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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THIRTY-FIRST REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING SIXTEENTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1928

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIRTY-FIRST REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
SIXTEENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30TH, 1927, AND THE FIFTY-FIFTH REPORT OF VITAL
STATISTICS DEPARTMENT, YEAR ENDED
DECEMBER 31ST, 1926
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Ciiaiit.es F. Kaxfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1027.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1927.
To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Provincial Board of Health
for the year ended June 30th, 1927.
WILLIAM SLOAN,
Provincial Secretary. ,   ' REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1927.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Thirty-first Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended June 30th, 1927.
Ordinarily, our Report appears in August of the current year, but owing to our arrangement
with Ottawa in respect to the vital statistics it has been delayed pending receipt of the tables
from the Census Bureau.
In 1918 I suggested to the Honourable the Minister a change in the date of the publication
of our Report, asking that it be published in midsummer in order to coincide with the completion
of the school-year, and also to enable us to present a report on the Vital Statistics Branch a
sufficient length of time from the completion of the previous year to enable us to return a
complete report.    This has been carried out.
In the meantime, arrangements which had been pending with the Census Bureau at Ottawa
have been given effect to, and all the Provinces make their complete Vital Statistics Report to
Ottawa, who tabulate them, but we find now that Ottawa is not able to give us the figures until
the end of the present year, and we are just in receipt of these.
This delays our general Report, and I beg leave to suggest that we revert to our former
procedure; that is, for the Annual Report of the Department to appear in midsummer at the end
of the school-year, and that the Vital Statistics Report be issued as a separate report and be
published on receipt of the full tables at the end of the year. This will enable us to present
both Reports to the Legislature in January of each year as is provided for under present laws.
This procedure will coincide with the other Provinces in regard to the issuance of the Vital
Statistics Report, and enables comparison to be made as between the Provinces, and also enables
the Census Department to publish a complete report coincident with the publication of the
Provincial reports.
The Annual Report of the Provincial Board of Health is primarily engaged in reporting the
statistics of communicable diseases which come within the purview of the Department, and,
by comparing the number of cases as reported from year to year, gauge the results of the work
of the Board. This is the general conception that the public has of our work, but as we progress
we have endeavoured to show the public that the number of cases of infectious diseases reported
is more a criticism of, not the Department, but of the conduct of the community itself in regard
to their non-observance of the law of the land.
Our whole effort has been directed along the lines of the awakening, in the public conscience,
of a sense of their responsibility, and that the results from the enforcement of the health laws
can only be brought about by co-operation on the part of the public. Governments may make
laws, but they can only keep a step or two ahead of what the public desires, and to get at the
desires of the public necessitates a long-continued propaganda in an effort to educate them to
their responsibilities. I am pleased to say that during the past few years there has been a
remarkable awakening of the public conscience in this matter. They are beginning to realize
what the individual as regards his relation to the community means, and as regards the efforts
he must make individually in the prevention of disease by attention to personal hygiene, the
education of himself and others in the idea of the prevention ,f disease as distinct from its
cause. The inculcation of this idea has been our aim, and our efforts have been to create a
broader outlook by the health-work as carried on by the Government.
Formerly it was the highest ambition of public-health workers to show each year a
diminished morbidity and mortality rate from certain named diseases. If the Public Health
Officer could show that in a brief period of his incumbency he had cut the typhoid death-rate
down to one-fifth of its former proportions and had a steadily diminishing rate for scarlet fever
or diphtheria, he felt that he had done a great deal. But within the past few years we have
had a higher ambition. We have felt that we must deal with more than the negative side of
health, and that it was most distinctly within the province of a Health Officer to put forth
every effort to raise the vitality of every human unit in his community to the highest point of
efficiency. He must no longer be satisfied with the knowledge that from the result of his
efforts a number of individuals have survived who might have died from some preventable
disease, but he must also feel that he must lay a foundation for the robust citizens of to-morrow, and so our ideals have advanced, taking in not only the previous field of sanitation, but also that
of personal hygiene.
How to reach the individual, however, has been the problem. Health Officers could not
personally supervise the daily life of each individual in the community, and he recognizes,
therefore, the necessity for educational measures, directed both to the end of securing better
understanding, and hence better support to the Health Department, and also to so educate the
individual as to furnish him with the knowledge of how to promote his individual health and
with the incentive to put that knowledge into effect.
That we are accomplishing our purpose is largely due to the fact that a sufficient number
of the citizens have become thoroughly interested, and through them, as individuals, organizations have been reached, and public-health work in British Columbia is able to show milestones
of progress from year to year.
Our Public Health Nursing Service is probably the best example of the progress that we
are making in regard to the education of the public.
The Department of Public Health in the University is providing a course for the training
of our Public Health Nurses. This is supplemented by a training in our leading Public Health
Centres of the actual work as carried out in our different districts, and it is due to the establishment of these nurses that we are able to report still further advances during the past year.
Our ambition has been to create self-contained health units in the different municipalities
under a full-time Medical Health Officer and with a sufficient number of nurses to give effect to
the health laws.
There have been, in our two largest cities, full-time Medical Health Officers for some years,
but in all of the rest of the Province part-time officers carried on the work. These officers were
selected from amongst the local practitioners, and while the Department acknowledges its
indebtedness to these men and to their valuable services in time of epidemics, yet it was
impossible to embark upon an educational health-work under the supervision of men who were
themselves busy practitioners, and our object has been to convince the people of the value of
giving specially trained people the special work of educating them to realize that, within natural
limits, any community can determine its own death-rate, and also to realize that " prevention
is better far than cure."
We have established, during the past year, three full-time health units. It is a difficult
matter to convince people that they are deriving benefits following certain costs if it cannot
be demonstrated to them that there is not an actual monetary return, and in this materialistic
age a suggestion to increase taxes without such a monetary return receives very scant attention.
But the work carried on by the nurses, the results we have achieved in our schools, the better
control of epidemics, all has had its effect, and led to the adoption by three of the districts of
full-time men, and I am pleased to record that the results in these districts, in even such a short
time, have convinced the people.
The men whom we have placed in charge are men who have specialized in health-work;
they went into the district with a definite programme and have carried it out, with the result
that adjoining districts are making inquiries as to how it was done and what it costs.
In inaugurating the first three units, we are indebted to the Rockefeller International Health
Board for financial assistance, which is granted for a limited time, but it is the fact that this
has been granted that has enabled us to get the people to make the beginning. By the time
that this grant is withdrawn these districts will, as they express themselves, willingly go on
with the work.
The plan carried out is a full health programme, beginning with prenatal work, followed
by infant-welfare, pre-school, then school, until,the child leaves the school. This is the basis
of the work, and using this as the introduction into the home, the establishment of classes
amongst the older people, we are able to bring home to them the real purpose of a co-ordinated
plan; that is, the elimination of disease by study, research, and co-operative effort, based upon
our knowledge that common contagious diseases are spread chiefly by the direct transfer of
excretions from person to person.
The establishment of unified health service is the application of the knowledge gathered
as a result of investigations by many men in all countries, and its justification is probably best
expressed by quoting from Dr. Charles V. Chapin's address on " Science and Public Health "
before the American Public Health Association:—
" The science which can point to its achievements against smallpox, malaria, yellow fever,
diphtheria, typhoid and typhus fevers, tuberculosis, and a score of other diseases, as well as BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27. K 3
to a rapid lengthening of human life, and especially to the saving of vast numbers of infants
from early death, need not be ashamed to acknowledge that some experiments have failed;
neither should it hesitate to admit that we are still merely picking up pebbles on the shore of
the sea of knowledge, and that what is not known about maintaining and perfecting the health
of mankind is far greater than what is known. The opportunities for discovery are as great
as before the days of Harvey, Pasteur, and Lister."
We have endeavoured to show in our reports that the Health Board is appreciative of the
changes that have taken place in regard to the management of health matters. The essential
change is that " The old public health was concerned with the environment, the new is concerned
with the individual; the old sought the sources of infectious diseases in the surroundings of
man, the new finds them in the man himself." Our object is the awakening of the public
conscience and securing the encouragement of an intelligent public opinion to bring, through
the practical application of our health laws, the increased length of life, increased productive
capacity of the human asset, decreased sickness and misery, and bring about the culmination of
national prosperity produced by happy, healthy, contented people.
I will refer briefly to the different branches of the Department.
TUBERCULOSIS.
The work in regard to tuberculosis is making very satisfactory progress. Dr. A. S. Lamb,
our Travelling Diagnostician, is reporting a real increase in the interest which is being manifested by the people in general.
He is establishing clinics in different parts of the Province, in co-operation with the local
medical men and with the assistance of our Public Health Nurses. He deals with this in his
report, which we are publishing.
The figures in regard to tuberculosis, which we publish, appear large considering the
population, but we must take into account that British Columbia, for climatic reasons, is
regarded as a Mecca for tuberculosis cases which come here from all parts of the country.
In addition, the number of deaths is swollen by the deaths amongst the Indians, the Chinese,
and the Japanese, and Dr. Lamb, in his report, is publishing these figures, which are illuminating.
In connection with the Canadian Tuberculosis Association, and through financial assistance
of the Federal Indian Department, surveys of the Indians have been carried out during the past
two years under the management of Dr. Hill, Professor of Health in the University of- British
Columbia and Director of Laboratories, together with Dr. Vrooman, formerly Superintendent
of the Tranquille Sanatorium, and Dr. Lamb. The results of their work are embodied in
comprehensive reports which will be published in the Annual Report of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association.
The work lias been done in a very thorough manner, and is probably the best of its kind
that has been undertaken in regard to the Indians in any part of the continent.
We believe that the Federal Department has under advisement the establishment of a
Tuberculosis Sanatorium for the Indians. The Provincial Government has already under construction a hundred-bed unit at the Provincial Sanatorium at Tranquille, and there has been
provided in the CitjT of Vancouver a ninety-bed accommodation for advanced cases, in order
to relieve the Sanatorium of the care of these cases and to permit of more cases in the incipient
stage being treated.
VENEREAL CLINICS.
Our venereal clinics are carrying on their work in a most satisfactory manner. Their real
purport is being better understood by the public, and without very much effort on our part the
attendance is increasing and we are working our clinics to capacity. We have had to enlarge
the accommodation in the clinic in Vancouver three different times.
Educational work is also being carried on through different agencies, and we are satisfied
that there has been an appreciable control of the disease established—that is, on the curative
side—and these results are being shown by the decrease in the number of patients in our mental
hospitals since the inception of our work.
The preventive side is a problem which requires very earnest work to bring about appreciable
results. The control of the infected person, especially in our cities^ is a problem to which no
satisfactory solution has been offered, other than the hope, by education through meetings and
literature, of impressing upon the rising generation the real clangers of venereal disease. K 4 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
One striking result, as we gather from our reports, is the account given by the drug trade
of the great decrease in requests for " quack " remedies and the increase in the demand for
prophylactic packages. We take it that this is one of the best indications of advance in the
education of the public.
LABORATORIES.
The laboratories are probably the best barometer of our work, and the increase in the work
in these places us amongst the leaders on the continent; that is, for the work done on a
per capita basis.
Since the last Report we have opened another laboratory at Kelowna, making four Provincial
Laboratories, and we have requests from two other centres in the Province for similar establishments.
In the report issued by the American Public Health Association on the laboratory-work in
North America, the amount of work done in our laboratories shows that we are in the forefront
in regard to our use of these facilities.
In addition to this, we are receiving co-operation from the municipalities in a very satisfactory manner, and they are contributing a yearly grant in preference to paying for the work
as it arises from time to time. They are satisfied that the control of infectious diseases is much
more effective with the help of the laboratory and are recognizing that a yearly contribution is
a real economy.
In connection with the laboratory-work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out free on request,
and for the year ended June 30th, 1927, the following have been furnished: 12,445 points
smallpox vaccine, 3,769,000 units diphtheria antitoxin, 40 doses diphtheria toxoid, 7 packages
Schick test for diphtheria, 2,083y2 c.c. scarlet fever antitoxin, 9 packages Dick test for scarlet
fever, 623 doses typhoid vaccine, 207,000 units tetanus antitoxin, 7 packages whooping-cough
serum, 8 packages anti-meningitis serum, 6 packages anti-streptococci serum, and 1 package
haemostatic serum.
SANITATION.
The report of our Chief Sanitary Inspector is included herewith.
Under the general head of sanitation, we are concerned with the larger problems in regard
to water-supplies, sewerage, transportation, public buildings, and more especially with the logging
and mining camps and the inspection of fruit and fish canneries. This work is carried out in
a very systematic manner and the greatly increased problem of the auto tourist is being handled
satisfactorily.
Following a severe epidemic of typhoid fever in New York, intensive work was carried on
by the United States Public Health Service in the regulation of the oyster-beds. We have
become, by arrangement, an integral part of this work and our inspection of all our oyster-beds
are accepted by the United States Public Health Service, which permits of the export of the
oysters to the United States.
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING.
I have to report a continued improvement and extension of this work. The University of
British Columbia has enlarged the scope of the work, and has so arranged the schedule that
more time will be given in the course for the actual work in the field in connection with our
existing health centres. One month of the course will be spent by the students under charge
of the Supervising Nurses in our health centres, and the nurses will take an active part in the
public-health nursing work as carried out in British Columbia.
We are very much gratified indeed to report an enlivened interest on the part of the teaching
profession, and wish to recognize the co-operation that we are receiving from the Provincial
Education Department.
It is a splendid evidence of the advance of public opinion in this question that there are
usually five or six places waiting for nurses, and, in addition, we are receiving requests from
the local School Boards that our nurses be detailed to teach health in the schools.
In a former report I mentioned that I preferred to call our nurses public-health " teachers "■
rather than public-health nurses. This idea has been kept uppermost and we are reaping the
effects during the present time.
INFECTIOUS DISEASES.
.   On the whole, the past year has been favourable in respect to the occurrence of infectious
diseases.    We have had two possible threatened epidemics, one of smallpox occurring in the BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 5
Nanaimo District and later in the season for a time it appeared as if we were in for a very
serious epidemic of poliomyelitis.
The smallpox manifested itself first in one or two cases in the sparsely settled country
districts and, being of such a mild type, unfortunately did not alarm the people. While the
usual precautions were taken and quarantine established in as far as possible, it was difficult
to persuade the people that there might arise from this a serious state of affairs. It continued
to spread through the district. Officials from the Board were sent up. Free clinics for vaccination were established which were well patronized, and almost immediately there was a subsidence
in the number of the cases.
In this connection, I would like to point out, more especially to the authorities of Greater
Vancouver, that it is a very great mistake to neglect precautions at any time in regard to
smallpox. The experience which Vancouver had in 1925-26, when it was very difficult to
persuade the authorities to take any active steps in the prevention of smallpox,, led to the
development of an epidemic which brought about a ban placed on the city by the United States
authorities. This soon convinced the business element of the necessity of something being
done, and we succeeded in vaccinating a great many people, and more especially the schoolchildren.
During the past summer season, some cases developed in the suburbs of the city and the
enforcement of the regulations as to vaccination of school-children was carried out, until a
stop was put to it by the School Board, who, under a technical interpretation of the terms of
the regulations, said that they were not lawfully permitted to spend money for vaccinating the
school-children by the school doctor in the school offices. This difficulty was met by the City
Board of Health offering to assume charge and bear the expense, but they were not allowed the
use of the school offices.
This action on the part of the School Board is very much to be regretted. The children
were accustomed to attending these offices for the regular examinations by the School Medical
Inspector and the nurses, and it was no difficulty to carry out the vaccination. Following the
action of the School Board, the City Board of Health advertised, free clinics to be established,
but they were not patronized to any extent.
During the past three weeks there has developed in the schools of South Vancouver a dozen
cases, and active measures are being taken to endeavour to nip the possibilities in the bud.
Vancouver is a seaport town, open all the year round, and in communication with all ports
in the world. The civic authorities must recognize that under present international conditions
any city in the position of Vancouver must have a clean bill of health if they expect to carry
on business.
POLIOMYELITIS.
In 1916 a severe epidemic of poliomyelitis existed in New York, over 20,000 cases with over
5,000 deaths. Previous to that, poliomyelitis had been very rare in North America, but since
then it has gradually crept over the country, and during the past year large numbers of cases
have been reported from the different States, nearly every State in the Union being affected.
In July an outbreak occurred in the neighbouring Province of Alberta, and in August cases
developed in British Columbia in the middle interior, and there were reported in all 175 casesy
but a number of these were reported in carrying out the regulations to treat suspected cases as
true cases.
The medical profession co-operated in a splendid manner with the Provincial Board of
Health, and by October the conditions were well in hand. This was followed, by the end of
the month, with a complete subsidence.
Our knowledge of poliomyelitis as to causation has been enlarged by the experimental work
which has been carried on in the laboratories, and we know that the symptoms are due to the
effects from a virus which is so minute that it has not been isolated to be examined, but in the
laboratories they have been able to transmit the disease to monkeys. There has not, however,
as yet, been brought forward a serum which would act either as a prophylactic or as a curative
measure. There has been, however, use made of the serum taken from paralytic cases and the
same procedure is carried out with this as in the treatment of measles.
Immediately following the outbreak, the medical profession was circularized and the
addresses of the patients and information as to the date of attack and the time of development of paralysis was asked for.    The medical profession co-operated in this by giving us the K 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
names and addresses, and a letter was sent to the parents asking for permission to obtain blood.
We have had a very good response indeed, and our laboratories are collecting serum which we
will have on hand should another outbreak occur within the next year.
A table of infectious diseases reported during the year is incorporated in this Report, and
the regional report of diseases is as follows:—
Chicken-pox.—McBride, Parksville and District, Port Essington, and Williams Lake and
District.
Influenza.—Britannia Beach, Campbell River and District, Clayoquot Sound District, Edge-
wood District, Invermere and District, Kimberley, McBride, Oliver and District, Smithers, and
Williams Lake and District.
Measles.—Ashcroft and District, Burnaby Municipality, Merritt and District, Mission, Parksville and District, Pitt Meadows Municipality, Port Simpson, Vancouver, and Williams Lake
and District.
Mumps.—Alert Bay.
Rubella (German Measles).—Burnaby Municipality, Cranbrook and District, Cumberland,
Kamloops, Kimberley, Pitt Meadows Municipality, and Point Grey  (University District).
Scarlet Fever.—Kamloops and Merritt and District.
Smallpox.—Kamloops District and Nanaimo and District.
Whooping-cough.—Cranbrook and District, Duncan and District, and Invermere and District.
Cemetery-sites approved.—New Westminster District (Jewish), Salmon Arm, Grindrod, and
Clo-oose.
Sewage-disposal Systems approved.—Point Grey (extensions), Vancouver (extensions), West
Burnaby, South Vancouver (extensions), North Vancouver City (extensions), Prince Rupert
(extensions), Powell River (extensions), and Trail (extension).
Water-supply Systems approved.—Point Grey (extensions), North Vancouver City (Rice
Lake storage system), North Vancouver District (Kennedy Lake supply and extension of main),
Vernon (extension and alterations), Sechelt (Chapman Creek supply), West Vancouver (Eagle
Lake supply), Saanich (extensions and alterations), South Vancouver (extension), Rossland
(extensions), Prince George (extensions), and Nelson (renewals).
I beg leave to ask, sir, for your consideration for increased accommodation for our Department. Our Vital Statistics Branch is showing a wonderful growth and the work has increased
over 100 per cent, in the past four years.    A full report of their activities is appended.
We a,re also appending a full report of the Medical Inspection of Schools, and I think any
one reading it will find it very interesting in the demonstration that we are able to give of the
improvements.
In asking for further accommodation, I am also asking for an increase in staff. The wrork
has grown to such proportions that the lack of a trained staff is militating against the expansion
of the Department. We can truly say that we have accomplished the main purpose of our
work—that is, educating the public—and the demands from the public for expansion of our
work are becoming insistent. I hope that you will please take under careful consideration our
request for the addition of an Epidemiologist to the staff. The question of expense should not
enter in, as he will save his salary five times over in the checking of infectious diseases and iri
the work which he can do along educational lines.
I would also like, sir, to express, for myself and staff, appreciation of the co-operation
which we receive from yourself, and I would like to take this opportunity of expressing to you
my appreciation of the splendid co-operation that I receive from the staff. The increase of our
work necessitates them working, on occasion, overtime, and a request for this is always cheerfully complied with. The fact that we have been able to make such satisfactory progress is
due to the cheerful help that I am receiving. I may say that the staff and myself appreciate
the active interest of yourself in our work—an interest that is based upon the idea of understanding the policies and the details of the Department and lending to our success your help and
encouragement.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG, M.D.,
Provincial Health Officer. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 7
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE
PROVINCE, JULY, 1926, TO JUNE, 1927.
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES  OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES  IN THE
PROVINCE, JULY, 1926, TO JUNE, 1927—Continued,
13
n   .
I'l
OS
o
p,
8
HS
o
s:
a.
S
8
"oj
J>»
H
13
OJ _3J
5 g
3S,
&1
O
P.
<u
361
1
4
o
ci tt'm
S ci aj
H3  £  OS
3 S qj
SOS
>
OJ
-Hi
OJ
'jh
Ci
O
QQ
495
46
3
OJ o
52 ic
o
5,
s
m
227
0
JH
•c
H
42
■o
'3 sj
•S ?
>) aj
Hfc.
41
ip
OH3
O  -Ii
-C  3
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Brought forward	
3
610
120
2,982
65
6
1
58
1,552
574
10
2
3
65
6
1
15
10
1
17
66
12
2
6
2
2
1*
175
50
2
10
80
4
1
33
20
35
30
5
'4'
20
6
43
58
2
5
28
9
i
2
4
1
3
4
5
6
9
2
1
25
46
9
13
2,383
49
46
1,811
63
4
1
3
11
19
3
1
12
1
4
6
3
1
1
14
10
8
1
2
Sfi
Trail City	
1
17
1
2
1
122
8
300
20
79
272
5
1
49
62
60
207
fW
1
2
41
37
5
4
43
8
40
49
1
125
250
8
1
1
282
150
10
1
54
67
1
509
13
2
11
477
81
-
1
936
1
252
235
64
Totals	
1,599
7,857
1,770
8SW GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1927.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Seventeenth Annual Report for the Sanitary Branch
of your Department.
With increasing population, both permanent and transient, the work of this division has
increased to such an extent that any thought of holidays has been submerged to the background.
New industries to develop our natural resources have called for more field-work along prophylactic lines. Fortunately, the general public is becoming alive to the value of good health through
sanitary precaution and a disposition to co-operate with Health Officers and Sanitary Inspectors
is far more evident than in pioneer days.
Briefly outlining my work alphabetically, I must commence with the new source of anxiety,
that of the
AUTO TOURIST CAMP.
Camps are now provided for visiting autoists by nearly all the municipalities, also as a
business by caterers to this class of tourists. These camps are under the inspection and
jurisdiction of local sanitary officers and are in the main quite satisfactory. Our greatest
concern lies with the indifferent and selfish camper that stops overnight at the first convenient
place, usually near a creek, litters the place with all kinds of refuse and insanitary filth, and
finally neglects to see that his camp-fire is entirely extinguished. It requires no stretch of
imagination to see what a twofold menace to health and property is engendered by such conduct.
In view of the increasing number of properly located and operated auto camps on all our main
roads, it is proposed that'in future no individual camping on or near roadside will be permitted.
BATHING CAMPS.
The cities have been deserted by the younger generation in their love for the sea and open
spaces. Seaside camps all over the southern portion of British Columbia have been literally
swamped, especially at week-ends, when the grown-ups make their periodical visits. One of our
largest marine transportation companies has shown vision and far-sightedness in establishing
many new camps at seaside points. These camps consist of numerous cottages with modern
conveniences, and in several camps the visitors may prefer a fully equipped hotel. At these
company-owned camps sanitation is not lost sight of, but unfortunately we have to deal with
many places used and rented by private parties where the tenants are transient, and where
nothing but the most primitive sanitary conveniences are provided, and very often the drinking-
water is of doubtful purity. These places, scattered along a coast-line of several hundred miles,
call for frequent visits and enforcement of the Sanitary Regulations. This constant vigilance,
coupled with the open-air life, is probably responsible for the freedom from all infectious or
contagious disease at our popular seaside resorts.
CANNERIES.
Our fruit and vegetable canneries, which are mostly located in the .Okanagan country, are
operated by men who are, fortunately, versed in the laws of sanitary cleanliness and take a
pride in having visitors see every part of their establishment, and co-operating at every turn
with inspecting officials.
FISH-CANNERIES.
Our fish-canneries form probably the leading food-export industry of Canada. The fact that
British Columbia canned salmon commands the highest prices in the world's largest market is
explained by the fact that in no part of the universe is the catching and canning of salmon
brought nearer the peak of perfection in sanitary and expeditious handling than in British Columbia. Every year sees new canning-machines added, so that in many of our newer canneries
the fish, is scarcely touched by human hands from the time it leaves the net until canned, cooked,
and ready for consumption. Federal Fishery Overseers are on constant patrol to ensure that
only seasonable and strictly fresh fish are used, whilst our own regulations are strictly enforced.
OYSTER-BEDS.
Another important and increasing food product coming under the jurisdiction of this
Department is oysters.
It is not generally known that an increasing export trade is being built up by our oyster-
ground operators. There are more than a score of firms operating oyster-beds on British
Columbia coastal foreshore. Many of them are exporting considerable of their products to
the United States.    Until quite recently this was accomplished without difficulty.
During the early part of this year the United States Health authorities at Washington, D.C,
formulated new regulations dealing with oysters and the oyster-growing industry. These regulations are applicable to every oyster-bed in the United States, and are also applied to oysters
exported to the United States, inasmuch as before oysters can be shipped from Canada to the
United States a certificate issued by the local Provincial Board of Health must state that the
beds are free from sewage; the buildings, containers, and implements are sanitary ; and the
operators and employees clean and free from skin, blood, or contagious disease.
Fortunately these regulations do not impede the export of oysters because every oyster-bed
in British Columbia is located far from city sewers, and the exporters are all of the type known]
as sanitary cranks and only too glad to carry out any suggestions made by your Inspector.
The oyster industry here is comparatively in its infancy, but we anticipate no difficulty in
protecting the public health from the slightest chance of ill-effect through oysters, in so far as
their culture is concerned.
The safe and proper handling of oysters after they are in the hands of retailers is now a
matter receiving the consideration of this Department.
MINING AND LOGGING CAMPS.
The mining and logging development in British Columbia is now attracting the world at
large.
The industries are largely controlled by big corporations with foresight enough to realize
the value of sanitation for employees. Nearly all the large industrial camps are now conducted
upon sanitary lines which exceed the demands of our regulations, resulting in a better class of
work and a contented people. This applies especially to such places as Britannia Mines, Ocean
Falls, Kimberley, Powell River, Woodfibre, Port Alice, and Anyox.
Our trouble, if any, is with the small individually owned camps. These are subject to
periodical visits.
NUISANCES.
Nuisance complaints this year show an increase, which can be explained as follows :—
In a district which up to a few years ago was a wilderness of isolation a firm started a
piggery on several acres. The place was conducted along fairly sanitary lines, but of recent
years adjacent acreage has been taken up, cultivated, and homes established by most desirable
newcomers. In the meantime the piggery flourishes, but the ground is becoming so saturated
with the effluent of the septic tank that, in spite of precautions, a strong nauseating odour
permeates the vicinity for half a mile distant. This is especially noticeable on evenings following
a hot day with low barometric pressure. A new sub-irrigation system is now being considered
in an effort to abate this nuisance. This is a fair example of the problems which your sanitary
officers are called upon to solve.
Another nuisance dealt with was the odour from a fertilizing and fish-oil factory adjoining
the residential part of a small city. This was abated by the owners closing down for the summer
season.    This concern established its plant without a permit from this Department.
Other nuisances arise from improper and inadequate disposal of septic-tank effluent. These
have-been dealt with.
To enumerate all the alleged nuisances wrould consume much time. Some are serious, whilst
many are petty, but all have to be investigated and corrective action taken where needed to
safeguard public health. 'JlMMlMi '
CRESCENT OYSTER-BEDS,  1927.     THIS  SHOWS ONE OF  THE SUB-FLOATS  AND RAFT-FLOATS  WHERE
THE SORTING-OUT OF  MATURED  OYSTERS  TAKES PLACE.     THE VERY   SMALL ONES
ARE   RETURNED   TO   THE   PROPAGATING-GROUNDS.
CRESCENT  OYSTER-BEDS,   SHOWING  MOUTH  OF   SERPENTINE RIVER AT LOW   TIDE.  WATERSHEDS.
The Sanitary Regulations provided especially for watershed areas have been most favourably
commented upon by visiting Health Officers and Sanitarians.    These regulations were revised
during the past year, and are as follows:—
Sanitary Regulations governing Watersheds.
These regulations shall be applicable to every
person entering upon any watershed area above or
beyond a municipal intake, reservoir, or dam.
1. (a.) Watershed Sanitary Inspector or Inspectors shall be appointed, subject to the approval
of the Provincial Board of Health, by the City or
Municipal Council concerned.
(6.) Watershed Sanitary Inspectors shall have
full authority to enforce these regulations. They
must reside upon the area under their supervision.
They shall not be absent from the watershed for a
period of more than twenty-four hours per week
without the sanction of the local Medical Health
Officer or Chief Provincial Sanitary Inspector.
(c.) The Inspectors shall order the liberal use
of quicklime or other disinfectants when and
wherever needed.
(d.) The Inspector shall send a written report
of the watershed conditions under his charge to the
Provincial Board of Health and a copy to the local
Medical Health Officer not less than every two
weeks.
(e.) The Provincial Chief Sanitary Inspector
shall make periodical visits to see that these regulations are being enforced, and shall have power to
change or add to these regulations according to
nature of industrial operations and changing conditions or emergencies. Such changes must be subject to the approval of the Provincial Board of
Health.
(/.) Operators shall provide food and shelter for
visiting authorized Inspectors when upon the watershed.
2. All officials and employees of companies
operating in the watershed shall produce to the
Inspector a certificate from a licensed medical practitioner that they are not affected by any disease
which, in his opinion, would pollute the water.
3. (a.) Certificates of health, successful typhoid
inoculation, or Widal test certificate must first be
produced before any person will be permitted to
work for the company, in any capacity, above the
city's intake.
(6.) Certificate shall state: (1) That he is not
suffering now from any communicable disease; (2)
that he is not a " carrier " of typhoid fever, diphtheria, or scarlet fever.
4. (a.) All persons entering the watershed, for
whatever purpose, other than officials and employees of the company, must first submit themselves to a blood test (Widal) and certificates of
health must state: (1) That the blood-test is negative; (2) that he is not suffering from any communicable disease; (3) that he is not a "carrier"
of typhoid fever, diphtheria, or scarlet fever.
(6.) No person will be permitted to enter the
watershed above the intake without first presenting
the aforementioned certificate of health to the Inspector in charge.
5. All persons entering upon watershed area
must satisfy the Sanitary Inspector in charge that
they are provided with the necessary equipment and
convenience to safeguard the watershed area from
contamination.
6. Instructions and rules on sanitation of camps
to be posted in all camp buildings in a conspicuous
position.    ,
7. Camps.—The location of all camps to be subject to the approval of the Provincial Board of
Health and the local Medical Health Officer after
consultation with the manager of the interested
company.
Arrangements must be made for safe and
thorough disposal of garbage, refuse, tins, etc., or
else remove same to an incinerator.
All liquid waste, slop-water, etc., from the cookhouses, bathing-houses, laundry, etc., must be run
in pipes, or by other means acceptable to the
Inspector, into a properly constructed tank and
chlorinated or otherwise treated so as to effect
sterilization.
Every camp shall be equipped with a wash-house
and laundry containing a stove, tubs, and facilities
for drying; also wash-basins, shower-baths, soap,
and all proper sanitary facilities to the approval of
the Inspector. Cleanliness, of course, is necessary
for the health of the men and it must be insisted
upon. Persistently unclean persons will be debarred from the watershed.
Bathing or laundry-work in the creeks or streams
is absolutely prohibited.
All cook-houses, dining-rooms, etc., to be screened
to prevent the entrance of flies.
Meat-houses and store-rooms must be fly-proof
and built to the satisfaction of the Inspector.
All bunk-houses must be built with adequate
light and ventilation, the interior limewashed or
painted and fitted with iron bunks.
Plans and specifications of all buildings to be
erected to be furnished in duplicate to and approved
by the Provincial Board of Health.
S. Latrines.—Deep pit not less than 8 feet by 30
inches, lime-treated daily, to be filled in with earth $
or gravel when contents reach within 2 feet of surface ; or a pail system of galvanized-iron pails
with covers, which can be easily handled and removed to the incinerator. The location of any
latrine must be selected by the Inspector in Charge.
Chlorinated or quick lime must be available at
all latrines and all latrine cans must have liberal
daily allowance when in use.
When necessary to install urinals on work away
from latrines, soak-aways must be provided and
constructed under approval of Inspector in Charge.
For all persons engaged or employed above the
intake where the work is not convenient to camp
latrine, the pail system must be used and removed
daily to the incinerator. Any man found not using
these pails must be instantly discharged.
All roads for rail-cars, trams, trucks, or other
vehicles must be constructed and drained in such a
manner as not to pollute any watercourse or
stream.
Maps of the property shall be furnished to the
Provincial Board of Health and the municipalities
concerned, showing as far as possible the plan of
the ground and sites of proposed buildings and
roads in their relative positions to any streams or
watercourses. .
K 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Provincial Board of Health maintains the Board  of  Health  may  be  appealed  to  to  act  as
right to alter, revise, or add to these regulations arbitrator.    The Provincial Board's decision to be
from  time  to  time  as   deemed  necessary  for  the final.
preservation of all domestic water-supply.   In cases Sanitary Regulations governing Watersheds ap-
of emergency the Inspector may make such tern- proved April 2nd,  1918,  and July 6th,  1923, are
porary   regulations  as  are  necessary,   which   shall cancelled.
hold   good   until   passed   upon   by   the   Provincial Provincial Board of Health.
Board of Health.
In cases of dispute between the municipal author- Approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council,
ities   and   the   company   or   individual   as   to   the sitting as the Provincial Board of Health, the 13th
interpretation of these regulations, the Provincial day of October, 1926.
The observance of these regulations protects the purity of water supplying Fernie, North
Vancouver City and District, Greater Vancouver, and Vernon. The regulations are enforced by
the municipalities affected. It may be noted, en passant, that no water-borne disease has
occurred in these cities since the aforesaid regulations became law.
Inspection visits to industrial camps number 200; to canneries, 125 ; visits to investigate
nuisances, 55; to watersheds to consult, advise, or relieve Resident Inspectors, 33; visits to
oyster-grounds, 20; and miscellaneous visits of inspection and inquiry, 70; making a total of
503 visits during the year.
The work, whilst arduous, is made lighter by the courteous and co-operative manner of
Provincial and municipal officers throughout the country, and the same can be said for operators
and employees throughout British Columbia.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Chief Sanitary Inspector. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27. K 1.3
COMBINED REPORT OP TRAVELLING MEDICAL HEALTH OFFICER
AND INSPECTOR OF HOSPITALS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1927.
II. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Fourth Annual Report as Travelling Medical
Health Officer and Inspector of Hospitals for the Province.
While my work as Tuberculosis Diagnostician for the last year is very much a reduplication of the previous years, having been carried on under the same guiding principles of
co-operation with the family doctors, there has been sufficient variation to still make the work
very interesting. There has been a steady yearly increase in the number of cases examined,
more marked the last year than previously, showing added interest not only of the medical
profession, but of the public at large. The interest of the doctors is further illustrated by the
number of inquiries that have come in as to when my next visit would take place.
I mentioned in my last annual report that I believed extra clinical service in Victoria
would be justified. After endorsation of the plan by the Victoria Medical Society, a clinic has
been held here during the second week of every second month. Much of the increase in the
total examinations during the year has come from this clinical service. The Provincial Royal
Jubilee Hospital Board has very kindly provided room and nursing service as well as X-ray
service for this work. The Provincial Red Cross has very generously guaranteed the cost of
X-ray films (the Hospital only charging for films and wear and tear of machine) up to $1,500.
This amount will be ample for our needs with something left over for next year.
Through a bequest of the late David Spencer, a building is in course of construction and
nearing completion on the grounds of the Jubilee Hospital as a separate unit to be used as a
tubercular clinic. This will assure permanency and will also act as an advertisement to the
city that wTork of this nature is being done.
The occasional afternoon clinic at the Saanich Health Centre has been continued.
St. Joseph's Hospital has been equally generous in placing X-ray and other facilities at our
disposal.
The regular clinics at Nanaimo have been continued during the year with interest well
sustained. The balance of the Province has been covered from one to three times, despite the
fact that hospital inspection has taken up an increasing amount of my time.
xinother factor that has contributed this year to the increased number of cases examined
was the prevalence during the fall and winter months of many cases of influenza. Many chest
conditions were left in its wake and presented some difficulties in diagnosis. Particularly
is that to be expected when we consider that many latent cases of T.B. become reactivated
after such acute chest infections.
One of the outstanding events of the T.B. world was the meeting of the International Union
against Tuberculosis in Washington, D.C, September 29th to October 2nd, 1926, followed from
October 4th to 7th by four days' session of the National Tuberculosis Association, which included
United States of America and Canada. In fact, this meeting of the National Association was
but a continuation of the International Union. This latter only meets every two years, so it
will probably be many years before another meeting is held in America. This meeting brings
together most of the greatest minds in the world on tuberculosis-work and every phase of same is
discussed. It was my great privilege, along with nearly every Canadian tuberculosis-worker, to
attend the sessions of this congress.
As the American Hospital Association was meeting at Atlantic City the early part of the
same week that the International Congress met, by going East a little early I was able to take
in a goodly part of that programme, with much profit. To see the display of hospital equipment
alone is well worth a trip across the continent. K 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
DETAILS OF CLINICAL WORK.
The total number of examinations was 518, of which 40 were re-examinations, making 478
cases examined. Two hundred and forty of these I have classified as non-tubercular. Of the
balance, 238, 184 are classified as positively tubercular and 54 suspects. Of the 40 re-examinations, many of them were amongst the positive cases and were re-examined to learn of progress
of the disease. Others were re-examined in order to more definitely classify case as positive
or negative. While my work is essentially diagnostic, every year I am asked to advise more
and more as to treatment and disposal of cases.
The further classification I have confined to the positive and suspect cases, instead of all
cases examined as in previous years. Of the 238 such cases, 118 are males and 120 females.
Eighty-nine were born in British Columbia, sixty-two in the other Provinces of Canada, 54 in
British Isles, 9 in United States of America, and 24 in other countries. Considerably over half,
then, of the cases were born outside of British Columbia. Their length of residence in the Province varies from many years to two months, and while my data are not complete, quite a goodly
number have been in the Province less than two years, some coming in after being diagnosed.
THE EDUCATIONAL PART OF THE WORK.
While there has been an increase in the clinical work, the educational part has not been
neglected. Meetings have been addressed as follows : Vernon, under auspices of Women's Institute, also high-school pupils in same town; a joint meeting with Dr. Lapp in Victoria under
Tuberculous Veterans' Association auspices, with Dr. Young as chairman; also one under
AVomen's Institute of Victoria; Health Bureau, Board of Trade, Vancouver; Public Health
Nursing class, University of British Columbia; at Duncan, under Cowichan Public Health
Nursing Service; at Chemainus, under Ladies' Hospital Auxiliary; and nurses in training at
Nanaimo, Hazelton, Nelson, Cranbrook, Kelowna, and St. Joseph's, Victoria.
INDIAN SURVEY.
The Indian survey, under the joint auspices of the Federal Department of Indian Affairs
and the Canadian Tuberculosis Association, working through a Provincial Advisory Committee
of which Dr. Young is chairman, is being continued this year. Having completed the survey of
Coast Indians last year, a similar survey is being carried on amongst the Indians of the Interior.
As a representative of the Provincial Health Department, I accompanied Drs. Vrooman and
Hill on a trip of inspection through the Okanagan, Kamloops, and Nicola Valley Districts. On
this trip 359 Indians were examined, including in many cases entire families. While this
Interior survey is not complete, indications are that the incidence of tuberculosis amongst them
does not materially differ from that found last year amongst Coast Indians. The percentage of
cases found amongst Indians compared with the percentage we believe to exist amongst the
white population runs in about the same proportion as deaths amongst Indians compared with
deaths amongst whites, the latter of which will be seen in tables below.
It is often asked, "Is any progress being made in the fight against tuberculosis?" "Is it
not a fact that the deaths per 1,000 of population is practically stationary, and, in fact, is
higher in British Columbia than in any of the Provinces west of Quebec? " To answer these
questions intelligently there are certain facts that have to be taken into consideration. First
of these is that out of a total Indian population in the Dominion of 100,000 in round numbers,
British Columbia has over 25,000, or one-fourth of the total, and the death-rate amongst these
people is eight or nine times that amongst the whites. Again, we are the only Province in which
there is any considerable population of Orientals, and the death-rate amongst these is also
inordinately high. In order to show this effectually, I asked Mr. H. B. French, of the Vital
Statistics Department, to segregate these different classes for the last five years. The tables
below set out the results very clearly. It also demonstrates very clearly that amongst the
white population during that period there has been a very steady and appreciable decrease in
the percentage of tubercular deaths, and leaving out Indians and Orientals, which does not
materially affect other Provinces, we have a condition here that we have reason to be proud
of. This result is attained without taking into consideration the fact that many people, both
civilian and ex-service, come to the Province on account of our climate when overtaken with
poor health. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 15
Chinese, British Columbia.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate
per Cent.,
all Deaths.
Chinese
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921 ....           	
49
64
44
40
44
59
220
232
228
211
193
224
22.26
27.5S
19.29
18.95
22.56
26.34
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
2.08
1922	
2.72
1923	
1.87
1924	
1.70
1925 	
1.87
1926 .. .                              	
2.55
British Columbia Indians.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Total Deaths,
all Causes.
Rate per Cent.,
all Deaths.
Indian
Population.
Rate per 1,000
Population.
1921 	
104
99
133
125
155
145
364
370
432
457
436
416
28.57
26.76
30.79
27.35
35.55
34.85
25,694
24,744
23,694
25,694
24,316
24,316
4.05
1922 	
1923 	
4.00
5.18
1924	
4.86
1925 	
6.37
1926	
5.96
Japanese, British Columbia.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate
per Cent.,
all Deaths.
Japanese
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921	
1922 ...
O  CO
O  CO
142
190
158
150
195
161
23.24
11.58
15.19
15.33
16.92
17.39
15,006
15,806
16,004
17,418
18,226
19,048
2.19
1.38
1923	
1924 	
1925	
1926 	
24
23
33
28
1.49
1.32
1.81
1.47
Races  other than Chinese, Japanese, and British Columbia Indians.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate
per Cent.,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1.000
Population.
1921 ....[
1922  ...J
1923 |
1924 |
1925 I
1926   |
326
322
324
339
306
300'
3,846
4,115
4,179
4,186
4,119
4,673
8.47
7.82
7.75
8.09
7.42
'6.42
460,349
474,917
47S.769
486,355
494,925
501,103
0.70
0.67
0.67
0.69
0.61
0.59
British Columbia, all Races included.
Year.
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B. Rate
per Cent.,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921 	
512
507
525
527
538
532
4,572
4,907
4,997
5,004
4,945
5,474
11.19
10.33
10.50
10.53
10.87
9.72
524,582
539,000
544,000
553,000
561,000
568,000
0.97
1922 	
0.94
1923 	
0 96
1924	
0 95
lg-^o 	
0 95
1926	
0 93 K 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HOSPITAL INSPECTION.
As Hospital Inspector, I have inspected twenty-seven public hospitals and thirteen private
hospitals, reports on most of these being made directly to the Provincial Secretary's Department.
I visited two towns where the question of establishment of hospitals was being considered,
as well as other special investigations.
I attended one Hospital Society meeting, at which the elective board was reduced from
fifteen to five members, the annual fee cut from ,$5 to $2, and a by-law passed making it illegal
for directors to have contracts with hospital boards. I met with eight hospital boards and,
where full meetings could not be arranged, have met with some member or members of the
executive in twenty cases.
I attended sessions of the Provincial Hospitals Association, also, as mentioned before, the
American Hospital Association at Atlantic City, and in May the meeting of the Hospital Section
of the Pacific North-west Division of the American College of Surgeons at Seattle.
There has been great activity throughout the year in planning and completing hospital
extensions, including infectious-disease departments, nurses' homes, etc. These extensions were
always associated with a request for special grant from the Government and universally received
favourable consideration.
I have received many expressions of appreciation of the action of the Government in
planning extensions at Tranquille. The extra accommodation for tuberculosis provided at the
General Hospital, Vancouver, did much to relieve the overcrowding temporarily, as did also
the opening of Vernon Villa by St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria, but the addition is still needed
to avoid overcrowding permanently.
The 1925 amendment to the " Hospital Act " has done much to assist the hospitals financially, and I believe it has worked no hardship on municipalities, being very fair to them.
Most of the hospitals outside of the larger centres are still working on a flat rate, rather than
the 70 cents per day per patient.
There have been no cases during the year referred to Arbitration Board for decision, which
would seem to bear out the opinion expressed above that provisions of Act are fairly satisfactory.
In closing, I would like to express my appreciation of the cordial co-operation and valuable
advice I have received from you on all occasions; also to the doctors, nurses, and lay organizations throughout the Province; to Miss Randal, of the Graduate Nurses' Association, I extend
my sincere thanks.
I have, etc.,
A. S. Lamb, M.D.,
Travelling Medical Health Officer and Hospital Inspector. REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1927.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg leave to hand you the Sixteenth Annual Report of the Medical Inspection of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
The work of our Department as a whole is making very satisfactory progress, and we have
been pleased to call your attention to the advances in respect to the different departments, but
I feel that, in reporting as to the work of the medical inspection of the schools, we can show
more real advance and more accomplishment, with the result of greater interest being taken by
the parents and public in general, than in any other department.
Our Nursing Service is increasing and the number of nurses at present connected with our
work is upwards of forty, a remarkable increase in the past five years, when we began with
one nurse. The soundness of our policy in the establishment of the Nursing Service is borne
out by the results as shown in the schools. We are now busy coping with the requests that are
coming in for extension of our Service, and it is becoming less and less incumbent upon us to
make an effort to induce the people to consider our Service. The improvement of the general
health of the children; the improvement in their class-work; the curing of a large number of
defects ; the institution of dental clinics ; the carrying-on of classes in health ; and the teaching
of health habits to the children;  all have been making remarkable progress.
In my general article on the progress of the Department I have mentioned more particularly
the inclusion of our nurses as teachers of health in the schools. This has been done at the
request of the trustees, and on their own initiative, and is, I consider, a most significant
procedure on their part as indicating their greater knowledge of the subject and their observation
of the results which have been obtained so far.
We have increased the number of our dental clinics and have applications from several other
points for the establishment of the dental work.
The most significant change is the increasing control we have over epidemic diseases.
During last summer we had several meetings of the School Medical Officers and Medical Health
Officers, and have formulated new regulations in regard to the management of the schools in
the event of any infectious disease showing, that are working a very great benefit in regard
to the control of such epidemics, but particularly in preventing interruption of school-work.
We found that, when children were excluded or the home was quarantined, it was difficult
to enforce, as many of these pupils were very anxious to receive the honour roll for perfect
attendance from the Education Department. This led to children returning too early, with
consequent spread of the disease and also injury to themselves from the fact that they had not
recovered sufficient strength to return. Parents and children alike were anxious that they should
get the honour roll, and no allowance was made by the Education Department for being absent
on account of quarantine. Representation was made to Dr. Willis, the Superintendent of
Education, and he very kindly consented to make such arrangements and has written us a
letter, which I append :—
" British Columbia Department op Education.
" Office of the Superintendent,
Victoria, B.C., August 18th, 1927.
" Dr. H. E. Young,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
" Dear De. Young,—In reply to your letter of the 12th instant, I may say that this
Department is pleased to approve of your suggestion that honour rolls be granted to every
pupil who is absent through illness or quarantine, for one or more days in any year, provided
2 K IS BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the actual number of days he is in attendance in the year, increased by the number of days he
is absent through illness or quarantine, equals or exceeds the total days' attendance made by
the pupil of the school, or class, with the best showing in the matter of punctuality and regularity, and provided also he secures a statement from a School Nurse, Public Health Nurse,
School Health Inspector, or other physician, certifying that absence from school was due to
illness or quarantine.
" Yours very truly,
"(Sgd.)    S. J. Willis,
Superintendent of Education."
Last year I had the pleasure of publishing a report made by Dr. Maxwell, Medical Inspector
of Schools for Ladysmith, and I am very pleased indeed to supplement that report with a later
report which he has given me for the present year. You will note his comment in this of the
effect, owing to some local difficulties, of cessation of the dental clinic. The result of this
backward step became very noticeable and the clinic is being resumed at that point.
I wish to congratulate Dr. Maxwell on the splendid work which he is doing in connection
with the schools.
" Ladysmith, B.C., July 9th, 1927.
" The Board of School Trustees,
Ladysmith, B.C.
" Dear Sirs,—In presenting to you my fourth report on the examination of the schools, I am
glad to say that the satisfactory condition which existed last year is again maintained.
" Public School.
" Malnutrition,—Last year there were 28 underweight; this year there are only 23. This
can, I think, be attributed to the special instruction given by Miss Hewertson and the interest
taken by the children in watching their weight.
" The other day I met three little children coming out of school and I asked them if they
had been having exams. They said, ' Yes.' I said, ' What marks did you get? ' One said,
' I was 72 and last time I was only 68! I have gained 4 lb.! ' and her face was radiant. The
other two were equally pleased and all were obviously more enthusiastic over their physical
than their mental development.
" Defective Vision.—This refers to those cases which have not been corrected by glasses.
Last year there were 17;  this year only 9.
" Adenoids and Tonsils.—Grouping the two together, there were 136 cases last year and this
year there are only 52. Very soon there will be no children in Ladysmith with enlarged adenoids
and unhealthy tonsils.
" Defective Teeth.—Last year there were 67 children with defective teeth; this year there
are 173.    Of these, 93 are cases where the primary teeth only are affected.
" I think it is most instructive that in 1925 there were 153 cases of defective teeth; then in
1926 there was a dental clinic and at the time of my examination there were only 67 cases of
defect.    The dental clinic was stopped and this year there are 173.
" I feel sure that, if a satisfactory arrangement can be made, the starting again of a dental
clinic will not only make a material difference to these figures, but will be greatly to the advantage of pupils and parents alike.
" Goitre.—There has been a great improvement in this condition since last year, when there
were 31 cases of enlarged thyroid. This year there are only 2 bad cases, 8 slight, and 14 very
slight.
" There were no cases of any infectious or contagious disease.
" I would like again to draw the attention of the trustees to our health report.
" My annual health report to the Provincial Health Officer commences on July 1st and ends
on June 30th. During the last period there was only one case of an infectious disease, coming
under the ' Infectious Diseases Act,' and that was a case of erysipelas. This indeed constitutes
a record and beats last year's previous record.
" This year we had, as you know, a mild epidemic of smallpox in the vicinity. We were
fortunate in only having two cases in Ladysmith. " High School.
" The only comment on this school which is of interest is again the subject of teeth. Last
year there were 52 children with perfect teeth and 16 with defective teeth. This year there are
only 47 with perfect teeth and 20 with defective teeth.
" Yours, faithfully,
"(Sgd.)     H. B. Maxwell,
Health Inspector."
QUEEN ALEXANDRA SOLARIUM.
Last year we published the first report issued by the Solarium, which explained fully the
objects of the institution.    The patients had not been received at the time of this report.
I am very pleased indeed to publish the following report of Dr. Cyril AVace, Medical Superintendent, of the progress that has been made since patients have been admitted.
The work carried on there is in the very best of hands. Dr. Wace has given up all other
work to assume the office of Physician in Charge, and under his able management the results are
just what we expected and a description of the work as carried on follows.
The following is a full report of the Solarium :—
" H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
" Dear Sir,—A year ago you very kindly asked me to send you a report on the progress we
wyere making in the establishment of the Queen Alexandra Solarium for Crippled Children at
Malahat Beach, V.I.
" This year I am glad to be able to inform you that the Solarium has been in active operation
since March 1st, on which date the first children were admitted for treatment. Sixty-six
children have been under treatment and there are to-day (November 30th) thirty-eight patients
in the Solarium. Two more will shortly be admitted and twenty-three further application forms
for admission have been, received.
" We can accommodate forty children through the winter and about forty-five in the summer.
" In the annual report which will be submitted to the directors of the Solarium early next
year full details of the cases treated will be given. I will, therefore, now only touch on some
of the more general and important aspects of this work.
" The value of the Solarium in the treatment of the delicate or pre-tubercular child has
been amply proved ; fifteen such cases have been or are now under treatment and the results
in every case have been most satisfactory.
" Nearly one-half of our patients are suffering from tubercular or other infection of bones,
joints, spine, or lymph glands, and some of these are of years' standing. Thirteen are cases of
old o*r recent infantile paralysis or anterior poliomyelitis.
" The outstanding feature of many of these cases (forty-one in all) is the marked deformity
that is present, and while this may be very difficult to avoid in certain cases of arthritis or
tubercular disease, it cannot be too often emphasized that, although partial or complete paralysis
of a limb or limbs or group of muscles is often inevitable, physical deformity need not occur in
cases of infantile paralysis. Such deformities are due either to the activity of unaffected muscle
groups in the limb overstretching the partially paralysed and unsupported groups, or to the
effect of body-weight on a partially or completely paralysed limb which is not sufficiently braced
in the correct alignment of the body as a whole.
" We have had only two cases of congenital deformity in the sixty-six admitted, which bears
out the statement that ' the cripple is made, not born.'
" I would call attention to the great value of the regular daily school which is held in the
Solarium for all children, wdiether ambulant or bed cases.
" It is to me increasingly evident that we must in time develop a scheme of technical training
in some trade or handicraft for those boys and girls who can never be physically fit for the K 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ordinary routine and work of life. This is the more necessary in view of the marked bodily
deformities and extensive paralysis of limbs we are seeing amongst our patients. Our accommodation does not allow of our admitting boys over 12 and girls over 14 years of age; several
applications for admission of older children and adults have been received.
" Applications for admission have been received from Alberta and Saskatchewan, and I am
more than ever of the opinion that the site of the Solarium and climatic conditions at Malahat
Beach offer great opportunities in the restoration of health for children from our Prairie and
Eastern Provinces.
" Our definition of a crippled child does not refer only to the child with a physical deformity,
but includes any child of suitable age whose ' normal physical activities ' are restricted by
illness, accident, or from birth. Chronic cardiac disease in childhood benefits markedly by the
prolonged rest and open-air life at a Solarium.
" Thanks to the generous support the Solarium has received, it has been possible to increase
our facilities for treatment by the construction of a large sea-water bathing-pool and the
installation of the most modern type of violet-ray lamp.
" I wish to call attention to the following points in the organization of our work:—
" No child suffering from tubercular disease of the lungs can be admitted. No mentally
defective child or one suffering from fits can be admitted. Acute cases of illness or children
requiring operation are not accepted; such cases are better in our general hospitals, but as
soon as the convalescent stage is reached the Solarium is an ideal place for the after-care and
treatment.
" No child is admitted except at the request of the doctor in charge of the case, and the
Medical Superintendent will at all times welcome the advice and co-operation of the family
physician.
" Our consulting medical and surgical staff are always most willing to help us with their
experience and advice.
" The general health of the children has shown great improvement and a considerable gain
in weight has been a marked feature in almost all cases.
" I have already referred to the great need of a thorough scheme of technical training for the
physically disabled and incurable child to establish him in helpful and remunerative work and
save him from a lifetime of dependence on others. No work for the crippled child can be
complete or satisfactory that does not recognize an ideal which may be summed up in the
words ' get him early and see him through.'
" I have, etc.,
"C. Wace,
Secretary and Medical Superintendent, Queen Alexandra
Solarium."
This is the first report which shows results, and it will, I know, be very pleasing to the
members of the Women's Institutes to read this and to find that their efforts are bringing health
and happiness to many children who, without this, would have been condemned to a lifelong
misery. They are being brought back to that heritage that belongs to all children—health, the
right and ability to work—making a marked contrast to the dreary outlook of a helpless cripple,
with all hope of enjoyment in life absolutely denied.
OPEN-AIR SCHOOLS.
" Preventive measures " is the key-note of all our work in connection with the children, and
this is being carried on through different agencies, and the results obtained in the open-air
schools, which are under the management of Miss Elizabeth Breeze, Head School Nurse of the
Vancouver schools, are demonstrating the benefits of the application of natural methods in
correcting defects.
Last year we published the first report of the open-air schools as carried on in Vancouver,
and I am very pleased to supplement that by a report which we have received from Miss Breeze
for the work during the past year. Miss Breeze says in her covering note to us that " they do
feel that the school is highly beneficial to the pupils and good results are being secured." " Open-air School, Vancouver, B.C.
" The open-air school has now been in operation for a year and a half, and we feel it has
passed the experimental stage and that the results obtained demonstrate very tellingly its value
to the school system and the community. As the number that can be cared for in the school is
small, our policy is to return the children to the regular class-rooms as soon as their improved
condition warrants it, thus giving opportunity to others. With this in view, all the pupils were
given a complete physical examination at the beginning of the year, with the result that twenty-
two, almost one-third of the school, were recommended for return to the regular class-room.
In addition to these, ten pupils left the city and one entered high school. These vacancies were
filled from the children on the waiting-list and thus we started the year with about 50 per cent,
new pupils.
" The pupils are selected by the School Medical Officer and are children found to be in poor
physical condition, severely run down, undernourished, and generally debilitated. No open case
of tuberculosis is permitted in the school, though contacts are received. In order that children
have every chance, all remediable defects receive treatment before pupils are enrolled; thus all
possible handicaps are removed and thejT are free to gain.
" The school programme has been followed as originally planned, with a few slight variations.
The mid-morning and mid-afternoon nourishment, the hot meal at noon, the supervised rest-hours,
the organized play and special physical exercises, and the effort made to secure good home
co-operation have all done their part in contributing to the results secured. Special emphasis is
placed on health education and its application to daily life. This we feel is most essential if
our work is to carry over into adult life.
" During the year eighty-nine children attended the school. The following indicates the
nationalities from which they were drawn : English, 45 ; Scotch, 13; Irish, 3 ; Canadian, 23;
Italian, 1;   Swedish, 1;  Polish, 1;  French, 1;  American, 1.
" Only two pupils showed a loss of weight during the year.    One of these had a heart
condition and had been in the school a short time when the report was made.    The other child
also was in for so short a time that we felt a fair trial was not made.
" The following is the term report:—
Number of pupils      89
Diagnosis—
Malnutrition     41
Ansemia      17
Enlarged glands        1
Family case        5
Pre-tubercular       >1
Other causes     21
Number gaining     87
Number losing  ;....       2
Total gain  (lb.) .'    514
Total loss  (lb.)       4%
Average gain (lb.)        5%
Largest gain  (lb.)          18%
Largest loss  (lb.)         2%
Number physically benefited      89
" Our enthusiasm for our open-air school is still great and we feel that it is doing the work
for which it was planned and, though small, is giving to many a chance for a healthy, happy life
which would otherwise probably be denied them."
The reports of the school medical examination show that there were 8,232 more pupils
examined than last year.
Details of the examination for each school follow.
I have, etc.,
H. E. Young,
Provincial Health Officer. SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors :  160.
Reports from Medical Inspectors :  160.
High Schools.
High Schools.    1925-26, 71:   Reported, 43;   not reported, 28.    1926-27, 73:   Reported, 50;
not reported, 23.
Pupils inspected :  1925-26, 7,861;  1926-27, 9,368, an increase of 1,507.
Graded City Schools.
Cities.    1925-26, 33: Reported, 29; not reported, 4.    1926-27, 33 :  Reported, 33 ; all reported.
Pupils inspected :  1925-26, 35,653 ;  1926-27, 39,882, an increase of 4,229.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities.    1925-26, 26:   Reported, 24;   not reported, 2.    1926-27, 26:   Reported, 25;
not reported, 1.
Pupils inspected :  1925-26, 26,547;  1926-27, 28,130, an increase of 1,583.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected :   1925-26, 616, at a cost of $14,120.75 ;   1926-27, 657, at a cost of .$15,245.
Schools not inspected :   1925-26, 83 ;   1926-27, 56.
Pupils inspected :   1925-26, 16,748 ;   1926-27, 17,661, an increase of 913.
Cost of inspection per pupil:  1925-26, 84 cents;  1926-27, 86 cents.
Percentage of defects :  1925-26, 100.65 ;  1926-27, 101.97, an increase of 1.32. STATISTICAL TABLES. K 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NORMAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
2
3  .
ft, X
O t*a
0)
V
OJ tw
o
m
0
Sfl
11
©
^
G^
ftp*
QK
QK
-4
Vancouver .
Victoria  	
Lacblan Macmillan
A. E. McMicking.,.
201
207
3
5
4
5
13
133
133
25
HIGH
Abbotsford	
Burnaby:
Burnaby, North
Burnaby, South
Chilliwack	
Coalmont..
Courtenav.
Cranbrook 	
Cumberland	
Delta:
King George V.
Esquimalt	
Fernie	
Grand Forks
Granby Bay .
Kamloops .-..
Kelowna,
Kimberley.
Ladysmith ...
Langley	
Maple Ridge :
Maclean ..
Matsqui :
Denrrison.
Matsqui..
Merritt	
Mission City .
Nelson	
Nanaimo ...   .
New Westminster:
Duke of Connaught.
Ocean Falls	
Peachland	
Point Grey:
Lord Byng ,
Magee	
Prince of Wa'es.
Port Coquitlam.
Prince George ..
Hevelstoke	
Richmond:
Bridgeport.
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
T. A. Swift	
J. G. McCairmon.
J. 0. Elliot!]]:!:'.
E. Sheffield.
J. McKee...
G. E. L. MacKinnon
G. K. MacNaughton
A. A. King	
J. S. McCallum.
W. Truax 	
D. R. Learoyd.
M. G. Archibald .
W. J. Knox	
D. P. Hanington
H. B. Maxwell.
B. B. Marr	
G. Morse ., .
T. A. Swift.
G. H. Tutill   ...
A. .1. Stuart ...
E. C. Arthur ...
W. F. Drysdale.
D. A. Clark 	
A. E. H. Bennett .
Wm. Buchanan.
W. Dykes   	
W. Saafer	
C. Ewert	
J. H. Hamilton.
W. K. Hall .
J. H. Palmer
Alan Beech..
Miss Morrison ....
Miss J. Dunbar ...
Miss A. J. Duncan
Miss J. Campbell..
Miss Hewertson .,
MissM. E. Kerr..
Miss A. Stark.
Mrs. C. M. Hyde.
Miss M. Ewart...
43
37
139
291
229
135
280
232
10
10
67
60
156
44
155
44
71
74
71
74
120
85
32
120
85
32
190
188
116.
110
33
33
76
88
76
64
77
71
17
34
59
65
231
242
14
31
56
57
231
237
357
357
26
26
20
20
241
256
538
516
237
229
45
67
175
43
65
170
90
99
96
90
92
79
1
i
5
4
13
11
1
36
"5
2
3
7
9
18
50
2
4
11
2
8
11
'i'
18
9
2
1
3
2
6
1
....
3
1
5
5
16
3
2
3
2
13
1
1
3
8
32
5
1
12
2
6
1
2
1
4
2
1
1
2
7
3
5
*?
3
3
5
2
12
4
1
6
28
7
11
1
1
It
6
1
8
1
4
10
28
64
10
14
4
40
2
1
5
1
1
2
5
19
13
32
57
2
2
2
12
19
•'
3
1
2
10
7
i
1
"i
1
5
6
0
"s
7
17
2
2
1
i
1'
1
4
6 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 25
SCHOOLS.
CD
>
QJ -£!
o; 35
QJ      .
a a
C    rS
h3
oj
u
"o
O
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
w
QJ
s
CJ
CC
6
Ml
<2
a
a
g
o
a
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
23
17
Eczema, 8; cardiac, 5; nervous
break-downs and chorea, 10
Acne, 2	
Good  	
Yes.
SCHOOLS.
1
2
4
8
13
29
49
Corrected vision, 8	
Corrected vision, 27	
Purulent ear, 2 ; closed  eustachian, 1; congenital short femur, 1 ;  infant paralysis, 1
Adequate.
Yes.
36
32
Old building repaired
Crowded ; poorly
ventilated
Good	
O.K	
Good	
Not crowded; well
ventilated and
heated
O.K	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Basement rooms
poorly ventilated
Excellent	
Should have a separate janitor
Good.
i
2
i
26
4
1
3
14
13
1
15
2
23
1
19
37
7
1
1
Chicken-pox, 3; whooping-cough, 3
O.K.
10
Skin-disease, 2 ;   nasal obstruction, 2
Clean ; adequate
Clean.
Clean; adequate
O.K.
Clean; adequate.
2
German measles, 34	
30
6
s
Old fractured dislocated lumbar area
34
Mumps, 4 ; German
measles
Chicken-pox, 4 ; German
measles, 8
6
Cardiac, 3; lungs, T. B.; bronchitis, chronic, 2 ;   curvature of
spine, 1; flat feet, 3 ; chorea,
1;  dysmenorrhea, 3
quate; sanitary.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
20
3
Good	
V
4
i
"s
6
2
4
3
1
"e"
i
1
1
7
6
89
19
69
5
18
4
18
10
21
4
Yes.
9
Satisfactory ....
Very satisfactory.
S
48
V.D.H., 3	
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
114
41
1
Aniemia, 1 ; asthma, 2 ; ca-
■   tarrh, 4 ; postural defects, 5;
deviated septum, l ;   appendicitis, 2
Orthopaedic, 4 ; heart, 14 ; pulmonary, 1 ; nervous, 1 ; amende, 2
2
Vaccinated, 202;  smallpox, 5
Heating fairly
good ; no overcrowding; ventilation good
Excellent,   well
ventilated and
heated
Satisfactory	
Good 	
Good  	
Crowded	
Good	
Adequate; clean.
Clean; adequate.
2
40
64
16
Adolescent goitre, 72; cardiac,
14 ; orthopaedic, 11; anaemia,
1
Adolescent goitre,  119; nervous, 1 ;   cardiac,  28 ;   orthopaedic, 24 ;  anaemic, 5
Adolescent goitre, 55 ; cardiac,
12 ; anaemic, 4 ;   orthopaedic,
9
1
1
1
3
Diphtheria,  1;   German
measles, 23
Mumps, 1; German measles, 35	
Good.
Clean; adequate.
9
Orthopaedic, 1	
.   1
Scarlet fever	
Measles, 5 ; roetheln, 10.
Influenza.	
Excellent.
23
6
Excellent in every
way
Clean; adequate. K 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical  Inspector.
Scliool  Nurse.
a
3
rH      ■
-a
<h oj
o
6 £
£   QJ
Ui
ft
M  OJ
ii
A aj
a
©
a
d
> —
'aj 5
03
fit*
oj
a> oj
OS
DQ
OJ £c
O   5J
OJ £
oj
3
o
c
a)
GJ aj
SI
3 o
23
150
240
767
724
424
464
485
398
830
335
125
140
23
133
240
79S
766
503
426
504
187
833
251
125
134
ii
2
1
4
16
2
9
12
9
2
6
34
31
2
1
2
l
4
Trail	
Vancouver:
H. White	
Miss M. Campbell.
ii         	
Miss E. Edwards..
1
2
1
2
18
18
2
"          	
School of Commerce	
1
e
Vancnlver, South :
John Oliver    	
G. A. Lam ant	
H. Dyer	
8
G. Williams	
Mrs. S. Martin	
GRADED CITY
Alberni
Armstrong .
Chilliwack
Court, nay.
Cranbrook :
Central	
Kootenay Orchards .
South Ward	
Cumberland  	
Enderby	
Fernie :
Annex 	
Central 	
Fernie, West .
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops:
Lloyd Georg
Stuart Wood
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith .
A.D.Morgan      118
Miss P. Charlton.
J. C. Henderson .
■L McKee	
G. E.   L. MacKinnon
G. K. MacNaughton .
H. N. Watson
H. W. Keith
W. Truax 	
A. Francis	
M. G. Archibald .
D. J. Barclay.
W.J. Knox...
H. B. Maxwell.
Miss I. Jeffares ..
Miss J. Dunbar .
Miss J. Campbell .
Miss Hewertson.
118
547
113
557
1
40
41
7
34
16
3
314
288
334
243
8
2
25
1
24
20
21
3
48
i)6
600
13
55
464
678
13
55
444
105
6
38
1
61
"s
20'
is
453
437
36
5
31
3
40
46
161
125
19
6
6
68
660
61
306
68
560
64
306
4
106
2
2
i
1
1
1
32
1
10
1
3
1
1
6
14
3
16
6
14
3
8
80
78
5
1
283
281
52
4
2
3
458
453
108
4
4
2
125
122
2
11
18
18
695
652
36
8
23
6
29
19
329
329
23
1
9
4
6
11
91
5
22
115
8
142
10
30
13
32
49
29 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 27
SCHOOLS—Continued.
S3
0)   QJ
u "d
CJ
HO
O
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac  Disease,  etc.).
d
a
a
QJ
<u
Ml
H
>
w
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
13
1
1
6
2
15
23
241
14
204
11
112
9
103
6
155
6
70
5
193
1
33
17
26
60
1
45
1
4
Endocarditis, 1	
Cardiac, 3 ;   pulmonary, 1...
Vaccinated, 495 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 491; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 298	
Vaccinated, 286 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 304	
Vaccinated, 106	
Vaccinated, 2 ; home visits, 2.
Exophthalmic goitre, 2; respiratory disease, 1
Cardiac, 1   	
Pulmonary, 1 ; cardiac, 1; nervous, 2
Measles, rubella .
Scarlet fever, 2 ; measles.
2 ; German measles, 45;
chicken-pox, 3
Diphtheria, 1;   measles,
10; German measles, 25
Diphtheria,  1 ;   measles,
6 ;  scarlet fever, 1;
German measles, 16
German measles, 27 ;
measles, 2
Mumps,   2;   measles,   2;
German measles, 18
Scarlet fever, 2; German
measles, 6
Scarlet fever, 2 ; measles,
4 ; rubella, 48; mumps,
1
No epidemic	
Influenza 12 ; mastoid, 1
Good Yes.
Satisfactory JGood.
Good   Yes.
Heating fair
Good	
Excellent....
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
SCHOOLS.
47
202
35
107
79
1
10
32S
77
12
150
173
21
33
162
49
33
19
*6
Good.	
Chorea, 4 ; cardiac, 2 ; Bright's
disease, 1 ; toxic goitre, 2 ;
congenital deformity of hipbone,  1 ;   harelip and cleft
palate, 1
8
2
4
Mumps, 20; German measles, 1
Heating  and ventilation good;
adequate space
Good	
Cardiac, 2 ; orthopaedic, 1	
Smallpox, 4 ; measles, 12
Crowded; poorly
ventilated
Good	
183
56
1
2
3
1
18
72
21
45
1
16
Ir
3
6
16
10
211
12
5
62
31
43
109
37
2
Pulmonary,   2;    wax in  ears,
129 ; nasal catarrh, 48 ; nasal
obstruction, 18 ; anaemia, 42 ;
nasal infection, 1 ;  stammering, 2 ; cleft palate, 3 ;   skin-
disease, 28
3
9
2
5
Measles,   rubella, scarlet
fever, chicken-pox
Chicken-pox, 15 ; whooping cough, 41 ;   scarlet
fever, 3 ; diphtheria, 5 ;
conjunctivitis, 13 ;   rubella, 7
O.K	
Good	
'I Scarlet fever, 1; measles, 3; \
Vdiphtheria, 1; chicken-pox, >
)l2                                               J
2
3
2
1
Diphtheria, 2	
Scarlet fever, 20 ; chicken-pox, 5 ; typhoid, 1 ;
German measles
Scarlet fever, 29 ;  chicken-pox, 4 ; typhoid, 1
O.K	
Good	
O.K	
Pulmonary, 2 ;   orthopaedic, 2 ;
nervous, 2
Asthma, 1; spine,  1; anaemia,
2 ; varicose veins, 1
Chorea, 13 ; cardiac. 7 ; flat feet,
7 ; bronchitis, chronic, 9 ; pulmonary T.B., 3 ; curvature of
spine, 5 ; squamous eczema of
face, 11
Orthopaedic, 9 ; eczema, 2 ; cardiac,   4; goitre,   verv slight,
14
Poorly ventilated.
3
1
Chicken-pox, 28; scarlet
fever, 3 ; German measles, 21
Excellent, but
most of the classrooms overcrowded
Good.
Adequate; clean.
O.K.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Clean;
inadequate.
Fairly clean;
adequate.
O.K.
Excellent.
Yes.
Modern ;   sanitary ; adequate. K 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
■*
a
0
ui
9-i
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
3
3   .
«
oj >.
> t;
a>
> cfl
a, fee
>o
<H    OJ
fe3
oi 5
a, 3
+3 q
*3 ja
o
© g
d *
8s
'V-  '■>•
"3 S
oj oj
OJ
SS
£j 3
£t   O)
r^
Q^
GS>
QK
Cm
<<
KH
Merritt	
Nanaimo :
Middle Ward .   ..
North Ward
Quennell	
South Ward   ..   .
Nelson :
Central	
Hume	
New Westminster:
Central    	
Lister-Kelvin
Richard McBri le
Queensborough.
Herbert Spencer,
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam :
Central 	
James Park .....
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert:
Booth Memorial
Borden Street ..
Meal Cove	
Revelstoke:
Central	
Selkirk	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm. ...*....
Slocan 	
Trail:
Central  	
East Trail	
Tadanae	
G. H. Tutill ....
W. F. Drysdale.
E. C. Arthur.
D. A. Clark.
C. T. Hilton.
W. Sager	
C. R. Symmes .
C. Ewert	
II. E. Tremayne .
J. H, Hamilton.
J. H. Palmer.
Alan Beech	
Wm. E. Gomm ,
F. S. Eaton.
Miss M. E. Kerr.
Miss A. Stark.
339
321
2
19
2
6
5
153
152
37
2
31
2
8
7
149
148
16
1
16
]
5
12
639
639
98
1
61
8
21
37
69
69
13
1
9
1
2
5
696
696
3
3
104
6
14
16
261
261
3
1
49
5
'   2
4
893
878
149
2
25
2
3
153
670
657
109
30
3
3
113
510
498
80
16
2
2
96
101
496
96
494
14
73
1
1
8
15
i
1
6
16
89
271
238
11
4
32
28
2
172
85
281
170
82
229
11
5
4
"3'
6
2
7
3
2
5
1
12
17
6
17
320
312
3
4
16
9
33
33
415
410
1
10
3
291
64
304
300
282
60
280
290
2
3
4
12
16
12
20
5)3
426
5
2
32
7
11
11
192
62
153
61
23
1
45
7
1
1
11
810
719
206
3
102
21
62
36
240
221
16
4
22
6
14
9
40
30
4
7
1
2
2
143
43
151
111
95 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 29
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition of
QJ
•3
bCJ£
aj
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
□*
a
oj
6
o
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
£i
ft
heated, etc.
a
Qtrl
WO
O
:>
M
s
99
27
35
4
2
1
Epidemic of measles, fall
of 1926, about 300 cases
Satisfactory	
129
12
6
Marked pallor, 2 ; pyorrhoea, 1;
postural defects, 2; cardiac,
1, bronchitis, 1; appendicitis,
2; vaccinated, 137
12
2
11
1
Measles, 14 ; smallpox, 2 ;
scarlet fever, 1; chicken-pox,  6;  whooping-
cough, 1
Heating fairly
good;    ventilation fair
Adequate ; fair.
87
30
5
Marked nervousness, 1; pallor,
2; malocclusion, 3; eczema,
1 ; blepharitis, 8; postural defects, 4 ; vaccinated, 119
2
2
19
2
Smallpox, 1; diphtheria,
1; measles, 6 ; scarlet
fever, 2 ;   chicken-pox,
1
Heatinggood; ventilation  fairly
good;   no   overcrowding
375
73
72
Marked pallor, 11; postural defects, 8; asthma, 1 ; chronic
kidney, 2 ; bronchitis, 1; conjunctivitis,  3 ; pyorrhoea, 4 ;
eczema, 2; faulty speech, 2 ;
St. Vitus, 1; marked nervousness, 5 ; malocclusion, 7 ; vaccinated, 5-4 ; blepharitis, 31 ;
rheumatic fever, 1; pneumonia, 2
3
5
57
1
Smallpox,   17;    chicken-
pox, 11; scarlet fever,
4 ; diphtheria 3; measles, 3
No overcrowding;
heating good;
fairly good ventilation
Adequate ; clean.
61
7
1
Marked pallor, 2; malocclusion,
2; blepharitis, 11; nervous, 2 ;
9
4
7
1
Heating and ventilation good
Adequate; excellent.
faulty speech, 1; vaccinated,
60
419
4
286
3
3
3
Good	
Yes.
147
90
1
1
3
All   rooms   somewhat   over
crowded
449
96
96
Orthopaedic,   15;  heart,   20;^
pulmonary, 4 ; nervous, 2 ;
anaemic, 6
315
191
73
Orthopaedic, 17; heart,   10;
pulmonary, 1; nervous, 2 ;
/ Measles, 342 ; mumps,
)
anaemic, 3
1 10 ; pertussis, 6 ;  scar-
288
160
57
Orthopaedic, 14 ; heart, 8 ;ner- \
vous,  2; anaemic, 2 ; pul-
pox, 10; diphtheria, 1;
f	
monarv, 2
^German measles, 38
60
28
6
Orthopaedic, 1; heart, 1	
219
137
47
Orthopaedic, 7; heart, 9 ; nervous,  2 ; anaemic,  1 ; pulmonary, 4                              J
48
4
116
Good	
Yes.
4 ; healed T. 11, 1
29
2
7
Measles, chicken-pox ...
Clean; adequate.
28
4
2
11
18
Chicken-pox	
Measles, 70;   whooping-
21
Cardiac, 3 ; chronic T.B. bone,
3
11
2
Good	
n
hip, 2
cough, 2 ; chicken-pox,
146
4
65
Blepharitis, 1 ;  conjunctivitis,
1 ; cardiac, 1; ortiiopaedic, 1,
nervous, 1
1
Diphthetia, 1	
Good, except 	
crowded and
poor ventilation
in former library-
room
n
6
21
Scarlet fever, chicken-
pox, mumps
3
45
19
5
6
12
59
20
VIeasles, scarlet fever	
Measles, scarlet fever	
Good	
Good.
20
(
153
Hernia, 1 ; cardiac,  3 ; orthopaedic, 6
66
IS
Clean; adequate.
306
320
303
Cardiac, 6 ; chorea, 2	
3
2
3
2
Measles, 220 ;   pertussis,
2 ; mumps, 12 ;   chicken-pox, 02 ;   scarlet fever, 2
Yes.
56
2
5
4
2
Mumps, 6;  chicken-pox,
13 ; measles, 22
.,
,,
8
1
0
'
„
3 K 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School
Vancouver:
Aberdeen	
Alexandra	
Bayview	
Beaconsfield	
Block 70	
Central	
Dawson	
Charles Dickens   .
Fairview	
Franklin	
Simon Fraser	
General Gordon.  .
Grandview	
Grenfell  	
Hastings	
Henry Hudson .   .
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
at
is
CO
a
&
%
a
3     .
'"
Q)  ^
OJ
V
0) W
•
-a
fl
fl
e3
5 a
5 s
£ 5?
6s
>a
o
2   0)
s'l
*S 3
»*
oi 5
«   53
QJ
^
Qr4
pt>
QW
QK
«|
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss D. Shields ...
Miss I. Smith	
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss A. McLellan .
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss 0. Kilpatrick.
Miss D. Bellamy .
MissM. D. Schullz
Miss O. Kilpatrick
Miss D. Shields .
iiss L. Drysdale.
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss D. Shields .
4SS
499
78
2
6
2
4
656
650
146
5
10
2
8
383
426
71
4
7
1
654
530
103
6
5
110
113
4
1
2
561 ,
623
82
10
4
3
4
989
967
198
28
1
1
3
563
626
68
7
1
'  2
4
529
438
67
6
4
2
404
38S
80
4
2
2
2
609
616
66
9
2
814
828
134
3
1
1
2
610
531
84
4
3
3
137
144
8
9
4
5
985
867
168
6
1
3
7
680
610
121
7
4
1
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 31
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other  Conditions,   specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
6
S
c
3
o
ft
is
B
►>
CC
a
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.    State
If   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
130
7
IS
138
3
17
50
1
13
108
1
13
5
2
113
6
25
87
3
55
123
3
11
103
10
59
7
101
2
10
103
23
76
1
20
26
8
145
2
16
120
13
Vaccinated, 241; pulmonary, 1;
cardiac, 2
Vaccinated, 297.
Vaccinated, 243.
Vaccinated, 237 ; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 39 ; cardiac, 1..
Vaccinated, 383; pulmonary, 2
cardiac, 1
Vaccinated, 541 ; cardiac, 4.
11    Vaccinated, 345 ; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 225.
Vaccinated, 202.
Vaccinated, 322 ; pulmonary,
Vaccinated, 510 ; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 270.
Vaccinated, 86.
Vaccinated, 427 ; pulmonary, 2;
cardiac, 1
Vaccinated, 464.
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
37 ;   German  measles,
76 ; chicken-pox, 5 ;
diphtheria, 4; diphtheria carriers, 4 ;  whooping-cough, 2
Scarlet fever, 4 ; measles,
90; German measles,
169 ; chicken-pox, t;
diphtheria, 2 ; diphtheria carriers, 3 ; whooping-cough, t   t
Diphtheria, 3; German
measles, 96; diphtheria
carriers, 1; whooping-
cough, 2; me&sles, 55
Scarlet fever, 1; German
measles, 102 ; measles,
7
Scarlet fever, 1; German
measles 3 ; diphtheria,
1; measles, 8
Scarlet fever, 3; German
measles,  31;   mumps,
4 ; measles, 30 ; diphtheria, 1; chirken-pox,
7 ;   whooping-cough, 4
Scarlet fever, 2 ; German
measles, 26; mumps,
3; measles, 158; diphtheria,-^; chicken-pox
4; whooping-cough, ~ii
Scarlet fever, 4 ; German
measles, 67; mumps,
1; whooping-cough, 9;
measles, 21 ; chicken-
pox, 59
Seal let fever, 1; German
measles, 18; measles,
14 ; mumps, 1; chick
en-pox, 15
Scarlet fever, 2 ; German
measles, 6; diphtheria
carriers, 4; diphtheria,
6; mumps, 1; mea&les.
41; whooping-cough, 1
Scarlet fever, 4; German
measles,  76;   measles,
77 ; chicken-pox, 7 ;
diphtheria, 2 ; whooping-cough, 1
Scarlet fever, 6; German
measles, 127 ; mumps,
8; diphtheria carriers,
5 ; measles, 98 ; whooping-cough, 1; chicken-
pox. 1
Scarlet fever, 5 ; German
measles, 154; measles,
47; diphtheria carriers,
1; whooping-cough, 1 ;
chicken-pox, 2; diphtheria, 4
Diphtheria, 1 ; measles,
14; German measles,
52; whooping-cough,
1; Chicken-pox, 10
Chicken-pox, 30 ; measles, 64 ; German measles, 180 ; diphtheria, 5 ;
diphtheria carriers, 2 ;
mumps, 6 ; whooping-
cough, 3
Scarlet fever, 3 ; measles,
23; German measles,
106; whooping-cough,
3 ; mumps, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 5 ; diphtheria, 1 K 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
so
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
Ph    ■
'ft
c
aj t*i
QJ
.« ^
oj u
> B
EQ
-3
<H   OJ
©  rti
o
i»
A.  OJ
°a
i"
a
OJ _
Q3
Ci>
jj'g
am
o 7^
OJ  K
OP3
o
a
OJ
-a
•4
SI
"a o
Van cou ver—Continued.
H. White	
Miss D. Shields ...
457
475
53
4
i
2
31
Livingstone	
Miss 0. Kilpatrick
423
439
41
8
i
4
22
Miss D. Bellamy ..
498
615
55
2
2
1
5
18
Miss 0. Kilpatrick
746
763
73
7
1
1
2
26
689
594
85
2
2
1
31
Miss I. Smith	
948
955
177
12
4
2
5
26
Florence Nightingale	
	
Miss V. B. Stevens
708
685
104
6
2
4
7
29
68
133
2
5
4
1
12
Miss D. Bellamy ..
595
493
91
2
2
5
15
"    	
Miss H. Jukes ....
961
942
213
22
9
57
Miss I. Smith	
624
617
101
3
1
3
1
33
Miss L. Drysdale..
927
793
100
4
1
6
66
1249
1279
141
11
1
3
10
5
Miss D. Bellamy ..
Miss M, Campbell.
748
692
98
4
1
4
Junior High	
Vancouver North:
H. Dyer           	
184
453
571
157
385
435
19
12
1
26
39
6
6
59
80
59
80
59
80
	
521
519
8
2
42
11
,3
73
73 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 33
SCHOOLS—Continued.
QJ
J   .
W .£3
M) *
QJ
CH
WC
O   j
Other  Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease, etc.).
R
c
QJ
te
a
.s
r*
CQ
-«
tf
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean  and
adequate.
70
22
88
1
15
149
3
8
161
5
25
132
1
14
207
1.
15
183
18
17
3
31
70
1
17
60
4
21
124
17
202
3
29
271
1
25
118
2
8
60
9
5
22
33
12
19
18
19
9
Vaccinated, 238.
Vaccinated, 225 ;pulmonaiy, 2:
cardiac, 2
Vaccinated, 362 ; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 357 ; pulmonary, 1
14    Vaccinated, 267.
Vaccinated, 421 ; pulmonary, 2:
cardiac, 2
Vaccinated. 332.
Vaccinated, 70 ; pulmonary, 2
cardiac, 1
Vaccinated, 315.
Vaccinated, 563; pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 287 ; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 487 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 1,136 ; pulmonary,
2
Vaccinated, 402.
Vaccinated, 85.
Heart, 3 ; bronchitis, 2	
Early exophthalmic goitre, 2:
heart, 3 ; respiratory disease,
6
Asthma, 1 ; heart, 6; early exophthalmic goitre, 3
Scarlet fever, 3 ; German
measles, 81 ; measles,
49; mumps, 3; chicken pox, 7 ; diphtheria,
2 ; diphtheria carriers,
1
Scarlet fever, 15 ; chicken-pox, 11 ; diphtheria,
2 ; whooping-cough, 1 ;
measles, 48; German
measles, 63
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
25 ; German measles,
21; chicken-pox, 13 ;
diphtheria, 2 ; whooping-cough, 2 ; diphtheria carriers, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
66; German measles,
72 ; mumps, 16 ; chicken-pox, 9
Scarlet fever, 1 ; measles,
10 ; German measles,
87 ; diphtheria carriers,
2 ; diphtheria, 2 ; chicken-pox, 29
Scarlet fever, 8 ; measles,
47 ; German measles,
260 ; whooping-cough,
2 ; diphtheria carriers,
1 ; mumps, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 32 ;   diphtheria, 6
Scarlet fever, 1; German
measles, 64; measles,
57; diphtheria carriers,
2; mumps, 24; diphtheria, 3; chicken-pox, 3;
whooping-cough, 1
Mumps, 9; German measles, 7 ; chicken-pox, 3 ;
measles, 1 ; whooping-
cough, 1
Scarlet fever, 5 ; German
measles, 2 ; mumps, I;
measles, 28; chicken-
pox, 12
Scarlet fever, 5; German
measles, 10; measles,
163; whooping-cough,
20 ; chicken-pox, 107 ;
mumps, 18
Scarlet fever, 2 ; German
measles, 108 ; measles,
35 ; diphtheria carriers,
2 ; diphtheria, 1; chicken-pox, 2
Scarlet f ever, 2 ; German
measles, 101 ; diphtheria, 14; measles, 10;
diphtheria carriers, 27 ;
mumps, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 2
Scarlet fever, 1; German
measles, 19; measles,
44; diphtheria carriers,
3 ; whooping-couph, 2 ;
diphtheria, 5; chicken-
pox, 33
Scarlet fever, 4; German
measles, 115; measles,
60; mumps, 3; chicken-pox, 9
German measles, 7  	
I Measles,   chicken-pox,
[ rubella
llean; adequate. K 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
_
D9
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Vernon	
Victoria:
Bank Street	
Beacon Hill	
Boys' Central	
Burnside	
Sir James Douglas
Girls' Central	
George Jay	
Margaret Jenkins.
King's Road	
Kingston Street ..
North Ward	
Oaklands	
Quadra Street	
Quadra Primary ..
Rock Bay 	
South Park	
Spring Ridge	
Victoria West	
G. Williams..
Mrs. S. Martin
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss C. Mowbray..
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams .
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss C. Mowbray
Miss I. E. Adams
Miss C. Mowbray ,
I. E. Adams .
148
148
318
318
215
215
473
473
381
381
476
476
292
292
80
139
80
139
369
369
546
546
20
311
139
315
20
311
139
315
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Burnaby:
Armstrong Avenue
Barnet	
Capitol Hill	
Douglas Road	
Edmonds Street   ..
Gilmore Avenue ...
Hamilton Road....
Inman Avenue
Kingsway, West...
Kitchener Street...
Nelson Avenue ....
Riverway, East....
Riverway, West....
Schou Street	
Seaforth ,
Second Street 	
Sperling Avenue..,
Windsor Street. ...
J. G. McCammon .
56
54
1
1
1
25
20
..      1
1
237
237
1
7
"3
"e
165
165
6
....
4
5
665
644
1        2
25
16
23
746
746
2       1
25
19
26
30
203
30
203
3       1
8
4
4
597
594
2       3
18
2
17
21
175
176
3
6
9
422
403
i'   '3
14
11
25
81
79
3
4
6
23
23
..    1
1
93
87
2
3
3
20
20
1
84
84
1
3
36
161
36
161
2
8
7
5
23
69
7
3
12
5
20 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 35
SCHOOL'S—Continued.
w>«
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease, etc.).
1
UI
S3
o
bo
QJ
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fl
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s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Cardiac, 1; blepharitis, 1; stammering, 1 ; seborrhcea, 1
Pulmonary, 1.
Deformity of spine, 1	
Pulmonary, 1 ; cardiac, 3 ; nervous, 3 ; defect of chest, 1
Cardiac, 1..	
One other deformity.
Pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 3 ; other
deformities, 2
Pulmonary, 1; cleft palate, 1 ;
deformity of chest, 1 ; other
deformities, 1
Pulmonary, 1 ; cardiac, 1; nervous, 2
Deformity of chest,  1 ; other
deformities, 1 ; cleft palate, 1
Nervous, 1; deformity of chest,
1
Nervous, 4 ; deformity of leg, 1
Pulmonary, 1	
Cardiac, 4 ; deformity of chest,
1 ; pulmonary, 1 ; other deformities, 1
Pulmonary, 1; other deformities, 1
Pulmonary, 1 ; other deformities. 2
10
Scarlet fever, 3 ; measles,
3 ; typhoid, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 1 ; influenza, 28 ;
mastoid, 2
Chicken-pox, 19 ; whooping- cough, 21; scarlet
fever
Measles, 7; whooping-
cough, 9
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
5 ; whooping-cough, 2 ;
chicken-pox, 7
Scarlet fever, 1 ; chicken-
pox, 17
Scarlet fever, 1 ; measles,
14 ; whooping-cough,
4; chicken-pox, 3
Chicken-pox, 16 ; whooping-cough, 4 ; measles,
10
Scarlet fever, 2 ; measles,
7 ; chicken-pox, 2
Scarlet fever, 3 ; measles,
12; whooping-cough,
1 ; chicken-pox, 1
Measles, 4 ; whooping-
cough, 1
Chicken-pox, 1; whooping-cough, 1; measles,
1
Diphtheria, 1;   measles,
4 ; chicken-pox, 9 ;
whooping-cough, 12
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps,
t ; whooping-cough, 1;
chicken-pox, 5
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
32
Chicken-pox, 3; whooping-cough, 1; scarlet
fever, 1; measles
Chicken-pox, 39; whooping-cough, 2; measles,
27 ; scarlet fever, 2
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps,
1; measles, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 1
Good.
Good; more lighting wanted
Good	
Rather poor; clean
Old building; clean
Old building; clean
Good.
Old building;
clean
Old building ; newly painted; clean
Good	
Clean; adequate.
SCHOOLS.
25
3
24
12
48
55
1
14
52
13
32
4
i
3
3
30
22
1
10
13
3
20
1
Good	
Yes.
9
102
Orthopaedic, 1;   corrected vision, 8
Corrected vision, 5	
Orthopaedic, 2 ;   corrected vision, 25
Orthopsedic, 1;   corrected vision, 27; stammer, 1
3
1
1
1
i
..
76
300
2
,.
343
14
/
95
1
279
(Jhorea, 1; corrected vision, 27;
heart, 2
,,
75
198
Asthma,  2;   corrected vision,
11 ; orthopaedic, 2
38
10
l
M           	
..
39
6
2
8
,,
12
1(
56
8
2
15
i
	
83
8
Heart 1;  corrected vision, 3..
1
. K 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Bj
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Chilliwack:
Atchelitz	
Camp Slough
Cheain	
East Chilliwack .
Fairfield Island ..
Lotbiniere	
Parson's Hill
Promontory Flat;
Robertson	
Rosedale	
Sardis	
Sumas	
Vedder	
Yarrow	
Coldstream:
Coldstream	
Laving'ton	
Coquitlam:
Blue Mountain ..
Central	
Glen	
Maillardville	
Silver Valley	
Victoria Drive ...
Cowichan, North:
Cbemainus	
Crofton	
Westholme	
Delta:
Annacis Island,..
Annieville	
Boundary Bay...
Canoe Pass	
Delta, East	
Inverhulme	
Kennedy 	
Ladner	
Mosher Siding ...
Sunbury	
Trenant	
Westham Island .
Esquimalt:
Esquimalt	
Kent:
Agassiz.	
Harrison River
Langley:
Aldergrove ....
Belmont	
County Line...
Glen Valley....
Ulenwood	
Langley, East .
Langley Fort. .
Langley Prairie
Langley, West.
Milner .	
Murrayville
Otter'	
Otter, South...
Patricia	
Sperling	
isprin^brook . .
R. McCaffrey .
L. A. Patton .
R. McCaffrey .
L. A. Patton .
R. McCaffrey .
S. G. Baldwin .
Bruce Cannon,
R. McCaffrey .
L. A. Patton..
H. B. Rogers.
J. S. McCallum.
P. McCaffrey
Miss Naden.
Miss Morrison.
29
55
66
37
24
18
77
116
8
22
66
34
17
114
14
158
26
19
18
21
36
15
26
14
13
56
33
24
159
22
22
58
25
31
14
84
148
72
82
130
52
22
25
29
23
29
65
66
60
37
24
IS
77
116
153
36
S
64
32
34
46
13
107
24
18
17
15
31
14
24
13
29
200
13
51
31
23
134
12
19
54
23
19
14
78
59
78
124
49
19 BOARD OF HEALTH EEPORT, 1926-27
K 37
SCHOOLS—Continued.
X
QJ     ■
bfiOD
i-i X
to
«    fl
o
HO
O
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease,   etc.).
6
a
fl
QJ
o
fl
OJ
u
■H
>
m
2
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated,  etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
13
9
i'
13
4
13
10
S
6
4
1
5
20
24
4
Good	
Pretty full;  ventilation rather
poor
One room  crowded ; other O.K.
Good	
Good.
"0
Scarlet fever	
Chicken-pox	
19
18
Orthopedic, 1	
"
6
Good.
9
5
1
Scarlet fever, diphtheria,
measles, chicken-pox
42
Excellent	
Good	
Bad	
Good	
Crowded; poorly
ventilated
Good	
Yes.
16
Good.
3
Had.
1
Good.
2
4
3
11
3
1
4
3
4
6
3
15
1
3
"i'
Scarlet fever, 3; influenza
Bad.
7
Clean; adequate
3
2
Measles       	
"       	
,,
1
,,
10
Stammering, 1 ; acne, 2 ; valvular disease, heart, 1; granular lids, 1
Spinal curvature, 1; granular
lids, 1
Chicken-pox, mumps,
measles
Measles, chicken-pox ...
1
2
Poorly lighted ;
water-supply
from creek
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
"
47
Nervous, 2 ; cardiac, 3 ; orthopedic, 10 ; aneemia, 1
11
5
4
Clean.
6
3
3
"j'
2
1
2
12
2
German measles, 6 	
8
5
3
7
German measles, 6  	
German measles, 49;
measles, 15
German measles, 3	
German measles, 4  . .. .
Chicken-pox,  tuberculosis, measles, meningitis, 2
German measles	
Measles, 8	
Scarlet fever, 4	
Mumps, 1	
Measles, 8	
Mumps 10 :   measles, 16
First class	
Poor	
"
20
,,
1
13
10
6
3
1
2
1
5
15
3
1
4
3
7
2
Not crowded ; well
ventilated and
heated
Rather crowded..
97
7
Chorea, 2 ; infantile paralysis,
1
Clean; adequate.
Rebuilt.
1
1
5
1
2
Not water enough
to flush toilets.
9
2
1
1
1
3
3
4
1
3
1
1
3
1
3
11
2
Poor ;   ventilation
via windows
Eight; flush.
Notwaterenough
to flush toilets.
fi
12
Whooping-cough, 10 ... .
5
1
2
5
2
Two; bucket.
4
Whooping-cough, 3	
4
6
in  good condition. K 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Maple Ridge:
Albion    	
Hammond	
Haney	
Lillooet. South	
Maple Ridge	
Alex.  Robinson	
Buskin	
Webster's Corner ...
Whonnock	
Matsqui:
Aberdeen	
Bradner	
Clayburn	
Punaeh 	
Gifford	
Jubilee	
Matsqui	
Mount Lehman	
Peardonville	
Poplar	
Ridgedale	
Mission :
Cardinell	
Cedar Valley	
Hatzic	
mission City	
Silverdale	
Silverhill	
Stave Falls	
Stave River Gardens
Steelhead	
Oak Bay:
Monterey Avenue...
Willows	
Peachland:
Peachland	
Trepanier	
Penticton:
Ellis	
Pitt Meadows:
Pitt Meadows	
Point Grey:
Edith Cavell	
Kerrisdale	
Lord Kitchener.
Langara	
Lloyd George	
G. Morse .
T. A. Swift.
A. J. Stuart .
J. N. Taylor.
Wm. Buchanan.
H. McGregor ...
L. Eroe ...
W. Dykes.
Miss Bradshaw.
Miss M. Ewart...
Mrs. C. M. Hyde.
a
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Z
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Ph    .
X
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3   .
6 *
'£*  OJ
fl
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"qj OJ
QJ
J J
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Ui
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Miss M. Ewart.
15
138
234
29
71
126
36
83
91
56
71
13
68
22
80
43
46
14
128
343
506
13
118
219
20
62
105
30
79
82
43
12
110
326 BOARD  OF HEALTH  REPORT, 1926-27
K 39
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease,   etc.).
c
£
w
a
3
QJ
5,
fee
ca
>
a
Sh
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean  and
adequate.
9
56
116
9
29
47
13
HO
38
18
13
4
5
2
6
3
1    Double congenital cataract, 1.
3      	
2 i	
3 Tonsillitis, 1.
Follicular tonsillitis, 1.
Chorea, 1	
Parotitis, 1.
Asthmatic, 1.
Stammering, 1; pulmonary, 7
cardiac, 11; orthopaedic, 5
anaemic, 14 ; nervous, 1
Cardiac. 7 ; anaemic, 12 ; hernia,
1; nervous, 1 ; pulmonary, 1 :
cleft palate, 1; speech defective, 1
Nervous, 13 ; cardiac, 7; acne.
28; orthopaedic, 7
Measles, 70 ; chicken-pox, 21 ..
Adolescent goitre, 59 ; cardiac,
15 ; orthopaedic, 9 ; anaemia,
2
Adolescent goitre, 88 ; pulmom
ary, 2 ; cardiac, 24 ; anaemia,
6 ; orthopaedic, 9
Adolescent goitre, 31; cardiac,
11 ; pulmonary, 3 ; anaemia,
1 ; orthopaedic, 5
Adolescent goitre, 30; cardiac,
3 ; orthopaedic, 2 ; anaemia, 1
Adolescent goitre, 75 ; cardiac,
8 ; pulmonary, S ; anaemia, 9 ;
orthopaedic, 8
20
Good.
Measles, 6	
Scarlet fever, 2; measles
20
Chicken-pox, 1; measles,
2U
Measles, whooping-
cough, influenza
Measles, whooping-
cough, influenza
Chicken-pox, influenza,
measles
Scarlet fever, 2 ; measles,
17 ; mumps, 4 ; chicken-pox, 1 ; rubella, 78
Scai let fever, 2 ; measles,
41; whooping-cough,
1; rubella, 125; chicken-pox, 3
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
45 ; mumps, 1 ; whooping-cough. 4;   rubella,
91;   chicken-pox, 1;
diphtheria, 7
Scarlet fever, 1 ; measles,
43; whooping-cough,
3 ; ruhella, 65 ; chicken-pox, 3
Diphtheria, 2 ; measles,
23; whooping-cough,
9 ; rubella, 57 ; chicken-pox, 13
Water-supply from
ditch
Difficult school to
ventilate, due to
construction of
windows
No water ohtain-
able, due to
periodic blocking of pipe
Fairly good	
Old building;
crowded
Somewhat worn.
All rooms overcrowded
Very good	
Good	
Most satisfactorv
Good.
Excellent; well
heated and ven-
tilated; no overcrowding
Excellent; well
heated and ventilated ; no overcrowding
Satisfactory
Excellent ...
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Excellent.
Clean; adequate.
Good. K 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School  Nurse.
3
C r-
c
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tjj
5" .
a si
o
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"5
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Point Grey—Continued.
Oak Street	
Prince of Wales    	
Quilchena	
W. Dykes	
Miss M. Ewart....
Mrs. C. M. Hyde..
674
145
473
221
571
420
415
20
32
92
90
21
158
242
92
40
56
45
159
83
28
62
31
47
94
230
279
63
37
15
74
286
16
68
189
38
27
25
22
648
150
521
191
610
400
400
20
30
90
85
18
158
242
92
40
60
45
159
81
28
62
31
47
94
230
279
55
34
14
65
277
15
64
172
35
24
23
22
15
8
15
1
7
10
8
3
io'
2
7
T
2
1
2
21
1
2
3
3
i
l
"2
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
5
61
9
38
11
23
15
15
1
2
5
5
2
3
5
3
2
3
6
10
1
1
2
2
3
10
4
2
3
1
41
5
4
2
2
1
4
5
1
1
10
1
2
15
15
7
3
1
3
1
2
2
1
6
20
25
2
1
7
10
2
54
14
19
17
38
30
25
2
1
7
15
2
W. K. Hall	
Richmond:
Lord Byng	
English	
Mitchell	
Trites	
Saanich:
Cedar Hill	
Cloverdale 	
R. L. Miller	
Miss M. Griffin....
Miss McRae	
IT          	
Gordon Head	
Keating	
Lake Hill	
MacKenzie Avenue	
Model...   	
Prospect Lake	
Royal Oak  	
"         	
2
1
1
2
4
4
2
2
2
7
.1. P. Vve	
K. L. Miller	
Saanich, West  	
Strawberry Vale	
	
2
2
23
"s
45
1
2
17
13
5
13
58
3
4
11
4
Tolmie	
Sumas:
Huntingdon	
Kilgard	
Straiton   	
Sumas, Upper	
X. A. Swift	
Surrey:
Anniedale	
F. D. Sinclair	
3
8
1
3
	
Crescent	
Elgin    ....
Grand View Heights ....
M
	
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 41
SCHOOLS—Continued.
QJ
X
u ^
OJ
QH
HO
C
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease, etc.).
6
a
a
QJ
aj
UI
t>
m
t*
Pi
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building, State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Adolescent goitre, 72 ; cardiac.
8 ; pulmonary, 4 ; orthopaedic, 19
Adolescent goitre, 24 ; cardiac,
4 ; nervous, 1; pulmonary, 1;
orthopaedic, 2 ; anaemia, 1
Adolescent, goitre, 76 ; cardiac,
15 ;  nervous, 1;  pulmonary,
3 ;  orthopaedic, 11 ;  anaemia,
3
Adolescent goitre, 24 ; cardiac,
4 ; orthopaidio, 3
Adolescent goitre, 50 ; cardiac,
10 ; anaemia, 1 ; orthopaedic,
8
Vernal catarrh.
Chronic arthritis, 1.
4    Corrections, 19.,
Appendicitis, 1.
Pleurisy, 1	
Anaemia, 13; acne, 2; cardiac, 2;
eczema, 1
Endocarditis, 1; cleft palate, 1
Polv. ant. chronic. 1 ; fct. systolic, 1
impediment in speech, 1; hypothyroid, 1
Infantile paralysis, 1.
Scarlet fever, 1 ; measles,
69; whooping-cough,
5 ; rubella, 207 ; diphtheria, 2
Measles, 12 ; rubella, 35 ;
chicken-pox, 10
Scarlet fever, 6 ; measles,
26; rubella, 127 ; diphtheria, 3; chicken-pox,
2
Measles, 31; rubella, 25 ;
diphtheria, 11; whooping cough,5
Measles, 43; rubella, 82 ;
mumps, 1 ; whooping-
cough, 2 ; chicken-pox,
16
Diphtheria, 12; scarlet
fever, 5; chicken-pox
2 ;   mumps, lu ;    roe
theln, 20;  measles,   35
Measles, 5; mumps, 10
Crowded .
Chicken-pox,   4	
Diphtheria, 2;    measles,
5; chicken-pox, 4
Measles, 1	
Chicken-pox, 32; measles, 1; typhoid, 1 ;
whooping - cough, 1;
scarlet fever, 1
Chicken-pox, 1; measles,
1;  whooping-couirh, 3
Measles, 2	
Chicken-pox, 6; scarlet
fever, 1; whooping-
cough, 1; measles, 2
Measles, 13; whooping-
cough, 1
Chicken-pox, 21; measles, 2
Measles,!;   influenza,  1
1:
Measles, ?9	
Chicken-pox,   6 ;    r
sles, 1
Measles, 1;   mumps,
whooping-cough, 2
Chicken-pox, 19 ; mea
sles, 17
Chicken-pox, 11; measles, 8 ; mumps, 1 :
whooping-cough, 3
Chicken-pox, 10; measles, 3 ; scarlet fever, 7
Crowded .
Good.
Clean; adequate.
O.K. .
Good.
O.K.
Clean; adequate.
Roetheln,l; chicken-pox,
2
Measles	
Measles	
Chicken-pox, rubella,
measles
Measles	
Measles	
Whooping-cough .
Good.
Poor	
Satisfactory.
Fair.
Good.
Require attention.
Clean.
Poor.
Good.
Clean. K 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
ol
92
a
K
a
M X
tfH    QJ
C £H
0
$°
<,   QJ
3     .
Ph V
<H  3
°a
d «
'in
fl
a
"5
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QJ S
QJ
IJ
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Surrey — Continued.
Hall's Prairie ...
Hjortli Road . ..
Johnston Road .
Kensington, East..
Kensington Prairie
Newton	
Port Mann	
Spring-dale ....
Strawberry Hill
Surrey Centre	
Tynehead	
Westminster, South .
White Rock
Woodward's Hill.
Vancouver, North:
Capilano	
Keith Lynn ...
Lynn Valley...
North Star
Roche Point .,
Vancouver, South:
Brock 	
Chainplain .
Connaught.
Gordon	
Moherly-Fraser . ..
R. McBride	
Sir A. Mackenzie .
John Norquay ...
Laura Secord	
Lord Selkirk	
Sexsmith..
Tecumseh .
F. D. Sinclair.
. McOarley.
G. A. Lamont.
MissE. Bell	
Miss E. Edwards.
Miss E. Edwards.
82
Miss E. Bell	
Miss E. Edwards.
171
31
102
300
215
38
498
POO
16
60
476
551
719
682
504
217
941
342
718
23
40
129
169
30
102
300
215
38
651
717
682
602
243
342
712
5
9
19  24
J BOARL
OF HEALTH REPORT, 192(5-27.                                          K 43
SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
>
OJ ti
*.  QJ
OJ oj
an
-a
OJ    -
u V
■3 3
H3
6
o
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a"
I
u
0)
oi
OJ
!3
d
CJ
d
o
a
S
a
o
p
OH
a
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
i
"i'
1
1
i
2
2
1
15
18
43
'26
5
96
178
2
3
92
102
108
161
134
62
135
■67
96
10
7
5
13
9
8
4
14
5
10
7
20
16
5
7
2
17
16
14
25
1
1
20
8
9
6
7
6
21
3
13
Appendix, 1; defective palate,
1 ; endocarditis, 1;   pigeon-
chest, 1
5
l
i
1
Clean.
ii
Good.
ii
Clean; adequate
Satisfactory.
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
it
ii
ii
4
4
'e'
i
i
2
High-arch palate, 1; anasmia, 1;
pigeon-chest, 1
Chronic infantile paralysis, 1;
anajmia, 1
Measles, chicken-pox ...
Whooping-cough	
Measles	
Whooping-cough, measles
«   	
Anaemia,   1 ;   chorea,   1 ;   ant.
poly.,   1 ; cryptic tonsil, 1;
endocarditis, 1
Pvorrhrea. 1 ; D.A.H., 1	
2
,.
Measles	
Marginal blepharitis, 1; facial
paralysis,  1 ;   deviated septum, 1
,,        	
2
2
2
2
3
6
12
8
3
13
21
13
20
26
27
20
7
13
13
8
Bifid uvula, 3 ; foreign body in
ear,  2; chorea,  1 ; endocarditis, 1; cleft palate, 1; fct.
systolic, 1; pigeon-chest, 1
2
1
Chicken-pox, measles ...
2
7
Asthma, 1; defective speech, 1;
heart-disease 3 ; epilepsy, 1
6
8
15
11
1
6
Measles, chicken-pox ...
Measles, whooping-
cough
Measles, scarlet fever,
chicken-pox
Scarlet fever, 2; meosles,
59; rubella, 103 ; chicken-pox, 8
Scarlet fever, 4; measles,
77 ; diphtheria, 2 ; rubella, 274 ;  mumps, 4 ;
chicken-pox, 9; whooping-cough, 12
Rubella, 7 ;   whooping-
ing-cough, 2
Measles, i ; rubella, 8 ;
whooping-cough, 3
Scarlet fever, 1 ; measles,
7 ;  rubella, 85 ;  chicken-pox, 3 ; mumps, 5 ;
whooping-cough, 3
Measles, 9 ; rubella, 120 ;
whooping-cough, 2 ;
chicken-pox, 28
Measles, 30 ; rubella, 99 ;
whooping-cough, 7 ;
chicken-pox, 10
Rubella, 65;  diphtheria,
1; measles, 26; chicken-pox, 2
Scarlet fever, ] ; measles,
17 ; rubella, 67 ; chicken-pox, 10
Measles, 22 ; rubella, 13 ;
mumps, 1; chicken-
■   pox, 4
Scarlet fever, 3 ; measles,
20; rubella, 124; chicken-pox, 8 ; diphtheria,
9 ; carriers, 7; mumps,
52
Measles, 12 ; rubella, 64 ;
chicken-pox, 3; whooping-cough, 16
Scarlet fever, 3 ; measles,
21 ; rubella, 157 ; diphtheria, 4 ; chicken-pox,
31; mumps, 3
Heart-disease, 1 ; bronchitis, 1;
epilepsy, 1
Asthma, 4 ; bronchitis, 1	
Conjunctivitis, 2 ;   throat cultures, 9; home visits, 26; vaccinations, 31;
Conjunctivitis, 3 ;  throat cultures. 7 ; home visits, 51; vaccinations, 50
1
16
16
14
6
Vaccinations, 4 ; home visits, 5
Vaccinations, 21;   home visits,
34 ; conjunctivitis, 1
Vaccinations, 12 ; home visits,
34
Vaccinations, 30 ; home visits,
89 ; conjunctivitis, 3 ; throat
cultures, 1
Vaccinations, 21 ; home visits,
44 ; conjunctivitis, 8
Conjunctivitis, 2; vaccinations,
10 ; home visits, 35
Vaccinations, 6 ;    throat cultures, 1; home visits, 5
Conjunctivitis, 7; vaccinations,
41;  throat cultures,  123 ;
home visits, 139
Conjunctivitis, 5; vaccinations,
15 ; home visits, 6
Conjunctivitis, 12; vaccinations, 20; throat cultures,
21; home visits, 67
	
1
9
2
4
i
2
4
5
5
2
12
2
7
10
25
14
11
2
20
10
7
3
14
13
7
2
1
3
5
1 K 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"n
1-1 X
«H   OJ
ll
a
3    .
Cm *
^  OJ
<h P
s
j^i aj
o
a
aj >-.
£•-
||
OS
OJ
£.2
■£45
t "
sj"£
'cj oj
93
CJ M
«-l    QJ
OJ    £
PPQ
ui
o
a
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SI
G  0
Vancouver, South—Continued.
Van Home	
Miss E. Bell	
428
703
5
14
52
365
5
426
703
6
14
62
365
5
58
99
1
7
10
15
1
4
12
12
31
19
56
Vancouver, West:
1
7
3
1
2
17
	
39
Whytecliffe	
RURAL AND
Abbotsf ord	
Adelphi   ...   	
Ainsworth	
Albert Canyon	
Albert Head	
Albreda	
Alert Bay	
Alexander Manson
Alexandria, North.
Alexis Creek 	
T. A. Swift.
Aleza Lake .,
Alice Siding	
Allenby	
Allen Grove	
Anarchist Mountain .
Anderson Creek	
Anglemont	
Annable	
Appledale	
Argenta 	
Arrowhead	
Arrow Park, East. .
Arrow Park, West , .
Ashcroft	
Ashnola	
Ashton Creek .-
Athahner-Invermere
Atlin	
Avola	
Balfour	
Balmoral	
Bamfield	
Barnston Island
Barriere River	
Baynes Lake	
Beaton 	
Beaver Creek.   ...
Beaver Cove  	
Beaverdell	
Beaver Lake	
Beaver Point	
Beaver River	
Beghie	
Belford	
Bella Coola	
Bella Coola, Lower .
R. W, Irving ....
I). J. Barclay....
J. H. Hamilton..
Irene B. Hudson.
Thos. O'Hagan...
C. A. Watson.
D. B. Lazier..
G. R. Baker..
G. A. Charter.
W. E. Laishley.
D. R. Learoyd.
G. B. Henderson	
Lee Smith	
H. McGregor	
Francis	
C. J. M   Willoughby.
W. Scatchard    .
W. A. Coghlin	
H. H. MacKenzie... .
D. J. Barclay	
J. H. Hamilton	
P. J. Emerson	
R. Gibson .
Lee Smith ..
H. W. Keith.
V. E. Coy....
R. J. Wride	
M. G. Archibald ..
P. J.  Barclay	
W. Scatchard	
Guy Palmer	
G.  Morse	
R. W. Irving	
H. A. Christie..,.
J. H. Hamilton...
A. D. Morgan	
C. A. Watson	
A. Francis	
P. V. Agnew	
E. M. Sutherland.
J. Sandilands. ...
J. H. Hamilton...
H. H. MacKenzie .
G. E. Bayfield ....
Miss H. Kelly.
Miss A. J. Duncan.
Miss Garrood .
13
11
16
16
13
13
13
13
11
7
52
40
12
12
-
7
11
11
21
48
13
16
11
16
15
12
97
21
78
23
14
17
17
31
16
6
27
15
23
12
18
9
9
12
12
20
48
16
22
14
17
15
31
15
6
26
13
20
12
17
8
9
12
11
20
48
16 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 45
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
108
122
3
4
7
3
6
23
48
15
30
Conjunctivitis, 3; vaccinations,
23 ; home visits, 34
Conjunctivitis, 15; vaccinations, 33 ; throat cultures, 6 ;
home visits, 84
8
4
7
3
12
4
4.
2
8
"i'
2
Cardiac, 1	
26
47
Scarlet fever, 1 ; measles,
12; whooping-cough,
3 ; rubella, 67 ; mumps,
1
Diphtheria, 1 ;   measles,
75 ; chicken-pox, 7 ;
rubella, 142 ; mumps, 4
I Scarlet fever, 3 ;
(measles, 63
Satisfactory
Satisfactory.
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
6
2
16
1
15
Scoliosis ; curvature of spine, 1
20
Measles, 9; chicken-pox,
12
Good	
No	
2
Good	
Fairly satisfactory
Clean ; fairly well
ventilated
4
1
1
1
4
Measles, 2 '.	
1
31
Scarlet fever, 1 ;  influenza, 1
No	
Not crowded ; well
ventilated and
heated
Slightly crowded ;
ventilation and
heating good
Satisfactory	
15
1
2
i
13
2
1
6
2
6
4
1
4
6
2
20
Chicken-pox, 21	
Chicken-pox	
2
1
O.K	
Satisfactory	
Lighting fair	
No	
3
9
Ofthopasdic, I	
9
13
3
1
22
3
3
3'
3
1
2
12
1
1
3
Not crowded; ventilation, light,
and heat good
Fair	
Good	
Furnace not satisfactory in cold
weather
Poorly heated ...
Good	
No	
Satisfactory	
Neither   	
Good	
2
17
1
Measles, 26	
Scarlet fever, rubella....
7
6
17
4
5
1
14
8
10
"9
1
3
1
4
1
i
7
3
3
Satisfactory	
Good	
8
Heart, i 	
H
5
O.K	
Good	
Satisfactory
New building	
Good	
1
4
' i
5
11
9
5
4
Orthopaedic, 1	
6
10
R
Fairly  adequate.
Two; clean.
Yes.
Good.
Need attention.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Clean.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Outside toilets in
Kood condition.
Two outside cans
emptied regularly.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
O.K
Clean
adequate.
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Fair.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Adequate.
Well taken care of
Yes.
Satisfactory.
Yes.
O.K.
Two; clean.
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
Yes.
Not satisfactory.
Two; fair.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Good. K 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
w
p,
'a
*A
a
1-1 X
Ph "ti
0)  P-.
OJ
33 a
oj M
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c" rt
a
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T   fi
z s
^
fir^
ct>
Qffi
05
■4
Bench...
Bend. ...
Beresford
Bevan
Big Bar Creek	
Big Bar Mountain.
Big Creek	
Big Eddy	
Big Lake ....
Birch Island.
Birken	
Black Canyon.
Black Pines.
Blackpool	
Blakeburn.
Blind Bay
Blind Channel .
Blubber Bay...
Blueberry Creek .
Blue River	
Bonaparte	
Bonchie	
Bonnington Falls.
Boston Bar	
Boswell	
Boulder Siding....
Boundary Falls. ..
Bowen Island	
Bowie	
Bowser	
Box Lake	
Brackendale	
Brechin   	
Bridesville...
Bridge Lake .
Brilliant	
Brisco	
Britannia Beach .
Britannia Mine...
Brookmere
Brown Creek..
Buckleyr Bay.. .
Bull River	
Burgoyne Bay.
Burns Lake	
Burtond de ....
Cache Creek...
Cahilty	
Campbell Ranch .
Campbell River.
Camp No. 3	
Canford 	
F. T. Stanier	
J. Sandilands	
C. J. M. Willoughby.
G. K. MacNaughton -
R. II. Mason..,
Q. A. Charter.'.
J. H. Hamilton ..
P. V. Agnew	
M. G. Archibald .
N. J. Paul.
R. Gibson .
K. W. Irving.
H. L. Burris..
E. Sheffield.. ..
W. Scatchard..
C. A. Watson.
Kingsley Terry
J. B. Thorn.,   .
Thos. O'Hagan.
R. H. Mason...
G. R. Baker	
H. H. MacKenzie.
P. M. Wilson	
G. B. Henderson..
W. C. Bissett	
A. Francis.   	
F. Inglis	
1. II. Hamilton...
L. T.  Davis	
P. J. Emerson....
N. J. Paul	
T. J. McPhee	
A. Francis...
R,. H. Mason.
J. B. Thorn.
F. E. Coy	
A. M. Menzies .
J. J. Gillis  	
W. Truax	
J. C. Dunn	
H. A. Christie  . ..
E. M. Sutherland.
J. T. Steele	
P. J. Emerson.. ..
R. Gibson	
R. W. Irving....
M. G. Archibald .
It. E. Ziegler.
T. A. Briggs .
J. J. Gillis...
12
11
20
7
23
8
14
8
23
67
13
11
28
13
16
11
20
20
14
12
14
25
13
15
24
22
139
19
9
121
9
59
22
61
86
10
60
21
15
12
9
29
8
22
67
12
11
28
11
20
20
12
12
13
20
12
15
24
22
130
11
56
66
14
9
58
22
34
10
20
12 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.                                          K 47
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued,.
>
53+3
+,   QJ
oj oj
OH
-a
aj   .
ij; &J
Bl c
'o
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
|
OJ
>
fl
zc
c
to
o
p.
a
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during tbe Fast
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly venti-
hiled, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
6
1
1
17
6
3
Good	
Yes.
Two; fair.
Clean.   •
Clean ; adequate.
Unsanitary.
Sanitary.
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean ; two.
Adequate ;   door
off one.
Clean.
Satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
Not clean.
2
14
6
1
1
Wax in ears, 2 ; blepharitis, 2 ;
skin-disease, 1 ;  anemic, 2 ;
nasal catarrh, 1
Chicken-pox, measles ...
Good	
O.K	
Poor; in need of
repair
Adequate ; good.
Not crowded; well
ventilated and
heated
Ventilation not
good
Good	
Poor light and ventilation ; overcrowded
Good	
Good ventilation
and heating
Good	
Good	
Building O.K.;
should have tap
w'ater
1
3
6
4
11
6
19
7
8
21
6
4
2
i
7
1
6
3
21
2
1
2
1
1
6
1
1
4
4
Smallpox, 1	
Influenza, 6;   tonsillitis,
4 ; scarlet fever, 1
Nervous, 4 ; cardiac, 2   	
Cardiac, 1	
l
Clean ;   fairly well
ventilated
Adequate	
No	
Good	
Clean.
Sanitary ; need
repair.
Yes.
Excellent.
Fairly clean.
Clean ; adequate.
4
4
6
11
1
6
1
9
3
7
2
15
17
5
6
61
2
14
13
2
4
1
24
6
12
6
1
I
6
13
1
4
10
15
2
";'
10
i
10
6
3
4
1
3
13
2
9
4
9
5
O.K	
Good	
Very good   	
Good 	
O.K.
Yes.
Good.
Clean ; adequate.
Fair.
Clean.
Yes.
O.K.
Poor structure
and condition.
l
...
Smallpox,   scarlet fever,
measles
O.K	
Gcod ; adequate ..
62
5
2
6
"s
14
2
Cardiac, 6 ;   eczema eyelids, 1 ;
lungs, 2 ; palate, 1 ;  mental,
1
Measles, 3 ;  scarlatina, 1
Spinal meningitis, l;scar-
latina, 1;   mumps, 20;
Measles, 15
Good	
Sanitary.
Clean ; adequate.
Dirty.
Fairly clean.
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Adequate.
Fair.
Clean; adequate
Two; clean.
Two closets n
repair; dirty
and ill-kept.
Adequate.
Yes.
Good.
2
I
Satisfactory	
Poor	
Good	
Slight chorea, 1 ; orthopedic, 1
Excellent	
Satisfactory   	
Fair	
Well-lighted ; ventilation good ;
not overcrowded
Good	
Room   should not
be used for
school purposes ;
it is poorly ventilated, inadequately   heated,
and, in general,
unsuitable
Excellent	
Good	
Srrabismus, 2	
3
18
2
3
3
2
2
1
2
1
1
Cardiac, 1	
Infantile paralysis, 1; ichthyosis, 1
2
1 K 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
„
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13
£5 aj
2
QS
££
na
Q.M
«!
Canyon City	
Canyon Creek ..
Carlin aiding . . .
Carrol's Landing.
Carson	
Cartier	
Cascade   	
Cassidy   	
Castledale	
Oastlegar	
Castle Rock	
Cawston	
Cedar, East	
Cedar, North ....
Cedar, South ....
Cedarvale	
Cebsta	
Champion Creek  ...
Chapman Camp	
Charlie Lake	
Chase	
Chase Creek, Lower;
Chase River	
Chaumox	
Cheamview  	
Cheracut	
Cherry Creek.  .
Chilco	
Chinook Cove...
Christian Valley
Christina Lake..
Chu Chua 	
Clayroquot	
Clearwater .
Clinton
Coal Creek .
Coalmont...
Cobble Hill.
Cokato	
Columbia Gardens .
Colwood	
Comox	
Concord	
Cooper Creek. ...
Copper City	
Copper Mountain.
Corbin	
Cortes Island	
Cowichan Lake ...
Cowichan Station.
Craigellacbie	
Cranberry Marsh	
Crawford Bay	
Crawford Creek	
Crescent Valley	
Creston 	
Creston, West	
Crow's Nest	
Croydon    ...
Cultus Lake ...   :	
Darlington	
Dawson Creek	
Dawson Creek, North.
Dawson Creek, South.
Deep Cuve	
Deep Creek	
Deer Park.	
G. B. Henderson
C. Ewert	
E. Buckell	
P. J. Emerson...
VV. Truax 	
J.  H.  Hamilton
VV. Truax	
T. J. Mcl'hee....
P. Ewert	
J. B. Thorn	
G. R. Baker	
M. D. McEwen .
T. J. McPhee....
V. Ardagh
VV. Scatchard... .
VV. A. Coghlin.. .
D. P. Hanington.
VV. A. Watson.. .
VV. Scatchard....
T. J. McPhee.
P. M. Wilson.
J. 0. Elliot	
G. A. charter.
Miss P. East.
A. D. Morgan
W. R. Stone .
R. W. Irving .
A. Fran Ms...
W. Truax ....
R. VV. trying .
D. S. Dixson  .
O. J. M. Willoughby.
R. H. Mason 	
W  Workman.
E. Sheffield.   .
F. T. Stauier .
D. Corsan .. .,
.1. B. Thorn...
I. B. Hudson .
T. A. Briggs	
J. C. Elliot	
D. J. Barclay...
W. N. Turpel...
Lee Smith	
R. Elliot	
R. Ziegler	
K. I. Murray....
II. N. Watson ..
J. H. Hamilton.
E. M. Sutherland .
D. J. Barclay. ...
J. H. Hamilton ...
H. H. MacKenzie .
G. B. Henderson ..
R. Elliot	
J. Sandilands..
J.C. Elliot	
R. W. Irving ..
W. A. Watson
S. E. M. Hoops .
H. W. Keith....
J. E. H. Kelso..
Miss Naden.
Miss  H. Kelly...
•Miss N. Armstrong
Miss Jeffares	
Miss Garrood.
9
20
13
26
38
20
76
8
61
9
22
11
16
20
26
12
108
12
79
6
12
12
18
20
10
8
12
10
47
26
22
10
12
62
77
10
8
10
40
62
15
46
13
29
10
20
214
9
16
12
17
10
23
8
7
10
27
13
20
13
26
37
20
73
6
59
9
21
9
15
18
24
12
99
9
75
5
11
11
17
zO
10
8
12
10
45
10
54
24
20
12
50
75
11
8
10
16
44
66
18
13
27
10
20
201
9
14
12
17
10
23
8
6
8
26
8
6
4        1
6
12
3
3
1
1
....      3
3
4
7
4
1    ....
4
3
6
2
2
2
2
1
3
2
2
3
1
1
5        1
3
1
6
20
35
1
2
1
2
4
2
1
2        2
4
6
9
1
1
4
2    	
1
1
1    ....
3
7
2       1
1
1
2
1    	
2
3
3
3
10    ....
23
23
1        2
10
9
4
1
1
t
1
3
1        1
4
1
1        1
2
2
2
2
4     	
9
9
13
1    ....
4
4
1
1      ...
2
1
2
1
4
4
4
3       1
1
3
3    	
1
3
1        1
4
7
3
3
9        7
5
8
16
1     	
4
5
11
3    ...
1
3
1     ....
3
1
1
12
2
3
4        2
2
3
10
3       3
1
9
9
..   .      1
1
3
1
2
1
5
5
1
3
5
7
1
24
1
13       8
13
13
21
5    ....
1
15
9
3      ...
9
»
12
1    ....
1
1
2    ....
1
8    ....
I
7
11
2
1
2    ....
4
7
27    ...
16
29
2    ....
2
2
1
2
6       2
5
4
4
1
1        1
....      1
2
7
1    ....
5
5
1    ....
1
5
1
6
3
1
1
4    ....
2
2
6
1
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1920-27.
K 49
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
X
tSx
OJ
HO
Other Conditions,   specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
d
a
a
"5
s
rH
>
CC
2
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
8
i
3
"2'
6
2
id'
4
11
1
1
11
1
Good	
Fair condition	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
5
7
	
2
Fair  	
Defective light ...
Adequate	
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
3
3
5
21
i
l
7
3
Yes.
2
Whooping-cough	
Adequate.
24
No	
Satisfactory	
Good	
7
Chicken-pox epidemic...
Smallpox, diphtheria	
Smallpox	
2
13
,,
7
1
M
Fair; frame building
One; poor.
5
1
5
2
1
4
5
5
23
2
15
1
	
::::::::::::::::::::::::
8
2
Rubella	
Excellent	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Not crowded; well
ventilated and
heated
O.K	
Good	
Adequately ventilated  and heated ; school-room
filled to capacity
Good	
Heating  and ventilation good
Not overcrowded ;
poorly heated by
stoves; fair ventilation
Old building	
Good...'	
1
TO
14
1
Smallpox	
3
Dirty.
3
0
Mentally defective  boy (aged
15), is a dwarf, and has congenital dislocation   of  both
hips
Clean; adequate.
Good.
0
1
1
8
3
5
4
1
5
4
4
3
3
1
2
2
3
3
10
2
1
3
10
2
3
0
3
6
6
4
1
1
25
1
2
3
2
2
O.K.
9
Bronchitis 1;   chronic nasal
catarrh, 1
1
1
2
2
14
1
Influenza, chicken-pox..
Two; clean.
Clean; additional
accommodation will soon
be required.
19
31 -
Cardiac, 4 ; chorea, 1 ; bronchitis, 4
Clean ; adequate.
Yes ; need repair.
15
17
Yes.
■j
Anaemia, 1;  slightly damaged
hearts, 4
Clean; adequate.
4
1
4
11
6
4
Round shoulder, 2; nervous, 3;
anamila, 3
Eczema, . ; V. D.H. 1	
Excellent	
Good	
Being improved ..
No	
Fairly good	
Adequate	
O.K	
Good	
Poorly lighted and
ventilated
Yes.
Improved.
4
19
Adequate.
Yes.
9,6
Good.
2
Adequate.
O.K.
12
1
Measles, whooping-cough
Diphtheria, 5	
12
Clean ; adequate.
4
Satisfactory.
Yes.
Good.
8
No	
Good	
5
Heart, 1	
Clean; adequate.
99
Measles	
1
Fair	
Pair	
Go;d	
Fair	
4
9
1
9
4
4
2
Yes.
1
1
tl
4
tl
8
Good	
„
3
M K 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School  Nurse.
fl
&
£
■4-1   OJ
. 0
o ^
H    .
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QJ   fcfi
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Qffl
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Demars, West	
Denman Island
Departure Bay	
Dewdney	
Diamond Crossing .
Divide 	
Dome Creek	
Doreen	
Doriston .
Dorr	
Dove Creek.
Driftwood..
Ducks bang
Dundon ....
Dunster. ...
Eagle Valley.
Echo Bay ...
Edgeyvater ..
Edgewood ..
Egmont	
Elk Bridge ..
Elko	
Elk Valley...
Ellison ......
Elphinstone Bay
Endako	
Enderby, North .
Engeu 	
Erickson	
Erie	
Errington	
Essington	
Evelyn	
Ewing's Landing.
Fairview..
Falkland ..
Fanny Bay
Fauquier. ..
Field	
Fife	
Fire Valley .
Firvale 	
Fir Valley ..
Fish Lake .
Flagstone.
Forest Grove .
Ford	
Forks 	
Fort Fraser	
Fort Fraser, North..
Fort George	
Fort George, South.
Fort St. James	
Fort St. John  	
Fort St. John, East.
Fort Steele	
Four Mile.	
Francois, North	
Francois, South.   ...
Fraser Lake   	
Fraser Lake, North.
French Creek	
P. J. Emerson ...
T. A. Briggs 	
T. J. McPhee	
A. J. Stuart	
H. B. Maxwell ...
E. M. Sutherland.
J. Sandilands	
V. E. B. Ardagh..
F. Inglis	
H. A. Christie ...
T. A. Briggs  	
C. H. Hankinson .
R. W. Irving	
R. H. Mason	
F. Inglis	
W. R. Stone	
H. W. Keith...
VV. R. Stone..   ..
G. B. Henderson.
J. B. Thorn	
L. T. Davis	
R. Large	
C. H. Hankinson.
W. J. Knox	
.1. Sandilands..
B. Buckell	
C. A. Watson..
F. E. Coy ...
J. E. H. Kelso.
F. Inglis	
F. J. Buckley .
H. A. Christie.
F. J. Buckleyr.
W. J. Knox ...
H. B. Maxwell.
G. II. Kearney	
P. D. Van Kleeck....
G. K. MacNaughton .
J. E. II. Kelso . . .
G. A. Cheeseman.
W. Truax	
J. E. H. Kelso'....
G. E. Bayfield ....
VV. J.  Knox	
C. J. M. Willoughby.
H. A. Christie.
F. V. Agnew...
P. Ewert....
R. W. Irving
VV. R. Stone
C. Ewert.
VV. R.
W. A.
F. W.
VV. J.
D. B.
W. R.
L. T.'
Stone...
Watson.
Green	
Lightburne.
Lazier	
Stone.
Davis.
Miss Hewertson.
Miss Jukes .
Miss Hewertson.
Miss Jukes ,
10
64
10
82
31
18
20
13
26
20
10
12
10
15
11
19
35
16
18
28
7
35
13
17
16
11
50
9
27
36
22
15
12
24
43
63
22
11
11
9
15
11
10
16
41
6
44
62
15
25
10
49
7
12
20
18
10
40
10
50
9
74
31
18
20
13
24
20
10
12
10
11
9
19
35
16
18
19
13
17
15
11
49
9
27
28
22
15
11
23
01
22
10
41
42
59
15
24
9
49
7
12
20
18
10
40
-19
12 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 51
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
X
OJ
fl fl
o
wo
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease, etc.).
d
g
fl
OJ
o
6:
n
OJ
n
u
fl
3
>
DQ
a
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during  the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
4
i
2
3
3
8
3
2
12
2
5
Cardiac-., 1    ...
Good	
Old	
Good	
Poorly built frame
shack
Satisfactory	
Good	
8
Yes.
2
Clean; adequate.
21
19
7
Not satis factor}7.
Two; good.
Two; yes.
Inadequate;
clean.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
12
1
6
3
7
"3'
1
2
3
Nasal spur, 1	
Small; low ceiling;
poor light
Satisfactory	
Good	
Nervous, 2 ;  discharging ear, 1
R
door.
6
1
Yes.
7
Clean ; adequate.
Sanitary.
Yes.
3
1
3
9
3
5
1
10
Clean; adequate.
2
2
3
2
6
8
Orthopajdie,   1;     antenna,   1;
chronic eczema, 1
Good	
9
adequate.
Yes.
13
6
1
1
1
	
1
4
Clean; adequate.
4
1
1
Measles, chicken-pox...
5
Very good	
Good	
Too little air
Good	
Efficient	
Clean; adequate.
24
6
5
5
2
1
"8'
1
3
3
3
2
14
2
1
1
1
Chorea, 1; cardiac, 1 ; eczema,
1 ; lack of bladder control, 1 ;
amemia, 2
Cardiac,  2 ;   Still's disease, 1;
psoriasis, 1
Nil, except flu	
Yes.
17
adequate.
Yes.
4
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
7
Impediment in speech, 1 ; ana;-
mia, 2 ; headaches. 1 ; nerve
disease, 1;   nasal catarrh, 3 ;
wax in ears, 4 ;   skin-disease,
2; blepharitis, 1
28
O.K	
Fair	
Fair   	
Good	
Poorly heated ;
building not
lined
Frame ; in need of
repair; windows
on wrong side
Satisfactory	
Temporary building
Uncompleted.   .   .
Good	
Good	
Old frame building
in only f tir condition
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Satisfactory   ...   .
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Influenza	
Scarlet fever, measles...
24
1
Both.
4
1
Pad.
1
Yes.
4
i
4
Good.
3
Curvature of spine, 1 ; anaemia,
.1 ; cardiac, 1
3
fl
1
Yes.
1
1
1
1
6
"s.
15
12
3
3
Adequate.
Two; clean.
Yes.
2
25
Amputated foot, 1 	
Measles epidemic .    ....
1
18
Blepharitis, 2	
Clean; adequate.
SO
10
10
Yes.
Fair.
•?,
.
3
3
3
11
6
	
Yes.
5
Measles, chicken-pox....
Very good	
Clean; adequate. K 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of  School.
Medical Inspector.
School  Nurse.
a
£
ra
a.
a
3
2;
X
tH   Ci
o 3
0
6 £
3     .
°a
(<   QJ
'u
fl
a
fl
OJ  J>.
£ c
OJ  OJ
CJ
oj .2
V..2
> be
o •?
cj 2
o be
£ a
"o
a .
OJ
Z 3
s
Q«
e^
QK
Qra
<
Fruitlands	
Fruitvale	
Galena Bay	
Galiano, North .
Galiano, South..
Gallie Bay....
Ganges	
Georgetown ..
Gibson Creek.
Gill	
Gillies Bay... .
Giscome.	
Glacier .
Glade...
Glenbank...
Glenemma..
Glenora
Glenrosa....
Glentauna..
Golden	
Goldstream.
Gowland Harbour.
Granby Bay	
Grandview Bench.
Grani.e Bay
Grantham	
Grant Mine	
Grassmere	
Gray Creek	
Great Central	
Green Bay	
Green Lake	
Grcenslide	
Grey's Oreek	
Grindrod	
Hall	
Hall's Landing . ..
Happy Valley	
Hardvvkjk Island..
Harewood   	
Harrogate	
H arrop	
Hatzic Prairie
Hazelton	
Hazelton, New.	
Headquarters	
Hedley	
Heffley Creek	
Heffley Creek, Upper..
Hendon   	
Heriot Bay	
Hillcrest	
Hilliers	
Hilltop	
Hilton	
Hope	
Hornby Island	
Horse Creek	
Hosmer
Houston	
Howe Sound. . ..
Hudson's Hope .
Huintt	
Hunter Island. .
Hupel	
Hnscroft	
Hutton	
R. W. Irving	
J. B. Thorn	
J. H. Hamilton . . .
E. M. Sutherland
O. II. West	
R. E. Ziegler	
E. M. Sutherland.
R. G. Large	
H. H. MacKenzie .
A. D. Morgan....
Kingslev Terry. .
W. E. Laishley ...
J. H. Hamilton...
H. H. MacKenzie .
P. J. Emerson ...
P. I). van Kleeck .
H. N. Watson .. ..
W. Buchanan	
0. H. Hankinson .
P. Ewert	
1. B. Hudson	
R. E. Ziegler ..
D. R. Learoyd .
H. W. Keith	
C. A. Watson
T. A. Briggs	
T. J. McPhee	
H. A. Christie ....
D. J. Barclay	
A. D. Morgan.
G. E. Bayfield ....
R. H. Mason	
J. H. Hamilton.   .
C. A. Watson	
H. W. Keith    	
H. H. MacKenzie .
J. H. Hamilton...
I. B. Hudson .   . ..
C. A. Watson	
T. J. McPhee	
Paul Ewert	
H. H. MacKenzie ...
A. J. Stuart	
Wm. J. Lightburne.
T. A. Briggs . .
M. 1). McKwen
R. W. Irving...
P. D. van Kleeck .
R. E. Ziegler	
H. VV. Keith	
b. T. Davis	
VV. Truax     	
H. G. Williams....
J. C. Elliot	
T. A. Briggs	
Paul Ewert	
D. Corsan .
C. H. Hankinson
P. Inglis	
VV. A. Watson  . .
IV. K. Stone	
G. A. Roberts ...
H. W. Keith	
G. B Henderson.
VV. E. Laishley ..
Miss J elf ares.
Miss II. Kelly.
Miss Gal-rood .
Miss H. Kelly.
Miss Garrood.
90
48
18
19
67
11
18
22
11
56
6
59
40
12
18
10
6
132
20
10
158
20
6
27
27
10
9
16
17
15
14
10
67
7
13
27
11
31
20
27
27
32
58
S
8
10
12
15
19
14
9
69
12
17
17
105
15
11
7
9
22
27
40
8
18
19
11
18
10
53
40
11
15
10
6
124
16
18
6
27
24
10
8
15
17
15
14
10
63
6
12
24
9
336
10
31
18
27
27
31
8
8
12
15
19
14
9
67
12
11
17
93
15
11
7
9
22
26
1
1
10
5
6
21
22
15
1
2
2
1
3
3
3
2
2
4
1
i
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
4
5
5
3
7
ii'
1
3
2
5
5
6
21
1
10
4
1
22
7
1
3
i
10
1
2
30
4
i
l
"i
3
6
2
6
2
1
1
2
6
3
9
2
10
2
1
4
2
21
27
10
3
1
2
20
5
1
64
6
1
2
2
3
3
1
3
1
5
2
1
3
1
3
1
1
5
2
2
44
i
2
5
1
9
2
2
2
1
"4'
1
i
1
1
2
2
1
20
1
4
3
4
2
2
20
2
5
11
•y
2
4
1
11
2
4
4
si
1
4
57
8
3
5
1
2
1
"s
1
7
1
11
2
2
3
6
1
1
7
1
4
1
3
1
1
•>,
4
*'''.
2
2
1
1
1
5
7
1
"2
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
5
4
1
19
3
1
1
1
1
4
16
4
5
13
2
24
5
4
3
2
2
2
3
2
1
4
2
4
10 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1920-27.
K 53
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
o
a
K
c
B
60
S
IS
o
H
t-i
[>
cd
n
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
in
1
3
2
6
2
"o'
4
3
7
6
iri
10
1
13
6
1
4
1
6
17
18
5
15
10
9
9
1
3i
Heart cases, 4 ;   spinal curvature, 1
13
20
6
3
102
9
l6'
2
77
1
2
24
5
4
Eczema, 5 ; epilepsy, 1	
Squint, 2 ; cardiac, 1 ; nervous,
1
Whooping-cough	
Hernia, 1 ; flat chest, 12 ; acne,
1 ; asthma, 1; bronchitis, 1;
spinal curvature, 1
7
.
4
3
3
2
1
8
3
2
2
Cardiac, 1	
2
Scarlet fever, 2	
4
4
Heart, 1	
3
1
23
60
3
4
2
1
1
28
1
10
2
1
1
4
4
73
1
4
2
Smallpox,  scarlet fever,
diphtheria, measles
Whooping-cough	
Chicken-pox, 14	
1
12
3
Heart, 1 ; spinal curvature, 1..
1
12
8
1
7
Chicken-pox, 5	
3
3
2
i
Mumps	
4
Measles, chicken-pox ...
2
6
4
2
1
10
1
3
6
1
41
3
2
Scarlet fever, whooping-
cough
Roetheln, 3   	
16
Anaemia, 1 ; slightly damaged
hearts, 6 ; epileptic, 1
2
8
5
Whooping-cough	
2
1
"3
2
1
19
Good.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Well ventilated ;
comfortably
heated
Adequate	
Satisfactory   ...
Good	
Building O.K. ,..
Not crowded ;
ventilation and
heating good
Good	
Very good.
Good	
Satisfactory ....
Fair	
Good	
Rather  crowded.
Adequate...
Satisf actor v.
Good	
Light poor .
Good	
Very satisfactory
No	
Good	
Crowded .
Good	
Fai r..
Good.
Excellent.
Two ; clean.
Good.
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
Adequate.
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
O.K.
Outside toilets in
fair condition.
Good.
Poor.
Fair.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Adequate.
Fair.
Adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
("lean;
adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Inadequate.
Good.
Clean
Fair.
Poor.
Good.
Yes.
adequate.
Fair     Clean ; adequate.
Good.      Yes.
Most satisfactory..
Heating    facilities
in  cold weather
inadequa: e
Satisfactorv	
Good    	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Poor	
Good	
Adequate	
Good	
Very good	
Good..   	
Fair..
Good.
Fair	
Good	
Not crowded; ventilation good;
heatiny poor
Clean.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Two; c.ean.
Yes.
Adequate.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Good. K 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
"a
rn
B
a
a
o
2
Name of School.
Medical
Inspector.
School Nurse.
•3    .
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Ingersoll Mountain.
Ingram Mountain.
loco	
Irving's Landing...
Isabella Point	
Jaffray	
James Island	
Jesmond.	
Joe Rich .
Johnson's Landing.
Jordan River	
Jura	
Kalcden	
Kaleva	
Keefers	
Kelly Creek....
Kelowna, East
Kelowna, South.
Keremeos	
Kerr Creek	
Kettle River, North ,
Kettle Valley	
Kildonan	
Killarney	
Kimberley	
Kincolith	
Kingcome Inlet.
Kingsgate	
Kinnaird	
Kispiox   	
Kitchener	
Kitsumgallum ..
Kitwanga.
Koksilah	
Krestova '.	
Lackenby	
Lac la Hache ..
Lakelse Valley,
Lakes District
Lang Bay	
Langford. ....
Larchwood ..
Lawn Hill	
Lazo	
Lee	
Lee Creek...
Lillooet	
Lindeli	
Lister 	
Little Fort..,
Lone Butte,
Long Beach.,
Long Lake..
Longworth ..
Loos	
.Loos, West..
Louis Creek .
Lumberton .
Lumby	
Lund	
Lytton	
Mable Lake..
Magna Bay..
Malakwa	
P. J. Emerson....
A. F'rancis	
C. R. Symmes
A. Henderson ....
E. M. Sutherland.
H. A. Christie	
S. E. M. Hoops ...
R. H. Mason	
Malcolm Island .
Mapes.	
W. ,1. Knox.
D. J. Barclay.
I. B. Hudson .
Lee Smith	
H. McGregor .,
C. A. Watson..
P. M. Wilson ..
A. Henderson .
VV. J. Knox....
M. D. McEwen.
A. Francis 	
\V. Truax	
A. F'rancis	
A. D. Morgan	
Lee Smith	
D. P. Hanington..
D. J. McDonald ..
C. A. Watson	
G. B. Henderson..
J. B. Thorn	
VV. J. Lightburne.
G. B. Henderson .
VV. N. Turpel.....
V. E. R. Ardagh.
H. N. Watson    ...
H. H. MacKenzie.
R. VV. Irving	
F. V. Agnew	
W. N. Turpel	
VV. R. Stone  ....
A. Henderson ....
I. B. Hudson	
F. W, Green	
G. H. Bleecker ...
T. A. Briggs	
J. Sandilands 1....
VV. Scatchard	
A. 0. Nash	
J. C. Elliot	
G. B. Henderson .
R. VV. Irving	
R. H. Mason	
H. H. MacKenzie.
R. W. Irving	
W. E. Laishley .  .
J. Sandilands.
R. W. Irving ...
F. W. Green	
H. G.Williams..
R. E. Ziegler ...
P. M. Wilson....
H. G. Williams .
VV. Scatchard...
J. H. Hamilton.
C. A. Watson.
W. R. Stone..
Miss P. East.
Miss Jeffares.
Miss II. Kelly.
Miss Garrood.
10
8
9
9
118
112
15
13
12
12
31
29
55
44
9
9
10
10
6
6
9
9
13
13
18
18
13
13
10
10
9
9
70
61
15
13
82
82
12
12
10
10
14
14
.   15
15
8
7
418
415
12
12
8
8
12
12
8
6
11
11
39
39
155
147
13
10
18
13
31
30
15
15
8
7
13
4
11
11
19
17
51
51
10
10
9
9
41
36
9
9
7
7
66
59
27
27
23
22
36
36
17
17
16
16
17
17
24
23
16
16
9
9
12
12
57
56
77
77
30
30
29
28
13
13
15
12
39
36
61
61
12
12
2
6
3
3
9
1
I
6
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
7
7
16
2
1
2
1
"2
i
1
2
1
2
6
6
2
2
1
2
4
6
3
2
2
3
1
2
8
16
6
3
3
2
2
1
3
3
2
2
7
4
1
4
2
1
6
2
5
2
4
i
7
3
4
4
l
2
2
4
1
2
8
2
8
3
1
1
16
2
12
2
1
2
1
3
6
1
2
6
14
5
1
6
28
1
10
45
1
4
i
"3
3
1
2
i
1
2
3
2
i
2
2
3
i
2
1
2
13
3
1
1
6
5
12
3
3
3
3
1
7
1
7
4
1
2
1
6
2
1
4
1
2
2
1
1
'2'
1
1
1
2
1
3
5
7
4
6
2
6
8
8
3
8
8
12
5
4
4
3
"i
1
1
4
14
1
i
2
3
4
3
4
7
2
1
3
6
3
16
6
6
1
8
1
29
7 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 55
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued,.
QJ
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O
Other  Conditions,   specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac  Disease,  etc.).
a"
0>
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o
H
OJ
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CC
Ph
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
"5'
5
4
3
20
Fair	
0. K	
Excellent	
Good	
Satisfactory   ...   .
Go<,A........   ...
Fair;  log building
Good	
No	
Satisfactory	
Good..	
O.K.
15
Infantile paralysis, 2	
1
3
1
Whooping-cough, 25 ....
Whooping-cough	
Excellent.
Good.
6
2
6
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
10
2
27
4
2
3
l'
2
4
8
2
7
4
6
4
2
3
1
Antenna, 1 ; curvature of spine,
1
Anasmia, 2	
Round shoulder, 1; aneemia, 2;
ep.staxis, 1
pair.
Sanitary ;
adequate.
2
3
5
Improved.
Yes.
2
Chicken-pox, influenza..
Influenza, 2	
8
Excellent	
Good	
Satisfactory	
O.K	
O.K	
Should be two janitors
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
2
Good.
10
9
2
2
1
2
10
3
3
Diabetes, 1; chorea, 3 ; curvature of spine, 2 ;   cardiac, 2 ;
infantile   paralysis, 1 ;  bronchial catarrh, 2
Rupture, 1; anaemia, 1; curvature of spine, I
Clean; fairly
adequate.
4
iO
Measles, 2 ; scarlet fever,
2
adequate.
1
O.K.
2
1
O.K.
10
25
2
Rubella	
2
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
6
2l'
1
2
31
1
3
5
4
Satisfactory	
Good	
One ; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
3
«8
Crypt orchid, eczema, arm vulgaris, chorea
5
Frame building;
good condition
Good	
Two ; yes.
Clean; adequate.
Bad.
6
15
1
17
Good	
1
3
1
i
10
Yes.
4
2
2
1
9
5
Round shoulder, 3 ; cardiac, 1;
aneemia, 2 ; nasal polyp., 1
Measles, 1; scarlet fever
1
Excellent 	
Good	
Fair 	
Good	
Fair	
Satisfactory.	
Full	
Good	
Conditions good..
Good	
Building in rather
poor shape; not
crowded
Fair 	
Yes.
0
1
Yes.
7
ii'
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
26
Clean; adequate.
18
1
Clean; adequate.
9
Epidemic of scarlet fever
Measles epidemic	
Influenza, German measles
3
5
Adequate.
Clean; adequate.
13
6
i
6
1
2
4
9
3
3
12
1
3
2
8
3
fair condition.
6
5
6
Good.
1
Fair	
Good 	
Adequate.
Boys' dirty.
in
1
Not good........
Satisfactory7	
Good 	
Light poor	
4
Satisfactory.
Good.
2
Whooping-cough, scarlet
fever
Influenza, 5 	
48
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
7 K 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School  Nurse.
fl
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Be;
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DQ
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Mara	
Marten Lake....
Martin's Prairie.
Marysville
Masset	
Mavne Island...
Mayo	
Mayook	
Meadowbrook .
Meadow Spur.
Meadow V alley.
Medora Creek.
Menzies Bay...
Merville	
Metchosin	
Michel	
Midway	
Mill Bay 	
Minto	
Mirror Lake ...
Mission Creek.
Moberly	
Mohun Lake	
Monte Creek	
Montrose	
Morrissey Mines.
Mountain   	
Mount McPherson .
Moyase	
Moyie	
Mud River	
Myncaster	
Myrtle Point	
Macalister	
McBride	
McConnell Creek .
Mackenzie	
McLure	
McMurdo	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo Bay	
Nanoose Bay	
Naramata	
Needles	
New Denver.
Newgate	
Nevvlands .. .
New Michel	
Nickel Plate Mine.
Nicola	
Nicola, Lower	
Nicomen	
Nicomen, North ..
Nimpkish ...
Nob Hill....
Noble Creek
Noosatsum ..
North Bend..
Northfield	
North Saanich . ..
Norwegian Creek.
Notch Hill	
Ocean Falls	
Okanagan 	
Okanagan Centre.
IT. W. Keith	
W. R. Stone	
R. W. Irving	
I). P. Hanington.
J. C. Dunn	
0. II.  West	
H. N. Watson	
H. A. Christie	
D. P. Hai i lgton.. ..
J. D. Thorn	
F. W. Andrew	
H. G. Williams	
11. Ziegler	
T. A. Briggs	
I. B. Hudson	
F. J. Buckley	
A. Francis	
F. T. Stanier	
G. K. MacNaughton
D. J. Barclay-
W. J. Knox..
Paul Ewert..
II. F. Ziegler.
R. W. Irving
L. T. Davis.
D Corsan ...
T. J. McPhee ...
■J. H. Hamilton.
F. W. Green ...
C. Ewert .
A. Francis	
A. Henderson ..
F. V. Agnew  	
J. Sandilands	
A. J. Stuart	
G. E. Bayfield	
C. J. M. Willoughby
Paul Ewert	
P. J. Emerson	
T. J. McPhee	
L. T. Davis	
F. W. Andrew	
■I. E. H. Kelso.
Wm. E. Gomna.
H. A. Christie.
VV. E. Laishley .
F. J. Buckley .
M. D. McEwen.
J. J. Gillis	
A. J. Stuart
C. A. Watson..
T. A. Briggs...
R. W. Irving..
G. E. Bayfield..
P. M. Wilson . .
T. J. McPhee	
S. E. M. Hoops ...
A. Francis	
W. Scatchard	
A. E. H. Bennett .
MissJeffares
Miss Naden..
69
12
29
21
17
21
12
17
15
17
9
9
13
44
30
165
37
24
43
8
7
11
10
12
61
13
20
66
11
7
18
60
18
11
fl
15
108
94
16
59
9
74
15
14
187
11
13
26
37
33
9
78
55
98
13
23
156
42
10
62
12
29
20
17
18
11
15
15
17
9
9
13
41
30
164
37
22
43
7
55
7
11
10
10
18
60
9
66
16
11
9
13
108
90
16
52
185
11
12
16
34
28
52
95
13
22
148
1
1
2
1
4
1
7
3
4
3
1
3
1
4
18
3
4
1
3
1
1
3
3
3
'37'
1
2
1
6
1
1
3
3
2
10
2
40
1
1
1
5
9
i
1
1
5
2
....
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
1
5
3
4
1
3
2
1
4
4
2
3
1
2
10
6
33
7
3
6
1
7
3
0
fi
3
2
1
7
6
15
1
1
i
i
1
4
9
1
'2
T
1
1
13
4
9
2
2
1
2
3
2
18
■'
i
3
4
"2
4
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
....
2
2
2
4
1
3
2
4
1
4
1
1
2
•1
1
5
6
2
1
2
6
11
0
7
1
12
3
2
4
"l
2
12
11
12
•y
1
14
3
9
4
2
5
7
1
62
7
H'
3
22
7
2
42
3
3
4
16
11
6
...
3
1
1
3
i3
1
1
"s
1
2
4
2
1
14
4
1
2
1
"3
1
4
7
8
3
2
4
9
6
"4
8
3
2
4
19
20
1
6
4
22
4 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 57
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Qh
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
•>n
1
3
Good	
O.K	
Good	
Yes.
a
3
1
1
1
1
1
4
Not crowded; well
ventilated and
heated
Good	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
10
IF
8
5
2
..
2,
M
10
3
1
1
8
4
No	
Yes.
Good.
2
Adequate.
Yes.
11
"4
51
37
16
"2'
1
3
1
89
32
1
6
6
1
2
2
Measles, 1; pertussis, 7..
3
98
8
1
9,
O.K	
Good	
O.K	
No	
O.K.
14
Yes.
25
Skin-disease, 5 ; wax in ears, 7 ;
nasal catarrh, 1
1
3
Yes.
11
4
Chorea, 1 ; eczema, 2 ; cardiac,
1; anaunia, 2
German measles, 5	
Excellent ........
Adequate	
Good	
Sanitary;
adequate.
Adequate.
•>.
Should be condemned
Good	
6
3
1
'i'
9
5
6
7
13
2
2
3
17
1
Yes.
Good.
8
14
.
R
Log building in
good condition;
lighting and ventilation fair
O.K	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
1
3
Yes.
29
1
11
Good	
Two; good.
2
6
4
"2
6
1
9
i
40
i
2
'l7
4
2
4
1
36
8
Good.
4
Satisfactory	
Good	
2
Whooping-cough	
16
No	
18
Smallpox, measles	
4
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
33
10
3
2
2
87
2
2
15
5
i
3
4
21
Anaemia, 3 ; eczema, 4; chorea,
2
Fair 	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Not crowded; ventilation and
heating good
6
78
2
2
good condition.
4
No	
Yes.
3
Good	
6
2
1
1
10
Clean; adequate.
Not very clean.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
12
Badly contracted nasal passage,
1
Needing many repairs
Good	
14
2
2
"        	
6
Good.
34
Chronic bronchitis, 1;   aortic
insufficient, 1
2
16
Good	
Yes.
44
O.K	
Excellent ; well
ventilated and
heated
11
6
O.K.
16
Whooping-cough, 23;
chicken-pox, 3
30
6
1
1
5
3
1
Cardiac, 3 ; hernia, 1; asthma,
1
Clean; adequate.
3
adequate. K 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Ph 'ti
M OJ
«m a
°|
II
fi   OJ
OJ CJ
23
54
10
21
83
11
9
15
16
9
6
12
23
63
10
34
11
24
10
9
10
12
79
17
29
17
18
8
22
49
12
15
24
5
9
32
28
15
10
11
13
11
23
17
13
436
12
177
15
52
9
63
■   16
21
30
8
89
7
19
12
19
8
7
33
8
18
11
14
11
25
12
28
10
23
49
10
21
81
11
9
11
16
9
6
12
22
62
7
34
9
22
8
9
6
12
78
17
26
16
18
8
22
49
10
15
24
1
3
2
2
3
W. J. Knox	
6
1
1
3
8
R. E. Ziegler	
Miss P. East	
"t
1
1
22
1
1
17
1
3
4
1
5
4
1
2
W. R. Stone 	
"2
1
2
7
R, G. Large	
Otter Point	
1
3
2
2
4
1
1
1
1
3
H. G. Williams	
2
1
2
1
i
Miss Hewertson ..
H. B. Maxwell	
Miss Hewertson ..
1
1
1
V. E. R. Ardagh	
1
2
J. T. Steele	
3
"i'
2
1
7
1
3
3
J. B. Thorn	
i'
1
2
1
2
1
2
N. J. Paul	
2
i
2
2
8
1
2
2
1
2
9
32
28
15
10
9
13
11
23
15
12
432 .
12
172
15
48
9
63
16
21
30
8
89
7
19
8
19
8
7
33
8
17
11
11
8
21
9
27
10
Popcum	
J. C. Elliot	
1
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
J. A. Street	
8
C. A. Watson	
1
1
1
W. E. Bavis	
1
4
1
2
1
1
i
3
3
2
7
2
20
3
2
2
69'
1
8
i
1
2
2
10
3
1
91
W. R. Stone	
2
1
8
1
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
"i'
L. T. Davis	
J. A. Street	
1
2
1
2
10
G. H. Bleecker	
G. R. Baker	
2
i
2
2
2
1
a. C. Paine	
M. G. Archibald	
L. T. Davis	
1
J. E. H. Kelso 	
"i'
'2
.   5
2
1
i
"2'
2
i
1
9
R. E. Ziegler	
3
3
"i
1
1
1
3
C. J. M. Willoughby	
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
2
1
W.W. Birdsall	
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 59
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
is
V-l   OJ
OJ  BJ
OB
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Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
d
a
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as
33
a
1
OJ
a,
a
a
M
o
S*
bd
a
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
2
4
i»'
5
3
10
11
2
Nervous, 1; acne, 1; aneemia, 2
Threatening chorea, 3; bronchial catarrh, 3 ; diabetes, 1 ;
cardiac, 2 ; anaemia, 3
Good	
Good.
Good	
adequate.
Adequate.
Yes.
2
Good	
Psoriasis, 1 ; deformed palate,
1 ; cleft palate, 1
i
Acute rheumatic fever, 1
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Fair....    	
Good	
3
Yes.
3
i
2
4
1
2
1
4
Round shoulder, 1; nervous, 1
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
1
1
20
3
3
1
Good	
..
Efficient .	
..
2
Measles, 1	
Good ventilation..
7
need new doors.
2
6
6
11
i
Measles, chicken-pox ...
Very good	
Good	
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
3
1
1
1
10
"e'
"3
Not
i
6
12
3
4
1
1
1
4
Heart, 1.                        	
14
Itch, 1	
Good.
17
4
4
3
exa
1
4
Good	
Yes.
8
Dirty.
2
mined as closed before arrival)
20
Good	
Fair	
10
5
„
3
8
3
3
's
1
4
5
4
19
2
46
2
13
2
,,
8
Yes.
Good	
,,
5
8
Cardiac, 3; orthopaedic. 6; anee-
mic, 2 ; pneumonia T.B., 1 ;
acne, 1
i
Measles, scarlatina	
Good.
Yes.
55
5
	
,,
7
Nerve-disease, 1; wax in ears,
3 ; nasal obstruction 1; skin-
disease, 1; blepharitis, 2
O.K	
14
Measles, chicken-pox ...
5
M
6
Good	
Yes.
2
7
4
5
No	
Yes.
i'
2
3
Good	
4
Good.
Yes.
2
2
12
5
11
O.K	
O.K.
Yes.
2
2
Yes.
4
22
7
13
1
O.K	
O.K.
2 K 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
_
Cd
a
2
Ph   .
X
<f-f  OJ
OS
o
6 a
2§
3    .
Ph 'ti
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im a
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OJ et
09
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s
S
Q^d
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■4
15
10
9
66
11
11
15
8
17
8
31
158
24
20
6
45
18
9
12
11
12
65
21
51
12
6
9
8
11
10
36
10
48
9
12
8
12
50
14
9
9
20
115
22
71
11
25
13
6
45
17
180
16
25
66
12
16
12
14
7
9
62
10
11
15
6
17
8
28
145
19
20
6
45
16
6
11
11
11
65
21
49
12
6
7
7
11
10
32
9
46
9
12
8
12
35
13
9
8
15
111
18
71
11
24
IS
6
43
17
180
14
25
66
9
15
12
1
"i
3
1
2
1
8
Rock}' Point	
1
i
4
1
3
Kolla	
10
Kose Hill	
W. E. Gomm	
1
4
1
'3
2
4
13
6
1
1
2
2
3
12
6
2
C. J. M. Willoughby	
J. T. Steele	
3
3
G. C. Paine	
B. W. Irving	
"3
11
1
1
3
1
1
1
11
2
"i,
1
"5'
W. J. Knox	
H. N. Watson	
Miss Jeffares	
9
St. Elmo	
J. C. Elliot	
6
J. B. Thorn and W. C. Bissett
P. D. Van Kleeck	
3
3
"e'
2
10
27
16
C. Ewert	
I
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
3
4
1
1
6
2
8
2
1
2
2
2
6
1
32
G. H. Bleecker	
2
3
3
20
4
E. M. Sutherland	
1
1
C. J. M. Willoughby	
1
2
Sayward	
Mrs. E. M. Walls..
1
2
3
2
"1
4
5
2
4
3
2
6
5
5
3
9
Sechelt	
i
1
"2
1
2
3
2
4
Shalalth	
J. C. Stuart	
1
9
Shelley	
6
J. T. Steele	
3
Shirley	
7
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
9
2
H. G. Williams	
E. Buckell 	
2
1
1
3
1
1
Sidney	
S. E. M. Hoops	
"i
2
3
11
1
3
1
3
1
3
4
'2
E. Buckell	
7
12
5
Sisters Creek	
G. R. Baker	
G. H. Bleecker	
2
1
1
3
16
1
6
"i"
1
6
1
'9
"9'
57
*?
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
1
3
1
1
3
2
1
1
10
,
W. E. Bavis   	 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27
K 61
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
5
9
4
1
2
4
O.K	
Satisfactory	
Pair log building ;
adequate
O.K.
4
Pertussis, 7	
Yes.
4
15
14
Yes.
5
Good	
4
2
2
2
3
i
,,
2
4
3
7
1
3
1
1
1
15
4
1
6
9
1
6
i2
Splinter in brow, 1; anaemia, 1;
wax in ears, 2 ; nasal catarrh,
1
Chorea, 3 ; cardiac, 4 ; curvature of spine, 4 ; anaemia, 11;
eczema of face, 5; pulmonary
T.B., 1; orthopaedic, 3
Primary class in
basement poorly
lighted
26
Scarlet fever 9 ; chicken-
pox, 48
8
Good	
14
Clean; poor
building.
Fair.
10
4
Good	
Yes.
3
Fair.
5
.
Yes.
3
Good.
8
New school;   well
lighted, ventilated, and heated;
sanitary drink-
ing-fountains
Fair	
3?
1
19
New; clean;
3
adequate.
Poor.
14
i
3
2
6
7
Good	
Yes.
2
1
Satisfactory	
Fair 	
Satisfactory.
2
3
Clean; adequate.
5
,,
8
Good	
Poor.
2
1
	
Adequate.
10
Yes.
?
1
5'
1
4
i'
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory.
?1
1
1
Yes.
5
Not crowded; ventilation and
heating good
Good	
Outside toilets in
9
fair  condition.
Adequate.
10
3
"8
1
2
3
13
Nervous, 1; discharging ear, 1;
conjunctivitis, 2
Round shoulder, 3 ; cardiac, 2 ;
otitis, 1
Heart, 1	
No doors.
5
6
Poor.
13
Poor.
1?
Satisfactory	
Good	
Not clean.
3
Good.
5
5
Excellent	
Good	
Yes.
00
,,
2
Clean; adequate.
8
Not crowded; ventilation and
heating good
Good	
Outside toilets in
1
fair   condition.
Clean; adequate.
1
i
49
4
4
5
3
No	
Yes.
1
Poor.
12
Good	
Dirty.
7
Clean; adequate.
61
Pneumonia, 1 ; fractured tibia,
1; herpes, 1 ; colds, 2 ; heart,
1
Yes.
3
Badly overcrowded ; poorly
ventilated
Bad.
8
8
4
6
1
Round shoulder, 5 ; cardiac, 2 ;
asthma, 2 ; nervous, 1 ; anfe-
mia, 4
Round shoulder, 4; anaemia, 1
9
Yes.
5
3
Unsatisfactory....
Good	
Fair.
6
3
Clean; adequate. K 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Usk	
Valdes Island.
Vananda 	
Vanderhoof.
Vaveil by
Vesuvius	
Vesuvius, North .
Vinsulla	
Waldo	
Walhachin	
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
S o rrento	
So uth Bank	
South View	
Spencer	
Spe nees Bridge ..
Spillimacheen	
Springbend ,
Springhouse	
Sproat Lake	
Squam Bay	
Squamish	
Squilax	
Squirrel Cove	
Stewart	
Stillwater	
Stone Creek	
Streatham	
Stuart	
Stuart Station....
Stubbs Island	
Sugar Lake	
Sullivan Hill	
Sullivan Valley ...
Sunnyside No. 2 ..
Sunnyside	
Swan Lake, North
Swift Creek	
Sylvania	
Tabor Greek	
Tappen Siding	
Tappen Valley....
Tatla Lake	
Tatalrose	
Taylor Flats   	
Tchesinkut Lake..
Telkwa	
Testalinda	
Three Forks	
Three Valley	
Thrums	
Thurlow	
Tintagel	
Topley	
Tranquille	
Tranquille, Upper
Trapp Lake 	
Trinity Creek	
Tulameen ...
Turtle Valley.  ...
Ucluelet	
Ucluelet, East	
Uncha Valley	
Union Bay	
W. Scatchard...
D. B. Lazier	
A. Henderson ..
W. Truax 	
J. J. Gillis	
Paul Ewert	
H. VV. Keith....
F. V. Agnew ...
J. H. Hamilton.
R. W. Irving ...
N. J. Paul	
VV. Scatchard...
R. E. Ziegler ...
H. A. Whillans .
A. Henderson ..
C. Ewert	
D. B. Lazier	
W. R. Stone....
D. S. Dixson.
H. G. Williams...
O. P. Hanington
R. W. Irving	
C. R. Symmes ■   .
H. G. Williams .
W. A. Watson ..
T. O'Hagan	
F. T. Stanier .
C. Ewert	
E. Buckell....
G. H, Charter	
D. B. Lazier .* .
VV. A. Watson 	
J. T. Steele	
G. C. Paine	
G. H. Kearney	
P. H. Paterson	
J. H. Hamilton ...
H. H. MacKenzie .
C. A. Watson	
J. T. Steele	
C. H. Hankinson ,
R. W. Irving	
M. G. Archibald ..
C. J. M. Willoughby .
H. VV. Keith	
E. Sheffield	
W. Scatchard	
Guy Palmer	
D. B. Lazier	
G. K. MacNaughton
W. N. Turpel..
R. E. Ziegler ..
Kingsley Terry
VV. R. Stone	
M. G. Archibald .
E. M. Sutherland .
Miss Naden.
C. J. M. Willoughby .
H. A Christie	
R. Gibson 	
<s
CQ
a
H
&
a
a  .
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CO
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a
o
ui
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<w at
a
£§
rZ    d>
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Q<!
PO
QK
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114
9
14
15
20
8
6
17
27
13
16
7
9
16
12
7
63
19
12
24
12
13
28
12
8
52
32
18
11
10
26
11
11
14
12
6
22
114
15
31
20
5
9
10
8
16
13
15
14
17
24
11
14
7
9
16
12
7
53
19
12
7
42
21
12
33
10
28
12
38
32 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 63
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
.5
X
OJ    ■
WH
we
3
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
6
a
a
ft
OJ
o
bJQ
H
>
w
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
5
3
Good	
6
2
2
0
4
Good.
5
2
Whooping-cough	
,,
5
Yes.
1
2
Needs new pits.
Good.
.
2
"3'
ii'
1
1
4
1
3
2
.
35
5
Lighting and ventilation poor
1
2
Good	
1
Good.
5
1
3
Fair condition....
Good	
7
Yes.
5
,,
1
Well-filled ;     adequately ventilated and heated
Good	
Good.
3
1
Need cleaning.
•>
Bad in all respects
3
2
Good	
School overcrowded
Good	
adequate.
1
2
Yes.
4
Iff
2
Yes.
4
1
2
1
4
Yes.
I
Good	
Clean; adequate.
i
4
'2'
....
3
6
3
5
6
6
5
Yes.
2
New and good
School-room large;
well lighted;
heated by a stove
in room
Good	
vl
It
1?
,,
Good.
14
14
2
2
Good	
7
3
Yes.
4
4
1
2
3
1
2
Fallen arch, 1;  spinal   curva-
ture, 1
.
6
	
4
1
7
Fair	
4
9
Yes.
3
'if
11
24
i
2
4
-8
i
1
2
4
5
2
»
Good ,
40
12
Nasal obstruction, 1; cardiac,
1; wax in ears, 11;  anaemia,
5; nasal catarrh, 2 ; skin-disease, 2
Pigeon-chest; T.B. peritonitis
Scarlet fever, measles,
chicken-pox
O.K	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
3
Building O.K	
22,
Nervous, 2; flat feet, 1 ; cardiac, 1; scoliosis, 1
1
Influenza, 5;   tonsillitis,
7
O.K.
35
4
Yes.
4
14
proper position
8
"3
4
3
4
Good	
Satisfactory	
Well-lighted; ventilation good ;
capacity fully
occupied
14
10 K 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
M
a
3
*<«
X
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3    .
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HH
H. A. Christie	
53
59
9
9
64
129
17
34
11
42
22
11
14
57
58
34
9
31
19
10
24
11
20
69
55
16
12
61
17
7
69
56
76
25
18
9
47
66
9
9
57
128
14
33
10
42
22
11
13
57
41
32
9
81
19
10
19
10
12
65
52
16
12
60
17
5
67
56
66
21
18
9
10
5
2
10
1
2
18
1
5
2
"9'
"i'
1
i
2
1
1
2
3
3
6
4
1
2
3
W. R. Stone	
3
G. R. Baker   	
' 3
8
7
5
8
4
5
16
25
W. J. Knox	
R
8
2
1
1
1
3
1
12
3
R. E. Ziegler	
1
White Lake	
E. Buckell 	
1
12
8
1
4
1
"i
1
2
5
4
«0
2
1
1
7
1
1
5
7
16
VVillowford	
3
Willow Point	
"3'
4
1
"5'
12
0
W. E. Stone	
F. E. Coy	
2
2
7
1
2
2
6
4
5
3
2
1
2
F. E. Coy	
2
Winfield 	
W. J. Knox	
8
13
2
4
8
3
1
9
18
5
V. E. R. Ardagh	
2
3
1
1
C. G. G. Maclean	
2
2
5
2
27
G. C. Paine	
Wycliffe	
C. Ewert	
2
F. W. Green	
1
2
1
"i'
3
5
5
2
2
1
10
3
12
4
3
12
2
Yahk	
Yale	
P. S. McCaffrey	
12
W. C. G. Bissett	
4
G. R. Baker	 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27
K 65
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
is
v. oj
ai oj
OH
oj   *
Mj2
U T3
d a
■3 3
BO
01
u
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
d
a
H
OJ
>
DQ
OJ
m
6
OJ
Pi
a
i
r->
o
a
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
30
iis'
2
4
1
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
18
1
6
16
8
14
2
"8
2
20
2
24
4
4
1
2
4
"i"
Smallpox, measles, scarlet fever, mumps
23
Talipes, 1	
Toxic goitre, 1;   anaemia,  1 ;
bronchial catarrh,
1
6
Clean; adequate.
7
O.K	
1
O.K.
Good	
3
Satisfactory	
Adequate.
Yes.
8
2
1
"fV
2
4
14
3
3
Influenza, chicken-pox,
measles
Crowded	
Good	
Yes.
10
Heart, 1	
3
Clean; adequate.
4
Temporary    quarters in a   house
Good	
Not crowded; ventilation andheat-
ing good
Good	
8
9
R
good condition.
Yes.
0
Measles, 13 ;   whooping-
cough, 4
Good	
5
Yes.
6
"3'
1
4
1
4
27
2
2
Clean; adequate.
13
Bad cleft palate, 1 ;  curvature
of spine, 3 ;   orthopaedic leg,
1 ; cardiac, 3 ; eczema, 3 ;
anaemia, 4
German measles, 5	
Good	
26
6
Thoroughly   satisfactory
First class in every
respect
Good	
12
2
7
5
1
2
4
14
7
1
4
3
6
No	
Yes.  REGISTRAR'S REPORT
UNDER THE VITAL STATISTICS ACT.
Office of Registrar, Births, Deaths, and Marriages,
Victoria, B.C., November 26th, 1927.
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Fifty-fifth Report of Vital Statistics for the year
ended December 31st, 1926.
POPULATION.
The census for the year 1921 gave the population of the Province as 524,582. Estimates of
the population for subsequent years as given by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics are as
follows:—
1922   535,000
1923   544,000
1924   553,000
1925   561,000
1926   568,000
REGISTRATIONS.
The following table shows the total number of registrations, including Indian returns,
received in this office for the years 1924, 1925, and 1926:—
Divisions.
BIRTHS.
Deaths.
Marriages.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1,366
869
4,507
1,376
285
1,144
659
1,046
408
1,249
819
4,734
1,509
277
1,184
645
1,187
469
1,135
803
4,604
1,627
288
1,045
610
1,227
486
662
300
2,035
617
107
427
220
455
457
650'
309
1,992
679
111
438
232
401
436
731
307
2,215
742
115
522
230
479
383
473
185
1,988
434
80
296
154
335
120
491
175
2,173
451
60
295
153
334
106
510
196
2,237
475
Ashcroft 	
60
Grand Forks 	
342
140
365
127
Totals |  11,660  |  12,073   |  11,825   |   5,280   |   5,248  |  5,724   |  4,065   |  4,238  | 4,452
BIRTHS.
The total number of living births in the Province, including Indians, for the year 1926 was
10,063, as against 10,342 for the year 1925, giving a rate of 17.7 per 1,000 population, as against
18.4 in the year 1925.
That all the births that occur in the Province are not registered as required by the " Vital
Statistics Act" is evident from the very large number of delayed registrations which continue
to be submitted to the Department from year to year. K 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The following table gives an analysis of births for the past five years:-
Total Births.
Single.
Twin.
Triplet.
Legitimate.
Illegitimate.
Year and Sex.
Born
alive.
Still-1
horn.1
Born
alive.
Stillborn.
No.
Born
alive.
Stillborn.
No.
Born
alive.
Still-
horn.
,1922.
Male   	
5,293
4,873
5,184
4,761
109
108
110
1
1
2
5,235
4,800
58
73
Totals..
10,166
272
9,945
	
	
218
....
....
3     [     ....
10,035
131
1923.
Male 	
Female 	
5,176
4,825
5,056
4,698
	
135
	
120
127
1
15     |     ....
8     |     ....
.... 1 .... 1 5,125
....     |     ....     |   4,752
51
73
Totals..
10,001
299
9,754
	
	
247
23
....     |     ....     |   9,877
124
1924.
Male 	
Female   	
5,203
4,916
5,119
4,814
146
120
98
S3
103
6
4
1
.... ' .... 1 5,121
....     |       3     |   4,828
82
88
Totals..
10,119
279
9,933
266
186
10     |     ....
....     |       3     |   9,949
170
1925.
5,329
5 013
5,241
4,921
143
111
111
95
101
10     1     ....
16     |     ....
.... j .... | 5,214
....     j     ....     |   4,921
115
92
Totals..
10,342
'280
10,162
.254    |   	
196
26     [     ....
....     |     ....
10,135
207
1926.
5,168
4,895
311
5,043
4,776
153
125
137
124
117
18     1     ....
15             1
1          ....
5,062
106
2
4,807
88
Totals..! 10,063
9,819 i
241
194
NATURAL INCREASE.
The natural increase for the past five years is shown in the following table :■—
Male.
Female.
Both
Sexes.
Population
(estimated).
Hate of
Natural
Increase per
1,000
Population.
Year.
Births.
Deaths.
Excess
of Births
over
Deaths.
Births.
Deaths.
Excess
of Births
over
Deaths.
Excess
of Births
over
Deaths.
3 922   	
5,293
5,176
5,203
5,329
5,168
3.052
3,070
3,080
3,047
3,332
1
2,241    1   4,873
2,106    |   4,825
2,123        4,916
2,282   j    5,013
1.836    1    4.895
1,855
1,927
1,924
1.89S
2,142 ■
3,018
2,898
2,992
3,115
2,753
5,259
5,004
5,115
5,397
4,589
539,000
544,000
553,000
561,000
568,000
9.8
1923   	
9.2
1924   	
9 2
1925   	
9.6
1926   	
8 0
DEATHS.
The total number of deaths in the Province for the year 1926 was 5,474, and of these 3,332
were males and 2,142 females. The rate per 1,000 population was 9.6, as against 8.8 in the year
1925. An analysis of the deaths shows that 2,172 of the decedents were single, 2,411 were
married, 875 were widowed, and in 16 instances the condition was not given. The nativity of
the decedents was as follows: Canadian, 2,598 ; British, 1,760; United States, 341; other foreign,
717; and 58 not stated. The racial origin of 1,994 decedents is given as English, 588 as Irish,
1,147 as Scotch, 59 as Welsh, 416 as Indian, 224 as Chinese, and 161 as Japanese.
The causes of death by sex in cities of 1,000 population and over during the year 1926 is
given at the end of this report. BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 69
INFANT MORTALITY.
The total number of deaths of children under 1 year of age for the year 1926 was 588, as
against 569 for the year 1925, giving a rate per 1,000 living births of 58.4 for the year 1926, as
against 55 for the previous year. The principal causes of death among children under 1 year
of age is shown below:— „
Cause of Death.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
154
88
54
75
50
39
35
11
29
17
11
129
190
52
62
36
51
38
26
23
13
10
8
109
158
40
52
38
17
28
34
19
12
7
13
156
158
49
50
39
37
32
20
27
10
14
12
121
183
37
83
26
36
20
32
23
Influenza	
15
8
11
114
Totals	
692
668
574
569
588
10,166
68.1
10,001
66.8
10,119
56.7
10,342
55.0
10,063
58.4
MATERNAL MORTALITY.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
Accidents of pregnancy:
(o.)   Abortion	
(o.)   Ectopic gestation	
(c.)  Other accidents of pregnancy	
Puerperal haemorrhage	
Other accidents of childbirth :
(o.)   Caesarean section 	
(o.)   Other surgical and instrumental delivery
(c.)   Others under this title	
Puerperal  septicaemia  	
Phlegmasia alba dolens, embolism, sudden death....
Puerperal albuminuria and convulsions 	
Following childbirth (not otherwise defined)	
Puerperal diseases of the breast	
Totals	
Rate per 1,000 living births	
13
13
4
14
3
3
1
2
14
7
13"
6
63
1
4
11
1
2
21
3
15
5
6.3
19
10
3
6
1
60
5.9
15
7
19
3
1
6.4
TUBERCULOSIS.
According to the census of 1921, 20.1 per cent, of the total Indian, 59.5 per cent, of the total
Chinese, and 94.5 per cent, of the total Japanese population of the whole Dominion were located
in the Province of British Columbia.   An analysis of the returns of deaths from tuberculosis
shows that in the year 1926 these three races alone accounted for 232 deaths out of 532, or 44.6
per cent, of all deaths from tuberculosis in the Province.    That the high rate of deaths from
tuberculosis among these three races has a marked effect on the rate for the whole Province
is evidenced by the following:—
Deaths, Rate per 1.000
T.B. Population.
Japanese, Chinese, Indians      232 3.70
Other races      300 0.59
Province, all races    532 0.91 K 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bkitish Columbia, all Races included.
Year.
Deaths
from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B.
Rate per Cent,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921  	
512
507
525
4,572
4,907
4,997
5,004
4,945
5,474
11.19
10.33
10.50
10.53
10.87
9.72
524,582
539,000
544,000
553,000
561,000
568,000
0 97
1922 	
O 94
1923 	
0 96
1924 	
1925 	
527
538
532
0.95
0 95
1926 	
0.93
Chinese, British Columbia.
Year.
Deaths
from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B.
Rate per Cent.
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1,000
Population.
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
49
64
44
40
44
59
_!_
220
232
228
211
195
224
27.58
19.29
18.95
22.56
26.34
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
23,533
2.08
2.72
1.87
1.70
1.87
2.55
British Columbia Indians.
Year.
Deaths
from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,'
all Causes.
T.B.
Rate per Cent.
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1.000
Population.
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
104
364
28.57
25,694
4.03
99
370
26.76
24,744
4.00
133
432
30.79
25,694
5.18
125
457
27.35
25,694
4.86
155
436
35.55
24,316
6.37
145
416
34.85
24,316
5.96
Japanese, British Columbia.
Year.
Deaths
from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B.
Rate per Cent.,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1.000
Population.
1921 	
33
22
24
23
33
28
142
190
158
150
195
161
23.24
11.58
15.19
15.33
16.92
17.39
15,006
15,806
16.004
17,418
18,226
19,048
2.19
1922 	
1.38
1923 	
1.49
1924 	
1.32
] 925 	
1.81
1926	
1.47
Races other than Chinese, Japanese, and British Columbia Indians.
Year.
Deaths
from
Tuberculosis.
Deaths,
all Causes.
T.B.
Rate per Cent,
all Deaths.
Population.
T.B. Rate per
1.000
Population.
1921 	
1922 	
1923 .:	
1924                  	
326
322
324
339
306
300
3.S46
4,115
4,179
4,186
4,119
4,673
8.47
7.82
7.75
8.09
7.42
6.42
460,349
474,917
478,769
486,355
494,925
501,103
0.70
0.67
0.67
0.69
1925        	
0.61
1926	
0.59 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 71
Causes of Death, 1922-26.
Cause of Death.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
417
28
24
8
6
11
13
426
35
28
6
1
16
13
439
42
17
10
4
6
9
443
41
14
10
7
8
15
431
44
17
11
Z
14
13
Totals	
507
525
'527
538
532
10.3
10.5
10.5
10.8
9.72
0.94
0.96
0.95
0.95
0.93
CANCER.
There has been a considerable increase in the number of deaths from cancer during the year
1926, as is shown in the following table:—
Cause of Death.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
Buccal cavity	
Stomach and liver	
Peritoneum, intestines, rectum ,
Female genital organs	
Breast	
Skin	
16
178
70
45
39
8
89
14
180
70
48
33
11
97
18
177
73
53
41
8
87
19
181
73
36
63
7
94
22
202
90
55
44
6
107
Totals	
445
453
457
473
526
0.82
0.83
0.82
0.84
0.92
AGES OF DECEDENTS.
The following is a comparative statement of the ages of decedents for the years 1922 to 1926.
The increases in the age periods from 40 years and upwards are very noticeable.
■a
a
Vim
rgOl
fl(H
u
a
CJ
CO
u
o3
OJ
Ol
to
o3
0J
CO
CJ
Cl   .
to
OJ
IO(H
rH    .
O JO
V 3
03
Ol
o ^
Ol*
cs
CO
o y,
^ 03
O CJ
COtH
OS
o t»
+j '-.
d
O CJ
ci
LO
O to
"3
o»
lOiH
OS
CD
si
OS
CO*
OS
O 03
"^ 3
OS
00
o to
^ 53
O <u
coH
cs
Cl
O tO
■" 3
o cj
OitH
09
U
gd
*fl
o a
,H 03
+j»
flT3
cj
cj-h
< to
"3
o
H
1922.
415
277
374
294
325
249
318
251
336
252
53
46
58
52
58
26
26
39
29
36
25
31
17
19
31
19
19
20
21
21
15
11
17
11
25
21
23
16
28
19
67
47
71
65
72
65
68
49
63
56
145
88
143
198
129
193
303
184
302
180
299
180
254
160
259
193
402
196
396
203
445
447
201
446
210
443
469
235
482
250
458
254
506
277
550
307
318
247
347
245
355
223
363
259
509
273
152*
130
145
120
169
139
174
119
181
151
26
17
25
17
27
22
31
2S
2
1
4
4
2
17
7
14
5
20
1
34
2
16
2
3,052
1,855
3,070
Female
1923.
Female
1924.
102 j  123
142     176
106 j  145
123 |  209
88 |   151
127 1  181
1,927
3,080
1,924
3,047
1,898
3,332
Female	
1925.
46     25
68 I  34
42 j  28
52 1   20
233 |  201
379 1  448
190 |   220
470 1   484
Female
1926.
Female
54
30
111
165
242
236
2,142
* Year 1922, 80 years and upwards. K 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CLASSIFIED DEATHS.
The following is a list of classified deaths in British Columbia for the past five years :-
Cause of Death.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
General diseases	
Nervous system	
Circulatory system ,...	
Respiratory system	
Digestive system	
Non-venereal—genito-urinary system	
The puerperal state .\	
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue	
Diseases of the bones and organs of locomotion
Malformations	
Diseases of early infancy '.	
Old age	
External causes	
Ill-defined	
Totals	
Rate per 1,000 population	
1,577
319
715
551
365
221
63
22
5
55
321
105
512
76
1,597
332
824
370
307
280
63
24
9
69
320
103
636
63
1,654
358
807
335
340
302
69
24
9
60
252
77
614
103
1,538
317
864
353
354
335
60
26
6
56
260
88
595
93
1,701
405
995
441
326
367
65
23
21
58
297
83
639
53
4,907      |     4,997
5,004
4,945
5,474
9.1
9.2
I
9.0
I
8.8
i.O
SPECIFIED DISEASES.
Deaths from certain specified diseases are given below for the years 1922 to 1926:—
Cause of Death.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
14
2
14
21
23
241
507
445
44
157
284
114
63
92
321
105
60
39
105
36
16
12
11
24
23
32
26
136
525
453
33
116
173
77
63
109
320
103
93
42
118
55
12
15
6
90
19
31
55
109
527
457
16
68
185
71
69
96
252
77
78
56
108
21
22
13
3
4
3
32
28
117
538
473
26
87
179
104
60
56
260
88
89
45
117
15
14
15
3
Measles	
10
38
Diphtheria 	
33
Influenza	
197
532
526
31
115
226
58
65
94
Early infancy	
297
83
101
60
Drowning, accidental.	
104
21
20
MARRIAGES.
There were 4,418 marriages in British Columbia during the year 1926, as against 4,223 in
1925, 4,038 in 1924, 3,943 in 1923, and 3,763 in 1922.
ORIENTAL RACES.
Chinese.—The total number of Chinese births registered during the year ended December
31st, 1926, was 203, as against 234 in the year 1925. Chinese children born and registered in the
same period numbered 163, the balance being registrations of children born prior to 1926.
The number of Chinese deaths registered during the year ended December 31st, 1926, was
224, as against 195 during the preceding year. Deaths from tuberculosis and cancer numbered
59 and 15 respectively. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 73
Deaths of children under 1 year of age, 16;   still-births, 2.
Japanese.—There were 1,170 registrations of births of Japanese children during the year
ended December 31st, 1926, as against 1,104 registrations the previous year. The number of
Japanese children born and registered in the same period was 756, as against 687 the previous
year.
Japanese deaths registered in the year 1926 numbered 161—deaths from tuberculosis and
cancer numbering 28 and 5 respectively. There were 60 deaths of children under 1 year of age
and 25 still-births.
INDIAN RETURNS.
The total number of registrations of births of Indians for the year ended December 31st,
1926, was 486, and of these 224 were males and 262 females. Children born during the year
numbered 415.    The birth rate per 1,000 population was 17.6, as against 17.8 the previous year.
There were 416 Indian deaths during the year, and of these 193 were males and 223 females.
Deaths from tuberculosis numbered 145, or 34.85 per cent, of the total number of Indian deaths.
Deaths from cancer numbered 8. The deaths of 70 children under 1 year of age were registered
during the year.
Marriages registered during the year numbered 127.
"ADOPTION ACT."
Particulars of birth relating to 124 children adopted under " the Adoption Act" were
received and filed in this office during the year 1926.
GENERAL REMARKS.
The work of the Department continues to increase, as may be gathered in part from the
following figures:—
1924.
1925. I 1926.
I
Letters inward 	
Letters outward  	
Searches	
Certificates issued	
Certificates,  mothers' pensions
Certificates,   S.C.R	
Hospital returns checked 	
Cash receipts 	
Marriage licences	
0,475
5,198
3,945
3,783
312
446
295
$3,133.81
315.00
8,198
6,630
5,493
5,450
811
398
578
$4,252.99
455.00
8.9S2
7,349
5,919
5,708
636
512
849
$4,539.09
405.00
That this increase in work has been successfully handled is entirely due to the loyal
co-operation of my staff and to the unfailing courtesy and assistance rendered by all officials
connected with this Department.
I have, etc.,
Herbert B. French, M.A.,
Deputy Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages. K 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX IN CITIES OF 1,000
a
o
+j
ci
o
s
to
56
CJZ
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Third
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1920.)
CJ
03
G1
O
p
is
0
03
q
'a
a
a
CJ
a
s
V
a
03
CJ
a
Q
'8
u
01
b
CO
M
o
a
u
to'
ft
O
o
s
CC
M
a
o
"as
M
1
0
7
8
0
10
11
13
16
21
22
23
24
25
29
31
32
oo
34
35
36
I. Epidemic, Endemic, axd Infectious Diseases.
Typhoid fever and paratyphoid :
(«.)   Typhoid fever M.
 F.
(6.)  Paratyphoid fever   F.
Smallpox M.
 F.
Measles M.
 F.
Scarlet  fever M.
   F.
Whooping-cough    M.
 F.
 F.
Influenza :
(ci.)  Sole cause M.
    F.
(6.)   With phthisis M.
 F.
(e.)   With bronchitis M.
 F.
(d.)   With  pneumonia   M.
 : F.
(e.)  With other respiratory diseases M.
 F.
(f.)  With pregnancy and parturition  1'.
(g.)   With other causes M.
 F.
Mumps     M.
 F.
Dysentery :
(c.)   Unspecified or other causes M.
 F.
Erysipelas   M.
 F.
Acute anterior poliomyelitis  : ...M.
Lethargic encephalitis M.
 F.
Meningococcus   meningitis M.
 F.
Other epidemic and endemic diseases :
(a.)  Chicken-pox M.
 F.
Tetanus M.
Tuberculosis of respiratory system M.
 F.
Tuberculosis of meninges and central nervous system  M.
 F.
Tuberculosis of intestines and peritoneum M.
    F.
Tuberculosis of vertebral column M.
    ...F.
Tuberculosis of joints  M.
    F.
Tuberculosis of other organs :
(&.)  Bones  (No. 34 excepted)   M.
(c.)  Lympathie system  (No. 33 excepted) M.
(d.)  Genito-urinary  system   M.
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2 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 75
POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1926.
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2 K 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX IN CJITIES OF 1,000
S o
38
41
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
54
56
CAUSE  OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Third
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1920.)
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I. Epidemic, Endemic, and Infectious Diseases—Continued.
Disseminated tuberculosis :
(a.)  Acute ......... M.
   F.
(6.)  Chronic or unstated M.
    ...F.
Syphilis  : :...  M.
 ......F.
Purulent infection, septicaemia M.
  F.
II. General Diseases not included in Class I.
Cancer of buccal cavity M.
   ......F.
Cancer of stomach and liver M.
  F.
Cancer of peritoneum, intestines, rectum M.
 F.
Cancer of female genital organs   F.
Cancer  of breast   F.
Cancer of skin     M.
    F.
Cancer of organs not specified   ...M.
 ...F.
Benign tumours  (not returned as malignant) M.
 F.
Acute rheumatic fever M.
  F.
Chronic rheumatism, osteoarthritis, gout  M.
  ...F.
Pellagra    M.
Kickets       M.
  F.
Diabetes mellitus   M.
 ...J .....F.
Anaemia, chlorosis :
(a.)   Pernicious   anaemia   ....M.
 =..,... F.
(l>.)  Other anaemias and chlorosis     M.
 F.
Diseases of thyroid gland :
(a.)   Exophthalmic goitre    M.
   F.
(6.)   Other diseases of thyroid gland    M.
 F.
Diseases of parathyroid glands    ..M.
 : F.
Diseases of the thymus      M.
... F.
Diseases of the adrenals (Addison's disease) M.
 F.
Diseases of the spleen M.
Leukaemia andllodgkin's disease:
(a.)   Leukaemia , M.
   ...F.
(6.)  Hodgkin's  disease M.
Alcoholism :
(a.)  Delirium tremens :  F.
(6.)  Acute alcoholism M.
  F.
I     1 I BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 77
POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1926—Continued,.
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1 K 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX IN CITIES OF 1,000
S o
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Third
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1920.)
66
68
69
70
71
74
75
77
80
81
83
84
85
II.   General Diseases not included in Class I.—Continued.
Alcoholism—Continued.
(c.)  Chronic  alcoholism M.
 F.
Chronic organic poisoning :
(a.)  Chronic morphinism   F.
(c.)  Other organic poisoning M.
Other general diseases :
(a.) Diabetes insipidus   F.
(6.)   Haemophilia    M.
   ...F.
(c.)  Purpura hemorrhagica M.
      ...F.
(d.) Others under this title ...M.
 F.
III. Diseases of Nervous System and Organs op Special
Sense.
Encephalitis M.
 ..'. F.
Meningitis :
(«.)  Simple meningitis   ...M.
 F.
(6.)  Non-epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis  F.
Tabes dorsalis  (locomotor ataxia) ...M.
Other diseases of the spinal cord M.
 F.
Cerebral haemorrhage, apoplexy :
(a.)   Apoplexy M.
 '.... F.
(6.)   Cerebral   haemorrhage ..   M.
 F.
(c.)  Cerebral thrombosis and embolism ....M.
 F.
Paralysis without specified cause :
(a.)  Hemiplegia M.
 F.
(6.)  Others under this title M.
   ...F.
General paralysis of the insane M.
    F.
Other forms of mental alienation  M.
 F.
Epilepsy ..„..: M.
   ...F.
Infantile convulsions (under 5 years)  M.
 F.
Chorea     F.
Neuralgia and neuritis   F.
Softening of the brain ...F.
Other diseases of the nervous system     M.
 F.
Diseases of the eye and annexa   F.
Diseases of the ear and of the mastoid process :
(a.)  Diseases of the ear    M.
 : F.
(6.)  Diseases of the mastoid process  M.
   F. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 79
POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1926—Continued.
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7 K SO
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX IN CITIES OF 1,000
So
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Third
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1920.)
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
97
98
100
101
102
103
105
106
107
IV. Diseases of the Circulatory System.
Pericarditis     M.
 F.
Endocarditis and myocarditis :
(a.)   Acute endocarditis M.
 F.
(6.)  Acute myocarditis M.
   ...F.
Angina pectoris    M.
 ...F.
Other diseases of heart M.
 F.
Diseases of the arteries :
(a.)  Aneurism M.
 F.
(b.)   Arteriosclerosis     M.
 F.
(c.)  Other diseases of arteries   ...M.
  F.
Embolism and thrombosis M.
 F.
Diseases of the veins M.
 F.
Diseases of the lymphatic system F.
V. Diseases of the Respiratory System.
Diseases of the nasal fossae and annexa  M.
Diseases of the larynx :
(c.)   Croup ...-M.
 F.
Bronchitis :
(a.)   Acute    M.
 :.  f.
(6.)  Chronic    M.
 F.
(c.)   Not otherwise defined (under 5 years)   M.
 '. F.
(<7.)  Not otherwise defined (over 5 years) F.
Bronchopneumonia :
(a.)   Bronchopneumonia M.
  ...F.
(5.)   Capillary bronchitis  M.
Pneumonia :
(a.)   Lobar M.
 F.
(6.)  Not otherwise defined M.
   F.
Pleurisy .. M.
 F.
Congestion and hemorrhagic infarct of lung    : M.
 F.
Asthma    , M.
 :F.
Pulmonary emphysema   M.
Other respiratory diseases (tuberculosis excepted) :
(a.)   Chronic interstitial pneumonia M.
(c.)  Others under this title   M.
 F. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1920-27.
K 81
POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1926—Gontinued.
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4 K 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX IN CITIES OF 1,000
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CAUSE OF DEATH.
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137
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139
140
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VI. Diseases of the Digestive System.
Diseases df the mouth and annexa M.
 F.
Diseases of the pharynx and tonsils M.
 F.
Ulcer of the stomach :
(a.)  Ulcer of the stomach  ..M.
 F.
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 F.
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„ F.
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 F.
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 F.
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 F.
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 F.
Other diseases of the intestines   M.
 F.
Cirrhosis of the liver :
(B.)  Not specified as alcoholic M.
 F.
Biliary calculi   M.
  F.
Other diseases of the liver ...M.
 F.
Diseases of the pancreas M.
 F.
Peritonitis, without specified cause   M.
 F.
VII. Non-venereal Diseases of Genito-urinary System
and Annexa.
 ...F.
Chronic nephritis  (Bright's disease)   M.
 F.
Other diseases of kidneys and annexa    ...M.
 F.
Calculi of the urinary passages  M.
Diseases of the bladder   M.
 F.
Diseases of the urethra, urinary abscess, etc.:
(a.)   Stricture of the urethra M.
(6.)  Others under this title F.
Diseases of the prostate  M.
Non-venereal diseases of male genital organs  M.
Cysts and other benign tumours of the ovary  F.
Salpingitis and pelvic abscess F.
Benign tumours of the uterus  F.
Non-puerperal uterine haemorrhage F.
Other diseases of the female genital organs F.
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1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 83
POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1926—Continued.
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3 K 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX IN CITIES OF 1,000
uz
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Third
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1920.)
X
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143
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145
146
147
148
149
150
152
153
155
156
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
VIII. The Puerperal State.
Accidents of pregnancy :
(6.)  Ectopic gestation      F.
(c.)  Others under this title  F.
Puerperal   haemorrhage     : ...F.
Other accidents of labour :
(a.)   Caesarean section F.
(c.)   Other surgical operations and instrumental delivery ....F.
Puerperal septicaemia F.
Puerperal phlegmasia alba dolens embolus, sudden death  F.
Puerperal albuminuria and convulsions , F.
Following childbirth (not otherwise defined) ....'.....F.
Puerperal diseases of breast F.
IX. Diseases of the Skin and Cellular Tissue.
Gangrene    M.
 :  ...F.
Furuncle   ....M.
Acute abscess ....M.
   ...F.
Other diseases of the skin and annexa M.
 F.
X. Diseases of Bones and Organs of Locomotion.
Diseases of the bones (mastoid and tuberculosis excepted) M.
 F.
Diseases of the joints (tuberculosis and rheumatism excepted) M.
XI. Malformations.
Congenital malformation   (still-births not included) :
(a.)   Congenital hydrocephalus M.
      F.
(6.)   Congenital malformations of heart   ...M.
 F.
(c.)   Others under this title M.
      F.
XII. Diseases of Early Infancy.
Congenital  debility,  icterus,  sclerema M.
 F.
Premature—injury at birth :
(a.)  Premature    M.
   F.
(6.)   Injury at birth   M.
 F.
Other diseases peculiar to early infancy    M.
 F.
Lack of care   ...F.
XIII. Old Age.
Senility   : M.
            F.
XIV. Affections produced by External Causes.
Suicide hy solid or liquid poisons  (non-corrosive)     M.
 F.
I    -: I BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1926-27.
K 85
POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1926—Continued.
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6
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33
6
41
109
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25
4
4
26
4
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13
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27
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43
40
10 K 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX IN CITIES OF 1.000
2 o
UZ
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Third
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1920.)
M
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167
168
169
170
171
172
174
175
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
185
186
187
188
189
192
193
196
197
198
199
201
202
XIV. Affections produced by External Causes—Continued.
Suicide by corrosive substances M.
   F.
Suicide   by   poisonous   gas M.
  F.
Suicide by hanging and strangulation M.
   F.
Suicide by drowning M.
 F.
Suicide by firearms  M.
   F.
Suicide hy cutting or piercing instruments    M.
   F.
Suicide by jumping from high places    M.
    F.
Other   suicides M.
Poisoning hy food     ,    F.
Other acute accidental poisonings    M.
 F.
Conflagration M.
 F.
Accidental burns and scalds      M.
 F.
Accidental suffocation      ...M.
 F.
Accidental absorption of deleterious gas, smoke, etc. M.
 F.
Accidental drowning M.
   F.
Traumatism by firearms -. .....   M.
Traumatism by fall M.
 F.
Traumatism in mines and quarries     M.
Traumatism hy machines M.
 F.
Traumatism hy other crushings :
(a.)   Railroad     M.
 F.
(6.)   Street-car M.
 .....: F.
(c.)   Automobile    M.
   F.
(d.) Aeroplane and balloon     M.
(e.)  Other vehicles M.
(f.)  Other crushing M.
Injuries hy animals M.
Starvation   M.
 F.
Excessive  cold     M.
Other electrical shocks  M.
    F.
Homicide hy firearms  ...M.
    F.
Homicide hy cutting and piercing instruments M.
 F.
Homicide by other means   M.
 F.
Fractures (cause not specified)  : M.
 F.
External violence  (cause specified) M.
 •.  F. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1920-27.
K 87
POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1926—Continued.
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18
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1
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1
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1
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13
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9
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2 K 88
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CAUSES OF DEATH BY  SEX IN CITIES OF 1,000
CAUSE OF DEATH.
(After the Bertillon Classification Causes of Death, Third
International Decennial Revision, Paris, 1920.)
204
205
XV. Ill-defined Diseases.
Sudden death   M
Cause of death not specified or ill-defined :
(a.)   Ill-defined ...M.
 : F,
(6.)   Not specified or unknown  M.
     F.
(c.)   Heart-failure     M.
   F.
(<2.)   Syncope M.
Males     .....
Females  	
Totals      	
84
30 I
28     29
112
53 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1920-27.
K 89
POPULATION AND OVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1926—Continued.
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1             1
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Chakles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Host Excellent Majesty.
1927.
975-1227-930S

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