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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1928

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR   THE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1926
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OP THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
Tie Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1926 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
A. M. MANSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
June, 1927. The Honourable A. M. Manson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Ninth Annual Report on the work of the
Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1926.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. D. McNIVEN,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., June, 1927. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister     7
Our Growing Industries        7
Minimum Wage for Male Employees        1
Shorter Hours of Work       7
New Legislation  ,.....-      8
Statistics of Trade and Industries  10
Method of obtaining Information  .".  10
How the Industrial Pay-roll is divided   10
Proportions for Different Areas  11
Racial Origin of our Workers  15
The Proportion of Asiatics   15
Weekly Wages, 1926, compared with 1925  16
Low-paid Workers fewer in Number   17
Chart showing Fluctuation in Industrial Wages  IS, 19
Average Weekly Wage in each Industry   20
The Fluctuation of Employment   20
Statistical Tables   21
The " Hours of Work Act "   35
Shortening the Working-day   36
Changes in Hours of Work  :.37, 38
Regulations, " Hours of Work Act, 1923 "   39
The " Male Minimum Wage Act"   41
Minimum Wage of Forty Cents an Hour  41
Order covering Lumbering Industry   42
Increased Pay for 9,000 Workers   42
The Case of Handicapped Workers   43
Validity of the Order Challenged  43
The Case in Court of Appeal  44
Cook's Wages in Lumber Camps   45
Labour Disputes in 1926  46
. Important Legal Decision  :  46
Carpenters and a Five-day Week   48
Summary of Labour Disputes, 1926   51
Employment Service   53
Summary of Labour Conditions  53
Chart showing Fluctuations during 1920   55
Re-establishment of Handicapped Men   56
Employment Service Policy  ,  57
Inspection of Factories  59
Report of the Minimum Wage Board   61
Conference on Fruit and Vegetable Industry   61
Collection of Arrears   61
A Few Cases in Court  62
Statistical Report   62
Labour Turnover in each Group   67
Summary of Orders   69
Association of Employers   73
Union Directory   75  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR
FOR 1926.
The conditions prevailing in the Province during 1926, the period covered by this, the ninth
annual report of the Department of Labour, were very favourable to the prosperity and continued development of our industries. Such labour disputes as occurred were mostly of short
duration, and the total loss of working-time which they entailed was 28,016 days. The
corresponding loss in 1925, which also was a period of only light industrial disturbances, was
23,300 working-days, but in 1924 no fewer than 223,876 days were lost owing to disputes. It is
not out of place here to congratulate both employers and employed upon the better spirit and
understanding which they have attained in their mutual relations.
Our Growing Industries.
Once again during the past year our industries witnessed considerable advancement, and the
pay-roll of the Province reached a total which is easily a record for all time. No fewer than
4,521 industrial employers sent returns to this Department, and we have also made a careful
calculation of the pay-roll of other employers not included in our returns. On this basis the
estimate is made of the salaries and wages in connection with industrial operations in British
Columbia during 1926, reaching a total of $175,173,836.47. This compares with $159,959,820.S0
for the previous year and $151,037,316.20 for 1924, the increase last year being more than
$15,000,000. Nearly all our leading industries shared in these increases, substantial gains being
recorded by, among others, lumbering, contracting, Coast shipping, food products, metal-mining,
pulp and paper, and the various manufacturing groups. The principal falling-off was in the
coal-mining industry, owing to circumstances which were, at least in part, temporary, and it isi
satisfactory to find that, during the period between the close of 1926 and the completion of this
report, the industry has taken a turn for the better. The highest number of persons employed
in industries generally was recorded in September and the lowest in January. The changes
made in wage-rates were mostly in an upward direction, and there was a slight increase in the
general weekly average. It is gratifying to find that the number of the lowest-paid wage-earners
showed a considerable decrease.
Minimum Wage for Male Workers.
In administering the " Male Minimum AVage Act" passed in the session of 1925, the Board of
Adjustment decided, early in the year, that it was not practicable to apply the Act to all
occupations at one and the same time. They accordingly concentrated a large amount of attention upon the lumbering industry, in which were employed a greater number of persons likely to
be affected by the Act than in any other. The steps taken by the Board to ascertain the true
position of affairs among lumber-workers are referred to at length in another section of the
report, and the Board feel that, in fixing upon a minimum of 40 cents an hour for lumber-workers,
they have done their best to strike a fair balance between the conflicting claims of employers and
employed. The order went into effect on November 1st, and in the last two months of the year
there was every indication that it was being faithfully observed by the general body of employers carrying on lumbering operations. In the ordinarily quiet period towards the end of the
year the payment of a higher rate of wages, where such was necessary, had not brought about
any unusual business depression, and there appears every reason to believe that lumbermen will
be able to accommodate themselves to the new conditions. The applications for permits to pay
on a lower scale in the case of handicapped workers have not been very numerous, and the 10
per cent, allowance for such cases, as decided upon by the Board, is evidently an ample margin.
The validity of the Board's order was challenged in the Courts, and their right to make an order
affecting one industry only, without at the same time bringing in other industries, was questioned, but the action of the Board was upheld by the Judges. The question of making further
orders relating to other occupations has since been the subject of investigation.
Shorter Hours of Work.
The section of the report which deals with the " Hours of Work Act" shows that the Act,
which has been operative since the beginning of 1925, is working smoothly, and that the limitation of working-hours which it imposes upon industry has been loyally accepted by employers of
labour in the Province.   Moreover, the period of its operation has also been a period of advance- F 8 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
nient in those industries where its effects are chiefly felt. No change has been made during the
year in the list of permanent exemptions issued by the Board of Adjustment nearly two years
ago, as it has been found, from experience, that they are sufficient to meet the needs of our
various industries, and no serious objection to them has been raised in any quarter. The report
of the Board also indicates the grounds on which temporary exemptions have been granted
from time to time, to suit the requirements of individual firms in times of emergency; but
neither the permanent nor tire temporary exemptions have interfered with the working of the
Act so far as to prevent it from bringing about a notable reduction in hours of work. Such
reduction is demonstrated by a comparison of the figures for 1926 with those for 1924, as given
in another page of the report.
Wages of Female Employees.
In the administration of the Minimum Wage Act for Women, the principal change made
during the past year was in relation to female employees in the fruit and vegetable industry.
Many of these employees were engaged on piece-rates, and the intention of the Minimum Wage
Board, in the existing order, had been to guarantee to them a rate of pay not less than the
minimum set for time-workers. A ruling given in a case in Court, however, made it doubtful
whether such guarantee could be enforced; and' the Board, after a public conference held in
Vancouver, decided to make the wording of the order more explicit, thereby securing for pieceworkers the benefit of the legal minimum wage. At the same time the minimum figure was
slightly raised from $14 to $14.40 a week. 'The tabulation of the wages of female employees
this year takes account of 16,070 women and girls compared with 33,899 for 1925. In most of
the groups there is a slight reduction in the average weekly wage of experienced adult workers,
and for this check no general explanation can be suggested. There have been fewer cases of
contravention of the law which in the opinion of the Board called for prosecution, but greater
results have been secured in the collection of arrears, which have been duly handed over to
women and girls who had been underpaid.
50,000 Persons placed in Employment.
The Employment Service in the Province has continued to do excellent work, and was instrumental during the year in finding employment for over 50,000 persons. Special attention has
been given to the needs of handicapped workers, including a very large number of ex-service
men, and the special section of tbe Service dealing with these workers succeeded in placing
2,087 men, or about 200 more than during the thirteen months covered by the previous report.
For a few months in the early part of the year a " Citizens' Committee " in Vancouver also put
forward an effort to secure employment for ex-service men. Its functions were largely a duplication of those of the Handicap Section of the Employment Service, which led to some confusion,
and the work of the committee was not continued after about three months.
New Legislation.
New laws of special interest to working men and women, which were placed on the statute-
book in the last session of the Provincial Legislature, may be briefly summarized:—
Under the existing " Factories Act," children were permitted, without restriction as to
hours of labour, to be employed in canning fish and in fruit-packing, but a new " Factories Act
Amendment Act" made such employment conditional upon the written permission of the Factory
Inspector being obtained, such permission to set forth the number of hours daily, not exceeding
six, during which a child may be employed. Another clause of the Act authorizes the Inspector
to permit a laundry to be operated on a holiday or during extra hours, on being satisfied that
the exigencies of the trade require such extension; the working-hours in no case to exceed those
prescribed by or under the " Hours of Work Act." The Act permits some additional latitude in
the canning or curing of fish, or in fruit-packing, in the height of the season.
The " Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act " made it obligatory upon every employer of
female employees to keep .records as to wages paid and hours worked. It also authorized the
Minimum Wage Board to amend an order relating to the wages and hours of female employees
without reconvening or calling any conference. Under the original Act an employer contravening an order under the Act was liable to a fine; the amending Act further provided that he
should be ordered by the Magistrate, on conviction, to pay to an employee the amount by which
she had been underpaid with costs. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1920. F 9
The " Old-age Pension Act " enabled the Government of the Province to enter into an agreement with the Dominion Government as to a general scheme of old-age pensions for the Province
pursuant to the provisions of a Dominion Act, and for the payment by the Dominion Government
to the Provincial Government quarterly of one-half the net sum paid out during the preceding
quarter by the Provincial Government for old-age pensions under the Act. It was further provided that the Act should be administered by the Workmen's Compensation Board, and that it
should come into operation on a day to be fixed by the Lieutenant-Governor by Proclamation.
Under the " Tug-boat Men's Lien Act," the owner of a tug-boat who performs towage is to
have a lien on the logs or timber products towed for the amount of money payable for the
towage. The lien is to lapse, however, in thirty days, unless the owner of the tug-boat in the
meantime files an affidavit giving particulars of his claim, to be followed by a legal action within
another thirty days. F 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
STATISTICS   OF  TRADE  AND   INDUSTRIES.
That the year 1926 was a period of important advancement in the industries of the Province
is the main conclusion to be derived from the mass of statistical matter which has been collected
by the Department of Labour from our industrial employers. For the past nine years this
statistical work has been undertaken annually by the Department, and perhaps in no other way
than by a comparison of our figures from year to year can an adequate idea be obtained of the
manner in which our industries have been changing and progressing during that period. Each
year we have given particulars of the pay-roll in the different industries, the weekly wages of
workers, the nationality of persons employed, and the fluctuations of employment from month
to month.
The Method of obtaining Information.
The method followed by the Department may be again explained. At the beginning of the
year we send out to industrial employers of labour a questionnaire covering, among other
matters, the features above mentioned, and they are asked to make their returns not later than
the end of January. In the large majority of cases this request is fairly met, but once more we
have to call attention to the delay of some employers in filling out the forms, which delay has
made it impossible for the Department to issue this section of the report as early as we would
have desired. Although the Department has in no case gone to the limit of its powers in
dealing with delinquents, it may be well to make it clear that employers failing to send in their
returns within the period specified are rendering themselves liable to prosecution. Section 8 of
the " Department of Labour Act " sets forth that:—
" Every person who for the space of one month after receipt of notice to furnish information
required under any of the provisions of this Act neglects or refuses to furnish the same shall be
liable, on summary conviction, to a penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars, and every person
who furnishes information required under this Act, knowing it to be false, shall be liable to a
like penalty."
Moreover, the above clause has been specifically applied to the Department's statistical
questionnaire by Order in Council. It was found necessary in a few cases to bring this fact
very pointedly to the notice of certain employers before a return could be secured. Those
employers whose returns were still missing when our final compilation1 was made are comparatively few and unimportant, and, as will be seen later, an estimate has been made of their
probable pay-roll for the year.
Returns received from 4,521 Employers.
The number of returns actually received for the year is 4,521, an increase of 3S3 over the
corresponding total for 1925. This increase may be taken as representing, in the main, the
march of industrial development in tbe Province, though we are also of opinion that the Department is successful each year in obtaining returns from a somewhat larger proportion of the
firms in business. Whatever the explanation, the fact remains that the number of these annual
returns has grown surprisingly in the past eight years. Our records begin with 1,047 returns in
1018, the number going up to 1,207 for 1919, 1,869 for 1920, 2,275 for 1921, 2,809 for 1922, 3,375
for 1923, 3,566 for 1924, 4,138 for 1925, and 4,521 for 1926.
No new feature was introduced in the form of the questionnaire sent out this year, but a
question relating to the hourly rates of wages of employees following particular occupations was
changed somewhat, with the object of gaining more exact information which might be useful
to the Board of Adjustment in administering the " Male Minimum Wage Act." This information
was sought for the first time last year, when apparently some employers took account of female
as well as male employees in the answers which they gave, and there was no inquiry as to the
number of workers following different occupations. The necessary changes which were made in
this year's questionnaire have produced a large additional body of information as to wages
prevalent throughout the Province, which information is now in possession of the Department.
How the Industrial Pay-roll is divided.
The 4,521 firms making returns account for a pay-roll of $129,420,599.55. For 1925 the
returns of 4,138 firms showed a pay-roll of $115,943,238.60, and in the previous year 3,566 firms
paid out a sum of $107,798,771.30. The amount paid to officers, superintendents, and managers
last year was $12,399,863.91, which represents an increase, as compared with the corresponding
amount for 1925, of 16.69 per cent. Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen received a total of
$10,627,258.93, compared with $9,698,598.40 in 1925, an increase equal to 9.57 per cent.    The sum REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926. F 11
received by wage-earners was $106,393,476.71, which compares with $96,620,701.07 in 1925, an
increase equivalent to 11.25 per cent. There does not seem to be any special significance belonging to the difference in the relative increases for the three branches of service, though this is
not the first year in which the managerial departments have shown a more rapid gain than the
other two branches, which may possibly be a result of the greater attention given to organization
and specialization1 in our industrial operations, incidental to the attempt which has been made,
not unsuccessfully, in many lines, to bring about a lower cost per unit of production. Adding
together these percentages of increase for the past four years, we find that, since the beginning
of 1923, payments to officers, superintendents, and managers have increased by 49.69 per cent.;
payments to clerks, stenographers, and salesmen by 40.07 per cent.; and to wage-earners by
43.55 per cent.
Of the total payments for salaries and wages in 1926, officers, superintendents, and managers
received 9.58 per cent.; clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, 8.21 per cent.; and wage-earners,
82.21 per cent. The comparative proportions in 1925 were 9.17 per cent., 8.36 per cent., and 82.47
per cent.;  and in 1924 they were 9.04 per cent., 8.29 per cent., and 82.67 per cent.
Some Supplementary Figures.
It should be kept in mind that the totals given above are not the complete industrial pay-roll
of the Province. In endeavouring to arrive at a comprehensive total it will be necessary to
include certain other substantial amounts. The total already given, $129,420,599.55, is the industrial pay-roll for the year of the 4,521 firms making returns to this Department, up to the
time when our final tabulation was made. From then, and until the time of sending this report
to the press, over a hundred additional returns were received, their pay-roll aggregating
$701,743.16. It is necessary, further, to make an estimate regarding other firms engaged in
industries which, come within the scope of our inquiry, but from whom no returns were received,
and under this head we have allowed a sum of $6,350,000. This brings the total to $136,472,342.71
for salaries and wages in the purely industrial operations embraced by our inquiry, the corresponding total for 1925 being $125,294,415.22.
Next to be considered are the transcontinental and other railway systems, not, however,
including industrial, interurban, or street-car lines. They have each and all made a statement
to the Department of their pay-roll in British Columbia for 1926, the total being $13,701,493.76,
or $397,658.18 more than in 1925. In the employ of the Dominion and Provincial Governments
are many workers whose duties are of an industrial or semi-industrial character, and for these
we have allowed a wage payment of $6,000,000. Wholesale and retail firms, who are not asked
to make returns to this Department, 'are estimated to have a pay-roll of $4,000,000; and in
another group comprising express companies, telegraph companies, and ocean steamship services
—the latter having a large number of employees whose homes are in the Province—the wages
paid last year were calculated to amount to $8,000,000. Outside of these are a large number of
■ semi-industrial occupations to whom the general terms of our questionnaire do not strictly apply.
Included in these are delivery, cartage and teaming, warehousing, butchers, moving-picture
operators, coal and wood yards, and auto transportation, with a collective pay-roll of probably
not less than $5,500,000. Other miscellaneous industrial activities, not to be classified under any
of the above heads, would increase the total by $1,500,000.
The industrial pay-roll of the Province, treated in a comprehensive manner as above, may
therefore be summarized as follows:—
Pay-roll of 4,521 firms making returns to Department of Labour  $129,420,599 55
Returns received too late to be included in above  701,743 16
Employers in occupations included in Department's inquiry, not sending
in   returns—estimated   pay-roll  6,350,000 OO
Transcontinental railways        13,701,493 76
Dominion and Provincial Government workers         6,000,000 00
Wholesale and retail firms •.         4,000,000 00
Delivery,   cartage   and  teaming,   warehousing,   butchers,   moving-picture
operators, coal and wood yards, and auto transportation         5,500,000 00
Ocean service, express and telegraph companies         8,000,000 00
Miscellaneous         1,500,000 00
Total   $175,173,836 47
Proportions for Different Areas.
For the third time, this year we have segregated the returns according to the areas in which
the industrial operations dealt with were being carried on.   The result shows that 36.44 per cent. F 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
of our industrial pay-roll was located last year in Greater Vancouver, compared with 35.05 per
cent, in 1925 and 36.05 per cent, in 1924. For the purpose of this calculation, Greater Vancouver
is taken to include Vancouver City, North Vancouver, South Vancouver, West Vancouver, Point
Grey, and Burnaby. The rest of the Mainland, including also the Queen Charlotte and other
Northern Islands, had 46.31 per cent, of our industrial pay-roll—an increase compared with the
45.93 per cent, for 1925 and 45.02 per cent, for 1924. Vancouver Island, taking in also for this-
purpose the Gulf Islands, has a lower percentage of the Province's pay-roll for this year—the
17.25 per cent, for 1926 comparing with 19.02 per cent, in 1925 and 18.93 per cent, in 1924. The
lessened activity of coal-mining on the Island during 1926 is sufficient to account for this difference. Dividing the totals given in the preceding paragraphs in the same proportion as the figures
in actual returns, we arrive at the following apportionment of the industrial pay-roll of the
Province for the past three years:—
1924.
1925.
1926.
$ 54,449,747 95
67,992,347 26
28,595,220 99
$ 56,065,917 19
73,469,545 69
30,424,357 92
$ 63,833,346 01
81,123,003 67
30,217,486 79
$151,037,316 20
$159,959,820 80
$175,173,836 47
As in previous years, the 4,521 returns received were divided into twenty-five groups.
Twenty of these show an increase over their pay-roll for 1925, the increase amounting to
$14,SOS,307.87. The remaining five groups show a decreased pay-roll, the decrease aggregating
$1,330,846.62.    There is, accordingly, a net increase in the twenty-five groups of $13,477,360.95.
Business Expansion the General Rule.
These figures show that our industries during 1920 were, for the most part, in a very healthy
condition—expansion being the general rule. The building and contracting group, for exanrple,
had shown such a marked advance during 1925 that many people doubted its ability to go
further ahead in 1926, and yet, in this later year, the pay-roll of the industry went up by
$1,700,000. The Lower Mainland, the region centring in the City of Vancouver, obtained the
chief benefit of this, but improved records came from most of the other districts in the Province.
Some of the big contracts which helped to make up the return are now finished, but others have
been entered upon, and small operations, such as the building of residences, are probably more
numerous, so that appearances point to another good showing for the current year. Our
wonderful Coast waterways are becoming more important as the highways and byways of commerce, and the pay-roll in the Coast shipping group went up last year by over a million and
three-quarters. The wage payments in this group have more than doubled themselves in the last
four years. The food products group improved upon its pay-roll for 1925 by more than a million,
and while the fine record achieved by the fish-canneries was mainly responsible for this, we
should not ignore the expansion in other divisions embraced in this group, such as creameries
and dairies, cereal-milling, fruit-canneries, bakeries, jam-making, and packing-houses.
Three Millions more for Lumbering.
Coming to lumbering, our largest group, nearly three millions was added to the pay-roll in
1926, a fact which is, itself, an eloquent comment upon recent legislation, of which the effect has
been felt chiefly in lumbering operations. The increase of three-quarters of a million in the
pay-roll of metal-mining follows upon a series of annual additions to the pay-roll, carried over a
number of years, and the prevailing note in this industry to-day is one of continued advancement.
The forward step by over $200,000 in our wood-manufacturing industry is a welcome sign that
progress is being made in the marketing of our lumber products in a more finished state. A
similar increase was shown in the smelting industry, while ship-building and repairing, after
lagging somewhat in 1925, last year showed an increase of more than 50 per cent., the actual gain
being over $600,000. Even a greater proportionate advance was made by the pulp and paper
industry, which paid out $2,300,000 more in wages in 1926 than in 1925. This is mainly due to
the fact that one of the largest concerns in the Province virtually doubled its capacity during the
year, and other operations were also on an extended scale. The full result of these developments
upon the annual pay-roll will not be seen until the end of the current year; and by that time
we shall probably know more about other important new projects which are now in hand. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 12
Some Additional Increases.
Printing and publishing is in line with other industries in showing an advance of $369,000,
and paint-manufacturing, one of our smaller industries, goes forward proportionately. Another
group which shows more than a 50-per-cent. increase is that of oil-refining, in which is included
those flourishing new ventures, the fish-reduction plants on the western coast of Vancouver
Island and the Northern Mainland. The metal trades group, in which are included machine-
shops, boiler-making, foundries, garages, etc., are up by a round million and a half, a circumstance for which one can suggest no other explanation than the general prosperity of the
Province; and the same condition no doubt explains the satisfactory increases in other groups,
such as laundries, cleaning and dyemg, manufacturing leather and fur goods, manufacturing
jewellery, house-furnishing, and garment-making. The production of builders' materials makes
another stride in step with the growth of building and contracting, and the pay-roll of the
breweries and soft-drink manufacturers is also appreciably ahead.
Where the Pay-roll is Lower.
Of the industries which show a decreased pay-roll, the most conspicuous is coal-mining.
The reduction of its pay-roll by over $600,000 may be due partly to the severe competition of
oil-fuel in its various forms, and partly also to the extreme mildness of the winter of 1925-26,
necessitating less than the norma! consumption of domestic coal. However, the first few months
of the current year have witnessed a notable increase in coal production in the Province.
There is again a decreased pay-roll in the explosives and chemicals group and a slight decrease
in cigar and tobacco manufacturing. The reduction by over half a million in the pay-roll of the
miscellaneous group is probably more apparent than real, as this group always embraces a
number of operations which, by changing their character somewhat, become eligible for inclusion
in one of the other groups. The wage payments for various public utilities in the Province show
a reduction of nearly $100,000, and the explanation appears to be that in 1925 the returns from
some of the operations, particularly in the Interior of the Province, included considerable payments for extension-work. The large companies in the Coast region nearly all paid larger totals
under the head of wages in 1926 than in 1925.
A comparison of the pay-roll in the various industries for the past three years is given in
the following table:—
Industry.
1924.
No. of
Firms
report-
ins.
Total
Pay-roll.
1925.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
ray-roll.
1926.
No. of
Blrms
porting^
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacture	
Coal-mining	
Coast snipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Manufacturing jewellery	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods.
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous	
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways, etc	
Manufacturing wood (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
20
22
131
855
24
331
62
40
13
64
46
904
465
162
72
5
11
96
10
30
3
69
59
574,933
1,251,102
65,159
7,599,643
6,480,990
12,270,425
790,926
7,760,664
692,802
5-03,972
254,729
1,154,546
420,517
31,339,445
5,646,298
7,102,374
1,463,132
492,761
226,368
2,636,049
3,981,623
1,436,102
4,213,469
7,794,865
1,645,866
27
55
6
21
144
982
19
378
79
43
10
84
54
990
522
215
145
8
12
104
11
35
4
101
89
$107,798,771 36
4,138
607,0193
1,390,309
57,085
7,475,214
6,736,972
13,343,560
564,630
9,110,208
703,383
. 515,105
220,705
1,363,415
413,277
32,015,830
5,849,903
7,829,541
2,715,462
774,587
192,648
2,910,339
3,989,546
1,212,370
5,037,966
8,984,065
1,929,922
33
72
7
27
146
1,191
9
441
82
42
9
77
58
974
579
260
117
21
9
126
13
40
3
85
82
$115,943,238 601 4,521
777
1,632
55
6,847
8,515
15,046
468
10,294
883
646
236
1,408.
458.
34,826.
7,386.
8,600,
2,205,
1,178;
223.
3,279,
6,289,
1,835
5,275.
8,887,
2,137
,755 68
,946 45
722 32
,756 57
,239 41
,488 07
,600 30-
,610 51
,661 63
,404 44
,981 78
,574 44
,889 0O
,351 73
,692 84
887 09
,618 67
,387 30
,448 47
,828 06
,325 87
,435 17
,709 00
,913 34
.361 41
$129,420,599 55 F 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
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M Ph Ph 50 OJ M a REPORT  OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER. 1926.
F 15
Racial Origin of our Workers.
The information given in the tables headed " Nationality of Workers " presents no striking
contrasts with the corresponding figures for last year. The numbers are somewhat higher in nearly
every instance, and the fact that some nationalities show a greater increase than others indicates
the sources from which our additional supply of industrial labour is being drawn. As in other years,
the largest share of our labour is supplied by native Canadians and natives of Great Britain, who,
between them, represent rather more than two-thirds of our industrial workers. The numbers
of Canadians and British accounted for in our returns are respectively 40,450 and 33,814, as
against 39,033 and 33,601 respectively in 1925. It may be assumed that the increase in the
Canadian element is largely made up of young men and women who have recently arrived at
the working age. The Canadian percentage, which fell from 36.42 in 1924 to 35.68 in 1925,
recovered nearly all this lost ground in 1926, going back to 36.39. On the other hand, the
British percentage, which fell from 31.24 in 1924 to 31.15 in 1925, has a further drop to 30.42;
the number of British male employees showing a slight actual decrease, which is more than
made up by the larger number of females. Including together the native Canadians, British,
natives of the United States and Australia, we find that English-speaking countries supplied
70.92 per cent, of our labour for 1926, the percentage in 1925 being 70.85, and in the two previous
years 72.33 and 69.61.    There was a slight increase in both the American and Australian figures.
The Proportion or Asiatics.
The Asiatic workers in our industries, as enumerated in our returns, increased from a percentage of 11.30 in 1925 to 11.56 in 1926. This increase represents a slight check to a reduction
which had been going on, with only one interruption, every year since 1918, when 20.37 per cent,
of our workers were of Asiatic origin. In 1919 this percentage fell to 18.35 and in 1920 to 16.64.
At the time this change was attributed to the fact that large numbers of our ex-soldiers were
returning and taking their places in the industrial field. The percentage of Oriental workers
again fell, however, to 14.45 in 1921, but rose to 14.61 in 1922, only to drop to 13.85 in 1923, 11.97
in 1924, and 11.30 in 1925, so that, despite the slight increase in the past year, the proportion is
decidedly smaller than in any of the eight previous years. The increase in the number of
Asiatics is chiefly made up of Chinese, though Japanese, and particularly females of that
country, figure more largely in the returns. The progressive decline in the number of Hindus,
which has been going on over a number of years, is again in evidence.
From the countries of Continental Europe there is a slightly reduced percentage, though the
actual numbers are in most cases higher than in 1925. A reference to our last Annual Report
shows that from 1924 to 1925 there was an increase in the percentage of Continental Europeans
from 14.56 to 15.91. Part of this increase was lost in 1926, the percentage going down to 15.62.
The principal increases are shown by Scandinavians, Russians and other Slavs, and Italians, and
a slight decrease is shown by Austrians and in those from " other European countries."
Dividing our industrial wTorkers into groups as above referred to, the proportions for the
last four years are as follows:—
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
Per Cent.
69.61
15.45
13.85
1.09
Per Cent.
72.33
14.56
11.97
1.14
Per Cent.
70.85
15.91
11.30
1.94
Per Cent.
70.92
15.62
11.56
1.90
100.00
100.00
100.0'O
100.00
Native Canadians and British Workers.
Over a number of years there have always been certain industries in which native Canadians
predominated over those of British birth, and others in which the positions were reversed. Thus,
in 1926. native Canadians held the first place in lumbering, breweries, cigar and tobacco manufacturing, contracting, explosives and chemicals, the manufacture of food products, garment-
making, metal trades, metal-mining, oil-refining, paint-manufacturing, printing and publishing,
and the manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.). Natives of Great Britain were the most numerous in
the production of builders' materials, coal-mining, Coast shipping, house-furnishing, jewellery- F 16 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
manufacture, laundries, cleaning and dyeing, manufacture of leather and fur goods, manufacture
of pulp and paper, ship-building, smelting, public utilities, and the miscellaneous group. While
native Canadians easily retained their priority in the lumbering group, their percentage of
workers in that industry fell from 34.00 to 32.76, while the British percentage fell from 16.73 to
13.6S. The additional labour required by breweries has been recruited largely from the British
element, but in the production of builders' materials the new employees consist mainly of
Canadians. In Coast shipping a reduction in the number of native Canadians is almost exactly
balanced by a British gain. In the manufacture of food products the Canadian gain was much
greater than the British. In garment-making the number of male employees, Canadian and
British, was more than doubled, although, compared' with 1925, the number of female workers
showed a considerable falling-off. British workers supplied most of the extra help in the
metal-mines, but in the new fish-reduction plants the employees were chiefly Canadian. Of the
large number of new employees needed in the pulp and paper industry, the British furnished a
much, larger proportion than the native Canadians, the latter increasing their number by only
fifteen, whereas the British total went up by 375. There was also a greater British than
Canadian gain in the ship-building group.
The total of workers of Scandinavian birth went up from 8,473 to 9,056. In coal-mining
there were 354, against 102 in 1925, but in Coast shipping the number was down. In the food
products operations they supplied over 300 extra workers and about 100 more to the ship-building
group. Something like 500 more Russians and Slavs are accounted for in our returns this year,
the groups in which most of this increase occurred being contracting, lumbering, metal-mining,
pulp and paper manufacturing, and smelting. An increase of 274 is shown in the number of
Italians, and these have gone mostly into Coast shipping, the food products group, pulp and
paper manufacturing, and smelting.
Orientals and Fish-cannehies.
The fact that our returns for 1926 show 1,395 more Asiatic workers than those for 1925
invites an explanation. More than this amount of increase is accounted for in the
food products group alone. In this group our returns show 1,446 more Orientals
employed than in 1925, and these again are accounted for chiefly by the fish-
canneries, with 2,425 Oriental workers as compared with 1,586, an increase of 839. The figures
for the two years, however, are not strictly comparable. In former years most of the Oriental
contractors for the canneries have avoided making returns, but this year the Department has
insisted upon their being made, and the inclusion of their figures has swelled the number of
Oriental employees in this year's totals, whereas those similarly employed in previous years were
not counted. In most other groups the number of Orientals was virtually stationary, or even
showed a reduction. Thus, in the contracting group, there were 22 Chinese, no Hindus, and 8
Japanese, where in 1925 there were 93 Chinese, 13 Hindus, and 53 Japanese. In the lumbering
group there was a slight increase.
Weekly Wages, 1926, compared with 1925.
The increases and decreases in weekly wages are shown in the following table:—
Increases. Decreases.
Builders' materials   $0 60 Breweries   $0 09
Coast shipping   1 38            Cigar and tobacco manufacturing....        73
Contracting            83 Coal-mining          46
Explosives and chemicals          44 Pood products, manufacture of          05
Garment-making     38 Metal trades   21
House-furnishing   33            Miscellaneous trades and industries        77
Jewellery, manufacture of      1 63 Paint-manufacture   06
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing      1  70 Smelting      2 85
Manufacturing  of  leather  and  fur
goods    22
Lumber industries   16
Metal-mining   53
Oil-refining     09
Printing and publishing   64
Pulp and paper manufacturing  09
Ship-building   1 02
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
telephones,   etc  1  57
Manufacturing wood   (N.E.S.)  1 34                                                                                                     '   ■ It will be seen that in seventeen of the groups there was an average increase in weekly
wages, and in eight groups an average decrease. Only male workers over 18 years of age are
included in this calculation, the wages of female employees being dealt with in another section
of the report. The comparison of wages for the two years, it may be noted, is not affected by
any substantial difference as to hours of labour, and the 1926 returns in the lumbering industry
nearly all relate to a period before the order under the " Male Minimum Wage Act" went into
effect.
Changes in the Weekly Rates.
As a result of disputes which developed during the year, large numbers of carpenters, shipyard-workers, and electrical workers secured an advance of wages, which explains the higher
average wage in the contracting, ship-building, and public utilities groups. As to the increased
wage average in the Coast shipping group, it should be stated that the practice of including an
estimate for board, in addition to money payments, in the amounts entered as wages is now more
prevalent with shipping employers. The largest increase of all is shown in the laundries,
cleaning and dyeing group, and the average wage in the small industry of jewellery-manufacture,
with another increase following that of last year, goes up to its highest point in several years.
The most marked change in the weekly average of any group is the reduction of $2.85 a week
in smelting. While the average for this group still remains as high as $32.90 a week, it seems
singular at first sight that such a reduction in wages should synchronize with marked expansion
of the industry, but the explanation appears to be an arrangement under which wages rise and
fall with the fluctuation in the price of metals.
Low-paid Workers fewer in Number.
The total of adult male wage-earners accounted for, 100,303, compares with a total of
95,441 for 1925, the increase being at the rate of 5.09 per cent. In last year's report the Department called attention to the fact that there was a larger number of wage-earners receiving under
$18 a week, or less than $3 a day. The 1926 figures, however, tell a very different story, the
number of these wage-earners falling from 10,803 to 6,978, or a reduction of 35.13 per cent. Wage-
earners receiving from $18 to $30 a week, or from $3 to $5 a day, have grown in number from
51,370 to 58,758, a rise of 14.38 per cent., and those receiving $30 a week or over have increased
by 3.90 per eent.—from 33,268 to 34,567. It is particularly gratifying to note a considerable
reduction in the number of very low-paid workers. Thus, there were, in 1925, 49 male workers
receiving under $6 a week, and in 1926 only 2. In 1925 there were 45 receiving from $6 to $7
a week, and in 1926 only 3;   and other changes have been as follows:—
$7 to $7.99 a week, reduced from 37 to 12;
$8 to $8.99 a week, reduced from 158 to 53;
$9 to $9.99 a week, reduced from 339 to 54;
$10 to $10.99 a week, reduced from 297 to 97;
$11 to $11.99 a week, reduced from 382 to 204;
$12 to $12.99 a week, reduced from 1,249 to 359.
These changes appear to have been fairly general, affecting most of the industrial groups.
At the other end of the scale there were 2,446 wage-earners receiving $50 a week or over in 1926,
as against 2,067 in 1925. In this section there were notable increases in the contracting, laundries,
metal trades, miscellaneous, oil-refining, printing and publishing, pulp and paper, ship-building,
and wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.).
The changes in the prevailing industrial wages in the Province during the past nine years
are shown in the diagram on pages 18 and 19. F 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Chart showing Fluctuation in Industrial Wages.
3Ctt
25%
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I9IQ
1919
1920
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Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1919-20.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.
1926.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals, etc	
Food products, manufacture of	
Garment-making	
House-fumishing	
Jewellery, manufacture of	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries...
Oil-refining!	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways,    gas,    water,    power,
telephones, etc	
Manufacturing of wood  (N.E.S.)....
$28 27
31 65
32 48
37 64
26 81
31 61
31 53
29 72
36 14
28 79
34 20
28 42
28 81
32 47
31 14
35 96
28 24
28 52
2T 23
35 97
35 18
28 11
36 44
32 81
27 46
$28 67
28 82
23 97
32 83
28 45
28 82
26 34
25 67
29 38
26 00
33 54
27 32
29 85
24.70
30 33
32 00
28 40
35 73
24 14
36 30
25 41
29 87
31 98
29 55
23 48
$26 62
25 61
25 30
35 96
25 43
28 06
26 13
27 39
27 28
24 23
30 90
26 11
26 67
25 29
27 73
30 97
25 91
32 63
21 79
36 23
25 88
25 55
29 91
30 41
23 12
$26 55
26 83
23 32
36 96
28 36
28 31
26 63
25 61
29 85
24 74
32 65
25 07
26 73
25 92
28 04
32 21
25 83
32 71
23 13
38 09
27 90
25 88
34 16
29 42
23 33
$26 51
26 10
24 07
35 73
29 59
27 98
26 86
25 94
28 38
25 53
31 26
25 70
26 44
26 15
26 37
31 84
25 85
33 06
24 69
39 52
27 69
26 79
35 14
29 84
22 55
$27 41
26 78
22 97
30 52
28 21
28 23
23 35
26 25
29 l'O
25 34
35 06
25 30
26 68
25 40
28 13
32 81
25 38
31 39
22 00
37 61
27 38
27 72
35 75
27 69
23 92
$27 32
27 38
22 24
30 06
29 59
29 06
23 79
26 20
29 48
25 67
36 69
27 00
26 90
25 56
27 92
33 34
24 61
31 48
21 94
38 25
27 47
28 74
32 90
29 26
25 26 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 19
Chart showing Fluctuation in Industrial Wages—Continued.
132 2
1923
1 934
1325
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Average Wage in Industries.
For several years past it has been the practice of the
Department to make a comparison of the wages prevalent in
the different years, the average wage of adult males in each
industry being worked out on the basis of the classified weekly
wage-rates. This practice has again been followed for 1926.
In our questionnaire we invite employers to give the number of
wage-earners within specified limits, but it would not be practicable for us to request exact figures. Accordingly, to take one
example, the 10,776 wage-earners who received " $24 to $24.99
weekly" would no doubt include some receiving $24, some
$24.25, some $24.50, some $24.75, etc.; while the 13,713 who
received " $30 to $34.99 " would be made up, in unknown proportions, of those receiving $30, $31, $32, $33, $34, etc. For
the purpose of making an average it has been assumed, where
steps of $1 were given in our table, that " $24 to $24.99," for
example, meant $24.50; and, where steps of $5 were given,
that "$30 to $34.99," for example, meant $32. Lest these
assumptions should be thought to err on the side of generosity,
" $50 and over " was taken in all cases to mean $50 only.
As the same method of computation has been followed for
each of the years mentioned in the table on page 18, the comparisons may be accepted as entirely fair.
The averages are calculated from figures supplied by each
firm for the week of employment of the greatest number, and
represent the pay for a full week's work. Actual weekly
earnings in many cases at certain periods of the year would
be lower owing to stoppages or broken time. On the other
hand, many employees would receive larger amounts at periods F 20 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
when overtime was being worked. By pooling the figures for all the above industries, and taking
into account the respective numbers employed in them, a general average wage for each year
is arrived at:—
Average Industrial Wage for all Adult Male Wage-earners as
computed from, Returns.
1918 $27 97 1923  28 05
1919  29 11 1924  28 39
1920  31 51 1925  27 82
1921  27 62 1926  27 99
1922  27 29
The lowering of the weekly average between 1924 and 1925 was explained by the reduction
in the working-hours of many employees, resulting from the operation of the " Hours of Work
Act."
Firms with a Pay-roll over $100,000.
The industrial firms in the Province whose annual pay-roll exceeds $100,000 have again been
numbered. The first year in which such record was compiled was 1921, when there were 118 of
these large operations. In 1922 there were 164, and in 1923 there were 200. Then there was a
fall in 1924 to 196, this also being the total for 1925. For the year 1926, however, there were
230 firms with a pay-roll of $100,000 or more. Eleven of these had a pay-roll of over $1,000,000,
three of them being between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, one between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, and
one over $4,000,000. This list does not include any public authorities, Dominion, Provincial, or
municipal; nor does it take account of transcontinental railways, wholesale and retail merchants,
and deep-sea shipping. The lumbering industry, of course, has the highest number of these large
firms, 102, compared with 89 in the previous year. The food products group comes next, with 21,
and there were 15 in contracting, 13 in Coast shipping, 12 in coal-mining, 11 in metal-mining, 10
in metal trades, 8 in ship-building, 7 in public utilities, 4 each in laundries, cleaning and dyeing,
printing and publishing, and pulp and paper manufacturing, 3 each in builders' materials and
manufacture of wood (N.E.S.), 2 each in garment-making, oil-refining, and smelting, and 1 each
in breweries, explosives and chemicals, house-furnishing, jewellery-manufacture, manufacture of
leather and fur goods, paint-manufacture, and the miscellaneous group.
The Fluctuation of Employment.
In the matter of fluctuation of employment, the movement was not unlike that of the
previous year. The low point was touched in January, for which month 70,030 workers (male
and female) were accounted for in our returns. Each succeeding month witnessed a decided
advance until midsummer, but there was a slight falling-off between July and August, and then
in September came the highest figures for the year, with a total of 89,912. For the next three
months the figures take rather a steep downward course, the month of December finding 73,3S3
persons in industrial employment, or 3,353 more at the end of the year than the beginning. In
the past eight years the peak of employment has been reached three times in July, three times
in August, once (in 1925) in October, and, for the year now under review, in September. Of the
twenty-five groups of industries, eighteen witnessed the peak of employment in the second half
of the year. With two industries, cigar-manufacturing and coal-mining, January was the
month of greatest employment. Two others were at the peak in March, one in May, two in
June, four in July, five in August, three in September, two in October, three in November, and
one in December.
Lumbering Most Active in May.
The year 1926 was the third year in succession in which the lumbering industry arrived at
its greatest activity during the month of May. The peak of employment in this industry seems
now to be two or three months earlier than in former years. In all likelihood it is a case of
meeting the requirements of the industry's more distant markets, which naturally wish to
receive their supplies during the best building months of the year, and which are annually
increasing their demands for British Columbia's lumber. An industry which was going very
strongly at the end of the year was that of smelting. A curious feature of tbe returns for
Coast shipping is the circumstance that the year's largest volume of employment was recorded
in the month of March. This seems to have been an unusually busy time on the water-front,
where activities were somewhat curtailed in succeeding months owing to the diversion of shipping
caused by the British coal strike. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 192G.
P 21
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading :—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc.—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping. —Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. — Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. -Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. flood Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.— Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
- dealers.
No, 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-m ills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.— Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.— Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting. —Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasolene lighting and heating devices, and supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No.  1.
BREWERIES.
Returns covering S3 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  .$191,188 53
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     66,919 06
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   519,648 09
Total $777,755 68
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March ...
April
May	
June
363
377
399
406
440
421
15
16
17
19
30
21
July	
August....
September
October	
November
December.
462
420
392
358
370
376
25
28
29
29
39
35
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
2G.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
56.00	
toS 6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
31.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
3
11
1
17
16
21
3
38
29
10
120
32
7
76
25
12
9
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.     18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.,
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
238
207
1
21
5
4
11
Females.
27
11
1 F 22
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 72 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $    203,576 10
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       108,150 50
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,341,219 85
Total 81,652,946 45
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January...
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
847
876
957
1,136
1,195
1,185
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
1,196
1,142
1,123
1,077
1,007
933
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Femalrs.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $ 6.99...
7.00 to     7.99  ..
1
1
8.00 to     8.99...
1
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99  ..
2
2
2
10
1
11.00 to   11.99...
1
12.00 to   12 99.
13.00 to   13.99...
1
14.00 to   14.99...
45
19
62
13
40
71
51
151
104
29
165
21
77
78
29
30
138
60
93
56
54
2
2
15.00 to   15.99
3
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
1
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99.
30.00 to   34 99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav Country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated 	
Males.       Females.
395
484
42
2
1
5
79
4
12
54
38
32
265
6
4
6
2
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 7 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents', and Managers $ 17,326 83
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  10,438 28
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..  27,957 21
Total      $ 65,722 32
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January .
February
March ...
April
May	
June
20
17
17
14
15
12
27
25
25
25
23
25
July	
August....
September
October ...
November.
December .
13
1-2
13
15
15
18
25
29
24
25
24
27
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
t 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
IS. 00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99.
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
2599..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
Males.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
over.    18 Yrs.
1
11
9
1
3
1
2
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finlind, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
11
3
13
2 REPORT OP THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 192G.
P 23
Table No.
4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 27 Firms.
Table No.
5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 146 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments,
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc	
Total	
1926.
$   346,472 53
183,291 76
0,317,992 28
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers f   757,879 69
.   ,$6,847,756 57
Total $8,515,239 41
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
.    Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
F'emales.
Month.
Males.
Females,
4,86f
4,78£
4,64£
4,21!
4,27;
4,35"
September .
October...
November...
December...
4,349
4,449
4,501
4,567
4,830
4,758
January....
February...
March	
June	
6,204
6,196
6,784
6,710
6,363
6,431
13
15
15
16
18
25
September..
November..
December ..
6,496
6,429
6,406
6,824
6,636
6,0S3
26
February....
26
20
April  	
17
16
17
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
t
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
8 Yrs.
over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
$ 6.00 to $ 6
7.00 to    7.
8.00 to     8.
9.00 to     9.
10.00 to   10.
11.00 to   11.
19
)9.
16
t 6.00 to $ 6
7.00 to     7
8.on fcm     R
99
99..
1
7
)9
3
8
26
7
34
27
3
18
12
1
19
6
2
15
3
99..
20
22
1
100
11
3
5
198
138
194
123
169
51
236
312
225
714
410
242
171
265
44
988
843
639
220
260
)9...
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
ll.OOto   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
16.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
•20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99  .
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
50.00 and over..
)9.
1
4
8
)9...
19. on to   12
19    .
34
11
97
38
23
28
97
58
99
109
62
131
668
401
73
367
392
116
1,123
510
316
159
155
2
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99
2
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.98...
17.00 to   17.99.
18.00 to   18.99...
2
13
19.00 to   19.99.   .
20.00 to   20 99.   .
21.00 to   21.99...
1
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99.
24.00 to   24.99.
2
1
25.00 to   25.99  ..
3
1
27.00 to   27.99...
29.00 to   28 99.
29.00 to   29.99...
4
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99...
1
1
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
770
2,540
82
1
50
19
38.S
20
73
364
108
89
457
2,628
3,616
211
48
8
18
111
13
15
263
59
4
422
10
Great Britain and Ii
United States of An
Great Britain and Ir
United States of Am
8
Italy	
Italy.                	
Austria and Hungar
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Other European con
63
1
142
79
18
196
All other countries
All other countries
ed	
te
d	 P 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TABLE   NO.   6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 1,191 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 1,957,058 62
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,425,515 46
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 11,663,913 99
Total $15,046,488 07
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
May	
June	
7,036
7,407
8,325
9,154
9,359
9,824
44
44
44
45
49
64
July	
September .
October 	
November..
December...
10,226
10,666
10.20S
9,414
8,488
7,249
72
73
61
60
57
56
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1
9
10
12
14
15
20
6
8
1
7
9
4
6
5
2
1
3
3
1
IS
23
7.00 to    7.99...
1
10
5
12
10
37
13
14
89
56
314
86
377
413
659
1,159
1,236
3,143
430
510
804
425
130
1,167
2,188
1.276
461   .
376
16
8.00 to     8.99...
23
9 00 to     9.99...
10
10.00 to   10.99...
24
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
3
1
17
30
4
14.00to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99.   .
1
10
2
11
12
1
8
10
7
6
1
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
8
2
6
7
1
4
1
1
2
6
4
4
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28 99...
29.00 to   29.99...
2
1
1
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
2
1
40.00 to   44.99.   .
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium ,
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.,
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan ,	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
8,097
5,656
498
47
19
59
333
37
71
947
389
69
22
8
1
611
37
22
1
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 69,849 25
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   110,039 17
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  288,711 88
Total $468,600 30
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females,
January .
February
March...
April
May	
June
153
161
196
236
321
335
Month.       Males.    Females,
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December ..
355
364
354
324
192
146
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $ 6.99.
to     7.99
to     8.99.
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
53
9
8
18
16
39
34
13
11
15
28
81
9
21
5
14
Under
18 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany     	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan    	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
115
97
4
1
14
1 REPORT OP THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
P 25
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 441 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 1,301,107 49
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,174,185 78
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    7,819,317 24
Total $10,294,610 51
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.  Females
January	
f^ebruary	
March	
April	
May	
June	
3,301
3,262
3,959
4,629
5,044
6,542
721
680
662
717
850
2,029
July	
August	
September
October
November.
December ..
7,575
7,938
8,217
6,033
4,982
3,909
2,903
3,252
2,935
2,231
1,380
846
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ e.oo
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 .
to $ 6.'
7.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
to 19.99.
to   20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
2
6
5
33
27
58
164
117
225
357
878
497
347
484
350
520
657
236
461
258
177
1,112
659
259
97
95
Under
18 Yrs.
11
19
9
12
8
16
24
39
11
28
30
11
11
10
7
1
1
3
9
18 Yrs.     Under
* over.    18 Yrs.
16
14
158
135
67
25
63
263
537
609
334
362
158
131
111
104
151
62
28
80
48
24
24
8
12
35
12
3
15
16
33
28
39
36
27
75
159
37
14
4
8
8
2
3
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France    	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries   	
Nationality not stated	
1,518
!,512
165
19
14
13
66
32
59
647
43
34
!,068
8
610
14
227
Apprentices.
20
2
7
2,173
921
119
3
4
20
114
45
66
66
67
16
214
2
123
Table No. 9
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 82 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $15S,520 12
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   108,793 63
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   616,347 88
Total $883,661 63
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June ....
400
420
423
391
235
261
281
281
286
272
July	
August....
September
October ...
November.
December .
384
407
419
446
407
338
267
295
313
317
299
267
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
■ 17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00
to
99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99
23.99!
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
3
....
4
6
3
2
13
5
3
8
7
11
7
1
14
2
10
1
1
23
40
24
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
10
28
102
67
40
33
45
15
28
10
11
6
2
18
9
3
1
1
1
1
10
1
11
4
6
5
1
Apprentices.
16
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium      	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China     ..   	
Hi ndustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationalitv not stated	
198
149
5
1
2
2
11
17
1
17
8
22
150
133
12 P 26
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No.  10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 4® Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $106,425 20
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     76,420 65
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    463,558 59
Total $646,404 44
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
April	
May	
June	
349
346
352
350
363
373
37
40
39
44
45
43
July 	
August....
September..
October ....
November..
December...
374
373
384
397
402
400
40
41
45
47
49
47
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
1
$ 6.00 to $ 6.99...
1
7 00 to     7.99...
1
1
4
2
1
2
6
2
18
"3 "
1
1
6
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
3
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
1
4
5
7
2
6
7
3
8
1
2
8
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
6
6
11
14
26
4
56
9
13
22
3
15
19
22
7
23
7
62
32
9
1
1
2
15.00 to   15.99.
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99.
1
18.00 to   18.99
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...|
22 00 to   22.99...
1
1
23.00 to   23.99...
25 00 to   25.99. ..
27.00 to   27.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44 99...
45.00 to   49.99.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country  	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
184
224
5
2
10
4
2
18
30
Table No.  11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $ 31,280 00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   95,154 50
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 110,547 28
Total $236,981 78
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January
February...
March	
April	
May..  	
June	
67
67
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December...
65
69
71
71
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $ 6.:
7.99..
8.99..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99
49.99
and over .
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
13
12
11
3
10
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany	
Austria and Hungary    	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan..  	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
29
1 REPORT OP THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 192G.
P 27
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 77 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   122,097 98
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       186,644 05
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,099,832 41
Total $1,408,574 44
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March.
458
465
462
467
494
489
807
810
821
829
840
869
August ....
September..
October ....
November..
December ..
500
507
498
479
443
441
951
931
917
866
June	
852
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males,
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
6
$ 6.00 to $ 6.99...
4
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to    8.99.  .
4
14
26
18
28
8
1
9.00 to     9.99...
2
1
3
4
1
1
1
3
14
1
22
350
140
144
61
25
60
8
19
6
7
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
3
5
11
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 t»   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
2
6
1
10
5
4
8
4
75
13
28
9
39
70
13
47
17
11
90
27
16
4
15
10
1
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
1
1
27.00 to  27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
1
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
2
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
1
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy...	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
japan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
152
262
10
43
1
10
371
484
26
17
1
29
16
1
1
5
13
10
Table No.  13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 58 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $ 67,109 00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     63,482 15
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 323,307 85
Total , §458,899 00
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June. ...
Males.
Females.
223
73
222
74
223
75
222
76
219
80
224
80
July	
August...
September
October ..
November
December
225
224
244
252
260
243
85
89
90
97
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to$ 6.!
7.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
1
4
4
3
3
7
5
11
8
15
5
11
19
14
15
29
4
68
11
4
18 Yrs.
& over.
5
2
10
8
3
9
16
6
2
6
7
2
1
3
3
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
1
10
1
4
1
2
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany 	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China :	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
114
18
1
10
3
13
4
4
4
47
48
6 F 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 974 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 2,169,255 05
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,087,782 91
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 31,569,313 77
Total $34,826,351 73
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February...
March	
Mav	
June	
21,423
23,513
25,764
26,377
27,141
26,649
48
52
55
58
60
6S
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December..
25,454
24,978
25,644
25,671
24,917
20,726
55
54
51
50
43
47
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
F^or Week of
Males.
FEMALES.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Y'rs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
1
6
3
22
11
9
61
22
43
9
56
4
25
23
12
6
1
1
2
1
1
2
11
24
123
271
564
611
718
602
1,277
5,411
1,261
3,064
1,366
1,152
3,903
1,397
924
1,630
977
605
3,093
1,802
1,051
729
732
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
6
2
4
1
3
12
21
8
5
4
1
2
4
3
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99   ..
20.00 to   20.99...
1
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
1
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
4
2
1
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Kussia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China    '.....
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
10,724
4,487
1,760
46
94
245
425
177
336
4,823
1,278
182
4,203
726
2,376
43
866
Females.
1
10
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 597 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,657,963 45
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,076,866 99
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   4,651,862 40
Total  $7,386,692 84
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June
3,400
3,630
3,663
3,772
3,699
3,940
91
93
100
107
July	
August	
September .
October
November ..
December...
3,765
3,828
3,688
3,889
3,779
3,729
125
125
121
110
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
F\)r Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
18.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to$ 6.99.
to     7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to   29.99.
to   34.99.
to   39.99.
to   44.99.
to   49.99.
and over .
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
1
4
9
10
30
14
42
100
23
81
39
61
68
80
173
150
256
271
277
258
108
135
142
85
964
428
172
79
77
41
19
28
26
18
37
17
24
24
41
16
6
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
2
7
30
19
16
5
12
6
Apprentices.
31
34
24
25
10
24
11
20
12
5
25
7
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
297
779
257
11
8
22
37
8
4
91
1
15
4
52
45
11
1 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 29
Table No.  16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 260 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   496,996 80
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      433,840 30
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  7,670,049 99
Total $8,600,887 09
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   F'emales. Month.       Males.   Females
January.
February
March .,,
April]...
May	
June
4,193
4,182
4,318
4,623
4,879
4,960
36
36
39
July	
August	
September..
October ...
November...
December...
5,114
4,254
5,233
4,271
5,106
4,613
39
40
39
40
41
41
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
F\)r Week of
Males.
FEMALES.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
$ 6.00 to $ 6.99. ..
7.00 to    7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to    9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
4
2
1
14.00 to   14.99...
1
13
7
16
67
14
17
36
74
123
97
104
459
330
879
2,231
1,557
416
423
73
1
15.00 to   15.99...
1
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99..
1
3
3
3
1
4
3
3
1
11
4
4
1
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
1
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
3
1
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
2,150
1,713
312
11
14
26
296
31
85
947
438
56
67
1
17
13
115
24
13
4
TABLE   NO.   17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 117 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  397,536 78
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      372,018 61
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,436,063 28
Total $2,205,618 67
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March..,
April
May	
June
830
879
896
923
956
1,004
266
280
296
288
310
335
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December .
1,053
1,071
1,079
1,022
1,042
994
334
328
291
313
307
308
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners
only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
IS Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
tices.
Under $6.00	
1
7
4
1
35
17
5
6
4
6
6
1
1
2
1
1
1
$ 6.00 to $ 6.99
7 00 to    7.99
1
18
1
4
3
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99  .
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
15.00 to   17.99  .
18.00 to   18.99 .
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to  27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
'45.00 to   49.99..
50.00 and over ..
1
5
13
6
12
6
24
47
11
23
68
53
44
33
136
145
89
59
26
54
81
10
113
51
28
7
8
2
14
7
6
9
6
139
28
24
11
11
17
14
4
4
3
3
9
4
2
1
2
2
2
1
Nationality of Em
ployees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
508
611
35
180
3
4
10
3
4
20
19
2
9
Ttn.lv	
3
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland,
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
etc.
1
4
16
1
Nationality not sta
ted. .	 F 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 21 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $     85,542 68
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       190,884 31
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       901,960 31
Total    $1,178,387 30
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
615
547
540
664
583
692
8
8
8
8
8
11
July	
September..
November ..
December...
804
809
761
693
574
613
9
9
9
9
12
June	
9
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
$ 6.00 to$ 6.99...
7.00 to     7.99...
8.00 to     8 99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
1
8
2
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99.   .
15.00 to   15.99...
4
1
2
33
1
9
9
62
22
71
55
14
38
25
245
182
116
52
18
S3
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
1
20.00 to   20.99.  .
1
2
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
3
24.00 to   24.99...
3
4
25.00 to   25.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium    	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary   ..   	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country    	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
521
425
10
3
17
87
13
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURINQ.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 64,536 56
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     62,679 50
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     96,332 41
Total $223,448 47
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   F'emales. Month.       Males.   Females.
January..
February.
March
April	
May	
June	
94
97
100
101
10
10
11
11
12
12
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
94
90
88
11
11
11
11
11
11
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 	
to$ 6.99..
to 7.99..
to 8.99..
to 9.99..
to 10.99..
to 11.99..
to 12.99..
to 13.99..
to 14.99..
to 15.99..
to 16.99..
to 17.99..
to 18.99..
to 19.99..
to 20.99..
to 21.99..
to 22.99..
to 23.99..
to 24.99..
to 26.99..
to 26.99..
to 27.99 .
to 28.99..
to 29.99..
to 34.99..
to 39.99..
to 44.99..
to 49.99..
and over ..
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
FEMALES.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland ..
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy.
Germany	
Austria and Flungary   	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China 	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries -.	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
39
2
1 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 31
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 126 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   462,550 20
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      886,980 70
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,930,297 16
Total $3,279,828 06
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March.  .....
April	
1,064
1,051
1,073
1,068
1,062
1,048
123
129
144
128
127
133
July	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
1,051
1,045
1,078
1,092
1,082
1,034
141
129
i   158
145
153
June	
153
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
F^RMALKS.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
5
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
5
$ 6.00 to $ 6.99...
7.00 to    7.99..,
13
5
4
12
6
14
8.00 to    8.99...
2
13
1
3
10
9.00 to    9.99...
2
4
2
7
10.00 to   10.99...
10
5
2
5
17
11.00 to   11.99...
3
4
1
1
5
12.00to   12.99...
16
15
1
21
13.00 to   13.99...
13
1
4
2
14.00 to   14.99...
15
4
15
4
6
15.00 to   15.99...
7
2
26
4
10
16.00 to   16.99...
8
6
7
17.00to   17.99...
11
1
3
2
18.00 to   18.99...
12
1
9
7
19.00 to   19.99...
4
10
1
20.00 to   20.99...
26
8
3
21.00 to   21.99...
11
31
4
22.00 to   22.99...
9
2
3
23.00 to   23.99...
7
17
4
3
24.00 to   24.99...
3
25.00 to   25.99...
26
6
12
3
1
2
27.00 to   27.99...
1
28.00to   28.99...
5
3
39
2
29.00 to   29.99...
1
30.00 to   34.99...
1
6
35.00 to   39.99...
54
133
262
169
2
40.00 to   44.99...
1
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
FVance	
Italy..
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females,
21
'34'
102
61
4
2
'io'
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 13 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  468,509 SO
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      278,804 00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  5,542,012 07
Total  $6,289,325 87
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.       Males.   Females.
January...
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
2,307
2,431
2,476
2,523
2,607
2,760
76
70
71
73
73
75
July	
August...
September
October ..
November
December.
3,018
2,942
2,978
3,147
8,075
2,880
77
77
76
81
76
81
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00 .
to$ 6.
to    7.
to     8.
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
tg, 15.99..
to   16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to   29.99.
to   34.99.
to   39.99..
to   44.99.
to   49.99.
and over.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
24
10
128
175
101
43
228
36
569
312
279
83
58
125
38
221
410
61
44
125
1
12
2
1
3
"2'
'li'
5
3
18 Yrs.
& over.
7
2
3
2
19
5
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany    	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China *.,..
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       f'emales.
818
1,009
112
11
2
17
237
3
47
94
126
30
103
507
44
33 F 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 40 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $    188,353 02
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       106,621 09
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,540,461 06
Total $1,835,435 17
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
1,120
1,237
1,495
1,338
1,456
1,392
July	
September..
November ..
December...
1,023
879
1,056
1,009
1,120
1,264
April	
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
F"or Week of
Males.
FEMALES.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
2
1
1
7.00 to    7.99...
1
1
8 00 to     8.99...
2
3
9.00 to     9.99...
4
10.00 to   10.99...
2
1
4
12 00 to   12 99...
1
1
4
1
1
13.00 to   13.99...
4
1
3
9
2
8
85
87
40
310
46
179
49
64
60
30
67
420
332
57
10
17
1
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
1
16.00 to   16.99...
3
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
1
21.00 to   21.99.   .
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
1
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99.   .
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99.
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
72
4
10
20
16
1
3
145
48
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 8 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $    240,994 14
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       353,737 11
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    4,080,977 75
Total $ 5,275,709 00
Average Number of Wage=earners.
Month.
January.,
February,
March
April	
May	
June	
Males.
2,303
2,380
2,464
2,437
2,469
2,471
24
24
24
24
24
24
Month.
July	
August.	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
Males.   Females.
2,486
2,656
2,718
2,896
3,080
3,082
24
25
25
25
26
26
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
F\>r Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
S 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 .
to? I
99.
99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
to   13.9
to   14.!
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
10
8
10
4
5
10
34
59
579
642
695
738
175
103
30
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
11
"3'
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
1,324
97
10
10
4
415
10
58
160
139
44
46 	
REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 192G.
P 33
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, POWER,
TELEPHONES, ETC. ,
Returns covering 85 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   566,200 38
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   1,301,110 94
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   7,020,602 02
Total $8,887,913 34
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.        Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March.. .
April....
May	
June ....
3,406
3,483
3,648
3,922
3,860
4,142
1,355
1,379
1,405
1,440
1,461
1,504
July	
Auglist....
September.
October ...
November .
December..
4,097
3,999
4,079
4,041
3,865
3,752
1,532
1,517
1,482
1,446
1,438
1,478
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
* 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17 00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to * 6.
to     7.'
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
2S.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
1
1
3
10
9
5
208
8
137
14
225
180
147
462
52
138
227
159
855
721
461
267
77
52
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
10
200
67
2
408
200
24
128
42
225
54
72
Under
18 Yrs.
10
1
Apprentices.
16
210
67
1
3
2
3
10
Nationality of Employees.
Countrj- of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries.   	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
1,667
2,587
166
19
4
19
106
13
6
142
33
14
13
4
4
5
50
944
620
78
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 82 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1926.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  272,033 71
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      133,135 85
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,732,191 85
Total   $2,137,361 41
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.    Females. Month.        Males.    Females,
January .
February
March. ..
April....
May	
June
1,081
1,122
1,334
1,388
1,499
1,609
45
61
65
63
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November..
December .
1,698
1,647
1,657
1,509
1,386
1,210
53
43
35
29
35
40
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
F\)r Week of
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29 00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
toS 6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over..
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
2
3
28
25
54
35
71
67
80
59
155
94
79
82
27
92
46
52
23
56
15
158
96
63
18
84
3
4
34
28
23
17
23
18
22
18 Yrs.  Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
4
17
10
2
6
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
FYance 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
784
552
50
2
4
4
23
6
23
68
18
3
72
2
56
2
33
Apprentices.
Females.
51
8
1 F 34
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 4,521 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve  Months  ended December  31st,  1926:-
Offlcers, Superintendents, and Managers  $ 12,399,863 91
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  10,627,258 93
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  106,393,476 71
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary   $       701,743 16
Estimated pay-roll of employers in occupations covered by Department's
inquiry, and from whom returns were not received   6,350,000 00
Transcontinental Railways   13,701,493 76
Dominion and Provincial Government Workers   6,000,000 00
Wholesale and Retail Firms   4,000,000 00
Delivery,  Cartage and  Teaming,  Warehousing,  Butchers,  Moving-picture
Operators, Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation   5,500,000 00
Ocean Services and Express Companies   8,000,000 00
Miscellaneous   1,500,000 00
$129,420,599 55
45,753,236 92
$175,173,836 47
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January...
February .
March..   . .
April	
May	
June	
July	
August ...
September
October...
November
December.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia.	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries   	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
36,155
31,198
4,015
251
248
495
2,586
373
822
8,921
2,785
586
7,932
748
3,912
110
1,840
65,999
4,031
68,972
4,080
74,551
4,163
76,962
4,276
78,885
4,508
81.419
5,784
81,879
6,800
81,094
7,128
83,167
6,745
79,081
5,936
77,197
5,052
68,850
4,533
4,295
2,616
286
12
8
33
130
53
67
136
103
12
24
2
237
22
151
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only.)
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00	
S 6.99.
7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to' 2S.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Totals.
18 Yrs.
& over.
12
53
54
97
204
369
528
965
1,438
1,311
1,952
2,520
7,755
3,062
5,427
4,697
4,475
10,776
4,462
2,820
4,803
3,990
3,981
13,713
10,460
5,151
2,797
2,446
100,303
Under
18 Yrs.
79
100
152
168
116
269
124
133
113
121
54
30
33
9
19
12
13
1,927
18 Yrs.
& over.
27
22
165
144
76
59
88
544
1,006
1,074
1,075
744
337
465
246
471
288
192
59
102
104
52
42
15
18
59
22
Under
18 Yrs.
19
27
38
64
70
79
69
113
167
63
37
Apprentices.
95
72
77
108
47
105
27
60
29
23
21
10
18
15
19
4
7
6
16
7
15 ■
REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926. F 35
THE "HOURS  OF WORK ACT."
Members of the Board of Adjustment:
J. D. McNiven, Chairman.
T. F. Paterson. F. V. Foster.
The " Hours of Work Act" of 1923 went into effect on January 1st, 1925, and the period
now under review was therefore the second year of its administration by the Board of Adjustment.
The Board have pleasure in recording that the Act has been, generally speaking, very loyally
observed by those in control of industrial operations throughout the Province, and that it has
been a distinct benefit to many thousands of workers whose hours of labour it has materially
reduced. It was pointed out, at the time when the passing of this Act was contemplated, that
occupations where workers were able to build up strong organizations of their own were not
likely to be affected greatly by its provisions, as they had, for the most part, secured an eight
hours' working-day by their own efforts. In some of our leading industries, however, the case
was different, and long working-hours were extremely prevalent with large bodies of unorganized
workers. It is to these latter in particular that the Act has been found applicable, and its
administration during the past two years has had the effect of reducing their hours of labour
in a very important degree.
Complaints and Investigations.
Complaints of non-observance of the Act have reached the Board from time to time,
although, taking into account the diversified nature of our industries and the very wide area
over which they are distributed, it may fairly be said that such complaints were far less frequent
than might have been expected. Investigation into their causes has been made, either by
members of the Board personally or by the staff of the Department of Labour, and where
grounds of complaint were found to exist there has been little difficulty in having matters put
right. The amount of friction or misunderstanding in the working of the Act has, in fact, been
singularly small.
A rigid enforcement of an eight-hours' working-day, for all workers in all industries at all
times, was clearly not contemplated by the Legislature, which expressly permitted a large amount
of flexibility in bringing the principle of the legal limitation of working-hours into consonance
with the changing needs of industry. The Act itself contained qualifying clauses with this
object in view, and also empowered the Board of Adjustment to frame such exemptions to the
operation of the Act, both permanent and temporary, as might be found necessary. The permanent exemptions have been provided for in printed regulations issued by the Board, and which
will be found reproduced on another page of this report. They have a more or less general
application in the industries to which they relate. The temporary exemptions are those allowed
by the Board from time to time, to meet the requirements of individual employers in periods of
unusual stress or emergency.
Reasons foe granting Exemptions.
During the year 1926 there have been 176 of these temporary exemptions granted. The
majority of them have been in the interest of those engaged in one branch or another of the
lumbering industry. Perhaps the commonest ground of application for permission to work overtime has been in the case of lumber-manufacturers who had to meet urgent orders. Among
those situated at or near the Coast a frequent experience has been the arrival of a ship for
lumber a few days before it was expected, and the firm has been allowed to work overtime in
order that the cargo might be shipped with as little delay as possible. Exemptions have also
been' granted to lumber firms to make up time lost owing to a breakdown, or to permit of a
holiday being taken on another day. Overtime during one week was allowed to an employer
" on account of important delayed orders and bad condition of roads," and rehauling or replacing
of machinery was allowed to be done in one or two cases during extra hours. Unloading crews
were allowed to work overtime on account of congestion of cars and scow; an extra hour daily
was allowed to make up delayed orders due to burnt-out motor; and a similar concession given
to meet additional requirements for railway needs prior to grain movements. A ten-hour day
was allowed to an Interior firm during the fall, " on account of number of logs that must be cut
before the river is frozen up "; and the gang working a resaw was allowed overtime during one
week because of " inability to run gang-saw on account of large turbine being burnt." Other exemptions were given to firms in the garment-making, contracting, and miscellaneous
industries, chiefly owing to the pressure of urgent orders. A firm supplying containers for the
fruit-crop was allowed overtime on account of the early berry season, and a firm carrying on a
highly specialized industrial process was allowed overtime for two engineers until such time as
their period of employment exceeded 50 per cent, of the time the plant was operated. A sugar-
refinery asked for a fifty-four-hour week in certain departments during the busy four months of
late summer and fall, and the application was granted. For the (makers of some specialities
permits were given to cover the few weeks before Christmas. A construction firm was given
facilities for two shifts to complete contracts before heavy rains, and on another contract a firm
was allowed to work two shifts on a nine-hour basis " provided all men that can be employed are
placed on each shift."
Where the grounds upon which applications for exemption were made appeared to be
unreasonable or insufficient, such applications have not been acceded to. During the past year
forty-two applications were refused by the Board.
Shortening the Working-day.
That the Act has resulted in a considerable shortening of the working-day for those who
formerly used to be employed for an excessive number of hours appears to admit of rio doubt.
Abundant proof of this is to be found in the details as to working-hours which were collected
by the Department from 4,521 employers of labour in the past year. In former years these
figures were dealt with in the statistical section of the report, but this year it was considered
that they might be more appropriately referred to in this section dealing with hours of work.
The table which follows speaks for itself. In each industry the comparison is made between
1924, the year before the Act became operative, and last year. In nineteen of the twenty-five
groups there is a lowering of the average weekly working period, and those groups not so
affected either contain a considerable number of wrorkers who do not come under the provisions
of the Act, or else their normal working-hours, both before and since the passing of the Act,
have been fewer than forty-eight a week.
Effect m the Lumbering Industry.
It is in the lumbering group of industries, employing altogether something like 40,000 persons,
that the effect of the " Hours of Work Act" has chiefly been felt. In the logging branch the
average hours have been reduced from 50.79 to 48.71, or a difference of 2.08 a week. Sawmills
have witnessed an average reduction of working-time by 4.82 hours a week; shingle-mills, 7.12
hours; planing-mills, 5.10 hours; logging-railways, 1.95 hours; the branch embracing box-
factories, sash and door plants, etc., 2.62 hours; mixed plants, 4.98 hours; and pulp and paper
mills, 5.01 hours. In the lumbering group there are still some sections with an average slightly
over forty-eight hours1, and this is explained by the permanent and temporary exemptions already
referred to, but the figures given in the table below will show that, for the general body of
workers, the Act has meant a real reduction in the hour's of labour.
Apart from the lumbering industry there is an average reduction of 2.15 hours weekly in the
contracting group, and of 4.41 hours in the allied group of industries for the provision of
builders' materials. The other changes are less important, though, in reference to the increase
of 3.49 hours weekly in the oil-refining group, it should be noted that this group includes the
new fish-reduction plants, where the operations are in the nature of things both seasonal and
intermittent, and in which it would not be possible to insist upon a strict interpretation of
the Act. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 37
Changes in Hours of Work.
The following table shows the effect of the " Hours of Work Act" on the average weekly
working-hours.    The Act became effective January 1st, 1925.
Average Weekly
Working-hours.
1924.
1926.
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this  heading are tabulated
mineral-water  manufacturers   and  breweries
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime,
tiles, and firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers
in sand, gravel, and crushed rock
No. 3.—Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing. — Comprises only these trades
No. 4. Ooal-mining.—This group contains also the
operation of coke-ovens and coal-shipping clocks
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of
passenger and freight steamships, stevedoring,
tug-boats (both general and towing logs), and
river navigation, but does not include the opera
tion of vessels in the offshore trade
No. 6. Contracting.—Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-metal works ; also contractors for
industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating,
railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making returns
as building contractors, constructors of dry-kilns,
refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces, electrical
contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers,
and bricklayers
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc.—Includes the manufacture of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This group
includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-
milling, creameries and dairies, fish, fruit and
vegetable canneries, packing-houses, curers of ham
and bacon, blending of teas ; also manufacturers
of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces,
coffee, catsup, and spices
No. 9. Qarment-malcing.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute
and cotton goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods,
millinery and ladies' outfitting
No. 10.—House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the manufacture of furniture, beds and
bedding, springs and mattresses, upholstering, and
carpet and linoleum laying
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well as manufacturing of jewellery and
watches and optical instruments (where same is
carried on in a factory)
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes
these industries only
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.—
Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves,
harness, trunks, and leather Indian novelties;
also furriers and hide and wool dealers
Covered by the Act. In certain
continuous processes seven
eight-hour shifts a week
are allowed
Covered by the Act	
Covered by the Act..
This group comes under the
" Coal - mines Regulation
Act"
This group is not covered by
the Act
This  group  is  covered  by  the
Act
Covered by the Act. In certain
continuous processes seven
eight-hour shifts a week
are allowed. The manufacture of fertilizers from
fish is dealt with in Regulation 11
All branches of the agricultural,
horticultural, or dairying
industries are exempt from
the provisions of the Act.
(See also Regulations 10,
11)
This group is covered by the
Act
This   group  is  covered  by  the
Act.    (See Regulation 13)
Covered by the Act
Covered by the Act.
Covered by the Act.
49.04
51.51
44.26
47.90
56.76
47.72
52.44
53.67
45.12
46.01
43.65
46.66
47.88
47.91
47.10
44.46
48.00
53.29
45.57
51.49
51.82
44.81
45.14
43.96
46.54
47.26 F 3S
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
■
Changes in Hours of Work—Continued.
Average
Weekly
Workin
5-hours.
1924.
1926.
No. 14. Lumber   Industries.—In   this   group   are   in
Covered by the Act.   (See Regu
cluded :—
lations 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
Logging 	
50.79
48.71
Logging-railways  	
52.01
48.06
Mixed  plants   .'.	
54.01
49.03
Lumber-dealers           	
52.29
55.58
46.78
Planing-mills   	
50.48
Sawmills  .          ..               	
54.05
55.44
49.23
Shingle-mills 	
48.32
No. 15. Metal   Trades.—This   group   includes   marine
Covered    by    the    Act.       (See
44.36
45.81
blacksniithing,     oxy-acetylene     welding,     boiler-
Regulation 9)
making, iron and brass foundries, garages, vulcan
izing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and
electroplating;   also  manufacturers of handsaws,
nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill ma
chinery, and repairs to same
No. 16. Metal-mining. — Includes     all     metalliferous
This industry comes under the
53.12
55.43
mining
" Metalliferous Mines Act "
and is principally a seven-
day operation
No. 17. Miscellaneous   Trades   and   Industries.—Here
Covered  by  the  Act	
48.79
47.67
are grouped  returns  from trades which  are not
numerous  enough  to  warrant  special  categories.
They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents,
awning, brooms, paper boxes, and tin containers;
also cold storage
No. IS. Oil-refining.—Includes   also   the   manufacture
Covered by the Act.    In certain
47.97
51.46
of fish-oil
continuous processes seven
eight-hour   shifts   a   week
are allowed.    (See Regulation 11)
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing. ■— Includes   also   white-
Covered by the Act	
44.63
44.25
lead corroders and varnish-manufacturers
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes
Covered by the Act	
45.90
45.58
the  printing  and publishing  of newspapers,  job-
printing, paper-ruling, bookbinding, engraving and
embossing,   blue-printing,  lithographing,   draught
ing and map-publishing,  and the manufacture of
rubber and metal stamps
No. 21. Pulp   and   Paper   Manufacturing.—Comprises
Covered by the Act.    In certain
53.24
48.23
only firms engaged in that industry
continuous processes seven
eight-hour   shifts   a   week
are  allowed
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises   both   wooden-   and
Covered    by    the    Act.       (See
44:73
44.14
steel-ship  building  and  repairing,  also  construc
Regulation 9)
tion and repair of small craft, and salvage
No. 23. Smelting.—Comprises    firms    engaged    exclu
Covered by the " Labour Regu
55.95
53.21
sively in that industry
lations Act "
No. 24. Street-railways,   Gas,   Water,   Power,   etc.—
Covered by the Act.    In certain
46.12
45.83
This group comprises generating and distribution
continuous processes seven
of light and power, manufacture of gas, dissolved
eight-hour   shifts   a   week
acetylene   and   oxygen;    also   includes   gasolene
are allowed
lighting and heating devices, and supply of water
to municipalities
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of  (not elsewhere speci
Covered    by    the    Act.       (See
48.90
46.28
fied).—Here  are  grouped  manufacturers  of  sash
Regulation   15)
and  doors,  interior finish,  water-proof ply-wood,
veneer,   store   and   office   fittings,   barrels,   boxes,
ships'   knees,   ready-cut   buildings,   wooden   pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926. F 39
REGULATIONS, "HOURS OF WORK ACT, 1923."
Having regard to the nature and conditions of the industrial undertakings hereinafter mentioned,
the condition of employment and welfare of employees, the Board of Adjustment, after inquiry held
pursuant to the " Hours of Work Act, 1923," and subject to the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council, hereby exempts to the extent hereinafter stated from the provisions of the said Act the
industrial undertakings and workers engaged therein, hereinafter mentioned, namely:—
1. All persons employed in sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains shall be permitted to work one hour per day in excess
of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act; but the total hours worked in any week shall not
exceed fifty-four,
2. In the industrial undertakings referred to in the preceding regulation the limit of hours of
work thereby fixed may be exceeded by one hour per day on five days of each week for the purpose
of making a shorter work-day on one day of the week; but the total hours worked in any week shall
not exceed fifty-four.
3. In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills situate in that part of the Province lying east
of the Cascade Mountains, and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers,
the engineers, firemen, and oilers shall be permitted to work overtime to the extent of one and one-half
hours per day to cover preparatory and complementary work in addition to the said fifty-four hours
per week set forth in Regulation 1.
4. All persons employed in the lumber and shingle-manufacturing industries in booming operations, or in handling and transporting lumber for planing to fill urgent orders, or for shipping to fill
urgent orders, shall be permitted to work such hours in excess of the limit of hours of work prescribed
in section 3 of the Act as may from time to time be necessary.
5. All persons employed on night shifts in sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills situate in
that part of the Province lying west of the Cascade Mountains shall be permitted to work a total of
forty-eight hours each week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight hours each week in six nights; but
no night shift shall exceed ten hours: Provided that this regulation shall not apply in respect of
industrial establishments carried on by any employer unless the actual working-hours of each person
working for that employer, either by the day or by the piece, or otherwise, are limited to forty-eight
hours in the week.
6. All persons employed in the logging industry in booming operations, or in transporting logs on a
logging-railway, by motor-trucks, horses, flumes, or river-driving, or in transporting workmen or
supplies for purposes of the industry, or in the operation and upkeep of donkey-engines, shall be
exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the Act.
7. In all industrial undertakings which use steam as a motive power and which are operated
with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers shall be permitted to work overtime to the extent of one and one-half hours per day to cover preparatory or
complementary work in addition to the maximum hours of work prescribed by section 3 of the Act.
8. All persons employed as members of the shipping staff in industrial undertakings where shipping
operations are of an intermittent nature shall be permitted to work during such hours in excess of the
limit of hours of work prescribed in section 3 of the Act as may be necessary from time to time to
enable urgent shipping orders to be promptly executed.
9. All persons employed in shipyards, engineering-works, machine-shops, foundries, welding plants,
sheet-metal works, belt-works, saw-works, and all plants of a similar nature, when engaged on emergency repair-work only, are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the Act.
(Section 9 amended as above, June 23rd, 1927.)
10. All bakers employed in the baking industry shall be permitted to work ten hours per month in
excess of forty-eight hours per week, and all bakery salesmen or deliverymen twenty-six hours per
month in excess of forty-eight hours per week.
11. The fishing industry and all its attendant branches, including the canning or otherwise preserving of fish and the manufacture of by-products of fish, shall be exempt from the provisions of
the Act.
12. All persons employed in cook and bunk houses in connection with any industrial undertaking
shall be exempt from the provisions of the Act.
13. All persons employed in the manufacture of furniture, beds and mattresses, as operators of
picking and garneting machines, shall be permitted to work four hours per week in excess of the limit
of hours of work prescribed by section 3 of the Act during the following months: February, March,
April, May, September, October.
14. Two machine-tenders and two back-tenders in the employ of the Sidney Roofing and Paper
Company, Ltd., are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of this Act while engaged in the manufacture of paper, but only while so engaged.
15. All persons employed in the manufacture of wooden boxes or containers for shipment or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables shall be permitted to work such hours in excess of the limit
prescribed by section 3 of the Act, for the months of June, July, August, September, and October, as
may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders. F 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
16. The employer in every industrial undertaking in which additional hours are worked by any
person employed therein in pursuance of section 6 of the Act, or in pursuance of any of these regulations which permits a limited extension of working-hours in excess of the limit of hours of work
prescribed by section 3 of the Act, shall keep a record thereof in the following form, and shall on the
first day of each month file with the Board of Adjustment a duplicate of the record for the last
preceding month:—
Return s
Overtime worked under Authority of Section 6 and Section 9 of the
" Hours of Work Act, 1923."
Date.
Name of Employee.
Occupation.
No. of Hours
Overtime.
Reasons for such
Overtime.
This is to certify that the information supplied on this form is correct and includes the names of
all employees who have worked overtime during the month of. , 19	
(Name of employer.)
(Nature of industry.)
(Location of plant.)
17. Every employer shall notify, by means of the posting of notices in conspicuous places in the
works or other suitable place, where the same may readily be seen by all persons employed by hiin,
the hours at which work begins and ends, and, where work is carried on by shifts, the hours at which
each shift begins and ends, also such rest intervals accorded during the period of work as are not
reckoned as part of the working-hours. These hours shall be so fixed that the duration of the work
shall not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours of Work Act, 1923," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not be changed except upon twenty-four hours' notice of
such change posted as hereinbefore specified; and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption
granted by the Board of Adjustment under section 10 of the Act a like notice of the change in working-
hours shall be posted, which notice shall also state the grounds on which the exemption was granted.
19. In the manufacture of carbonated beverages all persons employed in the capacity of delivery
salesmen shall be permitted to work during the months of May, June, July, August, and until
September such hours in excess of the hours prescribed in section 3 'of the Act as may be necessary
to meet exigencies of the trade.
20. All persons employed in the lithographing industry shall be permitted to work during the
months of May, June, July, August, September, and October such hours in excess of the limit of hours
prescribed in section 3 of the Act as may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders. This
exemption is to be used only when sufficient competent help is not available.
21. All persons employed in the sawmills of the Pacific Mills, Limited, operating in connection
with the pulp and paper plant at Ocean Falls, shall be permitted to work twenty (20) hours per month
in excess of the hours prescribed in section 3 of the Act.
22. In any week in the year on which a public holiday (other than Sunday) occurs all persons
employed in laundries, cleaning and dyeing establishments, shall be permitted to work on the remaining
working-days of the week such hours in excess of the limit of hours of work prescribed in section 3 of
the Act as may be necessary to avoid serious interference with the business of the industry, but the
total hours worked in any such week shall not exceed forty-eight.
18. Where additional hours of work are allowed by any of these regulations to cover certain
classes of workers or special conditions set out in the regulations, such additional hours shall apply-
only in respect of the classes of workers and the special conditions so set out, and shall in no sense
be regarded as part of the normal working-day. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926. F 41
THE " MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
Members of the Board of Adjustment:
J. D. McNiven, Chairman.
T. F. Paterson. F. V. Foster.
This Act was passed by the Legislature in December, 1925, and is the first and, so far, the
only law of general application providing for a minimum wage for male workers that has been
passed by any legislative body in Canada, or, indeed, in North America.
The character of the measure is by this time fairly well known, but it may not be out of
place to indicate its main provisions very briefly. The administration of the Act is in the hands
of the Board of Adjustment, whose duty it is to ascertain the wages paid to employees in the
various occupations and fix a minimum wage. This is to be made legally effective by the issue of
an order or orders by the Board, and after the date specified iu the order it becomes illegal for
an employer to pay an employee a wage less than the minimum. Exceptions may be made in the
case of employees classified as handicapped, or part-time employees, or apprentices, but for each
such individual a permit is to be given by the Board, authorizing the payment of a wage less
than the ordinary minimum wage; and the number of employees to whom such lesser wage is
paid may be limited. Penalties of fine or imprisonment are provided in case of violation of the
Act, and an important clause is the one which enables an employee, having been paid less than
the legal minimum: wage to which he is entitled, to recover from his employer, in a civil action,
the amount by which he has been underpaid, with costs.
Dealing with the Lumbering Industry.
In view of the magnitude of the powers which had been placed in their hands, the Board
decided that it would be better to proceed by stages, rather than attempt to deal at once with the
wages question as touching all industries in the Province. Their first survey of the position convinced them that the industry containing the largest number of persons liable to be affected by
the provisions of the Act was that of lumbering. In this industry, taking into account all its
branches, there are in round figures about 40,000 persons employed in the Province.
As soon as the Board made it known that they were considering the fixing of a minimum
wage for the lumbering industry, they began to receive representations, both from employers and
employed, making proposals as to the amount which should be decided upon. Some of the
employers who were paying to their unskilled workers as little in some cases as 22% cents or
25 cents an hour urged upon the Board that conditions in the industry would not afford a higher
rate of pay. Lumber-workers, on the other hand, urged that the minimum wage should be fixed
so as to correspond with the cost of living, which, it was represented, could not be met on a wage
of less than 50 cents an hour. This contention was brought forward very emphatically at a
public meeting at Vancouver, at which the members of the Board met the lumber-workers of
that city and neighbourhood in April. In view of the close resemblance between conditions in
the lumbering industry here and in the States of Washington and Oregon, the Board paid a visit
to those two States early in the year, and obtained a large amount of information as to the rates
of wages being paid. The result convinced them that, while in some of the more highly-skilled
occupations the wages paid on the American side were lower than in British Columbia, the lowest
rates of pay received by lumber-workers in this Province were somewhat less than the pay for
similar work in adjacent American States.
Minimum Wage of 40 Cents an Hour,
With all these facts and arguments before them, the Board eventually came to the decision
that the minimum wage in the lumbering industry might fairly be set at 40 cents an hour.
In order to give the lumber interests time.to allow for the change in any new business
arrangements in which they might be entering, and also gradually to bring about any necessary
readjustments in their working force, the Board agreed to postpone until October 1st the
promulgation of the Order, thereby allowing for the one month's notice provided by the Act,
bringing the Order into force on November 1st.
The Order was published in the British Columbia Gazette on September 30th, 1926, and was
in the following terms:— F 42 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
"MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
Order establishing a Minimum Wage in the Lumbering Industry.
Pursuant to the provisions of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," the Board of Adjustment, constituted under the " Hours of Work Act, 1923," having made due inquiry, hereby orders:—
1. That where used in this Order the expression " lumbering industry " includes all operations
in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging camps, shingle-mills, sawmills, planing-mills, lath-mills,
sash and door factories, box-factories, barrel-factories, veneer-factories, and pulp and paper mills, and
all operations in or incidental to the driving, rafting, and booming of logs.
2. That, subject to the other provisions of this Order, the minimum wage for all employees in the
lumbering industry shall be the sum of forty cents per hour.
3. That the number of handicapped, part-time, and apprentice employees in respect of whom a
permit may be obtained pursuant to the said " Male Minimum Wage Act" authorizing the payment
of a wage less than the minimum wage otherwise payable under this Order shall, in the case of each
employer, be limited to ten per centum of his employees.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this twenty-ninth day of September, 1926.
J. D. McNiven, Chairman,
T. F. Paterson,
F. V. Foster,
Members of the Board of Adjustment.
Increased Pay for 9,000 Workers.
According to the figures available to the Board at the time the Order was made, there were
nearly 24 per cent, of the lumber-workers in all branches of the industry in the Province who
were being paid less than 40 cents an hour, and it was estimated that the Order would mean an
increase of pay for nearly 9,000 workers. This estimate was borne out in the figures laid before
the Board by a large number of employers who favoured the minimum being placed at a lower
figure, and who set forth that a 40-cent minimum would mean a substantial addition to the cost
of operating their mills. As against this was the possibility that a higher wage would attract a
better class of labour. It had come to the notice of the Board that there was a large body of
white labour employed in the industry at low wages, and that these men, having no higher rates
of pay in prospect, had not regarded this work as their permanent calling. This had meant the
absence of an incentive to attain a higher degree of efficiency, and also frequent changes of
personnel, both of which conditions had been a liability rather than an asset to the industry.
The fixing of a legal minimum wage, it was considered, would make for an improvement in these
matters.
Orientals in Mills and Camps.
Undoubtedly the position in the lumbering industry was complicated by the fact that a large
number of Orientals were employed, mainly, though not entirely, in the lower-paid occupations.
For several years past the numbers of these Oriental workers, if not declining, had failed to
increase in proportion to the growth of the industry, but they were still sufficiently numerous to
affect the general rates of pay. The Board found it necessary to go very thoroughly into this
aspect of the question.
Of the men employed in the lumbering industry in 1925, 20.46 per cent, were Asiatics, but the
percentage varied considerably in the various branches of the industry. In the logging camps
there were only 7.53 per cent.; on logging-railways, 14.22 per cent.; in planing-mills, 36.85 per
cent.; in sawmills, 33.73 per cent.; in shingle-mills, 46.85 per cent.; and in box-factories and
sash and door mills, 11 per cent. Sawmills employed the largest number, and here again the
percentage varied very considerably in different mills. The result of investigations made it
appear that a comparatively small number of large firms, situated in or within easy distance of
the bigger centres of population, had come to rely upon the Oriental to a much larger extent than
was common to the industry as a whole. It is not without significance that some of the loudest
complaints against the establishment of a minimum' wage were received from these quarters.
1 Alternative Proposal made by Manufacturers.
A proposal was made by the representatives of large lumbering interests that the minimum
wage should be fixed at a lower figure, or that the Order should apply only to a given percentage
of the employees, corresponding broadly to the number of white workers in the industry; the
lumbermen, on their part, to agree to the gradual reduction, and eventually the total elimination,
of the Oriental worker. The latter part of the proposal was not worked out in detail, as the
Board took the position that, apart from any cons!deration of its feasibility, the terms of the
Act precluded them from dealing with the question in this way.    The attitude taken by the REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 43
Board is that, under the present law, any orders made must apply impartially to all workers,
irrespective of nationality. At the time of the Order coming into effect, probably more than half
of the lumber-workers receiving less than 40 cents an hour were Orientals. Careful inquiry
showed that, while there had been no restriction upon an employer as to the nationality of his
workers or the rates of pay they were to receive, the white worker did, in fact, command about
a 25-per-cent. higher rate of pay than the Oriental worker following the same occupation. There
was common testimony that the greater efficiency of the white worker entitled him to this higher
pay; it seemed reasonable to expect that, if an employer found himself obliged to pay his
Oriental workers 40 cents an hour, he would be willing to pay his white workers more, or,
alternatively, that a large additional number of white workers would be introduced into the
industry.
The Case of Handicapped Workers.
As to the handicapped man, the part-time employee, and the apprentice, who were permitted
to be paid at a rate lower than the legal minimum, the Board laid it down that no man should
be placed upon the handicapped list except at his own request. In their Order the Board limited
the number of employees permitted to be paid by any employer a sum less than the minimum
wage to 10 per cent, and the permits issued up to the present have in no case approached that
number.
The Order went into force on November 1st, and was therefore operative only two months
of the period covered by this report. The months of November and December are normally a
very quiet period in the lumbering industry, and 1926 provided no exception to the rule; but it
does not seem reasonable to attribute any slackness in the industry to the minimum wage, as the
lumber-mills of Washington and Oregon, where there is no legal minimum wage, and which are
governed by very similar business conditions, were feeling the effects of trade depression as
much as our own.
Inspection of Mills on the Coast.
In the last two weeks of the year an inspection was made by officials of the Department of
Labour of thirty-one of the principal sawmills in the Coast area, and in each case an examination
of books was made.    From the data thus obtained the following report was made:—i
Summary of Number of Employees in Thirty-one Sawmills, covering ttie Pay-roll Period of
November, 1926, and a Comparison with the Figures submitted by the
same Firms m 1925.
1925. 1926.
Total employees  6,489 Total employees   7,111
Whites   3,582 Whites   4,672
Orientals   2,907 Orientals   2,439
This shows an increase in the total number of employees of     622
Decrease In Oriental employees     468
Increase in white employees '.  1,090
Increase of total employees = 9% per cent.
In 1925 there were 55.20 per cent, of white employees and 44.80 per cent, of Orientals.
In November, 1926, there were 65.70 per cent, of white employees and 34.30 per cent, of
Orientals.
These figures seem a sufficient commentary upon any apprehension that the chief result of
the Order would be to benefit the Oriental worker.
Validity of the Order challenged.
The validity of the Board's Order was early challenged by the employers, and on November
7th a test case was brought before the Magistrate in Vancouver, a summons being taken out
by the Board of Adjustment against a lumber firm in that city for failure to post the order of
the Board. Counsel for the defendant argued that an order which included one industry and
failed to include other industries was invalid, but the Magistrate overruled this contention and
imposed the minimum fine of $10.
The defendants lodged an appeal, which was heard by Chief Justice Hunter three days later.
Defendant's counsel again used the same argument as in the Court below, submitting that the F 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
intention and meaning of the Act provided for full inquiry being conducted by the Board into
every line of industry before fixing a minimum wage affecting any industry. The order affecting
the lumber industry was simply an interim order, which the Board did not possess the right to
enact.    The Board had no right to discriminate against one line of industry.
The Chief Justice disagreed with this contention, and held that the intention of the Act was
that the Board should hold inquiries and make orders from time to time. Otherwise, if
defendant's contentions were upheld, the Act would be unworkable.    He dismissed the appeal.
The Case in Court of Appeal.
The defendants took the case a further step, and a decision was given a few weeks later by
the British Columbia Court of Appeal. Chief Justice Macdonald upheld the ruling of Mr. Justice
Hunter, and in doing so was supported by Mr. Justice McPhillips, Mr. Justice Martin, and)
Mr. Justice M. A. Macdonald. Mr. Justice Galliher dissented. The effect of this ruling was to
affirm the conviction recorded against the defendant firm.    No further appeal was taken.
Reasons for dismissing the Appeal.
Chief Justice Macdonald, in giving judgment, said:—
" The prosecution is founded on the provisions of the ' Male Minimum Wage Act,' chapter 32
of the Acts of 1925, which enacts that every employer shall post up in his establishment a copy
of the order of the Board fixing a minimum wage for his employees. It was for a breach of the
Act, not for a breach of the order of the Board, that the appellants were convicted.
" Their answer to the charge, and the only one open to them, is that the order was made
without authority of the Act, and is therefore null and void. They submit that no obligation
was imposed upon them by the Act to post up a piece lof paper which in contemplation of law
had no existence. The question for decision, therefore, is not whether the Board made the right
order or the wrong order, but whether they had power to make the order, whether it were right
or wrong. Mr. Farris, appellant's counsel, made two submissions in support of his contention,
that the Board had no power to make any order in the terms of the one in question. He argued
that they were authorized to fix a minimum wage for those engaged in ' occupations,' not a
minimum wage for those engaged in ' industries,' and that the order is of the latter description.
Secondly, he argued that the Board were authorized to fix a minimum wage only for all those
engaged in an ' occupation' throughout the Province, not for some of them merely.
" I shall deal first with the latter contention, since, in my opinion, the answer to it will
determine the appeal.
" The question, it will be borne in mind, is not whether the order is right or wrongs but
whether it is or is not null and void. It is conceded that the Board has power to fix a minimum
wage for those in occupations to which the Act applies. It is also conceded that the Board is
authorized to make an order that all those employees, for instance, engineers, blacksmith, etc.,
throughout the Province shall receive not less than a stated wage. But it is denied that this
may be done, as it were, piecemeal. It must be applied to all engineers, etc., irrespective of the
particular industry to which they may be attached for the time being. That is the appellants'
contention. That contention, in my opinion, goes only to the legality of the order, not to the
powers of the Board to make it. The Board has power to make a general order. We will
assume that they mistakenly made a limited one; that order may be wrong but not a nullity.
The latter is the only question we are concerned with. The Act itself, I think, contemplates
successive orders and admits of the fixing of minimum wages for all employees engaged in
occupations connected with particular industries. It would be difficult otherwise to give effect
to the peculiar circumstance of separate employers contemplated by the Act.
" I now come to the first submission mentioned above, that the Board by the order complained of, wdthout authority fixed a minimum wage to be paid to employees in an ' industry,'
not of an ' occupation.' Agreeing with Mr. Farris, as I do, that the wage must have reference
to the occupation, not to the industry, it becomes necessary to examine into its substance, which
is the fixing of a minimum wage for all employees, whatever their several occupations may be,
that is to say, trades or callings, connected with the lumbering industry, at 40 cents an hour.
True, it does not specify those occupations by name, but it includes them all in the 40-cent rate.
Now, whether or not that is a fair way of dealing with them, having regard to the different
standards of wages, is not the question. The question is one of ultra vires or intra vires, not
merely right or wrong. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926. F 45
" I am satisfied that the Board had power to make the order in question, so that the
conviction ought to be affirmed.
" Whether or not they exercised their powers properly in the premises, I find it unnecessary
to say. I do not wish to go beyond what is strictly necessary for the decision of this appeal.
I would dismiss the appeal."
A Dissentient Judgment.
Mr. Justice Galliher's judgment was as follows:—
" I am of the view that the word 'occupation' in the second line of clause 3 of the ' Minimum
Wage Act,'  S.B.C.  1925,  chapter 32,  has  reference to  occupations  of employees  and not  to
industries  in  which the  employer may be engaged.     Section 13i of the Act would seem to
strengthen that view.
" Assuming this to be right, the Board are directed to fix a minimum wage for such
employees in the manner provided in the Act.
" The Board are further directed to make such inquiries as it deems necessary for the
purposes of the Act by section 4, and section 5 enacts: (1) After inquiry the Board may by order
establish a minimum wage for employees and may establish a different minimum wage for
different conditions and times of employment.
" Then there are other directions which do not affect the point raised here.
" The Board proceeded under the Act, made certain inquiries, and fixed a minimum wage
for those employed in lumber industries only, and objection is taken that they are in error in
dealing with the Act piecemeal.
" The point is, should the Board first proceed to make all inquiries relating to the employment of those engaged in different classes or occupations, fix a minimum wage for each class,
and then, or at the same time, if different conditions and times of employment require it in
certain cases, fix a different minimum wage in those cases, or can they proceed as they did here,
and fix a minimum wage for one industry before fixing any general minimum wage?
" My view of the ' Minimum Wage Act' is that the Board should first fix a minimum wage
for a class of occupations, say a carpenter, a blacksmith, or a stationary engineer, so that not
less than a stipulated wage may be paid to him in the carrying-on of his occupation generally,
no matter how favourable the conditions are, thus establishing a basis which shall be the
minimum in that occupation; then, having established that basis, the Board may, where the
employee is engaged in his occupation, where the conditions are hazardous to life or health
(to instance mining) or for other good reasons within the Act, grade up (if I may use the
expression) the minimum wage to the employee under such conditions.
" Once you have established your minimum wage for an occupation you cannot grade down;
if conditions call for it, it may be graded up, and to grade up you must have a basis or foundation
to start from.
" I do not say it is not open to other construction, but the best consideration I can give It
leads me to the above conclusion.    I would allow the appeal."
Cooks' Wages in Lumber Camps.
During the period when this report was in preparation for the press a case was heard at
Prince George by County Court Judge Robertson, in which two men employed as cooks by a
lumber company claimed that they were entitled to be paid the minimum wage. The Judge held
that they were not so entitled, as employment of this nature was not included in the order made
by the Board. The legal argument in the case turned upon the question of whether the occupation of a cook was " incidental to " the lumbering industry.
The plaintiffs laid the circumstances before the Board of Adjustment, stating that, while
they were dissatisfied with the ruling of the County Court Judge and desired to enter an appeal,
they were not financially in a position to do so. Judging that it was desirable to have an
authoritative decision on the matter, the Board instructed counsel to argue the case on behalf
of the plaintiffs in the Court of Appeal. This Court, consisting of Chief Justice Macdonald,
Mr. Justice McPhillips, Mr. Justice Galliher, and Mr. Justice M. A. Macdonald, unanimously
reversed the decision of the County Court Judge, and held that the plaintiffs were entitled to
be paid the legal minimum wage as laid down in the order affecting the lumbering industry.
Other Industries and the Act.
In the last few months the Board have been conducting investigations into conditions in
other industries, with a view to issuing orders extending the operation of the Act. F 46 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
LABOUR DISPUTES IN 1926.
The absence of labour disputes of a serious character was again a welcome feature in the
industrial life of the Province during 1926. The more amicable conditions established in 1925
were continued in the past year, and for 1926 there were recorded thirteen disputes involving a
stoppage of work. These affected 1,749 workmen and entailed a loss of 28,016 working-days.
This compares with 15 disputes, affecting 3,572 workmen, and a loss of 23,300 working-days in
1925, whereas in 1924 no less than 223,876 working-days were lost in nine disputes.
An Injunction and Damages.
Owing to the discharge of two employees, which they held to be contrary to an unexpired
annual agreement, seven stage-hands at a Vancouver theatre struck work on January 9th. The
manager claimed to have replaced the strikers by other workers, but the union declared the
strike still in existence. Early in March an injunction was granted restraining the strikers
from interfering with and damaging the business of the theatre by distributing literature to the
effect that the theatre was unfair to organized labour. In the following month the manager of
the theatre asked to have the injunction made permanent, and also for $700 a week damages for
injury to his business. The Court granted the permanent injunction and awarded $1,750
damages against the union. At the end of May the theatre closed down indefinitely, but the
members of the stage-hands' union appealed against the Judge's decision.
Important Legal Decision.
The case, that of " Schuberg versus Local No. 118, International Alliance Theatrical Stage
Employees et al.," was afterwards heard by the British Columbia Court of Appeal, consisting of
the Chief Justice, Mr. Justice McPhillips, Mr. Justice M. A. Macdonald, and Mr. Justice Martin,
and their decision was rendered on January 4th, 1927. The decision of Mr. Justice Gregory in
the Supreme Court was upheld by the Chief Justice and Mr. Justice McPhillips, with Mr. Justice
Martin and Mr. Justice M. A. Macdonald dissenting. The effect of this division was to confirm
the injunction and award of damages given by Mr. Justice Gregory.
The evidence given in the case was briefly as follows: Schuberg, the owner of the Empress
Theatre in Vancouver, who had for a long time employed seven stage-hands, gave notice that
after a certain date he would employ only five. The stage-hands and their union objected to
this change, and a strike followed. The owner then engaged five new employees, and the union
thereupon placed men at the entrance to the theatre, who distributed handbills addressed to
" the theatre-going public of Greater Vancouver," stating in large type that " the Empress
Theatre is unfair to organized labour." The union also caused motor-cars and sandwich-men
displaying signs and banners bearing the same statement to parade before the entrance to the
theatre. During the continuance of these acts the volume of business at the theatre was
materially reduced.
The finding of Mr. Justice Gregory in the Supreme Court was that the actions of the union
were done with the intention of injuring the plaintiff's business, and in the hope that to save
himself from such injury he would return to the employment of the seven stage-hands. He
therefore granted the injunction with damages.
In the Court of Appeal it was contended that the Provincial Act relating to trade-unions
made picketing a lawful act. Omitting words not material, sections 2 and 3 of the Act are
as follows:—
" 2. No . . . trade-union . . . shall be enjoined . . . nor shall it or its funds
... be made liable in damages for communicating to any workman, . . . labourer, employee, or person facts respecting employment or hiring by or with any employer, producer, or
consumer or distributer of the products of labour or the purchase of such products, or for
persuading or endeavouring to persuade by fair or reasonable argument, without unlawful
threats, intimidation, or other unlawful acts, such workman, . . . labourer, employee, or
person, to refuse to become the employee or customer of any such employer, producer, consumer,
or distributer of the products of labour."
" 3. No such trade-union . . . shall be enjoined or liable in damages, nor shall its funds
be liable in damages, for publishing information with regard to a strike   ...   or other '   .   '
REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926. F 47
labour grievance or trouble, or for warning workmen    ...    or other persons from purchasing,
buying, or consuming products produced or distributed by the employer of labour."
The above sections were referred to by both Judges who gave judgment in the Court of
Appeal.    Chief Justice Macdonald, in holding that the appeal should be dismissed, said:—
" The Act of this Province, chapter 25S, R.S.B.C, does not assist the defendants. It would
protect them only against civil liability for the act of communicating information to workmen
concerning the hiring with the employer and against liability for ' persuading or endeavouring to
persuade by fair and reasonable argument without unlawful threats, intimidation, or other
unlawful acts,' and against liability for warning workmen against seeking employment from the
recreant employer. It does not protect them from liability for conspiring to injure the employer
in his business and from intentionally injuring him."
Mr. Justice M. A. Macdonald in his judgment gave prominence to the right of " warning "
given in section 3.    He said:—
" It is not necessary that the ' warning' should be based on ' fair or reasonable argument'
or confined to ' communicating facts' as in section 2. If such was intended these words should
have been incorporated in section 3. If the handbills and banners answer the general description
of a warning to intending patrons immunity is secured. One might suggest that the warning
should not mislead the public as to the true facts—that it should not contain the expression of a .
biased opinioii or make unwarranted assertions. But these considerations concern the lawmaking body, not the Courts. I must hold that,- however crude the means employed, the handbills and banners did convey a warning of the existence of a strike or of a labour grievance, and
that it affords an answer to the respondent's claim. It cannot be said that any one reading these
handbills would not receive a warning that a trade dispute was going on. He may not, indeed
will not, get the true facts in regard to it, but he does get a warning. . . . Nor do I think
(without discussing whether or not the element of malice is an ingredient) that acts performed
pursuant to legislative permission should be regarded as done maliciously."
Musicians, Vancouver.
In sympathy with the stage-hands at the same theatre, six musicians went out on January
11th, complaining also that an agreement had been violated. When the theatre closed down
at the end of May employment conditions were no longer affected by the dispute.
Moulders, Vancouver and New Westminster.
This dispute, which affected the moulders employed at about a dozen shops in Vancouver
and New Westminster, began on March 31st. Previous to the strike, moulders and core-makers
were paid at the rate of $5.70 a day of eight hours, and the men asked that the daily rate be
advanced to $6.50. A committee of the International Moulders' Union approached the employers,
with a view to a discussion with a similar committee, but the employers stated that they preferred to deal with the men in their respective shops. Later the employers offered an advance
of 15 cents a day, and, this being refused, after further deliberation they offered another 15
cents, to make the wage $6 a day. This also was considered unsatisfactory, and on March 31st
about 100 men went on strike. The stoppage lasted for over four months, though from time to
time small groups of men were taken back on their own terms. Efforts to bring about a joint
conference were of no avail, and on August 12th the strike was called off by the union.
Higher Pay for Shipyard-workers.
Early in March the shipyard-workers of Vancouver and district formulated a request for
an increase in wages; the carpenters, who were receiving $6.50 for an eight-hour day, asked for
$7, and the caulkers asked for an increase from $6.75 to $7.50. On March 8th they gave the
employers twenty days' notice to comply with these demands. The employers, however, refused
to consider an increase of pay until the completion of work on existing contracts, and also complained that in some cases the class of workers supplied was unsatisfactory. When the notice
for an increase expired the men agreed to continue work at the existing rates for another thirty
days. Negotiations followed and were carried on until May 8th without any stoppage of work.
On that date an agreement was made on the basis of a 50-cent per day increase for both classes,
but the new rate not to become effective on existing contracts until August 1st. On new contracts
and repair-work the new scale became operative on May 15th. F 48 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Painters, Vancouver.
The demand for a five-day week was the main feature of a dispute between the painters of
Vancouver and their employers, wmich commenced on April 12th. Other demands were for an
increase of pay from $6.50 to $7.50 a day and a closed shop. There were 220 men affected by
the strike, which commenced on April 12th. Some of the employers met the situation promptly
by offering $7 a day, with the question of a five-day week put back for further consideration.
This led to a partial resumption of work, and in the course of a few days most of the men had
gone back, no general agreement as to wages being reached.
Web Pressmen, Vancouver.
A dispute affecting eighteen web pressmen occurred in one of the newspaper offices in Vancouver, over an arrangement for changing the hours of employment on Saturday so as to do
away with overtime on the Sunday paper. The normal working-hours had been from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m., with overtime rates for those working from 6 p.m. to midnight. The change had the
effect of dividing the staff into three crews, the 'first working from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., the second
beginning work at 11 a.m., and the third at 1 p.m., the second and third crews finishing the run
on the Sunday paper with little or no overtime. The dispute, which began on Saturday afternoon, April 24th, was settled at a conference between the employer and the men's international
representative, it being agreed that the men .should work on the new schedule. Work was
resumed on the Monday morning, no Sunday paper having been issued.
Carpenters and a Five-day Week.
A proposal was put forward early in February by certain of the trade-unions in Vancouver
and district, affecting chiefly the building trades, in favour of the introduction of a five-day
working-week; in other words, for the suspension of work on Saturdays. Notice was given by
the Carpenters' Union that their members would inaugurate the new plan on Saturday, May 1st.
It was argued that the effect of the change would be to spread work over a longer period, thereby
stimulating activity in the winter months; and also that the working-man was entitled to a rest
on Saurday. On April 20th the Vancouver, New Westminster, and District Trades Council
passed a resolution approving of the principle of a five-day working-week.
The demand came at a very busy period in the building trade and contractors strongly
opposed it. Notices were posted on the jobs that all carpenters were expected to turn up for
work on Saturday, May 1st, as usual, and that if they did not do so their names would be
removed from the pay-rolls. The employers also stated that men who were prevented from
working on that day " by some untoward circumstance," but who would report on the Monday
morning and give an undertaking to work five and a half days in the week, would be kept in
employment. Some of the contractors on small-house building were said to be willing to concede
the five-day week, but all the employers with large contracts on hand refused to give in. If, they
further said, a higher daily wage were to be secured as the result of the five-day week becoming
general in Vancouver, it would result in more men coming to the city, with consequently less
employment than ever to go round during the winter months.
On Saturday, May 1st, about 1,000 carpenters in Vancouver and district absented themselves
from work and a large number answered a roll-call at the Labour Hall. It was stated by firms
engaged on large contracts that the stoppage had been general, though the carpenters had not
taken their tools off the jobs when they left work on the Friday. In addition to the 1,000 union
carpenters who had left work, it was stated that there were 200 non-union men out, and that
250 brick-layers and SO floor-layers were also affected.
On the Monday morning the men turned up for work, but in answer to the question, " Are
you prepared to work more than five days a week, or will you continue to stay off on Saturdays?"
nearly all of them answered that they were working a five-day week and no more. In accordance
with the contractors' expressed intention, superintendents on the large contracts did not allow
the men to start work, but on many of the house-building jobs in the suburbs work went on just
as usual. As to the extent of the dispute, it was stated by union representatives that not more
than 100 carpenters were being kept out of their jobs, but these were joined by a number of
steel-workers, plasterers, and others, though denial was given to a statement that a sympathetic
strike had been called. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926. F 49
As an offset to the demand for a five-day week, the next step was taken by the contractors,
and was in the form of an offer to increase the pay of carpenters from $7 to $7.50 a day, on a
working-week of five days and a half. A meeting of the men was called at short notice and was
attended by 528. On a vote being taken, they rejected the employers' offer by a majority of
about seven to two. However, on May 11th a conference was held between representatives of
the General Contractors' Association and the Carpenters' Union, when the proposition was put
forward for an immediate advance of pay to $7.50 for an eight-hour day and a continuance of
the working-week of five and a half days until May 1st, 1927. This was agreed to and the strike
was immediately called off, the parties agreeing to confer together sixty days before the lapse
of the agreement, to discuss wages and conditions for the following year. Work was resumed
on Wednesday, May 12th.
Firemen and Engineers, New Westminster.
Six firemen and engineers employed at a sawmill in New Westminster struck work on May
17th, a request for increased wages having been refused. The rates in effect were from $70 to
$150 per month, and the scale requested by the men ranged from $120 to $200 per month. By
the end of June the strikers had obtained work elsewhere and there was no formal settlement
of the dispute.
Carpenters, Victoria.
The rate of pay for carpenters in Victoria and district, which was $6 per day, was the
subject of a complaint by the Carpenters' Union, who pointed out that this wage was1 lower
than was being paid to carpenters In the other leading cities of Western Canada. Negotiations
for an increase were opened early in the spring, and later a specific request was made for an
increase to $7 per day, to be effective from May 17th. In order that longer notice might be given
to outside contractors, the date was afterwards changed to June 1st.
At a meeting of carpenters on May 22nd it was reported that the employers, or those of
them who were members of the Builders' Exchange, had declined to meet the representatives of
the men to discuss the proposed increase. By resolution it was decided to notify the Builders'
Exchange that the men were prepared to sign a twelve months' agreement providing for a $7 a
day wage. Failing a satisfactory reply before May 31st, the resolution called for a strike to
commence on June 1st.
The men took the position from the beginning of the dispute that an agreement with the
Builders' Exchange must be an essential part of any settlement. This was somewhat of a complication, as certain of the employers were better able than others to carry on their operations
without the work of union carpenters. On the second day of the strike it was reported that
eighty men had left work, and a number of non-union men made common cause with the union
strikers, bringing the total of those affected up to 130. Through the efforts of Mr. J. D.
McNiven, Deputy Minister of Labour, representatives of employers and employed were brought
together for a conference on June 4th. The outcome was an offer by the Builders' Exchange to
pay $6.50 for an eight-hour day, the new rate to commence on August 1st, and to be dependent
upon the men returning to work immediately.
The carpenters took a ballot on this offer, and rejected it by a unanimous vote, also passing
a resolution to stand out solidly for $7 a day and an agreement. The strike proceeded without
further incident for two weeks longer, and then Mr. McNiven called another meeting of the
parties on June 23rd. This was attended by the men's committee, but not by a full representation of the employers, and no immediate decision was possible; but another meeting was
arranged for the following day, and on this occasion an agreement was signed by the Builders'
Exchange and the Carpenters' Union.
The agreement was for an immediate resumption of work with an increase of pay from $6
to $6.50 per day, and a further increase to $7 at the beginning of September. Work was resumed
on June 25th.
Stage Employees, Victoria.
Three employees at a theatre in Victoria left work on June 23rd over a dispute as to the
number of men required to do the work. It was contended by the manager that the three men,
whose total wages amounted to $124 a week, were doing work which he was able to do himself
with one assistant and he asked that the staff be cut to two men, but this was not agreed to, and
the men's places were filled.
4 F 50 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Pile-drivers, Vancouver and New Westminster.
All the pile-drivers and bridge-workers on the Lower Mainland went on strike on July 1st
and work was tied up on many contracts. Their demand was for an increase in wages of $1 a
day. The employers offered to concede 50 cents a day, but this was not acceptable to the men
as a body, though in a few instances work was resumed on that footing. The dispute continued
until August 10th, when those of the men who were still out on strike agreed to accept the 50-cent
increase and work was resumed.    Eighty men were affected by the dispute.
Cannery Employees, New Westminster.
Some of the employees at a fruit and vegetable cannery who were working part time at
piece-rates, complained that their earnings were very low, and refused to begin work on July 6th.
They were told that they must begin work or lose their employment, and most of them returned
to work, but eleven of them were discharged.
Musicians, Vancouver.
The International Federation of Musicians having called a strike in a number of cities in
the United States, to enforce a demand for higher wages, the same terms were asked for on
behalf of the musicians employed at theatres in Vancouver. It appeared very likely that there
would be a strike on September 6th, the date when the men sought to have the new wage scale
brought into effect, but negotiations at the last moment brought about a settlement. As a result
the minimum weekly wage for musicians in first-class legitimate houses was fixed at $80 a week,
with a minimum of $06 a week in big picture-houses, and of $48 a week in smaller houses.
Electrical Workers, Vancouver.
The linemen and groundmen working for a firm in Vancouver, to the number of seventeen,
complained of the conditions under which they were working, one of them being that they were
expected' to cut a line which had been constructed by non-union workmen. They left work on
October 1st and remained out until the 18th. Settlement was reached as the result of a conference, the employers conceding an increase of pay of 25 cents a day, to $7.75 for eight hours, and
signing an agreement accepting the workmen's conditions.
Shingle-sawyers, Vancouver District.
About 90 men employed by three shingle firms in the Vancouver District left work respectively on November 5th, 8th, and 10th. The wages of shingle-sawyers had varied from time to
time according to trade conditions, and at the beginning of November the employers submitted
that owing to business depression they could no longer afford the rates of pay to which the men
had been raised earlier in the year. There are conflicting accounts as to the course of events
in the following few days. Employers submitted that the sawyers, after tacitly accepting a
10-per-cent. cut, which would have reduced their wages in some cases from $10 to $9 a day,
suddenly refused to go on working. At one of the mills, however, the men's statement was to
the effect that " the sawyers were notified on November 9th that a cut In wages was made to
take effect November 1st. We were notified of a cut after we had worked eight days, and when
we asked to discuss the matter we were simply told to either take a cut or go to the office and
get our pay."
When the dispute had been in progress about a week the men agreed to accept a wage cut
in accordance with the employers' terms. At one mill they resumed work on November 15th.
At a second mill a Chinese crew was put on, but after the cut was accepted by the white men
some of the latter were taken back from time to time. The third firm, who complained of the
peremptory manner in which the men had struck, said they considered they were to some extent
under an obligation to the six Oriental sawyers who had been taken on, though they preferred
white men for the work. At the end of the year no formal settlement of the strike had been
reported, conditions in the industry generally being rather unsettled. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 51
Summary op Labour Disputes, 1926.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
O SfH
Stage-hands—
Vancouver-
Musicians—
Vancouver..
Moulders—
Vancouver and New
Westminster
Shipyard-workers-
Vancouver	
Painters—
Vancouver..
Web Pressmen-
Vancouver..
Carpenters—
Vancouver..
Firemen and Engineers-
New Westminster...
Carpenters—
Victoria..
Stage Employees-
Victoria	
Commenced January 9th, at one theatre in Vancouver, owing
to the management having reduced the working staff from
seven to five. Dispute continued until the theatre closed
down at the end of May. Legal proceedings arising out of
the dispute are referred to on a previous page
Commenced January 11th, in sympathy with stage-hands in
above-mentioned dispute. Continued until the theatre
closed down
Commenced March 31st. The men asked for an advance of
80 cents a day. The employers offered 30 cents, but as the
difference could not be adjusted the men left work.
From time to time some of the men were taken back on
their own terms, and on August 12th the strike was called
off
Carpenters and caulkers at shipyards in Vancouver asked for
an increase, respectively from $6.50 to $7 and from $6.75
to $7.50 a day. They gave notice of their demands to
expire on March 28th, but after that date negotiations were
conducted without stoppage of work. The dispute was
then settled on the basis of a 50-cent daily increase for
both classes, not, however, to become effective on existing
contracts until August 1st
Commenced April 12th. The men demanded a five-day
working-week, an increase in pay from $6.50 to $7.50 a
day, and a closed shop. Some employers granted an increase of 50 cents a day, but work was resumed in a few
days without a general agreement
Commenced April 24th. Affected one newspaper office in
Vancouver, the men objecting to a new arrangement of
hours to do away with overtime. Settled by conference,
the men agreeing to work on the new schedule
The men desired to inaugurate a five-day working-week and
absented themselves from work on Saturday, May 1st.
Many contractors refused to allow them to resume work
except on the basis of a five-and-a-half-day working-week,
but announced that they were willing to consider an increase of pay of from $7 to $7.50 daily. On May 11th the
dispute was settled on those terms
Commenced May 17th and affected men employed at one sawmill only. Increased wages were demanded and refused.
No formal settlement
Commenced June 1st. The men asked for an increase from
$6 to $7 a day, secured by a twelve months' agreement.
On June 24th an agreement was reached,. the terms being
an immediate advance of 50 cents a day and a further
similar advance in two months
Commenced June 23rd, over a question as to the number of
men required to do the work at one theatre. Men's places
filled
Carried forward	
160
850
720
12,000
220
18
1,000
500
36
7,500
130
200
2,600
30
1,550
24,436 F 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Summary of Labour Disputes, 1926—Continued.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
to
CD
0>    .
o au
d 3sh
M
^ B
S3
.2"
at51»
Eh.S'O
1,550
80
11
18
90
24,436
Pile-drivers—■
Vancouver and New
Westminster
Cannery Employees—
New Westminster
Electrical Workers—
Commenced July 1st.    Men requested a wage increase of $1
a day and the employers offered 50 cents.    On August 10th
the men agreed to accept employers' offer
Commenced July 6th.    Some  of the female employees at a
fruit and vegetable  cannery complained that their  piecework earnings were very low and left work.   The majority,
however, went back on employer's terms
Commenced October 1st.    Men in employ of one firm complained of working conditions, and also objected to cutting
a  line  constructed  by  non-union  workmen.    Returned  to
work on  their own terms on October 18th,  and also  received an increase in pay of 25 cents a day
Commenced November 5th.    Owing to depression in the industry, employers proposed a cut in wages, which the men
refused to accept.    After a week's stoppage the men agreed
to a cut of 10 per cent., but the resumption of work in
some cases was indefinitely delayed
2,000
110
270
Shingle-sawyers—
Vancouver District
1,200
1,749
28,016 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 53
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
Superintendent.
Superintendent.
Superintendent.
Superintendent.
General Superintendent Jas. H. McVety, 714 Richards Street, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver,  714  Richards  Street ]
Vancouver, 53 Powell Street  J. W. S. Dickson,  Superintendent.
Vancouver (Women's Branch), 714 Richards Street j
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets ) W v*j « -a  «        • *    j    ,
■ir, *    •    ,-nr ,   t.        i v   t       , j r.        ui      C4.     j.   > H- Crisford, Supermtendent.
Victoria (Women's Branch), Langley and Broughton Streets (
New Westminster M. Standbridge,
Nanaimo J. T. Carrigan
Kamloops J. H. How,
Penticton A.  Gilley,
Nelson G. Anderson, Superintendent.
Cranbrook Wm.  Robson,  Superintendent.
Revelstoke H.  N.  Coursier, Superintendent.
Prince Rupert J.  M.   Campbell, Superintendent.
Prince  George G.   C.   Sinclair, Superintendent.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This statement, covering the work of the British Columbia branch of the Employment Service
of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, is the eighth annual report and covers the
calendar year 1926.
There are fourteen offices in operation in the. Province, one less than during the previous
year, the Vernon office having been closed at the end of November, changes in industrial conditions in the northern end of the Okanagan Valley making a full-time office no longer necessary.
A temporary office was operated at Kelowna from June to November, during the fruit season,
and if present conditions continue temporary offices will be opened in both Vernon and Kelowna
during the summer months to take care of the labour requirements of fruit-growers and connected
industries. The offices in operation are located as follows: Vancouver (3), Victoria (2), New
Westminster, Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Prince George, Cranbrook, Nelson, Revelstoke, Kamloops,
and Penticton. In Vancouver and Victoria separate offices are provided for the employment of
women, and special sections for dealing with the employment problems of men handicapped
through service overseas or injured in industrial life.
Summary of Labour Conditions.
Measured by the number of persons employed throughout the Province, conditions during the
period under review were practically as good as those obtaining during 1925, when 10 per cent,
more persons were employed than during any previous year since 1920. There was, however, a
surplus of labour in every part of the Province, and severe unemployment conditions in the
Coast area during the winter months.
Despite steps taken by municipal authorities to discourage an influx of unemployed into
the Coast cities during the winter, they came in large numbers, and it became necessary to
provide a certain amount of relief-work for residents whose chances of employment were greatly
reduced or entirely wiped out owing to the competition of so many new-comers. The situation
became easier during the summer, but the surplus was sufficient to permit of the transfer of
7,400 harvesters to the Prairie Provinces during the month of August.
During the year the offices of the Employment Service placed a slightly larger number of
persons than during 1925, a shrinkage of 20 per cent, in the number of harvesters sent out being
more than compensated for by the increased number of placements within the Province. With
the exception of a comparatively few positions for which workmen with special qualifications
were required, principally in new industries or for operating imported machinery in existing
plants, the Service was able to supply all the help required.
The Handicap sections of the Vancouver and Victoria offices continued the good work of
the previous year and, despite the large number of handicapped workers engaged in industry,
were able to exceed the number of placements recorded for the previous year.   The number of F 54 . DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
new arrivals from other parts of Canada and the British Isles, however, exceeded the number
placed in positions with a prospect of permanence, so that no appreciable reduction in the number
of unemployed has been effected.
Business transacted during the Year.
On other pages the details of the business transacted are shown by a chart and tables, the
figures showing the work by offices and by months. The total number of placements show a
slight increase as compared with the previous year, a contraction of 20 per cent, in the number
sent to other Provinces being overcome by an increase in placements within the Province. Uncertain and unsatisfactory weather conditions in the Prairie Provinces accounted for the reduction in number of harvesters placed, many of those who enlisted for this work the previous
year not having made sufficient surplus to justify the time, labour, and expense involved.
Although there was a large surplus of labour in every part of the Province throughout the year,
the number of employers who prefer to hire their help through the offices of the Service rather
than interview applicants on the job is steadily increasing. A feature of interest was the
number of persons transferred from one office zone to another, the Vancouver offices having
forwarded 1,2S0 persons to fill orders received by other offices which could not be filled in the
localities where the help was required. The number of persons placed during the year was
50,022, and of this number 31,066 were sent to " regular " positions, the duration of employment
'ranging from one week to permanence. The balance, 18,956, filled " casual " vacancies, where
the work was expected to last less than one week, but often developed into employment at
frequent intervals or permanent employment. The number of women placed was 9,295, and of
this number 4,315 filled " regular " positions; the balance, 4,980, went to " casual " employment,
principally in the domestic service branch.
The work of the Handicap sections of tbe Victoria and Vancouver offices, although included
in the aggregate figures, is dealt with separately in another paragraph.
The chart on page 55 shows the rise and fall of applications for employment, employers'
orders, and placements of applicants by weeks. Unlike previous years, the fluctuations are less
marked, the only exception being during the dispatch of harvesters to the Prairie Provinces.
Harvest-labourers for Prairie Provinces.
The arrangement with the railways and the Employment Service of Alberta and Saskatchewan, whereby labourers are given reduced rates of travel, was continued during the season of
the period under review. The number, however, was approximately 20 per cent, less than during
1925, the reduction resulting from unsatisfactory returns during the previous season due to
uncertain and bad weather conditions. Of the 7,336 persons sent, Alberta received 2,547 men
and 237 women, Saskatchewan 4,164 men and 304 women, and Manitoba 70 men and 24 women.
There were 3,641 of the number went in possession of letters from farmers by whom they had
previously been employed, offering employment for the season. From 294 rural communities
2,643 settlers were sent, an increase of 412 over the previous year. From the increasing number
of settlers on the land in this Province who are taking advantage of the opportunity to earn
money during the slack season on their own places, it is a safe conclusion that the harvest
movement is a material aid to permanent land colonization in this Province. As usual, the
demand from the Prairie Provinces for men from British Columbia was much greater than the
supply, but again, unfortunately, the weather conditions were such that many of the men did not
do as well financially as expected.
Seasonal Labour in Agriculture.
Ever since the growing of small fruits on the southern end of Vancouver Island and the
Lower Mainland has reached the commercial stage, the problem of obtaining sufficient help to
pick the crops has been more or less acute. The date when the help is required depends entirely
on weather conditions, and uncertainty on this point, coupled with low rates of remuneration,
makes the recruiting of sufficient help very difficult. The growth of hops on a large scale in the
Fraser Valley is likely to accentuate the situation, unless the hop-picking comes at or near the
end of the berry-picking season. On the other hand, there is always a plentiful supply of female
help for canneries and other branches of industry in which the minimum wage rates are fixed
by the Minimum Wage Board, and from this it would appear that the regulation of hours and REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 55
Chart showing Applications, Vacancies, and Placements Week by Week during 1926.
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F 56 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
wages is the solution of the problems confronting those engaged in the fruit and hop industry on
the Lower Mainland.
In the Okanagan Valley and the Kootenay and Crowsnest Districts the supply of local labour
has been sufficient to meet the requirements, supplemented by quite a number of persons who go
into the Interior for a change during the summer months.
Re-establishment or Handicapped Men.
Since December 1st, 1924, the work of placing handicapped ex-service men in employment,
previously carried on by the Dominion Government Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, has been in the charge of the Employment Service, the expenses for additional staff
required for this work being paid by the Dominion Government, it being the view of Dominion
officials that the work can be better taken care of by a Department engaged exclusively in
employment problems. Under the new arrangement special sections were created in the Vancouver and Victoria offices, and the employees in these sections devote their full time to the task
of finding suitable employment for handicapped men registered for work, and finding suitable
men to fill vacancies where employers are willing to accept men whose efficiency has been
reduced by injuries received overseas or in industry.
Early in the year a Citizens' Committee was formed in Vancouver for the purpose of providing employment for handicapped ex-service men, the movement being supported by many-
leading citizens and the newspapers of the city. The organization also met with the approval
of the Department of Soldiers Civil Re-establishment, and a grant of $150 per month was made
for a period of three months towards the salary of the secretary. The objects of the organization
were stated as follows:—
" The whole scheme is to have as its objective the stimulation of as wide interest as
possible in order to provide greater opportunities for the employment of handicapped ex-service
men, that the secretary shall work in the closest co-operation with the Employment Service of
Canada and the Department of Soldiers Civil Re-establishment, calling in the assistance of
appropriate members of the Advisory Committee when they can help."
Unfortunately this programme was not adhered to, with the result that some confusion
occurred through the duplication of the form of organization and records already provided in
the Handicap section of the Employment Service. The results obtained were negligible and at
the end of three months the work was abandoned.
Reference was made in a previous report to the number of Canadian and Imperial pensioners
in the Province, the approximate number being 7,000, and of these about three-quarters are
located on the Lower Mainland and the southern end of Vancouver Island. It will be readily
seen that this number of handicapped ex-service men added to those injured in industry has
provided the Coast area of the Province with a problem greater than that of any similar area in
Canada. The problem is further complicated by the absence of highly developed and widely
specialized processes of refined manufactures such as are established in the older-settled communities. Logging, lumbering, fishing, and mining are what may be termed primary, extractive
industries, and require men who are physically fit. Comparatively speaking, the list of casualties is high and difficulty is experienced in providing re-employment in these industries for
those who unfortunately have had their faculties impaired through industrial accidents. In
addition to the task of finding employment for handicapped men who have been in the Province
for some time, there is a constant stream of new-comers, who, because of medical advice or a
personal desire for milder climatic conditions, decide to make their homes in the Vancouver or
Victoria districts. During the year 787 new arrivals registered for employment, and of this
number 140 made application in Victoria and the balance, 547, in Vancouver.
The placements during 1926 totalled 2,087, almost 200 more than during the thirteen-month
period covered by the previous report. Of the men sent to employment during the period under
review, 773 went to positions where the work lasted for more than one week and in many
instances became permanent. The balance, 1,314, filled short jobs where the duration was less
than one week. The Victoria office was responsible for 227 " regular " and 587 " casual " placements ; the remainder, 546 and 727 respectively, were arranged by the Vancouver office. It will
be noted that the number of" placements with possibilities of permanency was slightly smaller
than the number of new arrivals during the year. Keeping in mind the nature of our industries
and the number of handicapped men already in employment, the problem of finding work remains REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 57
one of the first magnitude. In justice to employers in the Coast area it must be conceded that
they have done exceptionally well in absorbing handicapped men, but they cannot be expected to
employ the host of new-comers who arrive in Vancouver and Victoria at the rate of approximately three per day. Many of these men, and of those who have been residents of the
Province for longer periods, are entirely unfitted for any kind of work available here, and quite
a large number, because of increasing debilities due to advancing age, are unable to perform
any work, although their pensions are insufficient to maintain them. The problems presented
by these men can only be solved by the Imperial and Dominion Governments providing sheltered
employment for those still capable of performing some useful labour but unable to obtain employment in industry, and institutional care for those who are unable to work and who are in receipt
of insufficient pension allowances to support them.
The Employment Service Policy.
In view of frequent statements by workmen that the offices of the Employment Service are
instructed and give a preference of employment to newly arrived immigrants, it appears advisable to state that no such instructions have ever been received and that no such policy is being
followed. The plan followed from the organization of the Service has been to give local
residents of the districts in which the offices are located the first choice when filling vacancies,
and not to transfer persons from one employment district to another except when absolutely
necessary to meet requirements. In addition, for the purpose of saving time and money for
unemployed workmen, weekly reports are on file in every office showing the labour-supply in all
of the principal centres of the four Western Provinces, and this information is available to any
workman who is considering moving to another district or Province. The aim is to place workmen in search of employment in contact with employers who require help, and to discourage
workmen from going to districts w:here no opportunities of employment exist. The Immigration
Department is kept advised regarding conditions throughout the Province and more particularly
with respect to districts in which there is a surplus of labour. Many public and semi-public
bodies refer all inquiries received from potential immigrants regarding labour conditions to
officials of the Employment Service, on the understanding that accurate up-to-date information
will be supplied.
Employment-work is difficult to carry on satisfactorily under the best of conditions, but the
small number of complaints received, and the degree of support received from employers, workmen, labour organizations, and public bodies generally, appears to warrant the view that during
the eight years the Employment Service of Canada has been in existence the results obtained
have justified the judgment of those responsible for its organization.
Business transacted by Ofeices, 1926.
Office.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
to other
Provinces.
4,295
3,642
1,495
3,752
5,591
5,124
2,646
1,563
7,303
1,139
29,145
22,326
12,937
3,446
10,076
3,152
2,514
1,452
1,053
1,584
1,439
1,708
1,453
1,153
1,134
379
4,941
11,034
6,847
833
4,731
2,337
2,376
1,238
845
1,573
1,272
1,662
1,368
1,090
1,036
324
4,615
10,981
5,906
762
4,721
2,224
9
31
9
38
2
5
15
4
454
686
140
2
14
13
103
280
83
298
635
102
348
Prince Rupert	
334
20
4,720
id
456
175
397
Victoria (Women)	
68
Totals              	
117,632
44,592
41,993
1,422
8,029 F 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Business transacted Monthly, 1926.
Month.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
to other
Provinces.
10,017
2,277
2,212
37
9.113
2,074
2,008
50
17
9,847
2,846
2,742
63
95
9,315
3,739
3,592
127
318
10,007
4,651
4,380
97
96
8,540
4,721
4,084
126
27
10,844
6,180
5,912
127
21
13,501
4,599
4,166
180
6,100
8,587
4,238
3,983
269
1,253
9,951
4,343
4,162
259
11
8,401
2,246
2,170
43
1
9,509
2,678
2,582
44
117,632
44,592
41,993
1,422
8,029
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
Totals REPORT  OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 59
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Chief Inspector R.  J.   Stewart.
Assistant Inspector H.  Douglas.
Assistant Inspector Miss A.   C.  McMullin.
Assistant Inspector ..Miss   Violet   Smart.
(Office Court-house,   Vancouver.)
The following report is submitted by the Chief Inspector of Factories:—
In submitting the annual report of the Factory Inspection Department for the year 1926,
I am glad to be able to report continued activity in the industrial life of the Province. As our
duties require us to visit all factories in which three or more persons are employed, we are thus
enabled to form a fairly accurate estimate as to the prevailing state of trade in the Province.
In a report of this nature it is rather difficult to give an entire resume of the work performed during the past year, as our duties to a certain extent are of a routine nature. However,
we have no hesitation in stating each succeeding year brings a noticeable improvement in the
safety, sanitary, and lighting conditions of the factories coming under our jurisdiction.
The efforts of the Department of Factory Inspection to assist in conserving the life and
limb of workers employed in industrial establishments has with very few exceptions met with
voluntary recognition on the part of those to whom orders were issued respecting dangerous
conditions. Conclusive proof that the factories in the Province are yearly becoming safer places
in which to earn a livelihood is evidenced by the fact that we are not called upon to investigate
as many major accidents, and the necessity of our attendance at Coroners' inquests is steadily
decreasing. These results have been attained largely through the whole-hearted co-operation
of the owners, managers, and workmen engaged in the operation of the plants over which we
exercise supervision relating to the safety of those employed therein.
We still occasionally meet some individuals not easily converted to safe practices, who prefer
to continue to work in the old familiar way, despising safety devices and improved and safe
methods, arguing that guards cause inconvenience and decrease production. Persons with these
views are a menace to themselves and all others employed in the plant. The value of guards
has been proven in too many cases to allow of any reasonable doubt as to their efficiency, and
any reluctance upon the part of an employee to use and maintain them in position requires stern
disciplinary measures.
Elevators.
The efforts of this Department to conserve life and limb of workers employed in industrial
plants is applied with equal force to the conservation of life and limb of the public in so far as
transportation by passenger-elevators is concerned.
During the past year a great many new elevators have been installed in order to keep pace
with the demands for this class of transportation. All new installations have been provided
with some form of interlocking device which prevents the operator from starting the car before
the doors are closed and locked.
Passengers or would-be passengers often expose themselves to serious injury by following
sudden impulses. That this is true we cite the following example: In one of our large office
buildings one of the tenants in the building was waiting to be taken to the main floor. The
first elevator to pass the floor at which he was waiting was travelling in the " up " direction.
The operator, according to a report made to this office, stated that after stopping at that floor
she opened the doors and inquired if he was going up; he replied, " No, I am going down." The
operator proceeded to close the shaftway doors intending to complete the run and pick him up
on the downward trip. For some unaccountable reason the waiting passenger grabbed the door,
pushed it open, and tried to board the ascending car, with the result that he was crushed
between the car platform and the top of the door, receiving injuries which necessitated the
amputation of a portion of his left leg.
Our records show that the majority of personal injuries received by the public have occurred
when entering or leaving the car.
•As various types of interlocking devices which will prevent this type of accident are available, we believe they should be included in the equipment of all passenger-elevators. F 60 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Complaints.
Many of the complaints received at this office are by phone and are from persons who are
employed in work-rooms where the lighting and ventilation are poor. In following up these
complaints, we invariably find that we have no jurisdiction regarding the matters complained
of, owing to the fact that these work-rooms are not factories as defined by the " Factories Act,"
which stipulates that three or more persons must be employed before we can insist upon compliance with the several sections of the " Factories Act." As a great many of these complaints
are made anonymously by some person employed in the work-rooms referred to, we presume they
are at a loss to understand why the conditions complained of are not remedied.
Prosecutions.
With the exception of some laundry-owners operating their factories during prohibited hours,
no prosecutions for infractions of the " Factories Act" were instituted during the year. We
have, however, on several occasions had to set a final time-limit before the desired results were
obtained. It has been the policy of this Department not to prosecute until after every opportunity has been afforded the employers and employees to comply with the law after having
been informed of its requirements.
Overtime Permits.
Owing to the exigencies of the trade, quite a number of requests have been made for overtime permits. These have been granted in all cases where our investigations warranted the
issuing of same.
Factory Conditions.
Factories which are located in buildings designed for the exclusive use of that particular
industry, as a rule comply with the requirements of the " Factories Act," or can be made so
with minor alterations.
It is in rented or leased premises In which a number of small industries are located, and in
which divided responsibility exists, that we experience our greatest trouble in obtaining compliance with the several sections of the " Factories Act." Owing to a combination of circumstances,
we have during the past year been forced to insist upon rather extensive structural alterations
being made to several buildings before proper ventilation, lighting, and heat for the employees
could be obtained. REPORT OF THE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
Officials of the Board :
Miss Mabel A. Cameron, Secretary Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Miss Violet Smart, Inspector Court-house, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province, of British Columbia.
Sir,—The report of the Minimum Wage Board of British Columbia for the year ended
December 31st, 1926, is submitted herewith, being the ninth annual summary of the Board's
administration of the Act and Orders relating to women and girl employees. Nine Orders have
been promulgated, covering a variety of occupations and industries in which women are engaged.
Conference on Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
In August the Order relating to the Fruit and Vegetable Industry was reopened at the
request of employees, who filed a petition with the Board in accordance with the procedure
prescribed by the Act for that purpose.
A Conference was convened in Vancouver, the sessions being held at the Court-house on
August 20th. In order to give all interested persons an opportunity to be heard meetings were
called morning, afternoon, and evening. Employers were represented by Mr. H. C. Wade, of the
Dominion Canners (B.C.), Ltd., Vancouver; Mr. J. A. Wattie, of the Western Packing Corporation, Ltd., Vancouver; Mr. A. L. Watson, of the Farmers' Canning Company, Mission City; and
Mr. Wm. O'Neill, of the Kelowna Growers' Exchange, Kelowna. The interests of the employees
were looked after by Mrs. E. C. T. Venables, of Penticton; Mrs. D. B. McClement, Kelowna;
Mrs. N. Wilson and Miss I. Anderson, both of Vancouver. The Board selected Mrs. H. P.
Hodges, of Victoria; Mrs. A. Wells Gray, of New Westminster; and Mrs. J. H. Miller, of
Vernon, to represent the public. Mr. J. D. McNiven, Chairman of the Board, presided at the
meetings, with his colleagues, Mrs. Helen Gregory MacGill and Mr. Thomas Mathews, also in
attendance.
The Chairman outlined the procedure to be followed by the Conference, and invited testimony from any one in the audience. Many views were presented and ideas advanced for the
improvement of the existing Order, which had been in effect since 1922, much stress being laid
on different phases of the piece-work problem. After lengthy and unhurried deliberation the
conferees unanimously recommended to the Board that the minimum wage for every experienced
female employee in the fruit and vegetable industry be the sum of $14.40 for a week of forty-
eight hours, either on a time or piece-rate basis. This was an increase of 40 cents over the
rate in the previous Order. Hourly rates of 30 cents were recommended for work up to and
including ten hours a day, after which the rate should be 45 cents an hour.
For inexperienced workers the Conference recommended a weekly rate of $11 during the first
two months' employment in the industry, this sum to be paid for either time- or piece-work.
An hourly rate of 23 cents was prescribed for work up to and including ten hours a day. Work
in excess of ten hours would entitle the employee to 35 cents an hour; these rates to apply
whether the basis of employment happened to be time or piece-work. The former Order allowed!
three months in which to become experienced.
After due consideration the Board accepted these recommendations, basing an Order thereon,
which became effective sixty days from September 3rd, 1926.
When it is realized that 2,455 women employees wTere reported as being employed in this
industry in canneries and packing plants for the busy part of 1926 the importance of the new
Order will be appreciated.
Collection of Arrears.
While most employers are complying with the provisions of the Board's Orders, there are
occasions on which, through ignorance or oversight, an employee Is not paid in accordance with
the terms of the Order under which she is working. As instances of this kind come to the notice
of the Board measures are taken to effect amicable settlements, which, fortunately, are successful
in the majority of cases. A natural timidity on the part of employees and a marked aversion to
publicity attendant on Court actions leads the Board and its officials to take such drastic means
as infrequently as possible.   In consequence of this policy, by personal investigation and through F 62 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
correspondence, the sum of $3,315.01 in arrears of wages was collected for underpaid employees.
This amount was made up of sums ranging from 75 cents to $400. The woman who received the
latter figure had been deprived systematically of a considerable amount each week for a number
of months.
These collections were negotiated in Vancouver, Victoria, Duncan, Salmon Arm, New Westminster, Mission City, Nelson, Nakusp, Revelstoke, Kamloops, Chilliwack, Penticton, and other
parts of the Province. The girls to benefit by the provision of the Act enabling them to receive
their arrears were employed in various occupations. Hotel and restaurant employees, factory-
workers, beauty-parlour attendants, fruit-cannery help, office clerks, dental assistants, laundresses, telephone operators, all shared in obtaining amounts to make up their correct legal wage.
A Few Court Cases.
1. Early in the year a manufacturer's agent was found to be paying his office clerk much
lower wages than those prescribed by the Order. Upon the Inspector making a personal investigation the employer expressed his disapproval of the regulations and assumed a defiant attitude
towards the law. An information was laid against him for failure to pay the minimum wage.
When the case came up for hearing the defendant did not appear and a remand was taken.
Next time he was present at the opening of Court but disappeared when his name was called.
The case, however, was proceeded with and the employer fined $25 or, in default, ten days. He
thereupon put in his appearance and paid the fine. The employee sued for her arrears in the
Small Debts Court.
2. An employer in Vancouver paid an office clerk less than her just due. A case was started
against him, and when the Police Magistrate heard the evidence he said the accused did not
deserve to be let off w'ith the minimum fine, and ordered that a penalty of $50 be imposed, or,
in default, thirty days.
3. The owners of a tea-room employed a young lady for less wages than the Public Housekeeping Order required. Proceedings were instituted in the Police Court, and when the case
was called a plea of guilty was entered.   The Magistrate imposed a fine of $25.
4. In a Vancouver laundry the Inspector found that one of the employees had not been paid
the correct wage for the time worked. The case was taken to Court and a conviction registered
against the company.    A $25 fine was ordered to be paid by the employer.
' 5. An establishment manufacturing candies and confectionery failed to pay the wage
prescribed by the Order relating to the Manufacturing Industry. Police Court proceedings were
commenced, and after one remand the employer, through his counsel, pleaded that he was manufacturing an article which was sold to the public and the price included cost of production.
Counsel then said he was attacking the Act on the grounds that it was indirect taxation. The
prosecutor replied that an argument of that nature could not be advanced in the Police Court.
An adjournment was granted to communicate with the Attorney-General. However, when the
case came up again, counsel for the defendant pleaded guilty and a fine of $25 was imposed by
the presiding Magistrate.
6. For permitting two girls to work excessive hours a cafe proprietor in one of the smaller
towns was taken to Court, two informations being laid against him. At the trial he entered a
plea of guilty to one charge, whereupon the second charge was withdrawn. A fine of $25 was
ordered to be paid.
Statistical Report.
The pay-roll returns required from employers each year were sent in by 3,123 firms, against
2,804 for the previous year. With this increase of 319 reporting firms details of wages and
working-hours were submitted for 16,070 women and girl employees. This is an advance of
2,171 over the 1925 total, which accounted for 13,899 employees.
To analyse the returns they were divided into nine groups, corresponding to the classifications covered by the Orders of the Board. Separate tables have been compiled for each industry
for which an Order has been made. For 1920 the information was supplied for the week of the
greatest employment. The figures appearing in the following tables are so tabulated that comparisons with those of former years may be readily made.
Reference to the Appendix of this report will make clear exactly what classes of work are
included in each grouping. A summary of each Order in convenient form may also be found
in the Appendix. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 03
Mercantile Industry.
1926.
1925.
1924.
1923.       1        1922.
1
406
2,820
456
$42,508.65
$4,222.50
$15.07
$9.26
13.92%
44.54
382
2,574
442
$39,017.26
$4,000.50
$15.16
$9.05
14.66%
43.24
335
2,124
341
$32,203.49
$3,028.00
$15.16
$8.88
13.83%
42.95
325
2,000
364
$30,520.25
$3,321,00
$15.26
$9.12
15.4%
42.95
320
Number of employees—
1,828
283
Total weekly wages—
$27,577.19
$2,682.00
Average weekly wages—
$15.09
$9.48
13.4%
43.7
Percentage of employees under 18 years....
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $12.75; 727 or
22.19 per cent, of all employees reported received this amount, 1,841 or 56.20 per cent, of all
employees reported received more than this amount, and 708 or 21.61 per cent, of all employees
reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $12.75 included girls
under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Laundry Industry.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years....
Average hours worked per week	
1926.
59
799
123
$11,484.90
$1,288.50
$14.37
$10.48
13.34%
45.02
1925.
53
654
101
$9,545.70
$1,085.00
$14.60
$10.74
13.38%
45.46
1924.
53
625
84
18,859.'00
$889.00
$14.17
$10.58
11.85%
43.69
1923.
53
558
60
!8,026.50
$667.00
$14.38
$11.12
9.71^
44.33
1922.
46
474
101
$6,880.00
$1,215.50
$14.51
$12.03
17.57%
44.73
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $13.50; 248 or
26.90 per cent, of all employees reported received this amount, 393 or 42.62 per cent, of all
employees reported received more than this amount, and 281 or 30.48 per cent, of all employees
reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $13.50 included girls
under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 1$ years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—-
' Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years....
Average hours worked per week	
1926.
1925.
399
1,644
79
$27,264.81
$1,114.50
$14.11
4.59%
45.54
356
1,450
67
$23,763.16
$990.50
$16.39
$14.78
4.42%
45.38
1924.
314
1,316
49
$21,493.42
$730.00
$16.33
$14.90
3.59%
45.97
1923.
287
1,174
47
$19,164.50
50
$16.32
$14.61
3.85%
45.42
1922.
SIS
287
1,171
44
718.25
$658.00
$15.98
$14.95
3.62 <>
46.23 F 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14; 344 or 19.96
per cent, of all employees reported received this amount, 1,163 or 67.50 per cent, of all employees
reported received more than this amount, and 216 or 12.54 per cent, of all employees reported
received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $14 included girls under 18, for
whom a lower rate is set, a few inexperienced workers over 18 years of age, and employees who
worked less than 48 hours and received pay on. a pro rata basis.
Office Occupation.
1926.
1925.
1924.
1923.
1922.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week ,
3,609
147
$68,838.71
$1,878.00
$19.07
$12.78
3.91?
41.94
1,523
3,354
128
i,215.99
,640.00
$19.74
$12.81
3.68%
41.84
1,171
2,799
92
$54,758.49
$1,113.50
$19.56
$12.10
3.18%
41.9
1,133
2,595
93
$50,285.00
$1,155.50
$19.38
$12.42
3.5%
41.90
1,097
2,502
91
$48,341.00
$1,110.50
$19.32
$12.20
3.5%
41.93
For a week of 48 hours the minimum, wage for experienced employees is $15 (monthly wage
$65) ; 519 or 13.82 per cent, of, all employees reported received this amount, 2,858 or 76.09 per
cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 379 or 10.09 per cent, of all
employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $15 included
girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years of age, and
employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Personal Service Occupation.
1926.
1925.
1924.
1923.
1922.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years 	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages:—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
Average hours worked per week	
19
:,381.00
J214.00
$16.47
$11.26
6.67%
38.67
65
221
18
1,824.20
5220.00
$17.30
$12.22
7.53%
36.15
34
126
22
$2,009.79
$239.50
$15.95'
$10.89
14.86%
38.14
34
91
18
$1,534.68
$208.00
$16.87
$11.56
16.51%
40.07
32
78
19
$1,196.00
$214.00
$15.33
$11.26
19.59%
38.03
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14.25; 29 or 10.18
per cent, of all employees reported received this amount, 174 or 61.05 per cent, of all employees
reported received more than this amount, and 82 or 28.77 per cent, of all employees reported
received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $14.25 included girls under 18,
for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years of age, and employees who
worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 65
Fishing Industry.
1926.
1925.
1924.
1923.
1922.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
4
26
$496.25
$19.09
48.00
21
2
$489.50
$24.00
$23.31
$12.00
8.7%
47.13
34
5
$601.44
$55.0.0
$17.69
$11.00
12.82%
50.59
31
1
$489.50
$13.5.0
$15.79
$13.50
3.12%
49.12
50
15
$778.00
$181.50
$15.56
$12.10
23.08%
46.08
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15.50; 4 or 15.38
per cent, of all employees reported received this amount, and 22 or 84.62 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1926.
1925.
1924.
1923.
1922.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
103
1,373
236
$24,386.21
$2,842.50
$17.76
$12.04
14.67%
41.22
1,312
220
$23,605.31
$2,655.00
$17.99
$12.07
14.36%
42.64
97
1,192
218
$21,256.75
$2,555.50
$17.83
$11.72
15.46%
42.29
$19,
$2,
94
1,089
204
426.18
289.50
$17.84
$11.22
15.78<J
41.34
83
1,084
142
!,698.50
,550.00
$17.25
$10.92
11.58%
41.53
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15; 291 or 18.08
per cent, of all employees reported received this amount, 938 or 58.30 per cent, of all employees
reported received more than this amount, and 380 or 23.62 per cent, of all employees reported
received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $15 included inexperienced employees for whom lower rates are set and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received
pay on a pro rata basis.
Manufacturing Industry.
1926.
1925.
1924.
1923.
1922.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wage£—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
335
1,491
527
^25,343.79
$6,182.00
$17.00
$11.73
26.11%
44.51
296
1,471
329
240
1,262
218
$24,415.40      $20,510.60
$3,409.00        $2,235.00
$16.60
$10.36
18.28 9
44.77
$16.25
$10.25
14.73%
43.65
234
1,107
249
$18,707.46
$2,494.50
$16.90
$10.02
18.36%
43.82
231
1,093
203
$17,485.00
$2,150.50
$16.00
$10.59
15.66%
43.92
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14;  439 or 21.75
per cent, of all employees reported received this amount, 1,081 or 51.09 per cent, of all employees F 06
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
reported received more than this amount, and 548 or 27.16 per cent, of all employees reported
received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $14 included inexperienced employees for whom lower rates are set and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received
pay on a pro rata basis.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1926.
1925.
1924.
45
39
39
Number of employees—
Time.
1,262
255
$21,920.13
$2,520.00
$17.37
$9.88
Piece.
435
503
$7,377.08
$3,251.50
$16.96
$6.46
Time.
783
222
$13,913.21
$2,170.00
$17.77
$9.77
Piece.
341
189
$6,923.65
$1,570.00
$20.30
$8.31
Time.
625
148
$9,849.70
$1,225.50
$15.76
$8.28
Piece.
252
65
Total weekly wages—
$4,975.19
$573.50;
Average weekly wages—
$19.74
$8.82
Percentage of inexperienced employees...
Average hours worked per week (time-
30.88%
47.01
26.78%
47.56
19.54%
43.29
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14; 109 or 4.44
per cent, of all employees reported received this amount, 1,063 or 43.30 per cent, of all employees
reported received more than this amount, and 1,283 or 52.26 per cent, of all employees reported
received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $14 included inexperienced employees for whom lower rates are set and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received
pay on a pro rata basis. In this industry there is much short-time employment, particularly at
the beginning and end of the season.
Summary of all Occupations.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years, or experienced	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced-
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced !	
Employees   under   18   years,   or
inexperienced....	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced	
Employees  under  18  years,   or
inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18
years, or inexperienced	
Average hours worked per week	
1926.
3,123
13,725
2,345
$234,001.53
$23,513.50
$17.05
$10.03
14.59%
43.82
1925.
2,804
12,181
1,718
5211,713.38
$17,764.00
$17.38
$10.34
12.36%
43.58
2,287
10,355
1,242
$176,517.87
$12,644.50
$17.05
$10.18
10.71%
43.09
1
1923.
2,195
9,612
1,251
$164,712.57
$12,511.50
$17.14
$10.00
11.52%
43.31
1922.
$152:
$12
2,135
8,989
1,242
890.94
546.50
$17.00
$10.10
12.14%
43.28
It is the earnest aim of the Board each year to receive returns from more employers than
for the previous period, and for 1926 it was not disappointed. By adding new firm-names to its
index and by receiving pay-rolls from establishments that had not made an accounting in former
years an appreciable gain was noted in this respect. The result of this increase is reflected in
the number of workers reported gainfully employed—namely, 13,725 over IS years of age or
experienced, as against 12,181 for 1925, and 2,345 under 18 or inexperienced, in comparison with
1,718 for 1925. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 67
There has been a general tendency in practically all the occupations towards a slight
decrease in average wages, which, however, still remain well above the minimum prescribed by
the Board. The public housekeeping occupation and the manufacturing industry are the two
groups that register advances over the 1925 averages.
Marital Status.
For the second time the pay-roll form for 1926 statistics provided columns in which the
employer recorded whether the employee was married, widowed, or single. In the fruit and
vegetable industry the married women comprise a large proportion of the workers, but one must
bear in mind that the product they work with is very perishable and at the peak of the season
all available help is pressed into service.
A glance at the following table shows the marital status of the women employees In each
occupation:—
Name of Industry.
Married.
Widowed.
Single.
Total.
497
248
520
340
385
63
51
15
981
184
35
144
92
107
12
25
1
35
2,595
639
1,050
3,324
1,526
210
1,533
10
1,439
3,276
922
1,723
Office      	
3,756
2,018
285
1,609
26
2,455
Totals	
3,109
635
12,326
16,070
Table showing Labour Turnover in each Group—Number of Employees in Continuous
Service of Employer reporting.
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u
cj
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u
cc
CO
CC
EC
ci
a
3
cj
CJ
cj
Name of
Industry.
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o
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N
H
a
[H
CO
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o
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CD
b-
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■2
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CD
t-
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fcH'g
» 5
33
205
1,513
313
531
117
372
84
261
74
166
36
121
31
84
28
67
13
39
8
20
4
69
9
3,276
922
466
Laundry	
59
Public  house-
19
977
285
155
100
49
37
28
22
12
9
30
1,723
399
Office	
78
929
601
487
382
274
218
248
125
118
76
220
3,756
1,636
Manufacturing	
100
802
302
248
147
112
81
68
45
37
17
59
2,0il8
335
Personal service...
42
99
56
23
36
9
2
3
6
4
1
4
285
76
Telephone   and
1
370
20
309
1
256
1
171
99
1
88
131
43
37
30
74
1,609
26
103
Pisbing	
4
Fruit and vege-
545
1,460
147
130
65
54
21
14
6
7
3
3
2,455
45
Totals	
1,026
6,483
2,349
1,756
1,236
800
599
604
327
262
160
468
16,070
3,123
.
Terms of Service,
In order to arrive at the labour turnover in each industry the foregoing table was prepared
from actual figures submitted by employers relative to the time each worker had been with her
firm. The desired information was omitted from some forms, and the ultimate result was that
for 1,026 employees or 6.38 per cent, of the total number the length of service was not specified.
Fluctuation in some occupations was more apparent than in others. In the mercantile
industry it will be noted that approximately half the employees had been with the firms by
whom they were reported for a period less than one year    Turning to the office occupation, F 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
where service is more steady, one finds that those whose record did not comprise a year's work
is practically only one-fourth of the total in that line of work.
If a study is made of the totals for all groups it will be found that 40.34 per cent, of the
reported employees had been with their employers less than one year. At the other end of the
table 2.91 per cent, had been steadily employed for a period of ten years or more.
High Wage and Long Service.
In going over the annual pay-roll forms note was taken of the highest individual weekly
wage in each occupation and the term of longest service.
The record wage in the mercantile industry was drawn by a Vancouver employee who
receives $65 a week. A Victoria firm has three employees who each have a service record of
21 years of steady employment.
The highest weekly wage in the laundry industry—$28—was paid in a Vancouver establishment.   A report from Nelson revealed that an employee had been with one firm for 25 years.
In the public housekeeping occupation a weekly remuneration of $31 stands at the top of
the wage scale in this line of worls:. Continuous employment covering a period of 18 years is
the longest reported. Both these records occur in a Victoria hotel, but they do not apply to the
same employee.
Two Vancouver firms vie for honours in the office occupation. For having served one company for 33 years an office-worker breaks all records for steady employment. To an employee
receiving $57.50 weekly falls the honour of obtaining the peak wage for clerical work.
A manufacturing concern in Vancouver paying $45 a week to one of its women workers leads
all others in this respect. A Victoria employee who has worked for her present employer for 22
years without a break takes the lead for service in the industrial group.
Both top places in the personal service occupation belong in Vancouver, although not in the
same firm. A weekly wage of $37 and a service record of 13 years win the coveted positions in
this classification.
In the telephone and telegraph occupation Victoria and Vancouver share the honours. At
the Capital City a telephone operator was reported' as having been working for 23 years. A
telegraphist in Vancouver receiving $37 weekly led all others in the matter of wages.
An employee in a Prince Rupert plant, who receives $28.75 a week and has been in her
present position for 4 years, takes both records in the fishing industry.
The highest wage in the fruit and vegetable industry was earned by a Penticton employee
whose pay-cheque for the week reported was $47. The longest term of service was given as
10% years in a Kelowna packing plant.
Co-operation acknowledged.
Before concluding our report the members and officials of the Board desire to take this
opportunity of expressing their gratitude to all who have co-operated with them in the administration of the Act. There was a more ready response to the request for the pay-roll
returns than had been experienced in previous years. With few exceptions the employers have
exhibited a readiness to comply with the provisions of the Orders, and every courtesy has been
shown the Inspectors in the pursuit of their duties. Employees, too, are recognizing more clearly
that the Act and Orders are for their benefit and protection, and less reluctance in reporting
alleged or real infractions is exhibited. To the general public, who by attendance at conferences
or practical interest in the Board's activities shown in other ways, the members now express
their grateful thanks.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,    .
Your obedient servants,
J. D. McNiven, Chairman.
Helen Gregory Mac Gill.
Thomas Mathews. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 09
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS.
For convenient reference a summary of the Orders now in force is herewith appended:—
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
This includes all establishments operated for the purpose of trade in the purchase or sale of any
goods or merchandise; and includes the work of all female employees engaged therein on the sales
force; the wrapping force; the auditing or check-inspection force; the shoppers' force in the mailorder department; the receiving, marking, and stock-room employees; sheet-music saleswomen; and
those otherwise engaged in the sale, purchase, or distribution of any goods or merchandise.
Weekly
Minimum
Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced
Workers.
Under
18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$12.75.    Hourly rate, 269/M cents.
$ 7 50
8 00
8 50
9 00
9 50
10 00
10 50
11 50
for 1st   3
„   2nd   3
„   3rd   3
„   4th   3
„   5th   3
„   6th   3
„   7th   3
„   8th    3
months.
$ 9 00 for 1st   3 months.
10 00    „   2nd   3
11 00    „   3rd    3
12 00    „   4th   3
Licences   required   in   this
class.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    Time worked in excess of 48 hours must he paid for at
the hourly rate.
Order has been in force since February 24th, 1919.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING, AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Inexperienced
Workers.
Experienced Workers.
Under
18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$13.50.    Hourly   rate,   28%   cents.
$  8 00
for 1st   4
montlis.
$  9 00 for 1st    4 months.   .
8 50
„   2nd   4
,,
10 50    „   2nd   4
9 00
„   3rd   4
,,
12 00    „   3rd   4
10 00
„   4th   4
,,
11 00
„   5th   4
,,
Licences   required   in   this
12 00
,,   6th   4
..
class.
Above rates are based on a 48-hour week. Maximum working-period 48 hours, governed by
" Factories Act."
Order has been in force since March 31st, 1919.
PUBLIC HOUSEKEEPING OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of waitresses, attendants, housekeepers, janitre&ses, cooks, and kitchen
help in restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, ice-cream parlours, light-lunch stands, and other places where
food is cooked, prepared, and served for which a charge is made; and the work of chambermaids, in
hotels, lodging-houses, and apartments where lodging is furnished, whether or not such establishments
are operated independently or in connection with any other business; and the work of all female
elevator operators.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29%  cents.
$12 00
$12 00 	
F 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. In emergency cases 52 hours may be worked. Time and
one-half shall be paid for work in excess of 48 hours and up to 52 hours.
When lodging is furnished, not more than $3 a week may. be deducted for such lodging.
When board or meals are furnished, not more than $5.25 may be deducted for a full week's board
of 21 meals.    A fraction of a week's board shall be computed upon a proportional basis.
As elevator operators are required by law to pass an examination before running, elevators, no
apprenticeship is permitted under the Minimum Wage Order.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks,
filing clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other Orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer
operators, auditors, attendants in physicians' and dentists' offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$15.    Monthly    rate,   $65.
Hourly   rate,  31%    cents.
$11 00 for 1st    6 months.
12 00    ,,  2nd    6
13 00    ,,   3rd   6
14 00    ,,   4th    6
$11 00 for 1st   3 months.
12 00    „   2nd   3
13 00    „   3rd    3
14 00    „   4th    3
Licences   required   in   this
class.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum weekly working-period prescribed hy Order, 48
hours.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring, hairdressing, barbering, and other
work of like nature, or employed as ushers in theatres, attendants at shooting-galleries and other
public places of amusement, garages, and gasolene service stations, or as drivers of motor-cars and
other vehicles.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.25.    Hourly rate, 29i1/k cents.
$10 00 for 1st    6 months.
11 00    „   2nd   6
12 00    „   3rd    6
13 00    „   4th    6
*$10 00 for 1st   3 months.
11 00    „   2nd   3
12 00     „   3rd    3
13 00    „   4th    3
Licences   required   in   this
class.
* These rates for learners do not apply to attendants at shooting-galleries and other public places of
amusement, garages, and gasolene service stations, or to drivers of motor-cars or other vehicles, from whom
no apprenticeship is deemed necessary.
Above rates are for 48-hour week, which is maximum permitted.
Wages for Ushers.
Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, or the like, engaged after 6 p.m., on legal holidays,
and for special matinees, are entitled to a wage of not less than 30 cents an hour, with a minimum
payment of 75 cents.
Ushers working more than 18 hours a week, but not in excess of 36 hours, are entitled to not less
than $10.80 a week.     (Ushers in this category may be employed only between 1.30 p.m. and 11 p.m.)
Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours are entitled to not less than $14.25.
No distinction is made for ushers under 18 and over 18 years of age. No apprenticeship considered
necessary for ushers.
Order has been in force since September 15th, 1919. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 71
FISHING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of cannedi fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50.     Hourly  rate,   32'/z4  cents.
$12 75 for 1st    4 months.
13 75    „   2nd    4
14  75    „   3rd    4         „
Licences    required    for    inexperienced
employees 18 years of age or over.
Order has been in force since February 28th, 1920.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy, and shall also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the
operation of telephone or telegraph systems who are not governed by. any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.    Hourly rate,  31%   cents.
$11 00 for 1st    3 months.
12 00    „   2nd    3
13 00    „   3rd    3
Licences    required    for    inexperienced
employees 18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum hours permitted are 8 per day and 48 per week,
except in cases of emergency, when 56 hours may be worked. Time and one-half is payable for hours
in excess of 48.    Every employee must have one full day off duty, in every week.
Where telephone and telegraph employees are custoimarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m.
and 8 a.m., 101 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the
number of hours of employment a week.
In cases where employees reside on the employer's1 (premises, the employer shall not be prevented
from making an arrangement with such employees to answer emergency calls between the hours of
10 p.m. and 8 a.m.
Order has been in force since April 5th, 1920.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use, any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$14.40.    Hourly   rate,   30   cents.
$11 00 for 1st    2 months.
Licences  required  for  inexperienced
employees  18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. For work over 48 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day,
wages shall he not less than 30 cents an hour for experienced workers, and for work in excess of
10 hours the rate shall be not less than 45 cents an hour.
For work over 8 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day, wages shall not be less than 23 cents
an hour for inexperienced workers, and for work in excess of 10 hours the rate shall be not less than
35 cents an hour.
Order has been in force since November 2nd, 1926. F 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, and adapting for use or sale any article or
commodity, but excepting fish, fruit, and vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Schedule 1.
Schedule 2.
Schedule 3.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29%
cents.
$ 8 00 for 1st  2 mos.
10 00    „   2nd 2
12 00    „   3rd 2
$ 8 00 for 1st 4 mos.
10 00    „   2nd 4
12 00    „   3rd 4
$  7 00 for 1st  6 mos.
10 00    „   2nd 6
13 00    „   3rd 6
Licences required for inexperienced workers 18 years of age or over.
Schedule 1 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly^powders, baking-powders, molasses,
sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, biscuits,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, soft drinks, yeast, cans, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, whisks, pails, wash-boards, wooden boxes, clothes-pins,
matches, explosives, munitions, gas-mantles, and window-shades.
Schedule 2 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Cotton hags, envelopes, overalls, shirte, ladies' and children's wear, gloves,
hats, caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, tents, awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding,
pillow-covers, loose covers, mattress-covens, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-imade millinery,
knitted goods, blankets, brushes, machine-made cigars, and dipped chocolates.
Schedule 3 applies to the following occupations, or to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or adapted for use or sale: Bookbinding, embossing, engraving, printing,
dressmaking, men's and women's tailoring, ready-to-wear suits, paper boxes, jewellery, furs, leather
goods, hand-made cigars, boots, shoes, and hand-made millinery.
Schedule 3 does not apply to regularly indentured apprentices whose indentures have been approved
by the Minimum Wage Board.
The above rates are for a 48-hour week. No employee shall be employed more than 8 hours a
day, nor more than 48 hours a week, except when permission has been granted under the provisions
of the " Factories Act."
Order has been in force since November 20th, 1923. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 73
ASSOCIATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
In the preparation of the following list the intention has been to confine it to organizations
which have direct connection with the employment of labour, and not to include any which are
established purely for other business or social purposes. The list, which is numerically about
equal to that of last year, has been carefully corrected at the last possible moment before going
to press.
Box Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association — Chairman,
A. M. Sharpe, B.C. Box Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
B.C. Hotels' Association—President, Lloyd A.
Manly; Vice-President, T. H. Whelan; 2nd
Vice-President, M. G. Gordon; Treasurer, P.
L. Simpson; Secretary, J. J. Walsh, 611 North
West Building, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver.
B.C. Loggers' Association—Chairman of the
Board of Directors, T. A. Lamb, Lamb Lumber
Co., Ltd.; Vice-Chairman, Geo. Moore, Merrill
& Ring Lumber Co., Ltd.; Secretary-Manager,
R. V. Stuart, 921 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver. Officers are elected annually on January 15th.
B.C. Lumber & Shingle Manufacturers' Association—President, F. R. Pendleton, Straits
Lumber Co., Red Gap; Secretary, R. H. H.
Alexander, 917 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver. Officers elected annually on third
Thursday in January.
Builders' Supply Section, CM.A. (B.C. Division)
—Chairman, A. J. Campbell, Hillside Sand and
Gravel Co., Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh
Dalton, 701 Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Canadian Jewellers' Association (B.C. Section) —
Hon. Presidents, O. B. Allan, Geo. E. Trorey,
Thos. A. Lyttleton, Walter M. Gow, and R. M.
Tod ; President, Alex. Waters ; Vice-President,
Allan Gow Carruthers; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Executive (Local) : Geo. E. Snider, W. J.
Hawkins, Harold J. Baxter, A. J. Jacoby, and
F. Hinchcliffe. Executive (District) : J. W.
Duncan, Victoria; J. Little, Victoria; Harold
Thorneycroft, Nanaimo; J. Bulger, Prince
Rupert; C. J. Whiten, Vernon; W. J. Kerr,
Kamloops;   A. Clausen, New Westminster.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division) ; Provincial Headquarters, 701-7 Board
of Trade Building, Vancouver—Chairman,
Edwin Tomlin, B.C. Cement Co., Ltd., Victoria ;   Secretary, Hugh Dalton, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (Victoria
Branch), 1008 Broad Street, Victoria—Chairman, H. J. Pendray, British America Paint Co.,
Ltd., Victoria; Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 1008
Broad Street, Victoria.
Canadian Storage & Transfermen's Association—
President, C. F. B. Tippet, 321 King Street
East, Toronto, Ont. (The Howell Warehouses,
Ltd.) ; Secretary, E. A. Quigley, Suite 10, 423
Hamilton Street, Vancouver. This Association
has Board of Directors of each Province.
Canned Salmon Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, J. S.
Eckman, Canadian Fishing Co., Ltd., Vancouver ; Vice-Chairman, C. Thomas, B. C.
Fishing & Packing Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver; Assistant Secretary of Section, R. E. Lanning, 705 Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Clay Products Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, James
Parfitt, Victoria Brick Co., Victoria; Secretary,
T. J. Goodlake, 1008 Broad Street, Victoria.
Confectioners' Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, L. H.
Nicholson, National Biscuit & Confection Co.,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701
Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Consolidated Shingle Mills of B.C., Ltd., 907-8
Metropolitan   Building,  Vancouver—Chairman,
C. E. Merritt;   Secretary, E. Bevan.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association, Inc.—President, L. A. Sandstrom, Pier 8, Seattle, Wash.;
Secretary,  Capt. A.  Langnes, Pier 8,   Seattle,
Wash.
Garment Manufacturers' Section, C.M.A. (B.C.
Division) —Chairman, T. S. Dixon, Gault Bros.,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
701 Board, of Trade Building, Vancouver.
General Cartage & Storage Association of B.C.—
President, Fred. Crone, Crone Storage Co., Ltd.,
760 Beatty Street, Vancouver; Secretary, E. A.
Quigley, Suite 10, Canadian Bank of Commerce
Chambers, 423 Hamilton Street, Vancouver.
General Contractors' Association—-President, J. F.
Keen ; 1st Vice-President, J. Tucker ; Secretary,
W. G. Welsford, 300 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Jam Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, C.
D. Hunter, Empress Manufacturing Co., Ltd.,
Vancouver; Vice-Chairman, H. 0. Wade, Dominion Canners, B.C., Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Master Sheet Metal Workers' Section, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division) —
Chairman, Wm. G. Humphrey, Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 701 Board of Trade
Building. Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, C.M.A. (B.C. Division) —
Chairman, W. I. Reid, Westminster Iron
Works. Ltd., New Westminster; 1st Vice-Chairman, D. A. Mcintosh, Letson & Burpee, Ltd.,
Vancouver; 2nd Vice-Chairman, A. Cairns, Vulcan Iron Works, Ltd., Vancouver; Treasurer,
J. Latta, Murray-Latta Machine Works, Ltd.,
Vancouver; Secretary, H. Dalton, 701 Board
of Trade Building, Vancouver. ,*•-     ■-■^^•^,^:--.
F 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Metal Trades Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, E. W.
Izard, Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt; Secretary,
T. J. Goodlake, 1008 Broad Street, Victoria.
Millwork Section, Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, T. Gadd,
Cedar Cove Sash & Door Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Manager, O. Phillips, 717 Board: of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Mining Association of British Columbia—President, Chas. A. Banks, Pacific Building, Vancouver ; Secretary, H. Mortimer-Lamb, Birks
Building, Vancouver.
Mining Association of Interior British Columbia—
President, J. P. MacFadden, New Denver; Secretary, W. H. Burgess, Kaslo.
Mountain Lumber Manufacturers' Association—
President, W. K. Nichols, Giscome, B.C.; Vice-
President, H. P. Klinestiner, Lumberton; Secretary-Treasurer, I. R. Poole, 204 Trades Building, Calgary, Alta. Officers elected at annual
meeting held in January.
Northern B.C. Lumbermen's Association—President, Geo. W. Nickerson, Prince Rupert; Secretary-Treasurer, A. Brooksbank, Prince Rupert.
Printers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, Chas. Chapman, Murphy & Chapman, Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver; Manager, R. L. Norman,
706 Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Printers' Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, A. F.
Stevens, Acme Press, Ltd., Victoria; Secretary,
T. J. Goodlake, 1008 Broad Street, Victoria.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Board—President, James Harknes.s. Vancouver ; 1st Vice-President, R. T. Wilson,
Nanaimo; 2nd Vice-President, J. F. Scott,
Cranbrook; 3rd Vice-President, T. J. Wilcox,
Kamloops; Treasurer, Wm. Kerr, New Westminster ; Dominion Representative, D. H. Kent,
Vancouver; Secretary, Cyril Dallas, Vancouver.
Head Provincial Office at 420 Pacific Building,
Vancouver. Branches are established at Armstrong, Cranbrook, Lytton, Nanaimo, Nelson,
Revelstoke, and Vancouver.    At New Westmin
ster there is a District Branch serving the principal towns of the Lower Fraser Valley.
Shingle Manufacturers' Association of B.C.—-
President, C. E. Merritt, Huntting-Merritt
Lumber Co., Ltd.; Vice-President, C. J. Culter,
Westminster Mills, Ltd.; Secretary-Manager,
E. Bevan, 907-8 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver. Meets for election of officers in January
each year.
Shipping Federation of B.C., Inc.—Manager and
Secretary, Major W. C. D. Crombie, Orange
Hall, 341 Gore Avenue, Vancouver; President,
Major R. G. Parkhurst, Vancouver; 1st Vice-
President, F. H. Clendenning, Vancouver; 2nd
Vice-President, K. J. Burns, Vancouver; Executive, K. A. McLennan, E. Beetham, B. C. Kelley,
W. M. Crawford, David Baird, B. W. Greer,
D. M. Cameron, J. C. Irons, L. B. Jepson, and
John McLeod. Meets for election of officers in
January each year.
Shipyards' Section, C.M.A. (B.C. Division) —
Chairman, A. Bennett, Vancouver Shipyards,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
701 Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Timber Industries Council of B.C.—President,
J. D. McCormack, Canadian, Western Lumber
Co., Ltd.; Managing Director, W. MacNeill,
911 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Vancouver Association of Electragists—President,
C. H. E. Williams, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver ; Hon. Secretary, J. C. Reston, 579 Howe
Street, Vancouver; Office, 425 Pacific Building.
Officers elected annually in September.
Vancouver Association of Sanitary & Heating
Engineers—President, W. Moscrop, 861 Seymour Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Robert G.
Hargreaves, 425 Pacific Building, Vancouver.
Officers elected annually in June.
Victoria Bread & Cake Manufacturers' Association—President, D. W. Hanbury, Golden West
Bakery; Secretary, Capt. T. J. Goodlake, 1008
Broad Street. Election of officers annually in
January.
Victoria Builders' Exchange—President, William
Luney, 508 Sayward Building; Secretary, J. W.
Bolden, 2509 Prior Street. Officers elected annually in January. 1
REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.                                     F 75
UNION DIRECTORY.
In our endeavour to present an up-to-date directory of trade-union organizations and their
officials we have been greatly assisted by union secretaries and others, to whom our grateful
acknowledgments are tendered. The number of such organizations in the Province does not show
any material difference as compared with last year's, a few local organizations having gone out
of existence and others having been initiated. The Department will appreciate any intimation
of changes in the list which may be made from time to time.
TRADES AND LABOUR CONGRESS OF
CANADA.
President, Thomas Moore, Ottawa. Vice-Presidents, J. T. Foster, Montreal; Jas. Simpson,
Toronto; R. J. Tallon, .Calgary. Secretary-
Treasurer, P. M. Draper, Hope Building,
Ottawa.
B.C. EXECUTIVE OF TRADES & LABOUR
CONGRESS OF CANADA.
Chairman, Percy R. Bengough, Room 803, 16
Hastings Street East, Vancouver; Secretary,
R. W. Nunn, 238 Queens Avenue, Victoria.
NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.
Canadian Merchant Service Guild.
Vancouver—President, Capt. Thomas Rippon, 675
Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver; Secretary, A.
Goodlad, 675 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Imperial Bank Chambers on 9th and
24th of each month.
Victoria—Secretary, Capt. T. H. Brown, 408
Union Building, Victoria.
Radio Division, No. 3, of the Electrical Communication Workers of Canada—Secretary, C. T.
Foote, c/o Canadian Marconi Co., 500 Beatty
Street, Vancouver. Meets in Hotel Vancouver
at call of the Chair.
TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCILS.
Prince Rupert—President, S. D. McDonald, P.O.
Box 268, Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. Derry.
Box 498, Prince Rupert. Meets at Carpenters'
Hall on second and fourth Tuesdays of each
month.
Vancouver, New Westminster and District—President, James Thompson, 122 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver; Secretary, P. R. Bengough,
803 Holden Building, Vancouver. Meets first
and third Tuesdays of each month on second
floor, Holden Building, at 8 p.m.
Vancouver Building Trades Council—President,
R. S. Stevenson, 5023 Chester Street, Vancouver; Secretary, W. Page, 815 Holden Building,
Vancouver.
Victoria—Corresponding Secretary, E. S. Woodward, 1325 Carlin Street. Meets at 8 p.m. on
first and third Wednesdays in month at Trades
Hall, Broad Street.
Federated Trades Councils   (Railroads).
Victoria (Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Employees' Federation)—President. Geo. Phil-
brook, 637 King's Road, Victoria; Secretary,
J. Booth, 2421 Mowat Street, Victoria.    Meets
in Room 4, Green Block, Victoria, at 7.30 p.m.
on first Monday in month.
DISTRICT  LODGES AND  COUNCILS.
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners.
District Council of Vancouver—President, A. McDonald, 25 Hastings Street East, Vancouver;
Secretary, W. Page, 809 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Electrical Communication Workers of Canada.
British Columbia District Council No. 1—President, W. T. Burford, 4144 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, C. T. Foote, 745
Yates Street, Victoria. Meets in Room 132,
Hotel Vancouver, first Sunday in the month at'
11 a.m.
International  Association  of  Machinists.
Vancouver District Lodge No. 78—President,
Bert Oliver, 807 Holden Building, Vancouver;
Secretary, A. W. Tait, 1865 Tenth Avenue
West. Meets on first Wednesday of each month
at 807 Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
Allied  Printing  Trades   Council.
Vancouver—President, R. H. Neelands, 804
iHolden Building, Vancouver; Secretary, Thomas
Carroll, 804 Holden Building, Vancouver. Meets
at S04 Holden Building, Vancouver, at 5 p.m.
on second Monday in month.
Victoria—President, Joseph A. Wiley, 141 Clarence Street, Victoria; Secretary, T. A. Burgess,
Box 1183, Victoria. Meets at Room 511, B.C.
Permanent Loan Building, at 8 p.m. on last
Thursday in month.
British Columbia Federation of Civic and
Municipal Employees.
President, W. J. Scribbens, 3208 Pender Street
East, Vancouver; Secretary, H. R. Simmers,
3675 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Federation.
Vancouver—President, A. Watson, 1329 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
H. A. Urquhart, 2015 Fourteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver.    Meets at call of the President.
Theatrical  Federation  of  Vancouver.
President, Geo. Gerrard, 991 Nelson Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Will. Edmunds, 991 Nelson
Street, Vancouver. Meets at 991 Nelson Street
at 10 a.m. on Tuesday before first Sunday in
month. F 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
TRADE UNIONS.
Ashcroft.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 210—President, J. D. Nicol,
Savona; Secretary, R. Halliday, Box 8, Spences
Bridge. Meets at Ashcroft at 7.30 p.m. third
Saturday in month.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 23—Secretary, Chas.
B. Brown, 2195 Linden Avenue, New Westminster.
Central Park.
Carpenters & Joiners (Amalgamated), No. 2605—
President, F. Williams, 2469 Twenty-ninth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Muirhead,
2572 Monmouth Avenue, South Vancouver.
Cranbrook.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers,
No. 308—Secretary, A. Mueller, c/o Cranbrook
Brewing Co., Cranbrook.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 559—President, R. Bartholomew,
Cranbrook; Secretary, M. H. Johns, Box 214,
Cranbrook. Meets at 2.30 p.m. on first and
third Sundays in month at Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
563—President, Hugh J. Brook, Box 551, Cranbrook ; Secretary, A. S. Saunders, Cranbrook.
Meets at 8 p.m. on second and. fourth Mondays
in Maple Hall.
Machinists, International, No. 588—President, W.
Henderson, Box 827, Cranbrook; Secretary, R.
J. Lawrie, Box 291, Cranbrook. Meets at residence of Secretary on first Sunday each month
at 4.30 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
229—President, John Flynn, Cranbrook; Secretary, G. C. Brown, Cranbrook. Meets at
Cranbrook at call of Secretary.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 407—President, E. Williams, Cranbrook;
Secretary, Joe Jackson, Cranbrook. Meets at
K. of P. Hall. Cranbrook, on second Sunday
in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood: of,
Local No. 173—President, W. Hewson, French
Avenue, Cranbrook; Secretary, J. F. Lunn, 200
Durick Avenue, Cranbrook. Meets at 8 p.m.
at I.O.O.F. Hall, Norbury Avenue, on first Wednesday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1292—President, H. H. Linnell, Cranbrook; Secretary,
E. G. Dingley, Box 728, Cranbrook. Meets in
Auditorium, Cranbrook, on second and fourth
Sundays in month at 3 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local 585—
President, P. C. Hartnell, Box 865, Cranbrook;
Secretary, H. B. Haslam, Box 784, Cranbrook.
Meets at Maple Hall every Sunday at 7.30 p.m.
Corbin.
Corbin Miners' Association—President, Thomas
Haigh, Corbin; Secretary-Treasurer, William
Almond, Corbin. Meets in Miners' Union Hall
on alternate Sundays at 7 p.m.
Duncan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
533—Secretary, H. W. MeKenzie, Box 356,
Duncan.
Essondale.
Mental Hospital Attendants' Union, No. 35 (T. &
L.O.)—President, J. A. Gibson; Secretary, J.
McD. Nicholson, Essondale.
Fernie.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers of
America, International Union of, Local No.
308—President, J. W. Gladney, McPherson Avenue ; Secretary, J. E. Robson, Box 1071, Fernie.
Meets at 96 Howlandi Avenue, Fernie, on first
Monday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Miners' Association (Independent), British Columbia—President, Matthew Tully, Fernie;
Secretary, W. A. Harrison, Box 568, Fernie.
Field.
Railway  Carmen  of America,  No.  1454-
tary, Thomas Barlow, Box 158, Field.
-Seere-
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
165—Secretary, C. Eriekson, Box 126, Field.
Meets at Golden on the last Sunday of each
quarter at 10 a.m.
Kamloops.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood1 of, Division
No. 821—President, A. Kenwood, Kamloops;
Secretary, T. J. O'Neill, Box 753, Kamloops.
Meets at Orange Hall on first and third Thursdays in month at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 855—Secretary, -J. Patterson, Box 201,
Kamloops. Meets first and third Sundays at
Orange Hall, Kamloops, at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 258—President, H. C. Embree,
Kamloops; Secretary, J. H. Worsley, Nicola
Street, Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops, at 2.30 p.m. on first and third Tuesdays
in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 15—President, H. Williamson, Wol-
fenden ; Secertary, Noel Montagnon, Vavenby.
Meets in Kamloops on first Sunday in January,
April, July, and October at 1 p.m..
Railroad Employees, No. 161—President, J. E.
Fitzwater, Kamloops; Secretary, N. Papworth,
Kamloops.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 148—
President, O. E. Klemmer, North Kamloops;
Secretary, J. F. Corbett, 977 St. Paul Street,
Kamloops. Meets every second Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. in the Orange Hall, Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 611—Chief Conductor, S. W. Bent,
Kamloops; Secretary, A. G. Corry, Box 177,
Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops,
on second and fourth Sundays in month at
2 p.m.
Railway Enginemen, Canadian Association of—
Secretary, W. Dohm, Kamloops. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 77
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
519—Secretary, V. A. Mott, Kamloops. Meets
at Orange Hall, Kamloops, on second Sunday
and fourth Tuesday in month at 7 p.m.
Kitchener.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 229—Secretary, Geo. C. Brown,
Box 739, Cranbrook.
Lytton.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 210—President, J. D. Nicol, Savona; Secretary, R. Halliday, Box 8, Spences Bridge.
Matsqui.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 31—President, P. E. Crick, Kamloops Junction; Secretary, F. Kent, Box A, Lytton. Meets at C.N.R.
Freight Office Building, Vancouver, at 11 a.m.
on first Sunday in March, June, September, and
December.
Michel.
B.C. Miners' Association—President, James Walsh,
Natal; Secretary, Simeon Weaver, Natal. Meets
every second Friday at 7 p.m. in the Michel
Hall and the Natal Club Hall alternately.
Mission City.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
168—President, F. W. Brunton, Hatzic P.O.;
Secretary, H. Anderson, Harrison Mills. Meets
at Vancouver on third Sunday in January, April,
July, and October at 10.30 a.m.
Nanaimo.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No.
54—Secretary, W. H. McMillan, 410 Bruce
Avenue, Nanaimo. Meets at 7.30 p.m. on first
Tuesday of month.
Typographical Union, Internationa], Local No.
337—President, R. J. Stewart, c/o Free Press
Block, Nanaimo ; Secretary, L. C. Gilbert, Box
166, Nanaimo.    Meets at call of President.
Nelson.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 196—President, Eli Sutcliffe, Nelson; Secretary, H. Hughes, P.O. Box 465, Nelson. Meets
at 417 Hall Street, Nelson, at 8 p.m. on last
Thursday in month.
Dominion Express Employees, No. 18, Brotherhood of—Secretary, L, S. McKinnon, 212 Baker
Street, Nelson.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 579—President, J. Simons, 203 Silica
Street, Nelson; Secretary, E. Jeffcott, 610 Mill
Street, Nelson. Meets at Recreation Club, Nelson, on Sundays at 10.30 a.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Division No. 631—President, Chas. W.
Munro, Nelson ; Secretary, Stanley Smith, Nelson. Meets second and fourth Sundays at 2
p.m. in I.O.O.F. Hall.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 663—President-Secretary, Fred. Chapman,
Box 253, Nelson.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United- Brotherhood of, Local No.
181—President, Albert Olson, West Grand
Forks; Secretary, F. Gustafson, Box 265, Nelson. Meets last Sunday in March, June, September, and December at 2 p.m. at Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 98—President, H. Korlak, General
Delivery, Nelson; Secretary, J. Shardelow, Box
765, Nelson. Meets in Canadian Legion, Nelson, at 7.30 p.m. on second Thursday in month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 460—Chief Conductor, A. B. Hall,
915 Stanley Street, Nelson; Secretary, H. L.
Genest, Box 216, Nelson. Meets in K. of P.
Hall at 1.30 p.m. on .second Sunday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1291—President, P. Craven, General Delivery, Nelson;
Secretary, A. T. Richards, Box 701, Nelson.
Meets in Nelson on first Thursday of each month
at 8.30 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
558—President, P. Jeffrey, 120 Mines Road,
Nelson; Secretary, A. Kirby, 820 Carbonate
Street, Nelson. Meets at Community Building,
cor. Stanley and Victoria Streets, at 1.30 p.m.
on second Sunday in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
340—President, Joseph Clinton, Box 766, Nelson ; iSecretary, L. E. Pascoe, Box 935, Nelson.
Meets in Daily News Office, Nelson, at 5.10
p.m. on last Wednesday in month.
New Denver.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, No. 98—Secretary, A. Shilland, New Denver.
New Westminster.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 573—President, O. Moir, New Westminster; Secretary, Geo. Yorkstown, 35 Eighth
Street, New Westminster. Meets at 35 Eighth
Street on fourth Thursday in month at 7 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, No. 466—Secretary,
J. F. Lower, 519 Tenth Street, New Westminster.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1251—President, John Saunders, 628 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster;
Recording Secretary, A. E. Corbett, Labour
Temple, New Westminster. Meets at Labour
Temple on first Thursday in month at 8 p.m.
Civic Employees of New Westminster, Union of—•
Secretary, Rees Morgan, 313 Regina Street,
New Westminster. Meets in Labour Temple
at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday in month.
Civil Servants of Canada (Amalgamated)—President, H. G. Cox, Box 40, New Westminster;
Secretary, F. McGrath, 316 Strand Avenue,
New Westminster. Meets at Dominion Building on third Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
256—President, Wm. Mathew, 910 London
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, H. Nevard,
1101 London Street, New Westminster. Meets
at No. 1 Fire Hall (no set day) during first
week of month at 8 p.m.
Fishermen's Protective Association of B.C.—
President,   L.   Patterson,   New   Westminster; F 7S
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Secretary, W. E. Maiden, Box 717, New Westminster. Meets at Trapp Block, New Westminster, at 3.30 p.m. on first Saturday of each
month.
Longshoremen's Association No. 1, New Westminster and District, Independent—President, R.
Butters, 608 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster ; Secretary, W. Olitheroe, 124 Fourteenth
Avenue East, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 151—President, F. Sinnett, 4019 Kings-
way; Secretary, D. MacDonald, 360 Sherbrooke
Street, New Westminster. Meets in Labour
Temple on first Friday in each month at 8 p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 654
—President, F. Staton, 906 Tenth Street, New
Westminster; Secretary, F. C. Bass, Box 115,
New Westminster. Meets in Labour Temple at
2.30 p.m. on fourth Sunday in month.
Plumbers and Steamfitters, United Association of,
No. 571—President, C. Porter, 3406 Imperial
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, Lloyd
Elrick, Port Mann.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 280—President, J. Huggan, 529 Ninth
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, M. Sor-
ley, 1556 Fourth Street, New Westminster.
Meets at Independent Labour Party's Headquarters, New Westminster, on third Friday in
month at 8 p.m.
Retail Clerks' International Protective Association, No. 1306—President, W. W. Callander,
321 Pine Street; Secretary, J. Ellis, 719 Thirteenth Street, New Westminster. Meets last
Thursday in month in Hart Block at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 134
—President, Herbert Bell, 1551 Inverness
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, A. J.
Bond, 519 Fourteenth Street, New Westminster. Meets in Labour Temple at 7 p.m. on
second and fourth Tuesdays in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
632—President, A. R. MacDonald, Box 1024,
New Westminster; Secretary, R. A. Stoney,
Box 1024, New Westminster. Meets in Labour
Temple at 8 p.m. on lastj, Friday in month.
Notch Hill.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 193—President, W. Annala,
Tappen;   Secretary, W. Loftus, Notch Hill.
Penticton.
Locomotive Engineers, No. 866—President, O. E.
Hulett, Penticton; Secretary, C. Cornock, Box
64, Penticton. Meets at Burtch's Hall, Penticton, on second and fourth Sundays of each
month at 3 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 884—President, C. A. Tupper,
Penticton; Secretary, R. O. Blackstock, Box
385, Penticton. Meets at Penticton on first
■and fourth Thursdays of month at 2 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1023—President, James Slatter, General Delivery, Penticton; Secretary, R. A. Eckersley,
R.R. No. 1, Summerland.    Meets in Penticton
at 1 p.m. on second Sunday of every second
month.'
Railway Carmen of America. Brotherhood of, No.
1426—President, H. Suckling, Box 322, Penticton ; Secretary, T. Bradley, Penticton. Meets
on first Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
914—President, Herbert Nicolson, Penticton ;
Secretary, W. B. McCallum, Penticton. Meets
at K. of P. Hall, Penticton, on first and third
Sundays of each month at 2.30 p.m.
Point Grey.
Fire Fighters' International Association, No. 260
—President, C. C. Maddison, No. 1 Fire Hall,
Kerrisdale; Secretary, H. Foulkes, 1395 Sixty-
fourth Avenue West, Kerrisdale. Meets at 319
Pender Street West, Vancouver, on first Thursday of each month at 10 a.m.
Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's Club (unchartered)—Secretary,
W. G. Bigmore, Port Alberni.
Prince George.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 843—President, W. Kemp, Prince George;
Secretary, M. O'Rourke, Box 124, Prince
George. Meets in Odd Fellows' Hall on second
and fourth Mondays of each month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Mount Robson Lodge, No. 827—President,
E. J. Rice. Prince George; Secretary, C. H.
Olds, Box 129, Prince George. Meets in I.O.O.F.
Hall at 2 p.m. on first and third Sundays in
the month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Nechako
Lodge, No. 1870—President, W. Cuilen, Long-
worth P.O.; Secretary, T. Nielsen, Box 162,
Prince George. Meets alternately at Endako
and Prince George about every six weeks; date
set at each meeting.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
202—President, C. M. Leclair, Snowshoe; Secretary, F. Swamson, Hutton Mills. Meets at
McBride and Prince George about end of each
quarter.
Railroad   Employees,   Local   No.   28—President,
F. C. Saunders, Prince George; Secretary, H.
A. MacLeod, Prince George. Meets at Tenth
Avenue, Prince George, on first Sunday in
month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 620—Chief Conductor, J. G. Sweeney,
Prince George; Secretary, J. E. Paschall, Box
305, Prince George. Meets in Prince George
on second and fourth Sundays in month at
8 p.m.
Prince Rupert.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1735—President, J. J. Gillis,
Box 694; Secretary, J. S. Black, Box 694,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at
8 p.m. on first and third Wednesdays of each
month.
Deep Sea Fishermen's Union of the Pacific—Secretary-Treasurer, P. B. Gill, Box 65, Seattle.
Meets  at  84  Seneca   Street,  Seattle,   also  at REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 79
Prince Rupert and Ketchican on Tuesdays at
7.30 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 344—President, A. McRae, Box 457,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, S. Massey, Box 457,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at
8 p.m. on first Monday of each month.
Longshoremen's Association, No. 2, Canadian Federation of Labour—President, Sydney V. Cox,
638 Sixth Avenue, Prince Rupert; Secretary,
Wm. T. Pilford. Prince Rupert. Meets in
Longshoremen's Hall on Monday of each week
at 8 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 207—President, F. R. Rogers, General
Delivery, Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. Campbell, Box 469, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on second Wednesday
in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
335—President, J. E. McDonald, Caspaco; Secretary, T. G. MeManaman, c/o C.N. Railway,
Kwinitsa. Meets alternately at Usk and Prince
Rupert at call of President and Secretary.
Plumbers & Steamfitters of the United States and
Canada, United Association of, Local No. 495—
President, R. Wilson, Box 209, Prince Rupert;
Secretary, W. M.. Brown, Box 209, Prince
Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m.
on  first Monday in the month.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 426—President, R. M. Tucker, Box
527, Prince Rupert; Secretary, E. Tulloch, Box
213, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall,
Eighth Street, Prince Rupert, at 8 p.m. on
second Monday of each month.
Railway Employees, Brotherhood of, Division No.
154—President, H. R. Hill, General Delivery,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, L. A. Astoria, Box
32, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
usually on the fourth Friday at 8.30 p.m.
Sheet Metal Workers, International Alliance, Local
No. 672—President, J. W. Ratchford, Prince
Rupert; Secretary, Geo. H. Dobb, 625 Tatlow
Street, Prince Rupert. Meets in Trades and
Labour Council Hall at S p.m. on fourth Monday in the month.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Local No. 510—
President, P. J. MeCormack, Prince Rupert;
Secretary, B. R. Rice, 800 Eighth Avenue West,
Prince Rupert (Box 892). Meets in Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on first Friday of each
month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
413—President, S. D. MacDonald, Box 689,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. M. Campbell, Box
689, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
at 3 p.m. on last Sunday of each month.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 407—President, Jas. Mathie, Revelstoke; Secretary, Jas.
M. Goble, Box 283, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on the fourth Saturday of each month
at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
657—President, H. Carpenter, Third Street,
Revelstoke; Secretary, J. P. Purvis, Box 27,
Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on first and
third Tuesdays of each month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 341—President, W. L. Lea, Revelstoke ; Secretary, G. P. Deptford, Revelstoke.
Meets in Selkirk Hall, Revelstoke, on second and
fourth Wednesdays of each month at 2.30 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 34—President, A. W. Bell, Box 209, Revelstoke ; Secretary, Dugald Bell, Box 209, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8 p.m. on first
Monday of month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
208—President, W. Lesley, Revelstoke; Secretary, A. Blackberg, Revelstoke. Meets in Revelstoke at 2 p.m. on first Sunday of each month.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 481—President, A. Watt, Revelstoke ; Secretary, H. Parsons, Box 42, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 7.30 p.m. on
third Tuesday of each month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Mount
Stephen Division, Local No. 487—President,
E. R. Clay, Revelstoke; Secretary, W. W.
Lynes, General Delivery, Revelstoke. Meets in
Selkirk Hall on second Monday at 7.30 p.m.
and fourth Thursday of each month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 51
—President, G. Forbes, Revelstoke; Secretary,
W. Maxwell, Revelstoke. Meets at Revelstoke at
2 p.m. on first Sunday and at 8 p.m. on third
Monday of each month.
Smithers.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America, No.
53—Chairman and Secretary, W. Mitchell,
Smithers.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
Ill—Chief Engineer, H. D. Johnson, Smithers;
Secretary, S. J. Mayer, Smithers. Meets at
Smithers on first and third Tuesdays in month
at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, No. 902—President, B. Ross, Smithers;
Secretary, T. L. Stafford, Smithers.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
340—President, D. Matheson. Houston; Secretary, F. Simonds, Quick.    Meets at Smithers.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 157—Secretary,  Hugh Forrest, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415 (Bulkley)—President, J. S. Oathroe,
Smithers; Secretary, G. W. Smith, Smithers.
Meets at Social Hall, Smithers, on first Thursday in month at 7 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Farthest
North Lodge, No. 869—President, A. Green-
halgh, Box 180, Smithers; Secretary, H. H.
Oleson, Box 180, Smithers. Meets at Railway-
men's Hall, Smithers, on first and third Thursdays of each month at 8.30 p.m.
South Vancouver.
Civic Emploj'ees' Union—President, A. W. Richardson, 5775 Prince Edward Street. South Vancouver ; Secretary, W. S. Welton, 832 Twenty-
eighth Avenue East, South Vancouver. Meets
at Municipal Hall, South Vancouver, on second
Tuesday in month at 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
259—President, G. Hearnden, 2625 Forty-ninth F SO
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Avenue East, Collingwood; Secretary, C. W.
Goldsmith, 1126 Twenty-sixth Avenue East,
South Vancouver. Meets at Municipal Hall,
South Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Monday in
month.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419—President, Alec. McDonald, Squamish ;
Secretary, J. E. Holmes, Squamish. Meets
second Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Presbyterian
Hall, Squamish.
Stev*eston.
Fishermen's Benevolent Society (Japanese Independent)—Secretary, G. Takahashi, Steveston.
Stewart.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers' Union, International, Local No. 181—Secretary, W. Fraser,
Stewart.
Three Forks.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173—Secretary, T. H. Horner, Kaslo. Meets
second Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.
Trail.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 763—President, A. Balfour, Box 114, Trail;
Secretary, T. Meachem, Box 74, Trail. Meets
in Miners' Hall at call of Chair.
Vancouver.
Automobile Mechanics, Lodge No. 702, International Association of Machinists—Meets in
Room 310, Holden Building, Vancouver, on
second and fourth Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
Bakery & Confectionery; Workers, Local No. 468—
President, A. Morris, 2834 Vine Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, Thos. Rigley, 37 Broadway
West, Vancouver. Meets in Holden Building,
16 Hastings Street East, first Saturday of month
at 8 p.m.
Bakery Drivers' Union, No. 464—President, T. R.
Adams, 992 Nicola Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Birt. Showier, 1115 Robson Street, Vancouver. Meets in Holden Building on second
Thursday of each month at 8 p.m.
Bakery Salesmen's International Union of America, Local No. 371—President, E. Holmes, 1217
Keefer Street, Vancouver; Secretary, H. A.
Bowron, 744 Fifteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at Holden Building on second
Thursday of each month at 8 p.m.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 120—Secretary, C, E. Herrett, 814 Holden
Building, Vancouver. Meets at 814 Holden
Building at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays in month.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676—President,
W. H. Clancy, 1117 Tenth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, T. J. Hanafin, 2376 Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 310 Pender
Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on last Sunday in month.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 151—President, W. J. Bartlett, 1154 Howe Street; Secretary, A. Arman, 2048 Second Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings Street East
at 8 p.m. on fourth Friday of each month.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 194—
President, L. C. Campbell, 349 Fifth Street
East, Vancouver; Secretary, A. Fraser, 5079
Ross Street, South Vancouver. Meets at Holden
Building at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood: of, Local
No. 105—President, Geo. Low, 63 Fifty-third
Avenue West. Vancouver; Secretary, Thomas
Carrall, 842 Hamilton Street, Vancouver. Meets
at Business Women's Club, 601 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver, on second Tuesday of each
month at 8 p.m.
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union, Local No. 505—
Secretary, I. G. Griffiths, 3622 McGill Street,
Vancouver. Meets at 804 Holden Building at 8
p.m. on first Wednesday in month.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers of
America, No. 300, International Union, of the
United—President, Angus McLennan, 6538 Cul-
loden Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, W. McLean,
2035 Broadway West, Vancouver,
Bricklayers, Masons & Tilesetters' International
Union of America, Local Union No. 1, B.C.—■
Secretary, Wm. S. Dagnall, 1244 Twentieth
Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 808 Holden
Building, Vancouver, on second and fourth Wednesdays in month at 8 p.m.
Bridge & Structural Iron Workers, International
Association of, Local No. 97—President, Sydney
Dunstone, 1426 Napier Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Paul Lauret, 1839 Main Street, Vancouver. Meets at 611 Holden Building, 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. each
Monday.
Canadian Pacific Express Employees, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 15—President, 0. G. Murray,
4330 Dumfries Street, Vancouver; Secretary,
E. W. Lambert, 2241 Fourth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 810 Holden Building on first
Tuesday of each month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated, Branch No.
1—President, Chas. S. Robertson, 2758 Second
Avenue Eaist, Vancouver; Secretary, J. T.
Bruce, Room 35, 163 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West
at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays of
each month.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated, Branch No.
2—President, G. Findley 45 Forty-third Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, W. Bray, 72 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at
Flack Building, 163 Hastings Street West, on
first and third Tuesdays of month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 452—President, A. McDonald, 25
Hastings Street East, Vancouver; Secretary, W.
Page, 809 Holden Building, Vancouver. Meets
at Room 213, Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8
p.m. on second and fourth Mondays in month.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of
(Floorlayers), No. 1875—President, E. C.
Woodward, 1402 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. Reid, 2339 Trafalgar Street,
Vancouver.
Cigarmakers, International Union of America,
Local No. 357—President, J. Halawell, 3939
Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary,
R. A. Shaw, 1022 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 804 Holden Building, Vancouver, at
8 p.m. on first Tuesday in month. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 81
City Hall Employees' Association—President, D.
Hargreaves, 562 Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Tarbuck, 2792 Pender Street
East, Vancouver. Meets at 251% Hastings
Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Wednesday of each month.
Civic Employees' Federal, Local No. 28 (Chartered
by Trades & Labour Congress of Canada) —
Secretary, G. Harrison, 1182 Parker Street,
Vancouver. Meets at 445 Richards Street,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first and third Fridays
in month.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated—President, R. D. McMahon, North Lonsdale; Secretary, J. Linson, Patterson Road, Eburne.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
C.P.R. System, Division No. 1—Secretary, G.
L. Gauvreau, 1622 Thirty-eighth Avenue East,
Vancouver. Meets at Room 132, Hotel Vancouver ; no regular time set.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
Local No. 52—Chairman, J. Clark, 738 Sherburn
Street, Winnipeg; Secretary:, J. A. McDougall,
1633 Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 213—Secretary and Business Agent,
E. H. Morrison, Room 111, 319 Pender Street
West, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street
West on Monday at 8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 310—President, J. Harkness, Fourteenth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, F.
Buckle, 2525 Wellington Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 319 Pender Street West at 8 p.m. on
Wednesdays.
Fire Fighters, No. 18, International Association
of—President, J. Anderson, No. 2 Fire Hall;
Financial Secretary, C. A. Watson, No. 3 Fire
Hall, Vancouver. Meets at 251% Hastings
Street East, Vancouver, on second Thursday at
10 a.m. and third Thursday at 8 p.m.
Granite Cutters, International Association of—
Secretary, James P. Simpson, 2856 Eaton
Street, Vancouver. Meets on third Friday of
month at Holden Building, 16 Hastings Street
East, at 7.30 p.m.
Hod Carriers & Builders Labourers, International,
Local No. 602—President, C. Lawson, 1832
Third Avenue West. Vancouver; Secretary,
J. A. Barrington, 4293 Welwyn Street, South
Vancouver. Meets in Holden Building, 16
Hastings Street East, first and third Fridays of
each month at 7.30 p.m.
Jewellery Workers, International Union of, Local
No. 42—President, Len. C. Simpson, 3492
Thirty-eighth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, F. C. Yarrall, 1836 Alberni Street, Vancouver. Meets on first Friday in month at 8
p.m.
Lathers, Wood, Wire & Metal, International
Union, Local No. 207—Secretary, Bert. Jenkins,
50 Forty-fifth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets
at Room 209, Holden Building, Vancouver, at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Mondays in month.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, Local
No. 44—President, C. Addie, 217 Twenty-third
Avenue, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Thompson,
Vancouver. Meets at Room 804, Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on third Wednesday
in month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Kamloops,
Division No. 320—President, G. P. Boston, 1763
6
Third Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary.
H. O. B. McDonald, 1222 Pendrell Street, Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on second Tuesday in month at 8 p.m. and on fourth Tuesday
in month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, No. 907—
Chief Engineer, J. H. Jones, 1847 Kitchener
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, T. Retallack,
1749 Seventh Avenue East, Vancouver.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Local No.
656—President, T. McEwan, 350 Fourteenth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, S. H.
Waterhouse, 1643 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hail on first Thursday of each month at 8 p.m. and third Thursday at 2 p.m.
Lumber Handlers' Association (Independent) —
Business Agent, Jas. Greer, 696 Powell Street,
Vancouver. Meets second Thursday of the
month at 8 p.m. at 696 Powell Street, Vancouver.
Lumber Workers' Association, Canadian (CF. of
L.)— Secretary, D. H. Marr, 2016 Third Avenue West, Vancouver.
Lumber Workers' Industrial Union, No. 120
(I.W.W.)—Secretary, Geo. Murray, 318 Cordova Street West, Vancouver. Meets at 318
Cordova Street West, Vancouver, on Sundays
at 2.30 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of. Local
No. 182—President, E. B. McLean, 453 Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver; Financial Secretary,
J. G. Keefe, 4514 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 313 Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Fridays.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 692—Secretary. Percy R. Bengough, 2416
Pandora Street, Vancouver. Meets at 804
Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
second  and fourth Tuesdays.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 702
—President, W. W. Hague, 3489 Forty-first Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, J. A. Holmes,
1754 Pendrell Street. Vancouver.
Mailers' Union, No. 70 (I.T.U.)—President, A.
R. C. Holmes; Secretary, Herbert E. E. Fader,
2718 Oxford Street, Vancouver. Meets at
Holden Building, Hastings Street East, Vancouver, on first Tuesday, in each month at 6
p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of. Local No.
167—President, C. J. Beck, 1612 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, A. D. Mcdonald, Box 115, Vancouver. Meets at 804
Holden Building, Vancouver, at 11 a.m. on
third Sunday in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1734—President, Abner Shunn, 5829 Lancaster
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, John Roscow, 14
Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets
at Eagle Hall at 10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in
month.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, No.
7—President, J. I. Marshall, 2247 Tenth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, E. Read, 232
Thirteenth Street West, North Vancouver.
Marine Transport Workers' Union, No. 510
(I.W.W.)—Secretary, Geo. Murray, 318 Cordova Street West, Vancouver. Meets at 318
Cordova Street West at 8 p.m. on Wednesdays. F 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Milk Wagon Drivers & Dairy Employees. Local
No. 464—Secretary, B. Showier, 1115 Robson
Street, Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Fridays in month.
Mill & Factory. Local Union No. 1599—President, H. C. Matthews, 571 Eighteenth Avenue
Bast, Vancouver; Recording Secretary, R. G.
Inder. 1848 Vine Street. Vancouver. Meets at
313 Holden Building, Vancouver, on first and
third Thursdays of each month at 8 p.m.
Moulders of North America, International Union
of, Local No. 281—Secretary, J. Pinkerton, 2159
Victoria Drive, Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first
and third Fridays in month.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 145
—President, Edward A. Jamieson, 991 Nelson
Street; Secretary, Will. Edmunds, 991 Nelson
Street, Vancouver. Meets at G.W.V.A. Auditorium, 901 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, at 10
a.m. on second Sunday in month.
Newspaper Vendors, Federal Labour Union No. 7
(T. & L.C.)—President, John Pell; Secretary,
D. Cameron, 523 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Meets first and third Thursdays of month at
8 p.m.
Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers of America,
Local No. 138—President, A. B. Hodge, 5274
Chambers Street, Vancouver; Secretary, D. D.
Bliss, 1033 Haro Street, Vancouver. Meets at
163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
on second and fourth Thursdays of month.
Photo Engravers' International Union of North
America, Local No. 54—President, Edgar
Sutherland, c/o Clealand-Kent Engraving Co.,
Vancouver; Secretary, James C. Wilson, 1640
Arbutus Street, Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first
Wednesday in month.
Pile Drivers, Bridge. Wharf & Dock Builders,
Local No. 2404—President, Chas. Anderson,
Box 320, Vancouver; Financial Secretary, J.
Thompson, Box 320, Vancouver; Recording Secretary, A. McMillan, Box 320, Vancouver.
Meets at 112 Hastings Street West, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m. each Friday.
Plasterers & Cement Finishers, International Association of the United States and Canada.
Local No. 89-^President, Alfred Hurry, 861
Thirty-fourth Avenue East. Vancouver; Secretary, Edward Williams, 1131 Barclay Street,
Vancouver. Meets at Holden Building, 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first
and third Wednesdays in month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
170—President, S. G. Smylie, 3765 Thirtieth
Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary and Business Agent, Wm. Watt, 984 Seventh Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at Holden Building,
16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
on second and fourth Fridays.
Policemen's Federation (Chartered by Trades &
Labour Congress of Canada), Local No. 12—
President, David Mitchell, 3142 Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, W. M. Thompson, 1362 Seventeenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meets at 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver,
at 7,30 p.m. on fourth Tuesday in month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 69—President, H. F. Longley, 308 Sixth Street, North
Vancouver; Secretary, W. W. Quigley, 2083
Second Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at
213 Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
second Tuesday in month.
Projectionists' Society, B.C., Local No. 348—
President, J. R. Foster, 1161 Granville Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, G. Gerrard, 2732 Carle-
ton Street, Vancouver. Meets on first Friday
in month in the Holden Building at 11.30 a.m.
Radio Division, Electrical Communication Workers of Canada, B.C. No. 3—.Secretary, C. T.
Foote, 1414 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144—
President, G. H. Patterson, 1030 Robson Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, D. A. Munro, 70 Seventh
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F.
Hall, Hamilton Street, on first Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. and third Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 58—President, A. S. Ross, 5873
Prince Edward Street, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. D. Vulliamy, 2215 Fifteenth Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets at Cotillion Hall, Davie and
Granville Streets, on first and third Fridays in
month at 8 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 267—President, J. R. Burton, 1324
First Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. B.
Physick, 1156 Thurlow Street, Vancouver. Meets
at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday at 2 p.m.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of.
Division No. 59—President, C. Bird, 2030
Union Street, Vancouver; Secretary, H. Winter, 2404 Guelph Street, Vancouver. Meets on
first Friday in each month at 8 p.m. No set
hall.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association—President, H.
F. Hatt, c/o Railway Mail Service, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. A. Overend, c/o Railway
Mail Service, Vancouver. Meets in Room 18,
Post Office Building, Vancouver, at 2.30 p.m. on
last Tuesday of month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood, of,
No. 630—President, J. Brodie; Secretary, J. W.
Hope, 110 Empire Building, Vancouver. Meets
at Belvedere Hall, cor. of Tenth and Main
Streets, at 8 p.m. on first Monday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks. Lodge 626—President, R. G. Walker, 1052 Richards Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, E. Baldock, 6433 Argyle
Street, Vancouver. Meets at C.P.R. Storeroom, foot of Drake Street, Vancouver, on
second Friday of month at 8 p.m.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 46—Secretary, F. H. Fallows, 1504
St. Andrews Street, North Vancouver. Meets
in I.O.O.F. Hall, Vancouver, on fourth Friday
at 8 p.m.
Retail Employees' Association No. 1 (Independent), Vancouver—President, H. O. Eccleston,
West Vancouver P.O.; Secretary, Robert Skinner, 571 Twenty-second Avenue West, Vancouver.
Sailors & Firemen's Union of Canada, National—
Secretary, W. Griffiths, 305 Cambie Street,
Vancouver. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1926.
F 83
Seafarers' Union of B.C., The Federated—President, R. Thom, 565 Howe Street; Vice-President, D. Gillespie, Vancouver; Secretary, W.
Donaldson, 2054 Wall Street, Vancouver.
Sheet Metal Workers, Local No. 280—President,
Austin Fisher, 1952 Fourth Avenue West, Vancouver ; Secretary, David McPherson, 807
Holden Building, Vancouver. Meets at 313
Holden Building, 16 Hastings Street East, at
8 p.m. on first and fourth Thursdays.
Shingle Weavers' Union, No. 17813—President,
J. N. Chute, 1163 Pender Street East, Vancouver; Secretary, AV. H. Matthew, Joyce P.O.,
South Vancouver. Meets in Holden Building,
Vancouver, on  the fourth Sunday at 7.30 p.m.
Shinglers' Union (Independent), Vancouver—
President, Wm. Harris, 163 Forty-ninth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, J. W. Austin,
565 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at Electrical Workers' Union Hall monthly.
Steam Engineers, Sawyers, Filers & Mill Mechanics, Canadian Society of Certified, Headquarters
No. 1—President, Lewis Thompson, Gordon
Drive, South Vancouver; Secretary, H. Isher-
wood, 858 Sixty-sixth Avenue East, South Vancouver. Meets on second and fourth Mondays
in month at 163 Hastings Street West at 8 p.m.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union of, Local No. 844—President, E. MeCal-
lum, 2786 Albert Street, Vancouver; Secretary,
Geo. Pettipiece, 641 Cambie Street, Vancouver..
Meets at 806 Holden Building, Vancouver, at
8 p.m. on every Thursday.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Industrial Union
of, No. 882—Vice-President, W. G. Hulbert,
1639 Fourth Avenue West; Secretary, Chas.
Watson, 871 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets every, second Wednesday at 8 p.m.,
Room 806, Holden Building, Vancouver.
Steam Shovel & Dredgermen, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 62—President, D.
Clark, Aldergrove; Secretary, G. D. Lamont,
223 Oarrall Street, Vancouver.
Stereotypers & Electrotypers, International Union
of, Local No. 88—President, J. Murphy;  Sec-
. retary, J. McKinnon, 3635 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver.    Meets at 310 Holden Building at 4 p.m. on first Monday in month.
Stone-cutters' Association of North America—-
President, E. J. Thomas, Fifty-ninth Avenue,
Vancouver; Secretary, E. W. Tonge, 4119
Grace Avenue, Burnaby Lake. Meets at 810
Holden Building on second Tuesday in month
at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 101
—President, J. E. Smith, 1551 Thirty-seventh
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, H. 0. Griffin, 447 Sixth Avenue Bast, Vancouver. Meets
at K. of P. Hall, Eighth Avenue and Scotia
Street, Vancouver, at 10.15 a.m. on first Monday and 7 p.m. on third Monday.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No.
Ill—Secretary, A. S. Crosson, 1228 Howe
Street. Meets at 209 Holden Building on first
Sunday in month.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, Local
No. 178—President, A. R. Gatenby, 1721 Cotton Drive, Vancouver; Secretary, C. McDonald, Box 503, Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first
Thursday in month.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers, No.
466, International Brotherhood of—President,
A. C. McKay, 70 Sixth Avenue East, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. P. Black, 880 Homer Street,
Vancouver. Meets at 213 Holden Building on
the second and fourth Wednesdays at 8 p.m.
Theatrical Stage Employees' Federation & Moving Picture Machine Operators of the United
States and Canada, International Alliance of,
Local No. 118—President, G. W. Allin, Box
711, Vancouver; Secretary, G. Martin, Box 711,
Vancouver. Meets at 991 Nelson Street, Vancouver, at 9.30 a.m. on second Friday in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
226—President, C. S. Campbell, 804 Holden
Building, Vancouver; Secretary, R. H. Nee-
lands, 804 Holden Building, Vancouver. Meets
at Room 213, Holden Building, Vancouver, at
2 p.m. on last Sunday in month.
Upholsterers' International Union No. 26—President, A. Cook, 170 Fifty-fourth Avenue East,
South Vancouver; Secretary, J. W. Gordon,
2292 Wellington Avenue, South Vancouver.
Meets at 342 Pender Street West, Vancouver,
on fourth Monday of month at 8 p.m.
Waterfront Freight Handlers' Association—President, H. P. Hazen, rear of 233 Main Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, A. McAdam, 4363 Hastings Street East, Vancouver. Meets in rear of
233 Main Street, Vancouver, on first and third
Wednesdays in month at 8 p.m.
Waterfront Workers' Association (Independent),
Vancouver and District—Secretary, C. J. Wilson, 132 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver.
Wood-workers, Amalgamated Society of, No. 1
Branch—President, G. Richardson, 2856 Oxford Street, Vancouver; Business Agent, J.
McKinley, 607 Fifty-second Avenue East; Secretary, C. E. Ellis, 1657 Thirty-sixth Avenue
East, South Vancouver. Meets at Flack Building, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesday of each
month.
Wood-workers, Amalgamated Society of, No. 2
Branch—Business Agent, J. McKinley, 607
Fifty-second Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, W. Bray, Vancouver. Meets at Flack
Building, 163 Hastings Street West, Vancouver, on first and third Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
Vernon.
Typographical Union, No. 541—President, H. G.
Bartholomew, Box 643, Kelowna; Secretary,
W. B. Hilliard, R.R, No. 1, Enderby. Meetings held at Vernon on last Sunday in month.
Victoria.
Barbers, Journeymen, International Union of,
Local No. 372—President, J. L. Blakeney, 1323
Government Street, Victoria; Secretary, Jas.
A. Green, 1319 Douglas Street. Meets at
A.O.F. Hall on fourth Monday in month at
8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 191—Secretary, P. W. Wilson, 1837 Crescent Road, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Mondays.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 147—President, W. W. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, J. A. Wiley, 141 F 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Clarence Street, Victoria. Meets at 103 Union
Building, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on fourth Friday
in month.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers of
America, International Union of United, Local
No. 280—President, G. M. Brewer, Crease Avenue, Saanich; Secretary, Ernest Orr, 58 Sims
Avenue, Saanich. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad
Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second Tuesday
in month.
Bricklayers, Masons & Plasterers of America, International Union of, Local No. 2—President,
E. W. Mertton, 1039 Hillside Avenue, Victoria;
Secretary, J. H. Owen, 541 Toronto Street, Victoria. Meets at City Temple Hall, Victoria, at
8 p.m. on first Monday in month.
Canadian Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No.
20—President, T. C. Johns; Secretary, F. E.
Dutot, 1549 Bank Street, Victoria. Meets at
Canadian Pacific Railway Building on first
Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners (Shipwrights), United
Brotherhood of, Local No. 1598—President,
Wm. Brown, Fourth Street; Recording Secretary, J. Townsend, Box 26, Victoria. Meets at
Trades Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on first
and third Mondays in month.
Civic Employees, Local No. 50—President, A. E.
Fraser, ,824 Pembroke Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. E. Farmer, 2948 Scott Street, Victoria. Meets at 842 North Park Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m.  on second. Wednesday.
Cooks, Waiters & Waitresses, Local No. 459—
President, Herbert Lane; Secretary, F. Dovey,
Box 233, Victoria. Meets at Room 7, Surrey
Building, Yates Street, on first and third Tuesdays in month at 8.30 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 230—President, John Grant, 830
Princess Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, W. Reid,
2736 Asquith Street, Victoria. Meets at Harmony Hall, Fort Street, at 8 p.m. on first and
third Tuesdays of month.
Firefighters, City Union No. 258—President, P.
N. Guy, Headquarters Fire Hall, Victoria; Secretary, T. A. Heaslip, No. 5 Fire Hall, Victoria.
Meets at Headquarters Fire Hall, Cormorant
Street, at 8 p.m. on or about first of each month.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America—President, J. Eva, Orillia Street,.
Saanich; Secretary, J. Barlow, Box 392, Victoria. Meets at K. of P. Hall at 8 p.m. on
third Friday of each month.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11
—President, W. J. Pearson, 2253 Dalhousie
Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. Cragmyle, 2872
Inez Drive, Victoria.
Locomotive Firemen & Engineers, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 690—President, E. S. Cottle, Mary
Street, Victoria; Secretary, H. Richmond, 615
Wilson Street, Victoria. Meets at A.O.F. Hall,
Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on first Wednesday and
third Thursday in month.
Longshoremen's Association, No. 38-46, International—President, J. Wilson, 706 Blanshard
Street, Victoria; Secretary, Francis Older, 746
Humboldt Street, Victoria.
Machinists, Local No. 456—Secretary, C. B. Lister, 3226 Oak Street, Saanich. Meets at K. of
P. Hall, North Park Street, fourth Thursday
in month at 8 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
2824—President, W. A. Wright, 601 Kelvin
Road, Victoria; Secretary, G. E. Wilkinson, 50
Sims Avenue, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall,
Broad Street, on third Sundays of March, June,
September, and December at 2 p.m.
Moulders, International Union of North America,
Local No. 144—President, G. Stancombe; Secretary, Thos. Jacklin, 1534 Redfern Street, Victoria. Meets at City Temple Hall at 8 p..m.
on second Wednesday in month.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 247
—President, Stanley Peele, 1210 MacKenzie
Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. H. Press, 1060
Burdett Avenue, Victoria. Meets at K. of P.
Hall at 2 p.m. on second Sunday in October
and April and 10.30 a.m. in May and September.
Painters, Decorators & Paper-hangers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1119—President, A. Weath-
erill, 1014 Caledonia Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, J. Whittle, 1747 Stanley Avenue, Victoria. Meets at Room 16, Green Block, Broad
Street, on first and third Thursdays in month
at 8 p.m.
Pattern Makers' League of North America—
President, J. LeSueur, 1272 Walnut Street, Victoria ; Secretary, J. A. McCahill, Box 851, Victoria. Meets on second Monday each month at
326 John Street at 8 p.m.
Photo Engravers, International Union of North
America (Auxiliary of Vancouver), Local No.
54—Secretary, Frank M. Day, c/o Engraving
Department, " The Times," Victoria.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf & Dock Builders, No.
2415—President, E. E. Goldsmith, 2565 Grahame Street, Victoria; Secretary, A. M. Davis,
1506 Holly Street, Victoria. Meets at 16 Green
Block, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Tuesdays of month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
324—President, J. Fox, 2858 Austin Avenue;
Secretary, H. Johnson, 3261 Harriet Road, Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad Street, at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays.
Policemen's Federal Union, Local No. 24—President, Thomas Hall, Police Station, Victoria;
Secretary, A. H. Bishop, 316 Skinner Street,
Victoria. Meets at Police Headquarters at 3.15
p.m. on first Tuesday in month.
Postal Clerks' Association (Dominion)—President, L. F. Hawkes, Cowper Apartments, Men-
zies Street, Victoria; Secretary, G. S. Bloom-
field, 2528 Garden Street, Victoria. Meets at
P.O. Building, Victoria.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 79—President, Thomas Nute, 534 Michigan Street, Victoria ; Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236 MacKenzie Street, Victoria. Meets at Campbell
Building (sixth floor) at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Railway Carmen of America, Victoria Lodge No.
50—Secretary-Treasurer, John H. Booth, 2421
Mowat Street (Willows), Victoria.
Railway Conductors, No. 289—Chief Conductor,
E. H. Spall, Wellington, V.I.; Secretary, J.
Martin, 2109 Vancouver Street, Victoria.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1137—Presi- dent, E. J. Leonard, 1441 Begbie Street, Victoria ; Secretary, H. McDougall, 1484 Lang
Street, Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall at 8
:p..m. on first Thursday in month.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
613—President, C. H. Cross, 704 Lampson
Street, Esquimalt; Secretary, W. M. Parlby,
780 Dominion Road, Esquimalt. Meets at
A.O.F. Hall, Broad Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m.
on second Tuesday and last Friday in month.
Retail Clerks, International Association of, Local
No. 604—President, J. Talbot, 1737 Bank
Street, Victoria; Secretary, H. H. Hollins,
Trades Hall, Broad Street. Meets at Trades
Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Sheet Metal Workers, Amalgamated, International Alliance of, Local No. 134—President,
J. McMinn, 634 Rupert Street, Victoria; Secretary, Thos. Brooke, 1543 Morley Street, Victoria. Meets at City Temple Hall, 842 North
Park Street, at 8 p.m. on first Thursday.
Steam Engineers, Sawyers, Filers & Mill Mechanics, No. 3—President, J. McKenzie; Secretary, B. Burton, Sidney. Meets at Trades Hall
at 8 p.m. on first Monday in month.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union, Local No. 446—President, C. Maclean,
2640 Avesbury Street, Victoria; Secretary, H.
Geake, 1242 Faithful Street, Victoria (Box
502). Meets at K. of P. Hall at 8 p.m. on
second and fourth Tuesdays.
Stonecutters' Association of North America (Journeymen)—President, Joseph Barlow, Box 853,
Victoria; Secretary, Wm. McKay, Box 853,
Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on second Thursday
in Labour Hall, Broad Street, Victoria.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 109
—President, E. F. Fox, 1219 Basil Avenue, Victoria ; Secretary, W. Turner, 2169 Fair Street,
Victoria.   Meets corner Broad and Yates Streets,
Victoria, at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Tailors' Journeymen Union of America, Local No.
142—President, M. Mobray; Financial Secretary, H. D. Reid, 3034 Washington Avenue,
Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on first Monday in
.month.
Teamsters & Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers,
International Brotherhood of, Local No. 365—
President, N. Hanson, 1463 Bay Street, Victoria ; Secretary, P. G. Rabey, 2536 Blanshard
Street, Victoria. Meets at Veterans of France,
Douglas and Courtney Streets, at 8 p.m. on
first Tuesday.
Theatrical Stage Employees & Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, Local No.
168—Secretary, O. More, 949 Balmoral Road,
Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad Street,
Victoria, at 11.15 p.m. on first Thursday in
month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
201—President, J. D. Davidson, 378 Burnside
Road, Victoria; Secretary, T. A. Burgess, Box
1183, Victoria. Meets at Campbell Building
(sixth floor), Victoria, at 2 p.m. on last Sunday
in month.
Upholsterers & Trimmers, No. 25—Secretary, J.
F. Sharp, 570 Yates Street, Victoria. Meets in
Campbell Building at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Mondays in month.
Willow River.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Railway & Shop
Labourers, No. 202—President, C. M. LeClaire,
Snowshoe; Secretary, F. Swanson, Hutton
Mills.
Ymir.
Mine, Mill and Smelters, International Union—
Secretary, W. B. Mclsaac, Ymir.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles P.  Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.

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