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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA TWENTY-EIGHTH REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING THIRTEENTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1924

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-EIGHTH REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
THIRTEENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30TH, 1924, AND THE FIFTY-SECOND REPORT OF VITAL
STATISTICS DEPARTMENT, BEING A SUMMARY
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1923
PRINTED   BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chables F. Banfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1924.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1924.
To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it Please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Beport of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended June 30th, 1924.
j. d. Maclean,
i
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1924.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health.
The reports that have been submitted during the past six years have shown that the work
of the Department has extended greatly in scope, and has changed from an annual report concerning itself only with the management of epidemics to the higher plane of prevention of
epidemics.
Health-work has proceeded through different stages, beginning with:—
The first period, one of general sanitation, when the Department was chiefly concerned
with water-supplies, sewage-disposal, street-cleaning.
The second period was of quarantine enforcement.
Then there was the third period of applied bacteriology. This period showed the beginning
of the work in the prevention of disease.
The fourth, and we may say the present, period is concerned with the social analysis of
disease, that of personal hygiene and education.
The foundation of this latest phase of Health Department work is the idea of prevention
of disease as distinctive from its cure. With the emphasis placed more on the preservation of
health and less on the cure of the disease, the public is coming to realize how essential to health
is " the futility of treating the disease and tolerating the cause."
We have endeavoured to show in our reports that the Health Board is appreciative of the
changes that have taken place in regard to the management of health matters. The essential
change is that " The old public health was concerned with the environment, the new is concerned with the individual; the old sought the sources of infectious diseases in the surroundings
of man, the new finds them in man himself."
What we are endeavouring to da is to present our problems to the public in such a way that
they will recognize their practical application to every-day life, and we have made progress
that, while the results are not spectacular, yet they are such as to assure us that the foundation
has been laid which will bring within appreciable reach the goal for which we are striving.
The awakening of the public conscience and securing the encouragement of an intelligent
public opinion to bring through the practical application of our health laws the increased length
of life, increased productive capacity of the human asset, decreased sickness and misery, and
bring about the culmination of national prosperity produced by happy, healthy, contented people.
We are at the beginning of an era where a great advance will be made by following up the
impression that has been madS. Health authorities can only go just a little bit faster than
the public will admit, but there has been a reversal in this attitude, and the public are now
demanding that they shall be told what to do, and this opens up the opportunity for the Public
Health Nurse's work.
Health-teaching by Public Health Officers, including visiting nurses, has made in the last
few years a great impression upon the communities where it has been carried on. Such health
education is going to be recognized as of fundamental importance.
It is the recognition of these facts that has been the incentive of the Board in establishing
the Public Health Nursing Service of British Columbia.
Our service has been in operation now for three years and the progress made has exceeded
our expectations.
The training of the nurses in public-health work has been carried on in the University of
British Columbia and the nurses graduating from this course are, as far as possible, placed
in positions which are open, the number of which is increasing as the people are realizing the
beneficial effects that are accruing to the public as a whole.
An outline of the way in which our work is carried on was published in our report last
year, and I consider it of such importance that I am repeating it. Q G British Columbia. 1924
Following is the report of the Saanich Health Centre:—
" Saanich Municipality.—Square miles, 55; population, 12,000; schools, 16 ; class-rooms, 5S;
school-children, 2,000.
" Public Health Nursing Service being directed from Health Centre.
" Nursing Service.—Superintendent Nurse, one School Nurse, and two District Nurses.
" Transportation.—Two Ford cars.    Approximate mileage covered monthly, 2,000.
" Well-baby Clinic.—Two each month; 624 babies registered to date.
" School-work.—Individual class-room inspection once each month, except in case of an
outbreak of communicable disease, when the nurse makes a daily examination of the pupils
until the danger of communication is passed. The teachers are instructed in observing signs
and symptoms and reporting to the Health Centre.
" Pupils are weighed and measured once in the school-year; subsequent months the children
are encouraged to weigh themselves and record the result under the supervision of the nurse.
Underweights are weighed every month.   Charts are placed in every class-room for this purpose.
" After each inspection the nurse gives a health talk to the class upon such matters as
personal cleanliness, care of the teeth, etc.; the talks are made suitable to the grade. Toothbrush and handkerchief drills are given to each primary class. Rolls of honour being given each
year to pupils who observe health rules.
" Little Mothers' League classes are for girls between the ages of 10 and 14 years. A definite
course on infant hygiene, which includes the proper dressing and feeding of the babe, with
practice on a baby doll. The classes cover a period of twelve weeks, with examination, badge,
and certificate issued by the Provincial Board of Health.
" Attractive Health Posters are placed in every class-room. Children are encouraged to
make health posters themselves about fruit, vegetables, sunshine, teeth, nails, etc. Prizes are
given by the Provincial Board of Health for the best health poster.
Dental Work.—The dentist works at the Centre three hours, from 9 a.m. to 12 every school-
day.    In this way twenty-five pupils approximately have dental care weekly.
" Tonsil Clinics.—The last Friday of each month at least four tonsil operations are done.
The children are put to bed and cared for, and remain fi'om six to thirty-six hours, until quite
recovered.
" Tuberculosis—Chest Clinic.—Once each month all suspects are encouraged to attend and
supervision is maintained at intervals by visiting the homes, or arrangements are made for
transfer to sanatorium.
" Social Service.—Social-service work is an important part of the programme, as there is
no organization in Saanich for this purpose.
" Infant-welfare.—All babies born in Saanich are followed up, We aim to visit each baby
once a month.    All through the pre-school period supervision is maintained.
" Home-nursing and Hygiene.—These lectures are conducted through all the fall and winter
months, the classes covering a period of twelve weeks, with examination and certificate issued
by the Provincial Board of Health.
" Addresses on various phases of public-health nursing, childj-welfare, etc., are given as part
of every month's programme.    Health Centre activities are shown on coloured slides.
" District.—The district work includes maternity-work and all nursing which is not communicable. A certain amount of education-work and distribution of health literature. This
service is heavy owing to night calls.
At the Health Centre six beds are utilized for a certain type of patient, such as malnutrition,
tonsilectomy cases, etc.
" Extension of Work.—We are organizing pre-natal, pre-school, and eye and ear clinics,
this latter being a vital necessity for the school-children. The work has increased with surprising rapidity during the past year, as the following figures will show, which includes individual attention to cases, nursing, school, welfare, etc."
I am adding to this a statement written at my request by Mrs. Lucas, Nurse Superintendent
of the Saanich Health Centre, reviewing the work for the past year:—
"The Saanich Health Centre is the main Public Health Nursing Station in British Columbia
aud the most highly developed type we have in Canada to-day.
" During the past year we have been told by a competent authority that we are doing the
best piece of Public Health Nursing being done anywhere in Canada or the United States.   We 15 Geo. 5 Board of Health. Q 7
were happy to have our own opinion verified by one whose opinion is based upon actual experience. This has renewed the courage of the nurses and spurned them to further effort. We have
every reason to feel immensely proud of our work and its results at this time. Many signs
point to the awakening of the public conscience to the value of the Public Health Nurse7 i.e.,
requests for nurses in the outlying districts, requests for qualified speakers from the Department, literature, posters, etc.
" The Public Health Nurses are all of great value to the Department, but of greater value
still to the public, whom they instruct; adult patients come for health advice, mothers with
their babies, and the school-child's health is carefully watched and his health chores are
assiduously impressed upon him. Of course, patients who are sick are also attended to, but
only under the direction of a medical practitioner; it is very necessary that this be clearly
understood.
" The Public Health Nurses of to-day, with their assured professional status and their
standardized training, may well hope to take their full part in the work of preventive medicine,
which is educational in that its main object is to give to each citizen that sure knowledge of
the laws of health which those who teach him, themselves possess. When every boy and girl
in the land leaves school educated in a thorough knowledge of health, so that as citizens they
demand the conditions of good health from the State in which they dwell, it is then, and only
then, that we may hope to see the reward of our present labours; this is slowly but surely
coming.
" In comparing this with reports of previous years, we are impressed with the phenomenal
growth of the work, which is due to many factors, but mainly to our method of educating the
mothers and children. Only two years have passed since this branch of our work was organized,
but its results are a sure proof of the value of the spoken word if it be spoken in season. We
no longer have to rush after parents at the last moment for permission to take the child to the
dental clinic which has been previously denied us—our appointments are booked up weeks
ahead of time. This also applies to tonsil and other clinics. The improvement of the health
of the child who has been treated is so apparent to the parents and the neighbours that it would
appear all our difficulties in the matter of dealing with ignorance of the people is at an end
if a child in that particular part of a community happens to have attended our clinic.
" We have advanced in our child-welfare very considerably. Our aim is to have a complete
health record of the child from the time of its birth until he leaves school. We can look forward
to the time when post-school health records will be compulsory and every individual will have
to submit to a medical examination each year. For the purpose of carrying out this programme
we have the co-operation of the Vital Statistics Department, which sends us each mouth a list
of the babies born in Saanich. Each baby is then visited monthly and a record-card is kept
for this purpose until he is 2 years old, after which another record-card is used which lasts
until the child is 6 years. Upon entering school a third card is made out which lasts through
the years of school-life. In this way we hope in course of time to have these telling history-
cards to back up our arguments. in favour of preventive methods, for there will always be
people to educate. A boy or girl who has been properly looked after with regard to the simple
•defects, such as teeth, tonsils, sight, and hearing, during childhood will be our most effective
teacher in the days to come, more particularly if there is an available official record.
" Much attention has been given by the School Nurse to toothbrush drill, each child being
provided with a toothbrush at a nominal rate. This drill is not theoretically taught, as some
people appear to think; on the contrary, the nurse stands in front of a class, each child has
the toothbrush, the nurse instructs them by actual practical demonstration, placing the brush
in her mouth, brushing on all aspects with an up-and-down movement, taking two minutes.
The children have several practices at this game and are then examined. We attach great
importance to what we call the " rules of the health game," and children who come up to
standard are presented with honour-roll certificates at the end of the year.
" The Normal students have shown great enterprise in making health posters, the Department giving prizes for the best. Over 200 were put out for our inspection this year, all good,
not perhaps from a drawing or artistic point of view, but to the public-health mind it is encouraging to note the trend of thought of the present-day youth along health lines, and for this we
have first of all to thank our pioneer Public Health Nurses, and, secondly, the teachers, without
whose co-operation we could not advance very far. Q 8 British Columbia. 1924
" Since our last report we have taken photographs of man}7 phases of our work, which the
Department has had made into slides. These are a valuable asset iu giving an address to the
public. We have an additional nurse on the staff this year and hope to purchase another Ford
car.
" The pre-school clinic is just in formation and we hope during the coming year to organize
others.
" Many visitors from all parts of Canada and the States have called to see the Health
Centre during the past year and their remarks have been very gratifying.
"(Signed)    C. A. Lucas, R.N.,
Nurse Superintendent."
Laboratories.
The policy adopted by the Provincial Government in the establishment of Provincial Laboratories has been more than justified by the results. The work is increasing by leaps and bounds,
and in a return made to a questionnaire we find that during the past year there were 107,004
examinations made, which is far in excess of many of the other figures quoted from other
points, and as far as population is concerned the highest on the per capita basis of any of the
offices reported.
The municipalities are appreciating the work and are more and more availing themselves
of the free service offered through these Provincial laboratories. 'The work has been confined
to the laboratories at Victoria and Vancouver, but with the growth of the work, the original
proposal, which I recommended two or three years ago, for the division of the Province into
districts with local laboratories is bearing fruit and a laboratory is being established in Kamloops. The laboratory is furnished and everything is ready to begin as soon as a man in charge
is installed. This laboratory will serve a very large territory, including the Tranquille Sanatorium, in the Interior of the Province, and we are reaching forward aud hoping to establish
next year another at Prince Rupert for the northern part of the Province.
In connection with laboratory-work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out on request. There
were sent out 794 doses of typhoid vaccine, 16,930 points of smallpox vaccine, 4,666,000 units
of diphtheria antitoxin, 25 doses of toxin antitoxin, 22 packages Schick test, 18,000 units anti-
tetanic serum, 3 doses antimeningitis serum, 3 doses tuberculin serum, and 16 doses anti-
streptococcus serum, all distributed free.
Venereal Clinics.
I have to report in regard to the work carried on that it has been increasing from month
to month, and in the two clinics established we are receiving an average of about 200 new cases
a month. The work in connection with the education of the people has not been carried on to
the same extent as previously owing to the fact that our clinics are practically working to
their limit, but we have in addition made provision to general practitioners for treatment of
indigent cases in any part of the Province. We furnish the laboratory-work free, also furnish
the medicines to all physicians who .report their cases, whether the patients are indigent or not.
Our physicians in charge of the clinics are reporting that there is undoubtedly a diminution'
of the number of cases of venereal disease, more particularly syphilitic, and the actual benefits
will begin to show in a very few years when we are able to check the number of cases admitted
to our Insane Asylum in comparison with what they were at the time we began the treatment.
Tuberculosis.
During the past year we have extended our tuberculosis campaign and as a result we are
able to report a continued improvement in the mortality list.
The Sanatorium at Tranquille has been taken over entirely by the Government and an
endeavour made to limit as far as possible the patients entering to those in which there is some
hope of at least an arrest of the disease. Provision is made for the care of tuberculosis patients
in local hospitals, which are obliged to provide 10 per cent, of their bed accommodation for
such cases. Our Public Health Nurses are trained in tuberculosis-work and are especially
instructed to report all suspected cases.
Axi appointment was made of a Travelling Diagnostician in Tuberculosis, who co-operates
with the members of the medical profession and addresses public bodies in all parts of the 15 Geo. 5 Board of Health. Q 9
Province, and also co-operates with the nurses and receives information from them in reference
to suspected cases which they have found.
In connection with the Inspector, arrangements were made for X-ray service and a portable
machine under the .charge of a technician from the Sanatorium was used. The results from
this have been very satisfactory. The Department has been commended both by the medical
profession and by the public for the steps that have been taken, and we are publishing in this
report a report from Dr. Lamb, our Inspector, which deals more specifically with his work.
Infectious Diseases.
We have to report a very satisfactory condition of affairs in this respect, more especially
as regards smallpox.
A year ago we were threatened with an epidemic owing to the fact that smallpox appeared
amongst the Indians. These people during the summer season are travelling up and down the
Coast engaged in berry-picking, hop-picking, and fishing, and a large number of cases developed.
This resulted in a great deal of trouble and expense, and we have during the past year carried
out a more drastic measure as regards vaccination of the Indians. It is their custom to hold
tribal meetings once or twice a year and we have attended these meetings with medical men
and insisted upon vaccinating them. The result has been that during the summer there has
been only one case of smallpox reported amongst the Indians.
Sporadic cases have appeared amongst the whites, but the type has been mild, with the
exception of two cases which caused us a great deal of worry, and they were both of a very
severe htemorrhoidic type and both died.
A table of infectious diseases reported during the year is incorporated in this report, and
in addition epidemics were reported as follows:—
Chicken-pox—Esquimalt Municipality, Trail,  and Trail District.
Influenza—Field, North Cowichan Municipality, and Shawnigan District.
Measles—Alberni District, Burnaby, Creston District, Cumberland, Enderby. Giscombe,
Matsqui Municipality, Michel, Nelson, New Denver' and District, Newlands, Penticton, Prince
George District, Salmon Arm, Saltspring Island, Sandon, Sooke and District, Trail, Trail District, Vancouver, Vancouver North Municipality, and Williams Lake.
Scarlet fever—Alberni District and Vancouver.
Smallpox—Vancouver.
Whooping-cough—Chilliwack, Creston District, North Cowichan Municipality, and Prince
George District.   .
Sanitation.
Under the general work of the Department, we are concerned with the larger problems of
sanitation in regard to water-supplies, sewage-disposal systems, transportation, public buildings,
and more especially with logging and mining camps and the inspection of fish and fruit canneries. The report of the Chief Sanitary Inspector is encouraging with regard to this work.
There has been a marked improvement in the sanitation iu respect to the motor traffic.
The tourist traffic has nearly doubled over the previous year, but we have not had any
complaints of moment. The auto camps established are working very satisfactorily, and in
addition to these there have been established by the Forestry Department of the Government,
summer camping-places along the roads where provision is made for the casual "camper by a
camp-site being cleared, wood provided, fireplace built, aud proper sanitary conveniences installed.
These have not only lessened the possibility of forest fires from this source, but have added
greatly to the sanitary conditions where casual camps had been formed.
I would recommend that the Government continue to impress upon the municipalities and
individuals in charge of camps that our regulations must be observed to the letter, more
especially as the activity of the publicity groups throughout the Province is encouraging the
motor traffic, and the increase in this traffic has been remarkable.
There is included with this report the report of the medical inspection of the school-children
of the Province.
We are continuing to receive from the voluntary organizations an increased interest in the
work, more particularly from the AVomen's Institutes. This noble band of women seem to have
grasped the idea of prevention aud are insisting upon all the Acts administered by this Department being carried out to the letter. Q 10 British Columbia. 1924
They have, in addition to the work in connection with this Department, established a
Crippled Children's Fund, and we are pleased to say that during the past year thirty crippled
children who had been condemned to a lifelong handicap have been cured. They have managed
from small contributions to pay for all of this work, and in addition have set aside a substantial
sum of money as a nucleus for a Preventorium. Our climate lends itself more particularly for
the treatment of children suffering from tuberculosis, and British Columbia is to be congratulated upon the sound, earnest, helpful work that the women are doing. This is the greatest
evidence that we have of the fact that the education in health is being carried to the people
and that they are willingly learning.
The continued drop in the deaths of children under 1 year of age is extremely satisfactory.
British Columbia is the lowest amongst the Provinces and is one of the lowest in the world in
the rate of deaths per thousand.
Cemetery-sites approved:   Vancouver Masonic Cemetery and Grey Creek Cemetery.
Water-supplies approved: Duncan, Allenby and Copper Mountain, District of West Vancouver Extension, Grand Forks Extension, Rossland (repair and maintenance), and Vancouver
Extension.
Sewage-disposal systems approved: "Trail Extension and Vancouver Extension.
The report of the Vital Statistics Branch-is appended, and the figures given show a very
satisfactory evidence of the satisfactory conditions of the general health of the people.
We have had an extremely busy year in the Vital Statistics Branch owing to the enforcement
of the " Chinese Immigration Act " and the enforced registration of all Chinese in the country.
In addition to this, the United States immigration laws have imposed conditions upon people
entering the United States which necessitates production of birth certificates for all.
We have been able to do all this work without any addition to our staff, and I would like
to take this opportunity of calling to your attention the earnest co-operation which I have
received from every individual employed on the staff. They are much interested in their work,
and the fact that we are continually up to date in all branches of the Department, in spite of
the great increase in the volume of business this year, is indicative of their whole-hearted cooperation.    •
I also wish, on behalf of the staff and myself, to express our feeling of great satisfaction
in the encouragement which we have received from yourself, as Minister of the Department.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. Young, M.D., CM.,
Provincial Health Officer. 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 11
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OP CASES OP CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE PROVINCE.
'3s
■§.£
d
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3
55
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a
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.£ 8
QJ   O
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3
40
16
1
30
200
31
7
2
2
6
2
11
1
59
4
116
3
1
18
5
1
4
5
1
27
1
46
12
626
11
4
1
1
22
59
2
3
1
9
6
13
2
2
1
,40
17
12
Cobble Hill	
1
6
7
7
2
9
4
1
2
S
6
30
6
40
108
47
25
30
100
2
50
3
72
24
9
30
9
1
4
23
3
4
6
1
2
10
10
2
1
28
2
io'
1
2
5
15
1
34
4
5
2
3
'   4
2
1
3
3
1
52
T
Field	
2
1
1
3
2
3
5
a
12
8
18
12
54
1
6
1
10
1
2
1
4
7
" i
4
10
1
60
2
2
1
2
l
3
5
40
13
1
1
2
33
136
3
1
40
62
34
35
"l3
1
18
1
3
8
72
43
8
12
1
10
1
3
8
4
8
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
6
10
18
6
18
25
42
325
88
16
5
40
199
409
40
1
5
2
2
50
30
1
5
97
3
7
10
"24
8
1
1
7
12
5
1
25
93
"'9'
S
4
42
51
6
2
2
10
1
4
30
5
88
10
"l5
3
3
36
1
1
4
12
2
5
1
3
1
5
3
2
"i
7
3
1
4
3
3
109
32
I
"T
1
4
1
2
3
5
10
472
1
1
7
2
6
65
4
1
1
62
64
3
26
48
497
245
163
335
1
3,417
101
2 Q 12
British Columbia.
1924
TABLE  SHOWING RETURNS  OF  CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN  THE
PROVINCE—Continued.
T^
g.S
■&!
3
"r
i
o
o
CO
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8
S
48
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& >
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62
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i %
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Sec
Brought forward	
26
8
1
2
180
2
27
2
497
18
245
163
•
472
6
3,417
1
3
220
60
1,444
184
76
375
4
101
2
4(V
Trail       	
Trail District	
"5'
1
2
4
64
1
14
1
1
13
6
899
32
6
181
3
127
5
122
30
170
15
41
345
7
70
138
14
4
334
11
3
160
1
4
1
30
40
Vancouver, North (Municipality) ....
Vancouver, North (District)	
2
11
i
150
1,006
33
18
429
64
42
176
100
35
32
0,133
ii
1
79
243
1,782
833
682
141
' 15 Geo. 5 Board of Health. Q 13
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1924.
fl. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Medical Officer of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Fourteenth Annual Report on Sanitary
Inspection.
The work of this branch of your Department is chiefly centred in the inspection of watershed
areas, industrial camps, food-canneries, and unincorporated towns.
Watersheds.
The sanitary protection of watersheds supplying more than half of the total population of
British Columbia has thus far been accomplished through the drastic regulations formulated by
your Board, and enforced by resident Inspectors under the supervision of the writer and the.
valuable and active co-operation of Dr. F. T. Underhill, F.R.C.S., D.P.H., F.R.S.I., M.O.H for
the City of Vancouver. Every one acknowledges that the power of the Empire is in " the
silent navy," but few people are aware that locally our future is in the sustained purity of
our water-supplies, silently though' zealously guarded by our Health Officers.
During the year just closing we have been called upon to take protective action regarding
water sources at Williams Lake, Gambier Island, Valdes Island, and several summer resorts.
Nuisances.
The past year has been a busy one in suppressing nuisances. Whilst in no case have we
been compelled to resort to the Courts, many complicated problems have been dealt with and
a few are still under consideration. The most serious have been in connection with slaughterhouses and fertilizing-factories. In nearly every instance it has been brought into existence
through ignorance of the fact that it is necessary to obtain an approval permit from the Provincial Board of Health for the location of any obnoxious trade plant or factory.
Industrial Camps.
In the matter of sanitary camps for our industrial workers in unorganized parts of our
Province, British Columbia stands pre-eminently the best on this continent, if not in the world.
This fact accounts in a great measure for the industrial peace in British Columbia during the
past several years.
There is no comparison between to-day's camps and the conditions prevailing some ten or
twelve years ago. This has been accomplished chiefly by the framing of regulations for the
sanitary control of industrial camps formulated in such an elastic manner as to fit the various
climatic and topographic conditions of this Province. To these have been added the assent
and co-operation of 95 per cent, of employers and employees, with the result that what was
regarded as an idle dream a few years ago is to-day an accomplished fact. In many of our
larger industrial camps the living accommodation for employees is superior to the ordinary
city hotel.
Canneries.
In the matter of canned or preserved food British Columbia is rapidly forging ahead. For
more than a quarter of a century British Columbia salmon has been famous in the greatest
markets of the world for its flavour and general quality. British Columbia fruit now bids --fair
to achieve the same favour in the public eye, and it is predicted that within a few years Vancouver Island will be famed for its loganberry wine, a local product which has leaped into
favour as a beverage and healthful tonic. It is produced under the most hygiene conditions and
the supply at present is said to be under the demand. Q 14 British Columbia. 1924
Summer Camps.
In no other Canadian Province has Nature been so lavish in its distribution of seaside playgrounds. It is estimated that one-half of our population live in the open for several months
during the summer; in addition to this, an ever-increasing number of visitors from the Prairies
and Southern tourists.
Seaside camps and resorts are nearly all located along the shores of unincorporated territory.
The sanitary supervision of these places occupies an important part of the work of this Department.
To measure the summer camp in its value to health would be an impossible task, and it
is gratifying to be able to report that in every camp visited your officers are met with courtesy
and co-operation in any action to better the general sanitary welfare. The darkest cloud on the
horizon at these places is the matter of water-supply. In many places it is inadequate and very
often its purity is under suspicion; thus the pleasure and peace of mind of parents and guardians
is often spoilt, and we are constantly being asked to investigate.
To make a survey, take samples, and dispatch them to the laboratory means not so much
work as the time involved before the analysis can be made known to the parties vitally interested.
To remedy this it is proposed to have a portable bacteriological water-testing outfit for field
use, so that at every summer camp or village the residents may have definite and frequent firsthand knowledge as to the purity or pollution of their drinking-water. This will give them a
sense of protection not hitherto enjoyed, and for the Department it will enable us to take preventive measures where there are any signs of typhoid or other serious pollution.
• Summary.
The general field of this branch of the Provincial Health Service has been beyond the
average in activity, owing to the prevalence of periodic yet isolated outbreaks of mild smallpox
and other contagious diseases in widely scattered parts of British Columbia.
Fortunately the departmental equipment for the work is better and more complete than ever
before and accounts in a great measure for the absence of any serious or continued contagious
outbreak in our extensive unorganized territory.
The distribution of printed departmental health propaganda is an important factor towards
the excellent health conditions now prevailing.
During the year just closing there have been 283 visits of inspection made to industrial
camps.
Nuisances abated      11
Water-supply systems investigated       3
Slaughter-house permits granted        2
Public cemeteries approved of       2
Canning and food-preparing plants visited      32
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Chief Sanitary Officer.
TRAVELLING MEDICAL HEALTH OFFICER'S REPORT.
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1924.
To the Honourable J. D. MacLean, M.D.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your consideration the following report of work done
by me as Travelling Medical Health Officer for the Province. This report will cover my first
year's work.
Following circular letter seut out by you to all the doctors in the Province with whom I
would come in contact, advising them of my appointment and requesting their hearty co-operation,
I notified each doctor the time of my visit a few days in advance. At the same time I got in
touch with some local organizations, through the secretary, requesting that a_ meeting be arranged
for me, either public or for their members (the former preferred), under the auspices of their
society, at which I might discuss " some of the tubercular problems of the day." 15 Geo. 5 Board of Health. Q 15
As this year my work was more or less preliminary in nature, I thought it best to call on
each doctor personally in order to explain the purposes of our ;work. I also saw any cases
referred to me by the family physician in doctor's office or in the patient's home.
In carrying out this plan I have visited eighty-three different towns and villages and called
on 146 different doctors.
Many of these towns I have visited a second time, such as those in the Okanagan and Fraser
Valley, also Nelson and Cranbrook, in the "Kootenays. In a few instances I have made three
visits.
The same applies to visits to doctors. As all my work is done directly through the family
physicians, a second call in a town means a second call on the doctor, and I must say that in
practically every instance I have had the hearty co-operation of the medical men in my work.
In addition to the clinical end, they frequently attended my public meetings, often one acting
as chairman, and in towns where no other organization existed the local Medical Health Officer
would arrange meetings for me.
In nearly every instance in which I visited a town for the second or third time there was
an increase in number of cases referred to me. In Penticton, where I made my headquarters
for the winter months and where I spent most of my week-ends during that time, there were
new cases being continually referred to me. In other towns in the Okanagan as well as in
the Fraser Valley the same condition obtained. This tends to show the possibilities of the
development of the work.
The Educational End of the Work.
In all, I have given eighty addresses, mostly open to the public; but a few for members
of organizations only. Forty-four of these, all public, were under the auspices of the local
Women's Institutes; three, Rotary Club luncheons; four, nurses in training; five, the pupils
of the Entrance and High School classes. The balance, twenty-four in number, under a variety
of auspices, such as the K. of P., I.O.O.F., First-aid and Home-nursing classes, Local Council
of Women, Women's Canadian Clubs, People's Forum, Board of Trade, and in a number of
instances meetings arranged by local doctors, usually the Medical Health Officer for district.
I had some difficulty at first in arranging meetings through Women's Institutes at time
requested until I was asked to meet with the District Conference of Women's Institutes in
Vancouver and Nelson, but after explaining our work to them and asking for their co-operation
this has been a very satisfactory method.
The numbers attending these meetings varied from nine to 200, most meetings ranging from
fifteen to eighty.   The average would probably be about forty.
The meeting at which there were 200 present was a unique experience. It was in a small
inland mining town where I had hardly hoped to have a meeting at all. On arrival I found
that no arrangement had been made for a meeting, but that one of the churches was giving a
concert by local talent in the theatre. I asked and was granted permission to address the
audience at the close of the concert. In spite of the fact that the hour was late and the programme rather lengthy, they permitted me a good half-hour and scarcely anybody left the
meeting.
At Smithers it was arranged that I should give a talk between films of a picture-show.
In every town where there were nurses in training I either gave a talk specially, or personally interviewed the matron of the hospital and had as many of the student nurses as possible
attend the public meeting. As already mentioned, I gave addresses to four classes of nurses
in training.
I have seen and examined 240 persons in consultation with their family physicians. Of
these, I have classed 114 as positively tubercular, thirty-two as suspects, and ninety-four as non-
tubercular.
Of the 114 positive eases, there were conditions varying from the incipient to far advanced.
Some of these cases are already on the cure, while others have been so far restored to health
as to be following their regular vocations. In many of these there was no question of diagnosis,
but advice was sought as to how they should carry on the cure, the amount of rest, exercise, etc.
The thirty-two suspects are largely made up of children of varying ages, many of them
of tubercular parentage, with some suggestive symptoms or signs, but nothing very definite;
others being adults with probably a very suggestive history and symptoms, but no definite
physical signs made out. This is the class of cases in which flouroscopic examination and X-ray plates may be a
great aid in bringing one to a definite conclusion.
The ninety-four classed as non-tubercular represents a variety of conditions, including two
cases, seen within a few days of each other,'of very probable malignant conditions of the chest, a
rather rare condition. The comparatively large number of non-tubercular cases out of the total
is some indication of interest taken in the clinical part of the work by doctors and laity alike.
Although I have not collected any exact data on the matter except in the last two months,
one is struck by the preponderance of cases who developed the disease outside the Province
and came here on account of their condition. This is particularly the case in the Interior of
British Columbia. These cases come mostly from the British Isles and the Eastern or Middle
Western Provinces. Many of these are carrying on very satisfactorily and making good progress
toward an arrested condition if not actual cure. Others, not doing so well, I have had the
pleasure of seeing put on the cure with resultant improvement in their condition. This tends
to strengthen one's belief in the climatic factor in the cure.
There is not as many of the above classes of cases coming to our Province to-day as formerly,
however, especially of advanced cases, due to the more prevalent belief that tuberculosis can
be treated satisfactorily in any climate, and that the worst place is away from home and friends,
especially if financial conditions are not adequate to compensate for loss of these.
Most of the smaller places are, of course, without any X-ray facilities. In the larger towns
the equipment varies from the old type of machine to the most modern, and results attained
in chest-work particularly depend upon a modern type of machine and also on the experience
of the operator. It is highly gratifying to see the doctors working away even while handicapped
in this way, and while the results are rather indifferent in many cases, there will no doubt be
Improvement as experience increases. To give encouragement in this work, and at the same
time to assist me in clearing up some diagnosis, you were good enough to gra.nt me permission
to have Mr. Lothian, X-ray technician from Tranquille, to accompany me on a trip through the
Okanagan.
We visited Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton, taking some X-ray pictures in each place and
going over with the doctors the difficulties they were having. We spent about ten days over
this, which seemed to be much appreciated by the doctors. I think the results were such as
would justify us in continuing the work in the future.
At the instance of your Department I have officially inspected six hospitals. In addition
to that, I visit hospitals in each town, generally going over them in more or less detail.
As far as I am aware—in fact. Dr. Wodehouse so informed me—British Columbia is the only
Province in which travelling clinicians visit the doctors personally. In all other instances the
clinics are held at)hospitals or some other public place arranged for. This latter is the method
I had proposed following after my first year, but present plan has been so satisfactory, both
to the doctors and myself, that I feel that it is best to continue it for the next year at least.
I very frequently hear complaints from the doctors that while we are advocating early
diagnosis and treatment, it is very often impossible to get cases in the Sanatorium when
diagnosed, particularly female patients. While accommodation for that class has been more
than doubled in the last two years, it still seems inadequate to present needs. I make it a
point iu these cases to impress upon the doctors, as well as Hospital Boards, that the General
Hospital is the place where those cases should be sent until they can be received into the
Sanatorium, and that it is the duty of the Public Hospital Board to provide accommodation for
advanced cases, and thus save Sanatorium beds for incipient or less advanced cases in which
there is hope of arrestment or cures.
I should like to see a survey of school-children in the Interior of British Columbia, some
part of the Dry Belt, to see if there is the same proportion of infection among children as in
other parts, such as was done under your direction in South Vancouver last year.
Amongst the greatest difficulties in the extension of preventive measures I believe to be the
dread of the patient being pronounced tubercular, and also the altogether inadequate instruction
by both doctors and nurses to their patients iu the methods of prevention of infection of others.
Allow me to extend my very hearty thanks to the doctors, to the Women's Institutes, and
all other organizations who have in many ways contributed to any success I may have attained.
I have, etc.,
A. S. Lamb, M.D. 15 Geo. 5 Board of Health. Q 17
REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1924.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg leave to hand you the Thirteenth Annual Report of the Medical
Inspection of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
In making my report of the medical inspection of the schools, I am conscious of the fact
that a study of the tables submitted would indicate a condition that was serious if it were hot
that a comparison with other years and with the reports that are being made to the Department
shows that a great advance is being made in the correction of the defects which are found by
the medical inspectors.
I would like to note that from year to year the interest taken by the Medical Inspectors
in their work has increased very markedly, and they are endeavouring to impress upon the
parents the fact that these examinations are not simply carried out in a perfunctory manner,
and that they are endeavouring to have the parents correct the defects that have been found.
The letters that we are receiving from the parents in regard to this work is evidence of
the interest that is being taken, and the people are insisting upon the work being carried out
by the Medical Inspectors in a way that will acquaint them with present conditions, and are
also insisting that means be provided whereby preventive measures can be taken.
This is especially true in regard to the dental branch of our work, and I would like to
acknowledge here the great interest that is being manifested by the dental profession in their
efforts to co-operate with the Department.
The dental defects existing among the children in British Columbia are appalling, and if
it were not for the fact that our reports show such a splendid effort being made to cope with
this trouble the situation would appear hopeless. As it is, we are gradually extending the
establishment of dental clinics in different parts of the Province, more especially where our
Public Health Nurses are established, and we have been able to give financial assistance to
some extent where our nurses reported total inability on the part of the parents to provide
treatment.
Our nurses are very much alive to the work and are able to demonstrate to the school
authorities that a concerted effort results in the work being done at a very low financial cost.
In fact, where the clinics are established our work is practically on a self-supporting basis, and
we find that the average cost of treatment when the work is carried on in groups is about $3.30
a pupil.
The importance of the work is very great and the results obtained are so marked that once
the work has been started in a district the people insist that it be continued. The first work
is always the greatest, as all the dental defects in the child have to be attended to, but the year
following it is a simple matter to deal with the new cases as they arise.
In addition to the medical inspection, we find that the complaints in regard to the sanitary
conditions are a rarity, whereas in the past we continually were being importuned to impress
Boards of Trustees with an insistence that would necessitate their observing the terms of the
" Public Health Act."
School trustees in British Columbia are very earnest people, and are endeavouring to obtain
information so that they ntay be in a position to give the very best attention they can to the
children, and they are beginning to realize that the enormous cost of education is due to the
fact that the money expended is spent by way of an investment, because it is realized that the
educated citizen is the best citizen, and they recognize also that it is very poor business policy
to spend money on educating a school population, one-third of whom are, reports show, suffering
from physical defects that in after-life will prevent any return on the investment that is made
on their education.
The people are beginning to realize that it is useless to spend money in educating children
who are physically defective, and we feel that in the progress made in the work of the medical
2 Q 18 British Columbia. 1924
inspection of the school-children of British Columbia we are well to the front, and, what is more
to the point, are achieving results that in the future will mean much to the generation that is
growing up by way of national wealth which a healthy population will be able to produce.
Details of the examination for each school follows.
I have, etc.,
H. E. Young, M.D., CM.,
Provincial Health Officer.
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors: 157.
Reports from Medical Inspectors: 139.
High   Schools.
High Schools.  1922-23, 61:   Reported, 27; not reported, 34.   1923-24, 59:   Reported, 27; not
reported, 32.
Pupils inspected:   1922-23, 4,783; 1923-24, 5,551, an increase of 768.
Graded City Schools.
Cities. 1922-23, 35 : Reported, 26; not reported, 9.  1923-24, 33 :  Reported, 26; not reported, 7.
Pupils inspected:  1922-23, 32,181; 1923-24, 32,475, an increase of 294.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities.   1922-23, 27;   Reported, 20; not reported, 7.   1923-24, 27:   Reported, 24; not
reported, 3.
Pupils inspected: 1922-23, 21,103; 1923-24, 24,856, an increase of 3,753.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected: 1922-23, 540, at a cost of $12,364; 1923-24, 561, at a cost of $12,687.25.
Schools not inspected:   1922-23, 149; 1923-24, 150.
Pupils inspected:   1922-23, 14,080; 1923-24, 14,6S7, an increase of 607.
Cost of inspection per pupil:   1922-23, 87 cents; 1923-24, 86 cents.
Percentage of defects:    1922-23, 110.35; 1923-24, 107.56, a decrease of 2.79.  Q 20
British Columbia.
1924
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
p.
Ad
Is
cq
ft
cz   .
rM V
CD
°s
Zi  CD
o
a
s
CD >.
8 a
a S
0)
>
&>.£
CD .iS
t <S
CJ £3
flK
CO
os
is  .
m cG
.-"
CJ T7
0) oi
v. c
a, t.
•a
■a
-4
-a
oj 'ca
ng
T. A. Swift. ...
41
74
193
199
98
15
48
80
41
67
39
193
88
13
48
78
132
91
39
32
16
135
245
395
20
13
274
237
46
118
114
16
60
92.
491
82
583
208
373
157
76
323
616
6
5
7
2
17
1
1
1
4
4
6
G. deB. Watson	
1
R. McCaffrey	
9
8
R. H. Port	
W. Truax	
Miss Morrison	
6
i
l
7
49
30
1
19
2
1
8
2
1
2
23
48
19
6
1
7
20
4
9
11
1
3
10
20
1
1
1
6
4
2
1
1
M. G. Archibald ...
24
W. J. Knox	
96
45
36
16
135
257
395
20
15
274
4
B. B. Marr	
G. H. Tutill	
2
W. F. Drysdale	
Miss M. J. Woods .
,13
1
1
3
2
2
2
1
23
18
23
E. C. Arthur	
35
New Westminster:
D. A. Clark 	
A. Stark 	
49
A. E. H. Bennett	
Point Grey:
W. Dykes	
Miss M. Ewart	
21
7
C. Ewart	
5
Prince Rupert:
King Edward  	
118
120
18
71
92
543
104
667
401
370
243
327
323
618
2
8
3
2
1
2
1
2
7
F. D. Sinclair	
8
Vancoaver:
H. White	
M. P. Campbell...
H             	
E. Edwards	
12
8
13
16
1
1
2
9
10
High School of Commerce.
3
5
1
10
1
1
11
5
14
26
7
G. A. Lamont	
40
34
GRADED CITY
Alberni 	
Cranbrook:
Central	
Kootenay Orchards
South Ward	
A. D. Morgan 	
G. E. L. MacKinnon .
122
104
2
1
6
1
580
642
48
22
21
5
88
79
7 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 21
SCHOOLS.
CJ A
oj"7:
X °
QB
a   .
cc w
fc. TJ
oj fl
a a
S3
oj
'0
3
1
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
d
a
s
ED
<P
3
ei
V
w
d
to
%
a
a
a
IQ
O
fe
&
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
5
1
1
1
1
9
18
2
3
1
IS
72
58
3
2
2
1
3
"2
6
4
14
2
13
10
3
1
Measles, 2; tonsillitis, 1;
endocarditis,   1;    hay
fever, 1
Good	
1
Cardiac,    2;    seborrhcea,   8;
blepharitis, 1
sanitary; otherwise closets
adequate    and
well kept.
Clean; adequate.
3
German measles, 1; scarlet fever, 3
5
Yes.
9
Satisfactory	
Good	
i
Yes.
17
Not crowded ; ventilation and heating average
Rooms   overcrowded
Clean; adequate.
9
35
69
15
2
8
3
18
56
34
3
13
1
3
11
"2'
80
3
11
6
9
"e
21
46
1
quate.
6
Chorea, 1; cardiac, 1; flat feet,
3; anaemia, 3; chronic bronchitis, 2; curvature of spine,
2; sq. eczema, 1
Epidemic of measles and
Good	
Satisfactory
Good	
Heating and ventilation good
Good	
sanitary;   adequate; efficient.
Good.
8
Yes.
3
Measles, 4 ; scarlet fever,
1; whooping-cough, 1
Scarlet fever ;   measles ;
chicken-pox
54
Hand amputated, 1; lame, 1;
stammers,   1;   nervous,   1;
anaemia, 1
V.D.H., 8 ; irregular heart, 1..
Orthopaedic,  10;   cardiac,  18 ;
pulmonary, 2; anaemia, 2
Clean; adequate.
46
6
54
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Ample.
1
i
Modern; O. K
41
Nervous,   1;   pulmonary,   45 ;
cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 7.
Pulmonary,   19;   cardiac,   4 ;
orthopaedic, 2
20
10
Ventilation fair...
Good	
Clean; adequate.
6
Good.
4
Dermatitis, 1; polypus nose, 1
100% inadequate.
Adequate.
6
39
166
Measles, 8; scarlet fever,
2 ; smallpox, 3 ; chicken-pox, 1
23
146
Measles, 8 ; scarlet fever,
16; smallpox, 5; chicken-pox, 1
Scarlet fever, 8 ;  smallpox, 1
Measles,4;scarletfever, 5
46
82
Vaccinated,  18S ;   cardiac,   1 ;
pulmonary, 1
54
'3
Measles, 1; scarlet fever, 2
19
Not crowded; well
ventilated    and
heated
Clean; adequate.
Adequate;   satisfactory.
129
1
i
Chicken-pox, 2; vaccinations, 21; smallpox, 3;
scarlet fever, 1 ; measles, 4
SCHOOLS.
so
3
10
14
64
Satisfactory	
1
13
1 Q 22
British Columbia.
1924
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
_
a
rn
"S
3
(3
O
o fe*
0)
<u
rt
0) tc
oi
2
^•6
'C
fe £
t»
t ti)
k H
o H
p
i\
y a>
°a
P
a
■§1
IJ
■3.2
(y ™
Qffi
C .3
0) rt
a; E
"o
a
a)
ts
•4
Miss Jeffares	
156
376
68
800
145
525
396
381
177
678
146
129
678
259
834
647
459
76
411
216
172
92
385
131
370
66
746
137
515
374
352
171
671
145
128
677
218
804
628
447
70
398
177
152
88
281
354
238
45
315
323
88
394
62
622
14
T'
148'
ii
8
3
8
1
113
112
66
12
64
4
6
4
6
"i'
8
6
i
12'
2
3
4
1
1
12
6
8
1
"3'
1
23
24
30
11
38
10
21
20
13
12
58
14
11
96
44
118
103
51
3
72
40
8
3
10
16
18
5
6
4
26
9
149
10
1
2
29
"6
T
3
2
1
69
21
3
2
1
2
"i'
3
4
1
7
94
10
16
117'
18
22
3
12
31
8
4
2
6
2
1
18
3
4
1
7
12
90
10
8
229'
18
16
5
10
2
12
2
1
47
16
177
164
98
18
114
4
'is
2
i
7
12
2
6
5
9
102,
H. W. Keith	
67
30
26
248
17
W. J. Knox	
Miss McClung ....
24
76
Nanaimo:
Middle Ward	
W. F. Drysdale	
Miss M. J. Woods.
106
229
83
80
Nelson:
140
65
New Westminster:
Miss A. Stark	
177
164
98
18
114
26
Port Coquitlam:
20
23
Prince Rupert:
300
365
266
46
320
330
92
404
62
622
IS
10
.
Revelstoke:
35
37
Rossland:
21
20
Trail:
Drs.   Thorn,   Coghlin,   and
Williams
381 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 23
SCHOOLS— Continued.
0J~
» |
OS
u "0
fl
HO
a
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
R
a
6
o
r
B
u
>
3
at
V
m
ft
a
to
3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
90
63
10
73
65
2
22
62
3
31
416
iio'
18
122
63
29
io
136
16
88
119
'eo'
5
40
55
78
13
355
92
119
38
70
12
44
53
11
280
1
302
199
80
437
416
60
367
322
43
273
257
30
51
221
48
209
1
22
15
12
12
82
46
100
20
8
6
5
2
24
23
6
1
10
12
1
31
7
33
9
26
120
6
4
22
52
2
22
378
7
412
Cardiac, 3 ; kyphosis,  3 ; nerv
ous, 3 ; hernia, 1 ; chorea, 1
Cardiac, 1	
Chorea, 2; valvular heart, 2.
Pulmonary, 2; cardiac, 4; nerv-
ous, 10; cleft palate, 2; infantile paralysis, 2
Chorea, 5; cardiac, 7; flat feet, 8
anaemia, 21; chr. bronchitis.
18; curvature of spine, 7; de
formed feet, 3; sq. eczema, 7
Cardiac, 4; orthopaedic defects,5
Cardiac 3	
Cough, 1; nervous, 1; ana3mia,4
Symptoms of anemia, 31; spinal
defect, 2; bronchitis, 2; asthma^; bothlegsamputated,l;
lame, 2; serious nervous con
dition, 2; heart defect, 1
cleft palate, 1; tubercular
glands, 1; chronic kidney, 1;
face paralysis, 1
Heart, 1; nervous, 1; dull, 1;
stutters, 1; peculiar walk, 2
ansemia, 4
Asthma, 1; eczema, 1; rheuma
tism, 1; anaemia, 5
Chorea, 1; V.D.H., 4; irregular
heart, 8
V.D. H., 5; intermittent heart, 1
Orthopaedic,  29; cardiac,   35
pulmonary,   8;   anaemia   5
chorea, 4
Orthopa-dic,   21;   cardiac,   19
pulmonary,   4 ;   chorea,   3
anaemia, 3
Orthopaedic,   19;   cardiac, 14
pulmonary, 5; chorea, 3
Orthopaedic, 1	
Orthopaedic,   19;   cardiac,   25
pulmonary,   5;   chorea,   1
anaemia, 1
Anaemia, 3; blepharitis, 1	
Funnel chest, 1 ; deformed elbow, 1; blepharitis, 10; irregular pupil, I; uvula absent, 3
7   Right leg atrophy, 1 .
Cardiac, 1; acne, 3; jaundice, 4
Cardiac, 3; orthopaedic, 5; jaundice, 40
Cardiac, 5	
Cardiac, 16; anaemia, 14; cleft
palate, 1; eczema, 4
18
Diphtheria, scarlet fever,
measles, whooping-
cough, chicken-pox,
conjunctivitis
Measles	
Measles; mumps	
Measles, 23	
Epidemic of measles and
whooping-cough
Rooms  fairly well
ventilated
Satisfactory .,.
Scarlet fever, 8 ; whooping-cough, 3
Measles, 75; scarlet fever,
6 ; whooping-cough, 5 ;
chicken-pox, 1
Typhoid, 1; measles, 80;
chicken-pox, 4; scarlet
fever, 9; smallpox, 3;
mumps, 1; whooping-
cough, 5
Measles, 65; chicken-pox,
7; smallpox, 1; whooping-cough, 6
Measles, 29; scarlet fever,
3; whooping-cough, 2
Scarlet fever, measles,
chicken-pox
Scarlet fever, measles,
chicken-pox
Smallpox, 14; scarlet
fever, 18; chicken-pox,
' 44; typhoid, 2; measles,
500
Measles  and  whooping-
cough
Measles and scarlet fever
Scarlet fever and chicken-pox
Scarlet fever and chick-
Measles, 1; scarlet fever,
15; chicken-pox, 6
Good	
Excellent in all,
except awnings
needed on sunny
side of some
rooms
Good	
Satisfactory ...
Heating   good ;
ventilation fair
Heating   good ;
ventilation fair
Heatinggood; ven
tilation fair
Heatinggood; ven
tilation fair
Overcrowded; two
classes in attic,
one in basement
Excellent	
Ventilation poor.
Good.
Wooden frame.
Modern; brick.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Indoor flush ;
sanitary; adequate; efficient.
Good.
Yes.
Adequate; fair.
Adequate; fair.
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
Fair.
Good.
Modern; good.
ii
Yes. Q 24
British Columbia.
1924
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
d
«
»   .
0)  fe,
0)
0)
o W
fe ;£
fe
£ ^
fe c
•o
"5 s
+3 p
4^   SS
o
<S d
OJ  o
oj 2
4) cj
a
"S3
tn rt
a>
QJ  OJ
QJ    OJ
« £
9
oa
nt>
OM
Qcq
*4
Trail—Continued.
Tadanac  	
Trail, East	
Vancouver:
Aberdeen	
Alexandra 	
Bayview	
Beaconsfleld
Block 70	
Central	
Dawson   	
Charles Dickens
Fairview	
Franklin	
Simon Fraser...
General Gordon.
Grandview	
Grenfell	
Hastings	
Henry Hudson.,
Kitsilano	
Livingstone   ...
Model	
C. S. Williams.
Drs.   Thorn,    Coghlin,   and
Williams
H. White	
M. P. Campbell.
V. B. Stevens...
D. Shields	
I. Smith	
M. D. Schultz...
M. P. Campbell.
H. Jukes.
M. K. Cruickshank
D. Bellamy.
M. D. Schultz ....
M. K. Cruickshank
D. Shields	
V. B. Stevens..
M. B. Schultz ,
D. Shields
M. K. Cruickshank
D. Bellamy.
40
40
55
54
464
464
619
619
419
409
435
320
112
727
90
658
1023
1003
475
463
539
467
338
329
578
462
562
519
651
612
90
743
76
731
664
649
615
512
443
439
504
483
171
102
18
1
6
4
1
15
4
4
4
35
3
10
S
13
3
1
I
17
2
7
3
26
3
1
1
14
42
5
2
2
6
3
1
1
16
5
10
8
1
1
2
4
1
1
21
7
26
4
8
6
33
2
7
1
.9
20
6
2
6
23
1
2
7
9
1
6
15
1 15 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
Q 25
SCHOOLS—Continued.
bC M
OJ
at a
KO
O
Other Conditions, specify
{Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
n
1
0)
o
ft
o
fe_
p
p~
ri
K
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
23
3
26
26
44
111
12
11
110
12
8
58
6
69
3
4
10
188
1
23
19'
182
31
33
92
8
12
70
1
4
62
2
6
112
5
13
81
9
118
10
20
15
123
2
8
3
7
122
4
6
82
1
1
80
8
11
88
2
5
Cardiac, 4 ; anaemia, 4 ; orthopaedic, 7
Cardiac, 3	
Vaccinated ,  183;   cardiac,   2 ;
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,   264 ;   cardiac, 5 ;
pulmonary, 5
Vaccinated,   161;   cardiac,   1 ;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 107 ; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,  22 ;  pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,  271;   cardiac,   3;
pulmonary, 5
Vaccinated, 452; pulmonary,
cardiac, 3
Vaccinated, 147 ; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 124 ; pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 122 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 182 ; cardiac, 3.
Vaccinated, 270 ; cardiac, 3.
Vaccinated,   229;   cardiac,  1
pulmonary, 4
Vaccinated, 36 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 243	
Vaccinated, 313 ; cardiac, 2.
Vaccinated, 195 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 142 ; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 123; cardiac, 1.
Measles, 54; scarlet fever,
12 ; chicken -pox, 2 ;
diphtheria, 3
Measles, 59; scarlet fever,
21; smallpox, 4; diphtheria, 2;chicken-pox,5
Measles, 81; scarlet fever,
10; chicken-pox, 2 ;
whooping-cough, 1
Measles, 23; scarlet fever,
20;diphtheria, 20;
diphtheria carriers, 16;
smallpox, 1; chicken-
pox, 2 ; whooping-
cough, 1
Measles, 2; scarlet fever, 4
Measles, 76; scarlet fever,
8 ; diphtheria, 7 ; diphtheria carriers, 9;
smallpox, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 21
Measles, 49; scarlet fever,
52 ; smallpox, 2 ; diphtheria, 8 ; diphtheria
carriers, 7 ; chicken-
pox, 13 ; whooping-
cough, 4 ; mumps, 2
Measles, 32; scarlet fever,
7 ; smallpox, 3; diphtheria, 5 ; diphtheria
carriers, 7; chicken-
pox, 3
Measles, 49; scarlet fever,
14 ; smallpox, 4 ; diphtheria, 1 ; diphtheria
carriers, 3; chicken-
pox, 1 ; whooping-
cough, 1
Measles, 15; scarlet fever,
6; smallpox, 1; diphtheria, 2;chicken-pox,5
Measles, 82;scarlet fever,
9 ; smallpox, 2 ; diphtheria, 5 ; diphtheria
carriers, 2 ; chicken-
pox, 12
Measles, 135; scarlet fever, 26 ; diphtheria, 4;
chicken-pox, 1
Measles, 60; scarlet fever,
14; diphtheria, 3; diphtheria carrier, 1
Diphtheria, 2	
Measles, 67; scarlet fever,
43; smallpox, 5; diphtheria, 1; chicken-pox,
9
Measles, 91; scarlet fever,
29; smallpox, 7; chicken-pox, 6 ; whooping-
cough, 5 ; mumps, 3
Measles, 64; scarlet fever,
11 ; smallpox, 1; diphtheria, 1; chicken-pox,
21; whooping-cough, 1;
mumps, 8
Measles, 30; scarlet fever,
2 ; smallpox, 1 ; diphtheria, 2; chicken-pox,
2; whooping-cough, 9
Measles, 23; scarlet fever,
3 ; smallpox, 1 ; diphtheria, 1 ; diphtheria
carrier, 1 ; chicken-
pox, 6 Q 26
British Columbia.
1924
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
"ft
p
fed
W J
°Z
A CJ
ft
<m a
iS  CD
d
o
'C
a
«
ID  fc»
> ~
o ci
CJ 5
<i3 s
oa
fe
Is
*H 'rn
CD .Ci
a>
CD    .
t  ""
8'g
a O
OK
li
S5   .
cj to
CJ ™
O rt
CJ £
on
oj
!H
"o
a
CJ
<1
-C3
Si
-   HH
■al
Vancouver—Co ntinued.
H. White	
M. K. Cruickshank
M. D. Schultz ....
I. Smith	
V. B. Stevens
D. Bellamy	
725
519
790
696
539
921
566
875
1180
034
414
597
510
530
70
131 ,
135
111
353
221
503
448
464
375
148
530
651
449
828
576
466
920
558
797
1096
536
414
597
510
526
70
131
92
100
128
105
218
149
190
139
93
343
172
137
235
166
108
205
193
160
216
113
2
3
2
102
11
23
"l
7
2
4
i
i'
23
18
28
32
9
15
25
17
38
10
31
43
48
12
1
2
14
9
24
1
32
SO
35
10
3
14
4
5
5
5
3
2
3
2
12
13
13
7
1
1
1
2
1
4
2
1
2
1
5
14
14
16
9
10
1
5
9
7
9
7
5
5
6
10
5
86
72
40
16
9
10
41
47
37
Florence Nightingale .     ,
46
37
52
I. Smith	
M. A. McLellan...
D. Bellamy	
38
80
86
36
Vancouver, North:
115
Vernon:
174
147
J. A. Osborn	
E. J. Herbert    ,
J. A. Osborn	
I. E. Adams	
J. A. Osborn	
83
Park	
11
Victoria :
14
5
11
14
14
Sir James Douglas	
''         	
17
5
..
3
1
2
10
12
t
Kingston Street	
North Ward	
9
20 15 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
Q 27
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
|
!
va
S
3
o
ft
o
tfl
H
>
CJ
a
tf
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
99
167
162
130
25
41
13
47
Vaccinated,   267 ;   cardiac,  3;
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 186 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated,  342;   cardiac,   4
pulmonary, 6
Vaccinated,   294;  cardiac,   4
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 188 ; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 498 ; pulmonary, 5
Vaccinated, 163 ; cardiac, 2.
Vaccinated,  343;   cardiac,   1
pulmonary, 10
Vaccinated,   829;   cardiac,
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,   200;   cardiac,   3
pulmonary, 1
Heart murmur.
Heart murmur, 8.
Asthma, 1; nervous, 3 .
Nervous, 1   	
Nervous, 1	
Cardiac, 2; dwarf, 1; infantile
paralysis, 1
Cardiac, 2 ; pulmonary, 1; impediment in speech, 2; club
foot, 1; curvature of chest, 1;
nervous, 2
Cardiac, 1; infantile paralysis, 1
Nervous, 1; pigeon breast, 1;
protuberance, 1
Depressed sternum, 1	
Cardiac, 1   	
Malformation of right ear, 1;
strabismus, 1; abscess of
middle ear, 1
Nervous, 2 ; cardiac, 2 ; ortho-
iffldic, 1; conjunctivitis, 1
Cardiac, 1; infantile paralysis,
1; paraplegia, 1; flat chest, 1
Measles, 56; scarlet fever,
10 ; smallpox, 4 ; diphtheria, 1; diphtheria
carriers, 3; chicken-
pox, 3 ; whooping-
cough, 1
Measles, 19; scarlet fever,
15 ; smallpox, 10; diphtheria, 2; chicken-pox,
2
Measles, 77; scarletfever,
25; whooping-cough, 1;
diphtheria, 2; diphtheria carriers, 2
Measles, 46; scarlet fever,
7; mumps, 2 ; diphtheria, 18 ; diphtheria
carriers, 27; chicken'
pox, 3 ; whooping
cough, 1
Measles, 63; scarlet fever.
12 ; smallpox, 2 ; diph
theria, 6 ; chicken
pox, 7
Measles, 139 ; scarlet fever, 28; chicken-pox, 11;
mumps, 1; diphtheria,
6; diphtheria carriers
2; whooping-cough, 6
Measles, 30; scarlet fever,
8 ; whooping-cough, 1
Measles, 92; scarlet fever,
13 ; smallpox, 2; diph'
theria, 2; diphtheria
carriers, 2
Measles, 88; scarlet fever,
2 ; smallpox, 1; diphtheria, 8 ; diphtheria
carriers, 4 ; chicken-
pox, 1; mumps, 1
Measles, 89; scarlet fever.
4 ; smallpox, 1 ; chick
en-pox, 2 ; mumps, 1
Measles; whooping-cough
Scarletfever, 3; measles, 1
Scarletfever, 5; measles, 2
Scarletfever, 5	
Scarlet fever, 8; measles,
37
Scarlet fever, 7	
Scarlet fever, 13	
Scarletfever, 2; measles, 4
Scarlet fever, 3 .
Scarlet fever, 1 .
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
O.K	
Tl 	
Excellent	
For an old building fairly satisfactory
Excellent	
Satisfactory	
Excellent	
An old school but
fairly satisfactory
An old building;
heating good but
ventilation not
perfect
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate. Q 28
British Columbia.
1924
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
'3,
p
^■6
cc
ft
D    .
a
o
QJ  fei
fe a
fe
Q>
>  Ml
to
rt
£   .
Oj 6C
"O
*2
ru  CJ
®3
. at
O u
2; *
3
g
«H   P
Oj QJ
QJ.2
oj 4S
CJ ■■-
QJ fa
qj a>
Qffl
J3 3
CJ -M
<H   OJ
qj   -_
o
a
9
•a
3
a o
Victoria—Continued.
D. Donald	
E. J. Herbert
I. E. Adams   	
548
219
171
329
322
126
146
152
5
19
13
1
13
2
1
00
15
i
15
South Park	
"         	
6
140
132
7
1
17
	
343
199
1
14
1
6
RURAL  MUNICIPAL
Burnaby:
Armstrong Avenue
Barnet	
Capitol Hill	
Douglas Road	
Edmonds Street   ..
Gilmore Avenue .
Hamilton Road.
Inman Avenue..
Kingsway, East.
Kingsway, West ..
Nelson Avenue ...
Riverway, East...
Schou Street ..
Seaforth	
Second Street .
Sperling Avenue..
Chilliwack:
Atchelitz	
Camp Slough	
Cheam	
East Chilliwack...
Fairfield Island ...
Lothiniere	
Parson's Hill .   ...
Promontory Flats
Robertson	
Rosedale	
Sardis	
Strathcona	
Sumas	
Vedder River	
Coldstream:
Coldstream	
Lavington.
Coquitlam:
Blue Mountain .
G. de B. Watsou .
E. J. Foster   	
0. de B. Watson .
E. J. Foster .
G. de B. Watson .
E. J. Foster	
G. de B. Watson .
E. J. Foster	
G. de B. Watson .
E. J. Foster	
G. de B. Watson .
E. J. Foster .
R. McCaffrey
J. C. Henderson .
R. McCaffrey .
J. C. Henderson .
R. McCaffrey ....
*C. Henderson .
McCaffrey.	
W. Arhuckle
B. Cannon.
29
15
85
28
14
77
"'-
i
1
1
7
1
4
2
9
97
96
1
1
498
451
13
3
4
661
661
16
43
4
9
51
26
170
22
169
2i'
6
2
18
2
10
171
165
4
2
504
493
8
3
52
1
23
51 ■
296
71
70
15
63
116
42
61
15
57
3
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
5
3
16
16
1
1
3
1
2
79
39
56
71
59
47
22
14
78
120
151
77
36
54
69
53
41
20
14
76
116
148
44
20
18
48
4
7
"i'
4
2
2
i
"3'
1
i
1
1
8
4
4
4
3
4
3
3
8
14
1
3
3
7
1
3
2
2
4
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
2
2
1
44
20
22
55
1
1
3
7
31
26
2
2
4
5
31
25
2
2 I
15 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
Q 29
SCHOOLS—Continued.
tt} ua
0)
WO
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Cardiac, 2 ; deformed chest, 4 ;
paraplegia, 1; pulmonary, 3
Paraplegia, 2	
Pulmonary, 2; cardiac, 3	
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 2 ; orthopaedic, 1
Deformed ribs, 1; ottis media, 1
Cardiac, 1;  nervous, 1; chest,
1; deformed arm, 1
7
13
5
2
3
6
1
6
8
13
11
3
1
2
1
6
7
2
3
24
15
Scarletfever, 5; measles, 9
Scarletfever, 1; measles, 2
Measles, 1	
Scarlet fever, 10	
Scarlet fever, 2	
Scarletfever,10; measles,
10
An old building;
dull and not too
cheerful; heating and ventilation good
An old building;
heating and ventilation fair
Very satisfactory..
Clean; adequate.
SCHOOLS.
9
2
13
27
124
Wax in ears, 1.
Cardiac, 2; rhinitis, 4; seborrhea, 5
Unclean lin ess, 2 ; bronchial
catarrh, 1; wax in ears, 2
Seborrhea, 1; uncleanliness, 2;
bronchial catarrh, 3; heart
trouble, 5; strabismus, 6;
discharging ears, 1; wax in
ears, 3; rhinitis, 2; thickened
nasal septum, 1
Cardiac, 8; rhinitis, 9; anaemia,
2; seborrhea, 24 ; blepharitis,
9
Rhinitis, 2	
Cardiac, 2; nervous, 3; rhinitis,
2 ; seborrhoea, 1; deformities,
3; alopecia, 1
Heart trouble, 1;  discharging
ears,   1;    wax   in   ears,   3;
rhinitis, 1;  thickened nasal
septum, 1
Cardiac,   6;    seborrhea,   13;
bronchitis, 1
Bronchial catarrh, 1; rhinitis, 1
Uncleanliness, 1; bronchial
catarrh, 1; strabismus, 1 ;
rhinitis, 1
Cardiac, 1; seborrhea, 3	
Blepharitis, 2 ; asthma, 1	
Uncleanliness, i; pulmonary, 1;
strabismus, 1; cleft palate, 1
Blepharitis, 1; rhinitis, 1	
Measles, 2	
Mumps, 3	
Smallpox, 1; mumps, 10.
Chicken-pox, 1; measles,
96 ; scarlet fever, 7;
diphtheria, 6
Scarlet fever, 7; mumps,
6; diphtheria, 5; smallpox,  12;   epidemic of
Scarlet fever,  2;   diphtheria, 2; mumps, 4
Measles, 12; scarletfever,
3; mumps, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; mumps,
-   10; measles epidemic
Chicken-pox, 2; measles,
40; scarlet fever, 6
Measles, 4	
Mumps, 40	
Mumps, 2; scarletfever, 1
Measles,6; scarletfever, 2
Mumps, 2	
Measles, 27; chicken-
pox, 8
Measles, 20; chicken-
pox, 8
Measles	
Good.
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Very poor .
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Four clean.
Two clean. Q 30
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL  MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
rt
^2
tf
«
O
£   .
0) fe.
OJ
<1)
Pn-d
h
> bo
"3
+4<2
O tf
O
y* qj
3
li
a>'£
O +J
o
q
. rt
O M
rt
<3 qj
PS
*QJ qj
QiH
QJ £
Qtf
-a
■4
s «
Coquitlam—Continued.
Coquitlam, East...
The Glen	
Maillardville	
Silver Valley	
Cowichan, North:
Chemainus	
Crofton 	
Genoa Bay	
Westholme	
Esquimalt:
Lampson Street ...
Glenmore .
Kent:
Agassiz 	
Harrison River
Lang-ley :
Aldergrove 	
Belmont    .
County Line 	
Glen Valley	
Glenwood	
Harmsworth	
Langley, East	
Langley Fort	
Langley Prairie
Langley, West	
Lochiel	
jYlilner	
Murrayville	
Otter	
Otter, South	
Patricia	
Sperling	
Willoughby	
Maple Ridge :
Albion	
Hammond	
Haney	
Maple Ridge	
Alex. Robinson ....
Ruskin	
Webster's Corners .
Whonnock	
Yennadon	
Matsqui:
Aberdeen	
Bradner	
Clayburn	
Dunach	
Glenmore	
Jubilee	
Matsqui  	
Mount Lehman....
Peardonville	
Poplar	
Ridgedale	
Mission:
Cedar Valley	
Dewdney	
Hatzic	
Mission	
Silverdale	
Silverhill	
Stave Falls	
Stave River Gardens .
Steelhead	
Oak Bay :
Monterey Avenue...
H. B. Rogers.
J. S. McCallum.
W. J. Knox
P. S. McCaffrey,
ii 	
B. B. Marr	
G. Morse .
R. H. Port .
A. J. Stuart.
.1. N. Taylor.
Miss I. Jeffares .
Miss Morrison .
Miss McClung .
Miss O'Brien.
18
20
123
12
130
15
49
21
64
27
26
21
23
92
139
44
20
85
120
42
12
29
23
27
32
64
183
99
74
44
64
62
21
46
58
65
14
33
26
104
38
15
56
59
48
38
50
377
25
17
24
31
27
278
16
20
102
11
123
14
35
20
58
26
21
21
23
87
123
39
20
80
108
37
12
27
20
25
30
58
167
82
55
41
60
61
18
42
51
64
11
28
20
100
36
13
62
54
36
37
45
355
19
15
23
28
20
1
1
3
8
4
11
1
1
1
40
4
2
3
8
4
7
2
1
1
40
3
51
10
3
3
7
2
1
2
7
4
1
1
6
6
4
2
4
2
5
14
2
4
1
1
1
1
12
3
8
4
21
6
6
6
57
4
51
10
6
i
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
1
6
3
4
l
i
i
2
1
2
1
7
8
1
2
15
2
1
1
i
2
2
2
1
"i
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
.:::
i
1
1
3
12
3
1
5
7
3
i
l
l
1
3
"3'
2
1
1
5
4
3
3
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
4
1
1
2
15
26
7
8
9
8
13
1
2
2
1
2
2
4
2
1
1
2
2
2
3
1
2
2
25
8
7
4
1
4
6
8
4
l
"i
10
40
1
6
7
48
1
1
2
2
14
2
1
2
1
"2
"2
8
7
3
12
18
112
5
2
3
4
10
2
5
21
10
43 15 Geo. 5                                           Board ob7 Health.
■
Q 31
SCHOOLS—Continued^
CD
t>
t> ja
cut:
cu cu
OH
-a
0  ■
?!
a!
SO
0
Other   Conditions,   specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
>
OJ
a
CJ
W
6
So
p,
a
a
U
O
tc
a
tf
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.  State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated,    poorly
heated,  etc.
Closets.    State
if  clean   and
adequate.
2
3
17
2
26
6
10
7
197
4
14
3
6
1
5
1
"i'
2
"9'
4
1
6
12
6
i
15
3
2
4
16
5
i
i
2
2
1
16
1
1
1
Poor	
Good	
Clean.
tt
Good.
Clean.
Not very clean.
Fair.
Clean ; adequate,
Good; sanitary.
Fair.
Good.
Poor.
Good.
Fair.
Good.
Poor.
Good.
Fair.
Good.
Poor.
Good.
Clean,
ti
M
Yes.
ii
Clean ; adequate.
it
Fair.
Clean; adequate.
Unsatisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
.
i
1
Needs repairing ..
Fairly good	
Satisfactory	
Not crowded; good
ventilation Seating satisfactory
Good	
1
i
1
8
4
41
3
2
1
4
Cardiac, 2 ; infantile paralysis,
1; Erb's palsy, 1
Amputated  leg,  1;   dwarf, 1;
chr. bronchitis, 2; anjemia, 4
3
20
1
Chicken-pox, 15; scarlet
fever, 5
Remarkably   free    from
epidemics
Good	
2
Crowded ; poor...
1
1
1
i
4
1
3
Poor	
Good.	
.,
Poor	
Good	
1
Scarletfever	
Crowded	
1
6
0
2
1
15
25
63
41
19
14
12
23
8
8
6
7
3
7
2
8
5
2
8
10
3
8
19
89
2
1
i
31
1
1
1
Fair 	
Good	
	
2
	
1
2
19
3
"
3
i
22
3
"   	
1
2
Tt
1
14
2
5
2
35
1
2
1
7
Measles, 4; chicken-pox, 5
Measles, 1	
..      	
Neurasthenic, 1; bronchitis, 1.
6
4
1
6
Satisfactory	
Influenza, 2; measles, 2;
Scarlet fever, 2
1
1
.„.
Good	
Crowded; poor
building
Excellent; no overcrowd! ng; ventilation   is good
when windows
are left open, but
had when   they
are closed. Heating satisfactory
1
19
Smallpox ; scarlet fever;
measles; chicken-pox
•
• Q 32
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL  MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
CO
03
ft
a
o
rt
rt
a
•nS
Ch   QJ
tf-d
oj
'u
p
a
QJ  fej
$ Vi
0)
fe
4)   tn
CJ +-
73
2
a
i4   QJ
a
QS
Q>
QK
QJ   --
Qtf
Oak Bay—Continued.
Willows	
Peaehland:
Peaehland	
Trepanier	
Penticton :
Ellis and Senator Shatford
Pitt Meadows:
Pitt Meadows 	
Richardson	
Point Grey:
Edith Cavell	
Kerrisdale	
Lord Kitchener   .
Lloyd George	
Magee 	
Prince of Wales	
Prince of W7ales Annex
Queen Mary	
Saanich:
Cedar Hill	
Cloverdale	
Craigflower	
Gordon Head	
Keating	
Model	
MacKenzie	
North Dairy	
Prospect Lake	
Royal Oak	
Saanichton	
Saanich, West	
Strawberry Vale	
Tillicum	
Tolmie	
Tolmie Primary	
Normal	
Sumas:
Huntingdon	
Kilgard   	
Musselwhite  	
Straiten	
Sumas, Upper	
Summerland	
J. N. Taylor.
Wm. Buchanan.
H. MacGregor   .
G. Morse ..
W. Dykes .
J. P. Vye.
A. E. McMicking..
T. A. Swift	
F. W. Andrew.
Miss O'Brien.
Miss J. Hardy .
149
239
122
41
66
81
155
46
44
75
41
40
102
244
249
62
23
29
20
44
305
46
18
291
822
97
704
128
216
114
37
61
77
133
42
44
71
40
40
88
225
234
53
277
21
24
19
44
291
56
63 I
15 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
Q 33
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition of
Other Conditions, specify
a       Acute Fevers which
Building.   State
if  crowded,      Closets.    State
QJ
fe
QJ    •
oj
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
a
o
o
|          during the Past
poorly venti-         lf <;lean fnd
lated, poorly     |      adequate.
QJ -4-j     rt s
+3
p,
heated, etc.
0
w
a
5 1
OH |HO
0
i   >
CO
31
7
29
Anaemia, 8; speech defect, 1;
orthopaedic, l
Smallpox; scarletfever;
measles; chicken-pox
Excellent; no
crowding; ventilation and heating very satisfactory
Clean; adequate.
68
10
Measles, 35	
Satisfactory.
3
Squint, 3; granulated lids, 3;
stammering, 1; hay fever, 1;
Measles, 188   	
asthma,   5;    bronchitis,   5;
cardiac,   5 ;   orthopaedic, 9 ;
jaundice,   27;    eczema,   4;
acne, 2 ; alopecia, 1
11
5
79
Good	
9
58
Pulmonary,   4;    cardiac,   31;
1
2
5
i
Measles,  53;   whooping-
Modern ; O.K	
Ample.
anaemia, 5
cough, 5; scarlet fever,
1; chicken-pox, 1
Nervous,    1;   pulmonary,    2;
cardiac, 34 ; orthopaedic, 7 ;
8
10
9
Measles,  80;   whooping-
cough, 9; scarlet fever,
anaemia, 7
14;  chicken-pox, 10;
smallpox, 1
12
62
20
Cardiac,   20;    orthopaedic,   6;
anaemia, 7
3
2
6
1
Measles,   62;   whooping-
cough, 1; scarletfever,
3; chicken-pox, 1
Frame; ventilation
fair
Not adequate.
26
71
40
Pulmonary,   3;   cardiac,   28;
orthopaedic, 4 ; anaemia, 10
3
6
8
5
Measles,  68;   whooping-
cough, 10; diphtheria,
1;   scarlet  fever,   IS;
chicken-pox, 3 ; smallpox, 1
Modern ; O.K	
Ample.
2
2
5
2
Mumps, 2 ;  measles, 91;
whooping - cough,   17 ;
orthopaedic, 10; anaemia, 8
scarlet fever, 8; diph
theria, 2; chicken-pox,
17; smallpox, 5
19
72
51
Nervous, 1 ; cardiac, 29 ; orthopedic, 6; antenna, 7
1
2
Mumps, 14 ; measles, 80 ;
scarlet fever, 6 ; chicken-pox, 1
Modern ; O.K
"
0
22
8
Cardiac, 14; anaemia, I	
2
4
Mumps, 1; measles, 34 ..
Frame ; O.K	
.[
29
127
48
Pulmonary, 3; cardiac, 55; orthopaedic, 5; anaemia, 7
2
1
4
2
Mumps, 1 ; measles, 80 ;
whooping - cough,   26 ;
diphtheria, 1; chicken-
pox, 10 ;  smallpox, 2 ;
scarlet fever, 9
Modern ;   crowded
35
3
Orthopaedic, 2 ; vaccinated, 25
Good	
Adequate.
51
5
Measles, 5; chicken -pox, 2
1
2
Orthopaedic, 3 ;  vaccinated,   34
Orthopaedic, 3 ; cretin, 1; vaccinated, 4
11 •   	
1
2
,,
M
Chicken-pox, 4; measles,
2 ; scarlet fever, 2
■ 2
1
.,
Orthopaedic, 2 ;  vaccinated,  18
2
1
2
"   	
8
Vaccinated, 14	
Orthopaedic, 2 ; vaccinated, 54.
Measles, 31	
Scarlet fever, 1 ,.	
fil
1(
,,
5
Diphtheria, 1; measles, 5;
scarletfever, 1 ; chick
en-pox, 1
T"
fii
3-?
Asthma, 1 ; systolic murmer at
Measles, smallpox	
Yes.
apex of heart, 2
18
5
Good	
Temporary     outhouses.
7
i
'46'
1
6
2
2
120
■
8
17
»      	
Not clean.
91
Nervous, 3; pulmonary, 1; car
8
Scarletfever ,
Eightrooms; mod
Sixteen; modern.
diac, 6; anaemia, 12
ern ;  frame and
concrete ; steam
heat Q 34
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL  MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School   Nurse.
a> fe*
o g
SB
<; a)
a
"3
s3
CJ 2J
8|
a T"
55 s
a* o
a) el
"c
53
W
Q^
W!>
QW
QPQ
«d
« 2
s S
Surrey:
Anniedale .
Clayton ...
Cloverdale.
Colebrook	
Crescent Beach	
Elgin	
Grand View Heights .
Hall's Prairie	
Johnston Road	
Kensington, East	
Kensington Prairie ,
Newton	
Port Mann	
Springdale	
Strawberry Hill	
Surrey Centre   	
Tynehead 	
Westminster South .
White Rock .
Vancouver, North :
Capilano	
Keith Lynn ..,
Lynn Valley...
North Star
Roche Point...
Vancouver, South:
Brock 	
Cham plain .
Connaughfc.
Gordon
Moberly.
R. McBride.
Sir A. Mackenzie
G. A. Lamont ,
F. D. Sinclair.,
R. V. McCarley,
E. Edwards
E. Bell .
18
16
2
46
42
1
164
149
2
2
12
2
2
25
22
2
30
27
3
2
38
37
31
30
1
94
66
9
2
60
50
1
2
48
46
1
i
1
1
39
37
1
1
1
77
69
7
2
1
1
32
30
1
2
1
61
47
4
3
1
44
42
9
3
27
25
9
41
27
2
i
106
97
4
7
i
172
138
4
1
l
3
97
97
1
3
9
6
79
79
4
1
7
7
330
328
3
l
25
5
39
39
147
147
2
2
14
2
15
13
26
26
1
1
1
452
452
32
1
22
2
10
19
858
857
38
1
39
1
33
29
24
24
32
4
2
5
49
49
35
6
10
14
421
421
42
12
1
13
28
464
462
50
17
28
23
748
747
41
2
15
1
3
19
644
642
38
2
13
2
. 16
24
5
11
20
1
6
6
.   6
12
9
12
12
7
19
13
4
10
24
43
16
22
67
30
30
167
165
136 15 Geo.
Board of Health.
Q 35
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition of
Acute Fevers which
Building.   State
Other Conditions, specify
a
have occurred
if  crowded,
Closets.    State
TJ
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Car
c
o
during the Past
poorly venti
if clean and
is
j'-ra
CO
diac Disease,  etc.J.
S
QJ
r-
f
Year.
lated, poorly
adequate.
cC  CC
.~
B
J2
a
a
heated, etc.
CJ  id
CJ
8
an
wo
C
>
. M
"
5
5
Cleft palate, 1	
2
Inadequate	
Poor.
13
5
Defective   palate,    1;    ampu
Measles	
Satisfactory   	
Good.
9
19
9
Measles ; scarlet fever ..
	
Adequate.
tated leg, 1; ptosis, 1
4
1
Measles ;  scarlet fever, 3
Good 	
Fair.
3
1
„
Poor.
Fair.
5
4
Measles; scarletfever...
Adequate	
<t
12
8
5
in
1
4
2
1
Measles ; scarlet fever...
Measles	
Adequate.
2
Fair.
fi
Defective    speech,    1 ;     hifid
Temporarv	
Temporarv.
uvula, 1
Infantile   paralysis,   1 ;   facial
paralysis, 1
Good  	
Good,
10
6
4
2
Satisfactory   ..
6
Measles	
Measles ; scarlet fever...
Poor.
18
Deviated septum, 1	
1
Fair.
11
6
3
7
9
2
1
1
1
Measles	
Measles	
Good.
5
Fair.
9
3
1
Adequate	
,,
27
T.B., 1; chorea, 1; foreign hody
Poor.
in ear, 1; systolic murmur, 1;
defective palate, 1; anajmia,
1; bronchitis, I
High arched palate, 1 ; chorea,
1; systolic, 1; conjunctivitis,
Adequate	
Good.
1; infantile paralysis, 1; bifid
uvula, 1
10
6
6
IS
1
3
28
5
6
6
10
Good  	
Clean ; adequate.
10
,,
46
Bronchitis, 2 ; orthopaedic, 1...
2
Measles; smallpox	
„      	
..
23
10
8
Valv. heartdisease, 1; chorea, 1;
bronchitis, 1 ;   orthopaedic, 1
Measles ;   chicken - pox ;
whooping-congh
8
3
13
1
3
1
Diphtheria, 5; carriers, 7;
ii
178
20
Pulmonary, 1; heart, 7; hernia,2
4
5
Ventilation fair...
Satisfactory.
nasal throat swabs, 198;
home visits, 40; whoop
ing-cough, 1;  chicken-
pox, 9 ;   vaccinations,
fe9 ; smallpox, IS ; scar
let fever, 5; measles, 20
488
30
36
Pulmonary, 4; heart, 7; hernia, 7
6
4
9
10
Diphtheria,   1 ;   measles,
96; nasal throat swabs,
20;   home   visits,   46;
whooxiing - cough,     3 ;
chicken-pox,   4;   vaccinations, IS; smallpox,
1 ; scarlet fever, 20
13
1
Diphtheria,  1 ; measles,
15; nasal throat swabs,
,,
Adequate ;   satis
factory.
23 ;   home    visits,   4 ;
whooping - cough,    2 ;
scarlet fever, 3
44
1
1
22
1
1
2
Home visits, 4 ; measles,
11
Diphtheria, 1 ; home visits, 1; mumps, 3 ; scar
Satisfactory.
202
Pulmonarv, 2 ; heart, 5	
let fever, 1 ; whooping-
cough, 2; measles, 52
172
7
25
Vaccinations,  50 ; pulmonary,
2 ; heart, 2 ; hernia, 3
11
11
1
Diphtheria, 2 ; carrier, 1;
nasal throat swab, 1;
home visits, 16; smallpox, 3; scarlet fever, 1;
measles, 78
Adequate ; satisfactory.
230
15
32
Vaccinations, 172; pulmonary,
3 ; heart, 11; hernia, 2
Diphtheria, 1; carrier, 1;
nasal throat swabs, 44;
Adequate ; satisfactory.
home visits, 66; whoop
ing-cough, 8; chicken-
pox, 8 ;   smallpox, 14 ;
scarlet fever, 2; mea
sles, 98
997
11
30
20
6
11
8
Diphtheria, 2; carriers, 4;
nasal throat swabs, 50;
Inadequate.
home visits,  39;
mumps, 1; whooping-
cough, 1; chicken-pox,
13 ;   scarlet fever,  8 ;
measles, 97 Q 3G
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL   MUNICIPAL
Name of School
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
cc
C,
a
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Vancouver, South-— Continued.
E. Edwards	
E. Hell	
357
213
999
288
684
360
648
15
21
58
78
289
18
357
211
996
288
681
360
648
15
21
58
78
289
18
30
34
31
60
32
39
39
14
2
1
2
1
7
6
14
8
8
15
13
2
2
3
3
1
2
15
6
30
1
26
6
13
7
16
27
14
20
10
36
17°.
69
Lord Selkirk	
	
40fi
84
E. Edwards ,   ...
7?
nn
Wolfe   	
140
Vancouver, West:
Capilano	
Cypress Park	
7
7
2
15
1
1
1
1
1
5
19
■
29
76
Whitecliff   	
2
RURAL AND
T. A. Swift	
225
27
15
12
8
12
11
36
6
13
28
25
215
26
8
11
8
12
9
29
5
8
22
24
6
11
20
9
10
13
36
11
21
11
25
64
22
38
2
8
1
6
1
49
0
H. H. Murphy   	
1
2
Miss Kelly	
2
1
1
2
2
7
3
1
7
10
1
VV. Laishley	
3
Alice Siding	
3
2
3
1
6
1
13
1
Vf. 11. Wood	
11
21
12
11
13
36
11
22
11
25
69
8
22
2
7
9
M. G. Archibald	
W. Scatchard	
A. L. Boggs   ....
2
i
2
5'
i
1
3
3
1
1
2
3
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
2
i
1
1
1
3
27
3
1
4
C. S. Williams     .
7
8
Argenta	
Arrowhead	
D. J. Barclay	
J. H. Hamilton	
E. H. S. McLean	
Miss Wade	
4
3
1
5
27
H. W. Keith 	
4
F. E. Coy	
1
J 15 Geo. 5
Boaed of Health.
Q 37
SCHOOLS—Continued.
CJ
>
cj A
cj E
V, oj
OJ   QJ
OH
rj
OJ   •
~ 13
CO  00
aS
HO
oj
'o
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
a
u
1
3
6
to
Qi
ft
a
o
%
to
a
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
168
3
9
23
6
15
4
8
8
10
24
51
89
4
22
.   5
41
4
22
19
30
2
1
15
6
3
i
16
5
3
1
6
1
4
3
10
4
5
Home visits, 19 ; whooping-cough, 4 ; measles,
35
Nasal throat swabs,  2 ;
home visits,  5 ;. measles, 60
Diphtheria, S; carriers, 8;
nasal   throat swabs,
359 ; home visits,   71;
mumps 1; chicken-pox,
11; smallpox, 1; scarlet
fever, 6 ; measles, 68
Home visits, 3 ; chicken-
pox, 1; vaccinations, 4;
smallpox,   2 ;    scarlet
fever, 3 ; measles, 63
Diphtheria, 1; carriers, 2;
nasal throat swabs, 36;
home visits, 76; whooping-cough, 4 ; chicken-
pox, 14 ; smallpox, 14 ;
scarlet fever, 5; measles, 26
Home visits, 22; chicken-
pox,  2 ;   smallpox,  5 ;
measles, 60
Diphtheria, 24 ; carriers,
16; nasal throat swabs,
696 ; home visits, 111 ;
whooping - cough,   4 ;
scarlet fever, 19; measles, 77
Adequate;   satis
99
Pulmonary, 2;   heart, 1;
hernia, 1
Pu 1 m o n a r y, 2 ;   heart, 5 ;
hernia, 5
Pulmonary, 2 ; heart, 4
Vaccinations, 258 ; heart, 6	
Heart, 6	
Pu 1 m o n a r y,  2 ;   heart, 1;
hernia, 3
8
5
2
4
factory,
Adequate;   satis-
factory.
Adequate;   satisfactory.
Adequate;   satisfactory.
Adequate;   satisfactory.
Adequate ;   satisfactory.
Adequate ;   satisfactory.
374
76
325
139
177
8
10
i>q
-j"
Heart, 2.    .
35
SI
Heart, 10 ; nervous, 1	
5
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
48
4
20
20
1
11
Quinsy, 1; measles, 2 ...
Good    ....
Log	
Satisfactory	
Good	
4
sanitary, otherwise closets ade-
quate and well
kept.
Two pits; four
seats.
1
2
Good.
2
3
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean : adequate.
In good condition.
12
4
1
2
Measles	
5
Very good	
Good	
i
3
1
1
2
s'
1
6
5
11
2
Clean ; adequate.
12
Scarlet fever, 6	
2
2-
Satisfactory	
Yes.
1
5
Log building ; not
overcrowded
Clean; adequate.
Onepit; two seats.
3
13
Chicken-pox, 7; measles,
27
Excellent	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
4
5
5
Good	
Inadequate  	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good.
9
31
18
26
1
1
Cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 2; flat-
chest, 3; anaemia, 6
4
6
Clean ; adequate. Q 38
British Columbia.
1924:
RURAL   MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
co
Is
CO
a
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M
Atlin	
C. M. Eaton   	
10
8
27
22
27
12
20
8
14
12
10
15
22
22
32
20
28
15
10
9
21
12
11
6-
9
17
30
16
13
17
9
6
6
9
22
14
17
15
20
Jl
16
24
30
128
15
20
18
14
45
46
19
7
12
56
27
43
31
10
6
18
4
54
30
12
56
21
18
23
37
38
70
12
45
10
7
24
17
27
12
18
8
13
12
10
15
17
22
32
20
13
13
5
9
21
12
11
6
8
17
30
12
8
16
7
6
6
9
21
14
15
15
13
11
16
24
24
lis
15
16
18
12
45
46
19
12
54
26
40
30
8
6
17
4
54
30
12
52
18
13
22
29
38
66
12
45
i
3
3
1
2
6
1
2
2
1
1
1
A. D. Morgan  	
1
2
1
i
1
3
6
3
2
1
1
1
7
3
Q. Morse	
H. 11. Murphy	
6
3
W. R. Stone    .
1
1
H. C. McKenzie	
4
E. M. Sutherland	
'J
Begbie	
Belford.            	
s
2
i
3
l
1
9
6
4
7
6
2
3
1
1
1
5
4
1
7
6
1
2
2
8
10
Miss Benvie	
Miss A. L. Boggs
9
Bench	
Beresford	
V. T. Stainer	
M. G. Archibald   	
1
4
5
7
J. H. Hamilton	
1
2
1
1
1
4
N. J. Paul    	
1
3
2
1
2
2
5
Black Pines	
H. II. Murphy	
Ed. Sheffield	
1
15
Blind Bay	
3
W. W. Birdsall	
Blubber Bay	
2
2
2
2
p. E. Beech  	
1
Bonaparte Valley	
Bonnington Falls	
1
5
1
4
7
1
4
7
7
P. M. Wilson	
4
3
W. II. Wood	
2
1
1
3
9
2
J. H. Hamilton	
1
Box Lake	
E. H. S. McLean	
N. J. Paul   	
T. J. McPhee	
6
i
l
3
1
1
1
4
3
2
i
i
"l
2
2
1
1
i
4
5
2
1
' i'
16
2
4
1
12
2
S
5
17
W. H. Wood	
7
Brigade Lake	
II. H. Murphy	
2
6
P. E. Coy	
2
3
1
2
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
6
1
i
—
3
i
3
1
3
4
2
5
1
1
3
2
3
2
2
3
1
1
4
2
2
5
4
T'
i
4
3
8
6
W. Truax 	
6
Bulkley, North	
1
Bulkley, South	
4
H. A. Christie	
18
E. M. Sutherland	
3
15
E. H. S. McLean	
7
S. E. Beech	
5
-
Campbell Creek	
Campbell Range	
Campbell River	
C. J. Willoughbv	
4
M. G. Archibald	
2
R. E. Ziegler	
5
G. B. Henderson	
J. J. Gillis	
3
i
Ti
2
2
3
14
1
1
5
"3'
2
2
3
7
i
2
4
Carroll's Landing	
E. Buckell 	
1
E. H. S. McLean	
2
4
T
3
1
3
6
"i'
3
4
10
T. J. McPhee	
10
P. Ewert	
II. H. MacKenzie	
3
i
5
14 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 39
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
>
3553
OJ    QJ
OH
QJ    •
OE CO
u -cc
cO OO
3 £
HO
oj
'c
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
oo'
1
OJ
tt
o
s
m
6
Pi
a
a
O
to
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
.if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.     State
if clean and
adequate.
2
1
Not crowded; well
heated and ventilated
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
3
2
5
2
24
7
3
i
10
Two pits; four
seats.
O.K.
11
2
Crowded 	
Satisfactory	
Good	
8
Clean ; adequate.
5
6
Yes.
8
1
2
"2'
1
2
Good.
6
8
•y
9
7
Impediment in speech, 1.   ...
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.
Yes.
1
8
Good	
Crowded	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
O.K.
IS
Cardiac, 1   	
14
4
Good.
6
3
3
1
3
1
3
4
5
1
Yes.
Flat-chest, 1 ;  amemia, 1 ; car.
diac, 1; digestive, 1
5
Yes.
4
1
1
3
2
Clean ; adequate.
3
1
Good condition ...
3
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
4
Poor  lighting and
ventilation
Excellent	
5
8
Two pits ; four
seats.
4
1
1
Poorly lighted	
Excellent	
Good	
Ingoodcondition.
1
"a
1
2
5
8
1
5
4
4
Tonsillitis	
Yes.
7
5
1
Filth v.
5
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
6
6
Smallpox ; measles	
4
4
Very good	
Good condition...
Div. IV. crowded .
Satisfactory	
Excellent	
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
ii)'
1
3
11
5
Conjunctivitis, 6	
10
49
5
Measles,20; scarlet fever,5
5
4
6
6
3
14
3
1
4
11
8
2
1
1
2
2
"2
4
5
5
1
2
6
4
1
3
2
1
3
7
1
Bad.
Clean ; adequate.
IS
27
6
BoneT.B., 1	
2
Scarlet fever 	
Good	
ii'
Good.
21
Measles and scarlet fever
Not satisfactory.
12
Cardiac, 1 ; defective speech, 1
Bronchitis, 1; fractured nose, 1
■'7
Poor windows ....
9
Good.
5
Chicken-pox, 1	
1
and heated
3
8
1
2
1
4
1
3
3
1
10
1
13
Clean ; adequate.
3
11
Crowded	
Good	
Good	
Excellent	
Poor building	
Adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Good;  adequate.
Yes.
1
10
Whooping-cough	
10
6
Undeveloped organ, 1	
Good.
9
1
Clean ; adequate.
4
12
16
2
1
Smallpox, 5; measles, 1.5;
scarlet fever, 10
1
14
Chicken-pox, 14	
Excellent Clean ; adequate. Q 40
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL AND
Name of School.
•
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
"Eh
1-1 ^
d £
is as
CO
a
£■00
D
-ID   Cd
°a
oo s
Z o
o
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too
CO
§3
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as
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ll
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Qi7-
CJ    .
>  Oil
qj b
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z .
o oo
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cj -r.
QJ  CO
"fH  oj
QJ  U
on
3
03
OJ
•0
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Sis
11
HEH
Cedar, East	
T. J. McPhee	
Miss Bodenham...
ii
49
7
74
20
136
15
98
6
13
13
13
11
10
11
15
12
22
21
4
43
103
25
25
11
12
49
6S
14
6
33
56
22
38
26
11
31
12
30
214
9
12
29
10
49
7
65
20
118
15
94
6
10
14
13
11
10
10
15
11
19
20
3
43
99
25
19
11
12
46
66
13
0
33
66
20
38
24
11
21
10
30
204
7
10
23
29
13
8
9
14
22
11
10
50
9
9
9
43
9
15
9
12
10
16
5
8
4
2
2
1
"7
1
14
4
li
"a
4
29
2
11
1
3
1
4
1
5
2
i
15
4
29
*
T. J. McPhee	
2
1
6
2
18
10
17
P. M. Wilson
1
N. J. Paul	
3
4
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
J. C. Elliot	
8
Cherry Creek Valley	
A. D. Morgan    	
W. R. Stone 	
2
i
EL H. Murphy     	
2
W. H. Wood  	
1
3
EL II. Murphy	
D. S. Dixon 	
M. G. Archibald
9
4
1
1
3
H. H. Murphy
1
S. E. Beech	
5
9
3
2
1
1
7
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
21
2
3
1
25
11
F. T. Stanier   	
is
Cobble Hill    	
,
7
J. B. Thorn	
10
1
2
4
1
3
2
1
1
3
1
4
3
1
2
2
1
3
2
"7
6
2
1
2
1
7
6
2
1
4
9
J. C. Elliot	
6
1
18
3
5
i
4
1
1
5
1
2
5
1
1
16
4
1
1
8
R. Zie'der	
1
H. M. Watson	
Miss Gawley	
in
3
J. H. Hamilton	
D. J. Barclay	
1
11
Miss Wade 	
10
14
6
R. Elliot	
2
J. C. Elliot	
7
1
2
4
3
3
1
1
4
4
3
4
1
2
10
17
23
11
10
50
9
9
12
44
9
16
1
Deep Cove 	
S E. M. Hoops       	
1
3
2
1
. -4
1
4
4
1
H. W. Keith	
J. E. II. Kelso	
14
1
E. H. S. McLean	
4
1
Departure Bay    	
T. J. McPhee	
2
1
H. R. Maxwell	
2
1
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
2
4
3
3
W. A. Watson	
1
1
H. A. Christie            	
14
10
22
10
8
3
F. Inglis	
1
1
3
1
1
4
2
1 15 Geo. 5                                           Board op Health.
Q 41
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
QJ
>
oj a
*r  QJ
OH
-03
0J     •
60 >§
CO  P
S3
oj
'3
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,   etc.).
CO
1
9
>
at
m
6
OJ
a
a
a
o
613
3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.     State
if clean and
adequate.
3
10
2
34
5
64
7
38
3
7
9
10
7
2
4
4
5
4
5
1
11
3
2
1
13
"9'
Ample space ; well
ventilated
First class	
Yes.
O.K.
Good.
Two flush; ten
seats
One pit; one seat.
O.K.
Dirty.
Two earth.
Good.
Yes.
Two ; clean.
Yes.
Inadequate.
Dirty.
Glean ; adequate.
7
4
70
9
29
1
1
2
4
Measles, 11; chicken-pox,
2
4
Measles, 18	
Satisfactory,    e x -
cept lighting
Good	
Fair	
i
1
1
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
2
Crowded ;   poorly
ventilated
Not crowded; unevenly   heated ;
fair ventilation
Poor heating; ventilation   and
lighting
Good	
Yes.
n
ii
Poor.
Good.
Two; clean.
16
13
3
9
5
6
9
14
10
1
15
21
1
12
12
2
9
9
12
1
3
11
6
3
4
2
7
3
1
1
3
9
3
6
5
10
5
5
2
1
7
3
12
14
Scarlet fever, 13	
Cardiac,   3 ;   nervous,   3 ;   pulmonary, 1
2
2
1
4
i
11
2
3
1
6
4
4
Frame; good repair
Nervous, 2; anaomia, 1; nystagmus, 1
V.D.H., 1	
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Fair.
Yes.
Good.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Fair.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean.
Yes.
Fair.
9
Measles, 2	
Anaemia, 1	
Good	
10
1
5
1
Crowded at times;
fairly ventilated
and heated
Good	
2
1
21
3
9
7
1
1
Measles, 5	
Poor lighting	
Good	
Poor lighting	
Newbuilding ready
Excellent 	
Crowded and poorly ventilated
Good	
2
5
3
4
Chronic bronchitis, 1	
4
1
3
i
2
Measles, 4	
Not clean or adequate.
Satisfactory.
Only one closet.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Clean.
3
1
2
3
....
Not crowded; well
ventilated  and
heated
1
3
2
Good	
Very good	
Good.	
Sanitary	
2
i
Measles, 1   	
Chicken-pox, 1	
■
•
\
- Q 42
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL AND
1*3
Ls
a
'£
Name of
School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
Sc6
o —
53
a
0)  r>i
53
ective
ring.
ective
athing
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di
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oil
Q^jQW   QM
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Eagle Valley,
Edgewater ..
Edgewood,..
Elk Day	
Elk Bridge ..
Elk Valley ..
Elko ....'....
Ellesby	
Ellison	
Elphinstone Bayr.
Endako 	
Enderby7, North .
Engen	
Erickson	
Erie 	
Errington	
Essington .......
Evelyn	
Extension   	
Fairview ......
Falkland	
Fanny Bay 	
Fauquier	
Field	
Fife	
Fire Valley	
Firvale 	
Fish Lake Road
Flagstone   	
Floral Creek
Florence Mine	
Forest Grove	
Forks 	
Fort Fraser 	
Fort Fraser, North
Fort George	
Fort George, South.
Fort St. James	
Fort Steele........
Foster's Bar	
Fraser Lake	
French Creek	
Fruitlands	
Fruitvale	
Galiano	
Galiano, North .   ...
Ganges Harbour....
Gerrard	
Gill	
Gilpin	
Giscome	
Glacier 	
Glade   	
Glenbank    	
Gl.nemma	
Glenora	
Glenrosa 	
Glentanna	
Golden	
Goldstream 	
Gowland Harbour
Granby Bay	
Grande Prairie ...
Grandview Bench.
Granite Bay   	
Grantham	
Grant Mine	
Gray Creek.
Grindrod..,
E. Buckell	
F. E. Gov	
J E. H. Kelso.,
VV. VV. Birdsall
B. C. Weldon. .
Miss O. K. Gawley
H. A. Christie .
W. E. Stone ...
W. J. Knox ...
F. Inglis 	
VV. R. Stone	
H. W. Keith	
W. R. Stone	
G. B. Henderson.,
J. B. Thorn	
L. T. Davis	
W. Sager	
C. H. Hankinson .
W. E. Henderson .
G. H. Kearney....
P. D. van Kleeck .
H. Meadows	
J. E. H. Kelso...,
G. A. Cheeseman .
VV. Truax 	
J. E. H. Kelso ...
G. Bayfield	
M. G. Archibald .
H. A. Christie ...
0. J. Willoughbv
D. J. Barclay	
F. Vere Agnevv , .
C. J. Willoughbv .
VV. R. Stone... T
C. Ewert .
W. R. Stone	
P. W. Green	
P. M. Wilson	
\V. R. Stone	
L. T. Davis	
C. J. Willoughby .
J. B. Thorn	
E. M. Sutherland
D. J. Barclay	
A. D. Morgan	
W. Truax 	
W. Laishley	
J. H. Hamilton...
11. H. MacKenzie .
E. H. S. McLean .
P. D. van Kleeck..
H. N. Watson ....
Wm. Buchanan. ..
C. H. Hankinson .
P. Ewert	
R. Felton	
R. Ziegler
Paul VVhelan ,
H. H. Murphy ..
H. H. Keith....
W. W. Birdsall .
T. A. Briggs	
T. J. McPhee....
D. J. Barclay.
H. W. Keith'..
Miss Jeff ares ,
Miss Kelly
11
10
21
10
19
9
44
81
14
23
6
49
9
44
21
18
90
• 9
18
17
8
35
18
13
17
10
6
11
13
13
28
7
72
54
14
47
12
4
48
103
58
15
16
46
8
22
8
49
39
21
44
15
11
7
134
11
200
24
14
14
29
10
101
9
20
8
17
9
38
8
29
14
20
6
48
9
44
20
18
87
8
18
16
8
35
21
16
13
17
10
4
11
10
13
27
7
68
49
14
45
9
4
46
92
58
15
16
41
8
19
8
34
39
18
44
7
14
11
7
113
17
11
206
19
14
13
24
62
9
95
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
3
I
4
4
7
8
2
3
5
5
•2
8
2
3
5
5
2
2
10
2
1
S
4
5
2
4
6
5
11
2
4
3
2
1
2
3
I
12
10
3
3
1
4
3
10
2
1
1
32
"i
1
"i'
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
'Y
5
3
2
4
10
2
1
5
3
1
5
1
2
3
1
"i
T
i
2
7
5
5
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
5
2
5
4
3
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
5
2
"3'
i
11
5
2
2
6
3
13
8
3
8
4
1
2
2
4
7
1
1
14
39
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
"l
1
1
1
2
4
1
5
1
1
3
1
3
1
5
1
3
■■-■
1
2
1
3
1
3
6
1
'  8
"»
5
1
8
2
2
I
4
1
9
10
4
4
2
11
1
3
71
9
5
2
1
1
2
10
1
8
61
2
1
S
3
3
2
1
4
22
■j
2
1
2
■20
10
11
3
7
2
40 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 43
ASSISTED' SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
cj A
a>TJ
QJ  %
OB
ia
QJ    .
-'.-£
u -c
« a
@5
oj
■3
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,   etc.).
a
u
9
>
w
9
St
V
m
d
to
9
&
a
o
a
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
2
4
Measles; variola, 1	
Satisfactory	
Overcrowded	
Excellent	
O K
Yes.
2
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
3
2
Clean ; adequate.
O.K.
11
3
5
Defective speech, 1; cardiac, 2
3
20
Satisfactory	
Good
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
3
Epidemic of measles and
some whooping-cough
5
7
4
6
Cardiac,  1;   anyemia,  1;   flat-
feet, 1
6
Clean ; adequate.
10
9
7
2
3
Good	
■
6
Clean ; adequate.
6
1
2
1
8
1
6
1
Measles, 10    	
Very good	
Satisfactory   	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
12
6
1
1
Fractured clavicle, 1	
35
6
Satisfactory	
Good.
3
3
Anamiia, 3; growth on tongue, 1
2
Good	
Yes.
1
14
"3'
3
1
5
Not clean	
Good	
O.K.
5
i
Not   built  properly.
Yes.
1
9
O.K.
in
4
2
1
11
ii
2
Satisfactory	
Poor lighting and
heating
Good
Clean ; adequate.
3
3
Fair lighting ....
Crowded   	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
16
2
28
11
6
9
7
Anamiia, 2; atrophy muscles,
right shoulder, 1; blepharitis,
3; uvula absent, 1
Clean ; adequate.
18
6
Good	
Yes.
14
"4'
5
5
Orthopffidio defect, 1; cretin, 1
4
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
1
Very good	
Good
13
Clean ; adequate.
fi
2
T
1
5
1
1
i
3
2
i
1
15'
ii
"2
49
47
41
1
6
i
Not satisfactory.
Satisfactory.
12
■ 2
s
6
Poor	
Good	
Fair	
Crowded	
Good
3
12
2
4
food
3
15
Measles	
1
1
6
11
5
10
2
6
3
57
1
5
4
6
9
14
Yes.
3
Very bad.
6
Measles and pleurisy	
	
4
6
Measles	
Adequate	
Satisfactory	
Poor lighting	
Adequate andgood
Satisfactory	
Clean ; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Good.
1
Epilepsy, 1; hernia, 1; eczema, 3
Asthma,  1;   markedly underweight, 3
2
2+
Scarlet fever and measles
5
Clean ; adequate.
3
127
4
Cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 2 ; nervous, 2 ; anamiia, 2 ; acne, 2 ;
catarrh,  3 ;   pharyngitis,  5 ;
enuresis, 2; chronic nephritis,
2; hernia, 1; osteomyelitis,
1; blepharitis, 3
1
4
1
Measles,    13;     chicken-
pox, 8
Excellent	
Satisfactory ■   ....
Clean ; adequate.
8
8
Adequate.
4
Good	
Fair	
22
Measles, 11; scarlet fever,
5
O.K.
3
2
2
30 Q 44
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
CO
ft
°o
Z  CD
'a
°a
s *
Z "
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o
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cj fc*,
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cj cQ
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OW
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ca
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QJ  «
QJ  t-
cq
'0
a
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<
Si
t. .-•
d co
— cc
cc 0
HEH
11
24
371
6
22
19
24
23
37
22
11
61
18
6
13
5
12
21
12
8
52
8
7
14
26
16
99
12
15
19
17
9
30
19
15
36
46
9
8
17
11
12
9
61
18
84
15
8
31
15
18
152
9
10
9
26
116
18
13
8
11
13
8
11
21
359
5
23
17
20
23
34
21
11
59
18
6
13
5
12
21
12
8
50
9
i
13
26
16
93
12
9
18
14
9
29
19
15
34
46
7
9
7
17
8
12
9
59
12
81
15
8
30
15
17
131
9
10
9
26
116
8
13
8
7
13
9
8
1
58
1
28'
2
'46'
T
3
8
8
8
5
3
14
2
R. Felton	
13'
"2'
1
.„.
2
10
1
1
1
3
1
1'
3
2
1
6
1
3
Harewood	
Harpers Camp	
T. J. McPhee	
1
1
1
1
i
5
2
1
6
1
3
5
5
1
8
1
Headquarters	
Headquarters, Camp 3	
Hedley	
T. A. Briggs	
M. D. McEwen	
C. J. Willoughby	
Heffley Creek	
Heffley Creek, Upper	
Heywood's Corner	
1
2
2
2
5
H. W. Keith	
Hilltop	
VV. Truax    	
1
1
3
21
3
Hilton	
4
J   C. Elliot
3
1
2
5
H. Meadows	
P. Ewert	
1
1
2
16
2
16
3
5
1
3
2
3
3
1
9
12
2
1
3
1
2
3
2
16
3
2
F. Inglis	
1
1
1
....
10
2
1
1
1
Hulatt	
W. R. Stone	
H. VV. Keith	
G. B. Henderson '....
VV. H. Wood	
F. E. Cov	
1
i
1
1
"l
1
2
1
1
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
1
Isabella Point    ....
E. M. Sutherland    ..
H. A. Christie	
James Island	
Joe Rich Valley	
F. R. Pollock	
R. Felton	
2
1
3
i
2
4
5
26
"3'
3
5
4
2
2
8
5
32
4
1
8
1
8
11
5
1
4
i
3
0
5
10
1
P. M. Wilson	
Kelowna, East	
W. J. Knox	
M. D. McEwen	
Miss Bodenham...
1
"l
'T
....
2
3
3
1
Kerr Creek   	
Kettle River, North	
Kettle Vallev	
VV. H. Wood	
VV. H. Wood	
6
2
2
6
1
1
5
3
J. R. Thorn	
i'
5
3
1
1
5
3
1
1
6
6
1
5
3
2
1
1
1
3
1
Kispiox	
H. C. Wrinch	
Kitsumgallum	
G. H. Bleecker	
H. N. Watson	
Lackenbv 	
Lac la Hache	
Lakelse Valley 	
Lakes District 	
1
1
3
1
3
1
VV. R. Stone   	
1
1
3 15 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
Q 45
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
CJ
>
cj ,d
cjcr.
-*-* aj
Q)   QJ
GEH
-a
a)   -
cj -i
u re
cj =
80
o
a
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,   etc.).
a
|
u
9
>
th
9
rt
V
m
d
Ml
QJ
ft
a
g
0
a
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
2
1
47
9
4
'27'
Yes.
4
Satisfactory	
First class	
Clean ; adequate..
O.K.
164
13
4
Measles, 130; scarlet fever, 42; chicken-pox, 10
3
Clean ; adequate..
4
2
10
Old and dilapidated
Excellent	
Low and somewhat crowded
11
3
7
6
4
3
Clean.
10
8
10
4
Anamiic, 1; right arm amputated, 1
Crowded	
9
7
6
6
Measles, 30 ; scarlet fever,
2
Satisfactory	
Poorly lighted	
2
Clean ; adequate.
1
Sanitary.
1
One  needs   operation,   cannot
talk plainly, due to deafness
3
Verv good	
Good	
Yes.
9
i
2
1
1
1
1
1
8
"2
Clean ; adequate..
9
2
Good.
"3
a
New building
needed
Good	
Good	
3
Adequate.
15
3
Good.
53
Excellent	
Good	
3
9
1
1
9
Measles and scarlet fever
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Yes.
8
2
Verv good	
Satisfactory	
6
Clean ; adequate.
Clean.
3
Measles	
Satisfactory'	
Good repair; satis-
factory
Not crowded; ventilation good
Good; need drinking water
Good	
1
1
Cardiac, 1; rachitis, 1	
Not satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
16
10
0
1
3
1
9
2
Measles	
?
Mentally defective, case is improving
Furunculosis, 1; stammer, 1 ..
4
2
Fairly clean and
ad equate.
6
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
3
1
1
7
3
i'
•>
2
5
12
7
1
12
1
3
5
Good, clean, sanitary and modern
Poor ;   not overcrowded
Clean ; adequate.
Nervousness, 3; chorea, 1; flat
feet, 2 ; cardiac, 1; deformed
feet or hands, 2; curvature
of   spine,   2;   chronic  bronchitis, 3
Epidemic  of   whooping-
cough, measles  and  8
cases scarlet fever
Measles  and fwhooping-
cough
Scarletfever,3; measles,2
1
Two; sanitary.
33
4
2
T>,
Satisfactorv	
Good	
Excellent 	
Yes.
4
Measles and chicken-pox
Good.
4
14
9
Scarlet fever, 3	
Clean ; adequate.
8
' i
8
4
5
1
Good   	
Clean ; adequate.
4
3
Adequate	
Excellent	
Clean	
Clean ; adequate.
Bad.
4
2
2
3
3
4
Good	
4
....
4
	
1
....
... 1 Q 46
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
a
r^<d
f-l   QJ
cn
£|
c -H
cc
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~ p
3   O
HH
R. Felton	
46
15
12
35
14
49
30
29
14
22
16
28
60
32
41
21
9
15
33
17
69
27
24
28
S
11
10
10
74
23
151
162
28
27
6
37
9
11
12
7
16
13
15
14
8
13
9
27
8
14
114
90
28
60
16
93
12
11
33
17
42
15
10
29
14
46
30
28
13
18
14
26
5S
32
41
21
8
11
33
16
66
21
16
28
8
9
10
7
10
58
21
140
150
28
24
6
34
9
10
12
7
15
11
15
14
6
11
8
27
8
10
112
87
28
56
15
93
12
8
24
17
1
3
1
4
i
2
2
1
4
3
i
i
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
4
1
1
2
1
3
8
1
T. A. Briggs	
7
8
A. C. Nash
3
"i
1
'2'
1
3
7
2
8
2
7
2
8
3
4
C. J. Willoughby ...
4
7
3
P. M. Wilson
2
'i
2
"i'
3
1
6
4
-•
1
1
2
2
11
1
1
1
1
6
2
3
3
6
0
2
8
4
6
Miss Gawlev	
10
VV. R. Stone  	
H. W. Keith
3
Miss Gawley	
46
C. J. Willoughby .
7
3
E. M. Sutherland .
4
I
2
2
4
2
2
2
6
I. JeiTares	
1
1
i
4
2
W. R. Stone
3
Meadow Spur	
J. B. Thom.
9
T. A. Briggs
is>
14
2
1
5
2
2
1
4
2
2
4
i
3
"i'
3
2
19
22
1
3
"i
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
"ij"
"s'
8
"s
4
"i'
1
1
6
18
44
"e
"2
'2
"7
i
15
13
6
17'
44
3'
5
1
2
' i
"e
i
14
6
11
E. Felton.
2
R. (J. Weldon	
31
61
VV. H. Wood
14
Mill Bay 	
4
1
W. .1. Knox	
8
Mitchell Bay 	
3
A. C. Nash .
4
Mount Ingersoll	
E. H. S. McLean	
3
1
1
Myncaster 	
VV. H. Wood
3
2
1
2
H. A. Christie
4
G. Bavfield
9
M. G. Archibald
P. Ewert
9
?1
Nanoose Bay	
T. If. McPhee   	
19
9
2
4
2
2
5
3
10
1
11
1
4
2
1
"2
2
9
1
1
3
4
5
20
1
1
3
8
3
14
J. E. H. Kelso
1
27
H. A. Christie	
?.
3
J. J. Gillis
10
8
I 15 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
Q 47
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition  of
Other   Conditions,   specify
a
o
fe
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Building.  State
Closets.    State
9
CJ    ■
ij, ■'-
iu 13
9
u
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
|
tfl
o
9
if  crowded,
poorly  ventilated,    poorly
if  clean   and
adequate.
CJ  OJ
m  at
"3
CJ
ci
a
a
heated,  etc.
OB
KO
o
>
CQ
P4
6
4
1
1
Eczema, 1; cardiac, 1; asthma,
1; seborrhea, 1
Satisfactory	
Clean ; adequate.
2
2
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
6
2
9
1
2
1
2
0
Mumps	
Two pits ;   seven
seats.
29
Good	
5
Clean ; adequate.
Poor all around...
Excellent 	
8
Measles and smallpox ...
2
7
1
1
1
Clean ; adequate.
5
Overcrowded ;
poorly ventilated
and lighted
Good
4
Measles, whooping-cough
repair  and
cleaning.
4
9
L°g	
Good	
O.K.
9
1
6
10
1
7
2
2
Measles, 11	
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Two pits ;   four
seats.
Yes.
3
Measles, chicken-pox....
6
43
1
1
3
2
11
4
Epidemic of impetigo.. ,
Good
Clean ; adequate.
Adequate ;  fairly
clean.
6
Fair	
Satisfactory	
Unfinished;    temporary
Satisfactory ......
9
2
Clean ; adequate.
3
2
5
0
5
Satisfactory	
Overcrowded ;
poorly heated
Building   overcrowded; unsafe;
poorly heated
Satisfactory   ....
Good	
Sanitary.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Filthy; adequate.
Filthy; adequate.
Yes.
13
V.D.H., 1	
"e
1
Measles, 2	
91
95
14
31
4
"5
3
. 1
1
i
2
42
36
Ifi
1
4
3
8
1
3
2
4
Defective speech, 1; cardiac, 1,
orthopaedic, 1; blepharitis, 3 ;
dermatitis, 3 ; acute coryza, 1
Cardiac, 3;   acute coryza,   3;
orthopaedic,   3;  anamiia,   1 ;
blepharitis, 2; appendicitis, 1;
eczema, 2; cretin, 1
1
Influenza, measles, pertussis, pneumonia,
chicken-pox
Influenza,  measles,  pertussis, pneumonia,
chicken-pox
15
19
Orthopedic, 1; cardiac, 1	
3
8
Chronic bronchitis, 2;   sq. eczema, 3
7
1
Epidemic of measles and
whooping-cough
Adequate; san i-
tary.
Clean ; adequate.
3
7
Frame; poorrepair
4
5
Meibomian gland, 1	
Good.
4
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
4
Satisfactory	
2
2
Fair	
Frame; new	
Good	
3
Clean ; adequate.
O.K.
15
1
"3
13
6
7
1
12
11
Scarlet fever, 1	
Measles, 13; pneumonia,
1
Measles, 27	
3
Satisfactory	
Good    	
Clean; adequate.
Adequate.
Good.
2
44
Tonsillitis, 1; eczema, 1; green
stick fracture, 1; asthma, 1;
acute rheumatism,  1; acne,
1; nervous, 1; rupture, 1
27
3
First-class	
Very good	
Good;modern
frame ;   ventilation good ; hot-
air heating
0 K
4
Clean ; adequate.
Good; eight flush
closets.
Yes.
12
9
26
Stammering, 1; orthopaedic, 1;
cardiac, 1;   anaemia,  4;   eczema, 1
4
1
1
1
5
2
19
1
Cardiac, 2; nervous, 1; orthopaedic, 1
Satisfactory	
Verv good	
Crowded	
Good	
4
Clean ; adequate.
Good
5
6
5
4
5
2 Q 48
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
Si
&
a
rt
Z
3
P    .
p. -O
CJ
3
0) >.
r*  —
CJ
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01   iC
o
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Hi>
Qtf
Qffl
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Nicomen	
Nicomen, North..
Nob Hill	
Noble Creek	
Noosatsum   	
North Bend	
Northfield	
Norwegian Creek
Notch Hill	
Ocean Falls	
Okanagan 	
Okanagan Centre  ..
Okanagan Falls
Okanagan Landing ,
Okanagan, South  .,
Okeover Arm  ..
Olalla	
Oliver  	
Ominiea	
One-mile Creek.
Orange Valley   .
Osland   	
Osoyoos   	
Otter Point ....
Outlook 	
Oyama   	
Oyster	
Oyster, North
Pachelqua
Palling  	
Park Siding ,
Parksville ...
Parson	
Pass Creek ,
Passmore	
Pemberton Meadows..
Pemberton Range
Pender Harbour
Pender Island ........
Penny	
Perow	
Perry Siding	
Pinantan   ...   	
Pine View 	
Popcum	
Port Alice..    	
Port Simpson	
Pouce Coupe	
Pouce Coupe, Central.
Powell River	
Prairiedale	
Pratt 	
Princeton	
Princeton, East.
Procter   	
Qualicum Beach   	
Quatsino	
Queen Charlotte City
Queen's Bay	
Quesnel	
Quick	
Raft River	
Read Island	
Red Gap	
Renata...   	
Rendezvous Island.
A. J. Stuart.
T. A. Briggs...
H. H. Murphy.
G. Bayfield ...
P. jM. Wilson ..
T. J. McPhee .
W. II. Wood	
W. Scatchard	
A. E. H. Bennett .
W.J. Knox   	
H. McGregor
J. E. Harvey .
R. Ziegler	
M. D. McEwen ..
G. H. Kearney., .
C. H. Hankinson .
Lee Smith	
W. R. Stone	
W. Sager  	
G. H. Kearney...
R. Felton	
W. Truax	
G. Williams ...
H. B. Maxwell
A. C. Nash   	
0. H. Hankinson
J. B. Thorn   	
L. T. Davis   	
P. Ewert	
H. H. MacKenzie .
N. J. Paul	
0. J. Willoughby .
A. Henderson . . ,
E. M. Sutherland .
W. Laishley	
C. H. Hankinson .
H. H. MacKenzie .
C. J. Willoughby .
C. Ewert	
J. C. Elliot	
O. O. Lyons	
W. Sager 	
W. A. Watson   ...
A. Henderson
W. R. Stone..
H. C. Wrinch.
Lee Smith....
D. J. Barclay
L. T. Davis ..
0.0. Lyons...
Guy Palmer ..
D. J. Barclay
G. R. Baker"..
G. 0. Paine	
M. G. Archibald .
R. Zeigler	
L. T. Davis	
.1. E. H. Kelso .
R. Zeigler	
Miss Bodenham. .
18
29
12
8
13
77
21
30
158
33
11
21
43
10
la
78
6
14
17
8
11
12
17
66
26
37
10
13
9
68
10
13
18
15
10
24
8
0
20
36
21
21
10
289
16
152
21
41
71
IS
12
12
18
25
12
5
13
70
69
156
30
11
21
43
10
10
57
6
13
15
8
5
10
16
57
23
36
9
11
68
10
9
18
15
6
30
39
7
10
23
8
6
21
36
19
21
10
275
16
148
20
41
71
18
12
12
26
12
1
1
2
3
3
3
5
1
4
4
1
2
1
2
5
2
1
4
11
13
6
9
10
6
15
10
8
6
9
4
1
6
4
3
16-
4
1
a
i
23
6
1
3
6
1
8
5
3
4
1
1
3
3
4
6
3
9.
i
2
1
16
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
i
2
10
1
6
2
4
3
4
2
5
1
4
4
7
4
3
3
10
5
5
1
2
5
6
6
1
5
1
1
1
1
4
1
8
2
2
i
1
5
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
5
2
1
]
2
8
2
2
3
2
1
1
2
2
1
ii'
2
1
3
"e
i
24
1
1
2
1
6
"6
1
12
1
5
2
5
4
9
13
2
42
3
fi
3
1
2
1
3
1
2
16
1
4
31
3
4
55
10
7
1
2
6
"i
4
2
6
2
4
2
9
1
2
i
2
1
2
13
4
2
1
2
2
2
"2
3
2
3
2 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 49
ASSISTED SGHOOZiS—Continued.
CJ
>.
cj jc\
oj ti
<W  CD
cj aj
Oh
-a
CP     ■
et a
S3
a
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
a
U
|S
w
9
'B
at
Q
d
%
a
a
o
is
a
tf
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
Satisfactory	
2
"2'
2
2
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
2
Good	
2
Good	
10
1
25
6
"i"
13
7
2
8
5
13
5
14
8
11
6
1
'3
7
O.K.
44
Chorea, 1; chronic bronchitis, 1
Pretty crowded...
25
1
10
Measles,   15;  scarlet
fever, 2	
Good.
12
Yes.
15
9
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Fairly adequate,
but needs repairs
Clean ; adequate.
8
CJ
Chorea, 1; cardiac, 1; chronic
bronchitis, 2 ; eczema, 1; an-
temia, 3
Epidemic of measles and
whooping-cough
Good, except that
blackboard  too
glossy
8
4
1
24
Fine rales in apex, 1; impacted
wax, 2; foreign body in ear, 1
Chorea, 2 ; cardiac, 1; chronic
bronchitis,  3;   curvature of
spine, 1
Measles,  12;   whooping-
cough, 16
Epidemics of measles and
whooping-cough
Good	
7
Excellent	
Good	
O.K.
3
"4'
1
17
4
Satisfactory	
Yes.
7
Good.
5
Good	
6
3
4
1
1
3
2
2
1
Bad.
9
Chicken-pox, measles...
8
Good	
quate.
3
Measles, whooping-cough
Good.
3
5
1
(
7
Good	
3
8
Rapid heart, 1; cardiac enlargement, 1
5
15
Adequate	
Yen tilation not
very good
Good	
2
1
....
"4'
"2
4
5
1
2
1
3
1
5
4
Very bad.
3
Clean ; adequate.
4
Clean ; adequate.
5
.
17
4
Good.
8
Good	
shallow.
Clean; adequate.
2
1
....
"li'
2
5
1
8
5
9
1
1
40
6
39
Good	
Good.
10
10
Yes.
7
Fair ; poor seats..
Good; poor lighting
9
4
29
8
Poor light and ventilation
Good	
Yes.
3
44
6
Yes.
7
6
Nephritis and cardiac, 1	
2
Scarlet fever, 3; chicken-
pox, 7; measles, 15
Good.
7
Good	
Poorly ventilated..
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
8
4
3
1
"i
2
8
3
2
3
Good.
4
Measles, whooping-cough
and influenza
Yes.
6
fi
quate.
in poor repair.
3
Overcrowded  	
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
2
1
O.K. Q 50
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
;.   CJ
ft2
CO
A
sd
&
0) fco
£ »»
>.5
G js
Qffl
Qtf
<,
Rexmount	
Rhone	
Riondel 	
Roberts Creek, East .
Robin's Range	
Robson 	
Rock Bay	
Rock Creek	
Rock Mountain	
Rocky Point	
Rosebery....
Rose Hill....
Rose Lake...
Round Lake.
Round Top..
Roy	
Rutland.
Saanich, North	
Sahtlam	
Saint Elmo  	
Saint Eugene Mission
Salmo	
Salmon Bench	
Salmon Valley	
Sand Creek	
Sandon	
Sandspit	
Sandwick   	
Saskatoon Creek..
Saturna Island. ..
Savona  	
Seaford	
Sechelt	
Seton Lake Creek.
Seton Portage ....
Shalalth	
Shawnigan Lake..
Shirley
Shoal Bay..
Shoreacres ,
Shuswap ..
Shuswap Falls ...
Shuswap, North .
Shutty Bench ,
Sicamous	
Sidney    	
Silver Creek...
Silverton
Sirdar	
Skidegate
Slocan Park ..
Slocan, South .
Smithers	
Soda Creek.,.
Sointula	
Solsqua	
Sooke	
Sooke, East.,.
Sooke, North.
Sorrento	
Spences Bridge
Spencer 	
Sproat 	
Squamish
A. C. Nash	
W. H. Wood	
D. J. Barclay....
F. Inglis	
M. G. Archibald
J. E. H. Kelso...
W. W. Birdsall...
W. H. Wood	
Wm. E. Gomm .,
M. G. Archibald .
F. V. Agnew	
G. C. Paine	
R. W. Irving ..
W. W. Birdsall.
W. J. Knox....
S. E. M. Hoops ..,
H. N. Watson
J. C. Elliot	
F. W. Green	
C. S. Williams
P. D. van Kleeck..
R. Felton.
W. Truax ....
E. E. Topliffe.
Guv Palmer	
T. A. Briggs	
W. A. Watson ...
E. M. Sutherland .
M. G. Archibald ..
R. Ziegler	
F. Inglis	
A. C. Nash	
F. T. Stanier .
R. Felton	
W. W. Birdsall ...
H. H. MacKenzie
W. Scatchard	
G.Williams...
W. Scatchard.
D. J. Barclay   ..
E. Buckell	
S. E. Hoops
E. Buckell	
Wm. E. Gomm ,
G. B. Henderson..
Guy Palmer ....
H. H. MacKenzie .
C. H. Hankinson
F. V. Agnew. ..
H. C. McKenzie.
J. H. Hamilton.
11. Felton	
W. Scatchard.
J. J. Gillis	
W. Truax	
J. H. Hamilton.
N. J. Paul	
Miss A. L. Boggs
Miss McClung .
Miss Benvie .
Olive Gawley.
Miss Gawley.
10
12
7
23
12
43
17
31
12
13
10
12
7
18
14
117
85
21
26
10
40
18
12
11
68
20
40
10
10
14
12
20
12
35
20
14
9
18
119
23
15
19
147
19
57
18
61
19
13
20
31
8
73
12
7
22
11
42
15
30
12
13
10
12
7
15
17
25
8
40
13
10
11
58
10
10
14
10
IS
12
8
10
26
17
6
17
14
7
17
9
18
114
20
84
16
18
140
18
62
17
13
17
30 15 Geo. 5                                         Board of Health.
Q 51
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
OJ
>
cut;
CJ %
an
re
CD    •
bo cn
c- 13
si a
h3
OJ
U
'O
O
Other Conditions, specify
fNervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
p
I
QJ
>
9
at
o
6
to
9
a
a
M
O
ti
n
tf
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
If crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
6
1
3
7
7
4
9
12
9
1
6
4
8
"i'
3
"i'
3
3
9
7
Good 	
Clean.
Yes.
Good.
Yes.
Good	
2
4
ii
7
Good	
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Not adequate.
Satisfactory	
Chicken-pox— May — ac-
countingfor large number of tonsillitis cases
.
2
Good	
1
Satisfactory	
Good	
Two clean ;    adequate.
Two  clean ;   adequate.
None.
Clean ; adequate;
sanitary.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Poor.
Clean.
2
10
57
5
12
1
30
1
3
13
2
10
6
5
8
2
6
8
6
7
10
3
3
1
12
3
9
4
5
59
5
3
3
6
3
65
8
17
4
11
3
2
9
7
8
Fair only	
Excellent in every
particular
Excellent	
Adequate	
Not very clean	
Good	
16
10
Cardiac, 2; curvature, 3; chorea,
2; nervous, 4 ; chronic bronchitis, 4 ; flat feet, 2; dermatitis, 1
1
1
Scarlet fever, 5; few cases
of measles and whooping-cough
3
"5'
1
1
i
i
5
i
2
2
3
2
1
2
1
21
2
1
Improved.
Clean; adequate.
Not adequate.
Yes.
Clean.
Satisfactory-
4
"7'
s
4
Pulmonary, 2; nervous, 2; cardiac, 7; renal, 1
10
Good	
V.D.H.,1    	
5
Measles, 1	
Fair	
Good	
O.K.
Yes.
Clean.
ii
Good.
Clean; adequate.
None.
Clean; adequate.
Two pits; eleven
seats.
Good.
Two pits;   four
seats.
Good.
Yes.
Not satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
100^ inadequate.
5
i
.
Orthopasdic, 1; cardiac, 1; nervous, 1
Nocturnal enuresis, 1; lisp, 1,
Chicken-pox; measles...
.
2
11
Systolic murmur, 1; rupture, 1
Good  ,.   .
6
9
Good	
Excellent	
Good	
"i
2
24
Orthopaedic, 1; tachycardia, 1;
nervous, 1; cardiac, 4
'45
1
14
"2
2
3
6
2
1
Cardiac, 1;   polypus nose,   1;
heart murmur, 1; hypertrophic turbinate, 1; conjunctivitis, 1; macrocephlo, 1
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean ;   fairly adequate.
Two pits ; f o u r
seats.
Dirty.
Clean.
Yes.
Clean.
2
"3
7
3
1
Nocturnal enuresis, 1; asthma, 1
2
2
No playground ...
30
3
• Q 52
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
co
S
°fl
9 >>
9
* .
dm
ll
y< 9
fl
S g
±; be
. 03
O H
2 *
at
-1- fl
oj cd
GJ £
Squilax ,
Stewart	
Stillwater	
Stone Creek 	
Stuart	
Stuart River...
Sugar Lake	
Sullivan Hill....
Sullivan Valley .
Sunnvbrae	
Sunnyside 	
Sunnyside Cannery
Swan Lake	
Swan Lake, North ..
Swift Creek   	
Sylvania .
Tappen...
Tappen Valley.
Tata Creek   .
Tate Creek..
Telkwa	
Three Forks
Three Valley	
Thrums	
Tonkawatla	
Topley	
Tranquille	
Tranquille, Upper .
Trapp Lake	
Trinity Creek .
Tulameen	
Turtle Valley
Usk.
Valdes	
Vananda 	
Vanderhoof	
Vesuvius   	
Vesuvius, North .
Vinsulla	
Waldo ....
Walhachin
Wardner .
Wasa.  ...
Waterloo
Webber Lake
Wellington   ..
Wellington, East ..
Wellington, South.
Westbank	
Westbank Townsite.
Westbridge	
Westviewr	
Whaletown	
White Lake	
Wildwood	
Williams Lake	
Williams Siding .  ..
Willow Point	
Willow River	
W. Scatchard.
H. A. Willans
A. Henderson.
C. Ewert	
W. R. Stone..
H. G. Williams....
D. P. Hanington..
C. J. Willoughby .
E. Buckell	
G. Williams....
W. Sager	
W. A. Watson .
Thos. O'Hagan.
F. T. Stanier..
E. Buckell.   .
F. W. Green...
W. A. Watson .
G. C. Paine....
E. E. Topliff...
J. H. Hamilton ..
H. H. MacKenzie .
J. H. Hamilton ..
C. H. Hankinson ,
C. J. Willoughby .
M. G. Archibald ..
H. W. Keith.
E. Sheffield. .
W. Scatchard.
G. A. Petrie ..
R. Ziegler	
A. Henderson	
W. R. Stone	
E. M. Sutherland
M. G. Archibald .
H. A. Christie .
S. E. Beech....
H. A. Christie.
F. W. Green..
T. J. McPhee
W. R. Stone..
T. J. McPhee .
G. L. Campbell   ..
Wm. Buchanan  ..
VV. II. Wood	
A. Henderson	
R. Ziegler	
E. Buckell	
A. Henderson	
F. V. Agnew	
H. H. MacKenzie .
W. Laishley ,
Miss Gawley.
7
5
40
38
18
17
10
10
9
9
6
6
7
7
12
12
9
9
12
10
11
11
14
13
6
6
7
7
19
17
40
30
18
18
14
14
9
8
7
7
63
53
18
18
9
7
45
38
11
11
20
20
17
14
9
8
14
14
10
10
9
9
16
13
42
23
16
16
43
43
101
99
19
19
20
15
9
7
59
58
15
14
38
33
18
13
61
61
10
10
74
62
56
47
151
150
18
7
59
51
13
13
9
9
14
12
20
19
35
30
41
39
22
21
23
19
7
6 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 53
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
ca
>
cj JZ\
O  %
an
QJ    -
cci ca
•35
fc'O
'o
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
1
u
9
>
m
9
a
V
Ul
6
Wl
OJ
n
a
a
o
*
bD
fi
tf
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
9
1
3
8
Good	
Two pits ;  three
Not adequate.
7
5
1
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
2
4
"      	
Good.
2
Clean ; adequate.
9
1
Fair lighting; poor
heating
Satisfactory	
3
Adequate but
seats dirty.
Good.
4
4
Satisfactorv	
Clean ; adequate.
1
6
2
1
2
4
Good.    .
16
but pits shallow
2
Satisfactorv	
Adequate hut
seats dirty.
Adequate but
seats dirty.
4
1
2
3
4
1
4
7
12
Satisfactory	
Crowded;    poorly
ventilated    and
heated
Clean ; adequate.
17
14
2
1
1
8
9
3
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
5
1
2
Clean ; adequate.
3
7
Frame building in
fairly   good   repair; ventilation
fair
Fairly clean ; not
in good repair.
Yes.
5
3
4
Fair lighting; poor
heating
6
1
3
1'
2
4
1
3
14
'if
8
21
2
i'
5
4
Two  pits;   eight
seats.
Clean ; adequate.
Sanitary.
6
Cardiac, 2; phthisis, 1; deformed hip-joint, 1
2
6
39
5
Good	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
9
Satisfactory.
Not satisfactory.
7
3
5
4
2
2
4
2
17
1
5
2
22
Comfortable	
Satisfactory ..
Poorly   heated   at
times ;   window
lighting fair
16
Scarlet fever, measles...
poor   repair ;
fairly clean.
Clean ; adequate.
S
19
Adequate but not
clean.
6
?3
Measles, 12; scarlet fever,
11
First-class 	
fi
28
1
"i
3
2
5
Measles, 14; scarlet fever,
13
17
70
Measles, 13; scarlet fever,
5
First-class 	
Good; not crowded
Satisfactory	
3
15
49
1
Satisfactory.
3
i
7
i
5
7
4
Satisfactory	
4
Clean
14
4
Clean ; adequate.
fi
3
Very good	
Very good. Q 54
British Columbia.
1924
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
so
01
ft
fi
o
53
GO
fc     .
OJ   t-»
0)
v   .
oj a*
CO
'3
<*2
tH   fi
B
p
2 s
£ M
° o
a
Sfl
w5
Ofi
fc §
fc s
3
cs
aj .s
QW
OJ  £
AS
-4
W. R. Stone	
12
18
8
13
52
34
9
41
12
60
50
65
29
25
12
15
6
7
48
24
6
41
12
46
47
54
29
26
3
1
1
1
2
4
1
3
Winfleld.       .  ■.
W. J. Knox    	
7
5
fi
11
2
2
1
i
3
"i"
17
3
8
7
3
8
15
14
5
Wycliffe	
5
1
2
1
2
22
9
Yahk	
3
Yale .
P. S. McCaffrey	
9.9.
C. S. Williams	
13 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 55
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—-Continued.
Condition of
Acute Fevers which
Other Conditions, specify
S
Closets.    State
>
T3
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Car
o
o
during the Past
if clean and
P si
OJ
diac Disease,  etc.).
a
QJ
*
Year.
lated, poorly
adequate.
SJ   fi
£
ft
|
heated, etc.
QH
ao
0
OJ
>
§
w
4
Good	
Good	
Excellent,   except
for want of water
supply for drinking
Yes
fi
1
I
Yes.
3
Clean ; adequate.
8
10
7
8
5
1
3
8
Chorea, 1; nervous, 2 ; cardiac,
1; anaemia, 3; chronic bronchitis, 2; curvature of spine, 1
Few cases of measles and
whooping-co ugh
8
1
8
Cardiac, 2; rapid nervous heart,
4
Measles, 14	
Much   overcrowded ; poor ventilation and light
Good	
5
7
Orthopaedic, 1; cretin, 2; nervous, 1
quate.
9
Clean ; adequate.
4
..
91
1
3
5
18
Potts disease, 1; nervous, 1...
Cardiac, 1; anaemic, 11; orthopaedic, 3
Fair.
14 Q 56
British Columbia.
1924
REGISTRAR'S REPORT UNDER THE VITAL STATISTICS ACT.
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1924.
B. E. Young, Esq., M.D., CM., LL.D.
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sib,—I have the honour to submit the Fifty-second Report of Vital Statistics for the year
ended December 31st, 1923.
Population.
An estimate by the Dominion Bureau of Vital Statistics gives the population of the Province,
including Indians (native), for the year 1923 as 553,556, as against 539,000 for the year 1922
and 524,582 for the year 1921 (census). The Annual Report of the Department of Indian
Affairs for the year ended March 31st, 1922, estimates the Indian population of the Province
at 25,694. The above estimates have been used for striking the rates per 1,000 of population
of births, deaths, and marriages.
Registrations 1921, 1922, and 1923 (exclusive op Indians).
The following table shows the total number of registrations of births, deaths, and marriages
in the Province for the years 1921, 1922, and 1923 :—
Registered births	
Registered deaths	
Registered deaths, less still-born
Registered marriages	
1921.
Population, 502,205.
11,659
4,489
4,214
3,994
1922.
Population, 514,256.
10,834
4,748
4.504
3,709
1923.
Population, 527,862.
10,777
4,906
4,602
3,856
Registrations by Divisions, 1921, 1922, and 1923 (exclusive of Indian Returns).
The following table shows the number  of registrations  in the different divisions  of the
Province for the years 1921, 1922, and 1923:—
Births.
Deaths.
Marriages.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1,526
699
4,729
1,405
343
1,250
592
1,115
1,360
671
4,282
1,307
296
1,299
583
1,030
1,298
832
4,287
1,253
262
1,245
582
1,018
659
246
1,891
577
112
426
194
384
684
309
1,996
641
100
425
235
358
696
322
2,011
696
85
466
235
395
568
164
1,970
389
79
392
152
280
522
159
1,865
373
70
321
134
265
463
212
2,012
410
Grand Forks	
56
290
130
283
11,659
10,834
10,777
4,489
4,748
4,906
3,994
3,709
3,856
REGISTRATIONS    (INCLUDING   INDIAN   RETURNS).
Indian returns are included in the following table, which shows the total number of registrations of births, deaths, and marriages in the Province foi* the years 1922 and 1023:—
Registrations of hirths	
Registrations of births, less still-born.
Registrations of deaths   	
Registrations of deaths, less still-born
Registrations of marriages	
.
11,197
11,213
11,020
10,875
5,118
5,338
4,871
5,032
3,813
3,960 15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 57
Births.
During the year ended December 31st, 1923, there were 10,777 registrations of births, and
of these 5,664 were registrations of male children and 5,113 of female children.
An analysis of the birth registrations for the years 1922 and 1923 gives the following results:
The number of birth registrations for the year ended December 31st, 1922, was 10,834, and of
these 8,959 were registrations of children born alive and registered during the year 1922. During
the period January 1st to June 30th, 1923, the births of 967 children born alive during the
year 1922 were registered, making a total of 9,926 living births for the year 1922. In the year
ended December 31st, 1923, registrations were received of 8,626 children who were born alive
and registered during the year. During the period January 1st to June 30th, 1924, 959 children
born alive during the year 1923 were registered, thus making a total of 9,585 children born
alive during the year 1923. Assuming that the estimates of the population of the Province as
given by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics are approximately correct, the rates per 1,000 of
population for living births were 19.30 for the year 1922 and 18.15 for the year 1923.
Of a total of 10,777 birth registrations for the year 1923, 4,328, or 40.16 per cent, of all
registrations, show both parents of British origin or nationality, while 7,972 registrations, or
73.97 per cent., show the fathers to be British.
In the following table all registrations of birth received between January 1st, 1914, and
December 31st, 1923, have been segregated and assigned to the actual year in which the births
occurred irrespective of the date of registration. It should be noted that births which occurred
during the year 1923 but which have been registered during the year 1924 are not included in
the total for the year 1923.   The number of these births will in all probability exceed 1,000.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
1919.
1918.
1917.
1916.
1915.
1914.
Prior to
1914.
1914	
8,902
1,377
132
99
88
50
45
38
32
36
1,745
1915	
8,599
1,277
122
89
43
38
46
43
29
10,286
1916 	
7,376
1,236
102
44
39
37
22
32
8,888
1,063
1917	
6,762
1,121
68
57
33
32
7,038
1,072
51
49
41
37
40
1918	
1,219
581
1919	
6,778
1,179
103
45
48
8,153
1920	
9,321
1,238
107
107
1921	
9,654
1,236
157
1922 	
8,959
1,081
10,040
320
1928	
8,898
8,898
11,047
10,773
8,073
8,328
10,799
7,671
Natural Increase.
The natural increase—that is, the excess of living births over deaths—for the year ended
December 31st, 1923, was 4,983, as against 5,422 in the year 1922 and 6,392 in the year 1921.
The following table, compiled from the Preliminary Report, Vital Statistics, Canada, 1923,
shows that the decline in the natural increase is by no means peculiar to this Province:—
1923.
1922.
1921.
Births.
Deaths.
Births.
Deaths.
Births.
Deaths.
1,957
11,607
10,672
70,056
16,472
20,530
14,972
9,852
1,142
6,858
5,006
35,637
5,330
6,151
4,984
4,955
2,160
12,693
11,564
71,430
17,679
22,339
16,163
10,166
1,113
6,679
5,158
34,034
6,754
6,119
5,264
4,907
2,156
13,021
11,465
74,152
18,478
22,493
16,561
10,653
1,209
6,420
5,410
34,551
5,388
5,596
4,940
4,208
Ontario 	
Manitoba	
British Columbia	
Totals	
156,118
70,063
164,194
69,028
168,979
67,722
Natural increase	
86,(
55
95,1
66
101/
57 Q 58
British Columbia.
1924
Deaths.
The rate per 1,000 of population for death registrations (exclusive of still-born) for the
year 1923 was 8.71, as against 8.75 for the year 1922 and 8.39 for the year 1921.
There has been a considerable decrease in the number of deaths attributed to respiratory
diseases—477 in 1923, as compared with 625 in 1922.
Deaths arising from external causes numbered 580, or 12.6 per cent, of all deaths.
Of the total number of decedents (still-born excluded), 1,237 males and 721 females were
given as married, 1,199 males and 592 females as single, 270 males and 413 females as widowed,
12 males and 4 females as divorced, and the balance, 149 males and 5 females, as not given;
1,956 males and 1,403 females were described as being of British origin.
Infant Mortality.
The number of registrations of deaths of children under 1 year of age during the year
1923, exclusive of still-born, was 582, or 67.4 per 1,000 of living births (born and registered
during the year 1923), as against 63.16 per 1,000 of living births for the year 1922. Should,
however, the births of children born alive during the year 1923. but whose births were registered
during the first six months of 1924, be included, then the rate per 1,000 of living births would
be 60.7.
The following table, taken from the Preliminary Report, Vital Statistics, Canada, 1923,
issued by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, is of interest for comparison, and shows that as
regards infant mortality British Columbia need not fear comparison with the other Provinces
of Canada or with other parts of the world.
Prince Edward Island
Nova Scotia	
New Brunswick	
Ontario	
Manitoba	
Saskatchewan	
Alberta	
British Columbia	
Average ....
Infant Deatii-ratb per, 1,000 Births.
83
97
106
84
85
93
94
66
70.8
97.6
103.3
82.9
94.4
85.6
91.3
68.1
1921.
1920.
83.5
80.0
100.7
116.5
113.3
134.9
91.2
103.7
83.0
102.7
80.6
85.7
84.0
93.5
56.5
60.8
86.6
97.2
Tuberculosis.
The number of deaths from tuberculosis during the year 1923 was 379, or 8.23 per cent,
of all deaths (exclusive of still-born), as against 401, or 8.90 per cent, for the year 1922. The
foregoing figures do not include 133 deaths from tuberculosis received under Indian returns.
The following table assigns deaths from tuberculosis to the various races:—
Chinese .......
Japanese	
Indian (native)
Other races ...
Totals
Population.
1923.
(estimated).
23,650
15,300
25,694
488,912
553,556
1922.
(estimated).
23,600
15,200
24,744
475,456
539,000
Deaths
from Tuberculosis.
Per Cent, of Deaths
from Tuberculosis.
1923.
1922.
1923.
1922.
44
23
133
312
64
23
102
311
8.5
4.4
26.9
60.6
12.8
4.6
20.4
62.2
512
500
99.3
100.0
Rate per 1,000 <
Population.
1.43
1.53
5.17
0.63
2.71
1.61
4.12
0.65
Cancer.
The number of deaths from cancer during the year 1923 was 436, or 9.47 per cent, of all
deaths  (exclusive of still-born), as against 424, or 9.41 per cent, in the year 1922. 15 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
Q 59
Ages op Decedents.
The following is a comparative statement re the ages of decedents for the years 1921, 1922,
and 1923:—
Age.
Under 1 year (excluding still-born).
Under 1 year (including still-born)..
1 to 2 years	
2 to 5 years	
5 to 10 years	
10 to 20 years	
20 to 30 years	
30 to 40 years.	
40 to 50 years	
50 to 60 years	
60 to 70 years •	
70 to 80 years	
80 to 90 years	
90 years and upward	
Age not given	
Totals.
4,489
617
627
582
892
871
886
63
83
87
91
96
103
93
86
99
159
186
186
280
297
284
469
479
471
563
565
576
582
622
633
593
663
706
417
530
663
215
205
258
42
42
32
30
23
22
4,748
4,906
Classified Deaths.
The following is a list of classified deaths which have occurred in British Columbia for the
years 1919 to 1923:—
1. General diseases	
2. Diseases of nervous system and organs of special sense	
3. Diseases of tbe circulatory system   ....
4. Diseases of the respiratory system	
5. Diseases of the digestive sys'tem	
6. Non-venereal diseases of the genito-urinary system and annexa
7. The puerperal state .'	
8. Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue	
9. Diseases ui the bones and organs of locomotion	
10. Malformations      	
11. Diseases of early infancy	
12. Old age	
13. Affections produced by external causes	
14. Ill-defined, including executions	
Still-born	
Totals	
1919. 1920. 1921. 1922. 1923.
1,056
417
643
1,096
203
205
41
22
11
52
290
84
462
93
184
4,759
1,193
422
646
840
285
278
47
10
8
37
343
88
544
38
284
1,107
447
656
487
269
223
61
17
14
25
311
84
476
37
275
4,489
1,222
424
667
625
306
249
57
20
7
29
302
74
496
26
244
4,748
1,221
512
710
477
286
254
61
17
12
55
298
96
680
23
304
For purposes of comparison the classified deaths for the year 1923 have been segregated
and assigned to the several mining divisions. " Tuberculosis," " cancer," and " influenza " are
included under " General Diseases." These three items number 866, or 18.8 per cent, of all
deaths.
Allotiment of all Causes of Death to each Mining Division for the Year 1923.
Mining Division.
? 1
n %
9 •-
C5ft
||
D   \%
Zw
o
ZZ   9
oi?
>>
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s a
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CD
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3
3
23
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1
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1
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32
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33
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8
26
i
"3  .
£|
3 3
HO
26
18
1
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<C
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O
n
141
8
3
2
4
7
16
51
7
3
1
1
4
7
95
9
5
1
6
2
8
126
22
3
9
9
1
44
38
1
32
3
33
4
1
5
2
517
66
Ganges	
2
2
4
47
12
1
3
2
3
21
1
i
2
39
8
"i
4
3
19
1
1
1
2
1
1
4
44
6
1
2
2
11
2
3
2
34
5
"i
6
"9'
3
67
17
10
65
3
13
108
"i
2
1
5
1
10
Totals    	
181
74
38
5
2
2
696
23
12
5
125
16
12
3
3
1
2
18
3
3
3
14
1
2
6
3
1
21
114
„
2
2
Totals  	
54
322 fc
Q 60
British Columbia.                                                 1924
Allotment of all Causes of
Death to each Mining Division foe the Year 1923—Continued.
Mining Division.
3 oj
o'S
IS
£-2
ll
0
rt  =
ll
Si?
58
18
7
22
105
202
34
27
9
2
1
2
8
285
4
2
25
3
3
1
20
2
60
2
0
I s
'R..S
PS 05
31
9
2
31
73
171
24
16
4
1
"i
9
222
3
OJ
Ci?
24
1
2
21
„ >j
rt rt
QJ c
01 "£
3 3 .
»o5
.  -Q OJ
3  S"£
O  O  >.
£Oco
14
2
4
7
rt
fc.
CJ
t7 S
3i3
3
cj
.si
So
a
TCrj.   0
a » 8
1§1
3
0
rt
s
fc.
0
"rt
s
1
1
3
rt
cs
12
4
6
20
42
81
10
2
5
3
3
0
J3
02
14
3
6
6
29
121
16
4
4
1
1
5
1
153
ol
taj
<!
T3
O
1
"2
7
10
10
3
11
1
"rt    .
C t«
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2%
* rt
HC
9
3
9
29
50
109
8
10
6
8
•6
3
to
OJ
1
i
6
8
"i'
1
73
0
H
289
69
64
284
696
1,536
172
143
62
26
6
32
34
2,011
33
6
183
27
44
17
141
15
466
13
1
8
9
5
5
14
27
3
85
1
85
64
15
15
9
86
11
40
23
59
19
6
53
69
9
9
75
152
126
16
26
6
3
"2
3
Chilliwack 	
Totals  	
2
5
1
1
5
1
4
137
48
85
3
2
2
3
1
27
3
6
482
44
34
16
5
2
7
3
99
8
8
7
19
i
1
5
1
21
4
....
1
3
1
2
....
26
6
19
166
4
2
19
4
5
3
7
2
46
2
2
2
2
4
Totals 	
96
2
22
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
6
1
26
103
1
593
10
1
60
3
6
2
34
4
179
6
ii'
"e'
2
18
2
45
126
1
6
Kamloops	
Merritt 	
20
2
6
'«'
2
48
' i
1
2
1
"2
2
8
3
6
2
12
9
5
1
7
3
10
5
5
2
7
1
31
1
11
1
4
4
10
1
31
1
2
3
5
2
1
2
Totals	
3
5
120
33
1
23
2
11
1
4
1
2
2
1
2
4
1
"i'
1
1
3
1
8
4
5
2
2
"i'
5
1
3
1
1
2
5
1
16
1
i
1
1
1
4
7
1
19
1
2
2
1
Totals  	
13
9
7
2
1
15
7
3
2
2
21
5
7
9
10
4
1
4
"e
2
2
1
8
6
1
4
1
16
4
2
7
12
1
6
2
3
2
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
8
12
1
5
8
i'
18
9
3
4
5
12
1
15
2
ii
2
1
1
6
1
3
"  3
1
3
Nelson	
1
8
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
Trail	
8
1
4
3
4
2
3
10
1
1
3
40
31
1
1
2
"i
4
3
"2
3
1
1
38
2
2
44
3
1
1
19
2
2
1
7
3
75
11
3
1
1
1
3
i
9
2
i
"i'
6
395
34
17
5
8
5
5
2
1
17
Totals 	
26
2
2
1
1
12
1
80
13
6
5
1
3
2
1
Atlin	
1
1
1
i
4
1
1
7
11
1
4
3
9
1
6
3
4
1
4
1
1
1
2
2
7
1
1
i
18
67
1
11
40
3
1
235
4,906
2
4
'2'
1
"2
19
1
6
3
2
Queen Charlotte	
Smithers	
1
5
4
1
2
4
2
1
6
1
1
Totals 	
13
512
31
710
19
477
18
286
11
4
61
17
3
55
17
298
12
304
4
96
61
680
5
23
37
1,221
254
12
• f
15 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
Q 61
Specified Diseases.
The following table of specified diseases  (exclusive of Indian returns)   has been compiled
from returns for the whole Province from the year 1906 to the year 1923:—
Diseases.
CD
©
CJ
o
CO
35
72
1
6
5
9
29
5
ISO
49
44
33
152
33
618
OJ
5
CJ
55
' i
16
18
14
10
137
79
36
46
153
59
624
o
OS
102
1
7
14
15
23
5
172
113
42
51
164
74
783
CJ
92
CM
rH
CJ
99
CJ
85
CJ
42
ia
CJ
32
14
"9
11
18
425
221
47
62
157
72
1068
CD
OJ
23
"l2
1
37
18
36
367
269
49
140
228
35
1205
r-
CJ
24
3
6
7
21
19
17
413
248
36
92
224
53
1163
00
Cl
15
"26
2
26
16
138
444
279
37
81
265
1S39
58
3220
CJ
CJ
8
2
2
2
8
34
163
411
3U9
39
91
226
615
51
1961
0
CJ
8
"is
9
26
32
64
444
320
41
220
147
300
68
1682
CM
OJ
20
4
8
6
27
34
414
373
50
222
132
17
42
1349
CM
CJ
rH
11
1
2
11
12
23
85
401
424
49
146
249
109
57
1580
CJ
CM
OJ
12
2
21
21
27
23
51
379
436
31
121
187
69
62
1442
Trt
0
n
39
1
2
6
4
16
2
178
36
20
63
io
4
26
21
26
243
68
47
802
11
11
31
23
68
10
316
148
60
85
237
53
1134
13
12
15
36
10
368
180
63
124
258
130
1308
11
18
27
35
11
422
159
51
66
195
113
1193
1
3
23
11
11
403
206
47
64
183
108
1101
166
170
332
455
696
6117
Cancer (all forms)	
3906
789
1644
110
45
458
217
53
778
3484
Diarrhoea and enteritis	
2949
1156
22,667
Allotment oe Specified Diseases to each Mining Division fob the Yeah 1923.
Mining Division.
■9 »
1
X
0
p.
a
oj
0J
CD
s
2
1
O)   j*
-cr oj
^ 'Z-.
cj c>
OD&-
ip
'ft J
°r-
0 CSj
JZ 3
■ss
1
rt
5
ci
tn
3
OJ
3
cq
3
1
0
CJ
cy
rQ
3
H
49
1
1
oj"
0
s
0
67
5
1
2
0
c
p
ffl
6
rt
0 3
9
'S
0
a
3
Ph
15
1
rt
'£ rt"
O  M
3 3
sg
SS
1
-a
3
rt
* rr,
za
-3'fc.
£ oj
.si
am
2
1
15
O
H
8
Oak Bay	
1
"s
5
59
8
3
2
3
81
6
1
"i"
8
2
"2
11
5
1
1
18
4
1
i
1
5
7
2
6
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
Totals	
1
1
8
7
1
22
22
11
4
18
55
177
21
14
2
3
1
2
220
2
2
4
4
6
3
2
1
1
2
9
7
7
14
48
7
2
1
1
1
6
19
6
8
33
68
4
6
2
i
1
1
"2
9
12
27
5
3
1
1
i
1
15
1
14
30
11
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
3
14
1
1
5
1
1
3
10
17
3
9
14
4
1
18
37
147
7
16
4
1
4
1
182
59
2
4
6
1
3
4
9
6
Totals	
	
2
11
1
206
544
59
2
2
1
1
1
22
2
11
1
1
60
2
1
83
2
1
38
1
13
Totals	
2
2
12
6
1
16
16
683
8
2
1
1
1
1
41
1
2
1
9
1
55
7
1
1
1
14
1
27
1
..„
3
1
1
11
1
2
2
1
"2
"l
3
69
5
11
"2
5
1
1
1
2
1
6
1
3
2
7
7
1
24
4
1
9
41
6
142 Q 62
British Columbia.
1924
Allotment oe Specified Disej4.ses to each Mining Division fob the Yeab 1923—Continued.
Mining Division.
-i &
A >
>. 9
o
3
03
0J
CU
9
as;
OQhh
in
3
'S.J
O bo
J= 3
>. 0
cs
OJ
h3
jC
rt
3
CU
3
C3
3
0
3
fc.
OJ
.3
3
H
fc,
OJ
cj
3
rt
O
1
CJ
0
fc.
pq
rt
■sl
3 3
0 CJ
fc- 3
P3Ph
rt
0
g
3
CJ
3
P«
es
3 rt
O  N
3 3
3 *
3 p
S*
a, ,5
3
rt
rt r£
§:-§
fc- -S
.S3
OS
Is
0
B
1
1
1
1
1
1
"1'
i'
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
3
5
2
5
1
i
1
1
i
1
8
1
Totals  	
	
2
1
1
1
9
2
4
4
2
23
	
	
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
6
1
3
' i
1
6
3
5
1
2
1
"2'
17
16
1
6
2
1
2
3
1
1
"i'
1
1
4
2
2
2
2
1
1
22
7
5
6
"2
Trail	
1
1
3
1
1
9
7
4
1
2
6
2
1
19
1
1
19
1
1
15
14
2
1
4
93
6
i
3
1
1
1
1
2
I
1
3
5
1
2
3
2
4
5
1
1
1
1
11
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
9
379
1
1
12
2
l
21
1
21
27
23
4
51
10
436
2
31
5
121
5
187
2
69
3
62
43
1,442
Mabbiages.
The number of marriages registered during the year 1923 was 3,856, as against 3,709 in
the year 1922, an increase of 147.
Oriental Races.
Chinese.—The total number of Chinese registrations of birth during the year 1923 was 337,
including two still-born. Of the above number, 180 Chinese children were born and registered
during the year 1923, the balance being registrations of children born prior to 1923.
The number of Chinese deaths registered during the year 1923 was 259, and of this number
twenty-one were of Chinese children under 1 year of age. There were forty-four deaths from
tuberculosis and ten from cancer during the year 1923.
Japanese.—There were 889 registrations of Japanese births during the year 1923, including
twenty-two still-born. Of this number, 595 were registrations of Japanese children born and
registered during the year 1923, the remaining 294 being born in years prior to 1923.
Death registrations of Japanese during the year 1923 numbered 185, and included in this
total were eighty-one registrations oC death of Japanese children under 1 year of age. The
number of deaths from tuberculosis and cancer among the Japanese for the year 1923 was
twenty-three and five respectively. 15 Geo. 5 Board of Health. Q 63
Indian Ketubns.
The total number of registrations of births of Indians during the year 1923 was 436, and
of this number 299 were actually born and registered in the year 1923.
Registrations of deaths of Indians numbered 432, and of these deaths 133, or 30.79 percent, of all Indian deaths, were attributed to tuberculosis. There were nine deaths from cancer.
The number of deaths of children under 1 year of age was 70.
The number of registrations of marriage was 104.
" Adoption Act."
Particulars of birth relating to eighty-one children adopted under the " Adoption Act" have
been received and filed in this office during the year 1923.
General.
The cash receipts during the year 1923 were as follows: Vital statistics, $2,179.82; marriage
licences, $295.
The number of searches made re vital statistics was 2,594 and the number of certificates
issued was 2,470.
The number of letters inward for the year 1923 was 4,973.
In conclusion, I wish to call attention to the willing and prompt assistance that we have
received on all occasions from all officers connected with this branch of the Health Department.
I have, etc.,
Heedebt B. Fbench,
Deputy Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.
victoria, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F.  Banfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1924. 

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