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TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1927

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 TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PROVINCIAL   INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOR BOYS
OP the province of
BEITISH COLUMBIA
APRIL 1ST, 1925, TO MARCH 31ST, 1926
printed by
authority op the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1926.  To His Honour Kobert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of tlte Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-second Annual Eeport
of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1926.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June, 1926.
WILLIAM SLOAN,
Provincial Secretary. Provincial Industrial School for Boys,
Port Coquitlam, B.C., May 28th, 1926.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Eeport of the Provincial
Industrial School for Boys, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1925, to March 31st,
1926.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
DAVID B. BBANKIN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. William Sloan, Provincial Secretary.
J. L. White, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Brankin, David B., Superintendent. Bkankin, Mrs. M., Matron.
Olakke, Miss A. D., Book-keeper, Stenographer, and Commercial Teacher.
Holland, Miss A., Nurse and Assistant Supervisor. Henderson, J., Tailor Instructor.
Ayling, N. C, Carpenter Instructor and Musical Director.
Osbobn, J., Shoe-making Instructor. McDowell, J., Agricultural Instructor.
Wells, Miss W., Senior School Teacher. Muteie, Miss J. A., Junior School Teacher.
Hughes, E., Chief Attendant. Scott, W. J., Attendant, Poultryman and Blacksmith.
Tbeeise, W. J., Nightwatchman. Smith, E., Plumber and Engineer.  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Twenty-second Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Boys, Coquitlam, B.C., covering the fiscal year 1925-26.
It is somewhat difficult to express, through purely statistical data, the amount of work that
has really been accomplished this year by both staff and boys and only those who were conversant with conditions a few years ago and who know them to-day can appreciate what wonderful
improvements and changes have taken place at Biscoq.
During the year we had considerable trouble with runaways, nineteen in all having got away
for periods from three hours to four months. This, to persons not familiar with the type of boy
we handle may seem large, but to those acquainted with our honour merit system and the
facilities granted to boys at this institution, it is remarkably low.
It must also he remembered that every boy sent here was beyond his parents, teachers, relatives, and Court officials. In many cases the spirit of the wanderer had taken full possession of'
him. In the case of ten of these runaways, they were boys over 17 years of age, who a few
years ago would not have been sentenced to this institution, but would have been in the penitentiary or prison farm, but the raising of the age from 16 to 18 years made them eligible.
Again, it must be remembered, we are running a semi-cottage system here for boys which
necessitates their marching to a central building for meals. This gives the runaway type of boy
a glorious chance suddenly to jump out of the ranks in the darkness of the morning or during
a fog and get into the bush and be lost. This has happened to us and in one instance four boys
on their way to breakfast with thirty-three others in charge of one man suddenly made a dash
for the bush and three of them got away. There were some adverse press comments about this
at the time but not a word of praise was given to the thirty-three boys who stood their ground
and made no attempt to follow after the others. One of the three who made his getaway was
killed in beating his way by train. This young man had on eight occasions, before coming to us,
ran away from home and travelled by the same method. His parents were unable to do any-
. thing with him and exonerated us from all blame.
In the case of six others, these were boys who ran away because I insisted upon them
continuing attending school because of their age or backwardness in. class-work, so they thought
by playing hookey it would make me change my mind, but it did not.
I am of the opinion that were there less sympathizers and conniving adults, boys would soon
find out it did not pay to become and remain fugitives.
Population.
On roll March 31st, 1925   135
Commitments during the year and sentenced     59
Commitments and held for trial only       3
■—197
Releases during the year      58
Deaths        1
Transferred to Oakalla       2
Boys released after trial       3
Transferred to Essondale       1
  65
Total on roll March 31st, 1926   132 I 8
British Columbia.
List or Boys
in School as at March 31st, 1926
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence in
B.C. previous
to being
admitted to
School.
Residence in
Canada previous to being
admitted to
School.
618
Years.
8
9
15%
10
6
13
18
14
12
14
3
11
12
15%
16
5
15
15
8
16   '
11
12
12
14
5
10
15
15
6
12
12
14
6
10
9
2
11
15
15
14
2
2
14
16
15
15
4
2
3 mos.
10
12
11
12
8
15
o mos.
10
10
15
17
14
10
Years.
12
628
9
633
15%
642
'Maresville,  U.S.A    ..    ...
10
652
15
657
14
662
Rossland, B.C	
18
678
14
690
Victoria,  B.C.
12
691
Michel, B.C	
14
694
3
700
11
703
St. Eugene Mission, B.C	
12
704
15%
705
Indian	
16
708
6
714
Lytton, B.C	
13
716
15
717
10
718
Pt. Essington	
Indian    	
16
719
11
720
Walla Walla	
12
722
12
723
14
724
725
Swede	
10
726
New Westminster	
15
727
English	
15
728
6
720
St. Eugene Mission	
12
732
17
733
14
734
6
735
736
England	
English..  	
Canadian-Scotch __	
10
9
737
Taber, Alta.
10
741
11
742
Trail, B.C.
15
'743
England	
English	
16
744
English	
14
745
Scotch	
0
746
Cobalt, Ont.
16
747
748
Saskatchewan	
Victoria, B.C.
Russian	
14
16
749
15
750
15
751
15
752
English 	
2
753
17
754
10
West Summerland	
12
756
11
757
12
759
8
761
Victoria,  B.C.
15
762
Canadian	
14
763
Patric,  Scot	
10
764
10
765
Comox, B.C.                  	
15
766
Comox   B C.
17
768
14
769
10 16 Geo. 5
Industrial School for Boys.
List of Boys in School as at March 31st, 1926:—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence in
B.C. previous
to being
admitted to
School.
Residence in
Canada previous to being
admitted to
School.
770
Years.
14
10
16
14
5 mos.
3 mos.
11
4
15
5
13
4
13
8 mos.
13
1
13%
isy2
15
ii
15
2
2
11
16
5 mos.
11%
17
3
14
12
14
18
14
5
14
9
13
6
6
16
15
10
14
14
15
4y2
8
11
13 %
o
13
5 mos.
15
13 y2
12
15
16
15
7
8
131/2
Years.
14
T71
10
773
1(1
774
14
776
Scotch      	
16
778
Tofino,  B.C	
11
780
10
781
Moricetown	
15
782
783
Ft. William, Ont.
13
784
4
785
13
786
14
787
13
788
17
789
Alberta	
is y2
151/,
790
Manitoba	
791
15
792
11
'793
15
794
Melville, Sask	
15
795
14
796
England	
11
797
16
798
18
799
11%
17
802
Penticton,  B.C	
803
English	
13
804
Grand Forks, B.C..
14
805
Nelson, B.C	
Polish	
12
806
Prince Rupert, B.C	
English	
14
807
18
808
14
809
English	
8
810
16
811
Porcupine  Hills  	
Swede	
16
812
17
813
6
814
6
815
Canadian	
16
817
Trail,  B.C	
15
818
U.S.A ,..
10
819
14
820
Vancouver, B.C	
English-Canadian	
14
821
Chilliwack, B.C	
Indian	
13
822
Scotch  	
12
8->3
Irish.
13
824
11
825
Scotch  	
Canadian	
131/2
10
826
827
•    13
828
Russia	
131/2
13
8'?9
Alberni	
Indian   	
Indian           	
830
831
British Columbia	
British Columbia	
13%
12
832
Victoria, B.C.
English	
Canadian ... 	
Scotch	
Welsh
15
833
834
15
14
835
Wales.	
836
Ryelander, U.S.A....
American	
8
837
13% I 10
British Columbia.
1926
List of Boys in School as at March 31st, 1926—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence in
B.C. previous
to being
admitted to
School.
Residence in
Canada previous to being
admitted to
School.
838
England 	
England	
Years.
5
6
15
11
12    9 mos.
15
15
Years.
839
6
840
15
841
11
842
843
Duncan,  B.C	
English 	
12    9 mos.
15
844
England	
English..	
15
Where they were born.
British Columbia   66
Alberta       4
Saskatchewan      6
Manitoba     6
Ontario      5
Nova Scotia     1
Scotland      7
England     15
Ireland    2
Wales  1
U.S.A  14
China   1
Russia   3
Sweden    1
Total ....132
Why' they came to us.
Theft   69
Incorrigibility  33
B. E. & S  23
Receiving       2
Forgery      1
Indecent acts      3
Drunkenness        1
Total 132
Places of Apprehension.
Vancouver  30
North Vancouver   3
South Vancouver   3
Victoria   25
Nanaimo   8
Trail  5
Cranbrook  6
Millardville  1
Nicola    1
Kelowna   1
Prince Rupert   5
Michel  1
Smithers   1
Creston    1
Alberni     3
Chilliwack     1
Point Grey   2
Powell River   1
Burnaby    4
Nelson   2
Lytton   1
Vernon     4
Prince George   2
Huntingdon    2
Port Coquitlam  1
Summerland  2
Esquimalt   1
New Westminster    7
Cumberland   1
Terrace   2
Penticton     3
Cloverdale    1
Keremeos    1
Total 132 16 Geo. 5 Industrial School for Boys.
Length of Sentences.
Section 16, " Juvenile Delinquents Act, 1908 "  24
2 years  41
3 „       11
4 „  8
5 „      2
Indefinite and undefined   46
Total '. 132
Ages of Boys in Institution as at March 31st, 1926.
10 years      2 16 years   23
11 „           4 17      ,.           9
12 ,     S IS      „        14
13 ,  11 19      .,           5
14 „        20 	
15 „        36 Total   132
Average age, 15.
Religious Statistics.
Roman Catholics  31 Russian Church      2
Methodists  26 Christian Science      2
Presbyterians     26 Lutheran Church      2
Church of England   21 Methodist Episcopal      2
Baptist     10 Missions     2
Salvation Army      3 Pentecostal League      1
Greek Catholics     2 ■—
Seventh Day Adventists      2 Total 132
Every facility is given a boy to practise his own form of religion. Services are held for
Protestants every Sunday afternoon in the Auditorium, the local ministers and Salvation Army
officers conducting on alternate Sundays. Roman Catholics' services are held by a priest from
Port Moody. In addition to these services, morning and evening prayers are conducted daily and
grace is said before and after each meal.
Medical and Dental Reports.
The following are the reports of our Medical Officer, Dr. Stanley Paulin, and our Dental
Surgeon, Dr. Emery Jones, and they clearly show that everything possible is done to remove
physical disabilities and to make and keep our boys healthy and strong.
Medical Report.
" During the year ending March 31st, 1926, the general health of the boys has been good.
Of infectious diseases there have been one case of mumps and seven cases of severe influenza.
One case of influenza was complicated by lobar pneumonia (with recovery). There was one
death in the case of a boy injured while attempting to make good his escape by climbing on to a
freight train.
" Of other disabilities not requiring admission to hospital there were pleurisy, 1; quinsy, 1;
subacute appendicitis, 1; asthma, 2; scabies, 10; fractured arm, 1; severe boils, 5; severe
colds, 25;  painful hip, 1;  besides the average of lesser complaints.
" Admissions to hospital were as follows :—
Acute appendicitis     1 Circumcision   3
Inguinal hernia      1 Perinephric abscess (nephrectomy) 1
Furunculosis of ear    1 Gonorrhoea (contracted before ad-
Hydrocele      1 mission)  1
Tonsillectomy      5 Railway accident (death)   1
" There was also one admission to the Essondale Mental Hospital. I 12 British Columbia. 1926
" Among the sixty new boys the following conditions were noted on admission:—
Defective vision of varying degree     n
Chronic discharge from ear    2
One or more carious teeth   14
Enlarged tonsils  13
Adenoids      3
Previous heart disease      2
Phimosis     3
Flat feet (varying in degree)    6
Chronic varicocele      1
Old infantile paralysis with shortening and atrophy of thumb      1
Deformity from previous fracture, dislocation at elbow      1
"(Signed)    Stanley Paulin, M.D."
Dental Report.
" On undertaking the duties of dentist at the end of July I found the work was far behind
because of there being no regular dentist during the previous seven months. Therefore, up to
the present I have been kept very busy during my regular days at the school, in the relief of
pain and the absolutely emergent work. Now that I have that part of the work in better
condition I hope to devote more time to preventive dentistry.
" During the past eight months I have found it necessary to remove 54 abscessed or badly
diseased teeth. I have administered local anaesthetic 64 times for the relief of pain, have examined
and made dental charts of the mouths of 60 of the boys; inserted 22 fillings and 4 pulp caps,
treated and filled the roots of 3 infected teeth, treated 8 cases for preventing caries, and treated
one case of minor fracture of the maxilla.
" I trust that the work done will greatly improve the general health of the boys.
" Respectfully submitted,
"(Signed)    Emery Jones, D.D.S."
Educational.
In our class-rooms the curriculum as authorized by the Department of Education at Victoria is carried out, and we teach from first primer to Entrance.
This is quite a large range to cover in a school like ours when it is remembered that nearly
all of our boys required individual instruction owing to being backward for their ages, and
through not having attended school regularly before coming to us.
Appended are extracts from the teachers' reports, also comment made by the Inspector of
Schools:—
Division I.—" We have at present twenty-four boys on our roll classified as follows : Grade
VI., 8; Grade VII., 12; Grade VIIL, 4; during the year eight boys were transferred to trades
and three went home. There has been continual improvement in conduct and application to
work. The moral tone is much better. The increased honesty and self-control displayed by
nearly all in my class-room is worthy of mention and much of this is due to the co-operation of
the staff.
"(Signed)    Winnifred Wells."
Division II.—"We have at present twenty-two boys on our register classified as follows:
Grade II., 2;   Grade III., 6;   Grade IV., 5;   Grade V., 5;   Grade VI., 4.
" Seven new pupils were received during the year and seven boys left school for trades or
home.
" A general improvement in writing and neatness of work is marked and a number of boys
have made special progress in art, map-drawing, and arithmetic.
"(Signed)     Jean Mutrie."
Inspector's Report.
" Yesterday I spent the day in the two divisions of your school and am pleased to be able
to inform you that conditions are favourable and progress is definite.
" At the time of my visit forty-six pupils were enrolled and forty-four of these were in
attendance. 16 Geo. 5 Industrial School for Boys. I 13
" The class-rooms are bright, sanitary, and well suited for the special set of circumstances
under which teachers and pupils are working.
" Equipment is, in general, suitable, but more modern silent readers are much needed if
progress in this most important subject is to reach its maximum. Coming from all parts of the
Province and from environments and influences which in many cases have caused a clash with
constituted law and order, these groups are far from homogeneous, and as their stay under your
supervision and control is usually of comparatively short duration, the matter of individual
tuition is of utmost importance. If they leave your school with an interest in informative reading and an ability to read with a good degree of speed and comprehension their future possibilities for self-education are greatly increased. In this connection an increase in equipment is most
necessary.
" The quality of instruction shows satisfactory improvement, and your teachers are well
suited for the difficult work they are doing.
" Discipline is better than one would expect considering the restless nature of the pupils.
" The influence of the class-room on the mental and moral rehabilitation of these boys will
certainly justify the hearty support of your department.
"(Signed)    E. G. Daniels,
" Inspector of Schools."
Commercial Course.
At the present time there is only one pupil in this class studying shorthand, typewriting, and
general office-work, two others having been returned home during the year. The boys have only
a very limited time for study, and after taking all things into consideration the progress made is
very satisfactory.
During the year the sum of $250 was spent for stationery, books, etc., supplied to our classrooms for educational purposes.
WORK ACCOMPLISHED BY DEPARTMENTS.
Tailoring Section.
The following list of work done in this workshop will clearly show that our boys are well
clothed and that a full recognition is given to the old adage " that a stitch in time saves nine."
Credits.
Value of new clothing (material and time)—
Overalls, 552 pairs  $831 00
Tweed pants, 50 pairs      173 00
Uniform coats, C        90 00
Uniform pants, 5        35 00
White coats, 16        32 00
White pants, 6         9 CO
Tweed coats, 2         6 00
Carpenter's aprons, 5      10 00
 $1,186 00
Value of new work for other departments  (time only) —
Bed-ticks, 139  $ 69 50
Ladies' dresses, 18       30 00
Curtains for Auditorium, 4         6 00
Picture-screens, 2         4 50
Sheets, 259       59 25
Table-cloths, 21        5 00
Calf-blankets, 2         5 00
Pillow-covers, 34       10 00
White aprons, 37      26 00
Concert clothes       38 00
      253 25
Carried forward $1,439 25 Credits—Continued.
Brought, forward  $1,439 25
Repairs (general) —
Overalls repaired, 646 pairs   $229 00
Uniforms repaired, 52      55 00
Mackinaws repaired, 40       40 00
Uniforms pressed, 50       50 00
Suits pressed, 16       16 00
Pants pressed, 24          7 50
Miscellaneous repairs      224 00
      621 50
$2,060 75
Debits.
Material, etc., used—
Cottonade   $492 75
Drill   193 80
Buckles and buttons, etc  7 60
Silicia     31 05
Tweed  107 50
Khaki material   46 75
Duck     22 99
Denim, khaki ....*.  3 30
Scissors, etc  39 75
$945 49
Shoemaking and Repairing Section.
We find that healthy boys are heavy on shoe-leather, as the following list of new boots made
and repairs to ones shows:—
New boots made—
148 pairs    $1,035 00
3 pairs  (medical)    30 00
 $1,065 00
Boots repaired, 1,218 pairs    1,915 70
Miscellaneous repairs        22* 00
$3,002 70
Shoe-findings and replacements     1,359 27
In addition to the above, considerable minor repairs to belts, straps, and harness were done
during the year.
Carpentering Section.
During the year this workshop has to its credit the erection of a new bull-pen and corrals;
addition to piggery and poultry-houses; cribbing for swimming-tank; fencing around baseball
grounds and tennis-court; a number of wooden gates and fences for farm; stage fixtures for
Auditorium; considerable picket fences; manure-pits; window screens and sashes for cold-
frames, besides repairs to lockers and doors.
Engineering and Electrical Section.
In addition to the regular work of attending to the heating and lighting systems, this workshop installed a new water system in the swimming-tank;  placed drinking-fountains on Central
Avenue;   a new water system into barns and gardens;   installed lighting system in blacksmith-
shop and kept radio, ice-making machine, and furnaces working smoothly.
Blacksmith Section.
This workshop is used chiefly to do minor repairs to farm machinery  and implements,
rehandling shovels, sharpening pick-axes, making bolts, and the hundred-and-one things requiring
attention in an institution of this kind. 16 Geo. 5 Industrial School for Boys. T 15
Paint Section.
This workshop has to its credit the painting and decorating of the Farmer's cottage, fences,
whitewashing and tarring roofs, etc.
Garage.
This section is one which appeals very much to a number of our boys and there is no
difficulty whatever in getting drivers, as the majority of our boys are committed for auto-stealing
and know cars from the well-known to the latest models.
We do all our own minor repairs and cleaning of cars, which means a considerable saving in a
year. Our total yearly cost for the upkeep of cars,, for gasolene, oil, and repairs, and including
work done by service stations amounted to the sum of $487.15, or an average of $40 per month.
This includes the use of cars and truck for all purposes.
Grading and General Work.
In this section new-comers over the age of 15 years are kept for at least thirty days, also
boys who become difficult to handle during the year. These have to their credit hundreds of
yards of cedar drains put in to carry surface water; making of new roads; grading of banks
and the excavation for a swimming-tank 90 by 45, and the mixing by hand of all the concrete
used on the tank; the levelling of the earth taken from the tank-and turning same into a
tennis-court; removing about 2,C00 additional yards of hard-pan from sport-field, besides considerable bush-clearing.
FARM SECTION.
We divide the work of the farm into the following subsections, as they are so interwoven into
each other that they cannot be shown under one heading:—
Dairying.
We have the following stock in this subsection, all fully federally accredited: 12 milk cows;
2 senior bulls ;  3 junior bulls ; 6 heifer calves.
Our cows are all on the Record of Performance and most of them are doing well. We
exhibited at Vancouver and New Westminster Exhibitions and carried away the following prizes :
Grand championship, 1; reserve grand championship, 1; senior championship, 1; senior reserve,
1; firsts, 4; seconds, 2 ; thirds, 6; fourths, 4; fifths, 3; and silver cup for the best graded herd.
To show that these honours were not lightly won, appended is an extract from the Vancouver
Province during Exhibition week :—
" The feature of the Jersey show was the large number of showmen who are large-scale
breeders, who had to acknowledge the supremacy of the stock owned by the little farmer in a
large number of classes. This goes to prove that no grounds exist for the old complaint that the
man with limited capital could not go into a large show with any hope of winning.
" One of the outstanding contests of the day was the grand champion bull. This was won by
the Provincial Boys' Industrial School with ' Interested Fern's Oxford.' Owing to the keen competition it was a creditable victory for their fine herd sire. The grand champion is a 3-year-old
and in winning his class he defeated the well-known bull ' Pretty Lad's Lady,' last year's
champion, owned by D. Spencer, Ltd. He also defeated the famous bull ' Cockscrew.' recently
purchased by Waikiki Farms, of Spokane, from Mr. J. S. G. Matson, of Victoria, B.C."
The condition of the stock was most favourably commented upon by members of the Jersey
Breeders' Association and Exhibition visitors.
More than ever we are finding our dairy to be one of our best assets and a paying proposition,
as the following will show :—
Credits.
Milk, 69,175.6 lb. at 4 cents   $2,767 02
Veal, 356 lb. at 15 cents         53 40
Butter, 62y2 lb. at 40 cents          25 00
 $2,845 42
Calves, 8 at $50 each       400 00
$3,245 42 I 16
British Columbia.
1926
Debits.
Feed purchased   $2,118 88
Veterinary supplies, etc        103 29
$2,222 17
Piggery.
We have recently set aside a portion of land to go more fully into hog-raising as we are
finding it profitable to do so.
Credits.
Pork, 3,232 lb. at 15 cents  $484 SO
Young pigs raised, 27     189 00
$673 80
Debits. -
8 young pigs purchased ...:  $ 48 00
Feed     271 35
$319 35
General Farming and Kitchen Gardens.
Credits.
Potatoes, 436 sacks  '.  $544 00
Parsnips, 900 lb  IS 00
Turnips, 1,500 lb  30 00
Cabbage, 771 lb  23 80
Tomatoes, 778 lb  48 56
Corn, 206 doz  36 15
Cauliflower, 60 lb  4 80
Squash, 22 lb  1 80
Carrots, 2,020 lb  42 05
Peas, 237 lb  14 22
Beans, 287 lb.   17 22
Onions, 730 lb  23 20
Beets, 630 lb  16 14
Cucumbers, 953 lb  19 26
Vegetable marrow, 135 lb  11 55
Parsley    2 65
Lettuce  16 25
„    ..  $   869 65
Fruits— ~
Raspberries, 110 lb  $    8 80
Currants (black and red), 150 lb :      12 00
Gooseberries, 25 lb        2 00
        22 80
Hay grown on farm       320 00
$1,212 45
Debits. " '"- ." :
Feed for 3 teams of horses purchased and grown on farm   $1,507 47
General repairs, horse-shoes, etc        171 10
1 dump-wagon purchased  .'       128 27
1 gasolene drag-saw purchased       221 00
6,000 lb. fertilizer        138 90
Seeds (potatoes, etc.)        203 32
Harness, etc         68 14
$2,438 20 16 Geo. 5 Industrial School for Boys. I 17
Land-clearing, Grading, and Teaming.
During the year over 5 acres of land were cleared of stumps, fallen logs, and rocks, which
would easily have cost $150 an acre if done by contract.    In addition to this, our teams hauled
from the river-bed 370 loads of gravel for swimming-tank and roads.    This was worth at least
$1.75 a load, or a total value of $647.50.
Tree and Shrub Planting.
During the year over 700 trees and shrubs were planted around the grounds and on the
hanks.   This meant making a number of trips to the Essondale Nurseries, hauling manure, and
digging holes.    The time alone employed by horses, men, and boys was worth at least $350.
Apiaries.
We have now gone in for bee-raising, making a start with four hives under the direction of
the Provincial Apiarist, and everything points' towards success.
Poultry and Rabbit Section.
I regret we have not had the success in this section desired, due to a certain extent in not
having a qualified man in charge and the fact that he is also in charge of the blacksmith-shop
and gardens.    We, however, managed to clear our way and hope for an improvement in the near
Credits.
Eggs produced at 38 cents per dozen (26,759)  $854 82
Poultry for table use, 213 birds   219 00
Ducks, 25 at $2 :  50 00
Drakes, 8 at $2   16 00
Geese, 7 at $2.25   15 75
Eggs sold, 2 sittings  2 00
Bantams sold  1 25
Chickens hatched, 1,346 at 30 cents each (average)  (up to March 31st,
1926)     424 65
$1,583 47
Debits. ~~-
Feed   $820 33
Coal       57 50
1 No. 234 Jubilee incubator      49 50
1 No. IS Buckeye brooder  '.      26 00
1 No. 5 Royal brooder       24 10
1 No. 19 Buckeye brooder  ,      31 50
1 White Wyandotte cockerel and 200 White Wyandotte hatching-eggs....     34 95
Disinfectant-powder, etc        5 00
Loss in young chickens    210 00
$1,258 88
Farm Credits and Debits by Sections.
Cr. Dr.
Dairy   $3,245 42 $2,222 17
Piggery         673 80 319 35
General farming  $1,212 45
Land-clearing and teaming      1,397 50
Tree and shrub planting        350 00
    2,959 95 2,438 20
Apiaries     129 93
Poultry and rabbit section     1,583 47 1,258 88
Credit balances   2,094 11
$8,402 64 $8,462 64 I 18 British Columbia. 1926
Kitchen and Culinary Sections.
It has often been said that the way to a boy's heart is via his stomach.    We do not find it
hard to believe this and as proof of our belief we append the following:—
Meals served—
Boys  133,957
Staff .•    25,477
Total  159,434
Cost of Provisions.
Groceries    $5,546 26
Meat  3,006 27
Bread    3,32S 40
Flour, etc  349 18
Milk     2,657 45
Eggs  772 85
Potatoes and vegetables   892 45
Poultry  r.  300 75
$16,853 61
Average cost per meal, 10 cents.
■ Music Section. '
As in former years, our band was much in demand and fulfilled several engagements,
amongst the most important being Vancouver Exhibition, where, at the request of the management, they headed the stock parade.
They accompanied our concert party to loco and Coquitlam and gave a good account of
themselves.
Their services were much appreciated at the public concerts given at Christmas and Easter
time in our own Auditorium, and their playing, morning and evening, is very pleasurable and
listened to by many in the district.
We experience the usual difficulty in keeping our band up to strength as so many band boys
keep going home.
Sport Section.
Our boys are most enthusiastic soccerites and baseball players and during the football season
played several games with outside clubs, and held their own in baseball more so than football.
I am pleased to say our grounds are getting better every year.
Our Visitors.
Hon. William Sloan, who presided at our annual concert; Judge J. Stuart Jamieson, Burnaby ; Judge Helen Gregory MacGill, Vancouver; S. M. MacKay, Vancouver; J. F. Robinson,
loco; J. W. Dixie, Esq., Victoria; S. Dixie, Esq., New Westminster; Mrs. F. Shelly, Parksville;
delegation of Kiwanians, New Westminster; J. L. White, Deputy Provincial Secretary, Victoria ;
Mr. and Mrs. A. Bligh, Vancouver; delegation of Orangemen and women attending Conference
in Vancouver, consisting of men and women from every Province in Canada and Newfoundland;
Mr. Little, Victoria; Mr. and Mrs. Craig, Alberta; Dr. and Mrs. Craig, Vancouver; Alderman
F. P. Rogers, Vancouver; R. Barritt, Esq., Winnipeg; O. E. Pickering, Esq., Ottawa; H. W.
Collier, Esq., Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Duker, Vancouver; Mr. and Mrs. MeMynn,
Oakalla, New Westminster;   Rev. T. Lennox, Vancouver.
Donations received.
Personal cheque from the Hon. William Sloan, Provincial Secretary, for Christmas cheer
($20) ;   box of biscuits from Mr. Pett, Millardville;   parcel of miscellaneous pencil-boxes from
Mr. Newman, Coquitlam ;  football from Spencer's Football Club.
Concerts and Outings.
Our many friends continue to encourage our efforts on behalf of the boys by giving us concerts and outings from time to time.   During the past year the Elks band came from Vancouver 16 Geo. 5 Industrial School for Boys. I 19
and gave us a wonderful programme of music and song. The Shelly's minstrels paid their annual
visit and were better than ever. The Salvation Army band from New Westminster came out
and rendered a much acceptable programme. A concert party from Vancouver, arranged by
Mr. A. Capon, took the place by storm. The Salvation Army band from Vancouver (1) provided
a rare musical treat which all will remember for years to come. The Canadian Forestry Department, through Mr. Wilkinson, gave a most descriptive picture of the terrible effects of a forest
fire.    It was timely and good.
All the boys and staff had a wonderful day at Bowen Island, thanks to the thoughtfulness of
Mr. Harold Brown, the genial manager of the Union Steamship Company, and the arranging of
transportation by the New Westminster Kiwanis Club and Mr. Elson, of the British Columbia
Electric Railway.    We certainly appreciated the change.
We took ninety-three boys during the season down to our summer camp at Crescent Beach
and gave them a special treat.
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F.  Banfielo, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1020. 

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