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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA REPORT TO THE HONOURABLE T. D. PATTULLO, MINISTER OF LANDS ON THE QUESTION… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1927]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EEPORT
HONOURABLE T. D. PATTULLO, MINISTER OP LANDS
ON
THE QUESTION OF JOINT CONTROL OF
WATER SUPPLY
TO
THE CITIES AND MUNICIPALITIES
ON BURRARD INLET
E. A. CLEVELAND
COMPTROLLER  OP WATER  RIGHTS,  OCTOBER,  1922
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chakles F.  Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1926.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Part. Page.
I.—Introduction, Summary, and Suggested Organization  5
II,—Water Agreements summarized   7
III.—Description of City of Vancouver Supply Systems  16
IV.—Water Consumption and Requirements  19
V.—Hydrometric Data and Storage Possibilities   27
VI.—Timber on Drainage Areas and Logging Operations  33
APPENDIX.
Copies of Notices establishing Land Reserves in Watersheds   37
Sanitary Regulations governing Watersheds  38
Copies of Water Agreements—
City of Vancouver and Burnaby  41
City of Vancouver and Point Grey   43
City of Vancouver and South Vancouver  45
City of Vancouver and North Vancouver District   47
City of Vancouver and West Vancouver  49
City of North Vancouver and North Vancouver District  50
District of North Vancouver and City of North Vancouver  51
Brief List of District Organizations for Conduct of Various Public Utilities   53
TABLES.
General Statistics—Areas, Populations, Water Services, Revenues and Expenditures, etc  12
Water Rights of Cities and Districts  -  14
AVater Services installed since 1916  22
Percentage Rates of Growth of Services  22
Anticipated Number of Services in 1925 and Requirements  25
Consumption of Water in Various Cities of Canada  26
Consumption of Water in Various Cities of United States .'  26
Average Consumption in Unmetered Cities in United States  26
Length of Streams and Catchment Areas   27
Comparative Maximum Discharge of certain Streams  ,  27
Hydrometric Data—Seymour, Lynn, and Capilano Creeks 27, 28
Precipitation Records  31
Seymour Creek Storage Possibilities  .  32
Summary of District Organizations 53-55
MAPS AND DIAGRAMS.
Water-supply Systems  9
Effects of Metering on the Use of Water  21
Number of Water Services installed, 1916-21  23
Curves of Growth in Number of Services  24
Boundaries of Watersheds  .'  30
Mass Diagram—Seymour Creek Run-off following 32
Enlarged Portion of Mass Diagram   33
Timber Lands on Seymour, Lynn, and Capilano Creeks  35  JOINT CONTROL OF WATER SUPPLY ON
BURRARD INLET.
PAET I.
INTRODUCTION, SUMMARY, AND SUGGESTED ORGANIZATION.
October 3rd, 1922.
Honourable T. D. Pattullo,
Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Sie,—Pursuant to your instructions, consequent upon representations made by several of the
municipalities interested, I have made an examination into the question of the necessity for and
the desirability of some form of joint control of the supply of water to the cities and municipalities adjacent to Burrard Inlet.
The areas in question are: City of Vancouver, Municipality of Point Grey, Municipality of
South Vancouver, Municipality of Burnaby, on the south side of the inlet, and City of North
Vancouver, Municipality of North Vancouver, on the north side; in addition to which consideration must be given to the requirements and claims of the Municipalities of West Vancouver and
Richmond.
The streams rising in the mountain range to the north of Burrard Inlet furnish the supply
of water for all the areas named save Richmond, and of the total requirements Capilano, Lynn,
and Seymour Creeks furnish the major portion. Capilano and Seymour supply the entire south
side as well as certain parts north of the inlet, while Lynn Creek supply is confined solely to the
north shore.
The discussion herein will have reference to the ownership and operation of the works
constructed for the diversion and carriage of these waters, the relation of the several communities thereto, the requirements and principal sources available, and the present impediments
to adequate and equitable distribution, as well as a consideration of the possibilities of some form
of ownership and control that would contribute to sufficiency and fairness in supply and would
ensure that proper provision is made for the continued and increasing growth of the most
important metropolitan area in the Province.
Briefly, the situation is as follows: The City of Vancouver owns the systems installed on
both Capilano and Seymour Creeks, with the exception of the joint ownership with Point Grey
of a portion of the diversion-works and supply-mains from Capilano, including an unfinished
partnership main to Point Grey through the City of Vancouver. In these works of the" city
water is carried for the supply, under agreement, of the Municipalities of Point Grey, South
Vancouver, and Burnaby and for the supply of portions of the Districts of North Vancouver
and West Vancouver. Likewise the City of North Vancouver supplies from its Lynn Creek
system, under agreement, certain portions of the District of North Vancouver in and around
Lynn Valley, and the district supplies from its Mosquito Creek works, under a similar agreement,
a small portion of the City of North Vancouver known as Temple Heights.
A little history will at this stage assist in a clearer understanding of the reasons for the
various agreements cited.
The City of Vancouver was incorporated on the 6th day of April, 1886, and on the same day
the Provincial Legislature, by special enactment, created the Vancouver Water Works Company.
Steps were at once taken by the company to provide a waterworks system from Capilano Creek
for the supply of the new and growing city, and in March, 1889, water was delivered to the city.
Some two years later the city purchased the system and has from time to time enlarged and
improved the works and has constructed entirely independent supply-mains from Seymour Creek.
At the time of the incorporation of the city the Districts of Burnaby, South Arancouver, and
Point Grey were, with the exception of an occasional clearing along their water-fronts, timbered
wildernesses. The same may be said of the City of North Vancouver and of the Districts of
North and West Vancouver. D 6
Department of Lands.
1925
As time passed development spread to these adjacent districts and in due course water in
addition to that which could be obtained from wells, springs, or small local streams was required.
What more logical course for the districts on the south shore, for instance, could have been
adopted during those early and uncertain periods of growth than to arrange with the City of
Vancouver to carry for them in its large and expanding systems the supply of water they desired.
These south shore municipalities acquired water rights on Seymour Creek, while the District
of North Vancouver acquired rights on both Capilano and Seymour and West Vancouver Municipality has a pending application for rights on the former. The City of North Vancouver obtained
no water rights on Capilano nor Seymour Creeks and derives no part of its present supply therefrom, but has an independent supply system from Lynn Creek.
Manifestly it has not been possible, nor would it have been an economic undertaking for
each of the municipalities at any stage of its growth to engage in the construction of separate
supply-mains from Capilano or Seymour Creeks. By combination they might have arranged for
joint supply. Failing this, a duplication of works on streams already occupied by one authority
obviously seemed undesirable if satisfactory arrangements could be made for a supply to others
through such works.
Applications for this supply service, which was sometimes mutual, as in the case of the City
and District of North Vancouver, led to the agreements referred to.
The continued development of the cities and surrounding municipalities necessitated extensions of the various works. Since the community projecting or extending a system required to
provide the funds for capital expenditure, the needs of a sister community were, as might be
expected, often not adequately provided for, and certain preferential rights to the use of its
own works were quite properly and prudently maintained by the owner. Accelerated growth,
too, in directions not fully anticipated has taken place and requirements now tax the main supply
systems to the City of Vancouver. It will, therefore, not be long until relatively large expenditures will be necessary to meet increasing demands and the time is opportune for a review of the
situation.
Approximately three-eighths of the population on the south shore of Burrard Inlet is now
outside of the City of Vancouver and is growing at a much faster rate than the city population.
The authorities of the city have in the past endeavoured to meet the requirements of their
neighbours, but the preponderance of population will shortly be in the districts, and it is hardly
to be expected that they should wish to remain in a position of dependence in the matter of
storage-works, extensions and maintenance of main works, and the important factor of protection
of the catchment areas.
The failure of the city to guard its own interests in so vital a matter as the disposition of
the timber resources within the Capilano watershed, and its neglect to prevent the already
established beginnings of the removal of timber above the city intake within the much more
important Seymour watershed, does not inspire confidence in its ability to assure the all-essential
future water-supply of its neighbours.
The repeated defeat of by-laws submitted for waterworks purposes during years past suggest
that, even though plans may be designed to provide for extensions or increased supply that may
be of the utmost importance to one or more of the municipalities, they may fail of ratification at
the city polls.
Were the districts dependent upon the waterworks supply system of the City of Vancouver
small and unimportant, having demands for water that might at any and all times be easily met,
the situation would be very different. But with already large and fast-increasing population it
seems neither reasonable nor safe that they should remain in a position where failure of the
citizens of the City of Vancouver to ratify a money by-law may retard their growth, prejudice
their interests, and even imperil health itself.
Some form of joint control of the sources of water-supply for the Greater Vancouver Area
is necessary to ensure an adequate treatment of the problem, so that the whole area will be in a
position to get its supply, present and future, on the most equitable terms. This implies that
duplication of effort and waste of resources be avoided; that on no municipal unit in the greater
area should there be placed the responsibility of financing for any or all the others, nor the
opportunity, by failing so to do, of prejudicing the interests of others. 16 Geo. 5   Joint Control of Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.        D 7
These ends would seem most readily served by the creation of a Metropolitan Water Board
embracing the Cities of Vancouver and North Vancouver, the Municipalities of Burnaby, South
Vancouver, Point Grey, and North Vancouver, and possibly West Vancouver.
In the Appendix to this report will be found some details of organizations in various parts of
the continent with somewhat similar objects and functions.
The Board should be endowed with authority to purchase the main water-supply systems
and to borrow money and issue bonds, debentures, or other securities in respect of such indebtedness; to purchase lands and timber rights.within the North Vancouver watersheds with tne
object of protecting the sources of supply ; and to engage in and carry on the business of supplying
water in bulk to its component units.
The main water-supply systems of the City of Vancouver and the Vancouver-Point Grey joint
main would be acquired by the new corporation. Consideration should be given to the advisability of Board control of the centrally located Little Mountain reservoir and to the desirability
of purchasing the main supply system of the City of North Vancouver.
The form of administration and control should be simple and at the same time permit of the
popular will being expressed through its representatives, but should possess sufficient elements
of permanence so that at no time should there be any divergence from the general plan of building
up step by step, as demands may dictate, of the necessary parts of a predetermined and comprehensive development.
Provision should be made for the setting aside and handling of sinking fund moneys and
appropriate methods prescribed for the raising of the necessary annual financial requirements.
The question of the recognition of the value to all the lands in a district of a water-supply
system and the raising of the water corporation's revenue on some basis that involves : (a) A tax
on assessed land values; (b) payment of a rate per unit of volume (uniform to all the municipal
bodies) for water actually delivered, should be thoroughly canvassed..
It may not be out of place to suggest here that multiplication of organizations and the
duplication of officers, staffs, and overhead generally might be avoided by the recasting of the
Vancouver and Districts Joint Sewerage and Drainage legislation and the incorporation of the
water-supply organization with it on some basis to be determined.
The area to be included, the supply systems to be purchased, the basis of appraisal for fixing
the purchasing price, and the form and details of the whole organization should be the subject
of complete discussion by the parties interested. In this discussion the Province should be
represented, since it has large areas in the Municipality of Point Grey for which no adequate
supply has been arranged, and on account of its guarantees of certain indebtedness of South
Vancouver. In addition, the general policy with respect to the rights of the Crown in the
unrecorded waters would dictate that especial attention be given the whole question.
Some of the considerations on which this opinion is founded, with certain related matter, will
be found in the following pages.
PART II.
SUMMARY OF WATER AGREEMENTS.
The water rights held by the cities and municipalities, under licence from the Crown, on
the various sources of supply are tabulated and shown on pages 12, 13, 14, and 15.
Copies of the agreements between the several parties respecting carriage of water will be
found in the Appendix hereto.
The more important provisions of the agreements will be briefly summarized here and such
comment made as may indicate some of the difficulties of the situation.
South Vancouver.
Under the provisions of the agreement dated July 17th, 1917, between South Vancouver and
the City of Vancouver, the city undertakes to supply " a like proportion of water per head of
population in the district as that supplied per head of population on similar levels in the city."
The number of points at which connections may be made with the city's mains is limited.    The district agrees to purchase and take " its entire water-supply from the city to such extent as
the city is able and shall find it practicable to deliver and supply at the points aforesaid," and
the city is relieved of any responsibility for failure to supply by reason—among other things—of
" excess draw-off in other parts of the city."
The agreement has now run half the period of ten (10) years in which it is to remain in force
unless terminated by either party by the prescribed three years' notice. The rate payable by
South Vancouver is 4% cents per 100 cubic feet of water, subject to a discount for prompt
payment.
The South Vancouver situation is probably the least satisfactory of any. It will be noted
that the municipality has placed entire reliance on the ability of the city to deliver a sufficient
water-supply at each of the several points, limited under the agreement to seven in number, at
which it may make connections to the city mains.
It so happens that the more thickly populated parts of the municipality are on higher ground
than the main portion of the City of Vancouver and its lower parts are supplied with water that
must pass over elevations below which lie large areas of the city. As a consequence " excess
draw-off in other parts of the city " has during the last three years or so very seriously impaired
the supply to South Vancouver.
For certain high-level areas not capable of being served by gravity the municipality pumps
directly from the city mains on Nanaimo Street at the city boundary.
As a net result of growth in both the city and districts and excessive use and waste in the
city, to which reference will be later made, the supply to South Vancouver is exceedingly unsatisfactory. The pressure-gauge at the Municipal Hall, at elevation of 400 feet above sea-level, which
records pressure by direct connection with Seymour high-level main, has given zero reading during
daylight hours for considerable periods during the last three summers. Complaints have been
numerous and continuous Quring these periods from residents on the higher levels under the
gravity system that not only is there no water for fire-protection, but that none is available for
domestic use except between the hours of 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Naturally such a condition must
react seriously on the growth and development of the community and should not long be permitted
to continue.
The total average daily consumption of water per service in South Vancouver in 1921 was
222 gallons. Compared with 900 to 1,000 gallons per service in the City of Vancouver, 280 gallons
in Point Grey, and 378 gallons in Burnaby, the low consumption, which is partly due to insufficient
supply, is striking. This is more particularly the case in view of the fact that the great length
of distribution system is largely of wire-wound wooden pipes, a considerable portion of which has
been in use for several years and from which one would expect a larger leakage than from well-
laid steel or cast-iron pipes.
BlJBNABY.
Under the provisions of the agreement dated June 5th, 1911, between the City of Vancouver
and Burnaby, in consideration of the transfer to the city by the district of the latter's water
rights on Seymour Creek and of the payment to the city annually of the sum of $7,000, the city
agreed to increase the diameter of the main it was about to lay from Seymour Creek to the city
from 30 inches to 34 inches and also to lay a submerged 18-inch main across the Second Narrows
of Burrard Inlet for the carriage to Burnaby of not more than 7 cubic feet of water per second,
the total quantity under licence to Burnaby from Seymour Creek. The city retains the ownership
of the supply mains and connections, and should it decide to change its intake to a higher point on
the creek it is agreed that Burnaby shall participate in the extension of the mains by contributing
pro rata its share of the cost of such change.
It will be noticed that Burnaby is in an entirely different position from its neighbour, South
Vancouver, in respect to water-supply. It has now no water rights on Seymour Creek, having
transferred them to the city in consideration of the city bringing for it to the south shore of the
Second Narrows the quantity of water that may be carried by the 18-inch submerged main, not
to exceed 7 cubic feet per second'—approximately three and three-quarter million gallons per
day—at an annual charge of $7,000.
From the standpoint of the citizens of Burnaby this annual charge may be looked upon as a
most moderate and favourable one, as it includes on a fixed basis Burnaby's participation in the
yearly maintenance and operation of the city's Seymour system from the intake to the Second 3-1
II
II
!l
1
.XVi
«i D 10
Department of Lands.
1925
Narrows.   Thus the large
floods on the creek last
The daily use of watej'
1921.   The distribution sy
city at Seymour Falls, the
waterworks Installation,
at Cambridge and Carlton
elevation .360 feet that th«
draught on the Seymour sy
The municipality will
Seymour Falls.
expenditures by the city on protection and restoration following the
Octpber do not add to the municipality's burden.
per service in Burnaby is a normal one, having been 377 gallons in
sjtem was designed for gravity supply from the proposed intake of the
early construction of which was contemplated at the time of Burnaby's
~.n the interval the whole supply of Burnaby is pumped at a station
Streets on its 24-inch main from the Second Narrows, so located at
water is received by gravity at the pumps under all conditions of
;tem.
je relieved of this pumping cost wlien the city mains are extended'to
Point Grey.
The agreement between Point Grey and the City of Vancouver provides for the joint ownership of portions of the Caiilaiio system, in consideration of the relinquishment to the city by
the district of its water rights on Seymour Creek and of the payment by the district, in certain
fixed proportions, of the cos ts of part of the city's intake and sediment-tanks and Capilano mains,
and of a new 24-inch main to be constructed from the second canyon of the Capilano to a point
in Point Grey.    The costs of maintenance are to be shared in like proportion.
The city agrees that, pending completion of this partnership main, it will "deliver to the
municipality as much wate:' as it can conveniently spare from its own system on the terms and
rmer contract.
Grey furnishes another variant to that in South Vancouver and in
conditions set out " in a for
The situation in Point
with a view of obtaining i
from Seymour, on which it
of the joint main.
Although the agreemedt respectin
the major portion of the w
of False Creek still exists
expended, Point Grey has
Burnaby.    The municipality here enters into partnership with the city in a portion of the works,
:s water-supply from the more convenient Capilano Creek instead of
has water rights, pending transfer of them to the city on completion
the joint main was entered into on May 1st, 1912, and
ork completed by the end of 1913, an unfinished gap at the crossing
with the result that, although something like $450,000 has been
10 date received no water through these works. The main has been
connected at Georgia Street, in the City of Vancouver, with the city's distribution system, but
on account of the reduced jressure maintained the flow in excess of that required in the lower
elevations of the city has been wasting through Stanley Park reservoir.
Difficulties over the cost of construction which was, under the provisions of the agreement,
carried out by the City of Vancouver led Point Grey to refuse to pay further moneys on construction account and the work was discontinued, with the result that this large investment has been
svithout being used for the purpose for which it was intended. Mean-
water to Point Grey without payment since 1918 from its Seymour
:es that both have suffered during the past two or three years with
an insufficient supply on tie higher levels in the summer. Indeed, during the summer of 1922
the water-level in Point G rey reservoir on one occasion, despite the most careful efforts to
'ithin 6 inches of floor-level.
)e right in its contentions concerning the matter in dispute, it may
safely be said that both are at fault in allowing several million gallons of much-needed water
to go to waste every day :'or want of a relatively short connection across False Creek. The
completion of this link in the system will be of advantage all around. The joint main will be
isolated from the city distribution and deliver directly to the city's Little Mountain reservoir
and to the Point Grey reservoir, from whence the high-level areas will receive their due supply
and the benefits will be felt by South Vancouver in temporarily decreased draught from Seymour
for city high levels and Poli.t Grey.
The per service consumption of water in Point Grey is a very moderate one, the average
rate being about 280 gallons per day, a result achieved by the metering of every service.
lying for almost nine years
time the city has supplied
system, with the consequen
maintain a reserve, fell to \|
Whichever party may
Municipa
The agreements betw
couver cover whatever
to the city mains in the
ities of North Vancouver and West Vancouver.
the City of Vancouver and the Districts of North and West Van-
suppl|y the city " may find practicable " to deliver, and limit the connections
case to three and in the other to one.    The rate charged is the 16 Geo. 5 Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet. D 11
same—namely, 6 cents per 100 cubic feet, subject to discount; but in. the case of North Vancouver
District the minimum annual payment is ?1,500. In the case of West Vancouver the water may
not be used for manufacturing or industries, but only for domestic purposes. The agreements
are terminable on one year's and six months' notice respectively.
The quantities of water at present taken from the City of Vancouver mains by these districts
are relatively small, amounting to an average daily use in 1920 of 113,000 gallons. Each district
has works of its own from other sources of supply, but has considerable area that can be supplied
only from Seymour or Capilano, as the ease may be. Tinder present agreements the districts are
confined to a certain number of connections, limited as to size and from fixed points on the city
mains. They are charged a higher rate than South Vancouver, though much nearer the source,
and are subject—quite properly—to the protection afforded the citizens of Vancouver in the use
of their own works in preference to the districts. The restriction in the case of West Vancouver
to the use of water for " domestic purposes only " may be noted.
City of Nobth Vancouver.
The agreements between North Vancouver City and District are reciprocal arrangements
whereunder each undertakes, with due restrictions as to liability, to carry water in its system
for the benefit of the residents of certain limited portions of the area of the other. The rates
collectable are shared equally, except as to the charge for fire-hydrants, which is based upon the
number in the respective areas served. Both agreements are terminable on six months' notice
by either party. The service under one of these agreements at least has of late been very
unsatisfactory, due to freshet conditions having filled with gravel the small storage-basin above
the intake-works on Mosquito Creek.
As hereinbefore noted, the City of North Vancouver derives no part of its water-supply from
either Capilano or Seymour Creeks. Its present source is Lynn Creek, from whence it constructed works in the year 1904. The summer flow of Lynn Creek has heretofore provided the
city with sufficient supply, although the hydrometric data indicate that in September, 1915, at
the gauging-station, situated just below the intake, the surface flow practically ceased. Conditions at the intake are extremely unsatisfactory; no provision is made for adequate settlement
of the suspended matter in the water and during every freshet great difficulties are caused by
movement of gravel and heavy material toward the intake. During 1912 and subsequent years
the city expended about $139,000 on a storage-basin at Rice Lake, a short distance to the eastward
of the present intake and on a supply-main connecting the basin with a new intake farther up
the creek.    For various reasons the work was left uncompleted and has not been used.
The city has at present no storage and it is hardly conceivable that as it grows to greater
industrial importance it will be able to cope successfully with increasing requirements from this
source alone, unless reasonably cheap and extensive storage facilities not now known may be
brought to light.
The city supplies from its Lynn Creek system a considerable area of the District of North
Vancouver and is in turn supplied by the district for the Temple Heights area lying at elevations
that cannot be reached by the city's Lynn Creek works.
Municipality of Richmono.
Richmond has a water right on Seymour Creek to the extent of 7 cubic feet per second, but
received its water-supply under an agreement with the City of New Westminster from the
Coquitlam Lake mains of the latter.
Following the disaster to the New Westminster supply in February last, Richmond secured
an emergency connection with the Point Grey system and drew w-ater therefrom until the
Westminster main was again in commission.
Under the provisions of section 137 of the " Water Act" the right of Richmond on Seymour
Creek is not cancellable for non-use. It need not, however, form an obstacle to any necessary
development. D 12
Department of Lands.
1925
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5
.S    Eh D 16 Department of Lands. 1925
PART III.
VANCOUVER WATERWORKS SYSTEM.
General Description.
The original works for the supply of water to the City of Vancouver were constructed by the
Vancouver Water Works Company—a company incorporated under special Act of the Provincial
Legislature on April 6th, 1886, the day on which the same authority passed the Act incorporating
the City of Vancouver.
It may be interesting to note here that when the permanent Board of Directors was elected
in December, 1887, it was composed of the following gentlemen: President, Captain John Irving;
directors, Hon. (later Sir) Joseph W. Trutch, Messrs. R. P. Either, G. A. Keefer, Thos. Earle, and
D. M. Eberts.    Mr. Eberts was appointed solicitor and Mr. J. W. McFarland, secretary.
The main works for a water-supply from Capilano Eiver were designed by the late Mr. G. A.
Keefer, M.Can.Soc.C.E., and constructed under the supervision of the late Mr. H. B. Smith,
M.Can.Soc.C.E. The general plan of the distribution system was designed by the late Mr. T. C.
Keefer, C.E., C.M.C., past President of the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers.
Surveys were made during the summer of 1886 and the first contracts let for construction
in June, 1887. The intake selected was at a point on the river about 6% miles up-stream from
its mouth, where a rock-filled wooden-crib dam was constructed and completed on, April 18th,
1888. The dam had a length of 384 feet, of which the maximum section formed a spillway 165
feet in length, 41 feet 2 inches in width, and 13 feet 9 inches high in the deepest part of the
original channel of the river. The elevation of ordinary water-surface in the reservoir thus
created was 417 feet about high-water mark of Burrard Inlet. From the dam for a distance of
13,530 feet down-stream to a point in the centre of a short tunnel through the canyon wall the
pipe was 22 inches in diameter, the total available head in that distance being 29 feet and the
computed discharge 4,878,000 imperial gallons per 24 hours.
From the tunnel to the north shore of Burrard Inlet at the First Narrows, a distance of
19,320 feet, the main was 16 inches in diameter, the total fall from the floor of the tunnel being
388 feet. At the north shore of the Narrows the 16-inch main was divided into two branches of
12 inches diameter. One 12-inch branch composed of cast-iron flexible-jointed pipe was laid
across the Narrows at the time of the original undertaking and the other branch, for which
provision had been made, at a subsequent date.
The laying of the first main across the Narrows, consisting of 746 feet of plain riveted-steel
pipe, 261 feet of riveted-steel pipe with cast-iron flexible joints, and 1,236 feet of cast-iron flexible-
joint pipe, the latter on a submerged sandstone ridge with a maximum depth of 56 feet of water
at low tide and in a maximum tidal velocity of about 9 miles per hour, was a very considerable
tax on the resourcefulness of the contractors.
From the south side of the Narrows the 164nch steel main was continued through Stanley
Park, across Coal Harbour, and along the graded streets to what was then the centre of the
city—a distance of 39,211 feet from the centre of the tunnel or almost exactly 10 miles from the
well-chambers of the dam. The total static head at the termination of the pipe was 384 feet and
the total calculated discharge 4,253,000 imperial gallons per 24 hours. Both the 22-inch and
16-inch mains were of mild steel 0.11 inch in thickness, manufactured from plates imported from
England by the company and rolled, riveted, coated with asphaltum, and laid in the trench by
the Albion Iron Works Company, of Victoria.
The water reached the city on March 26th, 1889. On November 15th of the same year a
serious accident happened to the submerged main by which the city was deprived of its water-
supply for a period of eight days. One of the 12-inch mains at the Narrows, lying in 40 feet of
water, was badly fractured. The break was generally attributed to a severe water-ram due to
too sudden closing of valves or hydrants.
In 1891 the City of Vancouver purchased the system from the company for a consideration
of $440,000.
In the succeeding years the remarkable growth of the city led to the installation of large
extensions to the distribution system and to the construction in 1893, under the direction of
Colonel T. H. Tracey, then City Engineer, of an open earth-embanked concrete-lined reservoir 16 Geo. 5 Joint Control of Water Supply on Burrard Inlet. D 17
of 10,000,000 gallons capacity on the high ground of Stanley Park at an elevation of 240 feet
above sea-level.
In 1898 a 22-inch steel main was constructed from the Capilano tunnel to the city. It
continues along with the original 16-inch to the Narrows, a distance of 17,900 feet, and is divided
there into two of 18 inches, one continuing by a flexible-jointed cast-iron pipe across the Narrows
and the other closed by a valve and left for future extension. On the south side the 18-inch
is enlarged to a 22-inch riveted steel, crossing Stanley Park and Coal Harbour, a distance of
6,500 feet, to Chilco and Georgia Streets, where the general distribution system of the city begins.
Continued growth of the city and of the adjacent municipalities made it necessary to reach
higher elevations and demanded a quantity of water in excess of that provided by the earlier
works.
In the year 1906 the intake of the Capilano system was changed to a point known as the
" Pool," about three-quarters of a mile up-stream from the original intake at the dam and at
elevation of 483 feet.
An intake-conduit, two sediment-tanks with appropriate screening and flushing apparatus,
gate-house, and caretaker's quarters were constructed and a 36-inch continuous wood-stave pipe
built down to the site of the old dam, where it is divided by a " Y," from which a similar main
30 inches in diameter extends for 8,900 feet, followed by a riveted-steel pipe of the same diameter
4,000 feet in length, extending to the northerly end of a second tunnel driven to the eastward
of the original bore, carrying the 22-inch, which is there reduced to a 16-inch. The 30-inch pipe
is divided at the tunnel into 22-inch and 26-inch steel-riveted pipes. The 22-inch passes through
the old tunnel and is connected there to the older main of the same diameter.
The 26-inch (known as the Vancouver-Point Grey partnership main) is installed in the
second tunnel and extends from its junction with the 30-inch to the First Narrows, a distance
of 18,500 feet. This partnership pipe is divided just north of the Narrows into two 18-inch steel
pipes, 700 feet in length, to which are connected cast-iron flexible-jointed mains of the same
diameter, extending across the Narrows a further distance of 2,100 feet. These two pipes are
again joined on the south side to a single 26-inch riveted-steel pipe which crosses Stanley Park
and Coal Harbour, a distance of 6,500 feet, to Chilco and Georgia Streets, where a connection is
made to the city distribution system by a sealed valve, intended to be used only in case of
emergencies such as a great conflagration. From this point the 26-inch is laid along Chilco, Haro,
and Smythe Streets to False Creek, where the pipe for the submerged crossing remains unlaid.
From this crossing at Connaught Bridge the pipe is laid via Yukon Street, Fourteenth Avenue,
and Laurel Streets to the city boundary at Sixteenth Avenue, and thence to Thirty-fourth Avenue,
where it is proposed to divide it into two pipes of such diameters that one-half the total discharge
of the main will be delivered to the respective reservoirs—the city's at Little Mountain at elevation 400 and the Point Grey reservoir at Hudson Street and Thirty-third Avenue at elevation 357.
It is stated that this main is to be connected by sealed valves at four other points where it
crosses city distribution-mains. The original agreement between the city and Point Grey bears
no evidence of any amendment having been made.
Seymour System.
Prior to the year 1908 the city depended upon Capilano as its source of supply. For many
reasons it was considered desirable to have an independent supply from Seymour.
The first or lower intake constructed in 1907 and 1908 is located 7 miles up from the mouth
of the stream and at an elevation of 405 feet above sea-level. A low submerged boulder weir
and intake-crib serve to divert the water to settling-tanks designed to separate the finer sediment
and floating matter from the water and prevent it from entering the pipe. Racks and scour-gates
with screening and skimming apparatus are provided- and a caretaker's house built in immediate
contact with the headworks.
The pipe-line follows a wagon-road built for purpose of construction along the right-of-way.
The first 1,450 feet of pipe is of 36-inch continuous wood stave followed by 17,500 feet of 30-inch
wood-stave pipe, extending to the bridge crossing the creek, where it is enlarged to a 32-inch
steel-riveted pipe for a distance of 500 feet. The special connections between wood and steel are
made with ordinary lead joints. From the end of the steel pipe a 30-inch continuous wood pipe
for 4,150 feet, where it connects with a 24-inch Stewart and Lloyd lap-welded steel pipe 5/16 inch D 18 Department of Lands. 1925
in thickness, with lead joints, extending 12,250 feet to the Second Narrows. From this main the
North Vancouver connection is made. At the Narrows the 24-inch is divided into two of 18-inch
cast-iron ball- and socket-jointed pipes, which extend across to the south shore, a distance of
1,200 feet. These pipes are cast in lengths of 9 feet, with a shell 1% inches in thickness, weigh
from 3,300 to 3,600 lb. each, have ball and socket joints requiring about 400 lb. of lead each, and
are capable of a deflection of 19° at each joint. They are laid in a maximum depth of water of
75 feet at low tide.
On the south shore the two 18-inch are joined into a 24-inch riveted-steel pipe which passes
under the Canadian Pacific Railway in a concrete-lined tunnel and follows along tbe south side
of the railway right-of-way westerly; thence through Hastings Park to and along Eton Street
to Powell Street and along Powell to McLean Drive, where it is connected to the general distribution system of the city. The total length of the main from intake to its connection with the
city distribution is about 10% miles.
In 1913 a new main from a temporary intake located about 2,000 feet up-stream from that
just described was completed. The main is 36 inches in diameter, riveted steel, 37,850 feet in
length from intake to the Second Narrows. The thickness of plate varies from % inch for a
short section near the intake to 7/10 inch at the Narrows. The pipe is designed to withstand the
pressure due to the head to be created by extension to a permanent intake at Seymour Falls, some
4 miles farther up-stream. It also crosses the Seymour Creek Bridge, installed for the earlier
pipe-line, and passes through a tunnel 700 feet in length a short distance below the bridge.
Below the sediment-tanks at the intake provision is made in the arrangement of the valves and
" Y " for a 48-inch extension northward to the falls.
Immediately north of the Narrows and about 400 feet eastward from the line of the earlier
Seymour installation the 36-inch is.divided into two short lengths of 24-inch, each of which is
again divided into two 18-inch, and from each of these an 18-inch cast-iron flexible-jointed pipe,
similar to those already described, extends across the Narrows to the south side and through
two small tunnels under the Canadian Pacific Railway tracks to a point near by, where three
of them are connected into one 32-inch riveted-steel pipe. The pipe is laid along East Street,
Boundary Road, Cambridge, Cassiar, and Charles Streets to Clark Drive, about 3 8/10 miles
from the Narrows, where it connects through a 24-inch pressure-reducing valve to a 24-inch steel
pipe extending north along Clark Drive to Pender, there making connection to the city distribution system and by an extension of the same main to Albert Street and McLean Drive, where
a connection is made with the earlier 24-inch Seymour supply-main. From the division-point of
the 32-inch at the junction of Charles Street and Clark Drive a 24-inch steel-riveted pipe extends
to Little Mountain reservoir by way of Clark Drive, Twenty-fifth Avenue, Cambie Street, and
Thirty-third Avenue.
The remaining one of the four submerged 18-inch mains which provides the water for
Burnaby under the agreement of June 5th, 1911, with the city has a cross-connection with a
sealed valve to the city main and is connected into a 24-inch steel main forming part of Burnaby's
internal system, which is designed to receive all the water for the needs of the municipality at
this point.
Little Mountain Reservoir.
Little Mountain reservoir of the City of Vancouver is constructed on an eminence of that
name in the Municipality of South Vancouver and about 1 mile southerly from the city. The
junction of Cambie Street and Thirty-third Avenue lies immediately to the west. The reservoir
is constructed partly in cut and partly in embankment. It is concrete-lined and has top dimensions of 377 feet by 612 feet, with a depth of 25 feet.    It was constructed in the year 1911.
The capacity is 25,000,000 imperial gallons up to the normal overflow-level of the waste-pipe
at elevation 397 feet.
It is an equalizing reservoir designed to provide for daily fluctuations in the city's demand.
It furnishes approximately one day's storage for the present population. The one 24-inch pipe
into the reservoir acts both as inlet and outlet and is provided with a hand-operated balanced
valve inside of the reservoir. The gate-house outside permits of the connection through automatic
regulating-valves of the 18-inch and 24-inch mains from Seymour and for an 18-inch from the
Vancouver-Point Grey partnership pipe from Capilano. 16 Geo. 5 Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet. D 19
Stanley Park Reservoir.
At an elevation of 240 feet in Stanley Park a concrete-lined reservoir with earth embankment
having top dimensions of 274 feet by 274 feet and a depth of 25 feet, with a capacity of 10,000,000
gallons, was constructed in 1893. Due to the growth of population on the higher levels of the
city, for which this reservoir will not serve, it is used now largely as a place to waste water at
periods of low draught on the distribution system In the lower areas. It is connected with the
original lG-inch Capilano main by a lG-inch pipe about 2,500 feet in length, on which there is a
regulating-valve originally designed to prevent supplies being taken from the reservoir until the
pressure in the main dropped below the head at which the reservoir would discharge.
City Engineer Fellowes has reported that of late the condition of the 16-inch and 22-inch
Capilano mains on the north shore is such that they begin to leak badly when the pressure at the
caretaker's house at the Narrows exceeds 145 lb. (The full static pressure due to elevation of
the intake is slightly over 200 lb.) In order to ensure that the pressure in these mains will not
exceed 145 lb., the regulating-valve on the main to Stanley Park reservoir has been so adjusted
that when the draught in the city from Capilano falls off and the pressure in the mains begins
to rise in excess of 145 lb. at the Narrows, the regulating-valve opens, water is discharged into
the reservoir, and an overflow of varying volume takes place. The connection made between the
26-inch Vancouver-Point Grey partnership pipe and the city mains at Georgia and Chilco Streets
places the 16-inch, 22-inch, and 26-inch Capilano pipes for the present in the same category as to
pressure, all being governed by the relief at the Park reservoir. This, however, will be altered,
as far as the 26-inch joint main is concerned, when it is isolated and carried through to its
termination.
From the date of purchase of the Vancouver Waterworks until 1915 the system was under
the supervision of the City Engineer. From 1905 to 1913 the design of extensions to the system
.and supervision of construction, excepting the distribution and maintenance, were in the hands of
Mr. H. M. Burwell, C.E., while from 1913 the whole of the works have been under the supervision
of the City Engineer.
PART IV.
WATER CONSUMPTION IN CITY OF VANCOUVER AND ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES.
City of Vancouver.
The complete absence of meters on the Vancouver water-supply systems makes a close
determination of the quantities being used at any time a matter of special measurement and
observation at several widely distributed points. These are consequently made only at long
intervals and any figures deduced for maximum and average used, therefore, lack precision
and are subject to some variation. The discussion following is an attempt to arrive at a figure
that may fairly be taken as the average daily consumption in the city.
From measurements made by the City Engineer's Department on July 22nd, 1922, the
Seymour Creek system was reported as delivering at the rate of 18.29 millions gallons per day;
at that period, according to the same authority, the consumption from the Capilano system, as
shown by measurements taken at the intake-flume and the overflow at the intake and Stanley
Park reservoir, was about 11 million gallons per day; or a total delivery of about 29.29 million
gallons per day.
Since the water-level in Little Mountain reservoir is not maintained during the summer, there
may also have been a considerable rate of draught from it at the time and the figure may be
rounded out as about 30,000,000 gallons.
As there were severe restrictions on use and considerable shortage, this rate may not have
exceeded by more than 10 or 15 per cent, the average daily rate for the year. Assuming it to
have been 15 per cent, in excess, the daily average use would be 26.5 million gallons. This
corresponds fairly well with the estimate of daily consumption for 1921 furnished this office by
the City Engineer, who states it " including water furnished the municipalities varies from 25
to 28 million gallons per day." The total for 1921 of the average daily use in the municipalities
served as measured was 4.7 million gallons; leaving for the City of Vancouver an average net
consumption of 21.8 million gallons.   The number of city services in July, 1922, was in round D 20
Department of Lands.
1925
numbers, 24,900, showing a mean daily use per service of 875 gallons, or a per capita consumption
on a basis of 5 per service of 175 gallons, or a per capita consumption on basis of 114,000 population of 191 gallons.
The Fire Underwriters' Inspecting Engineer, in reporting to the Mainland Fire Underwriters'
Association, concluded as a result of measurements made by him with the assistance of the City
Water Superintendent at all the city intakes on October 16th, 1917, that the actual quantity
passing through the mains at that time was 30,124,900 imperial gallons. This measurement
made on a day in October may be assumed as giving fair approximation as to the average daily
use. In order, however, to reduce this quantity to the 21.8 million gallons given in the preceding
paragraph as the approximate daily average there arrived at, we should have to assume the day's
overflow from city reservoirs as 8.3 million gallons. This is undoubtedly excessive. No water
is wasted at Little Mountain and the waste of 8.3 million gallons at Stanley Park would be more
than would be delivered to it by the entire use of the 26-inch joint main from Capilano.
Assuming the correctness of the figure of 30,124,800 gallons and the very uncertain loss at
Stanley Park reservoir as 4,124,800 gallons, the net supply to the city and municipalities would
be 26,000,000 gallons. At that date the combined use of the municipalities from city mains based
on the same average daily rate per service as calculated for the years 1920 and 1921 would be
3,200,000 gallons, leaving for the City of Vancouver 22,800,000 gallons. On this basis and with
the number of services at December 31st, 1917, as 22,771, mean daily use per service approximately
1,000 gallons, or a per capita consumption on basis of 5 per service of 200 gallons, or a per capita
consumption on basis of 114,000 population of 200 gallons.
The average rate of use in the city per capita would appear from these data to be in the
neighbourhood of 175 to 200 gallons per day. It should be expected that on account of the
greater use of water for industrial purposes, the number of apartment-houses and other large
buildings counted as one service 'each, the rate per service in the city would be greater than for
its neighbours, but not in such ratio as that shown. Under the circumstances the rate must be
considered as an excessive one. On page 26 will be found tables giving the consumption of
water in various cities in Canada and the United States and on the same page a statement by an
acknowledged authority of the average uses and losses in unmetered cities in the United States.
It will be of interest to compare the total consumption in the City of Vancouver with the
consumption in the City of Seattle in 1906. Vancouver has now according to the census a population of 117,217 and takes approximately 23,000,000 imperial gallons per day. The population
supplied from Seattle's Cedar River system in 1906, according to the report of the Superintendent
of Water, was nearly 200,000 and the delivery about 23,000,000 U.S. gallons, equivalent to
19,170,000 imperial gallons or 35 cubic feet per second—or to the minimum recorded flow of
Capilano Creek alone. The Seattle dry-weather use had grown by the summer of 1913, according
to the same authority, to about 33% million imperial gallons for a population estimated at 300,000
or about 110 imperial gallons per capita.
A comparison with the consumption to-day in the City of Winnipeg and its adjoining
municipalities is still more striking. The population served by the Greater Winnipeg Aqueduct
is now said to be 282,000. The Chairman of the Commission states that the total consumption
per 24 hours has not yet exceeded 14,000,000 gallons, a quantity approximately one-half that
coming through the mains of the City of Vancouver.
The Winnipeg daily per capita consumption is therefore about 50 gallons or one-quarter of
that of the City of Vancouver.
The heavy consumption in Vancouver is due to two factors—namely, unrestricted use (except
during shortage in summer) and waste through faulty and. leaking service fixtures, and to loss
through leaking mains.
For the former only one corrective exists—a meter on every service with charges based on
quantity used; for the latter, waste-detection surveys conducted systematically with proper
instruments and the rectification of faulty conditions.
It is not suggested here that meters are necessary and advisable in Vancouver at this particular stage—that is not within the province of this report—and would in any event require
most careful consideration, based on definite knowledge of cost of extensions of supply-mains
and storage compared with the cost of complete installation of twenty-odd thousand meters. It
may be cheaper for a time and under present circumstances to bring down water and allow the
most generous use rather than go to the expense of installing meters.    Any steps, however, looking 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
to the extension of the supply system must include careful consideration of the subject of meters.
Suffice it to say here that the day will come when every service will be metered.
The diagram illustrates the general effect of metering by  reduction of excessive use as
disclosed by the records of a large number of American cities.
Effect of Metering on the Use of Water based on Records of Use in Eighty-five
Cities of the United States.
1.00
o.8o
o.6o
0.40
0,20
0
20
40
60
80
100
After Morris Knowles.
Percentage of taps metered.
District of Burnaby.
Burnaby received in 1921 a total of 470,386,652 imperial gallons, a mean daily consumption
of 1,313,388 imperial gallons; number of services at December 31st, 1921, 3,478; the mean daily
use per service is 377 imperial gallons, or a per capita consumption on basis of 5 per service of
75 imperial gallons, or a per capita consumption on basis of 4 per service of 94 imperial gallons,
or a per capita consumption on basis of 12,000 of 109 imperial gallons. As the total quantity
received was metered the figure given for the mean daily use per service may be accepted as
correct.
Point Grey.
Point Grey received in 1920 an average of 1,370,000 imperial gallons per day according to
data furnished by City Engineer of Vancouver.
From a measurement made in December, 1920, by Municipal Engineer of Point Grey the
consumption for 24 hours was approximately 1,090,600 imperial gallons, and from a subsequent D 22
Department of Lands.
1925
test made on September 2nd and 3rd, 1922, the total consumption for the 24-hour period was
1,388,888 imperial gallons. Assuming this latter figure as present average daily consumption with
number of services at August 31st, 1922, as 4,954, the mean daily use per service is 280 imperial
gallons, or a per capita consumption on basis of 5 persons per service of 50 imperial gallons, or
a per capita consumption on basis of 4 persons per service of 70 imperial gallons, or a per capita
consumption on basis of 19,000 population of 73 imperial gallons.
District of South Vancouver.
South Vancouver received in 1921 108,000,000 cubic feet metered from the city, 675,000,000
imperial gallons, a mean daily consumption of 1,850,000 imperial gallons; number of live services
at December 31st, 1921, 8,354; the mean daily use per service is 222 imperial gallons, or a per
capita consumption on basis of 5 persons per service of 44 imperial gallons, or a per capita
consumption on basis of 4 persons per service of 55 imperial gallons, or a per capita consumption
on basis of population of 32,000 of 58 imperial gallons.
Water Services installed since 1916.
City of
Vancouver.
City of
North
Vancouver.
District of
North
Vancouver.
District of
South
Vancouver.
District of
Burnaby.
District of
Point Grey.
District of
West
Vancouver.
a q.
ax
C
E-
a  .
*a
a Si
"3
0
... *."
B d
a oj
P(*
o
EH
it
a  .
31
a
o
&
a a,
o
En
a .
Qsx
a
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B «
a oj
Ci*
a
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1917	
1918	
1919.
87
90
342
462
801
588
37
177
519
981
1,782
2,340
12
14
18
50
78
42
12
26
44
94
172
214
6
19
31
48
67
38
6
25
56
104
171
209
412
833
555
556
451
267
412
1,245
1,800
2,356
2,807
3,074
SO
69
151
321
412
354
80
149
300
621
1,033
1,387
37
111
272
496
818
602
37
148
420
916
1,734
2,336
56
79
110
47
144
77
56
135
245
1920	
292
1921	
436
1922*	
513
* To August 31st.     (See diagrams, pages 23 and 24.)
Requirements of Immediate Future.
Tn the table of general statistics on page 12 the number of water services in the cities
and municipalities at December 31st of each year since 1914 is shown. In addition, the
table below illustrates the percentage rates of growth of services south of Burrard Inlet from
1916 to 1921:—
1916.
1921.
Increase.
Average
Yearly
Increase.
Percentage
Increase
in 5 Years.
City of Vancouver	
22,684
2,445
2,700
5,547
24,466
3,478
4,273
8,354
1,782
1,033
1,573
2,807
356
206
315
561
8.0
42.0
60.0
50.6
A table has been prepared showing the probable average daily requirement in 1925 based on
the consumption in 1920 and at the five-year percentage rate of growth of services given above.
A consideration, however, of the annual rates of increase as disclosed by the diagram on page
24 shows that the average rate for the period named would be a very unsafe one, since war
conditions so seriously interfered with normal growth during the first three years of the period.
As a consequence the diagram has been extended to show the increase to be expected if the rates
of growth for the four-year period, 1921 to 1925, were the same as the rates for the year 1921.
The table hereunder exhibits the requirements on the latter assumption. It may hardly be said
that the year 1921 was in any way a phenomenal year in development in the areas under consideration, and the rates of growth applied to the extensions of the several curves are lower than,
under ordinary conditions, one would conservatively adopt. Indeed, the number of services
installed in the eight months of 1922 to date show, as might be anticipated, that the rates of
increase in the city, Burnaby, and Point Grey are greater than the several rates for the year 1921. 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 23
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Department of Lands.
/=&/*r y^A^r /me/
Fbi.-=t Grey 50C5
Ciruofyb.oc'r-'.   --c
S. fane's* 4Gt
Burnaby ES&
W.'fanc'ir'r ,'Q/£
C//yaF/V.Kjnc,ry4&r
~ wr'of   Jo.
/3/S    ■ /SfT /3/G /S/3
/SSO /S£/
2326,
A
I/?/*  / 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 25
On the basis shown on the diagram the number of services in the several places at December
31st, 1025, and the average daily water requirement at the rates per service already referred to
would be as follows :—
No. of
Services,
1916.
Increase.
Anticipated
No. of
Services,
1925.
Rate per
Service
(Gallons).
Requirement,
1925
(Gallons).
City of Vancouver	
South Vancouver 	
Point Grey	
Burnaby	
North Vancouver and West Vancouver
22,684
5,547
2,618
2,445
5,000
4,600
4,960
2,225
27,684
10,147
7,578
4,670
950
222
280
377
26,299,800
2,252,634
2,121,840
1,765,260
170,000
32,609,534
This quantity approximates the total daily delivery of water that can be made by the present
systems from both Capilano and Seymour when the Point Grey partnership main is completed.
The calculated total capacity of both systems under these circumstances is about 35% million
gallons per 24 hours, assuming that it is possible to divert their full capacity at periods of
minimum stream-flow.
It is most important to observe that, on the assumptions made, this figure represents the
average daily requirement throughout the year and is consequently very considerably less than
the maximum daily requirement during the summer season. Little Mountain reservoir is at
present available, to some extent at least, to balance daily fluctuations of draught, but when the
summer demand continually exceeds the total capacity of the mains as would happen under these
conditions the total quantity of water stored there would be speedily exhausted in an endeavour
to meet the daily need. In other words, with a maximum daily requirement in 1925 that might
easily reach 40 million gallons (at present rates of use), and with a total daily capacity of supply-
mains of 35% million gallons, the storage of 25 million gallons at Little Mountain would serve
to make up the deficiency for a period of only three or four days.
A consideration of these figures shows that on the basis of growth assumed the limit of the
present system's capacity will be reached before 1925, and that long before that time the ability
to provide for fire hazard, not only in Vancouver but in South Vancouver and Point Grey, will
have decreased enormously.
It is worthy of note here that at present maximum or summer rate of use the quantity of
water now held under licence to the City of Vancouver in respect of Burnaby—namely, 7 cubic
feet per second—will supply a population of approximately 30,000.
On account of the lower per capita consumption in Point Grey, due to the complete metering
of the individual services, the smaller quantity of water to which it is entitled under its water
licence will serve approximately 25,000 persons. Allowing a summer maximum per capita use
of 90 gallons, the 4.2 cubic feet per second (2.26 million gallons per day) which it is authorized
to use, and for which it has made provision to carry from the source, will supply the above
number of persons—an increase of only 5,000 over that attributed to the municipality by the
census of 1921.
South Vancouver holds water rights on Seymour Creek to the extent of 15.4 cubic feet per
second, equal to 8.3 million gallons per 24 hours, sufficient at the maximum rate, as used in the
case of Point Grey, for a population of over 90,000. The natural flow of the creek is entirely
insufficient to furnish South Vancouver any such quantity. In the ratio of its water rights to
the total water rights on the creek, South Vancouver's share of the minimum flow would be
8 cubic feet per second, or 4.3 million gallons per day. In the ratio of the present rates of use
the minimum flow of the creek as recorded in 1915 would supply South Vancouver with its
present consumption only.
Works of considerable extent, such as the completion of the Vancouver-Point Grey joint main
across False Creek, an additional 18-inch main across the First Narrows, and possibly provision
for an increased supply from the Seymour mains direct to Little Mountain during the night hours
and periods of low draught in the city, require the earliest and most serious attention.
These, however, are of relatively minor importance compared with the steps that should
be taken to provide for the near future needs of these fast-growing communities. D 26
Department op Lands.
1925
Conservation by storage and the construction of an additional supply-main or the adoption
of meters in the City of Vancouver, which latter would tide over a relatively short period, and
to which reference has already been made on another page, demand most careful and early
consideration. The advent of a few industries with reasonably large demands for water from
the present systems would present a most perplexing problem and give added emphasis to the
necessities of the situation.
Consumption of Water in Various Cities of Canada.
Name of City.
Percentage
metered.
Daily
Consumption
per Capita
(Imp. Gals.).
Name of City.
Percentage
metered.
Daily
Consumption
per Capita
(Imp. Gals.).
100
95
91
90
S2
41
36
34
41
65
50
33
46
110
85
125
Calgarv	
24
20
148
St. John, N.B	
290
Halifax	
200
Ottawa	
Montreal...	
Hamilton	
191
Regina	
140
136
London __	
Toronto	
Quebec	
100
Prom 1919 report of R. H. Coats, Dominion Statistician.
Consumption of Water in Various Cities of United States.
Name  of  City.
Daily Consumption
per Capita.
For Year.
U.S.
Gallons.
Imperial
Gallons.
213
127
130
127
243
210
202
104
104
17S
115
83-S6
130
111.9
118
120
230
322
114
100
177
106
108
106
202
175
168
87
87
148
96
69-72
108
93
98
100
192
268
95
83
1911
1911
1910
1911
Salt Lake City ..                               	
1912
1911
Colorado Springs	
1911
1912
1911
1911
1911
1910-11
1910
1911
1911
1910
1909
Buffalo	
1906
1910
1910
Average Consumption in Unmetered Cities in United States.
Types of Use.
U.S. Gallons per Capita ter Day.
Minimum.
Maximum.
Average.
30
5
3
20
80
30
10
35
50
15
Public :	
5
30
Total   	
58
155
100
(For conversion to imperial gallons deduct 17 per cent.)
After Morris Knowles. 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 27
PART V.
HYDROMETRIC DATA AND  STORAGE POSSIBILITIES.
Of the three principal streams from which the main water-supplies of the areas in question
are derived, the Capilano and Seymour are of much more importance from a waterworks standpoint than the Lynn, on account of the greater catchment area tributary to them above the
points at which it is practicable to divert water for that purpose.
The Capilano and Seymour are approximately parallel streams varying from 5 to 7 miles
in distance apart, while the Lynn occupies a smaller valley between them separated by from
1 to 2 miles from Seymour. All three streams enter Burrard Inlet immediately opposite the City
of Vancouver. They are typical of the British Columbia Coast region, having characteristically
wide variations in flow due to heavy precipitation, their proximity to the sea-coast, and to the
great difference in elevation over their drainage areas.
Their respective lengths and useful catchment areas are:—
Length
in
Miles.
Intake
Distance from
Mouth in
Miles.
Elevation of
Intake above
Sea-level.
Drainage Area above
Intake in
Square Miles.
Capilano.
Lynn	
Seymour.
19
11
26
4% and 5V2
7 and 7%
485
637 and  816
465  and 485
64
14   above  lower,   12%"
above upper.
69 above upper intake.
Tabulated hydrometric data extracted from the records of the British Columbia Hydrometric
Survey concerning the streams appear on the following pages, from which it will be seen that
in the period covered the mean monthly discharges in cubic feet per second at the recording-
stations have varied as follows: Capilano, from 2,440 in October, 1921, to 50 in September, 1915;
Lynn (below City of North Vancouver intake), from 585 in December, 1917, to 1.2 in September,
1915;  Seymour, from 2,280 in October, 1921, to 48 in August, 1915.
It may be of interest to note in passing that these creeks are occasionally subject to enormous
peak discharges and that the peaks fortunately do not all bear the same ratio of increase over
former high marks. The unprecedented flood of Coquitlam River in October, 1921, that did such
severe damage to the water-supply system of the City of New Westminster had its counterpart
in the Seymour and Capilano, as the figures witness:—
Date.
Maximum
Discharge,
Second-feet.
Previous
Maximum in
7-year Period.
Percentage
of Former
Maximum.
Coquitlam	
Oct. 29, 1921
Oct. 28, 1921
Oct. 28, 1921
24,400
23,200
17,400
9,150
13,600
12,300
267
170
141
Department of the Interior—Dominion Water-power Branch, Ottawa, Canada.
(Unpublished Records, subject to Revision.)
Summary of Mean Monthly Discharge in Second-feet of Seymour Greek above City Intake.
Year.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
March.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Mean.
1913-14...
1,150
323
761
935
915
685
320
68
534
1914-15...
1,230
1,550
187
411
423
700
1,180
540
214
88
48
56
552
1915-16...
1,380
474
872
155
1,150
973
706
882
1,190
991
260
74
757
1916-17...
183
494
271
243
321
160
579
1,150
1,210
797
154
253
485
1917-18...
395
944
1,750
1,270
590
S74
859
790
770
216
184
58
725
1918-19...
853
674
836
632
506
326
933
1,200
890
736
193
58
653
1919-20...
64
1,660
1,550
741
428
414
278
533
1,050
188
111
1,630
721
Mean	
684
966
911
655
534
601
781
859
858
477
145
380
654
1920-21...
1,250
1,020
915
671
947
475
691
1,160
1,470
649
292
1,150
891
1921-22...
2,280
807
1,200
241
198
126
419
1,240
1,400
342
*825
* For ten months. D 28
Department of Lands.
1925
Summary of Mean Monthly Discharge in Second-feet of Capilano Creek above City Intake.
* For ten months.
Lynn Creek.
Discharge in Second-feet below Waterworks Intake.
Year.
Oct.
Nov.
D.c.
Jan.
Feb.
March.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Mean.
1913-14...
2,190
850
1,200
1,160
1,170
905
393
115
643
1914-15...
1,680
1,640
227
645
655
1,020
1,490
704
305
138
53
50
717
1915-16-
1,200
540
1,100
175
1,190
1,240
927
1,210
1,550
1,250
440
98
901
1916-17...
166
526
345
308
586
176
705
1,520
1,530
948
249
264
594
1917-18...
425
1,020
1,230
1,570
970
1,530
1,070
997
867
274
247
54
838
1918-19...
905
843
878
823
707
385
1,260
1,440
1,010
779
232
64
777
1919-20-
75
1,660
1,760
760
540
510
325
252
1,060
224
119
1,770
755
Mean	
742
1,040
923
924
786
866
991
1,040
1,030
572
192
420
794
1920-21...
1,100
1,220
900
640
1,040
471
730
1,350
1,620
700
335
902
917
1921-22...
2,440
845
1,260
203
249
144
513
1,3S0
1,430
424
*889
Year.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
March.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Mean.
1914-15...
164
315
85
115
169
151
193
203
56
12.9
2
1.2
122
1915-16...
221
222
277
108
233
557
360
292
343
351.0
160
20.0
262
1916-17...
83
191
54
217
198
57
208
274
485
334.0
100
124.0
194
1917-18...
84
202
585
496
98
202
93
169
66
19.0
488
14.0
210
1918-19-
394
332
386
177
99
140
387
175
206
177.0
47
20.0
211
Minimum Discharge in Second-feet.
Year.
Seymour Creek
above
City Intake.
Capilano Creek
above
City Intake.
Lynn Creek
below
City Intake.
1914 15         	
41.0
55.0
50.0
49.0
46.0
48.0
130.0
70.0
69 sq. miles
35.0
45.0
45.0
40.0
46.0
46.0
126.0
87.0
64 sq. miles
0 0
1915 16          	
1.0
1916 17     .       -
1917-18               :	
6 0
1918-19	
1919-20	
10.0
1920 21          	
1921-22 (to July 31) -
14 sq. miles.
Had the Seymour and Capilano discharges on October 2Sth reached 267 per cent, of their
former recorded maxima it is not difficult to picture what would have happened to some parts
of the pipe systems bordering the creeks. These figures emphasize a possible hazard to certain
portions of the Vancouver system in spite of the care with which it has been constructed and
maintained.
The daily minimum discharges of Capilano, Lynn, and Seymour in the period of record have
been 35, 0, and 41 cubic feet per second respectively. The wide seasonal variations in flow and
the low minima recorded indicate the necessity for storage if a water-supply much in excess of
that now taken from the creeks is to be maintained. The situation is roughly the same on all
three creeks.
The present systems are capable of taking from the creeks in the order named approximately
25, 3, and 41 cubic feet per second. The discussion on the immediate future requirements of
Vancouver and adjacent municipalities indicates that in less than three years from now, and
under present rates of consumption, the capacity of the systems will be taxed to the utmost. 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control of Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 29
Regulation of stream-flow, therefore, becomes of the greatest importance and suitable natural
storage-basins must be utilized or artificial storage created if possible.
Fortunately there exists in the Capilano, Lynn, and Seymour watersheds a few small lakes
which, though having small tributary catchment areas, have heavy precipitation and from the
character of the country have a high percentage of run-off.
Loch Lomond at the head of Seymour, Burwell Lake on a west branch of Seymour, Palisade
and Lower Palisade Lakes at and near the head of an east branch of Capilano, and Kennedy
Lake (though of minor importance) at the head of a west branch of Lynn Creek, were all
surveyed by an engineer of this Department in. 1913, 1914, and 1915 and are fully described
and mapped in the published Water Branch Reports of those years. A reservoir-site in the
valley of Seymour Creek itself, extending up-stream from the falls at elevation 635 feet above
sea-level, and in which the City of Vancouver has acquired storage rights, was surveyed by
Mr. H. M. Burwell, C.E., in 1911 and has since been partly cross-sectioned up to the 685-foot
contour under direction of the City Engineer of Vancouver.
.So far as known, no surveys have been made in the valley of Capilano for this purpose.
The general features of the valley indicate that storage of limited extent only can be obtained
and at costs greatly in excess of that obtainable in the Seymour. For other reasons discussed
in a later paragraph, storage in the Capilano under existing conditions seems also less desirable.
Palisade Lake is tributary to Capilano, but water stored there for a depth of 100 feet or more
below the present lake-surface, as well as an additional 30 feet or more above, to be gained by
the construction of a dam, may, if so desired, be diverted by tunnel to the Seymour Creek
drainage area. For the purpose of estimate of the Seymour storage possibilities this has been
included therein.
Loch Lomond and Burwell Lakes are both capable of being raised 10 to 20 feet or more by
dams and of being tapped by tunnels approximately 1,100 and 700 feet in length at depths of
100 and 140 feet respectively. The capacities of the lakes at these depths and with low dams
are rather greater than the drainage area of each seems capable of supplying. As a consequence
the actual utilizable capacity has been considered as equal to the run-off. A small dam has
been constructed by the City of Vancouver at the outlet of Burwell Lake, but it is stated no
storage-water has up to the present been used from it, nor have any rights therein yet been
granted by the Crown.
Loch Lomond has also been made the subject of an application by South Vancouver for
storage rights.
There are a number of smaller lakes in the drainage area, but they are of no importance
and are not here referred to.
The map on the following page will give an idea of the general relation of the watersheds.
The Crown lands within them, with certain slight exceptions, have been reserved from sale.
Copies of the notices establishing the several reservations will be found in the Appendix hereto.
The valley of Seymour Creek offers opportunity for further study with the likelihood of
showing facilities for additional economic storage by the erection of additional dams, or by a
higher dam at the falls. Fortunately the construction of reservoirs in the Seymour area admits
of the work being carried on unit by unit, so that the creation, of storage may be kept only
reasonably in advance of the demands to be made on it. It will probably be found that on
account of the high cost of clearing the heavy forest-growth in the valley-bottom and otherwise
preparing the site, storage on the main creek will be more costly per unit of volume than in the
summit lakes. The value of timber products recovered and convenience of access and operation
will tend to some extent to counterbalance the greater costs. The value of storage in the valley
from the point of view of detention as an insurance against possible dangerous effects of organic
pollution from operations in the drainage area where large numbers of men might be employed,
such as in mining, is lessened by the disproportion between actual reservoir capacity and the
average rate of stream-flow through it. On the other hand, such sites as Burwell and Palisade
Lakes offer conditions that would seem almos to preclude possibility of organic infection.
. The precipitation records on page 31 have been kept by the City of Vancouver and are of
great value, though in the case of Burwell Lake and Seymour Falls cover a short period only.
An explanation of the application made of them in the computation of storage possibilities
appearing on pages 31 and 32 also follows. Department of Lands.
1925
AM/° SriOrY/A/G &OL/M0y477AT.S-
WA TEFfSNEDS   OF L YAf/V, CAP/LSWO
J$r\4AV0 SEYMOUrl CHEEKS 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control of Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 31
The tabulation of storage data makes no pretensions to completeness, but is felt to be a safe
general estimate of the minimum storage capabilities of the Seymour Creek drainage area.
A summation has been made of the mean monthly discharges of Seymour Creek given in the
hydrometric records shown on pages 27 and 28 and the mass curves following page 32 drawn therefrom. An examination of the curve will show that for the period covered—namely, January, 1914,
to July, 1922—the maximum amount of storage required to maintain the largest regulated flow
possible would have been during the period of June to August, 1915. An enlargement of that
part of the curve, compiled from mean daily run-off, to which is applied the estimated utilizable
storage shown on page 25—i.e., 32,000 acre-feet—indicates that a continuous draught of 210
cubic feet per second could have been maintained during the low period referred to. This
quantity of water is equivalent to 113,400,000 imperial gallons per 24 hours, which would furnish
a per capita daily supply of 113.4 gallons to a population of one million people.
A comparison just here to show what a considerably smaller quantity of water is doing
elsewhere may be of value.
The average daily supply for the year 1913 to the City of Boston, eight adjacent cities and
ten towns, having a combined population estimated at 1,152,490, was 103,847,700 U.S. gallons,
the equivalent of 86.5 million imperial gallons—a daily per capita supply of 78 imperial gallons.
No more need be said to establish the inestimable value of Seymour Creek. Its potentialities
merit and the future requirements of the Burrard Peninsula and the north shore demand that
its waters and its watershed shall be the subjects of wise forethought and well-considered
conversation.
With Capilano Creek also capable of furnishing a supply for 150,000 to 200,000 persons at
its lowest-known flow without storage, and with the supply from Lynn and the smaller creeks
on the north shore conserved, the water requirements of the Greater Vancouver area are assured
and near at hand for a very long time to come.
Precipitation Records.
Seymour Intake.
Jan.
Feb.
March.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Total.
1914	
24.29
9.37
11.09
6.79
3.50
4.04
0.68
1.27
11.22
15.90
22.39
4.58
115.12
1915......
13.85
10.05
9.05
7.53
5.77
1.60
1.33
0.98
1.21
21.94
11.05
18.92
103.28
1916	
6.87
11.92
22.04
8.47
3.70
3.52
8.66
0.70
2.38
7.31
11.95
10.15
97.67
1917	
10.60
8.04
7.04
12.47
3.31
6.92
1.49
2.11
7.40
7.84
13.87
27.49
108.58
1918......
16.58
18.70
13.87
2.44
4.36
2.49
2.90
6.87
0.50
13.20
19.91
15.54
117.36
1919	
14.94
10.57
10.20
5.44
7.76
1.99
1.42
0.54
2.85
3.20
24.59
18.05
101.55
1920	
20.69
0.99
11.30
2.82
3.96
7.78
1.16
4.56
19.55
14.71
15.57
24.87
127.96
1921	
19.58
16.69
5.57
8.31
4.84
8.11
0.12
5.83
17.53
26.83
14.86
14.21
142.48
1922
6.74
9.82
7.25
6.53
5.08
1.11
0.06
6.50
9.52
 1
	
i
leymou
;• Falls
1919	
21.75
3.75
12.95
4.00
5.30
10.50
0.70
0.48
3.80
3.10
33.86
3.S0
20.73
30.69
23.15
24.55
30.73
1920	
171.22
1921	
20.20
22.34
S.18
12.22
4.82
10.20
0.37
7.60
21.90
45.50
23.30
18.25
194.88
1922
11.35
14.80
14.65
5.75
5.85
0.80
Trace
5.65
12.75
Burwell Lake.
1920......
25.64
4.10
18.22
6.09
6.83
14.55
0.90
5.43
42.73
26.69
27.54
43.42
222.14
1921	
8.20
15.90
9.90
15.00
7.05
12.90
0.25
9.05
24.35
45.10
36.10
21.65
205.45
1922	
16.05
21.00
16.85
37.00
9.30
0.75
Trace
|_
6.70
15.50
	
From records of City Engineer's Department, Vancouver.
Precipitation Computations.
The lowest record at Seymour intake over a period of eight years, 1914 to 1921 inclusive,
■was 97.67 inches in 1916. D 32
Department of Lands.
192e
The lowest record at the City of Vancouver during the period of eighteen complete years,
between 1900 and 1921, was for the year 1915. The precipitation at Seymour intake in 1915
was slightly higher than in 1916.
The lower of the two full years recorded at Burwell Lake was 205.45 inches in 1921.
The precipitation at Seymour intake in 1921 was 142.48 inches; therefore, by simple proportion, the probable precipitation at Burwell Lake in 1916 would have been 140.84 inches.
For the purpose of estimating storage possibilities (except on the main creek, where actual
records of run-off exist) minimum precipitation has been taken as 125 inches.
Seymour Creek Storage.
Possibilities.
Capacities.
Estimated
Utilizable
Storage.
OJ
CD
a &
o ^
jj m <J
00
CD
U
W
aj ra
112 O)
ag .
A      Ui
o ra a>
ra ^ cj
SB a
O V
KM
£ >
3 go
«Z;.3
o
o
o
<
al
So*
o
CD
U
<
03
CD
«H
O
(h
(J
Jo
So
3,300
2,750
4,200
2,800
2,890
635
104*
102*
20
35f
135*
540t
600*
925*
175*
770*
56 sq. mi.
5,100
7,862 £
1,487 j
6,545
10
15||
25
30
50
1,100
1,600
875
4,200
10,000§
75
110
30
 1
4,000
7,749
2,345
5,100
5,349
875f
6,545
10,000
31,869
1,389
(2) Burwell Lake
(B) Cougar Lake...
(3) Unnamed lake	
2,545
238
1,782
(5) Seymour Falls (50-
2,723
Estimated available
8,677
L_
Note.—Estimated available storage based on present knowledge. It appears probable that further
surveys will indicate additional available storage on main Seymour Creek. Minimum annual precipitation
at Loch Lomond, Lakes Burwell and Palisade is estimated at 104.84 inches. (See above.) As the period
covered by the records extends only from 1914 to date, a minimum of 125 inches is used for the purposes of
this report.     Run-off estimated for (1)  and  (4)  as SO per cent, of minimum precipitation.
* Water Rights Branch surveys, normal surface area.
t Vancouver City Engineer.
t Area with 42-foot dam ascertained by survey under H. M. Burwell, C.E., as 484 acres.
§ Insufficient cross-sections to allow of accurate determination of capacity.
|| Constructed.
On Watek-supply Possibilities oe Seymotjk Cbeek.
(Reference to mass diagrams shown following this page.)
Discharge figures from records of B.C. Hydrometric Survey covering period from January,
1914, to July, 1922.
Discharge in cubic feet per second reduced 12 per cent, from B.C. Hydrometric figures to
allow for change of point of diversion from present intake to Seymour Falls.
Allowance for evaporation made in considering percentage of run-oft: available for utilizable
storage.
Mass curve drawn from mean monthly discharges, enlarged portion from mean daily
discharges.
Storage estimated as 31,809 acre-feet = 8.7 billion gallons.
Year of lowest yield in period, 1915.
Conditions of regulated flow that would have obtained in 1915:—
First draught on storage,        June 9)
Reservoirs at low-water level, Oct. 1(
Reservoirs at high-water level, Oct. 27, 16 days.
Maximum day draught on storage, 174 cubic feet per second.
Mean daily flow (natural), 73 cubic feet per second.
Mean daily draught on storage, 137 cubic feet per second.
Regulated mean daily flow, 210 cubic feet per second.
210 cubic feet per second=113,400,000 imperial gallons per 24 hours.
At 113.4 gallons per capita per day = supply for one million people.
115 days. Seymour Creek
Mass Curve compiled from mean daily run-off above City of Vancouver intakes
for period from June let to October 27th,l9l5.
Draft line shows maximum regulated
daily flow possible during period from
January 1314 to July 1322.
Estimated storage available-32,000ac-ft. Sevmour Creek
Mass Curve compiled from mean monthly run-off above City of Vancouver intakes
for period from January 1914 to July 1922
Draft line shows maximum regulated flow possible during period covered.
See enlarged diagram for period of minimum flow, June to October, 1915.
Estimated storage available - 32,000 ac-ft Capilano Creek
Mass Curve compiled from mean daily run-off
above City of Vancouver intake for period
from June 21st to October 26th, 1315.
Draft line shows maximum regulated
daily flow possible during period from
January 1314 to September 1922.
Estimated storage available-23370ac-ft. rm
Capilano  Creek
Mass Curve compiled from mean monthly run-off above City of Vancouver intake,
for period from January 1914 to September 1922.
Draft line shows maximum regulated flow possible during period covered.
See enlarged diagram for period of minimum flow, June fo October, 1915.
Estimated storage available 123970 ac-ft. 16 Geo. 5 Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet. D 33
PART VI.
TIMBER ON DRAINAGE AREAS AND LOGGING OPERATIONS ABOVE
WATERWORKS INTAKES.
Nature has clothed the drainage areas of the three principal streams on the north shore of
Burrard Inlet with a magnificent forest-growth.
It is generally agreed that forests exercise a beneficent influence upon the run-off from a
catchment area. The principal and more obvious benefits are the protection of winter snowfall
from a rapid melting and run-off by the defence of the trees against wind and sun; the retarding
effect of the trees, humus, and forest waste generally on precipitation, in its movement toward
the streams, thus affording opportunity for the water to sink into the soil and so reduce the
fluctuations of stream-flow and diminish the intensity of floods; and the protection of the surface
against erosion and wash of soil into the streams. Among the minor beneficial influences of
forests are: The tendency to equalize and increase the rainfall locally because of the more
constant and lower temperatures in their proximity which favour condensation of the moisture
of the air; the reduction of evaporation due to the shade of the trees ;< their constant contributions to the leaf litter and humus with which the layers of inorganic soil overlying the rock
are covered.
The measure of the benefits of each of these factors is not determinable, but their combined
effect is unquestioned.
The inquiry with which we are concerned here is as to the effect on the value of the streams
of the North Vancouver slopes as sources of water-supply by the removal of all the merchantable
timber that it may be possible to log from the drainage areas above the several intakes.
In general terms the answer is that the effect is detrimental and damaging; to what degree
is a matter incapable of definition and open to much argument and depending to some extent at
least upon the methods adopted.
The answer is based on two considerations: First, the danger of pollution of the water-
supply ;  and, secondly, the physical effects of forest removal on run-off and erosion.
On the subject of pollution it cannot be gainsaid that under the circumstances attendant on
industrial operations within watersheds of this nature the elements of danger are never absent.
The presence of a number of men in camps and at work above important waterworks intakes
as are to be found to-day on Capilano and Lynn Creeks and to a lesser extent on Seymour must
be regarded as an undesirable condition. It is true that sanitary regulations governing operations
in watersheds have been promulgated by the Provincial Board of Health and are reported to
be rigidly enforced and satisfactorily complied with by the companies operating; but these are
simply making the best of a bad situation. It is quite a safe statement to say that the highest
sanitary authorities would not look with approval on such a condition where no adequate storage-
basins or reservoirs exist in which the water might be detained for a few weeks at least and
so tend to purify itself from any chance infectious contamination. It would, of course, be
possible to filter and sterilize the whole supply, but only at great expense to the citizens and
with no added advantages over the wholesome water furnished by nature undisturbed.
Considered as economic resources, it is not open to debate that the value of these watershed
areas lies, first, in their importance as sources of pure-water supply, and, secondly, as stands
of merchantable timber.
On the subject of the physical effects of forest removal on the water-supply there is more
room for differences of opinion. As a preliminary, it may be said that for sheer downright
devastation of a timbered area the present methods of logging leave little to the imagination.
Despite this devastation, however, it is thought that the magnitude of the direct effect of logging
operations (in so far as they are capable of being conducted in these watersheds) on the
phenomena of run-off, maximum and minimum discharge, and erosion is unlikely to be of marked
importance.
The Capilano is typical of the North Vancouver streams, with their narrow valleys that limit
the extent of operations, and may serve as an example.
The timber properties of the Capilano Timber Company within this watershed are estimated
to contain approximately 450,000,000 feet of merchantable timber. The company began logging
3 D 34
Department op Lands.
1925
in July, 1918, and has to date cut over about 1,500 acres. An average yearly cut from 400 to
500 acres is estimated to produce an output of 25,000,000 to 30,000,000 feet B.M., which seems to
be about the quantity the company's operations are contemplated to remove. The total drainage
area above the city intake is about G4 square miles or approximately 41,000 acres. Under the
circumstances the area annually deforested is about 1 per cent, of the drainage area.
Fortunately the operations cover only the lower slopes and leave untouched the forested
inaccessible higher elevations that are of superior value as snow reservoirs, though the timber
is of poorer quality.
A careful examination of the logged-off areas leads to the conclusion that the surface run-off
is effectively retarded in its movement toward the stream by the enormous quantity of litter
resulting from the operations.
The growth of shrubbery in four or five years interposes a further restraint to the movement
of surface water, assists in holding the snow by affording some shelter from the sun, and checks
the erosive action of surface flow on the slopes. What is much more important, it offers a
considerable and growing defence against ravage by Are.
The lands covered by the operations in 1918 and 1919 show a moderate growth of shrubbery
and berry-bush generally and a fair sprinkling of deciduous saplings. Young conifers, due to
their slower growth, are found a few inches in height scattered here and there over the area,
but whether in sufficient number to be considered a satisfactory crop may be open to much doubt.
Certain areas logged over, and others burned over twenty years or more ago, show thick growths
of conifers. As to whether this spontaneous reproduction constitutes a satisfactory showing for
the elapsed time may also be open to question.
It will thus be seen that for the greater portion of the five years or so immediately following
logging the valley and hillsides covered by the operations remain almost completely denuded.
It is during this period, when practically every standing tree has been felled or broken down
and before the second growth has had a chance to assert itself, that some of the direct effects of
deforestation will be felt. These, however, should not be very serious, since the rate of logging
is such that no more than about 5 per cent, of the total area will be in this condition at any time.
The other hazard attending the operations of logging within the watershed is of vastly
greater importance. It is the danger of fire sweeping the inflammable slash and forest litter
and consuming with it the humus and other organic matters that form the upper soil layers, thus
exposing the solid rock, hanLpan, or other unproductive subsoil. Since the soil is the supreme
factor in slowing up the movement of the precipitation toward the stream, the removal of the
absorbent upper portion by fire deprives the hillsides of this restraining and filtering influence
and run-off is hastened and erosion results. The finer inorganic parts of the subsoils and the
clay constituents when present are swept into the main stream to add turbidity and discoloration
to what would otherwise have been a clear and sparkling water.
No hopeful anticipations of future luxuriant forest-growth may be entertained concerning
these valleys and hillsides when once devastated by a devouring Are. It may almost be said
that fires have in the past been one of the inevitable results of logging. The extreme care
exercised nowadays in logging operations to prevent fires and the improved methods of fighting
them gives some hope that such grave fears will not be realized in the operations under consideration, but assurance of safety is impossible.
The Capilano Lumber Company is now prudently leaving strips of standing timber half a
mile or so in length along the valley and extending across it and up the adjacent hillsides to
serve as fire-breaks. The configuration of the valley and the surface conditions in the logged-off
area, however, invite a conflagration. Should such a disaster occur the lesson will have been
dearly learned.
The investment of the Timber Company has grown to considerable proportions. The purchase
of its rights, together with the annual expense of guarding the region in its present condition
from fire, would form a heavy burden. The extent of unalienated Crown timber is also a feature
of importance.
This entire Capilano problem deserves the most searching and discriminating consideration
of all who are concerned with the preservation of the water-supply.
The Forestry Branch has been recruising the accessible Crown timber within the watershed
and is making a close study of the situation there from the commercial standpoint. An examination is being made of the possibility of extending logging operations to include additional areas 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 35
carrying merchantable timber to the extent of upwards of 200,000,000 feet B.M. The investigation
is to ascertain whether it would be. feasible to confine the annual cut within certain limits,
introduce additional safeguards against destruction by fire, permit of reproduction and maintain
a continuous timber yield. On these aspects of the question you will be advised by the Chief
Forester.
1
J
c1 D 36
Department of Lands.
1925
The map on page 35 indicates approximately the relative areas of Crown and alienated timber
on Capilano and also shows the surveyed lots and timber licences on Lynn and Seymour Creeks.
The area within the Lynn Creek watersheds, has for several years been the scene of logging
operations which furnish logs for a sawmill situate about 2 miles above the North Vancouver
City Waterworks.    No known Crown timber of any extent exists in its drainage area.
The valuable Seymour watershed remains almost untouched by the logger. Shingle-bolt
cutting is, however, being carried on in parts of the area tributary to the stream above the
Vancouver City intake. It is not yet too late for the City of Vancouver or the organization
created to control the water-supply—if one is incorporated—to protect the situation there. It
may not be necessary to acquire more at the present time than the timber rights in the lands
now being cut over. The absolutely essential thing is that enough of the timber rights be purchased now to prevent further logging operations by outside interests, either at present or in the
future, and that the remaining rights, if any, be acquired as funds can be made available.
No cruises have yet been made on behalf of the Crown to determine what quantity of
merchantable timber exists on the area within the Seymour watershed beyond the limits of the
present alienated lands and timber licences.
That the alienated timber in the watershed should be completely controlled by those
responsible for the supply of water to the cities and districts concerned is beyond question.
Should a new waterworks intake be constructed at Seymour Falls and the present intakes
abandoned the subsequent removal of timber below the falls would not interfere with the water-
supply. How far this is commercially possible, and whether it may be done without interference
with the waterworks or with the regimen of the stream, are problems for the future. The
clearing of a reservoir-site in the valley above the falls, as referred to earlier in this report,
would greatly reduce the remaining area of merchantable timber.
The pre-eminent object to be attained is the maintenance of an adequate supply of pure—
i.e., unpolluted—water; all other considerations are subordinate; and to that end the watershed
should be preserved inviolate.
Respectfully submitted.
E. A. CLEVELAND.
Acknowledgment is made of data kindly supplied by R. G. Swan, District Chief Engineer,
B.C. Hydrometric Survey; H. M. Burwell, Consulting Engineer of North Vancouver; and the
Municipal Engineers of each and all of the municipalities herein referred to, and to the reports
of the Mainland Fire Underwriters' Association. For data on the early construction of the
Vancouver Waterworks the contribution by the late H. B. Smith, C.E., to the Canadian Society
of Civil Engineers in 1889 has been drawn upon. 16 Geo. 5 Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet. D 37
APPENDIX.
RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given that all vacant Crown lands in the New Westminster District lying
north of the north boundary-line of the Municipality of North Vancouver and embraced within
the watershed of Seymour Creek are reserved.
Neil F. Mackay,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands and Works.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., August 24th, 1906.
(Appearing on page 2582 of the British Columbia Gazette dated September 6th, 1906.)
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that all unalienated lands belonging to the Crown situated within the
boundaries of the North Vancouver Municipality are reserved.
ROBEBT  A.   RENWKJK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B.C., June 8th, 1910.
(Appearing on page 5190 of the British Columbia Gazette, dated June 9th, 1910.)
CANCELLATION OF RESERVES.
Notice is hereby given that the reserves existing upon Crown lands situate in the Delta
Municipality, Richmond Municipality, Lulu Island, North Vancouver Municipality, Texada Island,
the islands within the boundaries of New Westminster District, and generally all vacant Crown
lands within the said New Westminster District, which said reserves were established by notices
appearing in the British Columbia Gazette, respectively, on December 17th, 1908; May 18th, 1911;
December 27th, 1908 ; June 9th, 1910; July 13th, 1911; July 13th, 1911; and October 19th, 1911,
are cancelled in so far as the same affect the acquisition of the said lands under the provisions
of the " Coal and Petroleum Act."
ROBERT A. ReNWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B.C., January 3rd, 1916.
(Appearing on page 8 of the British Columbia Gazette dated January 6th, 1916.)
RESERVE.
Capilano River, New Westminster District.
Notice is hereby given that all the vacant Crown lands on the watershed of Capilano River,
lying within the following boundaries, is reserved until further notice, viz.:—
Commencing at the north-east corner of Lot 1483, Group One, New Westminster District;
thence due west 2% miles; thence due north 11% miles; thence due east 5 miles; thence south
30° east 7% miles; thence south 50° west 8 miles, more or less, to point of commencement.
W. S. Gore,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands and Works'.
Lands and Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1905.
(Appearing on page 642 of the British Columbia Gazette dated April 6th, 1905.) D 38 Department op Lands. 1925
'HEALTH ACT."
Sanitary Regulations governing Watersheds.
1. (a.) An Inspector, or Inspectors if necessary, shall be appointed by the Provincial Board
of Health.
(B.) The Inspector to be given full authority for the carrying-out of all sanitary regulations.
He w7ill reside on the works and consult with the manager of the company in regard to all recommendations he may make in the way of other regulations which may be deemed necessary to
enact, owing to changing conditions incidental to the progress of the company's work.
(o.)  The Inspector shall order lime or other disinfectants to be used where thought'necessary.
(d.) The Inspector shall make a weekly report, in writing, to the Medical Health Officer of
the City of Vancouver, and in cases of emergency he shall report immediately by telephone to
the Medical Health Officer. A duplicate copy of such report to be handed to the manager of the
logging company.
2; All officials and employees of companies operating in the watershed shall produce to the
Inspector a certificate of a licensed medical practitioner that they are not affected by any disease
which, in his opinion, would pollute the water.
3. (a.) Certificates of health and of a successful typhoid inoculation must first be produced
before any man will be permitted to work for the company, in any capacity, above the city's
intake.
(5.) Certificates shall state:—
(1.)  That he is not suffering now from any communicable disease:
(2.) That he is not a " carrier " of typhoid fever, diphtheria, or scarlet fever.
4. (a.) All persons entering the watershed, for whatever purpose, other than officials and
employees of the company, must first submit themselves to a blood test (Widal), and certificates
of health must state:—
(1.) That the blood test is negative:
(2.) That he is not suffering now from any communicable disease:
(3.) That he is not a  "carrier"  of typhoid fever,  diphtheria, or scarlet fever.
(b.) All persons who may be found to be typhoid-carriers, tubercular, or suffering from some
venereal disease shall be rigidly excluded from the watershed.
(o.) No person, other than officials or employees of the company, will be permitted to enter
the watershed above the intake without first presenting the above certificate of health to the
Provincial Health Inspector in Charge and obtaining from him a permit to enter said watershed.
5. All sanitary regulations adopted by the Provincial Board of Health and applicable to a
logging company or works where a number of men are congregated in the watershed must be
read to a man in a language he understands before he is placed at work. His signature must
be obtained, so that he may understand that for any breach of these regulations he will be
dismissed from the camp.
6. Instructions and rules on sanitation of camps to be posted in all camp buildings in a
conspicuous position.
7. Camps.—The situation of all camps to be subject to the approval of the Provincial Board
of Health or the Inspector appointed by the Provincial Board of Health after consultation with
the manager of the interested company.
In all camps, arrangements must be made either to burn all garbage, refuse, tins, etc., or else
remove same to an incinerator.
All liquid waste, slop-water, etc., from the cook-houses, bathing-houses, laundry, etc., must be
run in pipes, or by other means agreeable to the Inspector, into an Imhoff tank, the effluent from
which is to be run into a properly constructed tank and chlorinated or otherwise treated so as
to effect sterilization.
Every camp shall be equipped with a wash-house and laundry containing a stove, tubs, and
facilities for drying-; also wash-basins, shower-baths, soap, and all proper sanitary facilities to
the approval of the Inspector. Cleanliness, of course, is necessary for the health of the men
and it must be insisted upon.    Fersistently unclean persons will be debarred from the watershed.
Bathing or laundry-work in the creeks or streams is absolutely prohibited.
All cook-houses, dining-rooms, etc., to be screened to prevent the entrance of flies.
Meat-houses and store-rooms must be fly-proof and built to the satisfaction of the Inspector. 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 39
All hunk-houses must be built with adequate light and ventilation, the interior limewashed
or painted, and fitted with iron bunks.
Plans and specifications of all buildings to be erected to be furnished in duplicate to, and
approved by, the Provincial Board of Health.
S. Latrines.—Pail system: This consists of galvanized-iron pails with covers, which can be
easily handled and removed to the incinerator.
Sawdust, which has been previously dampened with oil, must be provided in a convenient
receptacle and a small quantity sprinkled after each evacuation.
Urinals of an approved sanitary type to be provided and run into a treatment-tank.
In all camps above the intake, while working in the watershed, the pail system must be used
and removed daily to the incinerator. Any man found not using these pails will be instantly
discharged.
Spitting or blowing noses on to the ground and all other filthy habits must be absolutely
forbidden.
Maps of the property shall be furnished to the Provincial Board of Health and the City
Health Department, Vancouver, showing as far as possible the plan of the ground, and showing
proposed buildings and roads in their relative positions to any streams or watercourses.
The Provincial Board of Health maintains the right to alter, revise, or add to these regulations from time to time as deemed necessary for the preservation of all domestic water-supply.
In cases of emergency the Inspector may make such temporary regulations as are necessary, which
shall hold good until passed upon by the Provincial Board of Health.
In cases of dispute between the city authorities and the company or individuals as to the
interpretation of these regulations, the Provincial Board of Health may be appealed to to act
as arbitrators, and their decision to be final.
Provincial Board of Health,
2nd April, 1918.
By Order.
J. D. MaoLean,
Provincial Secretary.
Memorandum of Agreement, made this 5th day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand
nine hundred and eleven,
Between
The City of Vancouver (hereinafter called the " City ") of the first part
and
The Corporation of the District of Burnaby (hereinafter called the "District") of
the second part.
Whereas the City has a record of fourteen hundred (1,400) inches of water on Seymour Creek
and has a system of water-supply now in use from the intake at an elevation of four hundred
and sixty-five (405) feet:
And whereas the District has a water record of two hundred and fifty (250) inches on
Seymour Creek aforesaid and holds an interest in certain lands at or near the intake above
referred to:
And whereas certain other municipalities have water- records on Seymour Creek to the extent
of thirteen hundred and fifty (1,350) inches:
And whereas the City is about to install an additional thirty (30) inch main for its own
needs and has been requested by the District to increase such main to a diameter of 34 inches in
order to supply water to the said District:
And whereas the City has agreed to supply up to the maximum amount of two hundred and
fifty (250) miners' inches of water to the District upon the terms hereinafter stated:
Now, therefore, it is agreed between the parties hereto as follows:—
1. The City, so soon as it reasonably can and lawfully may, will supply such an amount of
water as required up to the amount of two hundred and fifty (250) miners' inches for the
exclusive use of the District from the intake on Seymour Creek to the north shore of Burrard D 40
Department op Lands.
1925
Inlet, and will provide and lay an eighteen (18) inch submerged main across the Burrard Inlet
Second Narrows, with all shore connections complete to couple with the distribution service to be
installed by the District.
2. The said (IS) inch submerged main and shore connections shall be for the exclusive use
of the District. The maintenance of such submerged main and shore connections and all repairs
thereto when necessary are to be provided by the City at the expense of the District, which will
pay the City the cost of any such repairs and maintenance when provided or made.
3. The estimated cost of said eighteen (18) inch main and shore connection and providing
and laying same is eighteen thousand dollars ($18,000), and the City will pay the cost of such
main and shore connections and providing and laying same up to and not exceeding the sum
of eighteen thousand dollars ($18,000), but if such cost exceeds eighteen thousand dollars
($18,000) any such cost in excess of eighteen thousand dollars ($18,000) shall be paid by the
District.
4. When and as often as an accident at any time occurs to the eighteen (18) inch main or
shore connections so as to deprive the District of its water-supply, the City shall with reasonable
diligence make the connection with the City service until repairs to the eighteen (18) inch main
are completed, and the City undertakes to install valves and connections with the City service
to meet such contingencies, and the District shall pay to the City the cost of making such
connections when made by the City.
5. In case the water-distribution system of the District or of any part thereof shall be ready
before the City completes its enlarged system, and provides and lays such eighteen (18) inch
main and shore connections, the City will give the District such water as the City can spare
from its other uses not exceeding two hundred and fifty (250) inches from the nine (9) inch
pipe already available for that purpose, and for all such water so given the District shall pay
the City monthly ten (10) cents per 100 cubic feet.
6. Should a bridge be built at the Narrows above referred to with provision to carry all
water-pipes, and should it be found to the advantage of the City to use the said bridge and the
City should remove its pipes from the bed of the Narrows, then the City may remove the said
eighteen (IS) inch main to said bridge, and the cost of removing the said eighteen (IS) inch
main and of making and installing all shore connections therewith and any and all other consequential and incidental costs and expenses entailed thereby or in connection therewith shall be
paid by the District to the City upon being suffered or incurred by the City.
7. The District shall pay to the City as consideration for the foregoing rights and services
from and after the providing and laying of said eighteen (18) inch main and shore connections
an annual sum of seven thousand dollars ($7,000) on the first day uf Dec-ember in each year,
which sum of seven thousand dollars ($7,000) is made up as set forth in the letter dated 4th of
March, 1911, from H. M. Burwell to the Chairman and members of the Water Committee, a copy
of which is annexed to the Agreement. The District shall moreover, as part of the consideration
for this Agreement, convey to the City all its rights, title, and interest in, of, to, and out of the
said water record of two hundred and fifty (250) inches on Seymour Creek, and the District
will forthwith make, execute, and deliver good and sufficient conveyance of such rights, title,
and interest to the City and deliver over to the City its deeds and documents of title thereto.
8. If at any future time the City shall decide to change its intake to any other point of
Seymour Creek and to carry its system to that point in order to obtain a higher elevation, the
District shall contribute pro rata its share of the cost of such change and carrying said system
to such point and of the maintenance of same, by paying annually to the City a part or portion
of the interest and sinking fund which* the City shall have to pay upon bonds, debentures, or
registered stock created, made, or issued for the purpose of paying or providing for such cost
and of all sums which the City shall have to pay for the maintenance of such changed system,
which said part or portion shall be determined in the same manner as the said seven thousand
dollars ($7,000).
9. In case the supply of water at the said intake on Seymour Creek shall at any time be
decreased so that there shall be less than three thousand (3,000) inches which can be carried
through the pipes and system of the City, then in such case the said two hundred and fifty (250)
inches of water to be supplied to the District shall be decreased in proportion so that the City
will not be bound to bring down and .supply to the District more than one-twelfth (1/12) of the
supply of water at said intake during such times as such supply shall be so decreased. 16 Geo. 5 Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet. D 41
10. The District shall pay and indemnify and save harmless the City from and against all
and any claims, loss, costs, damages, or expenses which shall at any time be paid or suffered or
sustained by the City or made or claimed against the City by reason of any accident, injuries, or
damages of any kind whatsoever, and whether to any person, firm, or corporation personally or
to any boats, ships, vessels, or property or things, or in any other manner of any kind whatsoever
by reason of the eighteen (IS) inch submerged main and shore connections, or the providing and
laying of the same, or the changing or removing of same to any such bridge or the existence of
same either submerged or upon said bridge, and if the City shall at any time be called upon or
compelled to pay any such claims, loss, costs, damages, or expenses the City may recover same
forthwith from the District.
11. The City shall proceed with reasonable dispatch to obtain the consent of the Dominion
of Canada or such department of the Government of the Dominion of Canada or such other
authority or authorities as shall be requisite or necessary for the purpose of providing and laying
such submerged main and shore connection, and in case such consent shall be refused or shall
not be granted, then this Agreement and all terms and conditions hereof, except as to the terms
and conditions in regard to the City furnishing water to the District through the nine (9) inch
pipe already available, shall be null and void and at an end.
12. All of the said eighteen (18) inch submerged main, shore connections, interchange connections, valves, and other connections referred to in this Agreement shall be and remain the
property of the City.
In witness whereof the parties hereto have caused these presents to be signed by their proper
officers in that behalf and their corporate seals to be affixed.
'(Signed)
J. W. Weart,
Reeve of Burnaby.
William Griffiths,
Clerk of Burnaby.
L. D. Taylor,
Mayor of Vancouver.
Wm. McQueen,
City Clerk of Vancouver.
Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of—
COPY OF LETTER REFERRED TO IN CLAUSE 7 OF AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 5th, 1911,
BETWEEN THE CITY OF VANCOUVER AND THE CORPORATION
OF DISTRICT OF BURNABY.
Vancouver, B.C., March 4th, 1911.
The Chairman and Members of the Water Committee.
Gentlemen,—In accordance with your request, I have prepared a careful estimate of the
extra cost of constructing a 34-inch steel supply-main from the present intake on Seymour Creek
to the Second Narrows above the cost of the 30-inch main now contemplated, together with the
cost of an extra submerged main at the Second Narrows with shore connections and the necessary
valves required to deliver a supply of water to the Municipality of Burnaby at the south side
of the said Second Narrows.
The amount of water which this enlargement of 4 inches to the proposed 30-inch main will
deliver to the Municipality will depend upon the pressure they propose to maintain in the pipe
at this point of delivery.
I might here state that, assuming they require to maintain pressure of 172 lb. per square inch
in the pipe at the point, at sea-level (which would be equivalent to 400 feet head), the hydraulic
grade or fall from the present intake to this point would be just about 9 feet per square mile
and a 34-inch pipe would discharge at the rate of 24 cubic feet per second, a 30-inch pipe under
the said conditions at the rate of 17 cubic feet per second.
The difference being 7 cubic feet per second or an amount equivalent to the 250 miners' inches
which this Municipality has recorded in Seymour Creek. D 42
Department op Lands.
Estimate of Cost—
Extra cost of 20,000 feet of lap-welded pipe: 34" diameter of 5/16"
plate and 20,000 feet of 34" diameter of %" plate above 20,000
feet of 30" diameter of %" plate and 20,000 feet of 30" diameter
of 5/16" plate, at an average of $1,275 per foot  $51,000 00
1,000
Extra weight of total 40,000 feet of pipe at 22.7 lb. per foot, 454 tons ;
haulage of extra 454 tons; based on Fogg's contract with City
at $3.75 per ton        1,700 00
Extra weight of lead and yarn for field joints at 10 lb. per joint,
2,100 joints, or 21.000 lb. at 4 cents, delivered at trench          840 00
Extra labour caulking joints and placing heavier pipes in trench,
calculated from actual cost of pipe installed, 2,100 joints at
20 cents per joint   420 00
Proportion of cost of contract price of pipe-line road, bridge, and
wharf;  total, $57,350—250/1400 of this amount     10,240 00
Proportion of cost of right-of-way;   total, $11,500—250/1400 of this
amount        2,050 00
Extra   excavation   and  back-filling   in   pipe-trench   and  rock-work,
15 per cent, increase in estimate of $50,000      7,500 OO
Cost of one IS" submerged main at Second Narrows     13,000 00
Shore connections, 1,600 feet of 18" pipe installed with gate-valve,
check-valve, and wye complete      5,000 OO
$91,750 00
Engineering and supervision at 5 per cent      4,5S7 50
$96,337 50
Loss on sale of debentures and expense at 3 per cent      2,890 10
$99,227 60
In the above estimate you will notice that I have made provision for one 18-inch submerged
main. This will be ample for present requirements antL for many years to come, although it
has not sufficient capacity to convey their full water record, under the conditions mentioned above.
It should be mentioned that in assuming the responsibility of installing and maintaining the
submerged main for the use of the Municipality the City is taking a great risk which should be
fully considered in the proposed arrangement to be entered into.
It is possible for a break to occur at any time through an accident, which may be of such
nature that the whole submerged main would have to be hauled out to make the necessary
repairs.
This would be a very expensive operation and should be provided for.
Leaving out of consideration accidents to the submerged main, we have ascertained from the
past twenty years' experience at the First Narrows that the life of these pipes is about fifteen
years, at the end of which time a complete renewal of the whole pipe including shore connections
would have to be made.
Possibly before that time passes a bridge will be constructed across the Second Narrows,
designed to carry all water-pipes, but at the present time we cannot depend upon this bridge, as
there is no certainty when it will be finished or that the proposed arrangement for the water-
pipes will be preferable to our present system of submerged pipes.
It will therefore be advisable to make a special arrangement with the Municipality of
Burnaby providing for the renewal of the submerged main whenever necessary and the repairing
of breaks, etc., or the complete removal of this part of the conduit to the bridge crossing.
Operating and Maintenance Charge.—The cost of operating and maintaining the supply-main
along Seymour Creek from the Narrows to the intake in 1909 was about $6,000 and in 1910 about
$13,000 as shown in the books, but it is impossible to state what this expense will be in the
future, as it will vary greatly in different years owing to the conditions which exist in this
valley. 16 Geo. 5 Joint Control of Water Supply on Burrard Inlet. D 43
Probably this matter can be best settled by making a fixed charge annually, allowing an
ample margin to cover the proper proportion of this cost and contingencies.
The average cost of operating and maintenance during the past two years is shown to be
about $9,500. As an example: Making use of this figure and assuming that the Municipality
should pay in the ratio of their water record to that of the City—namely, 25-140—this makes
an annual charge of about $1,700.
Annual Expenses.—The annual expenses necessary to provide for this extra cost of $99,227.60
would be as follows:—
Interest and sinking fund at 5 per cent  $4,961 40
Operating, maintenance, and contingencies, say     2,038 60
Total annual expense  $7,000 00
The foregoing calculation of the capacity of the proposed supply-pipe is based on the intake
being at or near the present one. It would be as well to here mention that the capacity of this
pipe will be greatly increased when this conduit is extended up to the proposed new intake at
the waterfall.
Under the new conditions which will then exist, the enlargement of 4 inches will give the
pipe an extra capacity of about 12 cubic feet per second, delivered to the elevation and point
mentioned, and the single 18-inch submerged main will then have a capacity of about 7 cubic feet
per second, or 250 miners' inches.
The agreement with the Municipality could, however, be made to cover this point if it was
stated that 7 cubic feet per second or 250 miners' inches was the. maximum amount to be supplied,
and should also provide for their share of the cost of extending the pipe-line to the waterfall.
The securing of this water record, thereby eliminating the possibility of future complication
and opposition, is a matter which should be given consideration. As the City of Vancouver is
at present applying for storage licence for the purpose of the future development of storage-
reservoirs in the Seymour Creek Valley, it makes it more desirable that the control of all the
water records from this creek should be in the hands of the City.
Yours respectfully,
H. M. Burwell,
Consulting Engineer.
■
Memorandum of Agreement, made and entered into this first day of May, in the year of our
Lord one thousand nine hundred and twelve (a.d. 1912),
Between
The City of Vancouver (hereinafter called the " City ") of the first part
and
The Municipality of  Point  Grey   (hereinafter  called  the  "Municipality")   of the
second part.
Witnesseth that:—
Whereas by a grant of water rights issued by virtue of the " Water Clauses Consolidation
Act" by C. C. Fisher, Commissioner, on the 28th day of September, 1906, the Corporation of the
District of South Vancouver was granted the right to use three hundred miners' inches of water
in Seymour Creek as set out and mentioned in the said grant:
And whereas by an Act of Legislature of British Columbia, being chapter 38, and known as
the " South Vancouver Division Act," the Lieutenant-Governor in Council was authorized under
his proper seal to incorporate into a district municipality under the name of the Corporation
of Point Grey all that locality at that time forming a portion of the District of South Vancouver
described in section 2 of the said " South Vancouver Division Act, 1907 ":
And whereas by section 13 of the said Act it was provided that the existing rights and
interests of the Municipality of South Vancouver existing before the passing of the said " South
Vancouver Division Act" to the aforementioned water grant or record should be apportioned
between the future Municipality of South Vancouver and the Municipality of Point Grey as might
thereafter be mutually agreed upon by such municipalities:
And whereas the said municipalities have agreed upon such apportionment as follows, that
is to say: To each municipality there has been allotted an undivided half-interest in the said
water record: D 44
Department op Lands.
1925
And whereas the said Municipality of Point Grey has agreed to relinquish, quit-claim, and
set over unto the said City of Vancouver all its rights, title, and interest in the said water record
aforesaid on and after the performance by the City of Vancouver of the covenants herein contained to be performed by it:
Now, therefore, in consideration of the premises and the terms and conditions hereinafter
contained, and of the sums of money hereinafter agreed to be paid by the said Municipality to
the said City, the said City and the Municipality do hereby agree each with the other as
follows:—
(1.) The said Municipality agrees that, upon the completion of the partnership main hereinafter agreed to be constructed, it will quit-claim, relinquish, and set over to the said City all
its existing right, title, and interest in Water Record No. 132, issued on the 28th day of September,
1908, by C. C. Fisher, Commissioner, to the Municipality of South Vancouver, which rights have
been mutually agreed upon as aforesaid as being the undivided one-half interest in said record.
(2.) The City agrees until such time as the water-main hereinafter agreed to be constructed
is completed to deliver to the Municipality as much water as it can conveniently spare from its
own system on the terms and conditions set out in the agreement between the Municipality and
the City, bearing date the 1st day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred
and eight (a.d. 1908).
(3.) The City agrees that it will, when requested in writing by the Municipality so to do
(provided that such request be made prior to March 1st, 1913, and provided the City has
reasonable assurance that the Municipality has passed the necessary by-law to raise the moneys
necessary to defray the Municipality's share of the costs thereof as hereinafter provided), lay
and install a water-main constructed of steel pipe twenty-four (24) inches in diameter from the
wye pipe at the Second Canyon of Capilano Creek, with connections across the First Narrows
of Burrard Inlet and Coal Harbour and False Creek through the City of Vancouver to some
point on Bodwell Road between Ash Street and Oak Street, on the following terms and conditions :—
(a.) Upon being requested as aforesaid, the City shall proceed to construct the said aforementioned main and carry out all work in respect thereto with all due diligence and without
unnecessary delay, and to complete the same with all possible speed (subject, however, to all
causes beyond its control, such as may be occasioned by strikes, acts of God, difficulty in obtaining
pipes, material, or the necessary right-of-way to run the said main).
(b.) The Municipality shall forthwith, after completion of the said main, pay to the City
the sum of thirty-six thousand and three hundred dollars ($36,300), which shall include and
cover not only the half of the cost of the 17,000 feet of pipe-line already constructed by the City
from the intake to the canyon on Capilano Creek, but also one-tenth of the amount expended by
the City in the construction of its new intake and sediment-tanks on Capilano Creek. (The
Municipality shall also pay to the City, as the work progresses and on Engineer's estimate,
one-half the actual sums which may be necessarily expended by the City in the construction of
the twenty-four (24) inch supply-main from the canyon to the point of delivery on Bodwell
Road as aforesaid.)
(c.) The said supply-main shall be known and designated as a partnership pipe and the cost
of maintaining the same from the said canyon on Capilano Creek to the point of delivery on
Bodwell Road shall be borne equally by the said Municipality and the said City. The said
Municipality further agrees to pay to the said City one-tenth of the cost to the said City of
maintaining the system between the said canyon and the intake up to the full development of
fifteen hundred (1,500) miners' inches.
(d.) The City shall without further charge to the Municipality cause the said partnership
main at all times to be supplied with water to its full capacity from the connection at the said
canyon on Capilano Creek: Provided always that should the said City fail to keep such pipe so
filled owing to a drought, act of God, or any climatic conditions over which it has no control,
the same shall not be deemed to be a breach of this Agreement.
(e.) No connection of any kind for drawing off water shall be made to the main whatsoever
north of the southern terminus, except one 22-inch connection to be placed at the point where said
main crosses the Georgia Street main, which connection shall be termed an emergency connection
and be Kept locked or sealed, and shall only be used by the consent of both parties hereto.
(/.) At the southern terminus of said main on Bodwell Road there shall be connected to it
two branch pipes, the diameters of which are to be mutually agreed upon by the Engineers 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 45
representing the City and the Municipality, one to be laid by and at the expense of the City
easterly along Bodwell Road to the City's reservoir at Little Mountain, and the other to be laid
by and at the expense of the Municipality westerly along Bodwell Road to the Municipality's
reservoir near Granville Street. Said pipes shall be so connected to said 24-inch main as to
ensure an equal flow of water through each pipe.
(g.) The Municipality shall give the City permission to enter on and dig its streets to lay
and repair the main branch pipe as aforesaid from Sixteenth Avenue to Bodwell Road and on
Bodwell Road to Bridge Street respectively, subject to such reasonable restrictions as may be
agreed upon by the City Engineer and the Municipal Engineer.
(4.) The Municipality shall supply the City with all plans in duplicate of all water-mains
which shall be laid by it, and the City shall supply to the Municipality plans in duplicate of all
water-mains laid by it in the Municipality.
(5.) The Municipality shall supply the City with plans in duplicate, showing any extensions
which are proposed to be constructed or installed, and such plans shall show all hydrants, valves,
and other apparati which are proposed to be constructed in connection with any water-main or
extensions thereof by the said Municipality; and the City shall supply to the Municipality plans
in duplicate of all pipes and works in respect to which it is liable to make any payments under
and by virtue of this Agreement.
(6.) All hydrants, valves, or other apparati constructed or installed in connection with any
water-mains, services, extensions in connection therewith, shall be of the same pattern and
conform with the specifications and standards required and used by the City in connection with
its own works.
(7.) Notwithstanding anything herein contained, it is expressly understood that the arrangement for supply of water by the City of Vancouver to the land vested in the Royal Trust Company
lying to the south of the southern boundary of the City, and bounded on the east by Ontario
Street and on the west by the Vancouver and Lulu Island Railway, embodied in the indenture
made the 31st day of December, 1908, by which the Trust Company conveyed to the City the site
of the Little Mountain reservoir, shall be duly observed and carried out by the City, and that
in the observance of such arrangement the same shall have precedence over the arrangement
for the supply of water to Point Grey herein contained.
(8.) This Agreement shall enure to the benefit of and be binding upon the respective parties
hereto, as well as their successors and assigns.
(9.) This Agreement shall be contingent upon the City obtaining the consent of the proper
authorities to the laying of the necessary pipes across Burrard Inlet as herein contemplated
and the assignment of the water record as hereinbefore provided for.
In witness whereof the said parties hereto have caused to be affixed hereto their corporate
seals with the signature of their proper officers duly authorized in that behalf.
Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence
of—
"(Signed)
James Findlay,
Mayor of the City of Vancouver.
Wm. McQueen,
City Clerk of the City of Vancouver.
A. G. Harvey,
Reeve of the Corporation of Point Grey.
Ben. A. Cunliffe,
Clerk of the, Corporation of Point Grey.
This Agreement, made and entered into this seventeenth day of July, in the year of our
Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventeen (a.d. 1917),
Between
The City of Vancouver (hereinafter called the " City") of the first part
and
The Corporation of the District of South Vancouver (hereinafter called the "District") of the second part.
Whereas pursuant to an agreement between the parties hereto dated the third of December,
1914, the City has been delivering and supplying water to the District upon the terms and
conditions set out in said recited agreement: D 46
Department op Lands.
1925
And whereas it has been agreed by the parties hereto that from and after the date hereof
the City shall deliver and supply water to the District to the extent and upon the terms and
conditions hereinafter set out:
Now, therefore, it is convenanted and agreed by and between the parties hereto as follows,
that is to say:—
1. The City, in so far as it is legally empowered so to do, shall while this Agreement remains
in force and effect supply and deliver to the District at the points hereinafter in paragraph two
(2) mentioned a like proportion of water per head of population in the District as that supplied
per head of population on similar levels in the City; and such water shall be drawn through the
regular water system used by the inhabitants of the City and shall be furnished at the pressure
existing on similar levels in the City, save as hereinafter otherwise provided.
2. The said points at which the City shall so supply and deliver the said water shall be at
the corners or intersections of Cambia Street and Sixteenth Avenue, Main Street and Sixteenth
Avenue, Fraser Street and Twenty-fifth Avenue, Victoria Drive and Sixteenth Avenue, Nanaimo
Street and Twenty-ninth Avenue, Rupert Street and Twenty-ninth Avenue, and at the corner of
intersection of Twenty-fifth Avenue and Inverness Street, and at such other points (but not
exceeding three other points) as the District may require. The supply of water at the corner
of intersection of Twenty-fifth Avenue and Inverness Street shall be furnished direct from the
high-water pressure system of the City and shall not be used or distributed by the District outside
of the area described by the following boundaries, namely:—
" Commencing at the intersection of Inverness Street and Thirty-first Avenue; thence south
to Thirty-fourth Avenue; thence east on Thirty-fourth Avenue to Culloden Street; thence south
on Culloden Street to Thirty-ninth Avenue; thence east to Knight Street; thence south to Forty-
third Avenue; thence west to Main Street; thence south to Fifty-first Avenue; thence west to
Ontario Street; thence north to Thirty-fourth Avenue; thence east to Prince Edward Street;
thence north to Thirty-first Avenue; thence east to the point of commencement, and shown
outlined in red on the annexed plan."
The mains and the area within which water from the high-pressure system shall be distributed as aforesaid shall be isolated from the general low-pressure distribution system of the
District by either creating dead ends or removing the spindles of the valves on all mains connected
with the said high-pressure area as the City Engineer may direct or require; and the said valves
shall be closed and sealed at locations to be inspected and approved by the City Engineer. The
City undertakes to supply and install the necessary meters and provide for the upkeep of the
same; but the District will supply one six-inch Trident Compound meter for the high-pressure
connection at the corner or intersection of Twenty-fifth Avenue and Inverness Street, and the
City will provide for the upkeep of same. No changes shall be made in the size or sizes of any
meters except such as shall be mutually determined upon by the Engineer of the City and the
Engineer of the District. The water supplied by the City shall be received by the District at
the said points, and the District shall connect its water-pipes in such a manner as shall be
necessary for such purposes at such points.
3. The District shall have the right, by any official or agent duly authorized by it for such
purpose, to have access to and to inspect the said meters or any of them in the presence of an
inspector or official nominated and authorized for that purpose by the City, upon the District
giving the City Engineer twenty-four (24) hours' notice of its desire to so inspect. Except as
aforesaid the said meters shall be under the full and absolute control of the City.
4. In each and every year while this Agreement shall remain in force and effect the District
shall pay to the City as a rental for such of the said meters as shall be provided and installed
a sum equal to all taxes and rates of whatsoever kind assessed or levied during such year by
the District upon or against the property of the City known as Little Mountain reservoir-site,
being composed of a portion of District Lot 526. And such sum so to be paid by the District
to the City in each such year shall be due and payable when such rates or taxes for such year
shall become due or payable.
5. The District shall from the date of the Agreement,1 and as long as this Agreement shall
remain in force and effect, purchase and take its entire water-supply from the City to such extent
as the City is able and shall find it practicable to deliver and supply same at the points aforesaid.
6. All water delivered and supplied by the City to the District shall be for the exclusive use
of the District, and none of same shall be sold or otherwise disposed of by the District to any
other municipality or to any person, firm, or corporation outside of the District. 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 47
7. The District shall pay to the City for all water so supplied and delivered a flat rate of
four and one-quarter (4%) cents per hundred (100) cubic feet. All water so supplied and
delivered shall be paid for monthly on the last day of each and every month while this Agreement
remains in force and effect: Provided, however, that if the District shall pay any such monthly
account for water within twenty (20) days after the same shall have become so due and payable,
then the District (if it shall not be otherwise indebted to the City under this Agreement for water
supplied) shall be allowed a rebate of ten (10) per cent, upon such monthly account.
8. The City shall not be in any way responsible for failures in supplying any water to the
District by reason or on account of any accidents or breakages in the City's waterworks system
or of the bursting or defects in pipes or appliances or other parts of the service which are or may
be installed for the purpose of delivering such water, or by excess draw-off in other parts of the
City, or by failure at either or both sources of supply; and the said District hereby agrees to
indemnify and save harmless the said City from all actions, causes of actions, claims, suits, and
demands which may at any time arise by reason of the supplying of water herein agreed to, and
in event of any such action, cause of action, suits, claims, or demands being brought against the
said City by any person, persons, or corporation, then the said City shall have a remedy over
against the said District and may enforce payment against the said District of any loss,- costs,
charges, damages, or expenses to which the said City may be put by reason of any such action,
cause of action, claim, suit, or demand.
9. In case the said Engineers are unable to agree upon any matter by this Agreement to be
determined by them, then such matter in dispute shall be by them referred for determination to
some other Engineer to be agreed upon by them, and the decision of such other Engineer in
respect of such matter shall be final and binding upon the parties hereto. In case, however, the
Engineer of the City and the Engineer of the District are unable to agree on such other Engineer,
they shall each nominate and appoint some other Engineer, and the two other Engineers so
appointed shall nominate and appoint a third Engineer. Such three other Engineers shall
determine the matter in dispute, and the decision thereupon of a majority of such three other
Engineers shall be final and binding upon the parties hereto.
10. This Agreement shall remain in force and effect for ten (10) years from the date hereof:
Provided, however, that either party hereto may at any time terminate and put an end to this
Agreement by giving to the other party hereto three (3) years' written notice of its intention
so to do.
11. The said recited agreement between the parties hereto of December 3rd, 1914, is hereby
terminated and ended.
In witness whereof the said parties hereto have hereunto set their corporate seals under the
hands of their proper officers in that behalf the day and year first above written.
Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of—
(Sgd.)    W. McBeth,
Mayor.
(Sgd.)    Wm. McQueen,
City Clerk.
(Sgd.)    William B. Russell,
Reeve.
(Sgd.)    Wm. T. Riley,
Clerk.
Memorandum of Agreement, made and entered into this 15th day of December, in the year
of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventeen (a.d. 1917),
Between
The City of Vancouver (hereinafter called the said "City") of the first part
and
The District of North Vancouver  (hereinafter called the said "District")   of the
second part.
Whereas the said District has requested the said City to deliver a water-supply at certain
points on the Capilano and Seymour pipe-lines:
And whereas the said District obtained a water record on the Seymour Creek entitling them
to miners' inches of water: D 48
Department of Lands.
1925
And whereas the City has agreed to deliver a supply of water through the pipes of the City:
Now, this Agreement witnesseth that, in consideration of the premises and the covenants
hereinafter contained, the parties hereto mutually agree each with the other as follows :—
1. The said.City agrees to deliver whatever supply it may find practicable so to do at points
on' its Capilano and Seymour pipe-lines which may be designated by the Engineer of the District
of North Vancouver, provided the said points are approved of by the City Engineer of the City
of Vancouver.
2. The total number of connections to be made from either the Capilano or Seymour pipelines, or both, shall not be more than three (3). None of the aforesaid connections shall be of a
diameter greater than eight (8) inches, and of this size only one will be installed, and the point
of installation to connection of said eight (8) inch connection shall be at the intersection of the
Keith Road and the Seymour twenty-four (24) inch rising main ; the said connection and location
to be made and located by the City Engineer of the City of Vancouver, and the whole cost of this
or of any other and all connections shall be borne by the said District.
3. The cost of any changes in the grade of the Capilano Road as established by Mr. Burwell
and the District's Engineer which would necessitate the lowering or altering of the City's pipes
to be borne by the District, except where such changes are or have been made and agreed to
by the City Engineer and the District's Engineer.
4. The District shall supply the City with a complete plan of their system, showing the
points of connection and location of hydrants.
5. The District shall provide a reasonable system of inspection to guard against unnecessary
waste (satisfactory to the City Engineer), particularly during the dry season.
6. The said District agrees to bear the expense of making connections and cost of installation,
and also agrees to bear the expense and cost of an automatic safety-valve, should the City at any
time during the term of this agreement decide to install said automatic valve.
7. The said District undertakes and agrees to pay the said City a flat rate of six cents (6c.)
per hundred cubic feet for whatever water shall be so delivered to the said District, subject to
sections 8 and 9 of this Agreement, and the said District shall be solely responsible and liable
to the said City for the payment of the same.
8. The City agrees to allow to the said District a discount of fifteen (15) per cent, on all
payments for water made within thirty (30) days from date of receiving statement from the
said City of accounts due.
9. The said parties hereto agree that the minimum cost per annum of water supplied as
aforesaid shall be one thousand fifve hundred dollars ($1,500) exclusive of meter-rents.
10. It is hereby distinctly understood and agreed and this Agreement is made on the distinct
understanding that the said City shall in no way be liable or responsible for any failure to supply
any water to the said District, and the said City shall be at liberty to discontinue temporarily
the said supply at any time it shall find it expedient or necessary so to do.
11. It is further agreed that the said City shall be in no way responsible for any bursting or
defects in the pipes or other parts of the service installed for the purpose of delivering said water
at the points above referred to.
12. The said District shall be solely responsible for any damages or losses which may be
occasioned or sustained by reason of any wash-outs or other damages whatsoever in connection
with the said water-pipe lines within the boundaries of the said District, and will indemnify
and save harmless the said City of and from any and all actions, causes of actions, claims, and
demands whatsoever in respect thereof.
13. It is hereby mutually agreed that either parties to this Agreement may terminate the
same by giving one (1) year's notice in writing to the other party.
14. All water delivered and supplied by the City to the District shall he for the exclusive
use of the District, and none of same shall be sold or otherwise disposed of by the District to
any other municipality or to any person, firm, or corporation outside of the District.
15. The parties hereto mutually agree that this Agreement shall cancel and supersede all
previous agreements in respect to the supply of water by the said City to the said District, and
shall come into force and take effect as soon as the Seymour Creek system of the said District
is in operation, subject to the approval of the Water Board of the Province of British Columbia. 16 Geo. 5 Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet. D 49
16. This Agreement shall enure to the benefit of and be binding upon the respective parties
hereto, as well as upon the successors and assigns of the said City and the successors and assigns
of the said District.
In witness whereof the parties hereto have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and
year first above written.
(Sgd.)    M. M. MoBeatii,
Mayor.
(Sgd.)    Wm. McQueen,
City Clerk.
(Sgd.)    E. H. Bridgman,
Reeve.
(Sgd.)    John F. Farmer,
Clerk.
Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of—
Memorandum of Agreement, made and entered into this seventh day of November, in the
year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and eighteen (a.d. 1918),
Between
The City of Vancouver (hereinafter called the " City ") of the first part
and
The Corporation of the District of West Vancouver (hereinafter called the " Municipality")  of the second part.
Whereas the said Municipality has requested the said City to deliver a water-supply at a
certain point on the Capilano Road from one of its Capilano water-pipe lines:
And whereas the City has agreed to deliver a supply of water from the City pipes:
Now, this Agreement witnesseth that, in consideration of the premises and covenants hereinafter contained, the parties hereto mutually agree each with the other as follows:—
1. The said City agrees to supply whatever quantity it deems practicable to the Municipality
at a point on the Capilano Road opposite the Municipality's Keith Road Bridge crossing the
Capilano River as shown on the plan hereto annexed.
2. The diameter of the water pipe or main shall be six inches (6") and the point of connection with the said main shall be at or near the intersection of the south line of the Municipality's Keith Road Bridge and the City's sixteen-inch (16") water-main on the Capilano Road.
The said connection and location to be made and located by the City Engineer of the City of
Vancouver, and the whole cost of the connection, except the installation of the three-inch (3")
meter hereinafter referred to, shall be borne by the said Municipality.
3. A control or shut-off valve shall be installed upon the six-inch (0") pipe as close to the
sixteen-inch (10") main as convenient. This valve shall be closed and sealed and only opened
in case of fire emergency, in which case the City Engineer shall be immediately notified, and the
valve shall be reclosed and resealed as soon as the fire emergency has passed. In case of undue
delay in closing this valve, the City reserves the right to decide whether the emergency is passed
and if in the opinion of its Engineer it has to close and seal the valve.
4. A three-inch (3") diameter by-pass pipe shall be installed around the aforesaid control-
valve, and a three-inch (3") meter shall be inserted in this by-pass pipe for the purpose of giving
a limited domestic supply of water to the Municipality. This three-inch (3") meter shall be
supplied by and remain the property of the City of Vancouver. The City will undertake the
maintenance of this meter, charging the Municipality a monthly rental of two dollars ($2) for
the use thereof.
5. The Municipality shall install upon the six-inch (6") main and maintain in good working-
order a pressure-reducing valve of approved design, and set so that the pressure of the water
entering the water-mains of the said Municipality through this connection shall not exceed the
pressure ordinarily present in those mains, due to the water from the existing source of supply
of the said Municipality at the level or height of the connection to the sixteen-inch (16") water-
main belonging to the said City.
6. The Municipality shall supply the City with a complete plan of the six-inch (6") main
when laid, showing the location of all valves thereon and of any Ape-hydrants attached thereto.
7. The Municipality shall provide a reasonable system of inspection to guard against unnecessary waste of water supplied through this connection, particularly during the dry season.
4 Department op Lands.
1925
8. The said Municipality undertakes and agrees to pay the said City a flat rate of six cents
(6c.) per one hundred cubic feet for whatever water shall be delivered to the said Municipality
through this connection, and the said Municipality shall be solely responsible and liable to the
said City for payment of the same.
9. The City agrees to allow the said Municipality a discount of fifteen (15) per cent, on all
payments for water made within thirty (30) days from date of receiving statement from the
City of accounts due.
10. It is hereby distinctly understood and agreed and this Agreement is made on the distinct
understanding that the said City shall in no way be liable or responsible for any failure to supply
any water to the said Municipality, and the said City shall be at liberty to discontinue temporarily
the said supply at any time it shall find it expedient or necessary to do so.
11. It is further agreed that the said City shall be in no way responsible for any bursting
or defects in the pipes or other parts of the service installed for the purpose of delivering the
said water at the point above referred to.
12. The said Municipality shall be wholly responsible for any damages or losses, either
immediate or consequential, which may be occasioned or sustained by reason of any wash-outs
or other damages whatsoever in connection with the said water-pipe lines within the boundaries
of the said Municipality, and the said Municipality will indemnify and save harmless the said
City of and from any and all actions, causes of actions, claims, or demands whatsoever in respect
thereof.
13. It is hereby mutually agreed that either party in this Agreement may terminate the same
by giving six (6) months' notice in writing to the other party.
14. All water delivered and supplied by the City to the Municipality shall be for the exclusive
use of the Municipality and shall be used for domestic purposes only, and none of the same shall
be sold or otherwise disposed of by the Municipality to any other municipality, or to any person,
firm, or corporation outside of the Municipality, nor for the purpose of supplying factories of
manufacturing industries or other large consumers of water within the said Municipality.
15. This Agreement shall enure to the benefit of and be binding upon the respective parties
thereto, as well as upon the successors and assigns of the said City and the successors and assigns
of the said Municipality.
In witness whereof the parties hereto have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and
year first above written by the proper officers in that behalf duly authorized.
(Signed)
R. M. Gale,
Mayor.
Wm. McQueen,
City Clerk.
V. V. Vinson,
Reeve.
Jas. OLlason,
Clerk.
Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of-
[Seal.]
This Agreement, made in duplicate this day of July, a.d. 1918,
Between
The Corporation of the City of North Vancouver (hereinafter called the "City") of
the first part
and
The Corporation of the District of North Vancouver (hereinafter called the "District ") of the second part.
Whereas certain of the City's water-mains are laid on streets in that portion of the District
of North Vancouver and known as Lynn Valley Water District:
And whereas it has been agreed by and between the parties hereto that the City will supply
water through said mains to the District for domestic purposes and for the use of the District
for fire purposes upon the terms and conditions herein set out:
Now, therefore, this Agreement witnesseth that the parties hereto, for themselves, their
successors, and assigns, agree each with the other as follows:— 16 Geo. 5
Joint Control op Water Supply on Burrard Inlet.
D 51
(1.) The City agrees to supply water to the District for the use of consumers in such part
of said Lynn Valley Water District as may be desired by the District for domestic purposes and
for the use of the District for fire purposes.
(2.) The District agrees to charge the users of such water so supplied at approximately the
same rates as the City charges for water used and supplied withiu the City.
(3.) The District agrees to collect such rates and to pay the City fifty per cent, of the actual
net rates collected by the District from users of water in that part of said District served by
the City's mains.
(4.) The District agrees to make up and render to the City an account of all such water
rates collected by it every three months, and to pay to the City, within thirty days after the
rendering of every such account, the amount shown to be due therein.
(5.) It is further agreed that the City's collector shall at all times during regular office hours
have access to the books of the District to ascertain the amount of collections made by the
District for water rates for that part of said Lynn Valley Water District served by the City's
mains, for the purpose of verifying the accounts hereinbefore mentioned rendered by the District
to the City.
(6.) The District agrees to lay and maintain all its own distributing water-pipes and services,
but it is understood and agreed by and between- the parties hereto that before the District connects any distributing-pipe with the City's main water-pipe from Lynn Creek, application for
such connection shall be made by the District to the City for permission to make such connection,
and all such connections shall be made under the supervision of the City Waterworks Superintendent.
(7.) This Agreement shall at all times be subject to the prior rights of the City, who shall
have the first right as users of the water flowing in the main pipe from Lynn Creek up to a user
of 300 inches.
(8.) In the event of the City at any time or times during the existence of this Agreement,
for any reason whatever, shutting off and not supplying water to the District for the use of
consumers of said Lynn Valley Water District for any period which in the opinion of the Council
may be necessary, the City, its successors or assigns, shall not be liable for any damages upon
any account whatever for or in respect of the shutting-off of the water from said District as
aforesaid.
(9.) The District agrees to pay the City a rental of ten dollars per annum for each fire-
hydrant in said Lynn Valley Water District, payment to be made on the first of January of each
year for the rental accrued due for the previous year.
(10.) The District agrees to supply to the City upon demand a copy of its plan of the waterworks mains, pipes, connections, and hydrants in said Lynn Valley Water District.
(11.). This Agreement and the provisions and. terms herein contained may be terminated at
any time upon either party giving to the other six months' notice in writing to that effect.
In witness whereof the Mayor and City Clerk of said City have hereto set their hands and
the corporate seal of said City attached and the Reeve and Clerk of said District have hereto
set their hands and the corporate seal of the District attached the day and year first above
written.
f (Sgd.)  G. W. Vance,
Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of— I Mayor.
| (Sgd.)  R. F. Archibald,
[Seal.] j City Clerk.
This Agreement, made in duplicate this day of , one thousand nine hundred
and seventeen.
Between
The Corporation of the District of North Vancouver (hereinafter called the "District ") of the one part
and
The Corporation of the City of North Vancouver (hereinafter called the "City")
of the other part.
Whereas the City is unable to supply from its present water system the residents of that
part of the City of North Vancouver known as " Tempe Heights," being that portion of the said City embraced in a plan of subdivision deposited in the Land Registry Office at the City of
Vancouver and numbered :
And whereas the District's water-mains from the Mosquito Creek have been constructed and
laid to the northerly boundary of said subdivision on Regents Avenue, and it has been agreed by
and between the parties hereto that the District will supply water, through said mains to the City
for the use of consumers in said portion of the City of North Vancouver for domestic purposes
and for the use of the City for fire purposes upon such terms and conditions herein set out:
Now, therefore, this Agreement witnesseth that the parties hereto for themselves, their
successors and assigns, agrees each with the other as follows:—
1. The District agrees to supply water to the City for the use of consumers in that part
of the City of North Vancouver known as " Tempe Heights" as hereinbefore described for
domestic purposes and for the use of the City for fijre purposes. Such water shall be delivered
to the City at the junction of Regents Avenue with the City boundary.
2. The City agrees to charge the users of such water so supplied at approximately the same
rates as the District charges for water used aud supplied within the District of North Vancouver.
3. The City agrees to collect such rates and to pay to the District fifty per cent, of the actual
net rates collected by the City from users of water in that part of said City served by the
District's mains:
4. The City agrees to make up and render to the District an account of all such water rates
collected by it every three months, and to pay to the District, within thirty days after the
rendering of every such account, the amount shown to be due therein.
5. The District's collector shall at all times during regular office hours have access to the
books of the City to ascertain the amount of collections made by the City for water rates for
that part of said City served by the District's mains, for the purpose of verifying the accounts
hereinbefore mentioned rendered by the City to the District.
6. The City agrees to lay and maintain all its own distributing water-pipes and services
from the before-mentioned point of delivery of the water by the District.
7. In the event of the District at any time or times during the existence of this Agreement,
for any reason whatever, shutting off and not supplying water to the City for the use of residents
of " Tempe Heights " aforesaid for any period which in the opinion of the District Municipal
Council may be necessary, the District, its successors or assigns, shall not be liable for any
damages upon any account whatever for or in respect of the shutting-off of the water from the
City as aforesaid.
8. The City agrees to pay the District a rental of ten dollars per annum for each fire-hydrant
in that portion of the City served from the District's water-mains, payment to be made on the
first of January of each year for the rental accrued due for previous year.
9. The City agrees to supply to the District upon demand a copy of its plan of the waterworks, mains, pipes, connections, and hydrants in that portion of the City served from the
District water-mains.
10. This Agreement and the provisions and terms herein contained may be terminated at
any time upon either party giving to the other six months' notice in writing to that effect.
In witness whereof the Reeve and Clerk of the District and the Mayor and Clerk of the
City have hereunto affixed the respective corporate seals of the District and City and set their
hands the day and year first above written.
The corporate seal of the Corporation of the District of North
Vancouver was hereunto affixed in the presence of—
Reeve.
Clerk.
The corporate seal of the Corporation of the City of North Vancouver was hereunto affixed in the presence of—
[Seal.]
(Sgd.)
G. W. Vance,
Mayor.
R. F. Archibald,
Clerk. m
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Laws, 1905.
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Chap. 461, Gen.
Laws, 1910 ; chap.
354, Gen. Laws,
1901.
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Hurds. Revised
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Chap. 157, Gen.
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Chap. 350, Gen.
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