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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1927

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN
FOR  THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31st, 1925
PKINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F.  Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majecty.
1927.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Warden for the year ended December 31st, 1925.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1926.  Office of the Provincial Game Warden,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1926.
Honourable A. M. Manson, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game
Warden for the year ended December 31st, 1925.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Provincial Game Warden.  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1925.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
For administrative purposes British Columbia is divided into five territorial divisions and
the accompanying reports submitted by the Inspectors commanding these divisions are a careful
and full presentation of Provincial game conditions as they exist at this writing.
APPOINTMENT OF CHIEF GAME INSPECTOR.
The quality of #our enforcement service is one steadily improving and a continuation of this
happy condition is fully assured by the recent appointment of a Chief Game Inspector. From
this officer much is expected. He will be required to assist the enforcement efforts of the Police
and Game Branches; supervise the machinery devoted to the conservation and propagation of
British Columbia game; and, in addition, sympathetically co-ordinate the best interests of our
Province and its sportsmen.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
The intensive pursuit of fur-bearing animals has created a feeling of alarm as to the future
of what at one time appeared to be an inexhaustible resource. To safeguard the future and to
create a permanent Provincial asset, a trap-line registration system is being worked out, and
once in effect this scheme is expected to transform our trappers into fur-farmers with a
Permanent stake in the country.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.
Calendar Year.
, ti
B'S
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a 1
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31
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Revenue
derived
from Sale
of Game
Licences
and Fees.
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111
194
267
'293
329
359
309
317
296
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
4
9
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
$1,763 50
3,341 00
6,024 50
'6,073 00
6,45'5 00
7,275 00
5,676 50
4,768 00
'5,825 00
$  65,487  50
75,537 00
116,135 00
132,296 '50
114,842 00
127,111 50
121,639  50
125,505 50
123,950 50
1918
1919
1920	
3  5,291  39
1921	
24,595 80
1922	
1923	
1924	
51,093 89
60,594  18
56,356 68
1925	
56,287 7S
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Owing to the splendid work of all members of the Force and the co-operation received from
the Game Conservation Board and the sportsmen of the Province, I feel that the wild life of
British Columbia has received the utmost of protection, and I wish to express my thanks for
the hearty support furnished by the above.
"A" DIVISION  (VrtANCOUVER ISLAND).
By Inspector T. W. S. Parsons, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit annual game reports for the year 1925, as prepared by Staff-
Sergeant A. T. Stephenson and Sergeant Robert Owens, ill charge of the northern and southern
districts of Vancouver Island respectively. These N.C.O.'s continuously supervised their territories and are particularly well qualified to deal with the matter in hand. The divisional
personnel consists of twenty-nine officers, N.C.O.'s, and men, and I am happy to say that all
ranks, whether regular police officers or special game details, have evinced the greatest interest
in game matters; indeed, that a fine spirit of co-operation exists between the two branches is
more than evidenced by the results of their work as tabulated on pages 34 and 35. The Police and
public too are on the most friendly terms, and I cannot sufficiently express my appreciation to
the sportsmen of Vancouver Island for the manner in which they have supported the efforts
of " A " Division in its attempt to give them a creditable and effective game service. There are
twelve separate police and game detachments on the Island, and whilst all have done well, X 8 British Columbia. 1925
I cannot refrain from drawing particular attention to the excellent launch service performed
by Constable S. W. Dawson, of Campbell River, and Constable H. Bishop, of Sidney, who in the
execution of their duty made many hazardous sea patrols. The assistance rendered by " E "
Division in the person of Constable W. H. Hadley, of Alert Bay, also deserves recognition.
On land the work of Game Wardens R. M. Stewart, A. Monks, R. Marshall, G. B. Simpson,
G. L. Ewing, and R. Gidley has been most thorough and on my inspection tours it has been
a pleasure to listen to much favourable comment upon their activities, activities in which the
police proper were frequently included.
The reports of Sergeant Owens and Staff-Sergeant Stephenson follow:—
VICTORIA DISTRICT (SOUTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND).
. Report of Sergeant R. Owens, N.C.O. i/c.
Game .Animals.
Bear.—A decided increase over the years 1923-24 has been noted. A number of bear have
been seen, particularly in the Jordan River area, and from reports these animals have become
plentiful in the Duncan and Cowichan Districts.
Deer.—Very favourable reports have been received as to the increase of deer. During the
latter portion of the hunting season bucks were reported to be plentiful. Does and fawns were
very numerous, especially in the Duncan area. The buck law has materially assisted in the
increase of deer. Very few cases of illegal hunting were reported during the past season and
the diligent patrols maintained by Constables has had a moral effect, reducing infractions of
the " Game Act."
Wapiti (Elk).—On the Shaw Creek Game Reserve elk are reported to be steadily increasing
and appear to be spreading at the western end of Lake Cowichan. Herds of elk seen were
reported in good condition.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Marten.—In the Cowichan area good reports of these animals have been received and trapping in the area mentioned has been favourable. In the remainder of the district marten are
reported as being on the increase.
Racoon.—Reported very plentiful in the district.
Otter.—These animals are scarce throughout the district.
Beaver.—Slightly on the increase in Cowichan area, but are scarce in other parts of district.
Mink.—Very few in district, with exception of Lake Cowichan area, where there has been
a slight increase.
Skunk.—None reported in any part of the district.
Weasel.—Fairly plentiful in portions of the district.
Muskrats.—In the Duncan and Lake Cowichan areas, where these animals were put down
a few years ago, they are reported on the increase and are being carefully protected both by
Constables and the residents, as the latter mentioned are desirous of seeing these animals
increase.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—Throughout the district pheasants have been plentiful, although in the Lake
Cowichan area these birds were reported as being scarce and of small size, and it is felt that
new blood should be put down in this part of the district. A number of Mongolian pheasants
were liberated during December in the Duncan District and from reports are doing well.
Grouse (Blue).—In the Highland, Shawnigan Lake, East and West Sooke, and the Jordan
River Districts blue grouse have been fairly plentiful. These birds have, however, been scarce
in the Lake Cowichan, Duncan, and Sidney areas.
Grouse (Willow).—These birds have been fairly plentiful in the Highland, Shawnigan Lake,
East and West Sooke, and Jordan River Districts, but have been scarce in Lake Cowichan,
Duncan, and Sidney areas.
Quail.—Numerous throughout the district.
Quail (Bob-white).—Introduced in the vicinity of Sidney, Gordon Head, and other parts of
district, but from reports apparently have not been doing very well.
Partridge.—Reported plentiful in North and South Saanich and Oak Bay Districts, but
scarce in Duncan and Lake Cowichan areas. 16 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. X 9
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks, Geese, and Brant.—Scarce throughout district in comparison with other years, the
reason for this being, it is felt, owing to the unusual mild weather. Ducks no doubt did not
migrate in their usual numbers owing to weather conditions.
Snipe.—A few snipe were noticed, but these birds have been very scarce.
Vermin (Destruction of).
Cougar.—Several cougar have been destroyed in the Sooke District and every effort has been
made to reduce their numbers in the Cowichan and Metchosin areas, where they are reported
on the increase.
Cats (Domestic).—A large number of young birds are destroyed each year by domestic
cats gone wild. Game Wardens have been taking steps to cope with this situation and have met
with a good deal of success.
Protection.
During the year very few complaints were received and every effort was made by Constables
to enforce the Act and regulations. The game reserves, particularly the Shaw Creek Reserve,
affords excellent protection to the elk and other game found therein. This reserve is patrolled
throughout the year by the Constable stationed at Lake Cowichan.
Game Reserves.
Conditions in the Shaw Creek and Elk Lake Game Reserves have been very favourable.
Fur-farms.
During the year 1925 a considerable number of applications for permits to fur-farm have
been received and investigated and in the majority of cases permits have been granted.    During
the latter months of the year there appeared to be an increase in the number of applications
received.
Summary.
Game conditions throughout the district are good and tend to show an improvement for 1926.
NANAIMO DISTRICT  (NORTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND).
Report of Staff-Serge/int A. T. Stephenson, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Deer.—These animals have shown a considerable increase in numbers and this also applies
to elk.
Bear.—Very plentiful.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—A very poor season was experienced as these birds were very scarce.
Grouse (Blue).—Plentiful.
Grouse (Willow).—These birds were in equal numbers to former years and were fairly
plentiful.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and Geese.—Both ducks  and geese were scarce, this being due no  doubt to the
exceptionally mild weather.
Brant.—Plentiful.
FUR-BEARINQ  ANIMALS.
Beaver,—These animals are increasing and complaints have been received of their doing
damage to agricultural lands.
Mink.—Mink are not very plentiful in the district, with the possible exception of the
northern end of Vancouver Island, where they appear fairly numerous.
Marten.—These animals are on the decrease throughout the district.
Racoon.—Fairly plentiful.
'Vermin.
Cougar.—During the year very few cougar were taken.
Wolves.—Appear to have become almost extinct on Vancouver Island. Noxious Birds.—Crows are on the increase and in order to save useful birds it will be
necessary to take steps to cut down this increase.
Game-protection.
Due in a large measure to the activities of Game Law Enforcement officers in the district,
violations have been kept down to a minimum. Mention should be made of the excellent work
performed by Constables R. Marshall, R. M. Stewart, and Probationer A. Monks. Constable
Marshall has been particularly active, both day and night, in his endeavour to enforce the game
laws, and this also applies to Constable Stewart. The work of these two Constables has entailed
many arduous hours of labour, coupled with hardships that task their ingenuity and patience.
Special Patrols.
At the latter end of March, 1925, Constables Marshall and Stewart made a special patrol
in the vicinity of Upper Campbell Lake, where they were successful in arresting a game violator
for trapping beaver during the close season. Twenty beaver-pelts were confiscated in this case
and a fine of $500 and $7.50 costs was imposed.
Game Reserves.
There is only one game reserve in this district. This reserve is situated at Strathcona Park,
near Campbell River. Two or three permits have been issued to hunt cougar within the
boundaries of this reserve, but no reports have as yet been received as to the number of
animals shot.
Fub Trade.
The fur trade does not appear to be in an exceptionally flourishing condition, but with the
increase of fur-farming in the district it is anticipated that there will be an increase in the
fur output next year.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming has shown a considerable increase during the past year and many settlers have
purchased fur-bearing animals and have taken out fur-farming permits after erecting the
necessary pens for keeping their animals under proper control.
Game Conservation Board.
The Game Conservation Board is represented in the district by T. B. Booth, a well-known
citizen and sportsman, who takes a very keen interest in the enforcement of the " Game Act"
and who is ever ready to render his services in this connection.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Inspector W. R. Dunwoody, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to place before you the annual game report for the year 1925, as requested
in your Circular No. 1064 of February 11th, 1926. The different matters are dealt with categorically as laid out in your letter.
G.4.ME .\nimals.
Game animals are plentiful throughout the Division, particularly in the Kootenay, Columbia,
and Elk Valleys.
Whilst it cannot be said that moose are plentiful, this animal seems to be on the increase
in the Kootenay Valley and the Elk Valley Game Reserve.
A herd of caribou also ranges on the Selkirk Divide between the East and West Kootenay,
but not in any large numbers.
The establishing some years ago of the Elk Valley Game Reserve has had a wonderful
effect in re-establishing the elk in that locality, and with this, of course, all other game animals
have correspondingly increased; including the Virginia deer, black-tail deer, goat, and bighorn
sheep; also black and grizzly bear are numerous. Big game is also plentiful in the Canadian
National Parks on the Kootenay.
Conditions throughout these valleys are very good and there is every reason to expect a
marked increase this year. The extremely mild fall and winter has enabled the animals to
remain on their summer ranges  in many cases  and they have been  able to  secure food  in 16 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. X 11
abundance.    More than this, they have been comparatively immune from predatory animals,
which create such havoc when the animals are " yarded " or snow-bound.
Mule-deer, white-tail deer, and bear show an increase in all other parts of the Division.
FUR-BEARING   ANIMALS.
As this Division is practically all closed to trapping, the fur-bearing animals show a decided
increase, the most noticeable being in the case of the beaver, which in some instances is
astonishing. This is particularly true near the mouth of the White River and on Finlay Creek,
and, in fact, throughout the Division it can be readily judged that these animals, in most
instances, are becoming a nuisance, as can be seen by the number of permits requested by
farmers to trap beaver.
Muskrats are scarce. Lynx, marten, mink, and weasel show an increase. To my mind,
further protection is very desirable and that for several years to come.
Game Birds.
I regret to report that during 1925 game birds were not as plentiful as during previous years.
I am hoping, however, that on account of the extremely mild winter we have had grouse will
get an opportunity to rehabilitate themselves throughout the country. I would be very much
in favour of a closed season on all land game birds this year (1926).
Pheasants in the Okanagan, I regret to report, showed a very severe falling-off last season
also. The mild season, however, may also have a very beneficial effect in this case. The Game
Conservation Board has from time to time shipped pheasants into this Division and an effort
has been made to establish them around Kootenay Lake, particularly in the vicinity of Procter
and Harrop.    The results so far have not been encouraging.
Hungarian partridges seem to be propagating very well in the Okanagan.
Migratory Game Birds.
With the exception of the Kootenay Flats at Creston and the Columbia Valley north of
Athalmer, we have very few migratory birds. A very fair number nested last year, but the
sudden high-water situation in the middle of May disturbed a good many of them. Both geese
and ducks were somewhat plentiful at these places on their southern journey last fall.
Vermin.
Vermin are unfortunately increasing, although there is a chance that some of the predatory
animals will die off this winter from lack of food. Cougar and coyotes are common. Lynx and
weasel are responsible for the destruction of many game birds and I am of the opinion that it
would be wise to allow the trapping of these animals.
Special Constable Shuttleworth at Penticton is employed principally on this branch of game-
protection work and his efforts, in this behalf have been crowned with considerable success,
particularly this last season.. The Department has supplied him with a cougar-dog and last
reports show that this animal is proving immensely valuable.
The bounty on cougar and coyotes, I think, should be retained. Another pest which is
increasing is the common crow. These are very destructive to the grouse in the breeding
season.    Hawks and owls are also destructive in the hatching season.
Game-protection.
Our law-abiding residents and visiting sportsmen evince a keen desire to assist us in the
enforcement of the " Game Act," and, generally speaking, we receive ready co-operation. It has
been drawn to my attention that it would be advisable to have uniform opening and closing
dates for big-game hunting. Last year the season for elk closed on October 15th, whilst moose
and sheep were open until October 31st. Even a good sportsman, having failed to get his elk
lawfully and out hunting sheep, say, on the 25th, would find it hard to overlook an especially
good bull elk if he ran across one. Elk have increased to an extent where they are spreading over
the country and the chances of old bulls with good antlers being killed are better if the season is
longer. Some people are of the opinion that it would be better to open the season on all big game
on September 15th, the heads being good then and the animals killed would not materially
affect the breeding. X 12 British Columbia. 1925
Propagation.
A bounty on certain hawks and owls would materially assist in the natural propagation of
game and migratory birds. The use of poison under certain conditions and in districts remote
from settlements and ranches would do much to lessen the number of coyotes, to the benefit of
all game.
I would also suggest that, where beaver have become a nuisance and occasionally have to be
trapped, these be transported to other places where they would be an asset from a fur-bearing
point of view.
Game Reserves.
I have already referred to the Elk Valley Game Reserve, which all reports show to be
teeming with wild life. We have also a game reserve at Vaseaux Lake, in the Southern
Okanagan, where pheasants and migratory birds are reported plentiful.
During the year 1925, on representations made, the Department established a game reserve
on the Kettle River. In this area of 600 square miles we have one of the finest breeding-grounds
in British Columbia for game animals. This sanctuary has always been the hunting-ground of
the Indian and in past years he has taken out a tremendous number of deer. With the destruction of predatory animals in this reserve, it is hoped that the area will act as a feeding-ground
for the Okanagan and other districts for the sportsmen's guns.
We have also a game reserve and sanctuary on the West Arm of Kootenay Lake at Nelson,
and even to-day the ducks around the wharves are in a practically semi-tame condition, showing
the value of these sanctuaries. I might also refer to the National Parks between the Columbia
and Kootenay, where game is showing a wonderful increase, due to the reservation.
Fur Trade.
Owing to the closed season in this Division fur-trading is practically nil.
Fur-farms.
There are several fox-farms now in the Division, particularly at Princeton, Grand Forks,
and Cranbrook, and all reports indicate that these are doing very nicely.
Judging by the number of applications which are passed through this office and inquiries
received, it is safe to say that more attention is being paid to fur-farming, including mink,
muskrats, and marten.
Special Patrols.
I do not think there were any patrols which can be classed under this heading, as all
patrols made were done in the particular Constable's own district; but the reports furnished
by Constables from their different stations, who were appointed for special game-work, show
that their particular bivouacs have been carefully patrolled from time to time and that nothing
was left undone in the way of game-protection.
Prosecutions and Convictions.
There were forty-six prosecutions and forty-four convictions under the " Game Act" during
the year.
Hunting Accidents.
On May 20th, 1925, James Maxwell, of Creston, was found dead alongside a wire fence,
with a .32 special rifle lying with the muzzle pointed towards the body and the stock on the
ground. This man that morning had stated his intention of shooting pheasants which were
destroying his crops.    Coroner's jury brought in a verdict of " accidental death."
On October 21st, 1925, Hagbert Hansen, of Princeton, accidentally shot himself with a .22 rifle
whilst hunting. This happened at Goose Lake, about 5 miles from Princeton. Jury brought in
a verdict of " accidental death."
Summary.
Game animals have increased and conditions are ideal. Fur-bearing animals are increasing,
but require further protection. Game birds are scarce and closed season suggested this coming
year. Migratory birds—conditions are not favourable. The planting of wild rice might assist
in keeping these birds. Vermin is on the increase to a great extent. Game-protection is regarded
as a necessity. Propagation might be assisted by transporting beaver and muskrats. Fur-
farming is becoming quite an industry. 16 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. X 13
"C"  DIVISION   (KAMLOOPS,  VALE,   OKANAGAN,  CARIBOO,  AND  CHILCOTIN
DISTRICTS).
By Inspector W. L. Fernie, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report under the " Game Act" for the
year 1925.
Game Animals.
Moose.—These animals are still very plentiful in the Cariboo District and are undoubtedly
on the increase and continually penetrating into areas where no white man remembers seeing
them before. The direction of the migration of these animals seems to be from the north
towards the south and they have now begun to get established within striking distance of the
main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and in a few solitary instances have crossed that
railway.    Some remarkably fine heads were taken out by hunters during the last open season.
Caribou.—These animals are certainly holding their own and in many cases increasing in
numbers and covering a larger area than they were formerly doing, more particularly in the
territory east and north of the Great Shuswap Lake. From my own observations these animals
are not shot off in as great numbers as the moose, their habits giving them a certain amount of
protection. The fact that they keep to the higher altitudes until the beginning of November or
thereabouts protects them from the average American hunter, who is generally homeward-bound
about that time.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals only occur in one area in "C" Division, and that is in the
Yalakom Game Reserve, near Lillooet, where they were introduced. They are now, of course,
rather difficult to count, but there is no doubt they are doing well and increasing. There seems
to be a tendency for a few of the bulls to roam away from the rest of the herd, and in two
instances at least their tracks have been seen travelling in a northerly direction, 150 miles at
least from Lillooet.
Mountairtrsheep.—From all the information I am able to obtain mountain-sheep seem to be
holding their own near Fintry, on the west side of Okanagan Lake on the high peaks. A band
of these animals are flourishing and are more or less fostered by Mr. Dunwaters, who takes a
very active interest in their welfare. The main hunting-ground, however, for these animals is
in the Bridge River country, and the sportsmen who have penetrated in there this last season
have come out well satisfied.
Mountain-goat.—These animals, I am glad to report, seem to be holding their own; their
fondness for inaccessible country being responsible, I presume, for their salvation. To the west
of Revelstoke and in the particularly rugged country which runs north from Craigellachie, in
my opinion, the goat will never be depleted to any great extent.
Bear.—The black bear and its cousin, the brown bear, are reported to be increasing all
through the Division. Grizzly bear are fairly common in places; three of these areas which
are outstanding are on the Yalakom Game Reserve, in the high country to the north of Canim
Lake, and in the upper reaches of the Tulameen River.
Deer.—Of the three species which we have in this Division, the mule-deer is by far the most
common and also the most hunted. In spite of the huntsmen, as a rule, returning satisfied from
their trips, I am of the opinion that mule-deer are on the increase, and, personally, I should
not be displeased to see permission given to shoot one doe, as I am satisfied that the females are
far away outnumbering the males. The laying-aside of a game sanctuary on the Kettle River
will be a great benefit to these animals, and I am pleased to see that interest is being taken and
reports required concerning the laying-out of another area to the north and west of Kamloops,
a territory called by the white population " Little Cariboo" and by the Indians " Sil-whoi-a-kun."
This territory has always been a great haunt for mule-deer.
The white-tail deer are not prevalent in this Division, but are known to occur occasionally
in the Okanagan country.
The Coast deer are fairly common in the western extremity of " C " Division and meet and
mingle with the mule-deer in the vicinity of Spuzzum, but do not, as far as I can gather,
hybridize. I anticipate that the next season will show a marked increase in these animals,
as I have known them to be practically decimated by a very severe winter. This winter has
been the mildest within the memory of any white man and I think the influence of this on the
herds of deer will be quite noticeable. X 14 British Columbia. 1925
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur-bearing animals are still scarce. The only district in the Interior which has been
favourably reported on is the Barkerville area and north and west of Quesnel, where lynx and
fisher are undoubtedly on the increase. Foxes are more numerous this year in the Chilcotin
country than they have been for years. There has been one instance of a silver fox being
trapped within 12 miles of Kamloops, a case without parallel in the memory of the inhabitants.
The absence of lynx is usually put down to the absence of rabbits, which form their staple
diet. These latter animals have been very scarce in most of the territory in this Division for
the last ten years and I see no sign of them increasing to any extent, and the common saying
that they come and go every seven years seems to be a myth.
• From all the data that we can collect, beaver and muskrats are becoming exceedingly
numerous in the southern portion of the Division. This condition has been the cause of our
receiving numerous complaints and requests for permission to destroy these animals from the
owners of low-lying meadow lands.
There is no doubt that throughout the Division the marten have been trapped to such an
extent that they have become almost extinct.
Game Biros.
The situation as regards game birds I should consider to be satisfactory.
Hungarian Partridge—The bird which I would say was topping the list as regards increasing
is the Hungarian partridge, which is working its way from the south towards the north. They
have not yet reached Kamloops, but they are fairly prevalent in the vicinity of Salmon Arm and
from there south they are numerous. Two reasons which are responsible for their increase
seem to be, first, their power of resisting cold and hardship, and, secondly, the fact that they
are very difficult to shoot.
Pheasants.—These are undoubtedly doing well and it will be interesting to observe the
result of the amendment to the " Game Act " which permits of them being shot by the owner
of a farm where they may be doing damage. Whilst visiting the Okanagan recently I was
struck by the great diversity of views held on this subject by different responsible sportsmen.
Very little grain was required to tide the pheasants over the winter months.
Grouse.—Blue grouse, I should think, are holding their own. Willow-grouse are certainly
not as prevalent as they were ten years ago, but I would not go on record as saying they are
decreasing.
Ptarmigan.—These are fairly plentiful in the high altitudes, but these birds are seldom
seriously hunted for.
Prairie-chicken.—Prairie-chicken are undoubtedly very plentiful and are increasing in the
Cariboo country from Clinton north. South of that point they are not so plentiful. The
Thompson River and the South Thompson are ideal breeding-grounds for these birds, but the
fact that they are so easy to kill has been responsible for them being thinned out almost to
the point of extermination. All the staff are continually on the lookout for a specimen of the
sage-hen; a pair of these birds undoubtedly bred in the vicinity of Kamloops twenty years ago,
but were destroyed by a settler, and as far as I can gather no specimen has visited British
Columbia since.
Migratory Game Birds.
Wild ducks, geese, and brant are plentiful in the Okanagan country, as also are ducks and
geese in the southern part of the Cariboo country. A sprinkling of ducks and geese have been
in evidence within sight of the City of Kamloops all winter, but not nearly in such great numbers
as seemed to have stayed on the Great Shuswap Lake and on the Okanagan and Long Lakes.
I recently noticed a large quantity of ducks also on Nicola Lake; in fact, I think the larger
proportion of the migratory water-birds last winter did not migrate. What effect this will have
on the numbers next season will be interesting to observe.
Swans are undoubtedly decreasing rapidly.
' Vermin.
Coyotes undoubtedly are increasing;   this is probably due to the poor price now being paid
for their pelts, as the trappers will not make the same effort to catch them as formerly when
a good skin was worth from $25 to $3Q. 16 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. X 15
Constable Quesnel, Lumby, was very active during the year in destroying vermin in his
district. This officer, working in conjunction with the Rod and Gun Club, Vernon, who supplied
him with ammunition, was responsible for the destruction of a large number of crows, crows'
nests and young, magpies with their nests and young, hawks,'horned owls, and skunks.
Special Constable Shuttleworth was detailed for duty in June, 1925, and did good work in
destroying a large number of coyotes in the North Thompson District. He is now in the same
area to-day, it having been found advisable to send for him in an endeavour to rid that country
of a band of cougar.
Owls have decreased 50 per cent, all through the high jack-pine country, of which there are
tremendous areas in this Division. This is, I believe, directly due to the scarcity of rabbits,
which form the owls' principal diet.
Eagles are still numerous in the less-frequented territories.
Game-protection.
Undoubtedly all the officers in the Division have given close attention to the matter of
game-protection. This is the result of strict instructions furnished them, and also, I think, to
a large extent in their natural inclination to protect the game of the Province.
They seem, almost without exception, to be fond of nature-study, and on being asked
questions give sometimes surprisingly accurate information concerning the game in the vicinity
of their detachments. A large number of prosecutions were instituted under the " Game Act"
during the year 1925.
In any case where complaint has been received concerning infractions of the "Game Act"
immediate attention has been given to the complaint, and owing to the efforts which this
Force is making they seem to be getting the support of the public.
Without doubt, in the northern portion of the Division, the Indians are still responsible for
the destruction of a great deal of game. The matter of game-protection in this Province, the
game being undoubtedly one of our big assets, is directing more attention and thought every
year, and it would appear that obtaining the co-operation of the Indians in protecting the game
has never been seriously attempted. The Indian generally considers himself an aggrieved person
and is apt to take the attitude of intending to shoot when he can without being punished either
in or out of season.
With their modern firearms and inherited method of hunting, they slaughter a large amount
of game, some of it wantonly. This is particularly noticeable in the Chilcotins, where one of
the white pioneer settlers pointed out a range of mountains from which the mountain-sheep had
been entirely cleaned off by the Indians, who were left unpunished.
In a previous report I made the suggestion that it would be a good idea to appoint some
of the Indian chiefs as honorary Game Wardens and their authority given some recognition.
In many cases I am sure they would use their influence to prevent wanton slaughter of game
by their people and would be all the more active from the very fact of their position being
recognized by the whites. The Inspector of Indian Agencies and Indian Agents in this Division
have volunteered every assistance in this matter. It might be pointed out to the Indians that
there is not sufficient game, under the old methods of indiscriminate killing, to keep up the
supply for both Indians and whites, and the most sensible thing for the Indians to do would be
to help the whites in the protection of what game we have left.
I would not suggest that the Indians be given any authority over any of the whites, except
in so far as to report any infractions of the " Game Act" which come to their notice.
In my opinion, also, it would be distinctly beneficial to occasionally employ an Indian to
accompany the white game patrols. If the right Indians are chosen, it would be surprising how
much more information regarding the wild life in the mountains would be obtained.
Propagation.
In several instances pheasant-eggs have been furnished to different settlers, with more or
less success. The most reliable way of introducing pheasants, or other game birds, is to hand
them over on their arrival to certain responsible farmers, who will turn them out in suitable
places where they consider they can look after themselves. X 16 British Columbia. 1925
Game Reserves.
Concerning game reserves, I think the laying-aside of the Bowron Lake Game Reserve has
been the cause of general satisfaction. On my last visit to Barkerville, from which it is only
20 miles distant, I did not hear one dissentient voice.
Sergeant Mortimer, N.C.O. i/c Vernon District, is putting forward claims to have a reserve
made between Lumby and Monashee. From my knowledge of this country it is too high to be
of use for agriculture, or even grazing. I hope to visit this territory in the near future and
will report further on my return.
As regards the area mentioned before in comments on mule-deer, I would again emphasize
the fact that it. is a country peculiarly adapted for being laid aside as a game reserve. The two
particular reasons being that it is already well stocked with game and also that it is too high
to be considered as a farming country. It would serve the purpose of being a sort of feeder
for the hunting territories used by the settlers on the North Thompson River and also those
settled on the North Bonaparte areas. It is a high plateau, averaging 4,500 feet, and is the
source of numerous creeks which radiate in almost every direction from it; some of these are
Skull Creek, Jamieson Creek, Tranquille Creek, Copper Creek, Deadman Creek, and the North
Bonaparte. Constable Emmott has been instructed to make a careful report on this area
directly conditions allow.
Concerning the Yalakom Reserve, Constable McKenzie, of Clinton, who has sole charge of
this area, gives me to understand that everything is in a satisfactory condition. I hope to
accompany this officer on a patrol into this reserve as soon as weather conditions will allow, no
other officer than Constable McKenzie, to my knowledge, ever having visited this area before and
the information concerning this reserve I would classify as meagre.
I find that the attitude of the Department of laying aside suitable areas to be game reserves
and sanctuaries gives general satisfaction to the public.
Fur Trade.
The fur trade is not in a flourishing condition this year owing to poor catches of fur in the
northern part of the Division and the fact of closing the trapping in the southern portion of
this Division.
Fur-farming.
There are a considerable number of fur-farms in the Division and there is a continual
stream of applications which require reports to be made on them. In 1925 there were about
twenty-five applications.
Some of the silver-fox farms are now well established and in the Nicola Valley are making
good profits. Dr. J. J. Gillis's farm is, I think, the best laid out; his farm is about 3 miles from
the City of Merritt and he is very courteous to visitors, and is glad to show them his farm at
certain times; when, however, the foxes have their young it is not wise to disturb them, as
they have a habit of destroying them if at all alarmed.
Some of the marten-farmers, I understand, have had the misfortune of having their stock
escape by gnawing through the wire. Special wire has to be used and the best is imported from
England. One interesting experiment being tried on at least two fur-farms is the propagation
of muskrats away from any body of water. Some text-books claim that muskrats are more
prolific under this condition.
lit would seem that fur-farming has come to stay in British Columbia, just as it has in
Prince Edward Island, where nearly every rancher has a few head of foxes in captivity and
on which he is dependent to pay the interest on the mortgage of his home.
The matter of the climate being mild does not militate so much against the quality of the
fur as might be supposed, as I am given to understand a good deal can be done by dieting the
animals before pelting them. The glossiness of their fur, and even the colour, is easily affected,
just as in the case of a horse getting proper care and oilcakes, etc.
Special Patrols.
A few special patrols have been undertaken by officers in this Division during the year, the
most important being:—
Constable McKenzie, Game Warden, Clinton, accompanied Sergeant Bowen from Ashcroft
to Hanceville and from there to the head of Chilko Lake.    This patrol was made for the purpose 16 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. X 17
of investigating the murder of Alex. Ducharme, trapper, who was killed by Fred Cyr. Constable
McKenzie, being' a Game Warden, was instructed to make observations re the game while he
was passing through the country. He reported that he found deer plentiful and numerous black
and brown bear. Grizzlies and goats he also reported as being numerous in the vicinity of Chilko
Lake.    Fur-bearing animals in this district were also reported as numerous, particularly marten.
On October 16th, 1925, a special patrol was made by Constable Collins and Special Constable
Lowry, of Merritt, into the Coquihalla country to investigate a report that Indians were slaughtering deer in that district. On investigation no information was obtained to substantiate the
report.
A special patrol was made by Special Constables Longridge and Townsend to Barkerville and
the Bowron Lake Reserve, as reports had been received that set-guns were being used by different
parties to kill bear. Although ten days were spent by these officers in the Bowron Lake Reserve,
no evidence of set-guns was found.
A complaint was made that Indians of the Canim Lake Reserve were slaughtering caribou
merely for the purpose of getting the hides, presumably for making gloves, etc. Corporal
Gallagher, of Williams Lake, made a special patrol into this country and was successful in
obtaining two convictions under section 7 (1) of the " Game Act."
Numerous short special patrols have been undertaken by practically* all the Game Wardens
and Constables in the Division during the year; in fact, the Game Wardens are out on patrol
practically all the time.
Conclusion.
In concluding this report, it is almost needless to say that the whole Force is watching
with interest the rearrangement of the machinery of this organization which is just about to
come into effect for administering the " Game Act."
The registration of trap-lines is of course the greatest innovation. To make this workable
I presume there will have to be a registration fee charged as well as the annual licence fee;
and as regards the length of the line permitted, I do not see what limit can be placed on them,
but I would suggest a certain length of line for an ordinary fee and a pro rata charge for any
increase. The issuing of maps of the Province on the same lines as the one. showing preemptions, timber limits, etc., would appear to be almost indispensable to properly record the
different trap-lines.
"D" DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIVER,
AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Acting-Inspector W. Spiller, Officer Commanding.
Game Animals.
Game animals are reported as being on the increase in the territory covered by this Division,
with the exception of white-tail deer.    It is suggested that the bag limit for this species during
the year 1926 be reduced to one of the male sex.    The mild winter of 1925-26 will leave all game
in good condition and in fine shape for breeding.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Owing to the change in the method of collection of royalties little data can be obtained
locally, but it is reasonable to suppose there is no appreciable decrease in these animals.    It is
suggested that royalties on pelts should be paid in the locality where obtained and thus form
a record on which to base statistics.
Game Birds.
A marked decrease was observed in grouse during 1925, which was undoubtedly due to the
severe winter of 1924-25.
Migratory Game Birds.
These seem to be on the increase, especially geese.    The weather conditions are similar all
along the Coast from the Nass River south to the International Boundary, and it is therefore
suggested that there should be no difference in the " open " season in the Western District.
Vermin.
Coyotes and timber-wolves are on the increase and are primarily responsible for the decrease
of deer and game birds.   The following suggestions are submitted:—
2 X 18 British Columbia. 1925
(1.) That bounty be paid only on unprime pelts, the market price on prime pelts being
sufficient remuneration.
(2.) That the bounty be doubled on unprime pelts, which could be destroyed by the Government Agent paying the bounty.
In my opinion this would tend to farmers and others keeping up a continuous pursuit of
these animals instead of waiting for prime pelts, as is done at present, and thereby deriving
double pecuniary benefit.
Game-protection.
N.C.O.'s and men of this Division have endeavoured to enforce the regulations. I would
suggest that, owing to the extent of the territory in this Division and the importance of the
fur-bearing animals, a complete change in the manner of enforcement be made.
Propagation.
This, in my opinion, is a matter for experts.    Possibly, after study, it would be found that
the capture of male deer in one part of the Province and turning them loose in other parts would
have the effect of increasing the size and strength of the herds added to.    The registration of
trap-lines will automatically assist the propagation of fur-bearing animals.
Game Reserves.
There are five reserves in this Division, as follows: Fort George; Prince George; Kunghit
Island (Queen Charlotte Islands) ;  Atlin (Taku and Stikine Rivers) ;   Kaien Island.
The Fort George Reserve should be discontinued, as this reserve is comprised of timber
limits which in due course will be logged, thereby destroying the game sanctuary there.
The Kunghit Island Reserve should be discontinued. At the present time there are no
facilities in the way of transportation to enforce this reserve, and to station a man there would
be inconsistent with the policy of economy and efficiency.
In regard to the Atlin Reserve, which consists of 5,000 square miles, it is too large an area
to protect efficiently, in addition to which a hardship is worked on the settlers on the Stikine
River, where game and fur-bearing animals abound. I would recommend that this reserve be
abolished and one established, to be called the Taku River Reserve, and covering that portion
of the Province drained by the Taku River and its tributaries from the International Boundary
to a point up-stream known as Yellow Bluff.
The Prince George Reserve is fulfilling its mission as a resting-place for migratory birds
going north and south. As to the Kaien Island Reserve, intermittent reports indicate a little
poaching here, but lack of trails, etc., make detection somewhat difficult.
Fur Trade.
From examination of fur-traders' books it is found that a large business in furs is being
carried on.
ITur-farms.
Little is known concerning this industry, all reports having been handled by the Game
Conservation Board. It is suggested that a list of fur-farms with the conditions of permits be
prepared and distributed to all members of the Force in order that close observation can be
maintained.
Special Patrols.
Constables Barber and Forfar, of the Peace River District, patrolled to Fort Nelson in the
early part of 1925 (April Sth to May 12th) ; they collected nearly $3,000 royalties on pelts of
fur-Dearing animals and from other sources and covered approximately 700 miles on this patrol.
Constable Thiis, accompanied by Alaska Game officials, patrolled to the Taku and Stikine
Rivers. The launch for this purpose was provided by E. P. Walker, of the United States
Biological Survey, Juneau, Alaska. A distance of 1,000 miles was covered and, though several
infractions of the " Game Act " were discovered, all the offenders were residents of Alaska.
However, they were prosecuted under the Alaska " Game Act" for making false declarations.
One offender was fined $50 at Prince Rupert for trapping without a licence as a result of
this patrol.
Corporal Van Dyk patrolled to Takla Lake in May, 1925, for the purpose of locating a
missing trapper.    The man was found drowned in the Willow River and duly buried.    In July,
J 16 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. X 19
1925, this officer patrolled to Nation River to endeavour to locate two missing trappers. They
were found dead, apparently due to ptomaine poisoning. In November, 1925, Corporal Van Dyk
repeated the patrol made by Constable Thiis and was also accompanied by Alaska Game officials,
the equipment for the patrol being furnished by E. P. Walker. Several complaints were investigated, and a seizure of one marten, eleven mink, sixteen muskrats, one otter, and eleven beaver
pelts having been taken in the Atlin (Taku-Stikine River) Game Reserve. The total mileage
covered by Corporal Van Dyk on these patrols was 1,900 miles, whereas the total mileage of
the combined patrols mentioned was 3,900 miles.
Acknowledgments.
In closing I wish to express appreciation of the assistance given by E. P. Walker, of the
United States Biological Survey, Juneau, Alaska, who placed a boat, fully equipped, and two
of his officers at the disposal of our officers when operating in or near the Territory of Alaska.
"E"  DIVISION   (VANCOUVER,  COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY  DISTRICTS).
By Inspector F. Cruickshank, OffIcer Commanding.
Pursuant to instructions contained in Circular Letter No. 1064, dated February 11th, 1926,
I beg to submit a report on the game conditions in my Division during the year 1925.    This
report is being segregated and dealt with as requested in this circular letter, referred to above.
Game Animals.
Deer.—From patrols made early in the year and from reports received from various
Constables in this Division, I have no hesitation in saying that deer are decidedly on the
increase, this being due to a certain extent on the protection afforded does.
During the open season, 1925, deer were taken in quite large numbers from the various
islands along the Coast of this Division. The majority of sportsmen invariably hunt deer on
the different islands in the Howe Sound District, and it is worthy of note that deer on these
islands are in excellent condition and appear to be in equal numbers each year, apparently no
decrease being noted. Each year from these islands a large number of deer are taken and good
hunting is always to be had by sportsmen in this part of the district.
A great number of hunters complain that the law in effect during the season, covering the
bringing-out of the head of any deer killed, causes a good deal of hardship. It is suggested
that if the buck law is still kept into effect it would meet all purposes if the " Game Act" was
so amended as to allow the hunter to leave the head of the deer in the bush, provided that some
other identification-marks be left on the carcass to show the sex of the animal taken.
Due to the present buck law the deer have been on a decided increase in practically every
part of the Division; in fact, in a number of cases farmers have been complaining Of deer
doing damage to their orchards and crops, and it has been found on investigation that a large
number of deer doing damage have been does, and I feel that in order to remedy or stop these
complaints it would be good policy to allow the shooting of doe deer in this Division for a limited
period, with a bag limit of one doe per hunter, and in this connection I would suggest that doe
deer be allowed to be shot or hunted the last two weeks of the open season.
The reason for suggesting such a short open season is in view of the fact of the difficulty
that would be encountered in keeping a check on the number of does killed per hunter, and it is
felt that by limiting each hunter to a short open season our officers would be in a better position
to see that the bag limit is adhered to, and this, in my opinion, would stop or nearly stop the
shooting of does and leaving them in the bush, as has been the case in the past. Another reason
for doe-deer shooting is in view of the fact that many residents along the Coast in isolated areas
require to obtain meat at certain periods of the year, and it is felt that the settlers in these
outlying districts should be allowed a doe deer during the open season. I am sure that this
would meet with the approval of a great many of the ranchers and homesteaders in such districts.
Mountain-goat.—From reports at hand mountain-goat suffered to a certain extent in the
Powell River District through fires during the year 1924. However, these animals are not hunted
to any great extent, the hunting in this Division being chiefly confined to deer, and as the goat
can very well take care of itself, there appears to be no cause for believing that these animals
are on the decrease, or need any further protection than that afforded in the past.
Bear.—A number of non-residents have again this year hunted grizzly bear at the heads of
the various inlets on the Coast, but from reports at hand very few of these animals were taken. X 20 British Columbia. 1925
In regard to the black bear, it is suggested that, in view of the fact of the damage done by these
animals to fawns of deer and by destroying bee-hives and orchards in this district, the. season
should not be closed at any time. In the Port Moody and Burnaby Lake areas damage has been
done by black bear, and it is felt that they should not be protected by a close season.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Although there are only a few beaver in this Division, yet complaints have been
received of damage being done by these animals to agricultural lands, this damage taking place
in the Mission District. Notwithstanding this fact, however, the beaver should be protected
throughout the Division, at least as far north as Jervis Inlet.
Marten.—These animals are not considered as plentiful, although in the Bute and Toba
Inlet regions trappers were successful in taking a considerable number of these animals during
the trapping season.
Mink.—Mink are about holding their own and are found in fairly large numbers throughout
the Division.
Muskrats.—In many parts of the district muskrats are nearing extermination. In the past
farmers throughout the Lower Mainland have complained of muskrats doing damage to their
property, but during the last few years these complaints have dwindled down to a few, and
most of the farmers in the delta and dyked districts are now endeavouring to conserve the
muskrat in view of the fact that they have become aware of its value both in the live state as
well as in regard to the pelt. Many inquiries are being received from farmers in this Division
requesting information in respect to the farming of muskrats. It is felt that in view of this
fact muskrats in most of the delta regions will be allowed to increase and will be protected by
most of the farmers.
Otter.—A few of these animals are to be found in this Division.
Racoon.—These animals are fairly plentiful and in the Cloverdale District a number of
these animals have been trapped where they have been doing damage to domestic fowl.
Skunk.—Fairly plentiful throughout the Division, but are not trapped to any great extent.
Weasel.—Plentiful.
Taking the situation in respect to fur-bearing animals into consideration, it is felt that a
great number, especially the mink and the racoon, are taken in an illegal manner by pit-lamping.
This, however, does not affect this Division to the extent that it does in other Coast areas.
Pit-lamping, however, is one thing responsible for the decrease in fur-bearing animals in this
Division.
I am sure that, as soon as the registration of trap-lines is actually put on a proper working
basis, in the northern parts of the Division better protection will be afforded fur-bearing animals.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—Prior to the open season on these birds a large number were noted during the
course of patrols throughout different parts of the Division; in fact, I feel safe in saying that
the pheasants have never in the past been so plentiful as during the year 1925, although notwithstanding this fact there was a very poor season for hunting these birds this year. One of
the chief reasons, to my mind, is in view of the heavy fog that hung over the Lower. Mainland
of the Province during the first three or four days of the open season*. On the opening date
especially the fog was very thick, and consequently the pheasants were scattered far and wide,
and naturally when the fog lifted a few days later these birds could not be found in the open,
but had left for the bush. If it is at all possible, I would suggest that hunting be prohibited
in foggy weather, as this undoubtedly spoiled the pheasant season during the year under review,
and, needless to say, shooting in a heavy fog is very dangerous. After the close of the season
pheasants appeared in quite large numbers and there will be a good supply next year.
All our Constables have been instructed to endeavour to keep track or trace of any Mongolian
pheasants, of which there have been a number liberated in this Division, and in this connection
I wish to state that a few of these birds have been taken by hunters and a number have been
seen from time to time during the course of patrols.
In the past complaints have been received from farmers as to damage being done by
pheasants to their crops, and it is worthy of note that these complaints are not nearly so
numerous as in previous years. 16 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. X 21
Partridge.—Throughout the Lower Mainland, where these birds are found, they are increasing slowly. To my mind a greater increase would be noticed if it was possible to import and
put down some new blood.
A short open season was provided for in the Delta Municipality, and from the reports at
hand excellent partridge-shooting was obtained by sportsmen in this area. In the Cloverdale
and Sumas Districts partridges are to be found in limited numbers, and probably it would be
advisable to allow a short open season in these districts next year for a period of not more than
one week, in order that the birds may be scattered. From the reports of the Constables at
Langley Prairie and Chilliwack, partridges this year apparently have increased in their districts.
It would probably be of interest to mention that a few partridges were noticed on Lulu Island
during the course of patrols this year.
Quail.—In the Delta Municipality quail are about holding their own, but it is felt that the
quail will never increase in this district owing to climatic and other conditions. I therefore
do not think it is advisable to liberate any more of these birds.
In the North Vancouver District a number of quail are to be found, but as these birds were
put down a few years ago they should now be in good numbers; but this, I am sorry to say,
has not been the case, the cause being the number of birds killed by domestic cats and other
vermin.
During the spring of 1925 a number of bob-white quail were liberated in this district.
From reports received they are slightly increasing. On Lulu Island a small number of quail
were seen this year.
Grouse.—The willow-grouse are not to be found in any great numbers in this Division, but
as it is felt that a continued close season would not in any way help these birds to increase, it
is suggested that a short open season be allowed next year.
Blue grouse are holding their own, and, in fact, I believe are increasing throughout the
Division, and can be provided with an open season next year.
Migratory' Game Birds.
Ducks.—Ducks just prior to the open season could be found in large numbers on the foreshores of the Richmond and Delta Districts, but owing to weather conditions on the opening day
very few ducks were taken, and throughout the season in 1925, owing to climatic conditions, very
poor shooting was to be had on these birds. Upon investigation, however, these birds were here
in just as large numbers as last season. The wood-ducks found in the Chilliwack area are slightly
increasing.
Sicans.—From reports at hand twelve swans have visited Daisy Lake again this year.
During the year 1924 a large number of whistling swans visited Sea and Lulu Islands, but this
was not the case during the year 1925.
Geese and Brant.—These birds were in equal numbers, if not greater numbers, than last
year. Brant-shooting has been exceptionally good in the Boundary Bay District, whereas the
snow or wavy geese off the foreshores of the Richmond and Delta Districts appeared in greater
numbers this year.
Owing to climatic conditions migratory birds, especially ducks and geese, apparently stayed
in the different inlets on the Coast. Geese and ducks at the latter part of December were to
be found in great numbers at the head of Knight Inlet. In the Pitt Lake area fair shooting
was obtained on geese.
Vermin.
During the past year coyotes have increased throughout the Lower Mainland and steps must
be taken to endeavour to keep a check on these animals, as undoubtedly they do untold damage
to game birds in this region.
A number of cougar were killed in the Pender Harbour District and in the vicinity of
Gibson Landing. In fact, bounties have been paid on more cougar this year than for a number
of years past.
Wolves are not to be found in this Division, with the exception of the northern portions,
and they are here found in such numbers that would, in my opinion, warrant a campaign for
their destruction, and I believe it would be advisable to send special men in to carry on this
work. At the head of Knight Inlet quite a number of wolves are to be found and they are
undoubtedly doing considerable damage to the game in this area. X 22 British Columbia. 1925
Crows and other noxious birds were found in quite large numbers this year, and steps
should undoubtedly be taken to' keep these birds down to the lowest possible numbers. I am
afraid, however, that this situation would not be met fully by paying a bounty. I feel that good
results can be obtained by instructing the various Game Wardens in the Division to carry on a
campaign against crows especially. It might be advisable to instruct certain Game Wardens
to carry on poisoning operations for taking such vermin. This could be done quite easily without
hindering or destroying any of our game birds.
Game-protection.
During the year 1925 there was an increase in the number of prosecutions conducted under
the " Game Act" and the Special Fishery Regulations for British Columbia.
A large number of these prosecutions were obtained through special surprise patrols being
made to different parts of the Division, which are being explained further in this report.
The following Constables were almost continually engaged in game-work during the year
1925: W. V. Fenton, Langley Prairie; W. J. Mcintosh, Fort Langley; H. C. Pyke, Chilliwack;
W. H. Cameron, Ladner; J. Moir, North Vancouver; J. Murray, Port Moody; P. Corrigan,
Mission; E. G. Stedham, Pitt Meadows; J. G. Cunningham and W. Clark, launch " Watla,"
Vancouver;   D. C. Campbell, Vancouver.
The other Police Constables stationed in the Division have done their utmost to enforce the
provisions of the " Game Act" in the districts under their control. This especially has been
the case in the Alert Bay and Powell River detachments.
Propagation.
During the year 1925 in the neighbourhood of 1,000 pheasants were liberated on the Lower
Mainland, all birds being in excellent condition and were obtained from the Government Pheasant
Farm in Victoria.
Some fifty bob-white quail were liberated in the district during the year 1925, these birds
having been obtained from the State of Washington.
The pheasants liberated at Bowen Island, at the request of the farmers there, have increased,
but the small number of birds shipped to Hardy Island have been destroyed by vermin, and it
is not thought advisable to forward any further birds to this island until steps have been taken
to cope with the vermin situation;  this to be done by trapping the mink and racoon in this area.
Game Reserves.
The following reserves are to be found in this Division: Nelson, Captain, and Hardy
Islands;   Burnaby, Deer, and Trout Lakes;   McGillivray Creek  (Sumas).
The deer on Nelson, Captain, and Hardy Islands are increasing and are in excellent condition.
During the year under review two mule-deer have been sent to Hardy Island and it is hoped
that these animals will become acclimatized.
It is interesting to note that beaver are increasing on the Burnaby Lake Reserve, and which
as an example will show that if protection is afforded these animals will increase.
On Nelson and Hardy Islands mink and racoon are increasing and are destroying a large
number of grouse, and it is suggested that steps be taken to allow the settlers there to trap
during the regular open season. This reserve was made for the express purpose of protecting
the deer and grouse, and if this is to be carried out, then the mink and racoon should not be
allowed to increase.
Fur Trade.
In past years the practice has been in effect to stamp each individual pelt taken within the
Province, but under Order in Council passed this year this practice is being done away with and
a new system is to be put into effect. This system does away with the stamping of fur and it is
hoped will be of material assistance to the fur-trader and trapper. At least the stamping of fur
has undoubtedly affected the value of any pelts so marked.
During the year 1925 the amount of royalty collected showed a slight increase over the
collections under this heading in 1924. With further reference to the non-stamping of fur,
this system is being put into effect for the purpose of co-operating with the Provinces to the east.
Fur-farms.
During the year 1925 a large number of fur-farms have been put into operation in the
Division, these farms principally being concerned with the farming of blue and silver foxes 16 Geo. 5 Report of the Provinci.al Game Warden. X 23
and muskrats, although a number are engaged in the business of farming marten and mink.
It is impossible at the present time to furnish information in respect to the amount of success
attained by these farmers, but it is felt that next year this information can be furnished.
Everything possible has been done to assist any person wishing to engage in this business.
Special Patrols.
During the year under review a number of special patrols have been undertaken. These
patrols may be rightly termed " surprise patrols" and were as follows:—i
(1.) April 18th to 30th. Granite Bay and Loughborough Inlet Districts. Launch " Watla,"
680; miles; total, 700 miles. Eleven convictions were obtained under the " Game Act," and
twenty-seven mink, one other pelt, and five firearms were confiscated.
(2.) June 1st to June 10th. Howe Sound and Sechelt Inlet Districts. Launch "Watla,"
441 miles;   total, 479 miles.    Four convictions—three firearms confiscated.
(3.) June 18th to June 23rd. Howe Sound area. Three convictions—two firearms confiscated.
(4.) August 8th to August 19th. Toba Inlet District. Launch "Watla," 426 miles; total,
500 miles.    Eight convictions.
These patrols have proven very beneficial, as a number of residents in the districts patrolled,
immediately after the patrols were made, secured firearms licences and endeavoured to obtain
full information in regard to the game laws and regulations. A number of other patrols were
made with the same results.
Through the co-operation of Stipendiary Magistrate H..O. Alexander, of Vancouver, who
accompanied the launch " Watla " on a number of these patrols, we were able to try the cases
at a minimum cost and also to patrol the districts in an efficient manner. This would not have
been the case if the services of this Magistrate were not obtained. It is felt that this Magistrate
should be complimented and thanked for the time and interest he spent and took in endeavouring
to assist and help our officers on these patrols.
Summary.
In conclusion, I wish to state that during the coming year, if possible, greater steps will be
taken to prevent violations of the " Game Act" occurring in the district and endeavouring to
keep such violations down to the lowest minimum, and in this connection it is hoped that a
number of special patrols will be made or carried out as was done during the year under review.
Through the interest taken by the Game Constables in the Division must go a good deal of
the credit for the game-protection service rendered during the year 1925, and a number of
sportsmen and others in the district have done their utmost to co-operate and help our Constables
in enforcing the provisions of the " Game Act."
In connection with the issuance of firearms licences, considerable complaint has been again
made this year by the sportsmen, who are of the opinion that a metal tag should be issued with
each licence, as was the case prior to 1919. A number of these licences become illegible the first
week of the season through being wet or worn, and in a great many cases they were lost.
There is no provision in the Act whereby a new licence, or even a covering letter, can be
issued to the licensee in such cases, and as this question is continually brought up I would
recommend that the tag system be again brought into effect, or provision made in the " Game Act "
to allow the issuing of a covering letter or substitute licence, as is done in the case of a worn
or lost driver's licence under the " Motor-vehicle Act."
ELK LAKE GAME FARM.
By Constable J. W. Jones, in Charge.
I beg to submit my annual report of the operations of the Cedar Hill Pheasant Farm as
follows:—
Pheasants in pens on January 1st, 1925      600
Breeding stock—
Hen pheasants   85
Cock pheasants  IS
—    103
Number of eggs laid   2,000
Set under hens   1,850 X 24 British Columbia. 1925
Small late eggs used for feeding young pheasants  150
Young pheasants reared  2,000
Liberated in the fall of 1925  050
Now in pens .-  000
Strayed from want of pen-room  ,  200
Casualties    100
Total number of pheasants in pens, December 31st, 1925   OOO
The following is a list of the vermin destroyed on the farm during the year 1925: Cats, 29;
hawks, 75;  white owls, 1;  owls, 20; blue jays, 10; total, 135.
COLQUITZ GAME FARM.
By Constable A. P. Cummins, in Charge.
Stock birds penned—
Mongolian hens   130
Mongolian cocks  35
Chinese hens  24
Chinese cocks  0
Pheasant-eggs distributed  460
Eggs placed under hens   2,000
Birds hatched   1,450
Casualties    340
Strays  100
Birds in pens (September, 1925)   1,000
Birds reared in 1924 and liberated in 1925  835
Ducks reared   150
During the latter part of 1925 the two farms were disbanded and one central farm put into
operation, and which is now known as the Elk Lake Game Farm, in charge of Constable
J. W. Jones.
APPENDIX.
Page.
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms licences, January 1st, 1925, to May 31st, 1925 25
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms licences, June 1st, 1925, to December 31st,
1925       26
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms licences, January 1st, 1925, to May 31st,
1925       27
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms licences, June 1st, 1925, to December 31st,
1925       28
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from fur royalties,
January 1st, 1925, to May 31st, 1925     29
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from fur royalties,
June 1st, 1925, to December 31st, 1925    30
Statement of various kinds of pelts on which royalty has been paid, January 1st, 1925, to
December 31st, 1925     31
Statement of big-game trophies paid by non-residents, January 1st, 1925. to December 31st,
1925 ;     32
Prosecutions, January 1st, 1925, to December 31st, 1925     34
List of confiscated firearms, January 1st, 1925, to December 31st, 1925     36
Hunting accidents, 1925  ,     37
Bounties paid January 1st, 1925, to December 31st, 1925     3S
List of guides, season 1925     39
Map of field organization of the Game Department. 16 Geo. 5
Report of the  Provincial Game Warden.                            X
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British Columbia.
1925
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1925, to December 31st, 1925.
Agency.
Name.
Species.
Amount.
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Dr. Leo D. Dick	
1
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2
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1
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$      55 00
65 00
SO 00
50 00
70 00
35 00
65 00
70 00
110 00
40 00
55 00
30 00
5 00
10 00
10 00
10 00
65  00
25  00
105  00
155  00
25 00
30 00
50 00
25 00
25 00
50 00
50 00
30 00
25  00
30 00
25 00
30 00
40 00
25 00
'25 00
25 00
25 00
■50  00
25 00
195 00
210 00
23 00
55 00
40 00
75 00
35 00
30 00
10 00
25 00
10 00
10  00
5 00
15 00
50 00
120 00
60 00
25 00
15 00
50 00
T. W   Thorpe	
\V.  H   Elwell
C.  H.  Moore	
C. G. Ray        	
— Van Vl< ck	
1
1
1
1
D. F. Houston	
C. M. Kelso
W. W. Knight	
H. W.  Diehl	
B.  Taro	
J. Taipi	
J. D.  Gauthier	
R. H. Van Schaack	
1    !      2
3
J. H. Anvill    	
Fernie	
Prince Rupert	
F. Muller    	
A. M. Gaudy	
A. W. Hanck	
1
F. Brindley	
F. H. Eiggall	
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
....
1
2
Dr. F. J. Leavitt	
G. N. Nelson             	
Z. M. Crane    	
T. L. Bontrilier
C. S. Harbey	
Smithers	
J.  M.  Cummings	
A. H. Plavau	
J. T. Little    	
E. J. Froelich	
H. Telford	
T.McClellan	
Cranbrook	
W. G. Kollock	
C. Church	
E. A. Hahn..
H. J. Merrill	
M. E. Payne	
C. E. Pendleton	
C. E. Buck 	
F. W. Leadbetter	
D. C. Macfarlane	
H. P. Buttres	
C. W. Wood	
....   j  .... 16 Geo. 5
Report of the Provincial G
ame Warden.
X 33
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January' 1st, 1925, to
December 31s'i
, 1925—Continued.
Species.
a
33
Agency.
Name.
>,
3 3
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3
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3
3
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Amount.
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Cranbrook	
Mrs. H. C. Pilcher	
1
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2
1          2
70 00
SO 00
G. Huher	
F. L. Westlake	
'2
1
1
1
65 00
40 00
Dr. Phillips	
1
15 00
M. Wright	
1
2
55 00
1
15 00
Fort Fraser	
1
2
2
.
30 00
25 00
55 00
G. R. Britten	
F. D. Chapman	
Telegraph Creek	
Geo. Eastman	
Dr. A. A. Kaiser	
1
2
2
1
'2
1
1
120 00
70 00
G. Norton 	
2
1
1
1
95 00
Mrs. G. Norton	
1
2
1
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95 00
J. L. Clark              	
1
1
1
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15 00
75 00
Mrs. J. L. Clark	
W. H. A. Holmes	
1
2
2
2
155 00
1
2
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2
2
2
2
2
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1
210  00
170 00
!    1
G. E. Burghard	
2
2
2
1
135 00
J. A. Beck	
1
1
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2
2
65 00
90 00
R. L. Riley	
1
2
2
2
1
ISO 00
D. W. Bell	
2
2
2
2
3
1
260 00
1
2
2
2
1
170 00
N. E. Hess 	
1
2
2
2
2
]
195 00
J. W. Hesse	
2
2
3
3
]
245  00
G. V. Welker	
'2
2
2
1
155 00
J. L. Hutton	
1
'2
2
2
1
ISO 00
S. B. Geise	
1
•.
2
2
2
1
210  00
F. A. Cooper	
1
25  00.
2
1
2
1
1
130 00
50 00
G. F. Tiffany
.itlin	
1
1
2
2
i
100 00
100 00
A. S. Crites	
A. D. Crites..	
1
1
2
2
i
145 00
F. B. Patterson	
3
2
'2
2
2
2
]
125 00
155 00
G. F. H. Koing	
J. C. Sharon	
1
2
45 00
Totals	
,T. C. Kerr	
1
2
55 00
26
42
58
18
12
85
55
11
4f
$7,073 00
'■'.
'     ,; ' X 34
British Columbia.
1925
Prosecutions  (Provincial Police Divisions)., January 1st, 1925, to December 31st, 1925.
Description of Offence.
. a
: Q
OS,
. Q
at
s 0
tr Ul
o S
o o
U'43
EHo
~ 33
? °
o> a,
w 3
3 =u
Fines and
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
Attempting to sell big game	
Having game on premises of shop, etc	
Hunting deer during close season	
Killing elk during close season	
Killing caribou for hides alone	
Killing   fur-bearing   animals   during   close
season	
Killing deer during close season	
Killing moose during close season	
Killing beaver during close season	
Possession of (leer-meat during close season
Possession of game during close season	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals
during close season	
Possession of deer under 1 year of age	
Removing head from carcass of a deer	
Running deer with dogs	
Killing bear during close season	
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during
close season	
Game birds  on premises of hotel or store
Hunting ducks during close season	
Hunting game birds in prohibited area	
Killing grouse during.close season	
Killing pheasants during close season	
Killing game birds during close season	
Possession of hen pheasants during close
season	
Possession of game birds during close season
Licences.
Carrying firearms without a licence..	
Carrying firearms in an automobile illegally
Failing to produce licence when requested..
Guiding without a licence	
Killing bear without a licence	
Killing game without a licence	
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied by an adult licence-holder	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a
licence	
Resident non-British subject carrying firearms without a licence	
Trading in fur without a licence	
Firearms.
Carrying pump-gun not plugged	
Carrying firearms in restricted area	
Carrying firearms In a motor-boat illegally.
Trapping.
Carrying traps without a licence	
Non-resident trapping without a licence	
Residents trapping without a licence	
Trapping during close season	
20
9
10
41
2
1
1
1
1
5
10
1
87
12
1
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
10
8
10
1
4
1
1
1
'5
10
1
8
3
87
12
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
12
10
30 00
100 00
125 00
20 00
25 00
133 00
500 00
310 00
10 00
475 00
25 00
30 00
55 00
50 00
111
00
23
00
10
00
25
00
160
0(1
385
00
25
00
180
00
30
00
910
00
125
00
'25
00
10
00
25
00
35
00
10 00
300 00
10  00
85 00
115 00
10 00
20 00
10 00
50 00
185 00
575 00 16 Geo. 5
Report of the Provincial Game Warden.
X 35
Prosecutions  (Provincial Police Divisions), January 1st, 1925, to December 31st, 1925
—Continued.
Description of Offence.
a
o
-  'ai
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: 0
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b'E
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3
rt  on
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a
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a
te
5
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a a
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2.5.
S3
I?
■3 zi
3 3
3,+J
tfi 3
3 0)
mm
Fines and
Penalties
imposed.
Miscellaneous.
Being a guide did allow a hunter to exceed
1
6
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
13
6
2
1
1
1
3
2
3
15
14
1
1
2
1
1
3
i
i
5
'2
3
15
15
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
i
!
i
....   1      S      25 00
Exporting fur without a permit	
False information to an officer	
Fur-trader not keeping proper record-book..
....
....
10 00
40 00
60 00
75 00
Possession of migratory birds during close
205 00
170 00
Gaol Sentences.
$5,825 00
Killing a cow moose during close season	
Non-resident   carrying   firearms   without   a
3 months.*
30 days.
Possession of fur during close season	
Residents carrying firearms without a licence
Trapping without a licence	
1 month each.
1 month.
2 months.
Totals  	
70
41
39
29
117
17
279
296
10
Hard labour. X 36
British Columbia.
1925
List op Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act,'
to December 31st, 1925.
January 1st, 1925,
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Police
Division.
Kind
confiscated.
Jan.
Feb.
April
May
6
19
4
23
23
25
28
5
11
12
21
June      8
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
- 6
20
20
4
7
29
31
16
2S
14
19
21
23
23
23
23
7
10
21
25
25
28
2S
4
Austion, E	
Kawraguchi, K	
Berg, E 	
Hand, R	
Newman, F	
Miyashita, S 	
Hays, J	
Derchi, J 	
Bnie, W 	
Lefcoat, B. G	
Lane, G. W	
Sing, C...	
Pah, C	
Hoon, N....	
Suzuki, H	
Mura, M 	
Sutherland, D	
Gagne, G .".	
Beltz, P 	
Det, L. S	
Clapp, L 	
Luhtla,  R	
McCouch, W.....	
Dick, P	
Aikoshi, S...	
Hill, M	
Bassett, G...	
Adams, W  	
Christie, J	
Chamberlain, J. O
Elliott, F	
Cane, J. T.„.	
Gauthier, A. N	
Higgenscn, S	
Sakaguchi, K	
Nomura, S	
Brown, A	
Richmond  	
Courtenay 	
Powell River...	
Loughborough Inlet
Loughborough Inlet
Sayward	
Sayward 	
Revelstoke 	
Nanaimo	
Pouce Coupe	
Cloverdale 	
Egmont	
Egmont	
Egmont  -■ 	
Vancouver	
Vancouver —
Nanaimo	
Sayward	
Courtenay	
Alert Bay	
.Athalmer	
Nanaimo	
Kelowna	
Nanaimo  	
Campbell Kiver	
Campbell River	
Campbell River	
Campbell River	
Campbell River	
Kaslo	
Lucerne 	
Burnaby...	
Alert Bay 	
Alert Bay	
Alert Bay .--.,	
Alert Bay	
Cranbrook	
' E "
'A "
'E "
'E"
' E "
'E"
'E "
'B"
'A"
' D "
'E "
' E "
'E"
'E "
'E"
' E "
'A"
•A"
'A "
' E "
'B "
'A"
'C"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
' A"
'B "
'D"
'E "
'E "
' E "
'E"
'E "
' B "
1 rifle.
1 pump-gun.
1 pump-gun.
1 pump-gun.
2 rifles.
1 shot-gun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 pump-gun.
2 rifles,
1 revolver.
1 shotgun,
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 pump-gun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 pump-gun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle,
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle,
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle. 16 Geo. 5
Report of the Provincial Game Warden.
X 37
-I
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'A X 38
British Columbia.
1025
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1(125.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Totals.
■8
2
1
3
1
113
28
39
12
1
30
51
2
4
3
2
21
4
11
1
9
14
1
8
17
4
5
5
2
2
1
11
8
3
1
85
230
241
121
48
555
122
705
5
227
60
5
55
1,092
342
599
232
182
5
ISO
121
5
251
191
1,617
$      160 00
170  00
Atlin 	
580 00
Clinton   	
Cranbrook	
602 00
322 00
870 00
175 00
536 00
1,195 00
619 00
1,970 00
10 00
Merritt  	
494 00
3'20  00
800  00
170 00
Prince Rupert	
2,005 00
2,604 00
1,469 00
1,438 00
544  00
404 00
10  00
375 00
Telegraph Creek	
692 00
450  00
1,587  00
50'2 00
Williams Lake	
3,304 00
Totals	
291
137
7.2T6
$24,397 00 l(i Geo.
Report of the Provincial Game Warden.
X 39
List of Guides, Season 1025.
Atlin District.
Murphy, N Atlin.
Cussiar District.
Bear Lake Billy Telegraph Creek.
Colbert, J	
Escardi, —	
Dougan, —  „
Henyu, B    „
Brooks, N  „
Frank, T	
Martin, L  „
Inash, C  „
Decker, L  ',.
Lawrence, C  ,,
Dease, J .Porter's Landing.
Hyland, J Telegraph Creek.
Frank, B	
Campbell, G  „
Fann, B  	
Little Dick	
Tait, N	
Dunstan, T ..."  „
McClusky, M	
McClusky, P	
Creyke, J  „
Gun-an-oot, P..
Hazelton District.
..Hazelton. Humodan, P..
..Hazelton.
Fort George District.
Allgier, L Dunster.
Brittain, A Lucerne.
Renshaw, J. H MeBride.
Jensen, E. W Dome Creek.
Colebank, G. F Woodpecker.
Hargreaves, G. E Mount Itobson.
Hargreaves. J. A  .,
Denison, G. M  .,
Hargreaves, R. F	
Lindsay, N	
Cowart, J. T Prince George.
Hoover, D  „
Hooker, J. B	
Jackson, G. H  ,,
Fisher, G. R	
Colebank, G. A Hixon Creek.
Smith, J. M Red Bass.
Wylie, R. M Giscome.
McPharland, J Raush Valley.
Bai-kerrille District.
Cochran, J. B Barkerville.
Thompson, R  .,
Fre-son, H  .,
Mason, H Barkerville.
Kibee, F	
Thompson, N  .,
Lillooet District.
MacEacheran, R Horsefly.
Lloyd, W. E	
Gaspar<L,E	
Walters, G. H	
Parminter, J. W        „
McLeese, P Lone Lake.
Hooker, F Horsefly.
Graks, B	
Duff, M. T	
Hooker, S. B	
Stephenson, A Likely.
Mackill, J     ,.
Furber, G —     ,.
Dering, W      ,.
Parminter, R -      ,.
Hamilton, It Likely.
Dixon, F      ,,
BramU'er, E      ,.
Leckie, C     ,,
Batenaude, G Harpers Camp.
Fletcher, J. E. Keithley Creek.
Finely, M	
Moffatt, H Beaver Lake.
Hamilton, T  ,,
Manson, W. M Lillooet.
Greer, T Williams Lake.
Lowder, D Quesnel Forks.
Moore, G. W Quesnel.
Dewees, R. G Likely.
McGregor, H     „ X 40
British Columbia.
1925
Lillooet District—Continued.
Collins, J. M Likely.
Mansfield, B      „
lilton, R. M      „
Johnston, J	
Ray, J. P. Birch Island.
Glover, J. M Mount Olie.
Tighe, J Likely.
McDougall, A     „
Gough, A     ,,
Kamloops District.
French, J. W Kamloops.
Kootenay District.
Roy, A. Me Invermere.
Hamer, J. M Bevelstoke.
Marquis, J. E » Kelson.
Bergenham, P..... Golden.
Soles, M   Harrogate.
Declare, J Elk Valley.
Stevens, P. V.... Skookumchuk.
Scofleld, B ;...,Windermere.
Nixon. J. M Invermere.
Nicol, A. H Fort Steele.
Hoops, B. M Telkwa.
Bovine, W Natal.
Coulliard. H Elk Prairie.
Miller, J. B Fernie.
Harrison, G. II Hector.
Yearling. W Athalmer.
Gates, G. W ...Vernon.
Vernon District.
Marian), C Vernon.
Nanaimo District.
Smith, J. C Comox.
Peace River District.
Hoy, D. II Fort St. James.
McCorkell, B	
Esswein, P Hudson Hope.
Thomas, S  ,,
Prince Rupert District.
Ratclift'e, W. E Atuarko. .  Ratclift'e, M Hagensborj
Vancouver District.
Phillips, F. A..... Vancouver.
Haswell, E. A	
Mansell, F North Vancouver.
Forbes, J ...Campbell River.
Utterstrom, J Vancouver.
Williams, A. R  „
McPhee, J Orford Bay.
Sykes, B. S Abbotsford.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F.  Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.
825-527-6961

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