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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1927]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL
POLICE
FOR the year ended
DECEMBER 31ST, 1925
PRINTED by
authority of the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce.
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for the year ended December 31st, 1925.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1926. Office of Superintendent of Provincial Police,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1926.
Honourable A. M. Manson, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report for the year which ended
December 31st, 1925.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Superintendent of Provincial .Police. REPORT OF
SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1925.
Hon. A. M. Manson, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to forward herewith my Annual Report for the year ended December
31st, 1925.
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
At midnight of December 31st, 1925, the strength of the Force stood as follows:  10 officers;
201 non-commissioned officers and men;  46 automobiles;  6 motor-cycles;  12 launches;  4 powerboats.
The following table shows the distribution of the Force as at December 31st:—
a
fl
m
CC
0
^3
a
U
cl
m
33
fcjj
w
rr.
m
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33
31
a
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M
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ui
33
o
a
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r/i
rt
.a
o
a
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rt~i
a
33
3
o
m 3
3
o
O
u
o
Ul
*tm
M
xn
m
m
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U
Ph
<1
rti
4
EM
1
I
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
i
2
1
1
3
l
2
2
23
33
23
2
'2
8
12
10
4
1
2
1
1
4
" C " Division -....
1
1
1
3
2
4
3
1
28
21
10
1
1
1
4
12
1
2
6
Motor Branch	
Liquor Enforcement Br.
1
22
Totals	
1
1
7
1
3
12
13
166
1
46
6
1'2
4
In order to facilitate the control I deemed it advisable to establish two distinct Divisions
out of " A" Division, making Vancouver Island one Division known as " A," with divisional
headquarters at Victoria, and what was formerly the Vancouver Subdivision is now known as
" E " Division, with headquartersr at Vancouver. The Force is now comprised of five divisional
headquarters, sixteen district headquarters, and ninety-eight detachments. A list of detachments with their respective officers as at December 31st, 1925, is shown in Appendix V. at the
end of this report.
ENLISTMENTS, DISCHARGES, ETC.
The following are the particulars regarding enlistments, etc., during the year 1925: Enlistments, 41;   resignations, 8 ;   dismissals, 4;   deaths, 2.
Taking over the policing of certain cities and municipalities has caused an increase of eight
men in the strength during the year; the Liquor Branch has increased to the extent of two;
the issuing of uniforms to all ranks has made necessary an increase in the clerical staff, while
it was also found necessary to engage clerks to cope with the increased correspondence and
reports at Nanaimo, Fernie, Frince Rupert, New Westminster, and Headquarters. I also had
to place an additional clerk to deal with the increase in the number of motor-vehicles licensed
and registered and the adoption of drivers' licences. Repeated complaints from the Islands
District showed the advisability of maintaining a regular launch patrol, and the game situation
in different parts of the Province necessitated the employment of additional men who devote
their whole attention to the enforcement of the " Game Act."
During the year the University area, including approximately 7 miles of the much-travelled
Marine Drive, came under the supervision of the Provincial Police, following the withdrawal
of this area from municipal territory at Point Grey. The problem of the traffic control in this
area is an important one, due to the large number of tourists and others who use the Marine
Drive, particularly in the summer season, and there is a possibility that an officer may be
needed there permanently if this area is to be policed by this Force.   The population is inereas- Y 6 British Columbia. 1925
ing, and it is likely to do so more rapidly since the opening of the University Buildings at Point
Grey. At present, however, I find that the situation can be effectively handled by the Vancouver
Detachment.
OBITUARY.
In the death of Staff-Sergeant Robert James Sutherland at Golden on 'Saturday, November
21st, 1925, after sixteen years' service, the Provincial Police lost one of its most trusted officers.
Appointed to the Force in November, 1909, the deceased was successively promoted to the ranks
of Chief Constable in 1914 and Staff-Sergeant in 1924. Kindly, tactful, and courteous, Staff-
Sergeant Sutherland was a great favourite and his presence will be missed throughout the
North-east Kootenay District, which he so successfully administered for the past ten years.
I also regret to report the death of Sergeant C. A. Booth, who had been continually associated
with the Motor Licence Branch since his enlistment on April 4th, 1911.
APPOINTMENTS.
On April 27th, 1925, Staff-Sergeant W. Spiller was appointed Acting-Inspector and placed
in command of " D " Division.
On September 1st, 1925, M. Furber was appointed Chief Game Inspector.
NEW BUILDINGS.
The Headquarters in the Old Drill Hall at Victoria has been altered and extended from time
to time to cope with the increased volume of business passing through our hands.
A new police office of the standard pattern was erected at Oliver and is now occupied. The
building, to my mind, is exceptionally well adapted for police purposes and also as a residence
for the Constable.
Provision was made in the Estimates for new lockups at Natal and Athalmer. The money
for the latter, however, was expended in adding additional living-quarters at the Kimberley
Lockup, which is a very important point.
It is hoped to have a new standard lockup built at Blue River during the year 1926. A new
building is also contemplated at Clinton to be used by the Government Agency at that point.
Provision has been made to have a lockup and Constable's quarters in this building.
A Government building was erected during the year at Smithers, in which provision was
made for offices suitable for District Headquarters, a room for a single Constable, and married
quarters for the N.C.O. i/c, which has filled a long-felt want.
Although provision was made for the erection of barracks at Fort St. John, construction
has been delayed owing to the uncertainty of the proposed location of the Edmonton, Dunvegan
& British Columbia Railway.
A new building was constructed during 1925 at Mission, which is almost completed and ready
for occupation. Capacity, cell-room and Court-room, with suitable living-quarters for married
man and family.
A new police building will be necessary in the immediate future at Alert Bay Detachment,
the present building being both unsanitary and unsuitable for the Constable's accommodation.
Repairs will also be necessary, with certain alterations, at both Powell River and Squamish
Detachments.
The Vancouver offices were considerably extended during the year to provide additional
accommodation, including offices for the Assistant Superintendent. The offices formerly occupied
by certain other departments adjacent to the Police quarters were taken over, with more space
and facility for all concerned. Various changes were also made in the internal arrangement
of the Motor Licence Branch for the greater convenience of the public. In this connection it is
respectfully suggested that the offices adjacent to that Branch might also well be taken over
eventually by this Department to allow better facilities for the accommodation of the motor-
using public, particularly during the rush periods of licence-issuing, which is now assuming
proportions beyond the capacity of the present quarters to cope with conveniently. A portion
of the new police offices was used to advantage as a sub-office for the issuing of licences at the
beginning of the year for the first few months; it has also again been opened for the convenience
of the public during the first few weeks of 1926.
Changes were similarly made at the New Westminster Headquarters to provide additional
facilities to meet the rapidly increasing motor-licence requirements, as well as for the greater
convenience of the N.C.O. i/c and staff at the Headquarters. 16 Geo. 5       Report of the Superintendent of Provincial Police. Y 7
UNIFORMS.
I am pleased to be able to say that uniforming of the Police Force was completed during the
year and all ranks with the exception of probationers are now in uniform. This is the first
occasion in the history of the Force that the men have been uniformed. As this was a new
experience, naturally the issue in some respects could be improved, and I hope to be able to
effect these improvements in the coming year. Although the idea of making this Force a
uniformed unit was received in some instances with opposition, yet, now that it is an accomplished fact, the good effect that it has had on the discipline and bearing of the men, the
increased efficiency and respect now commanded have fully justified the step and any extra
expense thereby incurred.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT.
In my last report I spoke of the need for a department dealing exclusively with Criminal
Investigation, While I have not been able to bring this Branch up to the standard its importance
deserves, I have detailed Inspector Cruickshank to take charge of this department and he has
two men in Vancouver working under his instructions. There is a lot to be done yet in this
regard, but having made a start on its organization, I hope to have a competent Branch operating
in the next year.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES BY BRITISH COLUMBIA POLICE.
"A" Division.—No municipalities have heen taken over in the Victoria District other than
the City of Duncan, which we are now policing, and this is apparently turning out very satisfactorily. City officials and residents in the City of Duncan highly appreciate the manner in
which our officers carry out their duties. Corporal Russell, in charge, and Constable Shepherd
are both zealous officers and carry out their duties most efficiently, both in the City of Duncan
and the surrounding unorganized territory.
" B " Division.—The only municipality in this Division to take advantage of the amended
" Municipal Aet" in having their police-work done by the Provincial Police was Rossland.
Notwithstanding a report furnished recently in this connection, I am well satisfied that the
people of Rossland as a whole are very well satisfied with the service being given them by this
Department. I look to see the present system remain in Rossland, and I am also satisfied that
in future other municipalities will adopt a similar method. As a matter of fact, I have already
been approached by the City of Nelson, getting data on our methods, and it may well be that this
will ultimately become a local issue there.
" D " Division.—On June 15th, 1925, according to an agreement with the Municipality of
the City of Prince George, policing was assumed by this Force, the success of which can be
measured by the vote taken in January last, when the present system was endorsed by a majority
of 170—275 in favour of British Columbia Police and 105 against.
" E " Division.—In this Division the policing of Matsqui Municipality by the Provincial
Force since April 1st, 1925, has so far been successful. Better results have been obtained, with
satisfactory service to the public. The question of policing Sumas Municipality has also been
a subject of discussion, but as yet this municipality has not decided in favour of Provincial
control, although there is a possibility that they may do so in the near future.
General.—Generally speaking, the policing of municipalities and cities by the Provincial
Force has been entirely satisfactory from every point of view. Indeed, not only have the
municipalities themselves often effected a considerable financial saving, but by the elimination
of " overlapping " services, not always sympathetic, local supervision has immeasurably improved
—with one Force in control questions as to either jurisdiction or responsibility cannot arise.
Again, when all is said and done, it is an obvious advantage for a municipality to have its local
officer backed by a constahularly whose influence extends not only through the length and breadth
of British Columbia, but also to neighbouring Provinces and to the States south of us. Although
still in the experimental stage, the trend is apparent, and ,1 feel satisfied that, as time goes on,
other civic administrators will more fully recognize the great crime-preventive value pertaining
to a Police Force whose operations are subject to an independent control.
IDENTIFICATION BUREAU.
Although the value of our Finger-print and Record Office is being continually demonstrated,
I feel this value might be further amplified by the adoption of criminal photography at Oakalla. Y 8 British Columbia. 1925
Photographs continue to play an extremely important part in effecting criminal identification,
and, to my mind, there is no question that such an innovation would be of immense assistance
to the Criminal Investigation Branch.
CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.
It gives me great pleasure to be able to say that the conduct of the Force during the past
year has been excellent and the discipline remains at a very high standard. There have, of
course, been instances of dereliction of duty and some of misbehaviour, but these have been
firmly dealt with. Fortunately these cases were very few, only four dismissals being made
during the year, and this number includes those dismissed for inefficiency or unsuitability.
When it is considered that the majority of the N.C.O.'s and men of this Force are carrying on
their duties at stations that are far removed from Headquarters, and therefore are required to
take important action and make far-reaching decisions on their own initiative, the almost total
absence of complaints against the Force is a matter of extreme gratification. During the year
I have had occasion to particularly commend in General Orders the work of the following N.C.O.'s
and men :—
September 10th, 1925. Constables Irving and Jacklin, for the efficient manner in which they
carried out and conducted a search for a missing child near Cordova Bay. With the quick
action of the officers the child was located in a short time. Again, on September 10th, Constables
Hatcher and Jacklin, for excellent judgment in apprehending two young offenders with a stolen
ear, both being wanted by the municipal authorities at Victoria.
Constable W. A. Walker, Princeton Detachment, for his prompt action in the arrest of
David Lloyd Chrisman for cattle-stealing.
Corporal J. F. Johnston, Trail Detachment, for his prompt action in effecting the arrest
of three men discovered in the act of breaking and entering.
Constable W. J. Stewart, Midway Detachment. The City Clerk of Greenwood wrote to me
an appreciation of the very valuable services rendered by Constable Stewart in bringing to
justice a perpetrator of a series of thefts in the City of Greenwood.
Sergeant G. H. Greenwood, Constable A. J. Smith, Constable F. Brindley, Constable I. J.
Brown, and Probationer Ward, for the splendid work done in connection with the arrest of
Jesse Mansfield, who had shot and killed George Whiting, road foreman, near Natal. In this
commendation Constable Smith was specially singled out for the coolness displayed in the
arrest of the offender.
Constable F. Brindley, of Natal Detachment, for the excellent work performed by this
officer in the case of a quantity of clothing, watches, etc., stolen at Crowsnest; the Constable's
prompt action resulting in the arrest of two men at Natal, who were afterwards convicted.
Constable D. A. Hazelton, Hope Detachment. A letter of appreciation was received by me
from Geo. A. Lundie, M.A., editoral staff, Vancouver Daily Province. Constable Hazelton was
commended for the arrest of James Lewis Morrison, who stole Mr. Lundie's overcoat from a
C.N.R. passenger-train on December 4th, 1925, while Mr. Lundie was proceeding from Vancouver
to Montreal.
Constable A. T. Regan, North Bend Detachment, by P. Philip, Deputy Minister of Public
Works, for services rendered him and his Department at North Bend. Very recently this
officer died through heart-failure and his loss is much felt by this Department.
Corporal W. J. Service and Constable T. Thiis, District Headquarters at Smithers, for
effecting arrest and preparing case in Rex vs. Serek, robbery with violence.
Constable W. J. Service, District Headquarters, Smithers, for assistance to Forest Branch.
Constables J. G. Cunningham, W. V. Fenton, and W. Clark, in connection with numerous
convictions in the Howe Sound area under the " Game Act " during a patrol with police launch
"Watla" in June, 1925.
Constable W. H. Hadley, Alert Bay Detachment, in connection with forest fires at Nimpkish
Indian Reserve;   also general policing of his district.
Constable F. Broughton, in connection with breaking and entering of Government Liquor
Store at Abbotsford.
Constable A. C. Sutton, Powell River Detachment, for arrest of Geo. Hannay, escaped
prisoner, at Squirrel Cove. Again, in connection with arrest of escaped prisoner, Joseph Martin,
en route from Prince Rupert to Oakalla Prison Farm. 16 Geo. 5       Report of the Superintendent of Provincial Police. Y 9
Constable A. MacClean, also in connection with escaped prisoner, Joseph Martin.    ,
Constables Fox  and Ledoux,  of the Liquor Board staff,  for work  in conjunction with
Provincial Police officers re Mission Liquor Store robbery.
ASSISTANCE RENDERED OTHER DEPARTMENTS.
When other Government departments require information they generally look to the Police
to obtain the same. This custom was more than ever exemplified during the year 1925; in fact,
certain investigations connected with the " Mothers' Pensions Act," " Fire Marshal Act," neglected
children, hospitals for insane, destitute, sick and poor, Forest Department, etc., have resolved
themselves into regular police duties. Moreover, I cannot recall a single instance in which the
conduct of these investigations has been criticized by the Department directly concerned. On the
contrary, time and again I have had letters thanking me for the assistance rendered by officers
of the Force. Transportation both by land and water has been provided for officials of several
departments while travelling on their official duties.
Department of the Attorney-General.
Besides guarding prisoners and looking after witnesses, the Force is called upon to supply
orderlies at all .Assize Courts.
" Deserted Wives' Maintenance Act."—The Provincial Police attended to twenty-six cases
under this Act during 1925.
" Fire Marshal Act."—Fifteen members of the Force have been appointed Assistant Fire
Marshals under this Act, All members of the Force continue to render every assistance to the
Fire Marshal and report on every fire occurring in their territory.
" Game Act."—In my capacity of Provincial Game Warden I am making the enforcement of
this Act the subject of a special report.
" Government Liquor Act."—The attention of the Force is continually demanded in the
enforcement of this Act, and its increased activities resulted in the number of cases dealt with
during 1925 showing an increase of 138 over 1924. I am glad to be able to report that complete
understanding exists between the Enforcement officers under Inspector Miller and the regular
Constables of this Force, their co-operation resulting in the prosecution and conviction of a large
number of violators.
" Motor-vehicle Aet."—During the year 1925 55,057 motor-vehicles were licensed, an increase
of 8,042 as compared with the number licensed during the year 1924. Of this number, 42,195
were issued by this Department direct from the five issuing offices at Kamloops, Nanaimo, New
Westminster, Vancouver, and Victoria, the balance being issued through thirty Government
Agents throughout the Province, assisted by our officers in the various districts. In addition
to motor-vehicle licences, 770 motor-cycle, 243 motor-dealers', 335 trailer, 5,342 chauffeurs', and
72,115 drivers' licences were issued. The amount of revenue under the " Motor-vehicle Act"
actually collected by officers of this Department amounted to the sum of $1,018,302.85.
All issuing offices make a daily return to the General Headquarters Office at Victoria of all
licences, etc., issued under the Act, such returns being accompanied by the original applications
made, etc., all records for the Province being kept at this office. Reports of convictions, etc.,
from Magistrates are also received and recorded.
The steady increase of motor-vehicles would appear to call for the formation of a squad
of motor-cycle officers engaged exclusively on the enforcement of the " Motor-vehicle Act " and
its regulations, as well as the "Highway Act" and regulations, and I would recommend that
such a unit be formed for this purpose to enforce all of the above in so far as the portions of
the Province policed by this Force are concerned, as well as in municipalities, with the exception
of traffic regulations and speed.
" Moving Pictures Act."—Whenever called upon assistance is rendered to the Censor.
" Pool-rooms Act."—The Force continues to supervise the conduct of pool-rooms in unorganized territory, and before being issued with a licence all premises are required to be examined
and reported on by the Provincial Police. During the year 1925 ninety-six pool-rooms were
reported on and licences issued for that year.
" Women's and Girls' Protection Act."—A number of cases have been brought to the attention
of the Force and dealt with. Y 10 British Columbia. 1925
Department of Agrictjltube.
" Sheep Protection Act."—The enforcement of this Act continues to receive the attention of
this Force, as do the " Brand Act," " Animals Act," " Pound District Act," etc. A number of
investigations were made under the " Noxious Weeds Act" and the necessary action taken.
Hide inspections, cattle-marking, and contagious diseases of animals are all matters that this
Force attends to as part of its duties.
Depabtment of Education.
The local knowledge of the Provincial Police has often been found valuable to this
Department.
Depabtment of Fisheries.
During the fishing season of 1925 three Provincial Police officers were detailed for special
fisheries duties. The selection of these men is always carefully made with a view to obtaining
the best possible results. Only those with an extensive knowledge of the waters in which they
operate and long experience with the subject are chosen. During the year 1925 the sum of
$16,690 was collected in licences and taxes for the Fisheries Department.
Department of Labouk.
This Department has on many an occasion invoked the aid of the Provincial Police. There
has been a number of prosecutions under the " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act" and the
" Hours of Work Act," and the men are always in a position to report on local labour conditions.
Department of Lands.
The Force has rendered all assistance in its power to the Forest Branch officials, not only
by assisting in the prosecution of cases, but also by procuring fire-fighters where necessary.
During the past year some of my best men were especially detailed for forest-protection work.
Depabtment of Mines.
Three members of the Force are appointed Sub-Mining Recorders—at Hope, Lytton, and
Hazelton. A number of prosecutions have been made under the " Coal-mines Regulation Act "
and the " Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act," and the Force has also rendered assistance to
the Inspectors of this Department.
Department of the Provincial Secretary.
" Dentistry Act."—Investigations have been made and prosecutions have followed under this
Act on behalf of the College of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia.
" Health Act."—Three hundred and ninety-five investigations of camps were made in the
year 1925. The duty of quarantining the occupants of homes in which an infectious disease has
shown also falls on this Force.
" Mental Hospitals Act."—The work in this connection is on the increase, as is shown by
the comparative figures of 113 for 1925 to 66 patients attended to in 1924.
" Mothers' Pensions Act."—One hundred and eighteen cases were investigated for the Board
in 1925.
Indigent, Aged, and Sick Persons.—This branch of the Provincial Secretary's Department
requires a great deal of attention from the Force, whose investigations often necessitate long
and arduous patrols. In the report following an investigation the Department always requires
a recommendation from the officer, and it is left entirely to his judgment as to the amount and
necessity for relief.
Neglected Children.—The Force is being constantly employed by the Superintendent of
Neglected Children to make investigations, sometimes extremely delicate ones, and the escort
of children to the Home in Vancouver is a task undertaken on many an occasion.
Vital Statistics.—The officers stationed at the Hope, MeBride, Hudson Hope, and Bella
Coola Detachments have been appointed as District Registrars of Births, Deaths, and Marriages,
and issuers of Marriage Licences. 16 Geo. 5       Report of the Superintendent of Provincial Police. Y 11
Public Works Department.
The condition of roads is watched and many matters in connection with them reported to
District Engineers. A check on heavy vehicles is constantly kept to prevent infractions of the
" Highway Act."
Tbeasury Dep_irtment.
Appendix III. at the end of this report gives details of the revenue collected by the Force
during the year 1925.
DOMINION STATUTES.
The enforcement of Dominion Statutes has been a particular duty in all Provincial Police/
districts. A noticeable feature of our criminal work has been the large number of cases handled
under the " Opium and Narcotic Drug Act" and the " Indian Act." In this connection another
feature worthy of comment is the high percentage of Orientals concerned with offences under
the first-mentioned law. We have also co-operated to a large extent with Dominion officials
charged with the supervision of immigration, criminal contagious diseases, shippingf, contagious
diseases of animals, customs and excise, explosives, Indians, migratory birds protection, naturalization, the postal service, paroled prisoners, ticket-of-leave, quarantine, railways, and the
telegraph service, and I am pleased to be able to say that we have received full measure of
support from all Dominion Government officials in every branch.
GENERAL.
During the year I visited every divisional headquarters and many district headquarters and
detachments. I am pleased to be able to say that at all times I found the Force carrying out
its duties in a very efficient manner and almost without exception to the entire satisfaction of
the law-abiding community. While I have remarked about the uniforms under that heading in
this report, yet mention of the striking improvement in the bearing of the men on the detachments visited was very marked, and this improvement seemed to me to be reflected in the
attitude of the men towards their work. There was a noticeable keenness and alacrity that
could not fail to impress, and I consider the uniforming of the Force to be one of the outstanding
achievements in its history.
Assistant Superintendent Owen also made exhaustive inspection trips during the year, and
made a number of recommendations relative to administrative matters throughout the Province,
which I have from time to time placed before you for your consideration.
I have always given special attention to co-operation with the various municipal, city, the
R.C.M.P., and other Police Forces, and I am glad to be able to report that the most cordial
relationship exists between us and the other Police bodies. We have always been ready to
render every assistance possible to any Force that may ask for it, and in return I am able to
say that we have never appealed in vain to any Force for anything that we may require in the
way of police-work. In those Divisions where the hobo situation is most marked the officers
commanding these Divisions report that the C.P.R. and the C.N.R. Police have many times
expressed their appreciation of the assistance we have been able to render. I may say that the
number of vagrants making their way both East and West was greatly increased, probably due
to the exceptional mildness of the weather. Of the spirit of co-operation shown by the other
Western Provincial Police Forces, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. I cannot speak too
highly. To any request we make we always receive prompt attention, and it is with a great
deal of pleasure that I draw your attention to the policy of mutual assistance so earnestly
fostered by Commissioners Bryan, Mabony, and Martin. Equally gratifying is the understanding
that exists between us and the Sheriffs and Police across the border. The holding of the Annual
Convention of the North-west Association of Sheriffs and Police in Victoria brought together
heads of all branches of police-work in the U.S.A. and this country and created an interest in
each other that cannot fail to react to the benefit of all concerned. With the harmony existing
the prevention of crime is made easier, and I shall continue to do my utmost to further the spirit
which I feel confident will be extended by every man in my command.
During the year, and since the appearance of the Provincial Police in uniform, I have been
asked to detail squads of men for various ceremonial functions, including the opening of the
Provincial Legislature. The opening ceremonies at the new University of British Columbia at
Point Grey required a large number of men from the Vancouver Detachment, as did the opening Y 12 British Columbia. 1925
of the Second Narrows Bridge.    On each of these occasions the men drew much favourable
comment.
Towards the end of the year 1924 we were confronted with a number of very serious crimes,
murder, hi-jacking, and bank robbery, perpetrated by gangs of criminals from the United States.
With the assistance of specials from the other side, we were able to bring to justice all the
members of these gangs, and at the Assize hearing penalties compatible with the crimes committed were awarded, the extreme penalty being given in three cases. Nothing of this nature
has occurred since that time, and it is apparent that the example of the swift justice administered
to criminals in this country has had a telling effect on bandits who had considered this Province
a fertile field for their depredations. These cases not only afforded a splendid proof of the
efficiency of the Police of this Province, but also demonstrated that in Canada law and order
must be respected.
I have dealt with the different phases of our work during the year under their separate
headings in another part of this report—general, policing, and administration matters, policing
of municipalities, conduct and discipline, etc. In conclusion, I should like to say that in their
reports for the year presented to me the Inspectors in command of Divisions without exception
express their appreciation for the whole-hearted support they have received from all the N.C.O.'s
and men under them. I should like to add my own appreciation to theirs and at the same time
warmly thank Assistant Superintendent Owen and every Inspector for their loyal support at
all times. To yourself I wish to express the appreciation of myself and all ranks for your
sympathetic manner and kind consideration given to all matters touching the work and welfare
of the Force.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Superintendent, British Columbia Provincial Police.
CRIMINAL STATISTICS.
Appendix I. at the end of this report gives in detail the cases dealt with by Provincial
officers. This table does not give the full total for the Province, but includes all indictable
offences where the accused was committed for trial and summary convictions dealt with by the
Force, but not summary convictions of cities and municipalities which have their own Police
Force. The number of all cases entered amounted to 3,263, with convictions amounting to 3,113,
or 85.92 per cent. This shows an increase of cases entered over last year of 899. The number
of escorts of prisoners made during the year was 2,285 and 169,130 miles were travelled in the
course of these escorts. The following is a short summary of the most important cases occurring
during the year:—
Murder and Attempts.
Rex vs. Leslie Dickie (Murder).—The accused, Leslie Dickie, was charged with the murder
of his infant grandson during a religious frenzy. He appeared for trial at the Nanaimo Spring
Assize on May 27th, 1925. The jury found him " not guilty." He was, however, detained in
custody and examined as to his mental condition, and upon being declared insane was committed
to Essondale Mental Hospital.
Rex vs. I. Yamo-moto (Murder).—The accused was charged with the murder of a fellow-
countryman (Japanese) at Port Alice. On May 28th. 1925, he appeared for trial at the Nanaimo
Spring Assize, was found " guilty " and sentenced to death. This sentence was subsequently
commuted to life imprisonment.
Rex vs. George Olebar and James King (Murder).—This was a case arising out of a drunken
orgy on the west coast of Vancouver Island, in which a man named Jamieson was killed. George
Olebar and James King were arraigned at the Nanaimo Fall Assize on this charge on November
4th, 1925. The jury found the accused " not guilty " and they were discharged, whereupon King
was returned to Oakalla to serve the balance of a six-month sentence for supplying liquor to
Indians. 16 Geo. 5       Report of the Superintendent op Provincial Police. Y 13
Rex vs. Corano (Murder).—This case occurred at Golden in September, 1925.. The accused,
sitting in a beer-parlour, got information to the effect that a man on the street had been insulting
his wife. Corano left the beer-parlour, followed the man up the street, and from the evidence
hit him with his fist, the man falling on the street. When the Police and doctor arrived the man
was dead.   The accused was tried at the Revelstoke Pall Assize and acquitted.
Rex vs. Hanley (Murder).—In this instance the accused, during an interview with a nurse
at the Nurses' Home at Trail, pulled out a revolver and shot her dead. He then turned the
weapon upon himself and severely wounded himself. The accused has already stood two trials
on a charge of " murder " at the Nelson Assizes and in both cases the jury disagreed. He will
be again tried at the forthcoming Assize.
Rex vs. Mansfield (Murder).—In this case the accused laboured under an imagined grievance
as between himself and a Government road-gang. On the evening of August 19th, 1925, he
accosted the members of this particular gang and ordered them to stop work, and upon their
refusal he returned home and procured a rifle. Coming back shortly after, he opened fire,
wounded two of their number, and then escaped into the bush. On the following day Mr.
Whiting, the road foreman, travelling back from Natal to his home in a Ford car, was intercepted by the accused on the road and there shot down in cold blood. The action of Sergeant
Greenwood and his officers are worthy of comment in this case, as everything possible was done
to locate Mansfield, their efforts being successful on the following evening, when Constable Smith,
who had Mansfield's home under observation, noticed his going in that direction. I have already
referred to Constable Smith's very cool and prompt action in effecting Mansfield's arrest and
disarming him. Two charges were laid against the accused, one of attempted murder and one
of murder, on which charges he was tried at the Fall Assize at Cranbrook, the jury bringing in
a verdict of " manslaughter " on the more serious crime. Mansfield was sentenced to fifteen
years in the Penitentiary by Mr. Justice W. A. McDonald. The Department has already signified
its intention of entering a stay of proceedings in the case of attempted murder.
Rex vs. Gujar Singh (Murder).—This case arose in the City of Kelowna.* At about 10.30 p.m.
on July 11th, 1925, Tarah Singh, a Hindu, was stabbed near the heart and a blood-vessel in the
neck severed (either of these wounds would have been fatal), causing his death. The accused,
Gujar Singh, endeavoured to escape, but was captured by Provincial Police officers between
Kelowna and Penticton. He was tried at the Vernon Fall Assize, found " guilty" of manslaughter, and sentenced to ten years in the British Columbia Penitentiary by His Lordship
Mr. Justice Morrison.
Rex vs. Fred Cyr (Murder).—On November 25th, 1925, Fred Cyr walked into the Provincial
Police Detachment at Hanceville and confessed to having killed .Alex. Ducharme, a trapper, at
Chilko Lake on November 5th, 1925. According to Cyr's written confession, a dispute occurred
between Ducharme and himself over a trap-line and also concerning Cyr's activities in connection
with a mineral prospect. Sergeant Bowen, of the Yale Police District, was detailed for this
investigation, which necessitated taking the Coroner and jury on a long hazardous trip in the
winter. At Prince George Assize, before His Lordship Mr. Justice Murphy and jury, a verdict
of " not guilty " was brought in and accused discharged accordingly.
Rex vs. Mrs. Mamie Colich (Attempted Murder).—The accused in this case attempted to cut
her husband's throat while he was asleep in bed. She was tried at the New Westminster Assize
on three counts—namely, attempted murder, wounding with, intent to do grievious bodily harm,
and assault. She was found " guilty " on the second count and sentenced to twenty-three months'
imprisonment. The accused, after finding her attempt on her husband's life was unsuccessful,
endeavoured to commit suicide, but in this she was not successful. For this offence she was
sentenced to six months' imprisonment, sentence to run concurrent with the above sentence of
twenty-three months.
Rex vs. Tommy Sampson (Attempted Murder).—The accused, an Indian of the Bridge River
Indian Reserve, Lillooet, was charged with the murder of Peter George Kistemtt, an Indian.
At the Kamloops Spring Assize a " no bill" was returned by the grand jury, but a " true bill"
was brought in on a charge of " shooting with intent to do grievious bodily harm." A verdict
of " not guilty " being returned, Sampson was honourably discharged. The defence maintained
that as the accused mounted his horse his rifle was accidentally discharged.
Big Alex, and Edie (Murder).—These Indians of Liard River, together with Clem, Dan, and
Jimmy Loot, also Indians, were charged at the August Assize in Prince Rupert with the murder Y 14 British Colu.mbia. 1925
of Moccasin Jim, another Indian, on the Liard River in the year 1922. Big Alex, and Edie were
found guilty of " manslaughter," the former being sentenced to five years' and the latter to ten
years' suspended sentence. The three Loots were found " not guilty" and discharged. The
incidents connected with this case were fully dealt with in my last annual report. Briefly, a.
R.C.M.P. patrol commanded by Inspector T. V. Sandys-Wunsch ascertained that Moccasin Jim,
suspected of witchcraft, had been murdered by his fellows and then buried. Following the
matter- up, Inspector Sandys-Wunsch subsequently discovered the body and brought those
concerned to trial.
Frank Bird, Alex. Bird, and Frank Roy (Murder).—These half-breeds were accused of the
murder of Mathew McLean, Indian, near Hazelton.    This case originated on September 13th,
1924, when McLean was reported missing and was last seen alive in company with the accused.
In October, 1925, a skeleton was found in the Skeena River at Salvus and identified as that of
McLean. The three were committed for trial, which, it is expected, Willi take place at the Spring
Assize, 1926, at Prince Rupert.
Rex vs. Faustina Pena (Attempted Murder).—This man picked a quarrel with G. Agarde
at Stewart on June 8th, 1925, in the course of which the latter was stabbed. Pena was committed for trial and at the Assize held in August, 1925, at Prince Rupert was sentenced to four
years' imprisonment.
Gillis Murder Case.—Much public interest was aroused in this case, particularly when the
horrifying circumstances of the murders were brought to light in the trials of the accused,
Owen B. Baker and Harry Sowash, alias Myers. A most complete case was made out for the
Crown against both men, on the strength of which they were both sentenced to hang, and
paid the penalty on January 14th, 1926. A similar sentence was passed on Charles Morris, the
third member of the trio convicted, but this was reduced to life imprisonment on the order of
the Hon. the Minister of Justice. The work of Inspector Cruickshank in connection with this
case was an outstanding feature of the year.
Trouble amongst Chinese at Port Moody.—On May 19th, 1925, a shooting affray took place
at Port Moody, due apparently to internal " Tong " fueds amongst certain factions of the Chinese
of the Lower Mainland, and resulting in several fatalities. Although prosecutions were instituted
against certain Chinese, after considerable investigation-work by the local Police and this Department no convictions were obtained.
Rex vs. Charles Henry alias Sonny White (Murder).—In this case one Frank Rosso, a storekeeper at North Vancouver, was found brutally murdered, and a strong case was built up, chiefly
on circumstantial evidence through the efforts of Constable D. C. Campbell, of the Vancouver
Detachment, and his bloodhounds, pointing to the accused, White, a half-breed, as the murderer.
On October 26th, 1925, a verdict of " guilty " was rendered by an Assize Court jury and the
prisoner sentenced to hang on January 14th, 1926. By order of the Court of Appeal a new trial
has been ordered in this case, to come up at the Vancouver Spring Assize.
Rex vs. Harold Berentsen (Murder).—A record in bringing a case before the Courts was
obtained in this prosecution. It arose from an alleged feud of long standing between two
members of the crew of an ocean-going steamer, which culminated in one of the two being stabbed
to death while the ship was at the Port of Vancouver. In order to allow the ship to proceed
on its way, special efforts were made to expedite the preliminary hearing and trial. The outcome
was almost a foregone conclusion from the commencement, and Berentsen was found " guilty "
and sentenced to hang on January 18th, 1926, the crime having been committed on October 28th,
1925. The sentence has since been reduced to life imprisonment by order of the Hon.'the
Minister of Justice, a decision which, owing to certain extenuating circumstances made apparent
at the trials, has met with general public approval.
Rex vs. Chang Sing (Murder).—This man was tried on a charge of murdering David Chang
Lew, one of the most prominent of his fellow-countrymen in British Columbia, at the Chop Suey
House, Pender Street, Vancouver, in September, 1924. At the Spring Assize Chang Sing was
acquitted.
Rex vs. Charlie Walkus (Indian) (Murder).—A charge of fatally shooting was laid against
the above, but the Police later recovering the body of Tommy Henderson, Indian, near Rivers
Inlet, this was changed to murder, and a special investigator, Dr. G. F. Curtis, was sent to make
a second inquest.   He found that there had been an altercation and deduced that a rifle in the 16 Geo. 5       Report of the Superintendent of Provincial Police. Y 15
hands of Walkus had gone off accidentally.    Walkus was subsequently acquitted by the Assize
Court jury at Vancouver.
Rex vs. N*eganie (Indian) (Manslaughter).—The accused when drinking with other Indians
at Chesacut Lake Reserve, Chilcotin, was alleged to have struck Louie Johnson, an elderly Indian,
from which blow or kick Johnson never recovered. On June 9th, 1925, before His Lordship
Mr. Justice W. A. MacDonald at Prince Rupert Assizes, a verdict of " not guilty " was brought
in and prisoner released.    The witnesses in this case were most unsatisfactory.
Robbeby with Violence.
Rex vs. Ross Watson.—This was a case arising out of the Nanaimo bank robbery, which took
place in December, 1924. Accused appeared for trial at the Nanaimo Spring Assize. The jury
failed to agree and the accused was kept in custody until the Nanaimo Fall Assize. On November
2nd, 1925, accused appeared for his second trial on this charge, and the jury found him " not
guilty."   He was thereupon discharged.
Rex vs. Stone, alias Rossi (Robbery with Violence).—This was a case arising out of the
Nanaimo bank robbery, and the accused was the first person to be punished for participation in
that crime. He appeared before Stipendiary Magistrate C. H. Beevor-Potts in the City Police
Court, Nanaimo, on August 27th, 1925, and upon pleading " guilty " was sentenced to eight years'
imprisonment in the Penitentiary and twenty lashes.
Rex vs. Antone Moresco, alias Alfred Castro (Robbery with Violence).—The accused was
charged with robbery with violence in connection with the Royal Bank robbery at Nanaimo,
which took place in December, 1924. He appeared in the City Police Court on October 16th,
1925, at Nanaimo, and Magistrate C. H. Beevor-Potts sentenced him to eight years in the
Penitentiary with twenty lashes, he having entered a plea of " guilty."
Rex vs. William Bagley (Robbery with Violence).—This was another charge arising out
of the Nanaimo bank robbery in December, 1924. On November 5th, 1925, William Bagley
appeared for trial on the charge of robbery with violence, and upon being found " guilty " was
sentenced to ten years in tbe Penitentiary with twenty lashes.
Rex vs. Ward (Robbery with Violence).—In this case the accused, in company with another
man, entered the premises of the Imperial Bank of Canada at Creston at 2 o'clock in the
afternoon, held up the manager and his assistant, robbed the safe of approximately $7,500, and
left the premises. Some bystanders, seeing something wrong, raised the alarm, and a posse,
including Constable McLaren and a number of citizens, took up the pursuit, the bandits using
their guns freely to avoid capture. Some of the citizens ran across one of these men before night
and effected his arrest, the other man making his escape. He was particularly well aided in this
by reason of a dense fog coupled with smoke from forest fires. Inspector Dunwoody arrived
there in company with Constables Mackenzie and King that evening and careful search was
kept up for two days and two nights, but the same weather conditions still prevailing it was
impossible to get any trace of the man. It is assumed that this man got across the International
Boundary, as a camp aferwards discovered showed that the bandits had made preparations for
going out by Port Hill. Ward, .the man in custody, was sentenced to eight years and the lash
by His. Honour Judge Forin.
City Hall and Capital Theatre Robberies, Vancouver.—Although these offences occurred in
1923, it was not until this year that the perpetrators have been brought to justice. As a result
of some good work by the Detective Branch of the Vancouver City Police, C. C. Thompson, alias
Hollywood; Frank de Paula, alias Machiel, alias Pelegrini; and John Howell, alias Howard,
were all committed for trial, and found " guilty " in connection with the city pay-roll robbery
of over $76,000. The two first named were also found " guilty " of the Capital Theatre robbery
of $2,680, each receiving sentences of fourteen years on the first charge and twelve years on the
second, the same to run concurrently. A stay of proceedings was entered in Howell's case as
he was already serving an unfinished sentence in the Walla Walla Penitentiary, Washington.
Other Cases.
Rex vs. Frank Mclsaac (Assault with Intent to Rob).—A complaint was made by telephone -
by Mr. Duckering, a merchant of Hope, B.C., that a man had attempted to hold him up in his
store.    Prompt response was given to the call by Constable Hazelton, Hope Detachment.    Two
men were found in the store whom this officer had ordered out of town two hours previously. Y 16 British Columbia. 1925
A third man, named Mclsaac, who had been seen in their company a short time prior to the
holdup, was also arrested and identified by Mr. Duekering. On January Sth, 1926, Mclsaac was
found " guilty " and sentenced to one year's imprisonment, leniency being shown liim as he was
under the influence of liquor when he committed the offence.
Rex vs. Steve Bandich (Wounding with Intent).—On September 17th, 192:5, the accused
attacked and twice stabbed a fellow-Russian whilst they were passengers from Anyox to Prince
Rupert on a C.N.R. steamer.    Bandich was sentenced to three years' imprisonment.
Rex vs. Arthur Stewart (Indian) (Wounding).—Stewart attacked another Indian at Port
Essington with an axe, causing him to lose the sight of one eye. Owing to the provocation by
the injured man a sentence of one year was imposed.
Rex vs. Arthur Bellos (Assault occasioning Bodily Harm).—This man, of Prince George,
struck another man over the head with some heavy material, and was sentenced to two and
a half years' imprisonment.    This case is now pending appeal.
Rex vs. Alexander Bigoff (Forgery).—This man forged three cheques at Stewart in January,
1925, by using the name of his cousin. Sentenced to two years on each charge, to run con-
currrently.
Rex vs. Joseph Oscar Williams (Forgery).—This man passed two forged cheques on merchants of Smithers during September, 1925. Sentenced to two years on each charge, to run
concurrently.
Rex vs. William Keaist (Seduction).—On October 28th, 1925, William Keaist appeared for
trial at the Nanaimo Pall Assize, charged with seduction. The jury were unable to agree and
were therefore discharged. On November 10th accused was again tried on this charge. Again
the jury failed to reach an agreement, whereupon His Lordship Mr. Justice Murphy released
Keaist on his own recognizance to come up for trial when called upon. The case was traversed
to the next Assize.
Rex vs. Richard Harry Ainsworth (Procuring).—This case arose in the City of Vernon,
where the accused had rented a house for himself and his alleged wife; they also had a young
girl with them. At the Vernon Pall Assize accused was sentenced to ten years' imprisonment
by His Lordship Mr. Justice Morrison.
Rex vs. Henry Higginbottom (Seduction).—The accused in this case is an elderly man who
resided on a ranch in Empire Valley, near Clinton, with his half-breed wife and daughter,
together with their ward, Louise Carrigan. He had misconducted himself with his ward for a
number of years. At Prince George Assize he was sentenced by His Lordship Mr. Justice
Murphy to one year's imprisonment, leniency being shown him on account of his age..
The Doukhobor Situation.
This report would not be complete without some reference to the Doukhobor situation, which
reached a climax about the beginning of 1925. The school question has always been a bone of
contention with these people, who live on the community system; every effort having been made
by both the Police and School Departments to make these people observe the law, but with little
success.
Some few years ago the more rabid fanatics began burning the schools, and in February,
1925, practically the last standing school was burnt. It was quite apparent then that something
must be done to make the Doukhobors observe the law, and, accordingly, School Inspector Sheffield
and Inspector Dunwoody were specially commissioned to deal with the situation. It is already
a matter of record the action they took in seizing the property of these people in order to meet
a fine of $3,500 which had heen imposed on them for non-attendance of the children at school.
How.pregnant with results these efforts were is clearly shown by the fact that the Doukhobors
since that time have rebuilt the burnt schools and to-day the accommodation is taxed to capacity.
This condition of affairs is one, I think, on which we can very well congratulate ourselves.
A better spirit now seems to prevail amongst the Doukhobors, and I have reasonable grounds
to believe that when their leader, Peter Veregin, Jr., arrives from Russia, the question of the
observance of other laws under the " Vital Statistics Act," etc., can be successfully dealt with. 16 Geo. 5        Report of the Superintendent of Provincial Police.
Y 17
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APPENDIX V.
LIST OF OFFICERS OF THE B.C. POLICE, WITH DETACHMENTS.
Headquarters.
Superintendent and Provincial
Game Warden Colonel J. H. McMullin Victoria.
Assistant Superintendent W. Owen Vancouver.
Sub-Inspector G. A. Hood Victoria.
Constable C. Clark	
 H. H. Clarke         „
„         J. C. Lowe Vancouver.
Probationer W. H. Greenwood Victoria.
Criminal Investigation Branch.
Inspector F. Cruickshank Vancouver.
Constable J. P. M. Hannah        „
 J. W. Cruickshank        ,,
Finger-print and, Record Branch.
Sergeant W. J. Voisey H.Q., Victoria.
Constable R. Peachey  „  .
„ C. O. Ockenden  „
Motor Licence Branch.
Sergeant W. H. Handley H.Q., Victoria.
Constable G. L. Asquith  „
 F. E. L. Philp	
Game Branch.
Inspector M. Furber H.Q., Victoria.
Constable T. H. M. Conly  „
" A " Division.
Divisional Headquarters—
Officer Commanding ..Inspector T. W. S. Parsons A'ictoria.
Victoria District—
Sergeant R. Owens Dist. II.Q., Victoria.
Corpora] J. Russell Duncan.
Constable W. V. Shepherd	
„         R. Godwin Ganges.
„         W. J. Hatcher Victoria.
 R. Meadows	
 J. M. Bella	
„         R. Harvey        „
 C. C. Jacklin	
 JM. Kelly	
„         H. Bishop Gulf Islands (launch).
Nanaimo District—
Staff-Sergeant A. T. Stephenson Dist. H.Q., Nanaimo.
Constable W. J. M. Telfer	
 H. N. Wood Alberni.
„         S. W. Dawson Campbell River.
„ R. L. Matthews .Courtenay.
,,         J. A. Anderson Cumberland. 16 Geo. 5       Report op the Superintendent op Provincial Police. Y 2c
"A" Division—Continued.
Nanaimo District—Continued.
Corporal A. D. I. Mustart Nanaimo.
Constable . F. E. Bradner         „
 G. F. Elliott	
„         G. Williams Port Alice.
„ J. A. Smith Alberni.
Game Branch, " A " Division—
Game Constable G. L. Ewing Duncan.
„  G. B. Simpson... Lake Cowichan.
„  R. Gidley Victoria.
,,  A. P. Cummins        ,,
„  R. M. Stewart Comox.
„  A. Monks Courtenay.
„  R. Marshall ......Nanaimo.
" B " Division.
Divisional Headquarters—
Officer Commanding Inspector W. R. Dumvoody Nelson.
Divisional Clerk Constable C. K. McKenzie      „
Boundary District—
Sergeant J. A. Fraser Dist. H.Q., Penticton.
Constable C. H. Martin Coalmont.
„         D. A. Macdonald Fairview.
„         G. F. Killam Grand Forks.
„        A. E. Spall Keremeos.
„         W. B. Stewart Greenwood.
„         J. J. McConnell Penticton.
„         R. C. B. Foote Princeton.
Fernie District—
Sergeant G. H. Greenwood Dist. H.Q., Fernie.
Constable H. S. Clark .Corbin.
„ S. S. Saunders Cranbrook.
 A. J. Smith Elko.
„        G. D. Mead .Fernie.
„         E. T. Davies      „
„  J. Itenner Kimberley.
„  R. S. Nelson  „
 F. Brindley Natal.
 F. G. Brown Waldo.
„         G. W. Donahoe Wardner.
 .G. C. Sharpe Yahk.
North-east Kootenay District—
Corporal F. Fryer Dist. H.Q., Golden.
Constable J. P. Green  „ „
„         A. E. Vachon Athalmer.
 C.   H. O'Halloran Revelstoke.
West Kootenay District—
Staff-Sergeant E. Gammon Dist. H.Q., Nelson.
Constable H. W. King Nelson.
 H. McLaren Creston.
 C. F. Oland Kaslo.
„        P. W. Jupp : Nakusp.
„         W. H. Laird New Denver.
 J. Urquhart Rossland.
 W. R. Henley Salmo.
Corporal J. F. Johnston .Trail.
3 Y 26
British
Columbia.
1925
Game Branch, " B " Division
Game Constable	
Divisional Headquarters—
Officer Commanding	
Divisional Clerk	
Kamloops District—
Sergeant	
Constable	
Corporal	
Constable	
Lillooet District—
Corporal	
Constable	
Vernon District—
Sergeant	
Constable	
" B " Division-
..G. H. Soles	
-Continued.
Athalmer.
Canal Flats.
Cranbrook.
Elk Prairie.
Golden.
....Penticton.
..D. Greenwood....
..G. Thomas	
.1. J. Brown	
F. H. Butwell....
R. M. Robertson
"C"
Inspector W. L.
Constable E. Pa
...W. Kier	
.JR. Pritchard	
Div
Fei
:ter
ISION.
nie	
son	
Kamloops.
—       ,,
....Dist. H.Q., Kamloops.
.....Chase.
..W. E. Giles	
A. W. Mable	
-F. Badman	
Kamloops.
Merritt.
Mount Olie.
.A. W. Collins	
...F. W. Gallagher
.JR. H. Tebb	
...H. C. Clarke	
..G. C. Mortimer..
..G. A. Johnson....
J   M. Smith
Quesnel.
....Dist. II.Q.. Vernon.
Enderby.
Kelowna.
Sicamous.
....Dist. H.Q., Ashcroft.
Yale District—
Sergeant	
Constable	
»        	
>t       	
.P. Pentecost	
..C. F. Kearns	
..G. F. Bradley	
31. Gorman	
                     .J                                 ».
....Clinton.
.1). A. Hazelton...
T. Higginbottom
..W. Greenwood...
A. T. Regan
Division.
W. E. V. Spiller
Ponder	
Hope.
Lillooet.
....Lytton.
North Bend.
Kelowna.
Barkerville.
Hanceville.
Likelv.
Lillooet.
Lumby.
Prince Rupert.
—           tt
Dist. H.Q., Prince George.
Giscome.
Red Pass.
MeBride
Game Branch, " C " Division
Came Constable	
tt               	
tt               	
jj               	
Divisional Headquarters—
Officer Commanding ..
Divisional Clerk	
Fort George District—
Corporal	
Constable	
._R. D. Sullivan...
...G. F. Turner	
...Ian McRae	
...II. P. Hughes	
...G. D. McKenzie.
.J. A. Quesnel	
"D"
Acting-Inspector
Constable R. P.
..W. A. Walker	
H. L. McKennev
.A. F. Sinclair	
..S. Service
. G. H. Clark	
Prince George. 16 Geo. 5        Report of
the Superintendent op Prov
incial Police.                Y
27
Fort George District—Oonti
Constable	
" D " Division—Continued,
nued.
... W. A. Huggard	
Prince George.
—           >t
...A. H. Silk	
...M. Martin	
Hazelton District—
Corporal	
Constable	
Peace River District—
Corporal	
Constable	
Prince Rupert District—
Sergeant	
Constable	
...IL H. Mansell....
....W. J. Service	
.   . Vanderhoof.
 Dist. H.Q., Smithers.
....P. Carr	
....S. Cline	
Burns Lake.
 Hazelton.
...A. Fairbairn	
....W. A. S. Duncan
—G. C. Barber	
...A. McNeil	
...AV. Smith	
Telkwa.
Dist. H.Q., Pouce Coupe.
Fort St. John.
Dist. H.Q., Prince Rupert.
 Anyox.
?f        	
Game Branch, " D " Divisio
Game Corporal	
Game Constable	
Divisional  Headquarters—
Officer Commanding	
Divisional Clerk	
Vancouver District—
Constable	
Corporal	
Constable	
Sergeant	
...R. Webster	
....J. A. Williams.—
....G. E. Ashton	
Atlin.
Bella Coola.
Dease Lake.
Masset.
Ocean Falls.
Port Essington.
Prince Rupert.
....C. Kench	
...A. Dryden	
...JR. Gibson	
...F. D. Markland.
....T. A. Camm	
...G. A. Wyman	
...J. H. Smith
....F. Islip	
....J. P. Eggleshaw.
n.
...T. Van Dyk	
...C. D. Muirhead..
...F. Forfar	
...0. L. Hall	
"E"
Staff-Sergeant S
Constable B. Me
...W. H. Hadley	
 Stewart.
Division.
North	
Terrace.
Prince Rupert.
Finlav Forks.
Hudson Hope.
Smithers.
*
Vancouver.
Alert Bay.
Powell River.
Rivers Inlet.
Squamish.
Vancouver.
...A. C. Sutton	
...A. MacCIean	
...A. W. Stone	
...J. W. Chadwick.
— 0. AVilkie	
....S. Marshall	
Vancouver District (Motor
Sergeant	
Constable	
...R. A. Sims	
...T. R. Baker	
F. W. Russell-Ri
...A. J. Collison	
Licence Branch) —
....G. H. Jennings...
....E. McArthur	
 J. R. Shannon....
...H. E. Baker	
gby	
Dist. H.Q., Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Miss Wade	
• Y 28 British Columbia. 1925
" E " Division—Continued.
New Westminster District—
Sergeant J. Macdonald Dist. H.Q., New Westminster.
Constable F. Broughton ..Abbotsford.
Corporal G. J. Duncan Mission.
Constable M. J. Condon      „
Corporal J. Kelly, New Westminster.
Constable .C. H. DawTson  „
 J. S. Pilling	
Game Branch, " E " Division—
Game Constable J. G. Cunningham Vancouver.
 H. C. Pyke Chilliwack.
„  D. C. Campbell Edmonds.
„  W. H. Cameron Ladner.
„  P. Corrigan Matsqui.
 E. G. Stedham Pitt Meadows.
„  J. Murray , Port Moody.
,.  W. Clark Vancouver.
 W. V. Fenton Langley.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F.  Banfield,  rrinter to the King's Most Excellent  Majesty.
1827.
S25-627-7403

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