greater part of the world's supply of coffee is grown in	
The country which produces the greatest quantity of wool is	
The country which, produces the greatest quantity of silk is	
The country which produces the greatest quantity of cotton is	
The country which produces the greatest quantity of petroleum is	
(o.)  The V-shaped Highland stretching in a great horse-shoe around Hudson Bay and
comprising more than half of the surface of Canada is called	
    This portion of Canada has supplied the world
with the greatest mines in existence of	
and	
(d.) The greatest commercial city of the United States is ,
situated at the mouth of the River.
The most important city in the southern part of the United States is	
 , situated on the	
The largest island of the West Indies is :     It is
under the protection of     The capital
is     Its two leading exports are	
and	
(e.)  The Atlantic terminus of the Trans-Andean Railway in South America is	
     The Pacific terminus is	
The most progressive country in South America is	
Its two leading industries are and	
The largest country in South America is	
Its capital is	
(f.)  The two., chief minerals of Great Britain are and	
Great Britain is the greatest manufacturing country in the world.    Manchester
is the centre of the industry.   Leeds is the centre
of the industry.   Birmingham is the centre of
the industry.
The greatest ship-building centre in the world is at	
on the river	
(g.) The capital of British India is	
The largest city in India is , situated at the
mouth of the ,	 Public Schools Report.
1926
Value.
The greatest sea-port on the West Coast of India is	
Two important exports of India are and	
(h.) The wealth of South Africa depends above all on its	
industry.    From South Africa comes almost half of the world's output of
 and practically the whole of the supply of	
The largest city in South Africa is , which is in
the centre of the district, in the	
(i.)   , situated in the ,
has been selected as the federal capital of Australia.
A dairy product shipped in large quantities from Australia to the British market
is	
The largest city in Australia is , in the state
of ,	
New Zealand has a cooler climate than Australia on account of	
and..
The capital of New Zealand is and the largest
city is , situated on Island.
11        2. Describe briefly either Siberia or China under the following headings :—
(a.)  Surface and drainage.
(6.) Climate.
(c.)  Principal products and exports.
(d.)  Cities.
32       3. On the accompanying map of Canada show and name the following:—
(a.) The 49th and the GOth parallels of latitude and the 120th meridian.
(6.) The following river systems:   (1) St. Lawrence;   (2) Nelson-Saskatchewan;
(3) Fraser;   (4) Mackenzie.
(c.)  The provinces with their capital cities.
((?.) The cities of Vancouver, Ottawa, Montreal, Nanaimo, Kelowna, and New
Westminster.
(e.)  The branches of the Canadian National Railway in British Columbia.
(/•) By printing neatly the name of each product in the proper place on the map,
indicate the localities where the following articles are the chief products
(two localities for each product) :   (1) Wheat;   (2)  Fruit;   (3)  Fish;
(4) Lumber;  (5) Coal. 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices. R 140
Public Schools Report.
1926
Value.
21
8
21
Grammar and Composition.    (Time, 2% hours.)
1. He that imagines he bath knowledge enough hath none.
When the spur touched him the horse sprang forward throwing the rider heavily to
the ground.
He who from zone to zone
Guides through the boundless sky thy certain flight,
In the long way that I must tread alone,
Will lead my steps aright.
I little thought what wealth the show to me had brought.
Before the sun rose Sir Victor had gathered his men around him and was ready for
the battle.
Give the subordinate clauses in the  above sentences  and  state the kind and the
relation of each clause.
2. London is the great mart of the world, to which the best and richest products are
brought from every land and clime, so that, if you have put money in your purse,
you may command every object of utility or fancy which groivs or is made anywhere without going beyond the city.
State the " part of speech " and the " relation " of each word given in italics in the
above sentence.
3. (a.)  Give the voice, tense, and class  (transitive or intransitive) of the verb phrases
in the following sentences:—
(a.) We shall now continue the story.
(6.) New methods have been adopted in recent years.
(c.) He has been working in the garden.
(d.) The greater part of the West coast is covered with forests.
(e.) He is leaving for his home in Alberta.
(/.) They had passed the village.
(6.) The plural
of radius is	
of memorandum is	
of valley is ,
of country is ,
of sheaf is ,
of oasis is ,
(c.)  The masculine
of widow is ,
of goose is	
of lass is , ,
of witch is ,
of niece is _..,
(d.) The comparative degree
of worst is ,
of hungry is	
of far is ,
of most severely is ,
of least likely is ,
4. Make the necessary correction in each of the following sentences:—
It don't seem possible.
It was me who came to see you.
I met a man who I had not seen for years.
I learned him to play golf.
He asked we boys to help him.
Father sent Walter and I to the store.
12 S-
■ '
17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 141
Value.
He takes everything too serious.
Have you ever saw his picture?
She likes to set by the window and read.
If one tries they can succeed.
The box of pens have disappeared.
The water in the lake is raising fast.
8       5. " Dear Sir,—I regret to inform you, Mr. Brown, that your son, Fred, was seriously
injured while playing football on the campus this afternoon.   Dr. Wilson says you
had better come at once as an operation is necessary."
Harry Johnston.
(a.)  Reduce the body of the above letter to a telegram of not more than ten wrords.
(6.)  Combine the following short statements into one well-formed sentence:—
He was a work-horse.    His colour was black.    One day he was going up a
hill.   He was pulling a load.   The load was heavy.   He slipped and fell.
One of his legs was broken.
12        6.  (a.)  In the following sentences, fill in all proper punctuation, capitals, and abbreviations, making corrections as in the example:—
O     B     S
Example:  old bill snipe carries a rabbits foot.
smiths office is at 372 Columbia street Vancouver.
j d burns and w r jones senior are keen aggressive resourceful business men
at dinner were mistress Johnson and reverend doctor Williams
here said he is this the book you wished
(6.) The following advertisement appeared in a Vancouver newspaper:—
WANTED—Ambitious young man  or  woman  for  position  as  book-keeper  in
rapidly growing business.   No experience necessary but first-class credentials
as to integrity and ability are required.   Progress Mfg. Co., 395 Princess St.,
Victoria.
Write an application for the position.
18       7. Write a story of about 20 lines on any one of the following topics :—
The Happiest Day I Can Remember.
Saved by a Dog.
A Camping Trip.
Penmanship and Dictation and Spelling.    (Time, l1/.. hours.)
(25 marks for Penmanship and 75 marks for Dictation and Spelling.)
[Note.—The Supervisor shall read Sections A and B to the, candidates three times—the first time
to enable them to gather the meaning; the second time, slowly and clearly in subsections as
marked by the bars, allowing all the candidates sufficient time to write the words; and the
third time for review. He should repeat words or phrases, when necessary, in order that
every candidate may hear distinctly. Punctuation marks should not be dictated. Candidates
are not permitted to rewrite the passages.]
16
25
A.
Strawberry Picking.
When the fruit is ripe I large numbers of women I and boys and girls I journey to the
fruit farms I to do the picking. I " How jolly," you exclaim, I " to do nothing I
but pick beautiful, | ripe strawberries I all day long! " | But I it is not | quite so
jolly a task | as it appears,] in spite of the fact I that the farmer j allows pickers j
to eat as miich fruit I as they like.l
B. It frequently occurs I that it is necessary I for the superintendent | and the board of
education I to give the public I detailed and specific information I concerning
needed  enlargements, | greater   financial   support   for   the  schools, I etc.     For Value.
14
20
example, I our larger cities I are all feeling the need I for increased revenues I
for permanent improvements I to the school plant. I School populations are
increasing, I and the consequent demands | on our public school facilities I are
likewise increasing. I This necessitates an educational campaign, land this in
turn I demands a special kind I of school report. I
C.  (a.)  An Atlantic current I bathes the coasts I of Great Britain and Ireland I in warm
water. I
(6.)  A curious but solemn ceremony I will precede the luncheon I on the eighth floor. I
(c.)  An   amendment   to   the   Act I will   permit I the   further   development I of   the
property. I
(d.)  By virtue of his office, I Caesar organized I several corps of cavalry I for his
campaign. I
(e.)  He endeavoured to persuade his associates I to release the traitor. I
(f.)  By this scheme I we shall be relieved I of immediate responsibility.!
(g.) Exercises develop I the muscles of the body.l
D. shrub
mourn (lament)
avoid
marriage
relieve
deceive
achieve
sceptre
haughty
parallel
metre
thermometer
paradise
fiery
dungeon
chauffeur (sho' fur)
monstrous
prairie
gymnasium
sieve
prejudice
reconcile
courteous
leisure
museum
suffice
conceive
lease
incense
cashier
noticeable
auxiliary
suffrage
gorgeous
excess
symbol
separator
alcohol
burial
athletic 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendi
R 143
APPENDIX C.
HIGH SCHOOL EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1926.
Value.
16
21
15
9
18
10
11
Grade IX.
Algebra.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1. (a.) Multiply 3a;42/ - 5x3y2 + x2y3 — yb by x3 — 3a.y2 - y3.
(6.) Divide 3x6 + 9a;5y - 5a.y - 29x3y3 + 3a.y + 25a;?/5 - 3y6 by x3 4- 3xhj - by3.
2. Simplify each of the following expressions :—
(a.)  \ 4a - [2a - (3« - 26) + 4a] - (46 - 6) }•
(c.)
4.e4y-8-<.62/2 + 12a.y
ix^y
(d.) (a2)(a3) + (a2f + (a3f.
(«■)   JlQp^- VWj^;
, „i  2x-y    5z2x . 21x2y3z2
(   ' l^*7lcy2~ i0xy2z '
3. Resolve into factors :—
(a.) x2+10cd+5cx + 2dx.
(6.) 6+16X-6.*.2.
(c.) a464+13a262-300.
4. For what value of n are the two quantities {'•§■ (5w - 7).- § (4n - 3) j- and ^ (27»i - 50)
equal *_
5. Solve the equations :—
6a. + l
(«•)
*!----2 = 5 (2a' +5) -5.
2        6 ;
(6.) 3a;+ 5^2/= 36
5x + 3|i/=26.
6. Write down the highest common factor and the lowest common multiple of :-
(a.) 3a664c and 6a365cf2.
(6.) 6a365<Z2 and 1562dV.
(c.) WbWc3 and 3a&Wc.
(d.) 3abb% 6a365<22 and 1562cZ7c3.
7. A has $10 less than B.    B has $4 less than three times the amount C has.
$30 less than A.    How much has each 1
C has Value.
6
8
10
10
10
14
14
14
14
1. Express
H
Arithmetic.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[All work must be shown.]
-? as a decimal.
1 :l
if
2. A cistern is 4 m. long, 24 dm. wide, and 80 cm. deep.    Find its capacity in litres.
3. (a.) A boy in the manual training class painted the surfaces of a 3-inch cube.   How
many square inches did he paint?
(&.) He then cut the cube into inch cubes.
(it.) How many of these inch cubes were painted on three sides?
(Z.)   How many of these inch cubes were painted on two sides?
(m.) How many of these inch cubes were painted on one side?
(».) How many of these inch cubes were not painted at all?
4. A grocer bought two sorts of tea at 55 cents and '61% cents per pound respectively.
He mixed them so as to have 3 pounds of the dearer for every pound of the
cheaper sort and sold the mixture at 80 cents per pound. What per cent, did
he gain?
5. The simple interest on a sum of money for 2 years at 5% is $84.   What is the
compound interest on the same sum for the same time at the same rate?
6. A building is assessed for % of its value, and the rate of taxation is 17% mills on
the dollar. What will be the amount of the tax, if it costs $52.50 to insure the
building for % of its value at 1%%?
7. Mr. Smith bought a lot for $1,200 and built a 4-apartment house upon it for $4,800.
The first year after it was built he rented one apartment for a year at $23 a
month, one for 8 months at $20 a month, one for a year at $20 a month, and one
for 10 months at $23 a month. He paid $75 for taxes and $69 for water and
insurance.   What rate per cent, did he make on his investment?
8. What annual income is derived from investing $4,147 in 3% stock at 72%?
9. $500.00. Victoria, March 19th, 1926.
Ninety days after date I promise to pay to the order of John Brown the sum of
Five Hundred Dollars with interest at 7% per annum, value received.
Thomas Smith.
This note was discounted at the bank on April 15, at 8%.    Find the proceeds.
Drawing.    (Time, 2 hours.)
(a.) Selections from Drawings.
[The time taken to collect these drawings is not to be deducted from the two hours allowed for
this paper.]
Select the following from the drawings you have made during the past year and write
your distinguishing number at the top right-hand corner of each. Before beginning
your drawing give these to the Examiner.
6       1. An example of nature-drawing in colour.
6       2. An example of shaded object-drawing.
6       3. An example of lettering.
6        4. An  example  of ornamental  design,  coloured  so  as  to  illustrate  the  principle  of
analogous harmony.
6       5. An example of ornamental design, coloured so  as  to illustrate the principle of
split-complementary harmony. • 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 145
Value.
35
(b.) Object-drawing.
Make a shaded pencil drawing of the table and bowl, shown in the cut below (omitting
the foliage so as to show the bowl empty), as they would appear to a spectator
about 4 feet to the left of the position from which they are seen in this picture.
35
(c.) Design.
From the picture of pine-cones and needles, given below, derive some simple decorative
forms and use these to enrich a square 7 inches wide. Name the article on which
your design might be used, the material of which it would be made, and the manner
of applying the ornament. Also write on the design the colours you would use in
the various spaces.
10 Value.
6
12
8
14
60
English Composition.    (Time, 2   hours.)
1. Choose from Group 2 the appropriate predicate for each of the subjects in Group 1:—
Group 1. Group 2.
A poor workman heeds no counsel.
Cheerful looks considers his beast.
An angry man attack the idle.
A merciful man do not always bear the most fruit.
The biggest trees never has good tools.
All temptations make every dish a feast.
m
2. Name and illustrate the chief uses of:—
(».) Capital letters.
(6.) The hyphen,
(c.) The apostrophe.
3. Rewrite the following, inserting the necessary capitals and punctuation marks:—
what is time
I asked an aged man a man of cares
wrinkled and curved and white with hoary hairs
time is the warp of life he said oh tell
the young the fair the gay to weave it well
4. Write a letter to a friend inviting him  (or her)  to spend a week of the summer
vacation with you.   Tell him (or her) what you will do to make the visit an
agreeable one.   Write the envelope address.
5. Write a composition of not more than two hundred words on one of the following
subjects:—
(1.) The Poem I Like Best in Narrative English Poems.
(2.)  A Devonshire Farm.    (Based on Lorna Doone.)
(3.)  David Balfour's Escape from the Sea.    (Kidnapped.)
(4.) A Football Game.
English Literature.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1-0       1. Quote ten consecutive lines from any poem studied during the year.
8       2.  (a.) Name four Canadian writers who have contributed poems assigned for study
for Grade IX. Literature.    In each case name a poem which the author
has written.
4 (o.)  What two American poets have contributed poems?    Give the name of the poem
written by each.
12       3. Give in your own words the story of one of the following:—
(a.)  The Prisoner of Chillon.
(6.) The Highwayman.
12       4. What are the characteristics of the Ballad as revealed in the poems which you.have
studied?   Give illustrative quotations.
12       5- Give in a few sentences the central theme of any three of the following poems:—
(a.)  The Red Fisherman.
(b.)  The Battle of Blenheim.
(c.)  Brignall Banks.
(d.)  Christmas at Sea.
(e.)  The Castaway.
10       6. Depict the character of the Woman in The Italian in England as she is revealed in
the poem. .
.
17 Geo.
5                      •            Part III.—Appendices.                                          R 147
Value.
-
16
7
Write a short account, about a page in length, of one of the following:—
(a.) The Kidnapping of David Balfour.
(6.) The Flight in the Heather,
(o.) David Balfour's First Visit to his Uncle Ebenezer.
16
8.
Write briefly on one of the following:—
(a.) The Counsellor's Visit to the Kidd Farm.
(6.)  John Ridd at London.
(c.)  The Character of John Ridd.
(d.) The Visit of John Ridd's Mother to Doone Valley.
French.    (Time, 2 hours.)
10
1.
Write the opposites of the following expressions: mauvais, loin, je m'assieds, grand,
nous ouvrons, peu, vous montez, le jour, en retard, il va.
10
2.
(a.) Put into the plural:—
11 se leve  il va au tableau noir, il prend la craie et il ecrit une phrase.    Tu
peux copier cette phrase.    Puis il unit le devoir.
10
(6.)  Put into the singular:—
Nous regardons par les fenetres, et nous voyons devant nous de vieux arbres.
Les enfants jouent quelquefois sous ces arbres.
5
3.
(a.)  Put the adjectives of Column A with the nouns of Column B :—
A.                                                                  B.
(1.)  une feuille mince                                              bras
(2.)  sa robe bleue                                                     yeux
(3.)  votre gros gateau                                             pommes
(4.)  le livre epais                                                     glace
(5.)  ce bel escalier                                                   soleil
6
(&.)  Put into French:—
(1.)  My pen is not as long as your pencil.
(2.)  Here are the prettiest flowers.
(3.)  Mary is younger than her brother.
5
(c.)  Put into French :—
(1.)   Several eggs.
(2.)  The twenty-first lesson.
(3.) A hundred sheep.
(4.) Enough tea.
(5.) All the horses.
8
4.
Put the bracketed infinitives into the correct forms:—
(a.)  Je (finir) ma legon.
(&.) Elle (descendre) dans le jardin.
(c.)   (Regarder)  tu dans ta salle de classe?
(d.)   (Etre) _l la maison a dix heures!
(e.) Je (s'appeler) Marie.
(f.) J' (entendre) la sonnette.
(g.) Vous (manger) votre dejeuner.
(h.) Tu (avoir) du pain. R 148
Public Schools Report.
1926
Value.
10
12
24
5. Complete the following sentences by filling in the spaces with suitable expressions:—
(o.)  Au printemps il fait .
(6.)  Je ne peux pas lever la grande table parceque .
(c.)  Voici les abeilles qui nous donnent  .
(d.)  Le fils du frere de ma mere est mon .
(e.)  Les Canadiens demeurent .
(/.)  Si je marche trop je suis en retard.
(_/.) Deux choses que je trouve dans ma poche sont:  .
(h.)  Je tiens mon crayon .
(i.)  Deux choses que je trouve dans la chambre k coucher sont: ■ .
(j.)  Georges a huit ans, Marie a six ans.    Elle est agee que Georges.
6. Here is part of a conversation between two school-boys.    Make up the remainder by
supplying Henry's answers, in complete sentences, to George's questions.
Georges:   Ou allez vous pour les vaeances?
Henri:
Georges: Qu'est ce que vous faites, en 6te?
Henri:
Georges:  Quels animaux y a-t-il a la ferme?
Henri:
Georges:   Quand rentrez-vous en ville?
Henri:
7. Translate into French :—
(a.) How are you?    Very well, thank you.
(6.)  To-day is Tuesday, June the tenth.
(c.)  It is a quarter to one and we have not much time.
(d.) We go from Vancouver to Victoria by boat.
(e.) I am going to play ball.
(f.)  My jersey is made of wool.
(g.) Don't you wear a jersey in winter?
(h.) We live in British Columbia.
General Science.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer six only.]
1. (a.)  Describe a mercurial thermometer, using a diagram to illustrate the corresponding centi
grade and Fahrenheit freezing and boiling points.
(6.) Convert the following Fahrenheit readings into the equivalent centigrade readings:
10° F., 98° F.; and the following centigrade readings into the equivalent Fahrenheit
readings:   -10°  C, 75°  C.
2. (a.) What are the essential parts of an electromagnet?
(6.)  Name and describe any common device employing an electromagnet for its operation.
3. (a.) "There are only two practical sources of electricity,  primary cells  and dynamos."
(Quotation from prescribed text.)    Describe the  construction and operation  of  a
primary cell, illustrating with a diagram.
(&.)  For "Vhat kinds of work are (i) primary cells, (ii) dynamos, especially suited?
(c.) What is meant by a "short" circuit? xEO.
'art
appendices.
R 149
4. (».) Clearly explain what is meant by buoyancy in liquids and gases.
(6.) A piece of oak wood density of which is .8 gram per cubic centimeter is placed in a vessel
of water.    What part of its volume will project above the surface of the water?
5. (a.)  Describe a hydraulic press, using a simple diagram to illustrate it.
(6.) If the area of the small piston of a hydraulic press is 36 square inches, and that of the
large piston 576 square inches, what pressure will be exerted by the large piston
when a weight of 75 pounds is placed upon the small piston?
6. (a.) Describe what is meant by  (i)  vegetative reproduction,  (ii)   sexual reproduction, as
found in plants, illustrating with an example of each.
(6.) Trace the development of the frog from the laying of the egg by the female to its adult
7. (a.) Name two stars and two planets and state three respects in which stars and planets differ.
C&.)  What instrument is used to determine the composition of a star?    Explain its use.
8. (a.) Clearly explain how plants absorb water from the soil.
(&.)  What is meant by  transpiration in  plants?    Name and describe,  with  the  aid of  a
diagram, the special cells in the leaves which regulate the amount of transpiration.
Value.
10
15
15
15
15
15
15
Geometry.    (Time, 2% hours.)
1. Two forts are situated 10 miles apart;  the guns of one fort have a range of 7 miles,
and those of the other a range of 6 miles.   Draw accurately a figure showing the
area exposed to the fire of both forts.    (Represent 1 mile by % inch.)
2. Draw a straight line perpendicular to a given straight line MN from a given point P
outside MN.    Give the proof of your construction.
3. The sum of the angles of a triangle is equal to two right angles.    (Letter the triangle
P, Q, R.)
4. Copy and fill in the following table:—
Angles of Regular Polygons.
No. of Sides.
No. of Degrees in an
Interior Angle.
No. of Degrees in an
Exterior Angle.
3
4
5
6
8
12
5. Through a given point P in a given straight line AB draw a line PQ, making with the
given line AB an angle equal to a given angle HKN.    Show method of construction, and give proof.
6. D is the mid-point of the side BC of a triangle ABC.   AD is produced to E so that
DE=AD.   Prove that EC=BA, and that EC and BA are parallel.
7. If the bisector of an angle of a triangle cuts the opposite side at right angles, the
triangle must be isosceles. R 150
Public Schools Report.
1926
Value.
20
20
20
3
20
4
20
5
History.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Answer any five questions.]
(a.) Name some of the chief tools of the Stone Age.
(&.)  What discovery lifted men from the old to the new Stone Age and in what way
did it do this?
(c.) How did farming probably begin?
(d.) What advantage over those who still remained hunters did farming give to those
who added that occupation to hunting?
(a.) What geographical features made the valley of the Nile a good place for the
growth of a civilization?
(6.)  Explain why there was a strong tendency towards unity among the people of the
Nile valley.
Outline briefly the stage of development reached by the Egyptians in farming, trade,
manufacture, and architecture.
Estimate the contribution of the Assyrians and Babylonians to the development of
civilization.
(a.)  Explain why the Phoenicians became the traders of the world.
(6.) Name some of  their chief colonies,  showing the  extensive  spread  of  their
colonization.
(c.)  How did the Hebrew kingdom compare with Egypt or Assyria in power?
(d.) What were the chief contributions of the Hebrews to world civilization?
(a.) Explain how geographical influences helped to divide Greece into many states.
(&.) What sense of kinship did these states have and what were the chief influences
causing this feeling?
(c.)  Indicate in a general  way the extent of the Greek  settlements  around the
Mediterranean.
(d.) Name some of the more important colonies.
(a.) Explain clearly why Marathon was one of the world's decisive battles.
(&.) Describe the part played by Themistocles in the defeat of Persia,
(a.) Outline briefly the Government of Athens in the time of Pericles.
(6.) Explain why Grecian power finally declined.
(«.) Explain clearly the nature of the three classes of Roman citizens, and the
difference between " citizens " and " subjects."
(6.)  How did this organization stand the strain of Hannibal's occupation of Italy?
(a.) Trace the growth of the capitalist class in Rome during the Punic Wars.
(6.) Explain how the rise of this class affected the Government and the small landowners of Italy.
20
20 7.
20 8.
20 9.
20 10.
Latin.    (Time, 2 hours.)
18       I- Decline together,  (1)  in the singular, bona mulier, communis solus, duplex fossa;
(2) in the plural, dextrum cornu, longum iter, altus portus.
Q       2. What is (1) a predicate nominative?   (2) an appositive?   Give examples in Latin.
4       3. What are the four ways of forming the perfect tense active in Latin?   Give an
example of each.
3        4. What are the principal parts of a verb?    Why are they so called?
7        5. Give the principal parts of:  eompleo, jubeo, cogo, gero, relinquo, cedo, expello.
Q       6. Write in the plural only, the future indicative active and the future perfect indicative
passive of moneo, rego, audio. lEO.
Part III.—Appendices.
R 151
Value.
7
9
15
25
7. Give the Latin for 9, 18, 27.    And give the ordinal numbers from 1st to 4th.
8. Compare facilis, nobilis, malus, multus, prior, superus.
9. Translate into English:—
(1.) Arnicitiae causa agros finitimis concedere non dubitabis.
(2.)  Ex equis ad pedes desiluerunt.
(3.)  Magnis itineribus ad flumen Tamesim hostes contendunt.
(4.) Fines latissimos habere videntur.
(5.)  Summa erat omnium rerum inopia.
10. Translate into Latin :—■
(1.) The previous winter he had collected very many war-ships and very large
forces.
(2.) On account of their signal valour they are the freest and noblest of the
citizens.
(3.) They will give five hundred hostages.
(4.) An attack was made by four hundred and twenty cavalry.
(5.) When I discover the reason, I shall despatch messengers to the neighbouring states. Grade X.
Agriculture.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer six only.]
1. What is meant by capillarity?   How can the farmer and the gardener affect the capillarity of
the soil?
2. Give an example of suitable rotation for a farm or a garden and explain why the land is to
be cropped in the order you mention.
3. Mention different species of nitrogen-gathering plants and describe the three kinds which are
of greatest economic importance to your own district.
4. Discuss any one farm- or garden-crop to be sold for seed, under the following headings:
(a) the choice and treatment of land;   (6) time and method of planting;   (c) care during
the growing season;   (d) harvesting and preparation for market.
5. How can one minimize loss of organic material and nitrogen in stable manure during storage?
6. Compare the outstanding characteristics of a dairy cow and a beef animal.
7. Prescribe housing and feeding methods  for a flock of 100 pullets  from  November 1st  to
March 1st.
8. Give the life-history of and suggest effective treatment for two of the most injurious insects
in your locality.
9. By what methods can a poultryman select his best breeders?
Value.
12
8
20
20
Algebra.    (Tinte, 2 hours.)
1. Bach of the following expressions is a perfect square :
25rtr4-30a;2y + A.
16a2-4B + 962.
7C-t-14m + ra2.
What is the value of each of the quantities A, B, C1
2. (a.) From the formula a = N/62 + c2 find the value of 6 when a = 29 and c = 20.
(6.) From the formula S = ut + \at2 find the value of u when S = 1710, £=10 and
a = 32.2.
3. Resolve into factors :—
(a.) I2 - I6(m - n)2.
(6.) Is + s3 + r2s + rs2.
(c.) h2-k2 + h + k.
(d.) a2b2 + c2d2 - b2c2 - a2d2 (four factors).
(e.) xi-32x2 + 2\
4. Solve the equations :—
(a.)  ^ _.*(«. +10)-(*-8)-
(6.) ix-3y-zr=3
y + 2z-5x=7
z + 3x-2y=U.
•_____!_ - 43
51        V
10        5. Simplify :—
62-c2
i      362
! 9	
- az + c-
10
)     (b-cf + a(b-c)
ab-b2 + bc"Y~     62 + 6c     j : a2-c2
6. Find the square root of xe - 6x4 - 22a.3 + 9x2+ 66a; + 121. 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 153
Value.
10
10
7. Find the lowest common multiple of ,r3 - 19a; + 30 and a;3 + 2x2 - 29a. + 42.
8. A bullet is fired from a rifle at a speed which would average 1,280 feet per second.
Six seconds later the marksman hears it strike the target. The velocity of
sound is 1,120 feet per second. Find the distance of the marksman from the
target.
1.
Arithmetic.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[All work must be shown.]
3. yJ-
o
SZ  Yd.
Find the perimeter of this lot.
10       2. In a park is a circular flower-bed 10 ft. in diameter, surrounded by a path 3 ft. wide.
How many cubic feet of gravel will be required to cover this path to the depth of
3 inches?
10       3. How many kilograms are there in a bar of gold 10 cm. long, 30 mm. wide, and 25 mm.
thick, gold being 19.36 times as heavy as water?
10       4. A farmer's roller is 6 ft. 3 in. long and 2% ft. in diameter.   Find the area of the
surface passed over in making 140 complete revolutions.
16 5. The manufacturer of an article sold to the retail dealer, making a gain of 25%. The
retail dealer sold the article, making a gain of 30%. Find the cost to the manufacturer of an article for which the retail dealer charged $91.
16 6. On August 7 a merchant buys hardware to the amount of $S50, with discounts of
20% and 10%, and paints to the amount of $1,360, with discounts of 25% and 15%.
An extra discount of 5% is to be allowed if the bill be paid within 10 days. How
much will settle both accounts on August 15?
16 7. Five men contributed equally the $80,000 necessary to build a business block. The
total receipts for the first year were $12,200. The expenses were: Insurance,
% of the value of the building at %% ; taxes, $16.50 per thousand on a valuation
of $70,000; janitors' services, $1,380; other expenses, $1,615. What per cent,
did each man make on his-investment?
16 8. Mr. Brown bought 125 shares of stock at 102%, and after receiving one quarterly
dividend of 1%%, sold them at 106%. Allowing brokerage, %%, in each case,
how much did he gain?
Botany.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[All questions are of equal value.   Answer five only.   Illustrate your ansioers
by carefully-drawn diagrams.]
1. Name, describe, and give examples of five modifications of plant parts for the purpose of food
storage.
2. Describe the condition of a deciduous tree during a temperate winter, referring especially to
the buds, leaves, leaf-scars, and stored food.
3. Make diagrams to show the structure of a flower belonging to   (a)  the Liliaceai,   (6)   the
Leguminosse.   Choose specific examples and label fully. 4. Name and describe, with examples, the various kinds of fleshy fruits and of dry dehiscent
fruits.
5. (a.) Explain clearly what is meant by transpiration.
(6.) Through what avenues does transpiration take place?
(c.)  Describe briefly the  various  modifications  in plant  structure  which  help  to  prevent
excessive transpiration.
6. Describe and give examples of the adaptations in seeds which aid in their dispersal.
Chemistry.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Value.
10       1.  ('<*•)  Outline a laboratory method for preparing hydrogen chloride.    Illustrate with a
diagram and write the equation.
5 (&.)  Enumerate the chief chemical properties of hydrogen chloride.
10       2.  (a.) Clearly distinguish between acid, base, salt.   Give an example of each and write
its formula.
"7 (6.)  Write a short note on the action of metals on acids, illustrating your answer by
one example.
12       3. Describe a test for each of the following substances : oxygen; carbon dioxide; hydrogen.
-7       4.  (a.)  Outline a laboratory method for preparing pure nitrogen.
4 (6.)  Give the chief physical properties of nitrogen.
*Y (c.) What evidences are there for considering air a mixture and not a chemical
compound?
4        5.  (a.)   State Gay-Lussac's Law of Volumes.
6 {b.)  When 300 cc. of hydrogen burn in chlorine, how many cubic centimeters of
hydrogen chloride are produced,  measured at the same temperature and
pressure?
12        6. Write an equation to illustrate each of the following types of chemical reaction and
indicate the name of each substance taking part in the reaction:  simple decomposition ;   simple replacement;   oxidation;   reduction.
7. Describe what takes place in each of the following and write the equations  (two
in each case) :—
8 (a.) A lighted taper is brought to the mouth of a jar of carbon monoxide and
after all action has ceased lime-water is added and shaken up.
8 (6.) The end of a coil of iron-ribbon tipped with sulphur is ignited in a flame and
then lowered into a jar of oxygen.
English Composition.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1"1       1. Use the following words correctly  in  sentences:   healthy,  healthful,  wholesome;
luxurious, luxuriant;   notorious, notable;   among, between;   invent, discover.
8       2. State what is wrong with the following sentences and show how to improve them :—
(1.) The admiration of this poem was unanimous.
(2.) Put one of the pills in a little water and swallow it three times daily before
meals.
(3.) Five score people were no joke to feed.
(4.) Night air, together with draughts, are the bugbear of many people. .EO.
APPENDICES.
R 155
Value.
6
75
3. Write after each of the following verbs at least four adverbs which carry out the idea
suggested by the words enclosed in parentheses:—
(1.) The boy whistled (as though he were happy).
(2.) The man worked (as a good workman works).
(3.) The wind howled (as it does during a storm).
4. Write a composition of about two hundred words on one of the following subjects :—
A Day in the Life of the Village Preacher.    (Based on The Deserted Village.)
The Scottish Archers.    (Quentin Durward.)
The Roman Mob.    (Based on Julius Caesar.)
My Favourite Winter Sport.
10
2
6
2
7
4
2
10
English Literature.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Candidates will anstver Section A and any two of Sections B, C, D.]
Section A. Narrative English Poems.
1. Quote ten consecutive lines from one of the following:—
(a.)  The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
(b.)  The Passing of Arthur.
2. (a.)  Who is the author of each of the poems referred to in question 1?
(B.) Name three poets of to-day who have contributed poems assigned for study for
Grade X. Literature, in each case naming a poem of the author in question.
3. Write full notes of explanation on any three of the following passages :—
(a.)   Shakespeare was of us, Milton was for us,
Burns, Shelley, were with us,—they watch from their graves!
He alone breaks from the van and the freemen,
He alone sinks to the rear and the slaves!
(&.)  The sequel of to-day unsolders all
The goodliest fellowship of famous knights
Whereof this world holds record.
(c.) From the great deep to the great deep he goes.
(d.)  So spake he, clouded with his own conceit.
4. (a.)  What was the sin of The Ancient Mariner?
(b.) Discuss in some detail how the Mariner suffered the consequences of his wrongdoing.
(c.) Trace the steps whereby he obtained forgiveness.
(d.) What is the moral of the poem?
5. Write a paragraph on one of the following topics:—
(a.) Coleridge's  Use of Figures  of  Speech.
(&.)  Wordsworth, the Poet of Humanity,
(c.)  Tennyson's Descriptions of Nature.
6. Give briefly what you consider to be the central theme of any two of the following
poems:—
(a.)  Goblin Market.
(&.) Fidelity.
(c.)  The Stone. R 156
Public Schools Report.
1926
Section B. Julius Caesar.
Value.
10
10
10
10
10
*
10
1.
We will find of him a shrewd contriver."    In the light of succeeding events show
that this estimate of the character of Antony was an accurate one.
2. Write on one of the following:-—
(a.) Discuss the means used by Decius Brutus to persuade Julius Caesar to go
to the Senate House on the day of his assassination.
(&.)  Shakespeare's Use of the Supernatural in Julius Caesar.
Section C.    Quentin Durward.
1. Write a carefully written paragraph on The Treachery of Louis XL
2. Write a brief account of one of the following:—
The Boar-Hunt.
The Journey of the Ladies of Croye under the Escort of Quentin Durward.
Section D. Specimens of the Short Story.
1. What do you consider the lesson to be learned from Hawthorne's story, The Great
Stone Face?
2. Write on one of the following:—
(a.)   Show wherein Phil Fogarty is a burlesque on such stories as it was intended
to ridicule.
(&.)  Discuss the principle of Climax in The Short Story, contrasting the use made
of it in Markheim and in The Purloined Letter.
French.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1.  (a.) Write the verbs of the following passage in the present tense, using "je" as
subject, and making any other necessary changes :—
II allait a l'ecole tous les jours.    II s'asseyait sx sa place, puis il ouvrait
son cahier et se mettait au travail.    II apprenait Ie frangais, et il lisait
un livre interessant.    A inidi il revenait chez lui pour son dejeuner.
(&.) Replace the verbs in italics of the following passage by the past indefinite
tense:—
Ce matin je dire " Au revoir " a, ma mere et je partir.    En allant h l'ecole
je voir quelques amis.    Je faire tous mes devoirs en classe et apres
l'ecole je alter avec un camarade faire une promenade sur 1'eau.   Nous
s'amuser bien.
(c.)  Rewrite the following sentences adding the expressions given in brackets, and
making necessary changes in the verb tenses:—
(1.)  II se depeche (S'il etait en retard).
(2.)  Nous remplirons nos devoirs (A present).
(3.)  Elle regoit beaueoup de lettres (Autrefois).
(4.) II volt beaueoup de choses interessantes.    (Quand il visitera ces autres
pays.)
(5.)  Vous avez assez de temps pour faire cela.    (Demain.)
(d.)  Put the correct terminations to the words in italics in the following:—
(1.)  Voulez-vous nous pass— les cerises?    Qui les a mang—f
(2.) Avez-vous fin— vos devoirs?
(3.)  Quels legumes les marchands ont-ils vend—.
(4.)  En ouvr— la porte, avant d' entr— dans 1'ScoIe, il enlSve sa casquette. 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 157
Value.
7
8
10
12
30
2.  (a.)   Substitute personal pronouns for the words in italics:—
(1.)  Donnez-moi du raisin.
(2.) II voit les bicyclettes.
(3.) C'est Vediteur qui a envoye ces livres a ses amis.
(4.) II ne repond pas a mes questions.
(5.) .Elle est assise derriere ses soeurs.
(6.)  II est plus agreable que ses freres.
(6.)  Fill in the spaces with suitable relative pronouns :—
(1.)  Le mouchoir — vous aviez perdu 6tait sur la table.
(2.) C'est  le  professeur  —  nous   enseigne   l'arithmetique,   et   a.  —  nous
donnons nos cahiers.
(3.)  C'est la maison — j'ai parle.
(4.)  Voici le magasin devant — il a trouve Ie porte-monnaie.
(c.)  Fill in the spaces with suitable interrogative pronouns:—
(1.) — arrivera demain?    Mon fils!
(2.) est amusant?   Ce livre-ci.
(3.) En — est votre crayon?   En bois.
(d.) Make up sentences in French, using the following words : (1) rien; (2) plusieurs;
(3)  celui;   (4)  c'est.
3. Name the following in French, using an article,  and giving the English for each
word:—
(a.) two wild animals.
(&.)  two birds.
(c.)  two vegetables.
(d.) two fete days.
(e.)  two articles of clothing.
4. Write a sentence in French about each of four of the following people, telling what
they do:—
(a.)  la cuisiniei'e.
(&.)  le libraire.
(c.)  le medecin.
(<_..)  le charpentier.
(e.)  la couturiere.
(/.)  le jardinier.
(fir.)  le marin.
(h.)  le laboureur.
5. Translate into French the following conversation:~-.
Henry:  John, wake up !    It is half-past eight, and breakfast is ready.    Have you
forgotten that to-day is a holiday and we are going to have a long motor ride
this morning?
John:   When I went to bed last night I was thinking of this and I did not go to
sleep at once.   That is why I did not wake sooner.   What is there for
breakfast?
Henry:   Fruit, boiled eggs, and coffee.    Mary is toasting some bread now.    Get
dressed quickly!   We shall be late.
John:   I hope it doesn't rain.
Henry : Oh no!   It is a beautiful day, and as soon as you are ready we shall start.
(pret: ready.) Public Schools Report.
Geometry.    (Time, 2% hours.)
Value.
14       1. The bisectors of two opposite angles of a parallelogram are parallel.
14 2. Of all the straight lines that can be drawn to a given straight line from a given point
outside it, the perpendicular is the shortest.
14 3. Construct accurately a triangle ABC from the data here given. Prove your construction.
JB
14       4- Any two sides of a triangle are together greater than the third side.
14       5- Find a point on the base of a scalene triangle equidistant from the two sides.   Prove
your construction.    Is this the middle point of the base?    Give the reason for
your statement.
14       6. What is the locus of a point which is equidistant from two fixed points P and Q?
Give a proof of your statement.
16        7. In the diagram, ABC is a triangle right-angled at B, AHKB, BMNC, and CQPA are
squares, and BEF is drawn parallel to CQ.    Prove that the rectangle ECQF is
equal to the square BMNC.
History.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Answer any five questions.]
20        1- Outline briefly the reforms made by Julius Caesar in the Roman state during the
years immediately prior to his assassination.
20       2.  (a.)  Describe what the early Roman emperors did in developing highways, commerce,
architecture, and education.
(6.) Contrast   this   development   with   conditions   in   Europe   during   the   period
400-800 a.d. 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 159
Value.
20
20
20
20
20
20
3. (a.)  Outline the main causes of the decline of the Roman Empire.
(&.)  Show how the long existence of the Roman Empire was of great importance to
the growth and organization of Christianity.
4. (a.)  Show how the growth of Mediaeval towns was helped by the Crusades.
(6.) Write on Mediaeval town life.
5. (a.) What do you understand by "The Renaissance"?
(6.)  Trace briefly some of its early developments in Art, Religion, and Science.
6. Show the importance of Magna Charta, The Petition of Right, and the Bill of Rights
in the development of free institutions in England.
7. (a.) Write briefly on the teaching of Calvin and its results.
(&.)  Show how the Roman Catholic Church was able to maintain its hold on the
south of Europe after the Reformation.
8. (a.) Explain the work of Voltaire and Rousseau in preparing the French people for
the Revolution.
(&.)  Write briefly on the character, abilities, and aims of Napoleon.
Latin.    (Time, 2 hours.)
12       1- Give the genitive and ablative singular and genitive plural of the following:   opus,
cornu, animal, obses.
Q       2. Decline in singular: res justa; rex fidelis; in plural: princeps monens.
6       3. Compare:  acer, gracilis, audax, multus, parvus, utilis.
4 4. Express in Latin: five hundred hostages; forty-three towns; thirty-five soldiers.
2        5. Distinguish in meaning:  is, ille, ipse, hie.
6        6. Decline in combination:   eadem res publica incolumis.
5 7. Write out the imperative active of:  scribe, teneo, nolo, fero, eo.
9       8. Give the principal parts of capio, peto, ago, verto, consulo, adeo; and give the present
indicative, first person, singular of ausus sum;  the imperfect subjunctive of fio;
and perfect indicative of possum.
35       9. Translate into Latin:—
(a.) Having pitched their camp, they determined to await Caesar's arrival.
(&.)  They promise that they will do all this.
(c.)  He wrote that he had abundance of corn and cattle.
(d.) How large is the swiftest of your ships?
(e.) He asked where the rest of the troops were.
(/.)  He has been unable to persuade me.
(g.)  Since he could not overtake the army, he recalled the cavalry.
15      10. Translate into English:—
Ancoris jactis, Ulixes constituit nonnullos e sociis in terram exponere, qui aquam
ad navem referrent et qualis esset natura ejus regionis cognoscerent.   Hi
igitur e navi egressi imperata facere parabant.    Dum tamen fontem quaerunt,
quidam ex incolis occurrunt atque hospitio acceperunt.   Accidit autem ut
miro quodam fructu quern lotum appellabant hi homines viverent.   Quern
cum  Graeci  gustavissent,  patriae  et  sociorum  statim  obliti,  afflrmaverunt
semper se in ea terra mansuros, ut dulci illo cibo in perpetuum fruerentur.
Account for mood of referrent; esset.
parabant—give force of tense.
fructu—account for case. R 160
Public Schools Report.
1926
Physics.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Anstoer five only.]
What causes the flow of water from a force-pump to be continuous and not intermittent?
Draw a sketch or diagram to explain the action of a pump for inflating a bicycle or
1. (a.)
(o.)
(c.)
2. (a.)
(6.).
3.
(a-)
(o.)
4.
(a.)
(o.)
5.
(a.)
(W
(c.)
6.
(a.)
(6.)
(OL)
7.
(a.)
(6.)
automobile tire.
A bar of iron is placed near the N-pole of a bar-magnet. What is the effect on the lines
of force in the magnetic field?    Illustrate by a drawing.
What is a machine? Name the simple machines known as the mechanical powers.
Show the position of the fulcrum and the force applied when sugar-tongs are used?
A man weighing 160 pounds lifts a weight of 90 pounds by means of a single fixed pulley
together with a single movable pulley. Draw a diagram illustrating the arrangement. What force does the man exert on the rope? What advantage is gained from
each pulley? When pulling up the weight what pressure does the man exert on the
floor?
Describe an experiment to determine the buoyant force which a liquid exerts on an
immersed body.
A cube of glass hanging by a string is half immersed in water. What is the tension on
the string if the cube weighs 13 kilograms in the air and the specific gravity of glass
is 2.6?
What is the purpose of the barometer? Describe the construction of any barometer in
common use.
State Boyle's Law and apply it in solving the following problem: A steel tank contains
1.9 cubic metres of oxygen gas at a pressure of 745 mm. How many litres will this
gas occupy when the pressure is 760 mm., the temperature remaining unchanged?
Describe the laboratory method of establishing the law of reflection. Illustrate by a
sketch.
Explain regular and irregular reflection and give two examples of each. How is visibility
affected by each?
A pin-hole camera 9 inches long is used to photograph a flag-pole 72 feet high.    If the
image is 3% inches high how far is the camera from the pole?
Explain clearly any one of the following:   compensated pendulum;   "thermos" bottle;
Davy safety lamp.
What reading on the Fahrenheit thermometer corresponds to -15° C. ?
If 40 grams of a metal are heated to 100° C. and then placed in 47 grams of water at
73° O, the resulting temperature is 75° C.    Find the specific heat of the metal.
What is the use of each of the following:  Electroscope;  Galvanoscope; Ley den Jar?
Draw a diagram illustrating a closed electric circuit with a battery of voltaic cells in it
arranged in series.    Indicate the direction of the current.    How would you use the
current to magnetize a darning-needle? .
17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 161
Grade XI., Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance.
Agriculture.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer seven only.]
1. Discuss the active principles of different kinds of sprays used by the orchardist and the
gardener.
2. What causes deterioration of milk, and how can we lengthen its " period of usability " ?
3. How do natural and artificial incubation compare with each other?
4. By what methods can the dairyman increase the production of his herd?
5. Given sufficient quantities of and choice between stable manure and artificial fertilizers, how,
and in what quantities, would you apply them in the following garden rotation:—
(1.)  Cabbage plants (cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts) ;
(2.)  Roots (beets, carrots, parsnips) ;
(3.)  Legumes (peas, beans) ;
(4.) Potatoes?
6. Describe the two main divisions of common weeds and suggest practical methods for their
extermination.
7. What are the five most valuable constituents in barnyard manure?
8. Discuss different ways in which the farmer or gardener can promote bacterial activity in
the soil.
9. What are the functions of water in the soil, and under what conditions is water beneficial
or harmful?
Value.
12
Algebra.    (Time, 2% hours.)
1.  (a.) Factor:—
(1.) x3-6a;2 + 12a:-8.
(2.) 24aa;-16a2-9a.2.
(3.) x2y + 3xy2 — 3a;3 - y3.
(6.) Supply the missing term so as to make a perfect square :-
n*nn%
(1.) 9mV-( ) + 4.
(2.) 25a.2 + 30a;-)-( ).
12
2.  Simplify:-
(1.)
(2.) 1
4a2
4a + 1     2a2 + a
x
4a2 - 1       8a3 - 1
3 +
14
ii
(a.) Solve: .05a; - 1.82 - .7* = .008a;- .504.
(6.) The pressure of water on a pipe that will not burst the pipe is called the safe
working pressure.    In cast-iron pipes, such as carry water in a city water-
system, the safe working pressure is given by the formula
7200/        1-.01D)   _100    '
D    V 3      /
in which P = the pressure per square inch,
D = the inside diameter of the pipe in inches,
T  = the thickness of the iron shell in inches.
Given D = 3 ft., T= If in., find P. Value.
12
12
14
12
12
4. A man receives $140 per year as interest on $2,500.    $500 is invested at 5%;
part of the remainder at 5£%, and the rest at 6%.    How much has he
invested at 5J%?
5. Solve:  2a:2-a.y=28
a.2+2y2 = 18.
6. (a.) A boy can row 10 miles down stream in 2 hours and return in 3J hours.    Find
the rate at which he rows in still water and also the rate of the current.
(6.) Find two numbers whose difference is 4 and the sum of whose reciprocals is f.
4.71+1 8"+1
7. Simplify : ; u 3
2n(4:n~1)n    (4»-H)»-i
8. (a.) If a, b, c, d are in continued proportion, prove that (b + c) is a mean propor
tional between (a 4- 6) and (c + d).
(6.) Solve graphically: x2 + y2= 100
x - y = 2.
Botany.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[All questions are of equal value.   Answer five only.   Illustrate your
answers by carefully drawn diagrams.]
1. Describe the adaptions in flowers for (a) wind pollination;   (6) insect pollination;   (c) cross
pollination.   Give one example to illustrate each adaption described.
2. Make diagrams and give floral formula, to illustrate the structure of a flower belonging to:
(a) Liliacese;   (&) Leguminosffi;   (c)  Scrophulariacese;   (<_) Cruciferse.
3. Sketch the life-history of a moss and of a fern, making clear what is meant by the " alterna
tion of generations."
4. Compare the subterranean absorbing system of a plant with the aerial absorbing system in the
following particulars:   (a)  materials absorbed;   (6)  regions through which absorption
-    takes place;   (c) methods of absorption;   (d) uses of the materials absorbed.
5. Trace the development of an ovule into a seed, describing the function of the pollen grain,
stigma, style, micropyle, and embryo sac.
6. Compare  the  fruits of  the  pea,   buttercup,   cherry,   apple,   and   strawberry   in   respect  to
(a) structure;   (6) origin of parts;   (c) method of seed dispersal.
Value.
16
14
14
Chemistry.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1. State the law of definite proportions and the law of multiple proportions, and show
how each is explained by the atomic theory.
2. Describe, with equations, one method for the manufacture of sulphuric acid.   What
are the properties and uses of this substance?
3. Give an account of chlorine under the following headings:—
(a.) Laboratory preparation;
(6.) Physical properties;
(c.) Chemical properties;
(d.) Commercial importance. 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 163
Value.
14       4. Explain clearly what is meant by each of the following terms and give one example
of each:   anhydride, catalyst,  chemical  equilibrium,  molar weight,  exothermic
reaction, synthesis, acid radicle.
14        5.  (a.)  Name five characteristic properties of aqueous solutions of acids.
(6.)  Name four characteristic properties of aqueous solutions of bases,
(c.)  Mention  four  distinct methods  of  salt  formation.    Give,   with  equation,  one
example of each method.
14       6. What weight of acetylene can be prepared from 6.4 grams of pure calcium carbide?
What volume does the dry gas occupy at 27° C. and 380 mm. pressure?
14       7. If 1 gram of copper powder is burned in chlorine the powder gains in weight 1.116
grams.    What is the percentage composition of copper chloride?    What  is its
simplest formula?
Atomic weights:   H = l, Ca = 40, C = 12, Cu = 63.6, Cl=35.5, 0 = 16.
English Composition.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Candidates are reminded that they are expected to spell and punctuate correctly.    They are
therefore urged to leave some few minutes free for a revision of their papers.   They are
also reminded that they cannot expect marks for paragraphs and essays that are not well
organized and well worked out.    They are therefore urged to plan their compositions before
they begin to write.   The plan of the essay in question 2 should be written in the examination
book as part of the answer.]
20        1- Point out definitely what is faulty in the following sentences, and rewrite them in
correct form:—
(a.)  When I saw him wavering and that his skate was loose, I knew he would
fall.
(&.)  She was not only happy over his victory but also over the defeat of his rival,
(c.) As his wife, her every wish was granted.
(d.) The exercise keeps you in condition and a fellow can study better.
80       2. Draw up a plan and write an essay of at least 300 words on one of the following
topics :■—
(a.) The Character of Leicester as presented in Kenilworth.
(b.)  Silas   Marner's   Early  Environment:    its  Nature  and  its  Effect  on  his
After-life,
(c.)  " The Nelson Touch " or The Secret of Nelson's Power.
(d.) Life in Arden.
(e.) The Character of King Arthur's Court as presented in Gareth and Lynette.
(/.)  The Characteristics of My Favourite Book.
English Literature.    (Time, 2% hours.)
[N.B.—Candidates will write on Parts A and D, and on either Part B or Part 0.1
Part A.
Choose one of the poets you have studied in Poems of the Romantic Revival, and write
on his work as indicated below. Your answers must be illustrated by quotations
from, or definite references to, the poems studied.
6       1. Show your poet's relation to the Romantic Revival.
R       2. Point out at least two ways in which the circumstances of his life affected his writing. R 164
Public Schools Report.
1926
Value.
10       3. Make a comparison, on at least two points, between his work and the work of one of
his contemporaries.
16 4. Quote at least 12 consecutive lines from his verse and show at least two ways in which
they are characteristic of his work in general.
Part B.
6        1. List half  a  dozen  words  or  expressions  that  have  changed  their  meaning  since
Shakespeare's day and state what they meant to Shakespeare.
17 2. Write a short essay on the variety of the interests that The Merchant of Venice
arouses in the reader or play-goer.
17       3. Illustrate clearly three points in the character of  Shylock  by quotation  from  or
discussion of as many passages in the play.
Part C.
6        1. List half  a  dozen  words  or  expressions  that  have  changed  their  meaning  since
Shakespeare's day and state what they meant to Shakespeare.
17       2. What was the attitude of Shakespeare's audience toward witches and witchcraft?
What is your own attitude toward them?    What purposes do they serve in the
.   . play of Macbeth?
17        3. Write on Macbeth as a study in character decay.    Trace clearly the successive stages
of that decay.
Part D.
20        The  following poem  is  given  as  an  exercise  in   " sight-reading."    Of  the  questions
appended below, answer (1) and (2) and any two of the others.
Dirge in Woods.
A wind sways the pines,
And below
Not a breath of wild air;
Still as the mosses that glow
On the flooring and over the lines
Of the roots here and there.
The pine-tree drops its dead;
They are quiet, as under the sea.
Overhead, overhead
Rushes life in a race
As the clouds the clouds chase;
And we go,
And we drop like the fruits of the tree,
Even we,
Even so.
1. Describe the situation in which the poet finds himself as the idea of the lines comes
to him:  the place he is in, the time of year, etc.
2. Point out a contrast, as to the movement of things, that is presented in the poem.
What words or phrases bring out this contrast especially well?    What contrast
in the life of the human race is symbolized in the poem?
3. Comment on the suggestions conveyed by wild, gloio, flooring, tinder the sea.
4. Point out two cases of " sound suiting sense."
5. What is a " dirge"?    Why is this a fitting title for the piece? 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 165
Value.
20
12
20
10
30
French Grammar.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1. Explain,  in  French,  the following words:      le  rhume;   le cavalier;   l'acteur;   le
parterre;   Ie bachelier ;   l'estrade;   le depute;   le port;   l'usine;   Ie tonnerre.
2. Complete the following sentences by putting the verbs, printed in italics, in the tense
required by the context:—
(a.)   Ses manigres affeetees ne m'ont pas plaire.
(b.)  Mon petit lapin mourir hier.
(c.)  II conduire son automobile une seule fois avant l'accident du mois dernier.
(d.)  Nous avons toujours vivre de notre travail.
(e.)  Je s'ennuyer quand je n'ai rien a faire.
(f.)  Est-ce que vous venir demain?
(g.) Nous le connaitre depuis deux ans.
(h.)  II arriva apres qu'elle sortir.
3. Change  the words  in  italics,   if  necessary,  so  as  to  make  them  agree  with  the
context:—
Les cheval sont alter a l'ecurie car les travail des champs sont finir pour  la
journee.    Dans les champs qu'ils ont labourer on  alter planter des  chou.
Ces animal aimer k manger le foin, qui est de l'herbe sec et quand ils ont
manger ils se reposent.
4. Write sentences in French, using the following verbs so as to illustrate the use of
the tenses marked after them:  dire (pres. subj.) ;  lire (past def.) ;   ouvrir (past
part.) ;  pleuvoir (fut. indie.) ;  vouloir (cond. pres.).
5. Put into French :—
We shall go for a walk.
You are lucky.
I should like to make the acquaintance of M. Durand.
Water cannot do you any harm.
You are right.
6. Put into French :—
He will be back in an hour and I can ask him for some. I shall be happy to help
you and we can begin to work if you wish to make the boat. There is
enough wood to make two. I remember the one we made some years ago.
We succeeded in building a splendid boat. It is quite as good as theirs and
it is about twice as big. We shall work in the open air because it is healthier.
Since the work will be rather noisy we shall do it in the open country and
as soon as possible.    This boat will be the best you ever saw.
French Translation.    (Time, 2 hours.)
35 1. Write a letter, in the first person, to M. Jean Dupont, 42 Rue Poulbot, Paris,
describing a visit to the country. Use the following material. Sign your name
" T. Brown " and give your address at 326 Hastville Street, Vancouver. Do not
use your real name and address.
You have just come back from a month's holiday in the country. The turf was
very green and the cherry-trees in flower. The uncultivated ground was
covered with ferns and in the clearings of the forest there were wild strawberries.* Unfortunately George tried to climb a maple tree, fell from a
branch and hurt his face. Your bicycle was very useful on this occasion
for you had to fetch a doctor. You were lucky to find him at home. George
is now quite well again but the scar can still be seen. You asked your father
for some books and you gave them to George to amuse him after his accident.
* Say straicberries of the icoods. R 166
Public Schools Report.
Value.
40
25
He asked whether he should send them to you by post but you replied that it
was not worth while. He is going to bring them himself, to-day week, and
you will go to the station to meet him. He often speaks of M. Dupont and
of the pleasant stay at his house in Paris.
2. Treat two of the following in French, about a page for each :—
(a.)  Comment voulez-vous gagner votre vie—ou vous rendre utile—quand vous
aurez termine vos etudes?
(6.)  Expliquer fl. un Frangais ce qu'on fait pour celebrer Hallowe'en,
(c.)  Expliquer 3. un Frangais comment on joue au basketball.
(d.) Faites la description de votre salle a manger.
3. Put into English :—
Je ne saurais oublier le spectacle a l'embouchure du fleuve. Les bateaux de
pgche toutes voiles deploy&es* avaient quitte Ie quai et, entoures de mouettes
qui les suivaient, descendaient lentement vers la mer. Un navire a voiles,
aussi modeste qu'il soit, me parait toujours imposant. Parmi les vagues ils
ont 1'air de hitter et les grandes lames ne les effrayent pas. Les hommes k
bord ne craignent pas le naufrage. Ils sont sfirs de leurs camarades; ils ont
confiance dans leur bateau, et ils veillent toujours. Ils sont tellement occupes
qu'iis ne voient pas le danger. Peut-etre leurs femmes y pensent-elles
davantage car elles entendent le vent, et la mer qui bat les cotes. Le gardien
du phare les rassure et tout le village est en fete quand on voit au loin les
bateaux qui reviennent charges de morue.
* Spread.
Geometry.    (Time, 2% hours.)
[N.B.—Draw neat diagrams;  use printed capitals.
enunciation.]
1. Make accurate constructions of the following
showing all the necessary construction lines :—
10 (a.) On a chord 1% inches long construct a segment of a circle containing an
angle equal to the given angle A.
Cite authorities by number or by
omitting explanations or proofs but
10
5
15
15
4.
(6.)  Describe a triangle ABC having AB = 2V4 in., BC = 2 in., and AC = 1 in.
Bisect the angle A internally and externally by lines which cut BC and
BC produced.
Compute the lengths of the segments into which BC, in the preceding question, 1 (&),
is divided by the internal and external bisectors of the angle A.
(a.) ABC  is  a  triangle having BC=a,  CA=&,  AB=c.    State  which  is greater,
a2 or V+(f, and by how much they differ in the following cases: (1) A = 90°;
(2)  A=80°;   (3) A=110°.    Illustrate with diagrams.
(6.)  Prove your statement in 3 (a) when A=110°.
(a.) Prove the theorem:   If two chords intersect within a circle the rectangle contained by the segments of one is equal to the rectangle contained by the
segments of the other.
(6.) Is this theorem true when the point of intersection, mentioned in 4 (a), lies on
or without the circumference?    Give reasons. 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 167
Value.
15       5. ABCD is a cyclic quadrilateral whose diagonals AC and BD intersect at E.    A circle
is drawn through ABE.    Prove that the tangent at E is parallel to CD.
15        6. On a given base construct a triangle having a given vertical angle and its sides in
the ratio 3 : 2.
15       7. Show how to trisect a given square by straight lines drawn parallel to one of .its
diagonals.
German Grammar.    (Time, 2 hours.)
10 1.  Give with the article the nominative and genitive singular and the nominative
plural of the following nouns: spicttj, Seller, 2KenfdE), (Stabt, HJieffe, <Sd)n.efter,
Sijnigtum, Satje, ^erj, -Cur.
10 2.  Put into German:—
(1.) The class waited for the teacher.
(2.) He sat in front of me.
(3.) He sat down next me.
(4.) He came instead of his brother.
(5.) He lives at his uncle's.
(6.) He rode around the park.
(7.) He came after school.
(8.) He has been here for a week.
(9.) He went through the house.
(10.) He stayed at home on account of the rain.
10        3. Insert articles and fill in correct endings where necessary, then rewrite in the
plural :—
S)ie§—rot—-BucE) getjort—fteifjtg—©djiUer, ber nttt fein—jung—-Bruber ouf
eh.—grtitt—-Bant fifct. —gut JJna&e fdjreibt ein—lang—@atj in fein—
groft — ^eft imb beaittroortet jeb — @djn.er $rage— alt—SefjrerS in —
beutfdj—tflaffe.
10        4. Change the following verbs to the imperfect and perfect tenses :—
(J.) (Sir I)ilft feinent -Bater.
(2.) 5Du trittft in ba§ gimmer.
(3.) $jjjc fajirt Ijeute ah.
(4.) ^d) uerftelje ben Sefjrer.
(5.) @ie *ie|ejt fid) an.
10        5. (a.) Change the following infinitives to the correct forms of the present tense :—
(!•) (Sr £)ebett bie ftreibe.
(2
(3
(*•
(5
) SDu fprcdjen $u [ant.
) ©r lanfen fdjnett.
) @r roiffen eg nidjt.
• ) 3)u lefen gut.
(b.) Write the future of (1), the future-perfect of (3), and all the imperative
forms of (2) and (5). Value.
10
6
16
18
6. Put into German :—
(1.) She gave them her pencil; it was sharper than his.
(2.) Your house is as large as ours.
(3.) The richest people live in the finest houses.
(4.) Fritz writes better than Karl, but Paul writes best of all.
(5.) With what shall I write and for whom 'i
7. (a.) Combine the following sentences by means of a relative pronoun :—
(1.) 3d) ..Qhz beinen -Brief erfialten.    SDu fenbeft i|n am 1. Sunt ab.
(2.) @ie befudjten fiarlg Xante.    $£ir ©oljn wax in Slmertfa.
(3.) -Paul fenbet SDtr ©riijje.    3d) Jjabe tfym beinen -Brief gegetgt.
(b.) Combine the following sentences by means of the conjunction given :—
(!•) 3d) 3e^e tyeute nidjt aug.    (5§ toirb regnen.    (benn.)
(2.) Ste <3d)ule ift aug.    3d) gefye nad) ^aufe.    (roenn.)
(3.) $dj fjatte fein ©elb.    (Sr mufete eg.    (bag.)
8. Put into German :—
(1.) He thought that Mr. Brown's house was burning.
(2.) The new is not always better than the old.
(3.) He who laughs last, laughs best.
(4.) I gave her all that I had.
(5.) Schiller was  born  on  the 10th  of  November,  1759, in  the  town  of
Marbach.    (In full.)
(6.) Please give me three glasses of milk and two cups of tea.
(7.) I am sorry that you are not feeling well today.
(8.) My name is Braun and I live at 2586 Granville Street.    (In full.)
9. Put into German :—
The lazy boy did not want to go to school but he had to go. His father
said, "Get up promptly at half-past seven and dress yourself quickly;
then you can eat your breakfast and go to school at twenty minutes to
nine." There the teacher said, "You must pay attention. You can
learn your lessons if you want to. But if you cannot do your work,
you will have to stay in after school and study while the others play
In the evening you must study again at home before you go to bed."
German Translation.    (Time, 2 hours.)
60 1. Put into English :—
(«■) -Die Siene begegnete tljm unb fprad): ,,-Bftr, bu madjft em geiualtig traurtgeg
©efidjt; wo ift beine Sufttgfeit geblteben?" ,,®u Ijaft gut reben,"
antroortete ber -Bar; ,,eg filjt ein grtmmigeg Zkx mit ©lotjaugeu in
otm Jpaufe beg .Roten, unb nrir fbnnen eg nidjt fjeraugjagen." ®ie
33iene fpradj: ,,3d) Bebaure bid), 33ar; idj bin ein armeg, fdjn>adjeg
©efdjbpf, bag ifjr nidjt angucft, aber id) glaube bod), baf_ id) eud)
Ijetfen fann."
(b.) 9?adj etlidjen -EBodjen fonnte er uur feufjen unb ftoljnen, unb balb raufte
er fid) ftunbentang bie Jpaare nnb fdjittte.te fid) uor ©djauber unb
SBiberwitten; £att)rindjen aber ptauberte frblj.td) fort. $ad) ettid)en
SKonaten fing er an abjumagern, fein (Sffen fdjmedte iljm meljr, unb 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 169
Value.
fogar hint SPfetfe unb fein Sautabaf, unb er niarb erfidEjtlid^ fdjroadjer
unb fdjroddjer. 3113 nod) ein WVlonat Ijerum roar, lag er at§ ein
blether ©fatten auf fetnem -Bette unb berettete fid) Ijeimlid) in feinem
.fperjen jum -Eobe nor.
(c) 3)a.tat ber Snabe felbft ben lOJunb auf unb fing an, treu unb einfdlttg bie
©efdjidjte uom (Sngel gu er^dljlen, roie er ben <£>anfel entfii£)rte, anal)
rote er iljm unldngft raieber erfdjienen fei unb iljm bie unfidjtbare
3Siefe gejeigt t)abe, roeldje ben .jpaitS fo ftattttd) gemadjt. £)aruber
roaren freittd) bie 3lnroefenben £)odi erftaunt, allein bie Jl'bnigin fagte:
,,©eroi§, bag ift ein frotnnter ©oljn, unb bie Sffialjrljeit fteljt iljm an
ber ©tint gefdjrieben."
(«..) S)en ©differ tm fleinen ©djiffe
(Srgreift eg mit roilbem 2Be£);
(§r fdjaut nidjt bie fjelfenriffe,
C5r fdjaut nur t)inauf in bie $bl)\
3d) gtaube, bie -Bellen oerfdjiingen
31m (5nbe Sniffer unb jtatjn;
Unb bag fiat mit iljrem ©ingen
SDie Sorelet getan.
(e.) ,,-H.tllft, feiner J?nabe, bu mit mir getjn ?
9J.eine 3^ocE)ter fotlen bid) marten fdjon ;
SJ.eine Xbdjter fiiljren ben nad)tlic£)en Dteiljn
Unb roiegen unb tanjen unb fingen bid) ein."
SJJein -Bater, mein -Bater, unb fteljft bu nidjt bort
©rlfontgg -toditer am biiftern Ort ?—
Stein ©oljn, mein ©oljn, idj felj1 eg genau;
(§g fleinen bie alten SBeiben fo grau.—
(/) 3)er -Bater tjie§ mid) merfen auf jebeg -Bogelg Slug,
2Iuf aller 3Binbe SBeljcrt, auf alter -E_.ol.en ^ug ;
Unb bogen bann bie ©tiirme ben 9Jtaft big in bie f^fut,
Unb fpritjten bann bie -ffiogen tjodj liber meinen Jput,
-Da falj ber -Bater priifenb mir in bag 2lngefidjt—
3d) fafj in meinem Jtorbe unb riittelte midj nidjt—
SCa fpradj er, unb bie -ffiange roarb iljm rote 23tut fo rot:
©lite! ju auf betnem SKafte, bu fleiner JJnbriot!
10        2. Translate at sight:—
(Sineg 3age§ roarf ein fleiner 3unge einen ©tetn unb brad) ein grof^eg ©djaufenfter.
D^atiirltdj lief er fort fo fdjneH roie er nur fonnte. SDer gornige i?aufmann
rannte aber fogleidj Ijinter iljm tier unb Ijatte il)n balb erfafjt. ,,jDu fjaft
mein genfter gerbrodjen!" rief ber fiaufmann drgerltdj, ,,9?un foil ft bu
bafitr bejaljlen!" ,,3>a§ rootlte id) eben," fagte ber fdjlaue 3un9e. ,,aber
fo utel ©elb fyatte id) ja nidjt bei mir, unb begtjatb moHte id) nadj Jpaufe
urn bag ©elb gu fjolen."
12        3. Put into German :—
A dog, carrying a piece of meat over a foot-bridge, looked down into the
water and saw a dog that also was carrying meat. He sprang into the
river, and as he snapped at his image in the water, he let fall his piece
of meat.    Too late he found that he had snapped at a shadow.
18        4. Write in German a description of the four seasons.    (At least half a page.) R 170
Public Schools Report.
1926
Greek.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Decline throughout o-v, pj-r^p, oSe (masculine only).
Decline in the singular 6'pvts, vv£; in the plural yeptov, riytpdiv.
Write the present passive imperative of dya, the imperfect active indicative of
iroic(i>, the perfect passive indicative of aye..
Write (in the singular only) the aorist middle subjunctive of Xvo> and the future
active optative of -repro..
State the method of expressing prohibitions, the form "of clauses after verbs
denoting fear, two uses of the dative case, the circumstances under which an
enclitic retains its accent.
State the cases governed by Sta, perd, \rapd, and irpo, with the meaning in each
instance.
Write the principal parts of fiovXopai,, StSao-KO., SoKew, eiropai, Oavpdfo, KaXew,
Xapfid.vio, Xeiiro), voplijjj, TrpaTTU).
Translate into English :—
(a.)  t<j> T-js 7raiSbs   irarpi, e'So^e irepm-mv avTi)v els aXXyv yrjv.
(b.) o~vpTrepif/ov(Ti S' avru> Kal dXXovs o-TjOarKoTas.
(c.)  XeXvrai ovv avTois rj yecpvpa Iva ol iroA.eyu.tot eKarepmOev kvkXojOcoo-iv.
(tf.)  eTreii.eXovp.eda yap wrens prt] ra, avra, SiSd^opev.
(e.)  evvo'iKws av rjp.iv elyov ol Uepo-ai et prj eipri<fjL<TdpeOa diroyjopeiv.
20        9. Translate into Greek:—
(a.) There are five black birds on your house.
(6.) It is not possible for all to be in-plain-sight a whole day.
(c.) These farms (use xojpwv) were full of trees.
(d.) If the man himself calls me, I will go to him.
(e.) We were afraid that they would arm themselves slowly.
Value.
12
1
8
2
12
3
4
4
5
5
4
6
15
7
20
8
History.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Answer any five questions.]
14 1.  (tt.) Trace the development of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland and Prance.
Q (6.) By what means did the Roman Catholic Church retain its hold on France?
15 2. (a.) What were the points at issue between the Stuart Kings and Parliament?
5 (6.) Why did the Commonwealth fail?
13       3.  (a.) To what extent did the wars of Louis XIV. undermine Prance?
7 (b.)  Show how increased taxation helped to bring on the French Revolution.
12 4.  (a.) Contrast the "Revolution in Peace," 1789-1792, with the "Terror," 1792-1795.
8 (6.) Account for the rise to power of Napoleon Bonaparte, 1795-1798.
10 5. (a.) Why did the Industrial Revolution first take place in England?
10 (b.) Give some account of the leading inventions.
6. Write notes on:—
5 (tt.)  The First Reform Bill, 1832.
5 (&.)  The Chartist Agitation.
5 (c.) Free Trade.
5 (<?.) " Votes for Women." 17 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
R 171
Value.
20
IS
8
20
7. Trace the development of the British Empire since 1S15.
8. (a.)  "The Prussianization of Germany."    How far does this phrase sum up the
policy of Bismarck?
(6.) To what extent did William II. alter Bismarck's policy?
9. Give some account of the work of the League of Nations.
Or
Write a short account of the Colonial Period of British Columbia history, 1S49-1S71.
Latin Authors and Sight Transl-\tion.    (Time, 2]/2 hours.)
A. Caesar, De Bello Gallico, Books IV. and V.
10       1. Translate:—
Interim, consilio ejus cognito, et per mercatores perlato ad Britannos, a compluri-
bus ejus insulae civitatibus ad eum legati veniunt, qui polliceantur obsides
dare atque imperio populi Romani obtemperare. Quibus auditis, liberaliter
pollicitus, hortatusque, ut in ea sententia permanerent, eos domum remittit.
(a.) Account for the case of perlato, domum; the mood of polliceantur, permanerent;
the tense of dare.
Q       2. Translate :—
Caesar questus, quod, cum ultro in continentem legatis missis pacem ab se
petissent, bellum sine causa intulissent, ignoscere imprudentiae dixit obsides-
que imperavit; quorum illi partem statim dederunt, partem ex longinquiori-
bus locis areessitam paucis diebus sese daturos dixerunt. Interea suos
remigrare in agros jusserunt, principesque undique convenire et se civitates-
qUe suas Caesari commendare coeperunt.
(a.) Account for the case of diebus; the mood of intulissent.
9        3. Translate:—
L. Donatio Ap. Claudio consulibus, discedens ab hibernis Caesar in Italiam, ut
quotannis facere consuerat, legatis imperat, quos legionibus praefecerat, uti
quam  plurimas  possent hieme  naves  aedificandas  veteresque  reficiendas
curarent.
(a.) Account for the case of Domitio, legionibus; the mood of curarent.
(&.) Write a note on quam plurimas.
(c.)  Give the date.
10       4. Translate:—
His rebus cognitis a captivis perfugisque, Caesar, praemisso equitatu, confestim
legiones subsequi jussit.    Sed ea celeritate atque eo impetu milites ierunt,
cum  capite  solo  ex  aqua  exstarent,   ut  hostes  impetum   legionum   atque
equitum sustinere non possent, ripasque dimitterent ac se fugae mandarent.
(a.) Account for the case of impetu, capite, fugae; the mood of exstarent, mandarent.
B. Vergil, Aeneid IL, Lines 1-505.
12       5. Translate :—
' sanguine placastis ventos et virgine caesa,
cum primum Iliacas, Danai, venistis ad oras:
sanguine quaerendi reditus, animaque litandum
Argolica.'    vulgi quae vox ut venit ad aures,
obstipuere animis, gelidusque per ima cucurrit
ossa tremor, cui fata parent, quern poscat Apollo,
(a.) Account for the case of reditus, anima; the mood of poscat.
(&.)   Scan the fifth line,
(c.) What do you understand by sanguine placastis ventos? Value.
9
11
20
13
6. Translate:—
ille simul manibus tendit divellere nodos,
perfusus sanie vittas atroque veneno;
clamores simul horrendos ad sidera tollit:
qualis mugitus, fugit cum saucius aram
taurus et, incertam excussit cervice securim.
at gemini lapsu delubra ad summa dracones
effugiunt, saevaeque petunt Tritonidis arcem,
sub pedibusque deae clipeique sub orbe teguntur.
(a.)  Account for the case of vittas.
7. Translate:—
heu nihil invitis fas quemquam fidere divis!
ecce trahebatur passis Priameia virgo
crinibus a templo Cassandra adytisque Minervae,
ad caelum tendens ardentia lumina frustra,
lumina, nam teneras arcebant vincula palmas.
non tulit hanc speciem furiata mente Coroebus,
et sese medium iniecit periturus in agmen.
(a.)  Account for the case of nihil, quemquam, divis.
(b.)  What part does Cassandra play in the tale of Troy?
(c.)  Scan the third line.
C. Sight Translation.
8. Translate at sight:—
{a.) The Haedui suspect treachery.
Vercingetorix coacto celeriter exercitu Lucterium, summae audaciae
hominem, cum parte copiarum in Rutenos mittit; ipse in Bituriges
proficiseitur. Eius adventu Bituriges ad Haeduos, quorum erant in
fide, legatos mittunt subsidium rogatum, quo' facilius hostium
copias sustinere possint. Haedui moniti a legatis quos Caesar ad
exercitum reliquerat, copias equitatus peditatusque subsidio Bituri-
gibus mittunt. Qui cum ad flumen Ligerim venissent, quod Bituriges ab Haeduis dividit, paucos dies ibi ruorati non flumen transire
ausi sunt, sed domum revertuntur legatisque nostris renuntiant se
Biturigum perfldiam veritos revertisse. Nam dicebant Biturigibus
id fuisse consilium ut si flumen transissent, una ex parte ipsi, altera
Arverni se oppugnarent. I.trum haec vera dixissent an perfldia
adducti essent, pro certo sciri non poterat.
(b.) Caesar arranges for the invasion of Mauretania.
Interim Cassio a Caesare imperatum est ut in Africam exercitum trans-
portaret et ad Mauretaniam per fines Numidarum perveniret quod
magna auxilia Pompeio Iuba rex Numidarum miserat maioraque
missurus esse existimabatur. Quibus litteris acceptis Casslus ipse
in Lusitaniam proficiseitur ad legiones arcessendas auxiliaque
adducenda. Certis hominibus dat negotium ut frumentum compara-
ret, centumque naves aedificaret ne qua res cum redisset moraretur.
Latin Grammar and Composition.    (Time, 2 hours.)
6       1. Write the ablative singular of res, iter; the accusative plural of mare;  the genitive
plural of nox, manus, corpus.
4       2. Decline together alia navis, hoc animal.
2       3. Write the numerals eight, eighty, forty-six, sixty-three. 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 173
Value.
6 4. Write the third singular future indicative of nolo; the third singular imperfect
subjunctive of proficiscor; the third plural perfect subjunctive of venio; the
perfect infinitive passive of frango; the third singular present indicative passive
of fero; the first plural imperfect subjunctive passive of capio.
3 5. Compare multus, liber, magnus.
5        6. Write the principal parts of nolo, parco, tollo, frango, cognosce.
4 7. Write the Latin for:   (a) At what time did he go away?   (6) the same camp;   (c) he
will use this sword;   (d) I know where they have been.
14       8. Translate into English:—
(a.)  Ibi ex captivis cognoscit quae in hostium castris gerantur.
(b.) Nulli civitati persuadere poteramus.
(c.)  Ut hostes consequi posset pontem in flumine fecit.
(d.) Negant se populo Romano bellum intulisse.
(e.)  His de rebus me consulere nolebat.
(f.)  Scripsit se Gallos qui ea loca incolerent expulisse.
(g.)  Centuriones monuit ne signa in hostes inferrent.
56        9- Translate into Latin :—
(a.)  They are said to be unwilling to help us.
(b.)  He asks why we do not retreat into the forest.
(c.)  They hesitate to leap down into the waves because they are unable to get
a footing there.
(d.) They marched for three days across a plain of great extent.
(e.) We were not able to carry our baggage with us.
(/.) They do not know whence we have set out.
(g.) They say that they have  always helped their  friends  and  injured their
enemies.
Physics.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[The last question and any other five constitute a full paper.]
16 1.   (a.)   Make a clear drawing of a pulley system which has a mechanical advantage of
2,  and  show that the work put  into  this machine  is  equal  to  the  work
obtained from it if friction be neglected.
(6.)  Show clearly by reference to a drawing how to determine the velocity of sound
in air by resonance.
16        2.  (a.)  How does the intensity of a sound depend on the distance from the source?
Prove this law.
(&.) A body which weighs 6 grams in air has a sinker attached to it and the two
together weigh 16 grams in water.    The sinker alone weighs 24 grams in
water.    What is'the density of the body?
16        3<  (»•)  Define the following terms:   thermal capacity, convection currents, dew point,
mechanical equivalent of heat.
(b.)  A candle and a gas-flame which is four times as strong are placed 6 feet apart.
There are two positions on the line joining these sources where a screen may
be placed so that it may be equally illuminated by each source.   Find these
positions.
16        4-  («•)  Describe Newton's method of obtaining the spectrum and explain clearly how
the colour of natural objects arises.
(&.) How much heat is necessary to change 30 grams of ice at -15° C. to steam at
100° C?    Take the specific heat of ice to be 0.5. R 174 Public Schools Report. 1926
Value. i
16       5. (a.) By means of a drawing show how to determine the position of the image formed
by an object placed (1) between the centre of curvature and the principal
■ focus of a concave mirror,  (2) between the principal focus and the vertex.
(&.)  A few turns of insulated wire are wound around a horizontal cardboard tube
and the ends of the wire are joined so as to make a complete electric circuit.
The N-pole of a bar magnet is introduced into the right-hand end of the coil.
Make a drawing of a side view of the arrangement.   Mark the direction of
the induced current and explain clearly how you determined it.
16        0.  (a.)  Describe the construction and mode of operation of either the electric bell or the
induction coil.    Use a diagram.
(&.) The poles of a battery are connected by a wire 8 metres long having a resistance
of Y2 ohm per metre.    If the E.M.F. of the battery is 7 volts and the internal
resistance 10 ohms, find  (1)  the current and  (2)  the potential difference
between two points on the wire which are 2 metres apart.
20       7. (a.) A body starts from rest under an acceleration of 10 cm. per second per second.
Calculate:—
(1.) Its velocity after 10 seconds;
(2.)  How far it goes in that time;
(3.) The force acting, if the body weighs 100 grams;
(4.)  The work done by the force in 10 seconds.
(6.) Calculate the horse-power being exerted by a man weighing 165 pounds who
climbs a vertical distance of 30 feet in 1 minute. 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 175
Grade XI., Normal Entrance.
Geography.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer five only.]
1. (a.) Discuss fully the statement " The sun rises in the east and sets in the west."
(&.) Make a diagrammatic representation of the chief winds and belts of calms of the earth,
indicating direction by arrows.    Account for the direction,
(c.)  How are mountains formed?
2. (a.) Describe the effects of the glacial period on the physical features of Canada.
(6.) In the production of sugar why is the beet industry more than holding its own with the
cane industry?   Name the three greatest producers of cane-sugar.
(c.) From what are the following obtained and where is the principal source of supply:
cocoa, turpentine, sago, rubber, currants, teak, allspice?
3. The Great Lakes.
(a.)  Sketch a map (as large as your paper will permit)  of the Great Lakes and the St.
Lawrence River as far as Montreal.    Show the connecting waters including the
canals, and the important Canadian and American ports.
(6.)  Explain the influence of this water system on the development of Canada.    What scheme
to increase its economic value is under consideration?    What menace is now agitating
many of the large ports?
4. (a.) Describe the main surface features of Africa and explain their influence on the climate.
(&.) Compare the Union of South Africa with the Argentine Republic as regards latitude,
physical features, sources of national wealth.
5. (a.) What forms the primary highland of Europe?    Locate the most fertile plain south of
this highland and account for its fertility.    What are the products of this plain?
(6.) Locate Fiume and Danzig and state the importance of each,
(c.) Write comprehensively on one of the following:—
The Lowlands of Scotland.
Famous Cathedrals of Europe.
The Valley of the Rhine. •
6. (a.)  Locate Iraq  (Mesopotamia).    Describe its lines of communication and locate its chief
cities.    (Use a sketch-map.)    What is its relation to the British Empire?    Why has
it commanded recent public attention?
(6.)  Describe the climate and the trade of New Zealand.
7. The Mining Industry of British Columbia.
(a.) What are the principal minerals produced?
(6.)  Where are the most productive mines located?
(c.)  Distinguish between lode mining and placer mining.
(d.) What is coke?   For what purpose is it generally used?
(e.) What is done at a smelter?   Name a famous smelter on the Columbia River.   What
products are shipped from it?
(/.)  Give approximately the gross value of the mineral production for the year 1924.   Which
mineral was first in value of output? R 176
Public Schools Report.                                            1926
Grade XII., Senior Matriculation.
\ alue.
14
1.
Algebra.    (Time, 3 hours.)
Solve:—
(a.)  x3y + xy3 = 290
x2 + y2=29.
(b.) 10*4-5 J 3x2-5x+2 = 6x2 + 6.
14
2.
(a.) The sum of the first 10 terms of a G.P. is 33 times the sum of the first 5 terms.
Find the common ratio.
(6.) Show that          X.   = 1 + rr^ + .i  ,°° *m +    t0 innnity'
(1 - xy            1 +x2    (1 +x2y
(c.) Find two numbers whose arithmetic mean is 25 and whose harmonic mean is 24.
14
3.
,   , -,„ a + b    2(b + e)    4(c + a)             .,   , ~„      „-,     „-,      „
(a.) If          _   v       y-   v        ;, prove that 27a + 2o5 + 22c - 0.
« - 6    3(6 - c)    5(c — a)
(b.) The expenses of an entertainment are partly constant and partly vary as the
number of guests.    For 80 guests the cost is $160 and for 120 guests the
cost is $220.    Find the cost for 200 guests.
14
4.
(a.) One root of a.2 - (k + l)x + 2k + 1 = 0 exceeds the other by 2.    Find the value
of k and,verify.
(6.) Prove that a.2 - 2{a + 2)x - a2 = 0 cannot have equal roots for any real value of a
14
5.
19
v/50 + ./8 - J3
x2 — 24
(b.) Determine the limits of the value of               for all real values of x.
v                                                                           2b-11
15
6.
(a.) In how many ways can 3 prizes be distributed among 20 pupils (1) if no pupil
may receive two prizes; (2) if any pupil may receive all the prizes .
(b.) In a bag are 8 white and 6 red balls all different.    In how many ways may 6
balls be drawn out so that in each case there may be at least 2 red balls?
15
7.
(a) Find the coefficient of ar5 in L2 j  .
/ n    2            A \ 7
(b.) Reduce to its simplest form the 5th term of  /-—_ ) .
\ IJb    3 fry
(c.) If the coefficient of xs in the expansion of (1 - x)" be ( - 1140 ) find n.
Biology.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[All questions are of equal value.   Answer questions 1 and 2 and any three of the remainder.
Illustrate your answers by carefully drawn diagrams.]
1. Describe and make a diagrammatic drawing of the digestive tract and glands, as seen from a
left lateral aspect, of either (a) the frog or (6) the clam.
2. (0.)  Describe in detail the microscopic structure of one unicellular  organism  and of one
simple multicellular organism.
(B.)  State whether the organisms described belong to the plant or to the animal kingdom
and give definite reasons for the classification in each case. 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 177
3. (a.) Define the terms isogamy and heterogamy.
(&.)  Describe the above processes in detail, using one member of the plant or animal kingdom
in each case as an example.
4. Distinguish between symbiosis, commensalism, and parasitism.    Give one example of each
and in each case describe the parts played by the contributing organisms.
5. Write a note upon the chemical, physical, and biological properties of protoplasm.
6. (a.) What are the essential features of the process of respiration?
(...)  Describe the process as carried on by man and by the yeast plant.
7. Write notes on the contributions made to biology by the following men:   Harvey, Priestley,
Darwin, Mendel, Pasteur.
Chemistry.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer ten only.]
[Atomic weights and other data are given at end of paper.]
1. A compound was analysed and found to have the following percentage composition: Hydrogen,
2.26%; oxygen, 62.88%; phosphorus, 84.85%. What is the simplest formula that
represents the composition of this compound?
2. What do you understand by the terms " ionization," " equivalent weight," " normal solution,"
and "valence" as used in Chemistry?
3. The hydrogen formed by the action of 0.2431 gram of magnesium upon an excess of hydro
chloric acid was mixed with the oxygen - formed from the action of water upon 1.562
grams of sodium peroxide and the mixture exploded; what volume, if any, will the
residual gas occupy, if measured over water at a temperature of 25° C. and a pressure
of 771 mm. Hg.?
4. Explain briefly what part the following men played in building up the science of Chemistry:
Joseph Priestly, Sir Humphrey Davy, and Sir William Ramsay.
5. Discuss the conditions under which the various forms of sulphur may exist.
6. How can the following substances be prepared commercially:   metallic sodium, nitric oxide,
ammonia?
7. Show by means of structural formula; the relationship that exists between orthophosphoric
acid, metaphosphoric acid, and pyrophosphoric acid.
8. Compare the compounds arsine, phosphine, and stibine as to their chemical and physical
properties.
9. From the position of the elements potassium,  silicon, lead,  and bromine in the periodic
arrangement of the elements according to Mendelejeff, what would you infer regarding
their basic or acidic properties, their valence toward oxygen, and the stability of any
compounds they may form the one with the other?
10. (a.) Explain  the   term   "unsaturated  hydrocarbons,"   illustrating   by   means   of   graphic
formulse.
(&.) How can any two of the following substances be prepared in the laboratory:   acetic
acid, ether, ethyl acetate?
11. If you were given four solutions a, b, c, and d, suspected of containing (a) mercurous nitrate,
(6) lead nitrate, (c) cadmium nitrate, (d) aluminium nitrate, how would you prove this
supposition to be correct?    Write chemical equations to illustrate your answer.
Atomic weights:  Mg=24.32, H=1.008, Na=23.05, 0=10.00, P=31.04.
Vapour pressure of water at 25° C.=23.5 mm. English Composition.    (Time, 3 hours.)
Value.
10       1. Point out definitely the particular principles violated in the following, and recast in
more satisfactory form :—
(a.) I went to a play last night. The play was Caesar and Cleopatra. It was
written by Shaw. The play was very interesting. The characters were
good.   The speeches were witty.    I spent a most enjoyable evening.
(&.) A dog, on hearing a peculiar noise and unable to understand exactly what it
is, will at once start to find out the meaning of the noise.
(c.) The impulse of tbe English race toward moral development and self-conquest
has manifested itself in Puritanism, and more powerfully than anywhere else.
(d.) We learned that it would take time to repair the automobile, and we walked
to the nearest village, had some lunch, and we then returned to the scene
of the accident, but the machine had not yet been repaired, and we tried
to help the driver repair it, but our efforts were all in vain.
(e.) Let every Canadian uphold the Constitution and do their part in averting
disorder.
10       2. Write a letter to the Secretary of the School Board in your place of residence applying for a position that you very much want on the teaching staff.
20       3. Discuss the principles of good paragraph structure as exemplified in the following,
and indicate clearly the means of explicit reference:—
The incomparable French natural-historian and felicitous writer, Henri Fabre, has
witnessed what I never have; he has seen the caterpillar build its case or
cocoon. In the instance which he described it was the small grub of one of
the Psyches. The first thing the creature did was to collect bits of felt or
pith from the cast-off garment of its mother. These it tied together with a
thread of its own silk, forming a band, or girdle, which it put around its
own body, uniting the ends. This ring was the start and foundation of the
sack in which it was to encase itself. The band was placed well forward,
so that the insect could reach its edge, by bending its head up and down and
around in all directions. Then it proceeded to widen the girdle by attaching
particles of down to the edges. As the garment grew toward its head, the
weaver crept forward in it, thus causing it to cover more and more of its
body till in a few hours it covered all of it, and the sack was complete, a
very simple process, and, it would seem, the only possible one. The head,
with the flexible neck, which allowed it to swing through the circle, was the
loom that did the weaving, the thread issuing from the spinneret on the lip.
Did the silk issue from the other end of the body, as we are likely to think
it does, the feat would be impossible. I suppose a woman might knit
herself into her sweater in the same way by holding the ball of yarn in her
bosom and turning the web around and fulling it down instead of turning
her body—all but her arms; here she would be balked. To understand how
a grub weaves itself a close-fitting garment, closed at both ends, from its
own hair, or by what sleight of hand it attaches its cocoon to the end of a
branch, I suppose one would need to witness the process.
60       4. Draw up a well-ordered plan and write an essay of at least two pages on one of the
following:—
(a.) The Essentials in the Art of the Short Story.
(6.)  The Influence of the Automobile on Modern Life,
(c.) The Value of Courtesy. 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 179
English Literature.    (Time, 3 hours.)
Value.
14       1. Quote about a dozen consecutive lines from the poetry in the Anthology of Modern
Verse that, in your opinion, illustrate the qualities of poetic diction.    Indicate
what these qualities are.
14       2. In about two pages, discuss the poetry of Walter de la Mare.
12 3. On the basis of your reading this year write an essay of about three hundred words
on one of the following:—
(a.)  " In poetry we are continually being re-born into new fairylands."
(b.)  Poetry as "a homesickness of the spirit for a perfect world."
12 4. Contrast the manner of presenting two of the chief figures in " Electra " with that of
presenting the two principals in " Julius Caesar," showing which characterization
you regard as the more detailed and vivid.
12        5. Discuss:—
(a.)   Sheridan's greatest asset as a dramatist.
(&.)  The title of "The School for Scandal."
(c.) The dramatic purposes served by the "Auction Scene."
12 6. In two pages give your opinion of Nora's action at the end of A Doll's House.
Support your answer with references to incidents throughout the play.
12 7. In which of the short stories studied this year do you think "a single impression"
or "unity of effect" is best illustrated? Indicate the various means by which it
is obtained.
12       8- Write concisely on each of the following:—
(a.) The contrast between father and son in Ethan Brand.
(&.)  The use of suspense in The Gold Bug.
(c.)  The character of the Sire de Maletroit.
French Language.    (Time, 3 hours.)
30 1. Traduction :—
This morning I received several letters, among which there was one from my
brother, who has arrived at Marseilles. He will stay there until you come,
unless you send him a telegram to tell him that you cannot leave London
before the end of next week. If you do not yet know on which day and at
what hour you can start, please write me a few lines. Thei'e is a good train
at a quarter to nine in the morning which does the journey in twenty-four
hours.
15 2. (a.) RSpondez aux questions suivantes, en employant le pronom personnel qui
correspond ft chaque nom en italique. Ex.: Voyez-vous le chdteau? Oui
je le vois.
(a.) Avez-vous envoye les fleurs a. la marchande?
(b.) Vous ont-ils donne de bonnes questions?
(c.)   Pensez-vous a la legon et preparez-vous le travail pour les 6Uves?
(d.) Est ce qu' on vote pour cet auteur? il va entrer A VAcad6mie.
(e.)  Pensez-vous & la lecon et preparez-vous le travail pour les eieves?
(b.)  Mettez le pronom relatif convenable:—
(a.)  C'est l'usine — je parlais et vers — nous allons.
(&.)  II dit — est vrai et c'est justement — on n'aime pas.
(c.) — de ces etudiants est le plus habile? R 180
Public Schools Report.
Value.
15
20
20
3. (a.)  Donnez 1'equivalent de:—■
Nobody knows it.    He reads well but he sings better.    Here is a better
song.    Such a good book!    Such a story!   There will be about ten
people.    They never work.    Speak louder.
(6.)  Placez les mots suivants fi, l'endroit qui convient:   savant, metier, elite, eelat,
amateur.
This author belongs to the — in his own town, for he writes as a true —
in his special subject, but in other matters he is only a sort of —;
after all it is not the — of a writer to do everything with much —.
4. Mettez chaque verbe en italique au temps convenable selon la signification du texte—-
Soulignez chaque verbe.
Autrefois les Parisiennes aller k pied par la ville et sortir tous les jours pour faire
leurs emplettes. A une certaine Spoque chaque menagSre faire son march<.
elle-m<5me, et entreprendre de montrer a sa fille a diriger la maison. Nos
grand'meres coudre toujours les trousseaux qui Slaient requirir pour leur
mariage, restant asseoir pendant des heures. Mais aprgs qu'on inventer
tant de nouvelles ameliorations et quand on parvenir a un perfectionnement
general dans l'industrie et le commerce, tout changer. Maintenant, le plus
souvent, madame se servir de son telephone pour obtenir ce qu'elle vouloir.
II faut qu'on la conduire en auto, quand elle sortir, afin qu'elle pouvoir aller
plus vite et il n'y a pas une seule jeune fille qui ne savoir plus du double
de ce que apprendre son aleule. Si l'on vivre comme jadis, serait-on plus
heureux?   Cela valoir il la peine d'y penser, de nos jours?
5. Frangais de:—
(a.) In the autumn of 1914, Canada sent to England about 3,300 soldiers.
(&.)  She says she will never be able to speak French without making many
mistakes,
(c.)  Whatever you may think, I wish you to know it was I who did it.
((_.)  I have been in the country for more than a week and I am still hungry,
(e.) We shall all go away as soon as we have finished.
20
35
French Literature.    (Time, 3 hours.)
1. Traduisez Ie passage suivant et faites quelques reflexions sur sa signification :—
Belle demande! Aux Grands Comgdiens. II n'y a qu'eux qui soient capables de
faire valoir les choses; les autres sont des ignorants qui r6citent comme l'on
parle; ils ne savent pas faire ronfler les vers et s'arrSter au bel endroit; et le
moyen de eonnaitre oil est le beau vers, si le comedien ne s'y arrete, et ne nous
avertit par 1ft. qu'il faut faire le brouhaha?
2. Developpez deux des sujets suivants (en frangais) :—
(a.)  Un vieux gentilhomme voit "Les Precieuses Ridicules" pour la premiSre fois;
il s'ecrie:   " Bravo Moliere, voiia de la bonne comedie! "    Description de
l'incident, de la scene, de l'audience et de la salle.
(&.)  L'hotel de Rambouillet, sa fondatrice, ses habitues;   receptions, influence,
(c.) Lettre d'un etranger qui a visite Paris, ses principaux monuments et rues,
et qui a vecu quelque temps k la campagne et a vu plusieurs chateaux.
■<<2.) La journge d'un fitudiant en meaecine (Studes, salles d'operations, terrasse
d'un cafe, sports, une manifestation etc.    .    .    .). 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 181
Value.
15       3. Mettez ces phrases en frangais moderne :—
(a.)  Ce necessaire va nous avancer les commodites de la conversation.
(&.) Veuillez done nous tendre ici le conseiller des graces.
(c.) L'embonpoint de ses plumes 1'empeche d'entrer dans la salle basse.
(d.) Elle est tout k fait achevee, je n'entends rien k ce qu'elle dit.
(e.)  C'est rencherir sur le ridicule que de parler ainsi.
20       4. Donnez en frangais une ou deux lignes d' explication sur dim des mots suivants:
La comedia dell arte—un cadeau—la petite oie—du dernier bourgeois—une ruelle
—sur le tapis—la carte de Tendre—un rabat—le petit coucher—Petits-Soins—sous
la Coupole—un domino,—un bouquiniste—l'lllustre Theatre—les tribunes.
10       5- Traduisez le paragraphs suivant:—
Quel meilleur symbole pourrait-on trouver des temps nouveaux dans ce qu'ils
offrent de plus haut: la conscience professionnelle, la ferme decision de
concilier coute que coute 1'interSt d'un seul et celui de tous, la minutie inflnie
dans Ie soin apporte au dStail. Le progres est vraiment Smouvant lorsqu'il
procede et qu'il temoigne d' une pareille volonte de mieux faire. Et que dites
vous de la France, ce pays oil l'on f auche encore k la main, oil, dans certains
coins recules, on bat encore le big aux flGaux mais ou aussi, en revanche, on a
su s'elever d'un bond jusqu' aux ultimes perfectionnements dans la science
et l'art de guerlr.
German Grammar and Composition.    (Time, 3 hours.)
1.  Put into German :—
20 (a.)*One of the most interesting buildings on the Rhine is the old Mouse-
tower, about which the following story is told. It is said to have
been built in the tenth century by a miserly old bishop who was
so cruel that he had had many poor people burned to death when
they came to ask him for bread during a famine. But the mice
which crept out of the ashes followed the wicked bishop into his
castle and gave him no peace. In order to escape from them he
had this castle built in the Rhine but the mice swam across and
ate him up alive.
20 (b.) The American students had spent two months in Germany but when
it was time to go back home they were sorry that they could not
stay longer. They knew that there were many beautiful cities
they had not seen and many interesting things they had not done.
But they had learned a great deal about the country and the
people. They decided that they would study German history the
following year to prepare them for their next trip. For they had
discovered that one can really enjoy a visit to a foreign land only
if one knows something of the history and literature of the people.
10        2. Put into German :—
(1.) Karl, whose mother was a German, had spent a year in Germany.
(2.) The most interesting thing they saw was the Hamburg harbor.
(3.) They had to get up early, for their train was to leave at 5 -a.m.
(4.) I finally succeeded in finding my friend.
(5.) He should have written to you, since he has not been able to come.
9 3.  Construct sentences (third person singular) using the following verbs in the im
perfect, pluperfect, and future tenses: cntffteljert; fid) erBarmeit; unternel)men. R 182
Public Schools Report.
1926
V alue.
6
6
9
20
4. Rewrite in the passive :—
(1.) 2J.ein -Bruber fdjretfit feinem greuttb einen -Brief.
(2.) ajJati £;at biefe§ ©ebaube itti 18.   ^cdjrtjunbert gefccrut.
(3.) iBiele Seute raerben tinnier ba§ .Spans befudjen.
«
5. Rewrite in indirect speech :—
(1.) (§t cmttoortete: ,,3.$ tam ba§ jefet nidjt tun."
(2.) gri^ fagte: ,,3Jtetn Onfel roirb un§ nad) -Berlin begleiten."
(3.) @ie ernriberte: ,,$$ bin letjte 9Bo^e fe£>r franf geroefen."
6. Put into German :—
(1.) If the weather is fine tomorrow, we shall take a trip up the Rhine.
(2.) If you would stay longer in Germany, you could learn to speak German
correctly.
(3.) They would have gone to Heidelberg if Paul had  not had to go to
Munich.
7. Write in German a description of a trip.    (At least 20 lines.)
Geometry.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[Omit any one of the first four questions.]
14       1- Show how to divide a given line internally and externally in medial section.
14       2. If the vertical angle of a triangle be. bisected by a straight line which also cuts the
base, the rectangle contained by the sides of the triangle is equal to the rectangle
contained by the segments of the base together with the square on the straight
line which bisects the angle.
14       3. ABC is a triangle having AB and AC produced to D and E, respectively, so that BD =
CE.    The line joining DE meets BC produced at F.    Prove AB:AC = EF:DF.
14       4. A and C are fixed points on the circumference of a circle.    B is any other point on
the circle and the bisector of the angle ABC cuts the circle at D.    Show that the
ratio AB-I-BC : BD is constant.
[N.B.—Graph paper is  supplied.—Accurate  diagrams must be  drawn for  questions
5 and 6. J
5. Given the triangle A (-3, 2), B (7, 2), C (3, 10), find the following :—
4 (a.)  The equation of BC.
4 (b.) The co-ordinates of the centroid.
8 (c.) The equation of the perpendicular AD drawn from A to BC, and the ratio
into which D divides BC.
4 (d.)  The area of the triangle.
6 (e.) The locus of the vertices of the triangles described on AB having the same
area as ABC.    (This is to be found analytically.)
8 (f.) The equation of the circumscribing circle, its radius, and the co-ordinates of
its centre.
12 6. (a.) Find the equation of the line through (3,-4) that cuts off equal intercepts from
the axes. Give the two solutions according as the intercepts have the
same or opposite signs.
2x    it
(b.) Find the perpendicular distance from ( - 2, 3) to the line ~ = 6.
O        u
12       7. (a.) Derive the condition that one line shall be perpendicular to another.
(b.) Show that y = mx±r Jl + ra'2 is always a tangent to x2 + y' — r'K 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 183
History.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[Answer any five questions.]
Value.
20       !• For what reasons did European nations send out colonists to America?
2. Compare Spanish and British colonial efforts under the following heads:—
5 (a.)  Commercial gain.
5 (b.) Religious policy.
5 (c.)  Government.
5 (d.) Treatment of the natives.
3. Write a short account of the explorations of:—
5 (a.)  Jaques Cartier.
5 (b.) Champlain.
5 (c.)  La Salle.
5 (d.)  La Verendrye.
20 4. Sketch the relations of Church and State in Canada during the French Regime.
12 5. Why was a conflict between France and Britain in North America inevitable?
4 (a.)  Estimate the importance, in this conflict, of the Great Lakes.
4 (b.)  Estimate the importance, in this conflict, of the Ohio Valley.
15 6.  (a.)  Account for the changes of British policy towards Canada in 1763,1774, and 1791.
5 (b.) Was the Constitutional Act a wise solution of the Canadian problem?
7. Compare the attitude of the following towards Canadian self-government:—
5 (a.)  Sydenham;
5 (6.) Bagot;
5 (c.) Metcalfe;
5 (ti.)  Elgin.
16 8.  (a.)  Sketch the movement for Confederation in the Maritime Provinces and in the
Province of Canada.
4 (5.)  Why did Newfoundland stay out?
20 9- " Tne history of the Canadian West is the history of the Hudson's Bay Company."
Discuss this statement with special reference to the Red River Colony and
British Columbia.
20     10. To what extent has Confederation solved the race question in Canada?
Latin Authors.    (Time, 3 hours.)
15        1. Translate:—
Quid  igitur  ait  Hortensius?    Si   uni  omnia  tribuenda   sint,   dignissimum   esse
Pompeium, sed ad unum tamen omni deferri non oportere.    Obsolevit iam
ista oratio re multo magis quam verbis refutata.    Nam tu idem, Q. Hortensi,
niulta pro tua summa copia ac singulari facultate dicendi et in senatu contra
virum  fortem,  A.   Gabinium,   graviter  ornateque   dixisti,   cum  is  de  uno
imperatore contra praedones constituendo legem promulgasset, et ex hoc ipso
loco permulta item contra earn legem verba fecisti.
(a.)  Explain the construction of sint and multo.
(&.)  Explain the references in Hortensius, Gabinium, praedones.
(c.)  Give the chief facts in Cicero's life, with dates. Value.
15
18
17
2. Translate:—
Ac ne illud quidem vobis neglegendum est quod mini ego extremum proposueram,
cum essem de belli genere dicturus, quod ad multorum bona civium
Romanorum pertinet; quorum vobis pro vestra sapientia, Quirites, habenda
est ratio diligenter. Nam et publicani, homines honestissimi atque orna-
tissimi, suas rationes et copias in illam provinciam contulerunt, quorum ipsorum
per se res et fortunae vobis curae esse debent. Etenim, si vectigalia nervos
esse rei publicae semper duximus, eum certe ordinem qui exercet ilia firma-
mentum ceterorum ordinum recte esse dicemus.
(a.)  Explain the construction of vobis (first line) and curae.
(...) Write explanatory notes (not grammatical) on quod . . . extremum proposueram, publicani.
3. Translate:—
Protinus aerii mellis caelestia dona
exsequar:  hanc etiam, Maecenas, aspice partem.
Admiranda tibi levium spectacula rerum
magnanimosque duces totiusque ordine gentis
mores et studia et populos et proelia dicam.
In tenui labor; at tenuis non gloria, si quern
numina laeva sinunt auditque vocatus Apollo.
Principio sedes apibus statioque petenda,
quo neque sit ventis aditus, nam pabula venti
ferre domum prohibent, neque oves haedique petulci
floribus insultent, aut errans bucula campo
decutiat rorem, et surgentes atterat herbas.
Absint et picti squalentia terga lacerti
pinguibus a stabulis, meropesque aliaeque volucres
et manibus Procne pectus signata cruentis.
(a.)  Explain the construction of apibus (1. 8), insultent (11), campo (11), terga (13).
(6.)  Explain the references in Maecenas, Procne.
(c.) What does etiam (1. 2) imply?
4. Translate:—
Quis deus hanc, Musae, quis nobis extudit artem?
Unde nova ingressus hominum experientia cepit?
Pastor Aristaeus fugiens Peneia Tempe
amissis, ut fama, apibus morboque fameque
tristis ad extremi sacrum caput astitit amnis
multa querens, atque hac affatus voce parentem :
' Mater, Cyrene mater, quae gurgitis huius
ima tenes, quid me praeclara stirpe deorum,
(si modo, quern perhibes, pater est Thymbraeus Apollo)
invisum fatis genuisti?   Aut quo tibi nostri
pulsus amor?    Quid me caelum sperare iubebas?
En etiam hunc ipsum vitae mortalis honorem,
quern mihi vix frugum et pecudum custodia sollers
omnia temptanti extuderat, te matre relinquo.
Quin age et ipsa manu felices erue silvas,
fer stabulis inimicum ignem atque interfice messes,
ure sata, et' duram in vites molire bipennem,
tanta meae si te ceperunt taedia laudis.'
(a.)  Explain the construction of stirpe (1. 8), nostri (10), te (14).
(...)   Scan  (indicating the chief caesuras)  the three lines beginning:   unde   .    .    .,
si modo    .    .    ., en   .    .    .
(c.) To what does Vergil refer in hanc   .   .   .   arteml 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 185
Value.
20        5- Translate:—
Anna refert: ' O luce magis dilecta sorori,
solane perpetua maerens carpere iuventa,
nee dulces natos Veneris nee praemia noris?
id cinerem aut manes credis curare sepultos?
Esto, aegram nulli quondam flexere mariti,
non Libyae, non ante Tyro;  despectus Iarbas
ductoresque alii, quos Africa terra triumphis i
dives alit: placitone etiam pugnabis amori?
nee venit in mentem, quorum consederis arvis?
Hinc Gaetulae urbes, genus insuperabile bello,
et Numidae infreni cingunt et inhospita Syrtis,
hinc deserta siti regio lateque furentes
Barcaei.    Quid bella Tyro surgentia dicam
germanique minas?
Dis equidem auspicious reor et Iunone secunda
hunc cursum Uiacas vento tenuisse carinas.
(a.)  Explain the construction of sorori (1. 1), Libyae (6), dis (15).
(6.)  Show how scansion differentiates the cases of sola and perpetua in the second
line.
15       6.   Translate:—
Turn virgam capit: hac animas ille evocat Oreo
pallentes, alias sub Tartara tristia mittit,
dat somnos adimitque, et lumina morte resignat.
Ilia fretus agit ventos, et turbida tranat
nubila.    Iamque volans apicem et latera ardua cernit
Atlantis duri, caelum qui vertice fulcit,
Atlantis, cinctum assidue cui nubibus atris
piniferum caput et vento pulsatur et imbri,
nix umeros infusa tegit, turn flumina mento
praecipitant senis, et glacie riget horrida barba.
Hie primum paribus nitens Cyllenius alis
constitit;  hinc toto praeceps se corpore ad undas
misit, avi similis, quae circum litora, circum
piscosos scopulos humilis volat aequora iuxta.
(a.)  Write on the figures of speech in this passage.
Latin Prose Composition, Sight Translation, and Roman History.
A. Latin Prose Composition.    (Time, 3 hours.)
50       Translate into Latin :—
(a.) Both you and I have been made consuls by the votes and kindness of the
Roman people.
(&.)  I had rather keep my promises than be the richest man in the world.
(c.) He was an excellent youth, and a most faithful friend to me;   he had much
conversation with me about the future.
(<-.)  No one can with a good conscience deny that your brother returned home in
safety by a miraculous interposition,
(e.) He was the first to deny the existence of gods.
(f.)  Procrastination  in  showing gratitude  is  never praiseworthy;    for myself  I
prefer returning kindness to being under an obligation.
13 R 186
Public Schools Report.
1926
Value.
35
15
(fir.) The cavalry charged so fiercely that had not night interfered with the contest
the enemy would have turned their backs.
(/(..)  He made it his aim to avoid injuring any one of his subjects, but to consult
the good of the whole nation,
(i.)  We were within a very little of being all killed, some of us pierced by the
enemy's darts, others cut off either by famine or disease.
(j.) And therefore do not object to endure everything in behalf of your suffering
country and your exiled friends.
B. Sight Translation.
L. Scipio, frater Africani, infirmo erat corpore; tamen consul, legato fratre, contra
Antiochum missus est. Cum in Asiam advenisset, ad duo ferme milia ab hoste
castra posuit. Antiochus coepit aciem ihstruere, nee Scipio detrectavit certamen.
Cum autem duae acies in conspectu essent, coorta nebula caliginem dedit, quae nihil
admodum Romanis, eadem plurimum regiis nocuit; nam humor gladios aut pila
Romanorum non hebetavit, arcus vero, quibus Antiochi milites utebantur, fundasque
et jaculorum amenta emollierat. Itaque fusus est regis exereitus fugatusque. Ipse
Antiochus, cum paucis fugiens, in Lydiam concessit. Turn Asiae urbes victori se
dediderunt. L. Scipio Romam reversus ingenti gloria triumphavit, et Asiatici
cognomen accepit.
ferme—.about; caliginem—mist; regiis — (militibus) understood; hebetavit —dulled;
amenta—thongs.
C. Roman History.
1. (a.) Write a short account of the decline of Greek power in Italy and Sicily.
(B.)  Describe the role of the Greeks in Italian history.
2. Give a short history of the war in Spain, 218-207 B.C.
Physics.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[Answer question one and any eight of the remainder.]
1. A uniform accelerating force acts oh a mass of 1,000 grams, giving it a velocity of
3 metres per second in 8 seconds from rest.    Find:—
5 (a.) The acceleration;
4 (B.)  The force;
3 (c.)  The distance traversed;
3 (d.) The work done.
5 Describe some device by which you might accomplish this, making due allowance for
probable friction, or other resistance.
4 2.  (a.) A weight of 50 pounds is suspended from two points, A and B, on a horizontal
ceiling. The cord from A to the mass is 8 ft. long and that from B is 4 ft.
long. A is 8 ft. from B. Find, graphically, the pull in each cord. (A freehand drawing with distances estimated roughly to scale is sufficient if
drawing instruments are not at hand.)
2 (B.)  Define mechanical advantage.    A load is lifted through a system of pulleys.
1 What is the relation, theoretically, of the amount of work contributed to the
machine to the actual work accomplished?
1 What name is given to the actual ratio of these two amounts of work?
2 ' What reasons might we have for using such a device instead of lifting the
load directly? 17 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. R 187
Value.
5 3. (o.) How is the height of a barometer affected by (1) the diameter of the bore of
the tube; (2) the pressure of air above the mercury in the tube; (3) being
suspended outdoors or in a warm room;   (4) being carried up a mountain?
5 (B.)  How do we explain the fact that bodies ordinarily expand when heated?
5 4. (a.) Show that 1,000 grams of copper at 400° C. would raise 200 grams of water at
20° C. to 100° C. and convert some of it to steam. How many grams would
be thus converted?    (Sp. ht. of copper .094.)
5 (B.)  Define mechanical equivalent of heat and give its value.    Why must the temper
ature of the boiler of a locomotive be over 100° C?
5 5. (a.) Find tbe frequencies of two tuning-forks, each of which would be in resonance
with an air column one foot long and closed at one end. (Take the velocity
of sound as 1,100 ft. per sec.)
5 (B.)  From the phenomena studied in sound, give an example of each of the following:
harmonic overtone, interference, Doppler's Principle.
3        6. What differences in character are there between sound waves and those of light?
3 What similarity and what difference among waves of light, radiant heat, and
wireless telegraphy ?
4 Give a reasonable wave length for each of these four types of waves.
3 7.  (a.)  Explain very briefly, with the aid of a simple diagram, how the power of a lamp
may be measured.
4 (B.)  An object is 30 cm. from a lens and its image is found to be 20 cm. from the lens,
on the same side as the object.    Find, from the lens formula, the kind of lens
it must be and its focal length.
3 Then draw a diagram, roughly to scale, showing object, image, and lens.
7       8.  (a.)  Draw a diagram showing what happens to a ray of sunlight in a small drop of
water in a cloud where a rainbow appears.   Give names to the different
phenomena which contribute to the result.
3 (B.)  A boy runs toward a plane mirror at the rate of 20 ft. per second.    How rapidly
does he approach his image?
5 9.  (a.)  Draw a diagram of a straight bar magnet showing one complete line of force,
with arrows at different points showing its direction.    What is the significance of this direction?
5 (B.)  Using our conception that electrons, only, move in a solid conductor, tell what
happens as a rod of sealing-wax which has been rubbed with flannel  is
brought close to an insulated conductor and then as the conductor is touched
with the finger while the wax is near it.
10. A 50-watt lamp operates on a 110-volt circuit.    Find:—
2 (a.)  Its resistance;
2 (B.)  Its current;
3 (c.)  How long it could be used for one dollar with electricity at 5 cents per
kilowatt-hour;  and
3 (d.) The number of calories of heat it generates every second.
Trigonometry.    (Time, 3 hours.)
12 1. (a.) If sin 9 = .5, find the value of 1 + tan2<9.
(b.) Find the numerical value of -| cot2 30° + 3 sin2 60° - 2 cosec2 60° - § tan2 30°.
(a) Prove (tan 6 + 2) (2 tan 9 + 1) = 5 tan 6 + 2 sec2 6.
13 2. (a.) From the top of a cliff, 200 feet high, the angles of depression of the top and
bottom of a tower are observed to be 30° and 60° respectively.    Find the
height of the tower. R 188
Public Schools Report.
1926
Value.
13
14
12
(b.) Prove (sin a + cosec a)2 + (cos a + sec a)2 = tan2a + cot2a + 7.
3. (a.) Solve 2 sin2* + J3 cos x + 1 = 0.
(b.) Solve tan 5 6 = cot 2 6.
4. (a.) In any triangle prove b2 = c2 + a2 - 2ca cos B.
(b.) In any triangle prove sin ^ =   ./ -L_
6c
5. Prove
sin a + sin /_>
sin a - sin /_.
tan
a + p
tan
j8
18        6. If a = 4584, 6 = 5140, c = 3624, find A, using formula for tan —,
given log 1.534 = 0.1858 L tan 30° 5' = 9.7628
log 2.090 = 0.3201
log 3.050 = 0.4843
log 6.674 = 0.8244
18        7. If b = 16, c = 25, B = 33° 15', prove that the triangle is ambiguous and find the
other angles, having given
log 2 = 0.30103 L sin 33° 15' = 9.73901
L sin 58° 56' = 9.93276
L sin 58° 57' = 9 93283
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Ghart.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1926.
6325-1126-5671

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