Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE OF… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1927

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0228003.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0228003.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0228003-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0228003-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0228003-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0228003-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0228003-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0228003-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0228003-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0228003.ris

Full Text

 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
FIFTH ANNUAL EEPOET
OP
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF  THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR  THE
FISCAL TEAE ENDED MAECH 31ST, 1926
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.
PROV!?■ tf?i a I, fc JBRARY,
ViCTC/.fA, B. C  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columhia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully  submits herewith  the  Annual  Report  of  the
Medical   Superintendent   of   Tranquille   Sanatorium   for   the   fiscal   year   ended
March 31st, 1926.
WILLIAM SLOAN,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. Wm. Sloan, Provincial Secretary. ,T. L. White, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM STAFF.
Medical Staff:
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent.
H. G. Chisholm, Medical Assistant. M. McQuittt, M.B., Medical Assistant.
R. B. Brummitt, M.B., Medical Assistant.
W. G. Lothian, Radiologist. G. Darling, Laboratory Technician.
G. J. Cameron, Dentist. Miss M. Hodgetts, Matron.
Administrative Staff:
A. Whitecross, Bursar. Miss Gordon Forbes, Clerk.
A. N. Low, Steirard. J. R. Mathieson, Clerk of Works.
Miss L. Wright, Dietition. J. Trevors, Laundry Manager.
G. T. Williams, Chief Engineer.
Chaplains:
Rev. Dr. E. D. McLaren, Protestant. Rev. Father A. Madden, Roman Catholic.
Sanatorium Farm Staff:
D. W. Strachan, Farm Superintendent.
F. C. Fisher, Book-keeper. I  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., April 1st, 1926.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary,  Victoria, B.C
Sib,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Fifth Annual Report of Tranquille
Sanatorium, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1925, to March 31st, 1926.
There were 147 admissions and 150 discharges. A total of 3S2 patients received treatment
during the year. All these figures are lower than for previous years, due to more advanced
cases, who require a longer period of treatment; being in• residence, resulting in a much smaller
turnover.    The largest number in residence at any time was 237 and the average 224.
The percentage of advanced cases among those seeking admission remains very high. This
is undoubtedly due, to a certain extent, to the shortage of beds at the Sanatorium and the long
waiting-list of applicants. Naturally enough, physicians will not apply for early cases while
they have advanced cases who appear to require treatment far more urgently awaiting admission.
The fact that there are too few beds available, and that it is a long time before applicants can
be admitted, is apt to make the physician feel that it is useless to apply unless the patient
is very ill and urges him to do so.
Our results are in keeping with the class of cases in residence and cannot improve until we
have accommodation for all seeking admission.
Some might question the advisability of taking advanced, hopeless cases into sanatorium, but
the isolation is well worth the cost. This has been proven in many places. Actual cases can
be cited where one person with advanced disease left in the home infected the whole family. The
care of the first case costs the State nothing, but the remainder of the family have to be cared
for at a cost several times what it would have been to isolate the one who was the source of the
infection. Humanitarian reasons for admitting these cases, while they will not bear much weight
with some, will undoubtedly appeal strongly to others.
Dental Service.
This service has been more satisfactory for the past year than for any since it was established. We have had a full-time resident dentist and he has been able to keep the work up to
date. The necessity for such a service in a sanatorium is now generally recognized, and it
undoubtedly plays a very important part in the successful treatment of any chronic disease.
Laboratory.
With better equipment and assistance our technician has been able to do a great deal more
work than ever before. Our laboratory is now equipped to carry on research-work successfully,
and a beginning was made at the end of the year along lines that will be reported on at some
ltrter date.    We expect to extend this branch of the work considerably during the next year.
Surgical.
Surgical treatment of tuberculosis has been the means of saving many lives and also of
shortening the period of treatment in numerous cases. At the beginning of the year there were
thirty-two patients receiving artificial pneumothorax treatment. During the year this treatment
was attempted in thirty-five, most of them being advanced cases. In thirteen of these no free
pleural space could be found; in twenty-two, partial to fair collapse was obtained. Of these,
three died during the year from progressive disease and the remainder showed good improvement.
The total number of refills given during the year was 871. U 6
British Columbia.
1926
Thoracoplasty was done on five patients during the year; of these, two died, the remainder
getting good results. This makes a total.of sixteen of our patients who have had the operation.
On the whole the results have been very satisfactory. Phrenicotomy was performed on three
patients as a separate measure. All our thoracoplasty patients now have a preliminary
phrenicotomy.
Consulting surgeons were called to attend several other cases requiring surgical treatment.
X-ray Department.
The X-ray is one of our most valuable aids in diagnosis and checking up progress. During
the past year 452 pairs of stereoscopic films of chests and fifty-nine miscellaneous films were
taken.
Dental films of the full mouth of all admissions, as well as many other dental films, were
taken. The fleuroscope was used freely for gross findings in pneumothorax work, and in
abdominal work with barium meals, etc.    Eighty-one X-ray treatments were given.
The two quartz lamps have been in daily use; one in the women's building gave 1,826 treatments and the one in the infirmary 1,850 treatments.
As mentioned in the last report, much of our X-ray equipment is old and out of date. We
can make it do for another year, but modern ■ equipment should be installed at the end of
that time.
Laundry.
The average number of pieces turned out by the laundry was over 31,000 per month. There
was a large increase in the amount of work as compared with the previous year. This was
mostly flat-work and was due to the increased number of advanced cases in residence. Our
last wooden washer was replaced by a metal one. We plan on installing a twin-press at an
early date, and this will be of great assistance in the work of ironing. At the end of
another year, at latest, a larger mangle should be added to the equipment. All linen and blankets
not in actual use are in charge of the laundry manager, who also has charge of the sewing-room.
We have found many advantages in this arrangement.
Financial.
The gross per capita cost was lower this year than for any year since the Government took
over the institution. There was a reduction of 12 cents per day as compared with last year.
The net cost naturally becomes higher as our revenue falls off. There will be a marked decrease
in revenue next year owing to the change in the " Hospital Act," which allows us to collect
70 cents per day from the municipalities as compared with $2.50 per day formerly charged.
Owing to the construction and age of some of our buildings the charges for repairs will be high
for several years.
Sanatorium Farm.
The Farm Superintendent's report shows a profit on operating. A good deal of money has
been spent every year out of the operating account for such improvements as fencing, ditching,
making dams, restoring worked-out land, etc. The farm is invaluable to the Sanatorium, chiefly
as the source of our milk-supply. The public expects the farm to have the appearance of a
model farm and at the same time to show a profit. As it is operated on a strictly cash basis,
and the Sanatorium pays current market prices for its produce, it takes very careful and
capable management to be able to do this. The Superintendent is to be congratulated on his
financial report.
Building Operations.
No new buildings were erected at the Sanatorium, but a calf-barn adjoining the dairy-barn
was built at the farm. Preparations are being made to build a residence for female employees
early in the next year. This has been recommended in previous reports. We also expect that
a gravity water system from Tranquille Creek will be installed during the coming year. The
bake-shop was enlarged, allowing the baker to carry out his duties much more satisfactorily.
The chief capital expenditure on buildings was the tearing-out and renewing of all lath and
plaster in the west wing of the women's building, which was in an unsightly condition. This
is now the finest and most comfortable building we have. A corner of the Sanatorium grounds.
General view of buildings, with a portion of the farm.  16 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. U 7
Recommendations.
The disposal of sewage has been unsatisfactory for some time, and I would strongly recommend that the laying of a trunk sewer be proceeded with as soon as the new water system is
installed.
We have found that it is difficult to secure single tradesmen who are satisfactory and have
them remain for more than a short time. I would recommend the consideration of erecting suitable apartments where married men could be housed with- their families.
The need for a properly constructed assembly-hall with a basement fitted up as a gymnasium
for male employees should be kept in mind. The room being used as an assembly-hall at present
is not half large enough and cannot be properly ventilated.
The most urgent need is for increased accommodation for patients. Our infirmaries are
taxed to the limit all the time and there is a long waiting-list for admissions. This increased
accommodation should be designed to care for early eases and others who would improve rapidly
under a strict regime. It should be an infirmary building of a hundred-bed capacity; this would
enable us to take in all cases applying for admission and at the same time to segregate the
different types with improved results.
Many have the idea that our patients are mostly people who have drifted into the Province;
it might not be amiss to say here that this is not so. There are very few who have not been
residents of the Province for several years. Those whose place of residence is given as outside
of British Columbia are cases -who are receiving treatment under an agreement with the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment.
Acknowledgments.
I wish to thank those who made donations of money and various articles for Christmas.
The Kamloops branch of the Red Cross made a generous donation in the form of subscriptions
to a long list of periodicals. Their visiting committee made regular visits, which were much
appreciated by the patients.    To the Red Cross we extend our hearty thanks.
Various organizations provided a large number of entertainments on the lawns and in the
assembly-hall. These are always a source of much pleasure to our patients. Motor-rides provided by some of the clubs also helped to relieve the monotony of Sanatorium routine. We wish
to express our appreciation to all who have in any way contributed to those diversions.
The " Tranquillian " made a donation of a radio set, and an installation including head-sets
for every bed. It also included a microphone, and the necessary equipment for local broadcasting, which makes it possible for every patient to hear all local entertainments and church
services. Arrangements were made whereby any concert in Kamloops can be sent over the
telephone and reach every patient through our radio installation. This donation is one which
has been a benefit to every patient and is appreciated by all.
I wish to thank the chaplains and visiting clergymen who have ministered to the spiritual
needs of this community.
To the consulting surgeons I wish to tender my cordial thanks.
I wish to acknowledge the splendid co-operation of my assistant physicians and of all the
members of the staff of the Sanatorium during the work of the past year.
To yourself and to all members of the Department I wish to express my appreciation of the
support and assistance which has been granted me.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP,
Medical Superin tendent. U 8
British Columbia.
1926
STATISTICAL TABLES.
Table No. 1—General Statistics for Tear 1925-26.
Civil.      Military.    Female.       Total
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1925..
Number of patients admitted, 1925-1926	
Number of patients discharged, 1925—26.	
Number of patients treated, 1925—26	
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1926..
125
69
194
122
39
71
31
47
33
45
70
118
37
73
235
147
150
382
232
Table No. 2.—Classification of 147 Cases admitted to Sanatorium during "Year 1925-26.
Civil.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Percentage.
Incipient or minimal	
Moderately advanced	
0
16
39
5
1
7
21
2
4
10
28
5
14
33
88
12
9.523
22.45
59.86
Miscellaneous _	
8.16
Totals
60
31
47
147
99.99
Table No. 2a.—Classification of 12 CAses admitted .as Miscellaneous.
T.B. suspects  :  2
Silicosis   2
Lung-abscess     1
Bronchiectasis   2
Pott's disease  2
Chronic bronchitis   1
Pleurisy :  1
T.B. peritonitis   1
Total  12
Table No. 3.—Showing Civil State of Patients admitted from April 1st, 1925, to
March 31st, 1926.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
40
60
22
25
62
85
Totals	
100
47
147
Table No. 4.—Showing Religious Denoaiinations of Patients admitted from April 1st,
t 1925, to March 31st, 1926.
Religious Denominations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Buddhist  	
1
o
4
73
1
18
1
1
4
35
7
1
Bralimin _	
1
Greek Catholic _  	
o
s
Protestant _ _	
108
1
Roman Catholic	
25
1
Totals
100
47
147 16 Geo. 5
Tranquille Sanatorium.
U 9
Table No. 5.—Showing the Nationality or those admitted from April 1st, 1925,
to March 31st, 1926.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
4
42
2
21
1
1
1
8
13
1
3
1
2
1
1
19
1
14
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
61
9
1
35
1
1
1
10
Italy  	
1
2
14
1
1
31
Totals	
100
47
147
Table No. 0.—Showing what Districts contributed Patients from April 1st, 1925,
to March 31st, 1926.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
.1
2
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Blind  Bay...-;	
1
1
1
Cranbrook _	
1
1
Cortes Island _	
1
1
1
9
1
3
9
1
3
12
1
Ladvsmith _ _	
Mount Olie _.	
1
1
1
1
3
4
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
Swift  Creek :	
1
1
Trail  	
3
Tranquille..., _... _ _..  	
3 U 10
British Columbia.
1920
Table No. 6.—Showing what Districts contributed Patients—Continued.
Place of Residence.
.Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
2
5
39
3
5
1
18
1
1
1
1
United States                 	
1
Union Bay                                	
1
9
Victoria                     	
Vancouver, North                	
4
Vancouver,  South	
6
1
Wellington	
9
100
47
147
Table No. 7.—Showing the Occupations of those admitted from April 1st, 1925,
to March 31st, 1926.
Occupations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
6
9
1
1
2
7
1
1
10
2
1
3
1
1
1
7
1
2
1
1.
1
C
1
1
1
1
1
l'
1
1
1
6
7
9
4
2
3
1
2
1
21
6
7
1
1
8
9
3
Cobbler	
1
1
Carpenter   _ _	
Clerk ;	
1
Dressmaker	
1
1
10
9
1
O
1
21
1
1
Lumberman   _ _...
Millman _             	
1
9
Mechanic 	
1
1
Metallurgist	
Miner	
1
6
6
Photographer	
1
1
Policeman.. __	
1
1
Plumber	
1
Radiologist             	
1
Rancher _	
1
Surveyor	
1
Stone-cutter	
1
School-children                               	
13
Salesman	
.8
Student	
9
q
Sailor	
4
1                             1
Taxi-driver   	
9
1                                       1
Waiter	
1
4
X-ray   technician	
1
Totals	
100
47
147 New type of cure cottage to replace pavilion accommodation for ambulant
Service Building.  16 Geo. 5
Tranquille Sanatorium.
U 11
Table No. S.—Showing the Ages of those .admitted from April 1st, 1925,
to March 31st, 1926.
Male. Female.
Under 15 years       4 3
15 to 20      „       3 6
21  „   25      „           13 9
26 „   30      „           13 11
31 „   35      „           19 10
36 „   40      „           17 5
41  „   45      „     13 1
46 „   50      „            10 1
51 „   55      „             6
56  „   60      „              2
61  „   65      „        1
66 „   70      „       	
Over  70      „      	
Totals.... _  100 47
Table No. 9.—Showing Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths from April 1st, 1925,
to March 31st, 1926.
Admissions.
Male.    Female.    Total
Discharges.
Male.    Female.    Total.
Deaths.
Male.    Female.    Total
1925,
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December.	
1020,
January	
February	
March	
Totals..
11
15
12
15
3
5
5
100
6
3
10
1
4
1
3
47
17
18
19
8
16
16
8
6
11
147
14
13
14
8
7
3
3
3
10
10
3
4
3
19
23
17
12
10
14
31
119
17
31
Table No. 10.—Showing Classification of 150 Discharges during 1925-26.
Results.
Classification on Admission.
Apparently
arrested.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Died.
Total.
12
1
6
27
28
1
2
5
8
3
2
2
17
5
3
27
1
22
37
Far advanced	
80
11
Totals	
13
62
18
26
31
150 U 12
British Columbia.
1926
T.A-ble No. 11.—-Showing Classification of 11 Non-pulmonary Tuberculosis Oases.
Male. Female.
T.B. adenitis and intestinal deratitis      1
Pott's disease of the spine      1
Sarcoma      1
Bronchiectasis      2
Pleurisy        2
T.B. suspect      1
Chronic bronchitis     1
Psychasthenia  ..... 1
Cardiac  asthma       1
Totals  10 1
Table No. 12.—Showing Causes of 31 Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
General exhaustion	
Spontaneous pneumothorax	
Tubercular meningitis...:.	
T.B. enteritis and peritonitis	
Following operation for thoracoplasty-
Hiemorrhage	
Totals	
14
2
14
23
1
3
1
2
1
31
Daily average population        224
Per cent, of discharge on admissions  (not including deaths)     80.95
Per cent, of fair recoveries on admissions      40.13
Per cent, of deaths on whole number under treatment       8.11
Total number of patient-days  81,775
DENTAL REPORT.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following statement of work completed in the Dental
Clinic of this institution during the year ended March 31st, 1926:—
Previous to this year the work in the Clinic was carried on by men who were either visiting
dentists or who were on part-time work. This year saw the first resident dentist installed on
full time, with his work confined entirely to patients. This arrangement has made it possible
for the work to be carried on more satisfactorily from the standpoint of the patients, as well as
that of the administrative staff.
The removal of all foci of infection is the principal object of the Clinic, and in connection
with this subject it might be well to add that, as complete X-ray examinations are available to
all patients, it has been found that approximately SO per cent, of the patients admitted to this
institution during the past year are suffering from infections of the mouth, usually apical
infections.
It has been my experience that infections in the mouths of tuberculous patients extend
rapidly; that a quiescent abscess or granuloma will become active in numerous cases; and that
the eradication of apical infections by treatment, other than the surgical removal of the tooth,
is not advisable, as in all these cases the patients' vitality has been lowered considerably and is
not able to throw off additional infections.
Where masticating surfaces have been lost, either through, extensive decay or infections
which have necessitated extraction, it has been the aim of the Clinic to restore these mouths to 16 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. U 13
a normal condition, as far as mastication is concerned, by the installation of either complete
or partial dentures.
To the staff may I tend my sincere thanks for the considerate assistance I received from
them throughout the past year.
Following is a statement of the work completed in the Clinic for the patients:—
Fillings    752
Extractions  371
Dentures      94
Dentures, rebases        8
Dentures, repairs     21
Inlays (gold)       6
Bridges         8
Devitalizations      12
Treatments    213
Pyorrhoea       69
Prophylaxis   172
I have, etc.,
G. J. Cameron,
Dentist.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Sputum.—The old method of sputum examination, preparing a direct smear, oftentimes
selected at random from a container smeared with infectious material, was superseded this year
by a method recently introduced in a number of public health laboratories. The sputum is
received into a glass bottle containing 10 cc. carbolic acid 5 per cent., and passed through an
electrical shaker for twenty minutes. All hard particles, mucoid material, and stringy masses are
so reduced to an even homogeneous mixture generally providing an equal distribution of bacilli.
A smear is then prepared in the usual way. The advantages of this routine are twofold—the
sputum rendered sterile ensures' protection to the technician, and greater facility for demonstrating the tubercle bacillus is afforded.
The number of concentrated sputum tests have not been segregated. Our experience has
taught that when tubercle bacilli are found in a concentrated specimen they are invariably shown
in direct smear examined with care. A high percentage of patients in this institution have
positive sputum as shown by the following analysis :—
Patients in residence, March 31st, 1926, 232. Of this number, 186, or 80.1 per cent., gave the
organism in their sputum, 60 of whom have become negative since admission; 46, or 19.8 per
cent., have never had tubercle bacilli demonstrated. Of 35 artificial pneumothorax cases with
positive sputum, 14 became negative in the course of this treatment.
Urine.—If microscopic examination of urine reveals pus, smears of centrifugated sediment
are stained and examined for tubercle bacilli. In the presence of acid-fast organisms where
doubt exists as to the real nature of the bacillus, a guinea-pig is inoculated to eliminate the
possibility of B. smegma. Two patients have thus been diagnosed with positive tubercle bacilli
who have no evidence of symptoms of the kidneys or urinary tract; one of these has persistently
had a negative sputum. Five cases in all show B. tuberculosis in the urine. One only has
positive symptoms; three without; and one, at autopsy, no lesion could be found. Renal
functional tests are performed when indicated.
Blood.—An epitome of 200 tests by the Wassermann reaction covering a period of two years
has afforded some valuable information regarding the presence of syphilis in tuberculosis.
Literature on this subject conveys the impression that the above condition commonly prevails.
Vedder, in a series of tests at the Fort Baynard Army Hospital, found 23.28 per cent, of 229
tuberculous patients reacted positively to the Wassermann test, a result which he claims coincides with findings by Letulle, Bergeson, and Lapine, of Paris. The latter estimates that one
out of every five tuberculous patients are luetic. Craig, conducting an examination of 116
patients with tuberculosis, found 10 per cent, with a positive reaction in addition to 6 per cent,
known to be syphilitic, a total of 16 per cent. U 14
British Columbia.
1026
At Tranquille Sanatorium the serum was separated from the blood, sealed and forwarded
to the laboratories of the Vancouver General Hospital, where the test was completed. Of the
200 tests performed, only three were positive, or 1.5 per cent., and of this number one later proved
to be a false positive, as revealed at autopsy. This case, with far advanced tuberculosis, never
had positive sputum, but post-mortem examination demonstrated typical tuberculosis of all organs
confirmed by sections from lung, liver, spleen, and kidney. If we disregard the false positive,
1 per cent, of 200 tuberculous patients at this institution react positively to the Wassermann
reaction, as compared with Vedder's 23.28 per cent., Letulle's 20 per cent., and Craig's 16 per cent.
The Kahn precipitin test for the diagnosis of syphilis in many quarters has replaced the
Wassermann reaction and has received official recognition by the United States Navy. The
technique is so simplified that the possibility of error is minimized and the results 98 per cent,
accurate. As a routine measure Kahn precipitin test has lately been introduced in this Laboratory and will be done in conjunction with the Wassermann reaction. A comparison of results will
subsequently be made.
Blood-counts.—A resumfi of 110 complete blood-counts on the tuberculous has shown average
normal findings. The blood picture in uncomplicated tuberculosis is without pathological significance, lymphocytes being slightly affected. In advanced cases a mild anaemia is frequently
encountered, and cases with complications a moderate leukocytosis is common, leukocytes
numbering 12,000 to 15,000.
Autopsies.—Whenever possible post-morten examinations have been performed. Pathological
conditions found have been compared with physical, laboratory, and X-ray findings.
General Work done in the Laboratory.
Material examined.
Sputum	
T.B.  positive	
T.B.  negative	
Plural fluid	
T.B. positive	
T.B. negative	
Pus  (urine)	
T.B.  positive	
T.B. negative	
Urinalysis....	
Renal funct. test	
Blood-counts—
Erythrocytes	
Leukocytes	
Hasmoglobin	
Differential	
Wassermann reaction
Kahn precipitin test..
Cerebrospinal fluid	
Animal inoculation....
Guinea-pig autopsy....
Autopsies	
Milk butter-fat	
Baterial counts	
Cultures	
Vaccines	
Miscellaneous	
50
30
20
51
90
34
56
1
1
93
27
27
27
27
8
106
56
50
1
118
99
66
33
2
67
71
31
40
2
1
1
79
1
127
1
118
74
30
44
2
1
1
59
12
5
7
240
1
134
73
61
3
19
30
26
2
1
1
4
4
17
1
12
8
65
39
26
14
3
11
234
119
3
1
2
17
4
4
4
4
13
14
1
1
3
1
1,047
560
487
4
3
1
48
14
34
1,112
10
50
54
51
54
88
25
6
17
18
7
12
8
20
10
11 16 Geo. 5
Tranquillf. Sanatorium.
U 15
METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
Summary of Meteorological Observ.ations fob Year ended March 31st, 1926.
Month.
Maximum
Temp.
Minimum
Temp.
Average
Temp.
Average
Humidity.
Snow.
Rain.
Sunshine.
1925.
April	
Deg. F.
77.0
86.0
98.0
94.0
92.0
77.0
64.0
60.0
53.0
44.0
60.0
71.0
Deg. F.
33.0
33.0
42.0
51.0
44.0
35.0
25.0
18.0
26.0
18.0
20.0
23.0
Deg. F.
51.03
61.11
66.73
'74.11
66.56
57.03
43.89
37.37
36.79
30.27
38.34
44.70
56.00
52.00
56.80
50.50
58.40
67.40
66.27
Inches.
1.50
8.25
15.00
Inches.
0.49
0.27
0.75
0.23
1.06
0.72
0.20
0.10
0.80
Hours.
191.8
280.6
June .■	
July: _
225.2
315.2
August 	
228.1
178.6
October	
161.2
101.6
18.2
1926.
23.7
62.4
194.9
BURSAR'S REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., January 7th, 1927.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheets and the Profit and Loss
iVccounts covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1926.
On examination of our operating accounts and tables submitted it is to be noted that we
show a decrease in our gross per capita cost, which is lower this year than in any of the preceding four years. This is due largely to the increasing demand for beds at all times. Our summer
population, which is usually low, has shown a marked increase over any previous year, and this
is a large factor in keeping down the per capita cost, as the decrease in number of patients has
never been large enough to allow a cutting-down of our overhead.
The net per capita cost shows a slight increase over last year owing to a falling-off of our
revenue. The collections from the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment have decreased
somewhat from last year, also our municipal and donation accounts, although our receipts from
private patients show an increase.
It is to be regretted, from the financial as well as from the humanitarian view-point, that it
is impossible to get more patients in the incipient stages of disease than we do, as the cost of
the maintenance of the advanced case is so very much higher than that of the incipient case.
The departments chiefly affected by the advanced condition of the patients are salaries, provisions, medical and surgical supplies, -which show an increase in expenditure. However, the
increases in the above-mentioned departments are more than offset by reductions in the operating
costs of the remainder of our departments, as we show a decrease in the total expenditures
amounting to $6,369.45.
The gross cost of maintenance for the year amounted to $293,980.72, and our revenue for the
■period was $84,809.76, which with 81,775 days' treatment being given makes our gross per capita
$3.59 and our net per capita $2.56.
The Occupational Therapy classes are still being fully taken advantage of, as will be noted
by a glance at Table G, where it will be seen that' 156 patients have taken part in the work
carried on.   This is an increase of forty over last year.
For comparative purposes, I have included in my report a number of tables which give a
summary of our financial operations. In these will be found our expenditures analysed under
the different headings, both as to total expenditures and per capita, cost. U 16
British Columbia.
1926
I again wish to thank you for the valuable support you have given me iu my work, also to
my staff I wish to express my appreciation of the faithful and efficient services rendered.
I have, etc.,
A. Whitecross,
Bursar.
TRAXQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31sr, 1926.
Assets.
Land    $   4,943 14
Buildings     354,054 S3
Plant and equipment  71,095 39
Furniture and fixtures  ,  15,442 93
Inventories   12,008 06
Treasury advance (for petty expenses)   1,000 00
Accounts receivable  :  3,502 50
$462,046 85
Deficit  (cost of operations, 1925-26)      209,180 90
$671,227 81
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia
371.227 81
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Depreciation—
Buildings   .....$ 1S.634 46
Plant and equipment       3,741 86
Furniture and fixtures   812 7S
Salaries      107,464 34
Office supplies  _       2,00S 04
Travelling and transportation         1,811 63
Fuel, water, light, and power       42.541 98
Maintenance and repairs  .-.     15,368 15
Furniture and fixtures         1,481 87
Provisions        88,020 94
Medical and surgical supplies         7.770 12
Incidentals and unforeseen         4,324 55
By Donations  , '.  $    1,000 00
Receipts from maintenance of patients      83,799 70
Balance       209,180 90
$293,980 72 $293,980 72 16 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. U 17
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31st, 1926.
Operating Expense Accounts.
Expenditure by voucher (less amounts credited to vote for supplies sold) —
Salaries—
Medical and clerical staff  ■$ 13,047 S4
Sundry employees       94,416 50
 $107,464 34
Office supplies—
Books and journals  $       107 49
Postage and office supplies         1,365 27
Telephone and telegraph  :  274 83
 :        1,747 59
Travelling and transportation  :        2,077 96
Fuel, water;, light, and power—
Fuel    $ 33,029 49
Power-house supplies       13,526 11
 46,555 60
Maintenance and repairs—
Repairs and renewals  • .■ $ 11,892 13
Janitors' supplies       4,483 59
a     .       16,375 72
Furniture and fixtures—
Bedding   $   2,568 39
Furniture and fixtures   623 26
 3,196 87
Provisions—■
Groceries   $ 35,263 74
Meats      19,932 79
Fish           2,157 53
Milk and eggs       31,882 11
      89,236 17
Medical and surgical supplies—
Medicines and drugs  $    3,6S1 39
X-ray and miscellaneous         4,923 31
 8,604 70
Incidentals and unforeseen—
Laundry    $   2,580 97
Freight and cartage         1,374 50
Sundries     748 06
Clothing          1,206 75
         5,910 28
Total operating expense by voucher   $2S1,169 23
Inventories as at March 31st, 1925—
Office supplies  $ 670 43
Travelling and transportation  :  208 41
Fuel, water, light, and power   3,143 6S
Maintenance and repairs   2,S79 46
Provisions   '.  2,300 57
Medical and surgical supplies   569 52
Incidentals and unforeseen   128 51
 9,906 58
Depreciation written off—
Buildings  $ 18,634 46
Plant and equipment        3,741 86
Furniture and fixtures   812 78
      23,189 10
Carried forward  $314,264 91
2 Expense ahd Revenue Statement—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought forward   $314,264 91
Less inventories as at March 31st, 1926—
Office supplies   $
Travelling and transportation 	
Fuel, water, light, and power 	
Maintenance and repairs	
Furniture and fixtures 	
Provisions   	
Medical and surgical supplies 	
Incidentals and unforeseen 	
Less equipment transferred to Asset Account
Less sundry collections—
Provisions  	
Maintenance and repairs 	
Incidentals and unforeseen 	
Medical and surgical 	
Travelling and transportation 	
3}       415 9S
174 74
3,569 27
3,887 03
1.715 00
1,696 09
459 10
90 85
12.008 06
$302,256 85
5,312 53
$296,944 32
1,819 71
321 64
51 75
470 50
300 00
2.963 60
Gross cost of maintenance for year   $298,980 72
Revenue.
By Donations    $    1,000 00
Receipts from Department of S.C.R      33,981 51
Receipts from municipalities       36,732 50
Receipts from private patients       11,085 75
 —     ,84,809 70
Net cost of operations for year ended March 31st, 1920   $209,1SO 90
Summary of Profit .and Loss Account.
Depreciation   $ 23,189 10
Salaries     107,464 34
Office supplies  2,008 04
Travelling and transportation   1,811 63
Fuel, water, light, and power  42,541 98
Maintenance and repairs   15,368 15
Furniture and fixtures   1,481 87
Provisions    SS.020 94
Medical and surgical   7,770 12
Incidentals and unforeseen   4,324 55
$293,980 72
Less donations  $ 1,000 00
,,    revenue (maintenance)      83.S09 76
Yearly
Per Capita.
$   103 53
479 75
5 97
8 09
1S9 92
68 62
6 62
392 98
34 6S
19 31
$1,312 44
84.S09 70
37S 62
Net cost to Government for maintenance of patients  $209,1SO 96
$   933 82 Patients' dining-room at Christmas.
1     ^%^%.£
Christmas at the farm boarding-house  16 Geo. 5
iRANQUILLE   SANATC
U   19
Remarks.
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1926   232
Daily average population for year ended March 31st, 1926   224
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year   $1,312.44
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day   3.59
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year   933.82
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  2.56
Capital Expenditures.
Cure cottages   $    60 00
Fire-apparatus shed  265 00
Bakery   500 00
Main building   6,956 70
Female boarding-house  266 3S
Hydro-electric plant  125 00
Heating plant  100 00
Salaries (Clerk of Works, etc.)   1,200 00
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each  Year, the Total
Amounts spent for Maintenance, and the Gross Per Capita Cost.
Year.
Average Number
in Residence.
Maintenance
Expenses.
Per Capita
Cost.
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
190.04
194.46
207.15
221.21
224.00
$271,730 08
284,019 31
312,065 72
300,350 00
293,980  72
$1,429 85
1,460 55
1,506 46
1,357 75
1,312 44
Table B.—Showing Analysis of Gross Per Capita Cost.
wl
T3
rrZ
03
o.2
S3
es
23
'S,a
ZJ «3
ah
tz
a
£ o
m
m
Year.
a
oi
Vi
03
m
Tfl
m
03
3i~Ci,
Ooo
■So
03 rn
> a\
03 C3
3 c ^
-3 03
ri&ri
fl a
S«
11
is*
0
o
rfi
O
-31 03 01
o.H™
3gg
-^   03
3. r/i
33 a
01 ti
rrZ o
'I "3
5
o
1921-22	
$ 16 96
$439 59
$9 01
$20 56
$225 14
$13S 43
$57  79
$421  96
$28 37
$72 06
$1,429  85
1922-23	
12 49
482 22
8 09
11  32
232 81
133 03
66 89
472 17
13 07
28 46
1,460 55
1923-24	
119 81»
479 85
7 46
9 42
243 48
85  77
13 70
441 26
39 95
65 76
1,506 46
1924-25	
116 77*
467  52
0 01
11 93
211  11
70 55
25 78
288 86
26 17
33 05
1,357 75
1925-26    	
103  53*
479 75
8 97
8 09
189 92
68  62
6 62
392 98
34 68
19  31
1,312 44
* Depreciation. IT 20
British Columbia.
1926
00  th  Ol   t-  Ol
O M l- H t-
00)1000
CO   rH  CD  IO  CO
l~ O O CO a
O
•H  ■*  Cl   O  M
hdOHOO
OI  Ol  CO  CO  Ol
t-  M M  H  IC
™       fl   ■
O co co ci n
oj        CJ
co Tf oi oi ■■■*
■ fln3 W
41 fl
2^3
ci co co w oi
CQ
CD   IO  CD  CO  CO
55
fc
n   J?
H
q
HH        p
-c
CD   05   r-  CC  Ol
H
5- w
H CC 1- O  H
W
» cj a
H  H  CD  W  C
OS  -H  b-  GO  l-
H
fc
M   IO  Cl   1-  1-
>©  Ol" CD  ICC  t-'
M
a
S
© t- H, © **
&
w
Ci  CO  CO  CD   Cl
c
o
O  t- [- ©  O
CC   rH   O   tH   Ol
i-( cc Tf o o
H
0
O   rH   rH   CD   00
■""*
oo C' o oo oo
«
Ph
m-
a
a
00 tH L- Ci t-
fc
OJ
I-  t-  CD  IO  GO
&
fl    «
Ol  00  t-  Ol   iH
00 O CO o 00
a
C O CO i- ■*
f»
O  CO  Ol  IO   rH
fa     fe
rH   rH
<,
fc
© CD O 00 10
<(
fl   .
rH   Cl   Ol   L—   rH
•Sow
M fl &
OC0i>NX
fc
O  CO  CD   O  CO
CO CO  t-  CD CO
P
O
fltf
O-
«•
«J
„
CO   rH   -f   IO.   X'         1
Sis
t- t- h-  O Ci
■h a  •
IO   CI   CO   O   rH
Q
£«*
r-- ci Tf i- io
H
.■ao
■si*
Ol  IO'   o CO  Cl
Tf  -^   IO  Tf  Tf
&
Sh-5
3
fc
H
Ci  CO  L-   H  CO
be ui   ■
t-   O   rH   ri   CO
aas
CO   OJ   CI   CD   tH
c o o m h
Ph
>-^5
Ci  Ol  Ci  CD  00
fc
CO
W
M
««
if  IO  !D  1-  -H
■
■H  CO  CD  01  ©
P
03 OJ
CO Cl  10  Ci  00
a
fc
t-  KO  W  CO  C
ri   H   t-H   rH   Cl'
a
a;
c
CD 00  L-  W  ^
I-   CO   rH   Ol   CO
V2
O
h- oi o O Tf
CO  O  O Ol  CO
IO   t-   Tf   Tf*   -rh
-5
CO  CO  01  CO  Is-
X  Ci  Cl  O  CO
o
fc
H
rH  rH
W9-
»    #    #
1
Ci ci co io o
CJ
CO  CO  C|  CO  rH
W
3
oi x Ci oi Ci
a.
Ol  Ol  rH  CO  00
s
Cl   H.  X  CO  H
1
CO  C|  -HH   to  CO
O
M
S*S-
tr
a
H
H
CD
oi co -* io to
Ct  Ol  Ol  Ol  01
1   1   [   1   I
tH  Ol   CO  Tf.   IO
Ol  Ol  01  Cl  Ol
Ci Ci OS Ci Ci
o
c
o
P3
PL,
D
02
O
i
gfi
t^e
CO  X  t-  Tf  IO
rH  rH  rH  Cl  Cl
>»j
Ci  O  rH  L-   IO
St)
CO Tf Tf CO co
o ^
a^-
O0,
£.8-
rn o CO ci ci
gf
x o »o Cl cc
*§
•*&  Ci   I—  Tf  CO
t-  X  -f  O  CO
Tf  CD  CO  Ci   Ci
ae-
fe.
IO  IO  CO  IO  Tf
3-S
X    10    Tf    I-.    Tf
O  O  CD  1-  Ol
Tf    Tf    lO    CO    CO
rH   rH   rH   r-l   rH
ClSr
rti)     .
___ -^ a
o-2§
X  rH Ol  I- Ol
O   CO   t-   ri   t-
<p o io o o
CO   rH   CD   IO   X
l-   O   O   CO   Ci
as-
rH   Tf   oi   O  CO
L-  X   rH  O  Ci
Cl   Ol   CO  CO  Ol
m
<Xr
ooooo
§a.s
ooooo
ooooo
ooooo
OI OI IO o o
X   Tf   O  Ol   rH
0
m-
S oi    .
X  X  X  X  CD
Ci CO  rH  O Is-
%3 oo a
oa.S
IO  H  00  H  01
01   O   Ol   rH   O
Revem
Mainte
of Pat
Ol  t-  Tf^  CO  X
CO  IO  t-  X  Cl
t- Tf o Ci X
•SS'S
IO  X  Ci  CO  io
CO  1-  rH  IO -t-
co ci x i- i-
Hsi'O
O  O  IO  O  H
CD  I-  In  X  X
"4
Tf  CD  IO   rH  O
S rt
O   Tf   rH   Cl   O
O  Tf   t-  rH  Tf
t» s
Ci  O  O  OI  Cl
<t
rH   rH   OI   Ol   Ol
Ph
<M
O  £0     .
- t:^
gflo
ci ci io t- ci
X  t-  OI   O  X
CO  CO  Tf  Tf  CO
^
tH*
cS
<u
H
(C
K
10
Cf
01   Ol  Ol  Cl  OI
rH Ol  CO Tf  IQ
Ol  Ol  Ol  Ol  Ol
o Ci ci o ci
T-
r-
r-
n
r- 16 Geo. 5
Tranquille Sanatorium.
U 21
Table E.—Showing Number of Days' Treatment given each Month.
Year.
April.
May.
June.
July.
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Total
for Year.
1921-22 .....
6,102
6,059
5,439
5,359
5,680
5,160
5,547
5,641
6,078
6,405
5,809
6,086
69,365
1922-23	
5,566
5,343
4,961
4,523
5,022
5,334
6,346
6,513
6,662
7,061
6,554
7,093
70,978
1923-24	
6,548
6,329
5,740
'5,567
5,981
5,786
6,191
6,527
6,543
6,600
6,703
7,304
75,819
1924-25	
6,701
6,575
5,965
5,815
6,312
6,457
7,101
7,133
7,243
7,382
6,686
7,383
80,753
1925-26	
6,982
6,982
6,638
6,543
6,182
6,581
6,951
6,714
7,002
7,269
6,592
7,319
81,775
Table F.—-Showing IjAUndby-work done.
Number of Pieces done from April 1st, 1921.
Year.
Flat-work.
Personal.
Total.
1921-22                                            	
139,393
181,399
196,011
212,308
230,653
123,875
140,447
147,060
146,694
145,438
283,268
1922-23                	
321,846
1923-24                	
343,071.
1924-25 _	
1925-26                                    	
359,202
376,091
Number of Pieces done during Year ended March 31st, .1926.
April	
May                   ...                  	
19,352
19,323
19,336
20,169
18,263
18,929
19,661
18,539
19,772
18,660
17,823
20,826
12,674
12,376
1.4,432
11,357
11,918
11,696
12,436
11.492
13,465
10,922
10,397
12,273
32,026
31,699
33,768
July	
31,526
August	
30,181
September      	
30,625
32,097
30,031
33,237
29.5S2
28.220
33,099
230,653
145,438
376,091
.Average number of pieces per month.... _	
19,221
12,120
31,341
Table G.—Showing Wobk completed by Patients in Occupational Therapy Classes
dubing Year ended March 31st, 1026.
Reed-wroi'k—
Trays—
Size 10 by 16   46
Size   8 toy 10   32
Size 14 toy 20   35
Size 10 toy 18  ,  2S
Brush and cointo trays, 8 toy 12   °S
Pin-trays   95
Tatole-lamps    -1
Dresser-lamps    14
Dresser-lamp shades   18
Sewing-baskets (lined)   22
Flower-vases     -3
Flower-baskets     14
Picture-frames   46 Table G.—Showing Work completed vy Patients in Occupational Therapy
Cl asses—Continued.
Pine-needle work—
Baskets   76
Pin trays  IS
Trays, 10 toy 18   6
Fruit-dishes    8
Collar-boxes   6
Woodwork—
Picture-frames   45
Inlaid trays   0
Card-tables  0
Writing-desks     2
Drawing-boards   3
Porch-chair  1
Ladies' jewel-cases  6
Cribbage-boards  12
Bead-work—■
Vanity-bags     80
Necklaces    16
Watch-fobs   6
Embroidery-work—
Table-centres    6
Table-runners  5
Tray-centres  4
Passe-partout work—Passe-partout frames   276
Note.—During the year 130 male patients and twenty-six female patients were able to participate in and complete the above work.
FARM SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1926.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit my report of operations of Tranquille Sanatorium Farm for the year
ended March 31st, 1926.
The farm crops in nearly every department were above the average. The hay-crop was the
biggest ever grown on the ranch. These good crops were due in part to the favourable season
and in part to the preparation of the soil in labour and cultivation expended upon it. Credit
must also be given to the hundreds of tons of manure that are yearly spread upon the land, as
well as to the great amount of irrigation-water that is used upon the land during the spring
and summer months. Fully 60 per cent, of the cultivated land on this ranch consists of a
shallow layer of silt washed down from the Tranquille Kiver. The subsoil consists of a very
coarse gravel with a mixture of sand; it will be readily seen that such soil is very porous and
requires an enormous amount of irrigation-water to keep the crops growing, especially during
the very hot months of the growing season. It has been found that only a few acres of this
gravelly land can be seeded down each year and given the proper amount of attention to secure
a good " catch " of alfalfa. In order to secure a good stand of alfalfa the young crop must be
watered regularly during the first year until late in the fall, or it will dry out, as the roots of
alfalfa do not go down far enough the first year to withstand the excessive drought. Although
we have an abundance of irrigation-water early in the season, it gets very short in the latter
part of the growing season. Every effort is being made to secure an adequate supply during
the entire growing season; this can only be done by building storage-dams. The Tranquille River
has an enormous watershed tributary to it, and discharges into Kamloops Lake (Thompson
River) 21,000 acre-feet between April 16th and September 15th.    The very much larger portion Range flock in winter feed lot.
Range herd in winter quarters.  of this water conies down as a freshet in the early spring and is valueless as regards irrigation.
A few years ago we built a dam at the outlet of Tranquille Lake, which stored over 700 acre-
feet. Since then three or four small lakes have been utilized, and last fall we built a 5-foot dam,
on a body of water known as Sauls Lake, with a storage capacity of 375 acre-feet. Several other
lakes are available and should be dammed as soon as time will permit, as the supply can all be
used to good advantage. It should be pointed out that all this storage does not reach its
intended destination—the field crops—due to the .fact that the Tranquille River follows a very
circuitous route through a very rough country, and the bed of the stream is beset with innumerable beaver-dams, swamps, meadows, and log-jams, which all retard and waste the storage-water.
The land under alfalfa gave a very good yield. Three crops were cut on all of it and four
crops on some of it. The silage-crops, consisting of corn, and oats, peas, and vetch, were also
good, although slightly less than last year, owing to the fact that less acreage was used for the
crops. A fairly good crop of garden vegetables was also produced, also a goodly crop of potatoes,
to supply the needs of the Sanatorium.
_An experiment was made in the growing of broom-corn, with marked success. This crop
matured well and a number of brooms were made from the straw toy the broom-factory of the
Canadian National Institute of the Blind, Vancouver. These brooms proved to be of good quality
and gave excellent service. It is intended that a further experiment will be carried out next
year for the purpose of finding out whether this commodity can be grown profitably in this
locality or not.    Enough seed has been saved from this crop to plant next year's acreage.
The apple-crop, which in ordinary years is only large enough to supply the needs of the
ranch, was the poorest in, many years; climatic conditions in the early part of the growing
season being responsible for this failure.
Horses still continue to toe the most unprofitable department of the live stock. Experts and
leading authorities on this subject tell us that a cycle of better prices and greater demand will
come in due course of time. In the meantime we are disposing of a few at going prices, weeding
out the undesirables, and attempting to build up a better and more saleable type by the introduction and use of good sires. The yearling and 2-year-old colts are showing marked results in
this respect. The colts sired by the thorough-bred stallion are all true to form and are likely-
looking individuals that should develop into very desirable saddle-horses. The colts resulting
from the Shire stallion crossed on the range mares are showing much heavier bone and greater
size than their dams. These range horses are being kept at a minimum cost, as they run on the
ranges all the year, only the weaned colts receiving special care and attention. The pure-bred
Clydesdales produce a number of colts each year, and four of these have found a useful place
among the work-horses of the farm.
The farm flock of sheep has produced a fair profit this year. The lamb and wool crop both
brought good returns. Owing to the large amount of other live stock kept upon the farm, it has
been found difficult to find a place and room for the sheep during the summer months, and it
is intended to herd them on the ranges this coming summer with the view of ascertaining whether
sheep can be handled profitably in conjunction with cattle on the open ranges.
Hogs still continue to hold first place as a profit-making department among the different
lines of live-stock. Thirty-five to forty sows are kept and the most of these produce two litters
per year. Tests and experiments have been made with different breeds of swine with varying
results, but we have found that the pure-bred Berkshire of the thick-smooth type is best suited
to our conditions. They do well on alfalfa pastures and develop and mature at an early age.
Our good housing accommodation makes it possible to raise late fall and winter litters with
good success. These winter litters usually mature at a time of the year when pork prices are at
their highest and well repay the care expended upon them.
As suggested in last year's report, we went into the turkey business a little more extensively
than ever before. Thirty-five turkey hens were kept for breeding purposes, with the result that
over $1,400 worth of turkeys were raised, with a resulting profit of almost $900. While these
young toirds required consideratole attention for the first six weeks of their existence, they practically fed themselves after that time, until the fattening period commenced, by running on-the
fields gathering grass, herbs, grasshoppers, and other insects. Four weeks before marketing
these young birds were stuffed with wheat, corn, oats, and mashes.
The dairy herd is the most important branch on the ranch in point of production. This herd
consists of eighty-five head, with an average of forty-five producing cows.    An effort has always been made to care for these cows in the most modern up-to-date manner, having ever in mind the
commercial standard " to produce a high-grade first-quality product in the most economical
manner." In other words, it is our aim to produce the greatest quantity of high-grade milk per
cow consistent with profitable production. The cows after freshening are gradually given an
increasing and balanced ration consisting of corn silage, second- and third-crop alfalfa-hay,
mangels, and a meal mixture of ground oats, barley, bran, and oilcake. They are given all the
corn silage they can eat, a few roots, 12 to 15 lb. of alfalfa, and a meal ration which is increased
day by day so long as the animal will respond to it by way of greater production, but never
exceeding in quantity more than 1 lb. of meal to 3 or 4 lb. of milk; this amount depending
on the stage of the lactation period. No extensive experiments are carried on, but variations
are made at times for the purpose of ascertaining what particular rations they respond to best.
Every effort is made to give the animals abundance of light and fresh air, as well as sufficient
exercise in a good-sized paddock. The cows are never pastured, as it has been found after
several convincing tests that it is more economical to cut the alfalfa as green food and haul it
into the barn for them. They are also well groomed and the barn is kept sweet and clean and.
sanitary all the time. These conditions entail considerable labour and expense, but we have been
well rewarded in the health of our cows, as is borne out by the fact that we have our cows tested
twice a year for tuberculosis, and have never had a reactor in the herd for a great many years.
The dairy herd have given a good account of themselves this past year, having produced a
total of 590,913 lto„ of which the Sanatorium used 529,030 lb. " Mercena Molly Hengerveld,"
who received special mention in last year's report, is still keeping up her yearly production. Her
last three yearly records are 17,105 lb., 18,375 lb., and 21,292 lb. of milk, and she will finish her
present year with approximately 24,000 lb. of milk. She is due to freshen in less than two
months after the close of her present year. " Alexandra Verona May " and " Excellency Hengerveld Echo " are two other cows that give promise of equalling " Mercena Molly Hengerveld " as
heavy and persistent yearly producers. As a 2-year-old, " Excellency Hengerveld Echo." gave
17,884 lb. of milk and 707.5 lb. of butter, while "Alexandra Verona May" produced 20,791 lb.
of milk and 843.7 lb. of butter as a 4-year-old.
The beef herd, consisting of 341 head, of which forty-three are pure-bred, came in last fall
in very good shape, and wintered well owing to the very mild weather and good care given them.
They are all out on the ranges now. Three new Hereford sires were purchased this spring, to
be used on the range herd. The three animals are of exceptional type and quality and should do
a great deal to improve the type of the herd.
I wish to take this opportunity to express my appreciation of the support and assistance
afforded by you during the past year.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
D. W. Strachan,
Farm Superintendent.
List of Record Performances produced by' the Sanatorium Farm Herd for the Ye.ar 1925-20.
■u„. Milk Production. Butter.
Aame' Lb. Lb.
Alexandra Birdie Rag Apple   14,443 615.00
Alexandra Dorothy Kelly Pontiac  12,555 563.75
Alexandra Korndyke Aaggie   22,081 958.75
.Alexandra Birdie May   22,050 928.75
.Alexandra Verona May  17,044 685.00
Balcomo Ormsby Linette   10,991 483.75
Balcomo Ormsby Maysie   14,704 643.75
Fairy Sylvia Echo  15,125 631.25
Johanna Buttergirl Pontiac  14,01S 563.75
Julianna Korndyke Pontiac .:  17,136 780.00
Lady DeKol Clinker   14,529 700.00
Mercena Molly Hengerveld   21,292 812.50
Stella Korndyke Buttergirl   16,62S 716.25
Uneeda Peach DeKol   15,858 587.50
Johanna DeKol Princess   35,627 629.50 )-",.'■ ■
,'
IG Geo. 5
Tranquille Sanatorium.
U 25
SANATORIUM FARM REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1926.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheet with the Profit and Loss
Accounts for the year ended March 31st, 1926.
The farm again shows a profit on its operating account, which, although somewhat less than
last year, is still quite a substantial sum.
The hay and field crops generally were heavy and show a good profit, fully justifying the
heavy expenditures in bringing the land up to its present state of productivity. The live-stock
departments have also been operated on a profitable basis, as shown by the accounts submitted'.
The Sanatorium has been supplied with farm produce throughout the year, to the value of
$27,254.40, in the following quantities: 529,030 lb. milk, 33,624 lb. beef, 77,800 lb. potatoes, 4,581
lb. pork, l,236-y2 ft. mutton, 648 lb. turkey, 221% lb. fowl, 339 lb. veal, and approximately 10 tons
of vegetables from the truck-garden.
I have, etc.,
A. W. Whitecross,
  Bursar.
TRrtANQIIILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1926.
Assets.
Buildings and improvements  .' $101,820 61
Equipment Account        6,308 03
Land Account  :      70,405 88
.Accounts receivable—
Tranquille Sanatorium Account  $ 2,276 29
Notes receivable         253 3S
 2,529 67
Dam Account   421 72
D. W. Strachan (petty cash advance)         1,000 00
Inventories (live stock) —
Dairy herd  f. $15,945 00
Bulls         525 00
Range stock    14,125 00
Sheep      4,3S0 00
Horses       7,335 00
Swine        2,394 00
Turkeys and poultry         320 00
One sheep-dog  30 00
      45,054 00
Motor-vehicles   615 15
Unissued stores—
Feed  $ 8,431 75
Ice         120 00
Coal          240 00
Potatoes    :         700 00
 9,491 75
Harness  : .'  622 50
Machinery and plant         2,673 50
Tools    419 35
Canadian Bank of Commerce (StockTrading Account)   787 78
Deficit for year 1925-26        3,655 69
$245,S05 63 Balance-sheet-—Continued.
Liabilities.
D. W. Strachan (petty cash advance)   $    1,000 00
D. W. Strachan (Stock Trading Account)         1,500 00
Capital Surplus Account     243,305 63
$245,S05 63
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts.
To profit on live stock  $ 6,977 01
Hide-sales         2S7 55
Milk-sales      19,316 70
Board Account  34 72
Beef-sales       4,463 73
Teaming            103 25
Pork-sales          762 96
Sundry farm produce       2,919 45
 $ 34,865 37
Expenditure.
Salaries $12,556 52
Feed   9,539 96
Fuel, light, and water   2,012 OS
Provisions  2,S06 95
Blacksmith's supplies  57 S6
Seeds and fruit-boxes  236 31
Drugs and veterinary   304 45
Implements and harness   1,992 26
Incidentals and contingencies  .'  3,119 76
 32,626 15
\ 	
Profit on Operating Account $   2.239 22
Less depreciation—
Depreciation on automobile $    205 05
Depreciation on equipment        476 41
Depreciation on farm buildings      5,213 45
$ 5,894 91
Balance, being deficit for year 1925-26       3,655 69
$ 5,894 91   $ 5,S94 91
Hay—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts.
Hay  (alfalfa), beef, 70,000 lb $     700 OO
Hay  (swamp), beef cattle, 543,000 lb      1.900 50
Hay (alfalfa), horses, 323,000 1b      2,422 50
Hay (alfalfa), sheep, 21,500 lb        215 00
Hay (alfalfa), dairy, 422,000 lb     4,220 00
 $    9,458 00
Carried forward  $   9,458 00 Wyomo George."
Mercena Molloy Hengerveld."  16 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. U 27
Hay"—Profit and Loss Account—Continued.
Brought forward   $    9,45S 00
Expenditure.
Irrigation, wages  $     510 00
Cleaning ditches          150 00
Ploughing, cultivating, working, etc         155 OO
Cutting and stacking meadow-hay       1,050 00
Irrigator's board         373 00
Harvesting four crops hay  :     2,015 00
 4,253 00
Profit, 1925-26  $    5,205 00
Swine—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts.
Pork sold to Sanatorium  $    762 96
Sundry sales     3,740 88
Pork sold to boarding-house         250 00
Inventory, 1925-26      2,394 00
 $    7,147 84
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1924-25  $ 2,330 00
Labour, sundry employees   79 44
Feed for stock          249 50
Barley, 22,000 lb        484 00
Oats, 40,000 lb.        700 00
Board of employees         225 00
Wages        358 69
Boars, purchase of   52 10
 4,478 73
Profit, 1925-26  $    2,669 11
Sheep—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts.
Mutton sold to Sanatorium  $ ■   333 62
Wool sold         108 15
Sold to boarding-house   12 00
Inventory, 1925-26     1,417 11
 $    1,870 88
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1924-25  $ 1,239 OS
Hay, 21,500 lto.         215 00
Salaries          50 00
Board, employees   47 00
Sundry employees    15 00
 1,566 08
Profit, 1925-26  $      304 80 U 28 British Columbia.   • 1926
Turkeys and Chickens—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts. .*,
Turkeys sold to Sanatorium $ 207 36
Turkeys sold, sundry   745 47
Inventory, 1925-26   157 50
Chickens sold to Sanatorium   50 56
Inventory, 1925-26   320 50
Sold to boarding-house   IS 30
 $    1,499 69
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1924--25  $ 166 50
Expenses   55 08
Feed     143 95
Turkeys purchased   15 00
Hens purchased  :  12 00
Board, employees   95 00
Wages, man for turkeys  89 93
Wages, man for chickens  56 06
  633 52
Profit, 1925-26  : $       S66 17
Silage—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts.
.Inventory, 1925-26, 1,042,000 lb $    2.605 00
Expenditure.
Seed-oats and peas  $      76 50
Irrigation         350 00
Cultivating and weeding          123 00
Employees, board          705 00
Cutting, hauling, and siloing      1,234 77
Seed-corn  28 75
 2,518 02
Profit, 1925-26  $        86 98
Orchard—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1920.
Receipts.
Inventory, 1925-26, 30 boxes  $      30 00
Sold to boarding-house, 30 boxes   30 00
 $        60 00
Expenditure.
Irrigation  : $      15 00
Material, 50 boxes   10 00
Labour, nails, etc  2 00
Picking and storing   6 00
Pruning   14 50
■       47 50
Profit, 1925-26  $        12 50 16 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. U 29
Dairy Cattle—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts.
%Iilk supplied to Sanatorium  B $19,204 10
Sundry sales  '   23 10
Cattle sold   428 55
Milk supplied to boarding-house   638 75
Manure     1,050 00
Inventory, 1925-26   16,470 OO
 $ 37,814 50
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1924-25  _ $16,440 00
Oats, 18S.700 lb  3,506 00
Bran, 36,000 lb  547 50
Oilcake, 291,600 lb  962 00
Salt, 7,300 lb  91 50   •
Barley, 30,500 lb  552 50
Ensilage, 501,500 lb  1,254 00
' Hay, 440,000 lb _  4,220 00
Drugs and veterinary   181 00
Teaming, 150 days   450 00
Green feed, 450,000 lb :  1,125 00
Light     583 00
Water     287 00
Wages    '.  3.525 00
Employees, board  2,281 25
Bedding   375 00
Sundries    374 54
 36,755 29
Profit, 1925-26  $    1,059 21
Range Stock—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts.
Beef sold to Sanatorium $ 4,410 66
Sundry sales  ■-        122 83
Hides sold         287 55
Manure        640 00
Veal sold to Sanatorium   44 07
Beef sold to boarding-house       1.383 90
Inventory,   1925-26      15,975 00
 $ 22,873 01
Expenditure.
Hay, alfalfa, 70,000 lb : _ $     700 00
Hay, swamp, 543,000 lb '. _      1.900 50
Sundry expenses          502 25
Meal, 38,000 lb        608 00
Silage, 100,000 lb        250 00
Salt  35 00
Wages   :        550 00
Horse-labour          550 00
Beef cattle bought         375 00
Range leases        289 78
Inventory, 1924-25  - .--    15,950 00
 21,710 53
Profit, 1925-26  $   1,162 4S IT 30 British Columbia. 1926
Potatoes—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
Receipts. _
Sold to Sanatorium, 77,800 lb $ 1,376 75
Supplied to boarding-house, 11,500 lb         176 25
Inventory, 1925-26          700 00
 $   2,253 00
Expenditure.
Seed, 9,600 lb $ 144 00
Ploughing and harrowing  :  4S 00
Planting    160 00
Weeding and cultivating  140 0
Digging and storing  280 00
  772 00
Profit, 1925-26  $    1,481 00
Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1920.
Receipts.
Vegetables sold to Sanatorium  $     855 32
Vegetables supplied to boarding-house         211 00
 $    1,066 32
Expenditure.
Ploughing and harrowing  $ 105 00
Weeding    95 00
Salaries and wages   331 43
Hoeing and irrigation   123 00
Seeds    70 05
Sundry  expenses    53 63
  778 71
Profit, 1925-26 $       287 61
Grounds—Profit and Loss Account, Mabch 31st, 1926.
To Expenses  $ 50 39
Teaming   62 50
Labour    475 00
Employees, board .'  283 00
Shrubs !  6 65
Loss, 1925-26  $ 877 54
Fencing—Pbofit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
To Salaries and wages $ 277 74
Team-labour  175 00
Material  30 00
Fencing expense  129 22
Employees, board  175 00
Loss, 1925-26  $ 7S6 96 16 Geo. 5                                 Tranquille Sanatorium. U 31
Maintenance of Ditches—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
To Salaries    ! $ 410 00
Board    230 00
Horse-labour   350 00
Material, lumber, gates, and flumes   150 00
Loss, 1925-26  $ 1,140 00
Machinery and Automobile Upkeep—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1926.
To Salaries    $ S75 00
Employees, board  450 00
Sundry employees  58 30
Gasolene, automobile  ' 104 00
Gasolene, farm engines  115 96
Depreciation, automobile   205 05
Depreciation on equipment   476 41
Loss, 1925-26 $ 2,284 72
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.
520-327-6820 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0228003/manifest

Comment

Related Items