Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1928]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0226064.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0226064.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0226064-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0226064-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0226064-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0226064-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0226064-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0226064-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0226064-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0226064.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN
FOE   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 31st, 1926
FEINTED BY
AUTHORITY OP THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May' it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Warden for
the year ended December 31st, 1926.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Aitorney-GeneraVs Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1927. - Office of the Provincial Game Warden,
Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1927.
Honourable A. M. Manson, K.C, M.P.P. *
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game Warden for the
year ended December Slst, 1926.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Provincial Game Warden..  REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
For administrative purposes British Columbia is divided into five territorial divisions and
the accompanying reports submitted by the Inspectors commanding these divisions are a careful
and full presentation of game conditions in the Province during the year 1926.
In January, 1926, the Game Laws Enforcement Branch of the British Columbia Provincial
Police was completely reorganized. Under this reorganization the staff of Game Wardens has
been increased from twenty-six to forty-five, and consequently more direct control in outlying
portions of the Province has been the result, and thereby better protection has been afforded the
game than in the past. During the latter part of the year 1926 the staff was further increased,
and it is with a great deal of interest to note the appointment of two Game Wardens in the
Fort Nelson area, a district which has been suffering in past years through want of proper
protection, due mostly through the geographical location of the district, which is without any
communication with the outside world for a number of months each year.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
As mentioned in my report for the year 1925, a system is now in operation covering the
registration of trap-lines. As specially prepared maps were required for use in connection
with the trap-line registration regulations, this has, to a great extent, handicapped and retarded
the system which has been inaugurated to take care of these regulations, but I am assured that
this system will be working smoothly during the coming year.
FUR-FARMING.
A great number of applications have been received during the year from nearly every portion
of the Province for fur-farming permits and information in regard to fur-farming generally,
and every step has been taken to furnish the necessary permits and required information at
once. It will be of interest to note the statement covering returns of the licensed fur-farmers
on page 52.
COMPARATIVE  STATISTICS.
Calendar
Year.
Informations
laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
Revenue derived
from Sale of
Game Licences
and Fees.
Revenue
derived from
Fur Trade.
1017	
1
1 1 1                        97
1(1
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
1
81>T«SSfl             S   (15 4B7 3(1
1918	
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
167       I         13
3,341.00
«,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
'7,,273.00
5,676.50
4,768.00
3,825.00
7,454,00
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505,50
123,950.50
135,843.50
1'919...
242
'2'66
312
317
280
283
279
439
'23
'27
17
42
29
34
17
44
1920	
$ 5,291.39
1921	
1922	
24,595.80
51,093.89
1923	
'60,594.18
1924	
56,356.168
1925	
56,287.78
1926	
62,535.13
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Owing to the splendid work of all members of the Force and the co-operation received from
the Game Conservation Board and the sportsmen of the Province, I feel that the wild animal
and bird life of British Columbia has received the maximum of protection, and I wish to express
my thanks for the hearty support furnished by the above.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND).
By Inspector T. W. S. Parsons, Officer Commanding.
For your information I beg to submit my divisional game report for the year 1926.
" A " Division, British Columbia Provincial Police, comprises the whole of Vancouver Island
and that coastal portion of the mainland of the Province lying between, the 50th and 51st degrees
of latitude. H 8
DISH COLUMBIA.
For administrative purposes this important territory is subdivided into three game districts
respectively commanded by Sergeant Robert Owens, Victoria; Staff-Sergeant A. T. Stephenson,
Nanaimo; and Corporal R. Matthews, Courtenay, in whom, as their reports show, the Department possesses tried officers of skill and ability.
All told, our divisional strength consists of thirty-five officers, non-commissioned officers,
and men, who, in the matter of game-protection, are happily not divided into " so many game
wardens and so many policemen." To the contrary, they present a united divisional front, a fact
more than evidenced by the increase in the number of prosecutions launched: 1923, 90; 1924,
92;   1925, 72;   1926, 121.
In respectfully drawing your attention to the reports su'bmitted below with the suggestions
therein contained, I would also, on behalf of " A " Division, express my thanks to the Chief
Game Inspector, Major M. Furber, to Staff-Sergeant F. R. Butler, and to the Headquarters Game
Staff for their invariable courtesy and unfailing assistance.
VICTORIA DISTRICT   (SOUTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND).
Report of Sergeant Robert Owens, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear are reported as being fairly plentiful in the Jordan River District. As
there does not appear to be any keenness on the part of sportsmen to hunt these animals, they
will undoubtedly continue to increase.    In the Duncan District black bear are quite numerous.
Deer.—Deer are on the increase, does and fawns predominating. Carcasses of doe deer
have been found on several occasions, these evidently being shot by mistake and left to rot
rather than risk incurring a chance of being prosecuted for violating the "buck" law. It was
invariably found impossible to trace offenders, although every reported case of this nature was
very carefully investigated.
In view of the increasing number of female deer I would recommend that an open season
on does be declared for a short period at the beginning of the hunting season. The season on
buck deer might advantageously open at least two weeks sooner and close at the end of
November. This is suggested as during the latter part of the season " rutting" commences and
the bucks are not in good condition.
Wapiti (Elk).—Elk are doing well in the Cowichan Lake area and are on the increase, and
several bands of cows with calves were seen on the Shaw Creek Game Reserve. The calves were
in excellent condition and more numerous than ever. In the Shaw Creek, Nanaimo, and Nitinat
River Divide there is every indication that elk are increasing rapidly, while in the Jordan River
District a few elk have been reported.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Fair reports have been received as to the increase in beaver in the Cowichan Lake
area, and if adequate protection is given them I have no doubt that this increase will continue.
Marten.—Some fair catches have been made in the district.
Mink.—Fairly numerous.
Muskrats.—The Game Warden at Cowichan Lake reports that there has been a remarkable
increase in muskrats in his district. During the summer months, when the lake is at a low level,
a number of new nmskrat-houses were noticed. Muskrats have also been seen in Somenos Lake
and Creek; in the Saanich Peninsula there are signs of muskrats.
Otter,—Although occasionally caught, these animals cannot be considered as being plentiful.
Racoon.—Racoon, are very plentiful and a number of complaints have been received in regard
to depredations of these animals to domestic as well as game birds.
Weasel.—There are a few weasel in the district.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—During the past season these birds were fairly numerous.
Grouse (Blue).—Reported as being plentiful and in good condition. Sportsmen experienced
great difficulty in obtaining goods bags.
Grouse (Willmv).—These birds were not as plentiful as the blue grouse and the number
seen during the hunting season was disappointing. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926. H 9
Quail.—Very plentiful. The bob-white quail liberated in the district a few years ago do
not appear to increase to any great extent.
Partridge.—A number were noticed throughout the district.
Migratory' Game Birds.
Ducks.—Ducks have been plentiful in the district and in good condition.
Geese and Brant.—Scarce.
Snipe.—Plentiful in the Sooke District but scarce elsewhere.
Fur-farming.
The number of fur-farms have increased.
Game Reserves.
Patrols have been constantly made in the Shaw Creek, Nitinat, and Nanaimo River Divide;
in the mountains of the Cottonwood Creek Valley and McKay Creek. These areas, with the
Shaw Creek Game Reserve, have been the subject of very favourable reports as to the game
conditions.
Special Patrols.
A number of special patrols have been made in the district during the year 1926.
Vermin.
Cougar.—Numerous reports have been received regarding the increase in cougar and a
number of these animals have been taken in different parts of the district.
Cats (Domestic).—As usual these animals have been giving the Game Wardens considerable
trouble, but it is gratifying to note that a numher of vagrant domestic cats have Ween destroyed
during the year.
Owls.—These birds have done a great deal of damage during the past year. Every effort
should be made to control this pest, and in this connection, I would suggest that a bounty of
50 cents be granted by the Game Conservation Board.
Prosecutions.
A considerable number of offenders against the " Game Act" and the regulations were
successfully prosecuted during the year. The painstaking services of Constable Gidley, Bishop,
and Simpson in enforcing the provisions of the " Game Act" are respectfully brought to your
attention.    These Constables have spared no effort in making their work a success.
Hunting Accidents.
Hunting accidents have resulted in two fatalities in this district. Clifford Syme was shot
and killed by one J. C. Horton at Crofton and Raymond Fisher, of Duncan, died from a self-
inflicted wound.
Propagation.
A large number of pheasants have been raised on the Elk Lake Game Farm and liberated
in the district.
Summary.
Conditions have been good throughout the entire district during the year 1926, and it is
expected that the season of 1927 will be equally satisfactory from a sportsman's point of view.
NANAIMO DISTRICT  (CENTRAL VANCOUVER ISLAND).
Report of Staff-Sergeant A. T. Stephenson, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Game animals are on the increase in this district, particularly elk and deer. Bear are also
plentiful. Due possibly to the unusual weather conditions, the deer did not seem to be in very
good condition during the past season. H 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
FUB-BEARING   ANIMALS.
Beaver are on the increase and, according to complaints received from time to time, some
damage has been caused by these animals to agricultural lands.
Game Birds.
The past season was a rather poor one in this district for almost every variety of game bird.
Pheasants were very scarce and there were few goods bags reported by sportsmen in the district.
Migratory Game Birds.
Neither geese nor ducks were plentiful. Brant were fairly numerous, but very few were
taken.
Vermin.
A few cougar were accounted for in the district, but these animals are not numerous at
present.
Crows are still numerous.
Game-protection.
Since my last annual report Constable H. C. Pyke has replaced Constable Robert Marshall in
the Nanaimo District. I may say that during the nine months in which we have had the
services of Constable Pyke he has accomplished a great deal of useful work in the matter of
game-protection. He has secured a number of important convictions, and his efforts, coupled
with those of Constable Adam Monks in the Alberni District, have resulted in violations being
kept down to a minimum.
Both these officers rendered excellent service in a capacity that calls for much arduous
efforts and the exercise of considerable discretion.
Propagation.
Deer, elk, beaver, blue grouse, and quail appear to be increasing. Pheasants, however, seem
to be on the decrease, and I would respectfully recommend that a number of these birds be sent
to Constable Pyke and liberated where he deems it advisable in the Nanaimo District.
Fur Trade.
There are no established fur-trade posts in the district in spite of the fact that we have
many resident trappers.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming is proceeding steadily in this district, but as yet there is no definite progress
to report.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
While registration of trap-lines and guides has been in force in most other parts of the
Province, it has not hitherto been in vogue on Vancouver Island.
General Remarks.
I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation of the excellent work performed by Constable H. C. Pyke, Nanaimo Detachment, and Constable Adam Monks, Alberni
Detachment, during the past twelve months. Their work, as previously pointed out, entails
much arduous labour, patience, and the exercise of considerable discretion. By their industry
and sound common sense these officers have done much to cause the " Game Act " to be respected
and enforced.
OOURTENAY DISTRICT  (NORTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND AND A PORTION
OF THE MAINLAND COAST).
Report of Corporal R. Matthews, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear south of the Campbell River are scarce, hut north of this river they
are in fair numbers and seem to be holding their own. On the mainland portion of this district
grizzly bear are plentiful at the head of Knight Inlet and Wakeman Sound. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1923.
H 11
Deer.—Deer are very plentiful throughout the district and are on the increase, which is
due, no doubt, to the continued close season on does. During the past summer a number of deer
died, and on being examined it was found that flukes were in the liver. It is thought that
drinking stagnant water in the swamps is the cause of this as very few deer killed on the highland were found with infected organs.
I would suggest that the open season on bucks be shortened by at least two weeks and
closed not later than November 30th. The reason for this is that by December 1st the rutting
season has been on a month and the bucks are neck-swollen, thin., and unfit to eat. Again, at
this time of the year the bucks are full of fight and will stand and look at a hunter until they
are shot down; a regular slaughter takes place and very few of the deer are taken out of the
woods as they are in such poor shape. I would like to add that during the first part of
December a good many of the bucks that were shipped out of the district were nothing but
skin and bone.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti (elk) are doing well and are on the increase. Small bands are
reported from Buttle Lake to the Nimpkish River and from Stratheona Park to the west coast.
It is impossible to give an estimate as to numbers unless an extended patrol is made into these
districts. Indians have reported that cougar are killing wapiti, but so far information has been
very meagre and not first hand.
Mountain-goat.—Mountain-goat are plentiful at Wakeman Sound, Kingcome Inlet, Knight
Inlet, Simoom and Thompson Sounds, These animals are on the increase, which may be
attributed to the fact that they are in a virgin country which is seldom hunted by outsiders.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Beaver are now getting to be in good numbers on the Island, and in some places,
especially Quinsam River, Nimpkish River, and adjoining areas, they are plentiful.
Fisher.—Very scarce.
Marten.—These animals are scarce on Vancouver Island where they have been trapped out.
The outlook is better on the Mainland, but even there they are decreasing in numbers through
excessive trapping.
Mink.—Mink have been trapped too hard and on some streams where these animals were
once plentiful there is no breeding stock left. On'the Mainland and the north end of Vancouver
Island some fair catches are being made, but on the whole the catch has been meagre.
Otter.—A few land-otter have been taken this season north of Campbell River and along
the Nimpkish River.    These animals are, however, very scarce.
Racoon.—Racoon, are in fair numbers all over the district.    The catch in 1926 was good.
Weasel.—Weasel or ermine are not plentiful.
Wolverine.—Fairly plentiful between Wakeman and Seymour Inlets, Frederick Arm and
Salmon Arm, as well at the head of Knight Inlet. In other sections of the district they are
scarce.
Game Birds.
Grouse (Willow).—Willow-grouse are decreasing. They appear, however, to be holding out
well on the logged-off lands where cover is fairly good. This applies especially to the swamps
between Union Bay and Campbell River.
Grouse (Bine).—These birds had a very heavy "hatch" during the past breeding season
and were subsequently plentiful.
Pheasants.—Pheasants are increasing and each season are spreading farther north.
Quail.—Quail had a good nesting season last year and there was a noticeable increase. New
blood should be turned out.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—Mallards, pintail, widgeon, and green-winged teal are plentiful and no indications
of any decrease can be noted.    In this district mallards are very plentiful.
Geese.—Canada geese are to be found in good numbers on the Mainland at Shelter Bay,
Knight Inlet, Wakeman and Thompson Sounds. In this portion of Vancouver Island they are
scarce.
Brant.—Brant are found in good numbers and at the present they are fairly plentiful
between Comox, Denman Island, and Union Bay.
Swans.—'Scarce. •
H 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Shore-birds.—Greater and lesser yellow-legs are very scarce and this also applies to plover.
Wilson snipe are showing up in fair numbers.
Vermin.
Cougar are on the decrease, but there is still a number far back in the hills. During the
winter nine were reported as being killed.
Wolves are very scarce in the district.
Crows are to be found in thousands along the coast and these birds take their toll of nesting
game and non-game birds. Owls are fairly numerous, while eagles are plentiful in the northern
portion of the district.    .
Cats (domestic), living altogether in the bush, are on the increase and if not checked will
do tremendous damage to game and song birds.
Game-protection.
During the past summer it was discovered in this district that the Chinese were paying as
high as $50 for unborn fawns, which are highly prized as they are used in making medicine.
One prosecution was conducted at Cumberland; the accused pleaded " guilty " to a charge of
" having in his possession five deer under the age of one year," and the maximum penalty of
$300 was imposed.
As this district was formed in June last, I am only able to give a summary of the
prosecutions conducted for seven months. During this time the " Game Act" and regulations
were vigorously enforced. The Game Warden, Constable W. V. Fenton, was continuously
patrolling the district and had the assistance and co-operation of the Police officers at all times.
Thirty-two prosecutions were conducted, twenty-nine convictions were obtained, and fines totalled
$1,055.    On charges of pit-lamping there were two dismissals and one conviction.
As the district has been enlarged, I would recommend that another Game Warden be
stationed in the northern part of the district at Port Hardy and that a launch be supplied for
game patrol-work.
Hunting Accidents.
There were no hunting accidents in the district during the year 1926.
Propagation.
Pheasants are increasing rapidly and are spreading north to the logged-off lands near
Campbell River.
Quail are increasing, but to date the breeding stock is not large.
Muskrats would do well in this district and I would recommend that these animals be
introduced. There are hundreds of acres of swamp lands which would make ideal homes for
these animals.
Fur Trade.
There are no licensed fur-traders in this district as the bulk of the fur is sent direct to
Vancouver by trappers.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farms are increasing in numbers each year and mink, marten, and muskrats are being
successfully raised. At the present time, however, fur-farming in this district is an experiment,
'but as the breeding stock increases the fur-farms are being enlarged and without a doubt the
farmers will soon foe getting returns from this industry.
Registration of Trap-lines.
This system appears to be working out well on the Mainland and I would recommend that
the same regulations be made to apply to Vancouver Island.
"B" DIVISION (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Inspector W. R. Dunwoody", Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith annual game report for " B " Division for the calendar
year 1926, as requested in your letter of December 31st last. In dealing with the different
subjects I have conformed to the order in whch they appear in your letter. As the variety of game animals differs considerably in the four districts comprising this
Division, I am dealing separately with the districts, and I trust that, for reference purposes, this
will be more satisfactory than if the Division were dealt with as a whole.
Game Animals.
Boundary District.
Deer.—These animals show an appreciable increase in this district, and although the local
Game Warden there reports the proportion of bucks and does in much better shape than
formerly, I am of the opinion, from reports received from all over the Division,, that we have
now arrived at a time when a change should be made in the "buck" law. Were the reports I
have received confined to the fact that does are seen out of all proportion to bucks, this would
not be of much importance as the bucks are generally found on the higher summits; but all
information points to the fact that there is an ever-increasing number of barren does to be found.
Reports show that in the neighbourhood of thirty cougar were killed last winter in the
Boundary District, and as statistics show that cougar will kill three deer in a week for food,
the slaughter of this type of vermin must prove very beneficial to the increase of the deer family.
Mountain-sheep.—I regret to report that, although a closed season has been in effect for
nearly eighteen years in the Similkameen District, there is not a corresponding increase shown
in the number of mountain-sheep to be seen either on the range south-east of Penticton or in the
Ashnola District.
Mountain-goat.—There are only a few mountain-goat and these are reported to be in the
Skagit River District and in the Chopaka area.
Bear.—These animals are not reported as plentiful.
Fernie District.
All reports point to a decided increase in the game animals in this district, with the possible
exception of caribou, which are apparently migrating west, as. we have several reports showing
an increase in this animal in the Kootenay Lakes.
Moose.—Moose are also increasing and particularly in the Elk River Game Reserve, but I
do not think this increase is yet reaching a stage where I could recommend an open season in
the Fernie District. The increase is limited, and I think one of the reasons for this is the fact
that moose pasturage in, that part of the Province is rather scarce.
Mountain Sheep and Goat.—From information received, it would appear that all big-game
hunters this past season were well satisfied with the bags they got of sheep and goat, so that
undoubtedly these animals are plentiful.
Bear.—Bear of all kinds are reported as being plentiful.
North-east Kootenay District.
Old residents and even the Indians in the Kootenay and Columbia Valleys state that game
animals are more plentiful in this district than they have been for many, many years, although
moose and caribou have not yet reached the point where an extended open season would be
advisable.
Deer.—White-tail and mule deer are abundant and the black-tail deer seem to be coming
back.
Wapiti.—This animal is also seen in abundance in this district.
Bear.—Bear of all kinds are reported as being plentiful. The close proximity of the Elk
River Game Reserve and the National Parks and Game Reserves, and also the fact that the past
two winters have been extremely mild, are important factors in the general increase of all
game animals. One guide is reported as having seen eighty-three sheep on one slide and
another hunter is reported as having seen forty rams before he finally shot one.
West Kootenay District.
Favourable reports are received from all quarters in this district as to the increase in game
animals.
Bear.—Grizzly bear can be found in the Slocan and Upper Duncan country. Black bear
are numerous throughout the district and in very many instances are becoming a nuisance to
fruit-farmers.    Brown bear are in fair numbers. Caribou.—In my remarks under this heading in the Fernie District I have already pointed
out that caribou are apparently migrating west, and small bands of these animals have been
seen at Wilson andl Mill Creeks, in the Slocan, and quite a large herd is reported in the Upper
Duncan, as well as some on the South Fork of Kaslo Creek and in the Howser District.
Mountain-goat.—A few of these animals are reported in the Lardeau on Davis and Copper
Creeks, also on the range between Summit Lake and Halcyon, in the Arrow Lakes District. A
few have also been noticed in the Little Slocan District.
Mountain-sheep.—A few of these animals are reported in the Little Slocan District.
Wapiti.—A small herd of elk are reported at LaFrance Creek.
Deer.—Deer are plentiful throughout the district. The open season this past year was
extremely mild and hunters had to undergo considerable hardship if they wanted to kill deer,
the result being that not a great number were killed.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Boundary District.
Beaver.—Beaver are reported as very plentiful in this1 district. I trust that a similar
report can be furnished next season, when we will then be able to speak from experience as to
the results of the open trapping season on this fur-bearing animal. Personally, I must say that
I have some misgivings as to the outcome of the open season, as apparently every trapper and
hundreds of others who are not trappers have registered trap-lines in order to be in a position
to get these animals when the season opens.
Muskrats.—These animals are very plentiful.
Lynx.—Lynx are in fair numbers only. Lynx being carnivorous animals, I have always
been in some doubt as to the advisability of keeping this animal on the fur-protected list.
Marten and Mink.—These animals are scarce throughout the district.
Fernie District.
Beaver and Muskrats.—These are on the increase, which undoubtedly is due to the protection
which has been afforded during the past five years. I am very niiuch afraid that the open
trapping season will gravely reduce their numbers, if not tend to exterminate them entirely.
Lynx, Mink, Marten, and Weasel.—These are all reported as plentiful. The fearful havoc
wrought by the weasel on the game birds leads me to suggest that this animal be struck off the
list of protected fur.
North-east Kootenay District.
Whilst on the upper reaches of the Columbia River beaver and muskrats are reported
plentiful, these animals, together with lynx, marten, mink, and otter, are reported scarce in
the other parts of the district. Nevertheless, the protection of the last five years has been
useful in this respect. I think, however, that an additional few years, coupled with a vigorous
campaign against vermin, would be still more beneficial. Available food-supplies cannot feed
fur-bearers and vermin too.
Reports from the Rev#lstoke and Big Bend country show a decided increase in all fur-
bearing animals.
West Kootenay District.
Beaver show a good increase throughout the district and particularly in the Slocan River,
Salmon River, and in the vicinity of Nakusp. AVhilst I presume the contemplated open season
is the correct one from a fur point of view, at the same time it does seem unfortunate that
in the killing of female beaver at that season there will probably be four or five lives sacrificed.
Marten, mink, fisher, and lynx are reported on the increase, as well as muskrats.
Game Birds.
Boundary District.
Pheasants.—Pheasants during the past two seasons have shown a general decline in numbers
in this district. I am of the opinion that the last open season was altogether too long. The
birds are smaller and the cocks are scarce. From my own observations in this district and from
reports of the local Game Warden, I think that during a very limited open season birds of both
sexes could be shot, the bag of course to be extremely limited. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926. H 15
Partridge.—Although this bird two years ago was reported a menace to crops, I do not
think we are likely to have a complaint of this nature in the near future, as there is a considerable falling-off in the numbers of these birds. Reports indicate that they have gone north to
Vernon District, where more grain is grown.
Quail.—Quail are reported as being numerous east of Penticton, on the benches.
Grouse.—Reported plentiful throughout the district, with the exception of the Similkameen,
where I would recommend a closed season for three years, so that these birds may have an
opportunity of again, propagating.
Fernie District.
Grouse (Willoio).—I would strongly recommend a closed season for at least two years for
this bird in this district. This, as you are aware, is a very easily taken bird and I think the
common use of the automobile accounts for its scarcity in a very great measure.
Grouse (Blue).—These are more plentiful than the ruffed variety, as they are better able
to protect themselves in the higher altitudes.
North-east Kootenay District.
Grouse are reported as very scarce in the Kootenay Valley and none too plentiful on the
Upper Columbia. In the Revelstoke and Big Bend areas, however, they are reported in good
numbers.
West Kootenay District.
On the whole, I think it can be safely said that grouse are on the decrease throughout this
district. An extremely bad condition of forest fires existed during the past two years and in a
great measure will probably account for the condition of grouse in the district.
There are a few1 coveys of Hungarian partridges in the district adjacent to Nelson.
Although an effort has been made by the Game Board to propagate the pheasant in this
district, up to date this has met with indifferent success, with the possible exception of the open
valley at Creston, where considerable numbers of these birds are to be found.
Migratory Game Birds.
Boundary District.—There are very few migratory birds throughout this district. My
remarks, however, under this heading will be confined solely to the Vaseaux Lake Game Reserve,
where the local Game Warden reports an increase in ducks and geese. The latter, apparently,
immediately on the young reaching maturity, migrate south, so that local hunters obtain no
benefit. Apparently an effort is to be made to 'band some of these geese next spring, with a
view to discovering their destination.
A few trumpeter swans are found on Vaseaux Lake, but as this lake and the Okanagan
River freeze over, the birds settle at the south end of Okanagan Lake and near Kelowna.
Femie District.—In the Fernie District migratory birds are practically a nonentity. Occasionally some ducks are seen on the Elk River and on some of the lakes near Elko and Cranbrook,
the birds not remaining in any of these places.    The same would apply to geese.
North-east Kootenay District.—A few ducks' and geese nest each year on Columbia Lake.
Conditions are not very favourable, however; the rapidly changing water-levels of the lake,
scant feed, and natural enemies are factors responsible; although mergansers and fish-eating
ducks appear to thrive and increase. Ducks and geese are reported as having bred in good
numbers on the Columbia River, but they left early for the south and very few northern birds
came in.    Ducks, geese, brant, and Wilson snipe are reported plentiful in the Revelstoke area.
West Kootenay District.—Migratory birds in this district are practically confined to the
Kootenay Lakes near Creston, where there is always a considerable number of local-bred birds
and always a big showing of northern birds in their flight south. This last season has been no
exception to the rule and migratory birds of all kinds were reported plentiful in that area.
Vermin.
Boundary District.—Under this heading cougar and coyotes are the main menace to game
life. Realizing this, the Department had Special Constable Shuttleworth appointed for this
work, and I think this officer's record in the destruction of predatory animals has been excellent.
Nine cougar were killed by Constable Shuttleworth last winter and in all thirty cougar were
killed in the Boundary District. II 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Constable Robertson reports that the use of the oil of catnip has been, demonstrated as a
lure for members of the cat family, and it is hoped that with the use of traps in conjunction
with the oil of catnip some benefit will be derived by way of thinning out these animals.
The same Constable offers the suggestion in connection with coyotes that the present bounty
of $2 be cut down to $1 during the winter months, when the fur is in good condition and
commands a good market price, and increased to $5 per pelt from May to September. I would
endorse this suggestion.
Fernie District.—Coyotes are reported as being all too plentiful in this district. They are
particularly destructive to deer in the spring, running them on the crusted snow. It is reported
that Indians have done good work in the past year taking out the young ones in the spring.
Cougar are reported as being numerous in the Elk Valley Game .Reserve. It might be
advisable in the near future to allow predatory-animal hunters into the reserve on special permit
in an effort to thin out these animals.
North-east Kootenay District.—'In the Kootenay Valley vermin of all descriptions are
reported as numerous; in fact, Constable Greenwood, who is a close observer of animal-life,
almost despairs of the survival of any game animal or bird.
Hawks are apparently a terrible menace to bird-life at the present time, as are cougar and
coyotes to the game animals.
Constable Greenwood also suggests the raising of the bounty in the summer on coyotes.
West Kootenay District.—Unfortunately, cougar are plentiful in the Lower Arrow Lake
country, Slocan Valley, and in the Grohman Creek area.    Coyotes are numerous throughout.
Game-protection and Hunting Accidents.
Boundary District.—The continual appearance in various parts of the district within a
short space of time of Constables Robertson and Shuttleworth has been a deterring factor in
preventing violations of the " Game Act" by Indians and others. There were no hunting
accidents in this district.
Fernie District.—In the Fernie District Constable Ira Brown is employed specially in connection with protection in the Elk River Game Reserve. This Constable is a splendid type of man
for this work and I have no doubt that the increase in the game in that district is due in a great
measure to his watchful eye on game-law violators. Constable Thomas, at the other end of the
district, is an enthusiastic game-protector.
There were no hunting accidents in this district.
North-east Kootenay District.—All game officers in this district reported the hearty cooperation of Rod and Gun Clubs and visiting sportsmen in the enforcement of the " Game Act."
A considerable number of people, however, are reticent in reporting violations. Something in
this regard might be accomplished if section 53 were printed in the regulations each year.
No hunting accidents reported in this district.
West Kootenay District.—In this district there are no special game localities where the
necessity for a Special Game Warden arises, and game duties are therefore carried out by local
officers. There have been no complaints regarding the manner in which these officers perform
their duty.
I regret to report one fatal hunting accident, which occurred on Sunday, November 21st, 1926,
when a boy named John L. Francis was accidentally killed by his companion, a boy named James
Clelland, on the Silver King Mine Road, near Nelson. It was clearly proven an unavoidable
accident, as Clelland slipped in the snow, his rifle discharging as he was falling, killing Francis
instantly.
Propagation.
Boundary District.—The present year has been good in so far as native birds are concerned
and in game animals; excepting grouse in the Similkameen, previously mentioned.
Fernie District.—Although there is a reported increase in deer in this district, various
reports have reached me with reference to the barren does which are seen. The fact that deer
are increasing may seem to contradict my previous statement that the " buck " law had outlived
its usefulness. I think that the increase shown in the Fernie and North-east Kootenay Districts
may be attributed to the proximity of the game reserves, where these animals are so well REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926. H 17
protected.    I am of the opinion that it would be advisable to cut out the " buck " law for a few
seasons and note results.
Grouse reports are unfavourable as to propagation; hence my previous recommendation for
a closed season.
North-east Kootenay District.—Reports are not very favourable regarding the turning loose
of some pheasants on the Columbia south of Golden last year. Apparently these birds have
disappeared. I am very much, afraid that the winters are too severe in the valley for the
Mongolian pheasants. I rather think that the Hungarian partridges could be imported more
successfully and would be a better type of game bird in the valley than the pheasant.
West Kootenay District.—Nothing was done in this district by way of propagation during
the year under review.
Game Reserves.
Boundary District.—We have two game reserves in this district, one the Vaseaux Lake
Sanctuary (Bird) and the Kettle River Game Reserve. The former is without doubt one of
finest bird reserves in the Interior and has been responsible for an increase in migratory birds,
particularly geese.
It is scarcely necessary for me to go into details with reference to the Kettle River Game
Reserve, as I note from a recent issue of the British Columbia Gazette that the reserve has
been cancelled. It is regrettable that through the condition of the ranchers in that district the
Department found it necessary to cancel the reserve, as I feel assured that this was a wonderful
portion of the Province for the propagation of game.
Fernie District.—I have already, in previous reports, commented very strongly on the
wonderful sanctuary for wild life the Elk Valley Game Reserve has proven, and to persons
who have noted conditions in connection with the reserve it is amusing to see animals heading
for the reserve about the time the first guns are heard. More game reserves certainly mean
more game.
West Kootenay District.—The only game reserve we have in this district is a restricted area
across the lake from Nelson. Pheasants and grouse are reported as doing well in this area
and ducks make a haven of it during the latter part of the open season.
Fur Trade.
Trapping for fur-bearing animals, with the exception of beaver and muskrats, opened in
this Division on November loth, 1926.
Boundary District.—Up to the end of December no fur trade of any account had materialized.
Fernie District.—The fur trade is probably offset to some extent by the fur raised on fur-
farms, especially fox, marten, and mink. Prices are reported as fairly good. I am of the
opinion that the new system of handling fur will undoubtedly help to preserve the quality of
British Columbia fur by preventing it being tampered with.
North-east Kootenay District.—The fur trade in this district is reported as picking up and
to date several good fur-catches have been reported by the trappers in the district.
West Kootenay District.—Only a few trappers have presented fur in the district and
royalties have been paid on a few marten and mink.    The fur is reported in, good condition.
Fur-farming.
Boundary District.—It is reported by Constable Robertson that the Dominion Government
has silver-fox farming under supervision and that it is proving a wonderful success. Fur-
farming being only in its infancy, the Constable suggests that the industry be carefully guided
by the Department.
Fernie District.—Fur-farming is in its infancy in this district; probably the principal farm
is that of the Cranbrook Silver Black Fox Company.
North-east Kootenay District.—Fur-farming has not been gone into very extensively in this
district. Commander Powles has a fox and muskrat farm near Wilmer. I understand he has
ten pairs of foxes, costing approximately $10,000.
West Kootenay District.—There are a few fox-farms in this district, but reports are not
very favourable. I presume this can, be accounted for by the fact that in most cases inexperienced persons are starting and operating the farms. H 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
Since the " Game Act " was amended and it became necessary for each trapper to register
his trap-line, over 400 applications have been received at this office from all parts of the Division.
This would lead me to believe that the trapping of fur will be carried out on a gigantic scale
during the coming year, and in my opinion grave danger is to be anticipated of killing off the
fur-bearing animals. Dealing with these applications entailed a considerable amount of work
on the part of officers and in many cases the greatest difficulty was experienced in settling
disputes. Next year, however, should see the end of any trouble as trappers will have their
lines clearly defined.
In my opinion, for humane reasons, the length of a trap-line should be limited and residents
of a locality should be given preference on trap-lines rather than outsiders.
The Fernie and North-east Kootenay Districts are the only districts where we have any
guides. Some trouble has been experienced in the past season with men coming from Banff
and guiding parties without proper licences. Prosecutions were instituted in some instances
and convictions secured.
Special Patrols.
Boundary District.—One special patrol was made by Constable Robertson through the Kettle
River Game Reserve. One prosecution was instituted and a conviction obtained under section
35 of the Act; careful back-tracking in the snow resulting in two prosecutions for shooting within
the sanctuary and two convictions.
Fernie District.—During the month of December Constable Ira Brown performed a most
difficult special patrol to the Wall Lake, Akimina, and Sage Creek Districts, under exceptionally
trying weather conditions with sub-zero temperatures, in connection with reported illegal hunting
in these localities.    The Constable found that there was very little foundation for these reports.
North-east Kootenay District.—Constable Greenwood performed a special patrol to Doctor
and Finlay Creeks in search of a herd of caribou reported by Dr. H'owden.
"C" DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE. OKANAGAN, CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
B\- Inspector AV. L. Fernie, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report under the " Game Act" for the
year 1926 for this Division.
Game Animals.
Moose.—Moose are still plentiful and are spreading towards the south. They have been
seen south of the Canadian Pacific Railway, near Basque.
Dr. Mills, a gentleman who visits the Cariboo almost every year, has noticed that frequently
the livers of moose are diseased, and attributes this to their feeding so largely on water-lily
pads, on which there exists a species of snail which acts as an " intermediate host" for the
parasite which causes the liver-trouble. Constable Turner, who has patrolled the Bowron Lake
country for years, informs me that nearly every liver from these animals that he has seen or
heard of is not fit for food, so I do not think this liver-disease is or will be a serious menace to
the health of the moose.
Caribou.—These animals, of which there are two varieties, seem to be holding their own,
and indeed are increasing in the southern parts of this Province and gradually getting back to
their former numbers. They are easily killed and were wantonly slaughtered off in the early
days near Kamloops and back of the Seymour Arm of the Great Shuswap Lake.
Elk.—The only place wapiti (elk) occur in this Division is where they were introduced on
the Yalakom Game Reserve, and from reports of the Game Warden in charge they are increasing,
and I should now say that the experiment of their introduction is a proven success.
Mountain-sheep.—Mountain-sheep seem to keep about the same; a few good heads have been
obtained last season in the Bridge River country.
There is a plan on foot to release a box-car load of these animals in the vicinity of Spences
Bridge, which are to be obtained from Banff National Park, in which place they are getting
too numerous for the range to support them. If this turns out a success, it might be a good
idea to distribute the next available lot to other points, such as Yalakom and also the Bowron
Lake Reserve, to both of which there is access by motor-car. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926. H 19
Mountain-goat.—All reports coincide in saying the mountain-goats are holding their own.
They are to be found anywhere in this Division where the country is wild and precipitous.
They can be frequently seen with a good glass from the villages of Hope and Lillooet.
Bear.—Black and brown bear are still increasing, certainly in the southern parts of this
Division. The grizzly is perhaps not so plentiful; it is an animal that cannot withstand the
advance of settlement and civilization. The opinion of hunters and guides as to abolition of
spring hunting for these animals seems to lean towards still making spring hunting permissible.
Deer.—Of these animals we have three species, which all occur in this Division, although
the white-tail deer is comparatively rare and is never seen north of the Southern Okanagan
country. The mule-deer is found pretty well all over and is increasing, and permission for
hunters to shoot one doe during the open season could reasonably be given now and would be
favourably received by most sportsmen.
The fact that the Kettle Valley Game Reserve has been cancelled would seem to make it all
the more important to establish the " Silwhoiakun " Reserve, north-west of Kamloops. This
area was partially prospected out last season,, but owing to other important duties not enough
time has been spent to suggest even tentative boundaries at present. The only serious opponents
to this area being laid aside will come from a few trappers, and this condition would have to
be overcome in any part of British Columbia where it wras proposed to reserve any land.
The Dominion officials are quite interested in the proposal and volunteer any assistance
possible.    This country has always been noted as being a great haunt of the mule-deer.
Concerning the Columbianus or Coast deer, one interesting fact has been ascertained, and
that is that it occurs on the Bowron Lake Reserve; two different specimens in different years
have been shot and examined. Dr. Baker, of Quesnel, will also vouch for the truth of this
curious circumstance. It apparently associates or frequents the same haunts with the mule-deer,
as it is possible to see by the tracks these animals leave on sand-bars, etc.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur-bearing animals are still scarce. The southern portion of this Division never produces
any large quantity, but in the northern half the fur output is of importance, as large portions
of it are practically uninhabited and fur is the only thing it produces.
The N.C.O. i/c of the Cariboo District reports that there is little fur there now. Possibly
it is, harder to learn the true facts of affairs than formerly, as since the Department does not
insist on the royalty being paid " up-country " the Game Wardens and Constables, do not always
get the accurate data; another point about this arrangement is that quite a lot of revenue
derived from fur royalties which it would appear might be fairly credited to the Cariboo and
other up-country points is shown as being revenue collected at the Coast.
Foxes seem to be holding their own in the Chilcotin and more silver and black are being
taken all through the Division. This is attributable to some of the inhabitants of the numerous
fur-farms occasionally gaining their liberty.
Lynx are still scarce and I presume will be until the rabbits increase again.
Muskrats and beaver are plentiful, and a certain number of convictions are continually being
obtained against trappers and others who are trying to gain a march on the law-abiding trapper
who is waiting for the season to open.
Marten are very scarce, but with the natural care registered owners of lines will take they
may begin to increase from now on.
The animal which shows the greatest increase of all fur-bearers is the coyote. One of the
suggestions made about this animal appears worthy of consideration, and that is that the bounty
be increased to $5 during the months that the skin is worthless and take the bounty away
altogether for the months when the fur is marketable.
As an indication of the numbers of these animals, I find that nearly 500 skins were brought
to the Kamloops Court-house in six weeks, and that one trapper, named Mortensen, brought fifty
of these himself in one month, for which he collected the $2 bounty and also was able to sell the
hides for $9.30 each.
Game Birds.
Hungarian Partridges.—These birds have now crossed the South Thompson River and have
gone as far west down that stream as Monte Creek, and-they have undoubtedly come to stay.
Pheasants.—Pheasants are doing well, complaints of them being too thick in some places and
a scarcity of them in others being received. Grouse.—Blue grouse seem to be normal. Willow and Franklin grouse, I know, suffered
terribly from a cold late snow-storm just after they were hatched, which killed nearly all the
first broods and made the fall shooting poor.
Prairie-chicken.—These birds are getting more plentiful.
Migratory' Game Birds.
More interest seems to be taken than heretofore in the ordinary migratory bird as to its
destination after 'gathering in Canada in the fall, and also as to where it was the winter before
its arrival. There is a well-organized association (Biological Survey, Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D.C, U.S.A., and the Dominion Parks Branch, Department of the Interior, Ottawa)
that has arranged the distribution of bands, etc., for use in connection with the banding of
migratory birds, Literature is distributed by the above-mentioned Departments to licensed
bird-banders from time to time, giving plans covering the erection of traps (humane) for use
in banding birds.
Vermin.
Crows and magpies are very plentiful and do a great deal of harm and damage. Possibly
a bounty put on them would help matters.
Owls are plentiful, while hawks seem to be a little on the decrease.
Cougar seem to be decreasing, although an Indian has just collected the bounty on four
which were caught in this area.
Game-protection.
In this Division the two main elements responsible for the destruction of game seem to be
the irresponsible foreigners and boys with .22 rifles and the aboriginal Indians. The former of
these are continually shooting off grouse and ducks out of season when they have an opportunity.
The principal culprits seem to be the sectionmen; sometimes whole crews are foreigners and
boarding themselves; these crews are often stationed in very isolated places and difficult for a
patrol to reach unobserved, more particularly on the Canadian National Railway north of Kamloops and on portions of the Kettle Valley Railway. To curtail this destruction a little it would
seem advisable to put a close season on rabbits, as on more than one occasion persons found
carrying .22 rifles in the close season for game have given as an excuse, or reason, that they
were out shooting rabbits, which, if these people have a firearms licence, they have every right
to do, and unless people are actually caught with game it is hard to get a conviction.
The Indians are apparently responsible for the wanton slaughter of quantities of the big
game. Possibly something could be done on the lines suggested in the two former annual reports
of getting some of the more influential ones to collaborate with the white race in protecting what
game there is left, and it would seem Important that a good Indian should accompany the white
patrol on some of the trips they undertake, as they are very useful and observant in the
mountains. Both in India and Africa the white police of necessity use the natives as scouts,
etc., and as they are to hand in this Province, it would appear that the services of the natives
might be used to advantage occasionally. The main protection afforded to the game of this
Province is in the enforcement of the " Game Act," and in this connection I am pleased to state
that the number of prosecutions lodged throughout this Division during the year 1926 far exceeds
any other year.
Hunting Accidents.
Two hunting accidents were reported in this Division during the year.
One accident resulted in the death of a young lad named Thomas Charles Cressy, who
was out hunting with two brothers, named Halinan. The elder Halinan, aged 18, while climbing
a hill, slipped and caught hold of a bush; the bush gave way and he dropped to' the ground, his
gun striking the ground and discharging at the same time. The shot struck Cressy, who was-
in front, in the wrist, causing Cressy to release his own gun, which also discharged on falling,
the shot penetrating Cressy's knee. This accident occurred on Sunday, September 26th, 1926,
and Cressy died on September 2Sth, 1926, in the hospital at Merritt. Death occurred through
shock and loss of blood, and I believe that if either of the Halinan boys had had first-aid
knowledge this young lad Cressy would still be alive.
The other accident happened to a young Indian named Alfred Sam on April 5th, 1926.
Sam, while returning to the Chu Chua Indian Reserve, and while crossing the Canadian
National Railway track, dropped his gun;   the gun discharged and the bullet entered the neck REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926. H 21
of  Sam.    First-aid  was  given  this   lad  by   Constable  Emmott,   who   dispatched  him  to  the
Kamloops Hospital.    Sam recovered shortly afterwards.
Propagation.
The distributing of pheasants throughout the Division seems to be satisfactory.
I understand that the Game Conservation Board intends supplying a few bull elk for the
Yalakom Reserve and it will be interesting to' observe how these animals make out in their new
haunts.
The experiment of releasing a number of mountain-sheep will also be watched with interest
at Spences Bridge.
Game Reserves.
There are two reserves in the Division which are worthy of mention, the Yalakom and the
Bowron Lake Reserves. It has been a cause of satisfaction that the waterways have been
included in the Bowron Lake Reserve, as unless this was done the reserve would only be a
nominal one. Kibbee, who used to make a living foy trapping on this territory, is more than
satisfied now he has the duty of patrolling the area with which he is so familiar.
The Yalakom Reserve is well patrolled and safeguarded by Constable G. D. McKenzie, who
has charge of it; as it is particularly the haunt of the mountain-sheep, it might be advisable
to introduce some new blood into those already there by shipping some 'in from the Banff
National Park.
Fur Trade.
The fur trade has not improved since my last annual report. No great catches are known
of in the northern part of this Division.
Practically all the fur trapped in this Division is shipped to Vancouver, and I think a more
complete report on the trading of furs would be obtained at that point.
Fur-farming.
There is a continuance of applications for permits to start fur-farms in this Division. Some
of these fur-farms when well managed are making money, especially the silver-fox farms. One
large muskrat-farm is becoming established on Swan Lake, about 30 miles north-west of Quesnel.
This company is going in for fencing on a large scale. There are also a number of people going
in for blue-fox farming. Others are raising chinchilla rabbits, and one lady in the Cariboo, I
am informed, is dong very well with these animals.
Dr. J. J. Gillis, of Merritt, I think has still probably the best-appointed silver-fox farm in the
Division; his professional knowledge being of great assistance to him in the care of these
animals.
On the whole, this industry is steadily increasing and I think will eventually grow to a
very important one; and fr#in one point of view the fact of trap-lines being registered has in fact
made every such line more or less a fur-farm, as the owner knows that if he wishes he can hold
it permanently and will take pains not to exterminate the fur-bearers, but will rather treat it in
such a way that they will increase.
From the latest records there are approximately fifty-three fur-farms in this Division.
Registration  of Trap-lines  and  Guides.
With the introduction of the " registration of trap-lines " it is very noticeable that a friendly
feeling has been created between the trapper and the Game Warden. The majority of the
trappers, realizing that a new system has been put into effect which will assist them in looking
after their trap-lines and generally help them to conserve the fur-animals which may be on their
trap-lines, appreciate this piece of legislation.
In assisting the trappers to submit their applications and sketches the Game Warden has a
splendid opportunity of getting in touch with all game matters in his district. It would appear
that the trapper is just as much interested as the Game pfficials are in the conserving of fur-
animals and big game. Much valuable information can be obtained regarding illegal trapping or
other game infractions. Further, with the introduction of the registration of trap-lines, the
Game Warden or Constable has an opportunity of studying hia district thoroughly and can learn
many new trails and routes that probably he was not aware of formerly. However, the new
system seems to be running fairly smoothly. ,'.v
H 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
We have been handicapped in the way of maps, as some of the districts have no maps at all,
and in some cases the maps do not cover the country as completely as they might. Where we
have met with the greatest difficulty is in that country south of the Canadian Pacific Railway,
where the trapping has been closed for a number of years.
Another difficulty is in certain parts of the Province where ranchers are dependent on the
water-supply. These ranchers are afraid that, if trappers are given control over the headwater
areas, the beaver will foe in due course extinct, and that instead of the water being dammed or
stored by the beaver and the water retained there will be no water when it is most needed.
In the application for registering trap-lines it might be better to put the onus of establishing
nationality on the applicant rather than on the Department, and certainly the divisional office
should be furnished with a sketch similar to the one which is forwarded to General Headquarters,
otherwise it is almost impossible to discover if trap-lines desired to be registered later will
overlap lines which have already been applied for.
Guides.
The fact of guides being licensed is proving satisfactory and it is a help to the regular
Game Wardens in keeping the different hunting-parties under surveillance, and the different
guides also take an interest in what other parties and guides are doing and where they are
going during the open season, and so an astonishing amount of information is available concerning the amount and description of the game shot and where the carcasses are to be found
if it is desired to scrutinize them.
Special Patrols.
There have been many special patrols made and nearly every corner of a rather inaccessible
Division was visited by some member of the personnel during the past year.
Corporal Sulivan has been very.active and has been on the high broken divides to the south
and west, as well as making a reconnaissance of the proposed " Silwhoiakun " Game Reserve to
the north-west of Kamloops.
Constable MacRae made two penetrating patrols, one to Towdystan over towards Bella
Coola, and the other into the Itcha Mountains; both of these patrols I am sure will have good
results.
Constable Hughes, of Cedar Creek, has made some patrols through the Horsefly and Rose
Lake country.
Sergeant Mortimer and Constable Quesnel made a special patrol' into the Monashee country.
Constable G. D. McKenzie went into the Bridge Lake country and also patrolled the
Yalakom Game Reserve.
Inspector Fernie patrolled the country south of Kamloops several times during the summer,
also visited the Bowron Lake Game Reserve on three occasions.
Conclusion.
On the whole, the present system of game-protection seems satisfactory. There are still
individuals who are of the opinion that the game should be administered by a separate department, but, although this may be the ideal arrangement, I think the majority realize that at
present it is not feasible.
All of which I respectfully submit.
" D" DIVISION  (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND
YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By  Inspector W.  Spiller,  Officer . Commanding.
Game Animals.
Reports from north of the Stikine River indicate a decrease in the smaller species, due
mainly to the increase in cougar and coyotes; south of that the average seems to be maintained.
An increase in all species might be, looked for, providing a vigorous policy be pursued to
exterminate cougar and coyotes.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Little information is now available concerning these animals, due to the fact that most of
the royalties on these animals have during the past two years largely been paid and collected
in Vancouver instead of in the localities where trapped or taken. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926. H 23
Game Birds.
During the year 1925 pheasants were released on Poreher Island; these have not increased
to the extent expected and it is therefore recommended that the experiment be not repeated. On
the Queen Charlotte Islands pheasants seem to be doing well. Owing to the mild winter
(1925-26) a perceptible increase in grouse was observed, especially along the Canadian National
Railway tracks, where during the present winter large numbers have been noticed feeding on
wheat spilled from the cars.
Migratory Game Birds.
There still seems to be an increase in geese and ducks, especially on the Skeena River and in
the vicinity of Hartley Bay.
Vermin.
All species seem to be on the increase and no doubt, unless checked, will ultimately destroy
all other game.
Game-protection.
The N.C.O.'s and men throughout the Division were very active in enforcement, resulting in
a 100-per-cent. increase of protection over the year 1925.
Hunting Accidents.
No hunting accidents were reported during the year 1926.
Propagation.
Climatic and other conditions in this Division lend themselves as more suitable for natural
rather than artificial development, aided, of course, by destruction of vermin.
Game Reserves.
Five established reserves exist in this Division, namely: No. 2, Fort George; No. 7, Prince
'George; No. 11, Kunghit Island; No. 12, Atlin; No. 21, Kaien Island.
No. 12, Atlin Reserve, was made to assist propagation in that portion of the Province east
of the Alaskan boundary where the Alaskan game authorities also maintained a reserve. In
July, 1926, the latter was abolished, and I would therefore recommend that our reserve in that
locality be lifted, as the only thing accomplished by its retention is the formation of a reserve in
British Columbia to feed Alaskan Territory.
Fur Trade.
By examination of fur-traders' books it is found that a large business is being carried on,
competition being very keen in the purchase of raw furs. For example, one fur-trader in Prince
Rupert has a contract with an Eastern firm to supply them with 5,000 mink; presumably other
traders have orders of a similar nature.
Fur-farming.
Information tends to show that in the near future fur-farming will become an important
and lucrative industry. Reports indicate that the spirit of the " Game Act" is being observed
by fur-traders and fur-farmers.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The registration of trap-lines is as yet only in its infancy and a very tedious process. The
fact that the Indians in the past have been adverse to recognizing our " Game Act" has created
many difficulties. This, thanks to Sergeant Van Dyk's persistency, is being overcome, and,
though the registration may take a long time to accomplish in this Division, I feel that, once
accomplished, a very stable form of game-protection will thereby be maintained.
Special Patrols.
During the year Sergeant Van Dyk (Divisional Headquarters) made two patrols to the
Stikine River, Telegraph Creek, and Juneau, during which much valuable data were gathered.
Mileage, 3,100. .
H 24 ,      BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In January Constables Dryden and Williams, of Ocean Falls and Bella Coola respectively,
performed an eight-day patrol in the southern portion of Prince Rupert District by launch,
during which they secured ten convictions under the Act.    Mileage, 400.
In February Constables Barber and Forfar, of the Peace River District, made the annual
patrol to Fort Nelson, during which some $3,200 was collected in royalties on fur.    Mileage, 900.
In June Constable Muirhead (Prince George District Headquarters) patrolled to Two
Brothers Lake searching for two missing prospectors and trappers. Although no trace of the
missing men could be found, much data were gathered by this officer, who in the course of this
patrol encountered innumerable difficulties in a country seldom travelled by a human being.
Mileage, 800.
The total mileage covered in these special patrols was 5,200 miles.
New Detachments.
During the year game detachments were established as follows: Fort Nelson, consisting
of one Corporal and one Third-class Constable; Fort St. James, one Second-class Constable.
Recommended that the stationing of Constables at McDame and Boundary, Stikine River,
be considered.
Acknowledgments.
In closing, I wish to express my appreciation to the N.C.O.'s and men of this Division for
the manner in which the " Game Act" has been enforced during the year, also to Sergeant T.
Van Dyk for his interest and activity displayed in the tedious work incurred by the registration
of trap-lines.    This officer has the welfare of game very much at heart.
"E" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY DISTRICTS).
By Staff-Sergeant S. North, Officer Commanding.
Pursuant to instructions received in the Provincial Game Warden's letter of December 31st,
1926, I beg to submit the following report on game conditions in " E " Division, British Columbia
Provincial Police, during the year 1926:—
This report, as requested, deals with the following subjects: (1) Game animals; (2) fur-
bearing animals; (3) game birds; (4) migratory game birds; (5) vermin; (6) game-protection
and hunting accidents; (7) propagation; (8) game reserves; (9) fur trade; (10) fur-farming;
(11)  registration of trap-lines and guides;   (12)  special patrols.
Game Animals.
Deer.—From reports submitted by officers and the number of deer killed Ihrougout the past
season, it would appear that this species of big game is still on the increase, or at least holding
its own. In the 1925 report it was recommended that a short open season be allowed on does,
and I again suggest that a short open season would do no harm. In fact, I believe, if an open
season on does was granted during the fall of 1927, it would meet with the approval of the majority
of the sportsmen and farmers along the coast. It is to be regretted that we have a certain class
of so-called sportsmen who do not trouble to ascertain the sex of the animal until after it has
been shot. Consequently a large number of does are found lying in the woods. If these hunters
were allowed one doe per season it would have a tendency to save the waste of valuable meat.
From reports received I am led to believe that the proportion of does seen in the woods in this
district would be about ten to one buck.
A numlber of excellent specimens were secured in the Howe Sound areas, but I deeply regret
to have to report that a great number of very poor deer have been taken off Bowen Island and
Gambier Island.
Early in April reports were received from Bowen Island advising that a number of deer had
'been found dead at various points througout the island, and that in all instances these animals
appeared to have suffered from bowel-trouble. An investigation was conducted and both dead
and living specimens, were secured and forwarded to Dr. E. A. Brace, Animal Pathologist for the
Department of Agriculture, for observation. Dr. Bruce also made an investigation on the island
in company with our officers on the launch " Watla " and diagnosed the disease as bronchopneumonia. During the spring and summer some thirty animals were found dead on the island.
Bowen Island is sparsely settled and thickly wooded, and as this number of dead animals were
found the total casualties must have been very great.    During the open season this fall several REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926. H 25
very poor deer were shot and left in the woods on, account of their condition. In spite of this
malady a large number of splendid deer were secured by the hunters on Bowen Island.
Early in December reports were received from sportsmen at Gibson's Landing, advising
that diseased deer had been found on Gambier Island, one of these hunters forwarding a quarter
of a buck deer to this office which he had secured on Gambier Island, and which appeared to be
full of long thin worms, particularly in the joints and under the skin of the animal. This
specimen was forwarded on to Dr. Bruce, who is still investigating this new outbreak. Dr. Bruce
reports that the disease found in the animals on Bowen Island has no connection with the
alleged disease found on Gam'bier Island.
The theory is advanced by up-coast sportsmen that the deer on these islands are becoming
inbred and that there are too many does, using this argument in their plea for an open season
on does. I would again urge that some sort of tag system be inaugurated to keep a check on the
deer bag limit. It has been reported that some hunters far exceed the season bag limit of
three deer, a regulation which at the present it is impossible to enforce.
Mountain-goat.—From the reports received from coastal officers and sportsmen who take
pleasure in hunting these animals, it would appear that they are still holding their own up the
coast, with the exception of Powell Lake, where the goat are reported as decreasing. Our
officers on the patrol launch " Watla " made a special patrol into the Toba and Bute Inlet
Districts early in October, and report seeing a great number of goat at Ramsay Arm and on
the mountains on the north side of Toba Inlet. Goat are reported to be increasing around
Rivers Inlet District. For some years the goat had disappeared from the McNab Valley in
Howe Sound, but a few animals have again been seen during the last season on the hills east
of this valley. A few goat were obtained at the head of Stave Lake, but this place is not very
popular with the sportsmen owing to the difficulties of getting in and out of the area where the
goat are to be found.
Bear.—Grizzly bear can be found at the heads of most of our coastal inlets, but the favourite
spot is at the head of Knight Inlet, where they are reported to be fairly plentiful. One grizzly
bear was obtained at the head of Jervis Inlet hy a party from the State of Washington.
Black bear are very numerous all over the district and the usual number of complaints of
destruction by these animals were received from the more settled portions of the Lower Mainland. There has been considerable agitation among some members of sporting associations for
the protection of female bear with cubs, but it would be practically impossible to enforce such
a regulation if it was passed; still, some steps could be taken to educate! the sportsmen to spare
the female when they observe one with young.    I do not see how this could be done by legislation.
.Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—A few beaver can still be found in the southern portion of the Division, along the
Campbell River in the Langley District, and in the vicinity of Stave Lake small colonies of these
animals are found. At Burnaby Lake, which is a game reserve, we have several colonies. These
appear to be increasing, and although complaints of damage done by these animals are being
received, they should still be protected in the Lower Mainland, and where it is found that their
activities are endangering agricultural interests it is possible to grant a permit to trap them or
have the Department employ a trapper to do this work. The beaver in; the northern portion of
the Division, while not reported to be increasing, are holding their own, and the area north of
Jervis Inlet is provided with an open season for the spring of 1927. It is thought that now the
registration of trap-lines is becoming an accomplished fact, and each and every trapper is
becoming practically the owner of his line, the Department could well continue to allow an open
season on beaver throughout the district where there is registration of trap-lines.
Marten.—These animals are not really plentiful in this Division, although some of the
trappers make a fair living trapping them. A few of these animals were taken alive for breeding purposes last season, and some preparations are being made to catch them for breeding
purposes this season, but as yet the raising of this animal in captivity has not yet proved feasible.
Mink.—In all parts of the Division mink are holding their own. On the Nelson, Captain,
and Hardy Island Game Reserves these animals have become so plentiful as to be detrimental
to the increase of the grouse on Nelson Island and the pheasants on Hardy Island, so much so
that it was recommended to the Game Conservation Board that permits be granted the bona-fide
settlers in the reserve to trap the shore-lines for mink and coon, which has been done, and should
be beneficial to the bird-life of the reserves. H 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
A number of trappers are taking mink alive for breeding purposes, as there is a fair demand
for live animals and they are easily caught.
Racoon.—Racoon appear to be holding their own and bringing a good price on the fur market.
Otter.—It cannot be said that these animals are plentiful. Still, the trappers along the coast
usually manage to secure a few each season.
Skunk.—The usual number were taken throughout the past year, but are not trapped very
extensively.
Muskrat.—These animals are in great demand, both for pelts and breeding purposes. There
is such a demand for the live animal that it is almost a shame to pelt them, Prices range from
$7 to $25 per pair, but in spite of the demand the majority of trappers still trap with the steel
traps, some claiming they can make better at pelting than trapping alive on account of the
difficulty of getting a suitable trap to catch these animals. The box trap is used with some
success, but is a slow process. There is a wonderful opportunity for some one of a mechanical
frame of mind who can invent a really successful live-muskrat trap. The muskrat has about
held his own in the last year or so throughout the Fraser Valley and several complaints have
been received of these animals doing damage to dykes.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—The season just past exceeded expectations. During the season of 1925 the
pheasant-shooting was very poor in spite of the fact that prior to the opening date they appeared
to be very plentiful, but during the season of 1926 the sportsmen received fair hunting and a
great number of bag limits were secured; the reason for the large numbers of pheasants, in spite
of the incessant hunting, being on account of the very mild winter of 1925-26, followed by a
really good breeding season. After the close of the season pheasants appeared to be very
plentiful in all parts of the Fraser Valley.
From reports obtained from our officers in the field, quite a few Mongolian pheasants have
been obtained and were in excellent condition. The usual reports have been received from the
hunters in favour of killing hen birds, of the very great proportion of hens to cocks, and in
some instances these reports have been borne out by our Game Wardens; and if breeding
conditions are favourable and the sporting associations request a short open season for the
fall of 1927, I do not think any great harm would be done in granting the same.
Very few reports of damage to farmers' crops by pheasants have been received in the past
two years. A large number of the farmers in the Lower Fraser realize that the pheasant does
not do the damage claimed against him and several requests have been received from these
farmers for new blood.
Pheasants are reported to be very plentiful on Texada Island. This island has only been
provided with an open season during the last few years, and it is encouraging to be able to
state that these birds are doing very well, especially at the north end of the island.
Partridge.—The season on these birds was open for ten days in the Delta and Chilliwack)
Electoral Districts, which comprises the whole of the Mainland south of the Fraser River to the
boundary-line, and west of Chilliwack to the Gulf of Georgia. Excellent shooting, was obtained
in the new area opened around Sumas and a number of bag limits secured. After the season
was closed a great number of these birds were observed, which practically proves that this
valuable sporting bird has secured a solid footing in the district, and it is to be hoped that the
sportsmen will be allowed at least the same length of season for 1927, if not longer.
The partridge on Lulu Island do not appear to be increasing. In fact, only two coveys have
been reported during the past fall.
Quail.—Throughout the district these birds appear and are reported to be increasing, due no
doubt to the extremely mild winters recently. But it is doubtful whether this class of game bird
ever will be able to stand an open season on the Lower Mainland, as the climatic conditions do
not appear to be favourable. In the Delta, Point Grey, and North Vancouver Districts some very
fine coveys can be found, but as soon as we have a hard winter these birds will again decrease,
and it takes several seasons for them to gain! the foothold they now have.
The few bob-white liberated in the spring of 1925 seem to have disappeared, with tbe
exception of a covey of about fifteen birds in Point Grey.
Grouse.—Willow-grouse have been fairly plentiful, although nothing like in former years.
Some fair bags were procured throughout the Fraser Valley.   There always seems to be consider- able controversy over the opening date on these birds, but personally I am of the opinion that
the recommendations of the allied sportsmen of the Lower Mainland should go a long way
toward settling the suitable date.
Blue grouse did not show up to expectation during the past season. During 1925 a great
many bag limits were secured on Bowen and Gambier Islands, which is the principal blue-grouse
country adjacent to Vancouver, but this past season daily bag limits have been very scarce.
There are no willow-grouse to be found on either of these islands.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—The. opening of the season on ducks this year was a gala day for the sportsmen.
Weather conditions were ideal and had been so for several weeks prior to the opening day.
Thousands of ducks were down from the north for the main event of the year, from a sportsman's point of view. Bag limits were in evidence all over the flats along the Gulf of Georgia
and in the Fraser River. Some limits were obtained before 8 a.m. Ducks have been very
plentiful all through the season, especially at Sumas Prairie and Harrison River. The Pitt
Meadows and Delta Districts have also shown up very well in comparison to last season.
Geese.—During the latter part of September and early in October a large number of geese
passed through the district going south. A few snow-geese put in an appearance off the Lulu
Island shore-line about October 15th, and these numbers increased from day to day until the
opening day of November 1st. These birds are very plentiful, and if not increasing at least are
holding their own, as it is very rarely that any of these birds are shot.
Brant.—During the latter part of December brant were very plentiful around the Boundary
Bay locality and afforded splendid shooting to the few men who hunt these birds. They are also
reported to be plentiful off Canoe Pass and some fair bags have been secured here.
Swans.—Reports of several swans having been seen throughout the district from Lulu Island
to Sumas Lake area have been received at these headquarters.
Vermin.
Coyotes and red fox are reported to be still on the increase in the Lower Mainland. Several
permits have been granted to kill the red fox during the close season throughout the Sumas-
Chilliwack Districts, and through the great amount of damage done by these animals to farmers
and game it is suggested that they be classed as vermin throughout the Lower Fraser from the
Cascade Mountains to the Gulf of Georgia.
Wolves.—Corporal Stone, of the Rivers Inlet Detachment, reports that wolves are very
plentiful and doing untold damage to the deer. It has been suggested that permits be granted
to trappers to poison these animals in an endeavour to,-.decrease their numbers, but the use of
poison is very dangerous, and I would suggest that better results could be obtained through,
the Department employing professional men to hunt and poison, if hecesssary, under proper
supervision.
Cougar.—A great many complaints were received from Cortes Island of a cougar which'was
doing untold damage to the farmers' sheep and the deer, and after several attempts being made
to catch this animal it was finally killed by Francis Louis, an Indian of Squirrel Cove, on
August 18th.
Crows.—This pest is still increasing throughout the district and is responsible for the
destruction of a great number of our game birds and song-birds. A bounty of 10 cents was paid
for the destruction of crows during the months of April and May, but this amount did not
compensate the sportsmen for the shells used, and the amount of bounty paid out in this
Division was almost negligible. There is a slight agitation amongst the sportsmen to have this
bounty again put on and increased sufficiently to at least pay for the cost of the ammunition.
Game Protection.
It is gratifying to hear of the favourable comments by notable sportsmen of this district
commenting on the efficient patrol-work carried on throughout the past year. This patrol-work
has been under the supervision of Corporal J. G. Cunningham, N.C.O. i/c Game Laws Enforcement
Branch, and I am pleased to report the splendid co-operation of all/ our officers in an endeavour
to do their utmost in the interests of the game of the Province. Prosecutions in the Division
have increased considerably over previous years, due to a large extent to co-operation of members H 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of the sporting associations, who are willing at all times to help our officers in the protection
of the game. Several changes have been made in the personnel of the Game Laws Enforcement
Branch throughout the past year, and while some of our foest Wardens were transferred to other
parts of the Province, still in all instances their places have been filled with very efficient officers.
The following Constables were almost continually engaged on game-protection work during
the year 1926: W. H. Cameron, Ladner Detachment; R. M. Stewart, Chilliwack Detachment;
E. G. Stedham, Pitt Meadows; J. Murray, Port Moody; J. Moir, North Vancouver; D. C.
Campbell, Vancouver; C. Ledoux, Matsqui; J. G. Cunningham, launch " Watla," Vancouver;
W. Clark, launch " Watla," Vancouver;  A. P. Cummins, Vancouver;   F. Urquhart, Surrey.
The following Constables, although not specially detailed for game-work, have given a great
deal of their time to this work:. F. Boyt, Powell River; G. E. Elliott, Mission; A. J. Collison,
Vancouver;  A. W. Collins, Agassiz.
All other Police Constables throughout the Division have done their utmost to enforce the
" Game Act " and make game law enforcement in the Division a success.
Hunting Accidents.
I am pleased to report that there have been no hunting accidents during the year 1926 in
this Division.
Propagation.
A large number of pheasants were received from the Government Pheasant Farm at Victoria
early in the year and were liberated in the Chilliwack, Sumas, Ladner, Pitt Meadows, and Lulu
Island Districts. A small number of partridges were liberated in the Chilliwack District in
March.
/ Game Reserves.
One new game reserve was created in the Division during the year and is situated in the
North Vancouver District. This reserve comprises practically all the watersheds of the Seymour,
Lynn, and Capilano Creeks. Grouse, deer, and goat were becoming very scarce on the north
shore owing to the proximity of the cities, but with a few years' protection there is no doubt
but what this game will return and be a source of pleasure to the citizens of the surrounding
cities.
Game is increasing on the Nelson, Captain, and Hardy Island Reserves. Owing to the
increase of mink and coon on the reserve, and the damage being done by these animals to the
game birds and domestic fowl, permits were granted to bona-flde residents on the islands to
trap the animals along the shore-line.
During the year of 1925 two mule-deer were sent to Hardy Island and it was hoped that
these animals would become acclimatized, font shortly after liberation one of them became sick
and in spite of the special attention paid to it by Tom Brazil, the caretaker on the island, it
soon died.    The second animal also took sick and has since disappeared.
The beaver in the Burnaby Lake Game Reserve are very plentiful for the size of the reserve.
A few beaver have now spread out up Still Greek to a point about 2 miles up the creek from the
reserve.
Fur Trade.
The practice of stamping fur has been done away with and royalties are now collected upon
export or upon being sent to the tanner. This new system is proving successful and is popular
with the dealers. Taking the fur trade on the whole, prices and quantity of pelts are reported
to have been better than during the previous year.
Fur-farms.
During the past year a large number of new fur-farms have been put into operation throughout the Division. The majority of those issued with permits are commencing on a very small
scale. In most instances the farmer is starting out on a small piece of property with from one
to six pairs of muskrats. The prospective farmers are leaning heavily toward the raising of
these animals on account of the small amount of capital required, with the minimum risk of a.
failure. At present there is a great demand for the live animals for breeding purposes, and those
few mnskrat-farmers who have been fortunate in raising young rats have found a ready market
for their output at practically their own price. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1928. H 29
There are a great number of silver- and blue-fox farmers in the Division. These farmers
are required to make returns to Victoria; consequently this Division has not all the information
as to the success of these farmers, but it is known through the inspections conducted by our
officers that a great many farmers who invested in blue fox have been disappointed in the
business. A few of these farmers had fair success, but a great many had no returns whatever
from their investment. The silver-fox farmers have been more successful and quite a number of
these animals have been pelted. As the regulations now stand, a royalty of $5 is collected on
silver fox taken in British Columbia. This tax is protested by the breeders as being unfair on
account of the amount, and also as in the majority of cases the original stock had been imported,
the owners object to being taxed. The fur-farming industry has a great future and every
assistance should be given to this class of business, fout as a great number of our native fur-
bearing animals, including silver fox, have been caught up for fur-farming, it is only natural
that the Government should receive some return for the animals! trapped; but I would suggest
that the tax on ranch-bred silver fox be reduced.
Registration of Trap-lines.
Many obstacles are being met in the registration of trap-lines throughout the Division,
principally in the northern part where the white and Indian trappers intermingle. There have
been numerous disputes over priority of rights over lines, but in most instances the Constables
in charge of the various detachments have settled these disputes amicably. However, there is
a great deal of work yet to be accomplished before the registration of all trap-lines has been
perfected. These regulations meet with the whole-hearted approval of the real trappers, who
trap the same lines from year to year, but the beach-combing or travelling trappers who move from
place to place in a gas-boat, trapping wherever they wish, do not favour the regulations, as they
curtail their former freedom, which was very detrimental to the fur-trapping. During the past
year a great many applications for registration of trap-lines have been received in this Division.
Registration of Guides.
During the season 1926 only one application for a guide's licence was received throughout
this Division.
Special Patrols.
As was in the case in 1925, several special patrols were made. These patrols met with fair
success and no doubt from reports received left a good impression with the real sportsmen and
the fair-minded citizens in the districts visited.    The following special patrols were made:—
(1.) April 15th to 22nd. Vancouver to Nelson Island Reserve, Reynard Island, Bute Inlet
District, with the launch " Watla," visiting fur-farms and investigating complaints. Total:
mileage, 480.
(2.) June 12th to 15th. Gambier Island-McNab Creek, Gibson's Landing. Three convictions netting $70 in fines.    Total mileage, 128.
(3.) September 9th to 15th. Nelson Island and Jervis Inlet Districts on the launch ". Watla."
In previous years complaints had been received from this area of illegal hunting on the Nelson
Island Game Reserve during the opening days of the season on blue grouse and deer. No
violations of the " Game Act" encountered on this patrol.    Total mileage, 426.
(4.)  October 5th to 13th.    Jervis, Toba, and Bute Inlets, on "Watla."    Total mileage, 436.
(5.) November 3rd to 8th. Agassiz and Harrison Lake Districts. Four convictions, netting
$80 in fines.
(6.) November 30th to December 11th. Harrison and Stave Lakes. Four convictions,
netting $80 in fines and one gun confiscated.    Total mileage, 462.
A great many shorter patrols were conducted throughout the year by officers on the " Watla,"
resulting in a great many convictions and complaints investigated.
Summary.
. The past season has been a busy one With the officers in this Division. The registration of
trap-lines, the inspection of proposed fur-farms, in addition to the usual patrol-work, all tends
to take time and care; but I am pleased to say that, without one exception, I have found the
officers willing to co-operate in making the Game Laws Enforcement Branch of this Division .
H 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
a success. The Game Constables have had the whole-hearted support of their brother officers
on the Force, as well as the sportsmen of the district, with excellent results.
Throughout the year the usual complaints have been received and reports of lost licences,
and I again strongly urge that some provision be made to cope with this trouble of worn or lost
licences, as well as the issuing of a metal tag.
It must be noted that the .revenue derived from the sale of firearms licences for 1926 has
decreased considerably, in comparison with the revenue from this source in 1925. Part of this
decrease is due to the fact that trappers were encouraged to take out their licences in the district
of the Province where their line was situated, and partly through the moving of the Game Conservation Board offices to Victoria. A great number of applications for licences were received
from residents and non-residents of the Province by mail at the Board office in Vancouver. Such
applications in the majority of cases are now dealt with in Victoria. Apart from these reasons,
a great many hunters have given up the gun on account of the majority of the land in the
district having been gradually taken up by clubs as private shooting-grounds. The need for
public shooting-grounds is becoming more and more acute every season, and if this source of
revenue is to be kept up the time has now arrived when a portion of the revenue derived should!
be invested in acquiring some of the bogs or waste land in the Province for the general public
to hunt on.
The revenue derived from the royalties collected on fur has increased considerably during
the past season, this increase no doubt being due to the change in the collection of royalties.
Prior to 1926 royalties were collected as soon as the fur arrived in the hands of the dealers,
but now the royalty is not collected until an export permit is required, and consequently a. large
amount of the revenue is collected in A'ancouver that was in former years collected at other
points in the Province.
REPORT  ON  OPERATIONS  OF ELK LAKE  GAME  FARM.
By J. W. Jones, Constable i/c.
I beg to submit my annual report dealing with the operations of the Elk Lake Game Farm
and the propagation of game birds thereon.
The farm up to the present is yet incomplete, being in need ofj one more acre of land to be
cleared and an additional battery of pens.    These requirements would facilitate better operation
of the farm.
During the past year conditions on the farm were very favourable, except that, as it had
only been occupied one year, it was more difficult to get settled, and therefore this was somewhat
of a detriment to the propagation of game birds, but next year I anticipate much better results.
The following is a statement of the propagation of small game and birds on the farm during
the calendar year 1926 :;—
Pheasants in pens at December Slst, 1926  2,300
Breeding stock consisting of  320
Strayed from breeding stock     20
Number of eggs laid  2,S00
Set under hens   2,700
Small late eggs used for feeding young birds     200
Young pheasants reared  2,400
Now in pens - -  2,000
Casualties       300
Strayed     100
Muskrats        13
Ducks        30
Geese       10
Marten          1
Vermin destroyed.—Domestic cats, 20;  hawks, 10;  big-horned owls, 32;  total, 62. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.                         H 31
APPENDIX.
Page.
Revenue derived from sale of resident .firearms licences, January 1st, 1926, to June 30th, 1926 32
Revenue derived from sale of resident firearms licences, July 1st, 1926, to December 31st,
1926  33
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms licences, January 1st, 1926, to June 30th,
1926  34
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms licences, July 1st, 1926, to December 31st,
1926  35
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' lieenc.es and from fur royalties,
January 1st, 1926, to June 30th, 1926  36
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from fur royalties,
July 1st, 1926, to December 31st, 1926  37
Statement showing particulars of skins on which royalty has been paid, January 1st, 1926,
to June 30th, 1926  38
Statement showing particulars of skins on which royalty has been paid, July 1st, 1926, to
December Slst, 1926 ,  39
Bounties paid, January 1st, 1926, to December Slst. 1926  40
Statement of fur confiscated, January 1st, 1926, to December 31st, 1926  41
Statement of firearms confiscated, January 1st, 1926, to December 31st, 1926  42
Hunting accidents, January 1st, 1926, to December 31st, 1926  43
List of guides, 1926  44
Record of big game taken, Cassiar District, 1926  45
Statement showing returns of 760 holders of special firearms licences, season 1925-26  46
Statement of big-game trophy fees paid, January 1st, 1926, to December 31st, 1926  47
Prosecutions, 1926  50
Statement of returns, fur-farmers, 1926  52
List showing personnel of Game Branch, British Columbia Provincial Police  61
Map of field organization of Game Branch, British Columbia Provincial Police, 1923  64 H 32
H
K
P
i-a
a
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
o
o
o
CO
o
©
Cl
O
c
5
C
©
id
CD
io
(^
"HH
©
IP
Cl
o
to
I-
00
CO
o
©
id
ri
©
Cl
o
IO
c
Oj
©
©
id
01
©
10
Cl
r
©
IO
c
O
I.O
ci
ri
©
©
id
©
o
©
©
o
3
©
e
Iff
Iff
CJ
©
©
o
tH
o
CJ
it:
io
c
-
-
-
if
c
c
c
' c
CC
©
a
©
c
c
c
c
CT
c
©
©
CC
c
©
©
IO
CO
c
c
©
Iff
©
K
©
©
ip
cj
t-
QO
id"
fa
6
■H
(-?5HO
01
O   IO           ri
CO   ©   "HH
CO   ri   10
CO  Ci  CO  Ci  ^  IO
lp  CJ  -HH  ri  ri  ri
CO  CO  ri  ri  CO  CO
CO  ri  ri  CJ   ri  Cl
ri
ri
fc-
fa
fa
d
©
>P
b-   OS   rH
ri
rH
ri   CO  b-  CO  Oj  ri
r-l   ~            CO
10
IO   ©   rH   IO   ©   ri   CI   t>   01   ri
CO   CJ   rH   CJ   CJ           Cj                   CO
'HH   ©   OS   ©
ri   Cl   rH
ri
t-
cs
IO
GQ
o
p
O
a
a
o
a
<1
O
q
o
©
id
© o o
© q ©
id d d
H ri
©
©
©
©
id
©
q
id
©
©
©
IO
6*5-
d
rH
H
ri  CJ  Cj
rH
rH
ri
©
rH
fa
d
fl
o
a
<
© o
©  ©
d d
O  -H
ooooo
o q q o q
(6 <6 <o <o (O
O1*   ri   Cj   CO
CO
o © o o
oooo
dodd
ri   IO  CN)  63
ON                 rri
O©0©0©00©0
©©©q©©©©©©
opdododdp'o
COClOJCCJOlCDt-OOCO
CJ          10  10  CJ
©  ©  ©  ©  ©  O
© © © © © ©
ocdddo
O   OS   Cl   -^fi   ©   IO
CJ  ri  CJ                 Oj
O
©
©
CD
CO
co"
d
O   rH
CJ
CD   "HH   rH   ©   CO
CO
iH  1(5  M  M
CJ   '            ri
COOJClOOlOlOlr-COCO
CJ    '      10  lp   CJ
O  CS  Cl  -HH  ©  10
CJ  ri  CJ                 CJ
CD
CO
CO
fa
6
<
a
H
4^
o
a
O
©
d
OJ
o o
© ©
d d
© ©
© ©
© ©
Cl H
o
q
d
ri
©
©
©
rH
©
©
©
CJ
©
©
©
io
rH
d
15
CJ
lp   rH
CJ  rH
ri
rH
CJ
lO
rH
fa
o
■4
©  ©
O  O
d id
rH   rH
o o
o o
d d
rH  CJ
o
o
id
rH
©
©
>©*
ri
OOO
© © ©
id d d
Cl  01  iH
©  ©  ©  ©
©  ©  ©  ©
id id id id
rH  rH  rH
o © © © ©
©  ©  ©  ©  ©
© d © id id
CO  Cj  ri  CO   ri
©OOO
©   ©   ©   © .
id © iq id
O
©
id
CJ
IO
SO-
Cl   CO
OI  HH
CO
CO
IO  CO  CJ
ri
ri  CO  CO  CO
CO   HH    Cj    t-   CO
©  tH  ri   t-
rH
lO
o
ri
fa
d
d
ti
o
a
O
O
id
CO
C
©
d
rH
oo©oooo©ooo©o©oooo©
10 io IO O  IO ip O lij Ip o ip o p o o p IO  LO o
i^ i^ i> ira f.i w io w t^ io ci in io 16 d io ci i> d
iO          rH   rH                   iO  H                           Ol   HH   10                  CJ
Cl
© o ©
ip © ip
cj' d i>
rH   CO
©  O  ©  O ©
©  ©  ©  ©  lp
d d id d ci
©  t-  CD Cj
rH           ri
o
IO
00
ci^
6
cs
"*
MMMC<1WIO^HMCOH«WOOWHM«)
©                                      Cj                               rH  rH  £1
10   Cl   CO
ri
©   GO   CD   CO   ri
£-   CJ   ©
10
ri
IO
60
a
<D
<)
a
a
a
>H
O
O
c
e
►
P
C
2>
c
f
> f.
\
r
?1
4
a
s
6
■-
■
4   P
a
T
c
0
c
c
1
r
■4-
a
> -
C
P
a
C
c
|
t
|
c
a
a
'1
f
•1
6
PC
c
1
c
1
a
a
"r-
c
1
p
C
1
a
e
d
0
c
-< -4 ^ <j C
9fl3'Bl!S'S|a|SSs^S.s.Ss^pSF
itiflSa;OOt-(Cdrt.r^Orta;a)QjQ^(^lflc>OHc;da
JOUPfefeOOWW  jg^^^CH^pH^aririHOicHf>>
c,
>
I
ti   a) REPORT OP THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 33
so
CR
p
a
H
Ol
a
3
P
>
M
©O©0'0©00©0000000©00©000©0©©©©©©0©©
©
IO  10   10  ©  LP  ©   LP  10   ©  IO  ©  IO   10  O  ©  O  ©  10  ©  ip   IO ©   10  IO  lp  ©  IO  O  ©   LP   10  io  ©  10
©
^J
Ol   Ol   Cl   ©   b-   O   OI   Ol   ©   Cl   ©   b-   01   ©   IO   ©   ©   Cl   IO   b-   Ol   ©   Cj   t-   Cl   IO   l>   IO   IO   Cl   b-   b-   ©   b-
io
ri
©C0C0c0©C0ri©©asi0©b-ri6lOClOC0riri©ri©ri©©OriC0C5C0ClCS
©
©CICOCl©©©riri©cO©COriri©ri©cOcOOCD©ClrH©lb©ipOCO©Oib*
CO
Cj
Cj                           ri   CI   CD   ClOJCJri           COrH           ririCOCICOCJriri           ri   H   H   ri           COb-CCri
CO
rH                                                                                   ri
©
ri
66-
60-
fa
o"
rH       {   CO
: ci io oo    :    : co •*
; ri co ci io io ri co © co oi ri
CO   b-   ri   CS
: co ri o t- ri
10
&
:   rH   rH
'riri         ri  Oj  CJ   ri  Ol          CO  01
rH   rH           rH
: © cj ci io
©
fa
;    :              :                                                           :                        \ rH
IO
►4
d
IO
i ^*
:b-IOriClCI©'HHb--HHb-C110b-©ririOSCJCj
'  b- CO ri ri
: ri ri io ri ©
Cl
fa
CO
:CJb-CICSri©C0riC0ri    "     OI   Cl   IO   IO   OS   b-   CO   rH
ri   rH           b-
: th l— co io
^
£
:                   CJ   ri                                   OJ                           rH     "     CD
: ri co ci
CD
fa
CO
+j
• o
: o o    : © o ©
; o
: o
: o o
o ©
; © o ©
: o o o
o
fl
1 q
I °. °.
; © © ©
' ©
i °.
; t ®
q q
: © q ©
; © © ©
©
fl
id
i *d ©
: id © d
©
: id
; id ©
id id
id id id
i id id ip
©
m
o
, Cl
1          rH
:       Ci ©
;   rH   CO
riri
: oj ip ri
: b- © oj
Ci
H
a
I           rH
:   "      rH
©
ft
3
<
.        .        •   &r       •                           •                                    ,..,...                          ,        .
60-
o
d
if?
' H ci
■ ri ri o
£l
I    rH
: co co
CS  CO
: ri ri co
!   IO   CO  10
00
la
:       oj
rH
j   rH   CO
CO
ri
O0©0©©©©©©©©©©0©©0©©0©©
©©o©o©o©oo
o
a
© © q o q © c
d © © © d d c
- c
jqqppqqqqooqppqo
icDcoco'cicDCDcDcicicicicDCDCDCD
qqqqoqqqqq
ddddpddddd
©
©
I c
a
o
a
■     O  10  ri  00   C
b-       oi ri «
J c
1  OS  CO  CS  ri   ri   CD  CJ   ri  CS  IO  CO  ri   CO  O  CO  lO   b-
Jriri  10  10  lOriCOririCO  01  C0©C0©C0©
COIO©b-OQOriIO©0
©CO          IP  ri   t-  ©  Oi  Cl   TH
CO
©_
J ^.
j
rH                   rH                                                                   rH           rH   Cl   Cl
rH   rH           rH
io"
<l
Cl
fa
SO-
«-
ffi
OlOriC0©CJCSC0CSririCDOlriCSiOC0riC0©C0  10b-      :   ©  IO  ©  b-  ©  00  ri   IO  CO  ©
CO
t—         OlriCDCOririiOiOlOriCOririCOOJQOOOOOCO©
©CO          10rib-0©01ri
cs
o
ri                 ri                                                            ri          ri  01  01
riri         rH
io
S3
Ci"
OOO
© o © © o © ©
© o
© © o © O
© ©
O
' © © © O o ©
©
o
4j
o © ©
© o © © q q q
© ©
©  ©  ©  ©  ©
© ©
©
© © © o © ©
©
©
J
a
S ci cd
cd ci cd ci d> ci cp
© d
d  ©  ©  ©  ©
© d
d
'  CD  CD  CD  CD  CD  CD
©
©
a
l>  CI  t-
OJ   lp   OS   CO   rH   Ol   b-
©   ©
00   CO   IO   CO   IQ
10   CO
ri
I—  ©  CO  ri  Cl  CI
-*
fa
o
rH
Ol   10   rH   rH
ri           rH
CJ  ri
rH                 riri'
b-
d
a
SQ-
CO"
SO-
fa
b-  CI  b-
Cl   IO  CS  CO  rH  (M  b-
CD   ©
00  CO  IO  CO  10
IO to
H
b-  ©  CO  ri  CI  Cl
rH
H
d
rH
Cl   10   rH   rH
H          ri
CJ  ri
rH                   ri   rH    '
b-
ia
C0
©©©©©0©©©0©0©00©©©00©©©
©©©©©©oooo
©
4-1
©qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqq©
<^  C^  CO  CD  (->  C?  C^  C?  fC>_  ^
©
fl
d d © id d © © id id id id d © id © id © id © id id id d
id © id id © id © id © d
©
lO©ClCl©rit-OriCO©OIriCOOI10©Trl©i0rilbCl
COCIri©C0©Clb-riC^)
O
rH         rH                 10   10 ri  CO  Cj  CO         CJ  CJ   ri                 CO  10  ri          10 .§P
CJriCOri         ri   ip  ri  Cl  H
Cl
a
rH
j-J
©
hj
■«
ae-
rH
SO-
fa
d
©Clri   10  CO  C]  riri   CO  b-CSriCOt-ririClcSCIriCOriri
r- ri co- ri © co ri io ci co
Ol
d
COriCl      "    ri   ©   ri   Cl   Ol   ri   b-          rilOCIririCOriCO           ri   CI
riOOOCj          CO©60riC-|
-^
ri   ri           ri                                                                           ri                   CO   ri
Cl  rH
©
cf
©  O  O
000©00000000©©0©000©©©00
© o © o o
o
.jj
10   IO  Ip
10  ©  IO  IO  ©   10  ©   IP  IO  ©  O  ©  ©  IO  O  IO  10  ©  IO  10  10  ©  10  ©
10 io io o K3
©
fl
ci oi oi
r-^ id ci b- © b- id t^ ci id d id © b- id ci oi id ci ^ ci © oi d
ci b-^ b^ id ?J
id
P
b-   IQ  CO
©rilOCJCO^OlCIril0ririCJ©ririip©cs©COriCJri
rH   ri   ©   00   O
CD
o
a
iO   rH   -ri
Cl  10  Cl  ©  ©  Ol  CO  ri   Cl   CO   ri  10  CS  b-  CD   CO    "    ri  f-  Ol   ri   b-  ©  CO
CD  b-  CO  Cl  frj
b-
,4
,_4
rH  ri" cf rH                        cf                       CO  rH  ©" Cj"                rH                        rH
CO" 10" ©"
lp
fa
■<
rH
CD
so-
tc-
d
CSriCO      Ib-cOririCIriOrib-ClriCOCOOSCOt'-riOlb-COlOriOSCD      !  io  o   f-  •+  H
CO
d
la
O   O   r-
©riOriCOriCOt—  ©ri-riOCOriricOClCDriOOCOOOOCO
ri  OS  ri   ri  c«
o
©           rH
riCOt-OOririririCOri           Cj   10   b-   Cj   05           rH   b-            ""    CI   ^   H
ri  Cl^ b-  rH
CO
rH                                                                           ri           ri                                                                                    IO   Cl   01
©"
Ol
Q
i
t
3
j
J]
<
1
fn
3
O
ri
Ui
OJ
!
1
<
c
i
s
'fl
0,
o
i
o
si
P
C
c
p
c
X
p
c
p
1
a
a
CO
e
H-J
u
a
c
-a
a
K
a
p
0
c
c
o
o
c
-4-)
+■
faj
|
5
p
c
y.
fl
I
CO     P
a  o
P*     CJ
&  fl
cu
p
fl
o
g
t
a
6
it
'-
0
CJ
.5
CO
a
W   o
4-»
<D    QJ
CJ    CJ
fl   C
EC
a.
a
M
c
a
a
P
K
a
E
a
O
rfl    a,
fi >
fl fl
^   c
fcJC   t
3   fl
0
o
PI
o
4-
J4
j .
fl   £
jd p
m
13
-t-j
O
B   fl    ui  -i_> J2
■—    fl    —
aoc^wccs.^mo^ajof-i
*C 'E
fl   cp   O   0   a;   d   cv .h r r
I
<
<4
<
"4
c
U
C
p
£.
ft
C
O
W
ff
rl
<-
s
£
55
P4
Ph
PM
P-
Ph
O
rt
M
TTu
H
>
{>
>
t>
e ;
H 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
o
Ci
fc
P
1-5
9
fc
<l
1-3
H
fc
s
p
02
«
fc
o
O
H
Ol
P
fc
s
©
—
©
©
©
~
©
©
©
c
©
©
©
©
o
s
©
©
o
©
c
e
0©©©©00©©©©0©©©©0©0©0
o
©   IO  IO  IO   ©  ©  10   CO   10  ©  ©   rH  CD  ©   ©  ©   ©  ©   O  O  10
ri
rH                    rH   rH           rH           CO   rH   rH                           CJ   Tfl
10
H
Cl
SO-
6^-
CO
4-i
P
fl
:;::    :    ::©::: o    :::    :
O
si
o
©
o
3
CO
r-i
ri
6
CO
ri
o
«1
<
 so-   •                   	
&S-
-<
o
CD
Q
ir,
w
©o    :©o©    :ooo©o©
: © ©'© © ©    :
o
a
© ©
© o o
oooooo
o © © o o
o
o
a
o ©
o © o
© o © o o ©
© o ©,o ©
o
10   rH
©   10   CO
IO  Cl  GO   ©   ©   ©
CI   ri   ri   ©   CI
Cj
a
<
rri
rH           CI   ri
rH    CO
10
SO^
^
o
io ri    ; © io co    ; to ci co co cs ©    :    : oi ri -h cs ci     :
Cl
a
,   rH                       .                    r-            .     tH       ,       ,                   rH
10
+3
c
a
a
CQ
a
rH
<
J
H
H
fe
o
la
i
Q
a
w
a
^
<
o
DQ
w
i
02
6
la
-
OS     '
s
o
•3
K
ci
£<
al
o
w
©
oooo
o o
o
o
9s
fl
o © ©
o
©
o © © ©
o ©
©
o
o
IO  IO   to
IO
lO
© © © ©
o o
IO
o
S ^
Cl  Ol   b-
Cl
b-
IO   IO   IO   10
IO o
rH
rH  t-1
^S
<
■ se-             ■    ■         '         '    ■ ■ ■
&&
C3 Q
	
»!i
1"
o
: ri ri co    :    : io    ; co    :    j    : ci to oi oi    : © ri    : th
CO
a
£
CO
DQ
C
b
<
U
e
+j
a
d
CJ
w
c
>
c
C
p
u
c
i
I
J*
I
<
t
O    V
fe p
M c
•O  §
Si
i
1
c
0
c
IS t
T
£   r
0
CO
8 p
a
c
£
c
c
f)
I
c
c
p
DO
9    &
fl    J
fl
o
i—i   m rt   Ij   P   P   h   b   c;  a   oj   c   (D^Boofl-Hrr
<
<
■^
c
t
P
«
u
U
fc
X
S5
r-
p.
C
'^
B
fc»
>
p. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 35
3
o
s
0
55
CO
p
1-3
fc
o
P
fc
!>
©
:©o©ooooo©oo©o©
0 ©
©   ©
©
-
©
0 <p
D
©
©
0
©
©
©
o
;©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©o©©
©
: © © © io io io io io © io io ci 10 o io io © © io o © io © io © © io 10 10
Cl
©
:©©ri©ri©riO©b-  IO  riCjCl©C0CO  IO   ©TH0O©©CJ'^ClcOri©
CO
I           ri           riCO           riririrHrH                   ©riCOCO           ©           rH           ri   CO   ©           Ol   10   rH
Cl
B
Iri                                                                                    Cl                                                                    ri           OJ
CO
eo-
rH
so-
w
cfl
a
0
©
Cl
a
m-
v.
<
Q
la
1
-*-3
fl
fl
O
a
<
o    : ©    : © © © © © ©    :©©o    :ooo©    :©o©©    :    :©o©©o
©
0
©
: ©
:©©©©©©
; © © 0
; © © © ©
: © © © ©
:©©©©©
©
: 0
;©©©©©©
; © © ©
: © © © 0 ■
: 0 © © 0
;©©©©©
0
a
;   ri   CO   ©   -HH   ©   Cl
; 10 co ri
: oi ri co co
1  Cj   rH   CO  01
; co ci ri ci ri
b-
a
■      ^ T_j-
! "<# rH ** rH
: ri       00
CJ
<
so-
60-
K
o
©    : t-i    irico©ri©ci    : io oo h    : 01 ri to co    :ciricoci    :     :cociriciri
b-
^
!           :        rH T-i.                      ;                       ; th ri ri t-h     :                             ;     ; ri        co
Cl
m
^
ri
+j
I:::::;::::;;:::::::;:::::©:::©
©
a
; ©
: ©   ©
£
a
o
a
: °
: so-
; 10
10
60-
H
<
i3
H
f£
o
21
a
ft
ti
o
m
a
a
o
-<
H
m
o
la
a
-a
a
a
M
C3
a
3
K
&3
(h
zn
o
fc
w
S
4-J
© ©
©©©©©©©©
O © © © © © ©
©©0©©    :©©©
O
5»i
P
© ©
©©©©©©©©
© O © © © © ©
© © © © ©    : © © ©
©
aS
IO 10 10 10 10 © 10 10
b-  CJ  CI  OI   b-  ©  Cl   b-
10   O   10   IO   ©   ©   10
0 io © 10 0    : 10 10 ©
O
S^
a
10   ©
CJ   ©   CJ   b-   O   10   1-
10 b- 0 ci ©    : ci oi 10
t->
ri
Cl  ri          CO  ri  ri  ri
cj        ri Cj        ©
rH           rH   CO   Cl       \   ri   IO   ri
35
3.H
H Q
<i
cj                                                 riri
»
	
&9-
SO-
H fc
!      ICJTfl      !rHipriC0b-©lOC0      IrHOOrib-OOClb-      I  ©  CO  ri  CO  QC      !  b-  ri  ©
35
o
fc
:;              iri            thth              ;                 oo           cj:                 ririiipcj
O
•0
p
M
<
IH
4->
QJ
QJ
a
a
gj
fc-
o
0
"c.
u
£
I*
o
s
4-
'-H
O
u
0
c
p
p
c
c
«C
6
T.
P
fl
T
CD
z
p
B
c
fl
_
a
a
B
0
OJ
3
a
M
'r-l
0
a
K
a
fl
O
c
1
fl
4-
0)
0
C
4-
'E
G
CO
c
1
'fl
fl
IX
fl
0
a
P
a
a-   c
55 a
OJ
Pi
fl
O
9
9
0
rince George.
rince Rupert,
uesnel .....
4
c
a
"3
>
00
U
fl
CJ)   £
,£ p
5 cc
c
|
fl
c
0
QJ
*BJ
-
E
D
<
<
<
<
g
C
V
fc
fe
fc
«
w
tsl
^
a
fc
'A
^
ri
fc
fc
fc
O
M
DQ
H
>
!>
>
^
> H 36
•
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GO
H
fc
p
1-3
O
>i.
«
<l
P
fc
■<
P
H
o
fc
<1
P
fa
50
IS
O
«
o
H
P
fc
H
i>
CO <l
PS H
op
fcH
h9
CJ)
© th co cj 01 ri b- © b* t- 01
ri cl co ci os ri © © ©co
IO  CI   b-  b-  ri  Ol   b-  Cl Cl  rH
co © ci © ci oi CO' © ri co © © ri  co 10 10 b- io co ri cs io ci ©  b- ri  b- co b- ©
oc©ril-C5©ririCl©ri©riri©©^Ob-ocri©riri©cOri©oocico
to  ©"  Ci  rH   Ci   ri  CO  co"  ©      '  ri  ©  CO  oi  b^  OS  ci  ri   b-^  b-^  oi
00   CO OI ri CO Cl   Ci   CC   Ol   GO   rH   CC   CO    "      rH   CO
b- CO  ©   IP   b-  ri  Ol   IO  ©^        Ol
rH b-"  b-~  rH Cs"
> O  ri ri  b- Ol  CO
CO   CO   Cl   b-   ©   ri   ©   Ol   CJ   Ol   ©   IO   IO   OO   ri
rH        io ri co ri Cl oj co ri        co
o
©
10
CJ
©
©
d
©
rH
©
©
©
10
© © ©
© © ©
id id d
Cl oj io
CJ ri ri
© ©
© ©
© d
io ©
P   H*
S   P
■"1 <3
* a
otitic
i+j^pPoooflfl
:g a
OJ    O    U    U    ti    CD REPORT OP THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 37
s
p
P
i-s
P
fa
fc
o
X
<
EH'
<
o
M
§
a
N
B
a
fc
«
P
fa
N
O
H
H
<!
02
P
fc
a
W -fl
s s
PS H
o a
* s
ft -fl
» EH
60
<
OQO^OOOOO'fOHloOOOIOt'O^^fflRnHJ-IOM'ti
^. >j? b ^ o « fi h oq (p t- w t^ t^ o i; h io q ^ io en © oo ^ « q o; p
oi cs .h oi o **'    ' >H csi os w co    'HooicOHdflloddoJnfliiodBiH
OJPl  M  H  OOO CO  CO ICS CO  IPS fl(OHOOHrtfflOt-Of-M
M   H CO O   L—   CS IQ   Oi   0} OS
CO ^ CO
CS 7-i ©
CO   -tf
©   :
©    :
©    :
©    :
©
©
©
©
10      !
10       i
10
*P
so-   :
© ©
© ©
id id
b-  ri   ©  h-
Ol   CO  ©  Ol  ri   00  IO  CO  GO  ri   IO  ©  ri  CS  !
CjCOrHOriCOricOCOCjri© <
©  th   ri CO  01 "* '
© ri  Cl  Ol
I   rH   CO  ©   ri   Cl   '
ririC0ri©Ol©ClC0©ri©ricO-ririri
rH 10   10  ri Ol    "     ri   ri   CO TH    ■
o o
© ©
id id
CJ Cj
© IO   IO
©  I- CI
ri   © ri
©©OOO©©©©
©©©©©©©©©
© id © © id id © © id
10   Cj   10   10   b-   b-   »0   ©   Cj
Cl CI CO   ~     -HH  ri
CO  ri   rH   CO  ri   CO
:©ri©ojiococoori
©
O    Bi
B «' i
2 a'Ss
< < < <
£ a a
-8-2
.5 3
3 5
as
al fa
a
a fe
o o ° rt o
o £
o cj K a .-< .a
... .QJ  -^    O    O   •-.    -j    -   r-   .^.    0>     f,    v    f    a   ^   ,C
'•'•SgjaSBS^as.j.g.Sos--
tDOOrt^-HQJcsajQj^jQ    t^fc.ca<i)fl
,±1 a e 5 p '
cj co oj .a* ;r" ;
B > f> S PS I H 3S
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
CO
CM
as
B
tr>
3
CO
H
fc
P
1-8
CO
CM
|H
PS
-«f
P
fc
<
1-8
M
|H
■y.
CO
p
O
s
«l
■JIUI15IS
CO
©
Cl
iO
ri
r-l
10   CO
©
rH
10
Cj
ri
CD
©
ri
ri
©
OS
©
©
ri
"BUTJ8AIOA\
■H
b-
CO
Cl
ri  10  CO  01  ©
CO   rH
Cl  Cl  ri  ri
ri  ©
WAV
rt
©
rH
■popn^v
rH
rH
ri
©
rH
Cl
Ol
•I8ST!3Ai
COO©OOriririCO©CS
X  CJ   CO  CC                 CO  CO   lO
ri"
tO   rH
©   rH
©
CO
©rirocoosoo©©cDcoci    ;
COClCCOIb-CD©ririCO©      :
©    00   CO            ri   ri             b-                                   i
oi" id                            id                    ■
t-H
b-
00
b-
to
Cl
'UOODBa
CO
CO
Cl 10
cj H
b-
co
ri
©  Cj
IO
CO
b-
rH
■ri
co"
10
b-
CO
©
IO
©
•JB^JO
o
b-
©
b-
b-
CI
IO©©00©riC0©
b-  10                               10
CO
rH
10
Cl
to
■^Bjsisnjii
OI  ©
CO   rH
rH   rH
o
Cj
©
cj"
IO
©
ri   b-  ri   Cl  ©  Ol   b-  ©  ©  Cl
ri  OlC0b-C0©OJ©          ri
©   10   Cl   Ol   ri                   OS           rH
CO   rH           rH                           Cl"
rH                                           CI
Cl
b-
©
Cl"
ri
'WTC
r«!   00
©   10
CO
CD
CJ
-V   b-   X   ri
10   ri   ri   rH
CO
10
rico©ClOriiO©oOrirHb-riCOb-     1
Clri                 rH©CJb-ri©rib-ri©             1
ri  ©  10  ri   ri  tH   ri   b-         Cl
rH   CO   Oj"                                       ©                                   '
Oi
CO
00
©"
Ol
•uejjjspt
Id   rH   rH
©           ©
©   ri   ri   Cl   CO
Cj   ©  ri
©
IO
CD
Cl
riri©©   Cj   ©CD©
C0©0OCI©COb-Cb
CO   ri   rH           ri                   ©^
rH                                         ri"
oo co    :
ci         ;
©
oo
b-"
•xuA-'!
©
10
rH
o ©
©   rH
rH
©lOC0©CO©COCOClb-00     1
IO  ©   CJ  ri  Cl          rib-                Ol      :
co ri                                ©                      |
ri"                                                   rH                               '
ri
©
10
•pag 'xo^
a
ri
CC
CJ
©©©©©cococo
ri   Cl           ri   CO                   ©
© ci                         o
01  rH      \
rH
00    ■
IO
Cl"
■SSO.TQ
'xo^
CJ
CD
CC
ri©b-oo©cicori
IO  GO    '      Cl   CO   ri           IO
t- ~                          ©
b-
10
b-
©
■jeAitg
'xo^
©   ,-i
rH
00  ri   Cj  IO  ©  CO- Oj  ©
©  tH   -      "     "                    ri
01  rH      j
Cl
©
CO
■.TOtlSI^g
rtrt
Ol
ri
rt
C0©C0©©COriCl
ri  © CO CO OJ               >o
riri                                           CO
ri   rH       \
b-
ri
b-
•e,o.too
ri
©
ri
©
Cl
•j9ABag
00  10
ri   rH
CO
CO
00
©©©©ri©©©
C0rib-»Ol©©ri
CO  00  10  CO  ri          ri  b-
c6"                            i.o"
b-
co
CS
Cj"
mbsH
H
b- b- ©
rH   rH   rH   ri   CC-   Cl
w
Clb-riCJ©b-CJ0OrirH
© tO CO ri rH               io
rH                                              CO
CJ
»o
00
CO
c
OJ
bit)
"»
4-J
P
<U
g
Sj
>
o
O
a
<
I
<
c
fc.
L
fl
a
<
c
c
u
£i
c
a
C
-fl
c
0
fci
cu
=
fc
p
e
-
f-
C
a
B
fc-
1
c
c
i
1
5
B
1*
ti
C
I
«
■i-
a
c
5
3
t
1
1
c
1
0
1
s-
a
P
J
B
a
a
fc
fl
c
J_
*
a
fc
a
c
c
fc
a
c
fl
c
fc
a; 4*
s I
O    P
o  a
CJ     t
p   p
'tn   *■
fc fc
1
1
a
p
C
C
J*
c
3
>
a
'fc
1
1
a
c
t-
fc
|
bi
a
I
6
■%
i
a
>
1
2
I
C
0
E
•f
1
i
J
,  j
3       i
u
j
•J
B
4-
c
r REPORT OP THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.                         H 39
:    ■    :    :    :    :    :    :    :    :    :    :    :    :    :    : co t- ci    : 10 ri    •    : ©    : ip    :    ;
Ci
•Jiunsis
: th              :             {    : to
©
:    i    :oi    :    :    i h m    :    :    :    ;    :    :    :co    ;ci    : © H    ;    ;co    ;ri    :    :
•^
■euu9AiOAV
: ci    :         j
;    : t-
: ci    j    j
CO
ri
1    ;    : ci    :::    :i    :::::;: rH 10    :::    1    :: ri    ::;    :
©
2>
04
■JIOAV
; ci
CI
•jjeoptAV
rH
a
r-i
ci    :    :b-io    :    :©ci    :cj    :    :    ;io    : cs h- ri © b- 01 "<hh    :b-co©©oo
lO
co ri
■   rH
© 01 © co b- co co    ; © ci 10 ri ri
©
l-H
•jas-BaAV
rH
'   10   Cl   Cl           rH   S>  rH       J  «&           ri
rH
05
'   rH
•^
a
pa
Ci
Cl  rH
Cl
: oo to    ;
: ^
; b-
• ci    :    :
rH
St.
Cj
:      ^    :
: co
i    CO
©.   :    :
to
1
•uooo'bh
: oi
^
Q.
; to
©    !    :
CO
O
■mw
I ©
lp
CO
£^
©
©
co ri b-    : © ©
: oo
fi< co    ;
-*
CS
CO
SP
CO   ri   CO      I   ri   ri
: ci
ri oi    :
IO
T-1
•;ej;1S1ik
1.;
ri  ri  Ol      I   10 rH
: co
c\    ;
CO
'      '      •             '      '      '      ■              ri                    ■                    '      '   CO      '
©"
H
CC
rH
|H
CO
©  CD
ri
co
ri   ri   ri
b-CDr-OlriCOClrH©
b-  Cl   10
Ci
ri
©
IO
rH
b-   IO   ri           10   ri                   b-
ri        co
©
»-3
p
1-3
"5WK
CO           ri            "     ri                  ©
CO
Cl
CO"
a
£2
OJ
10
CO  ©
Y_j
CO Cl  0  N Cl   N JO   IO  CO M   1^ CC   D5      I  00
©
0.
01
ri   ri   ©  ri   Cl   ri  ri   ©                ©     '    ^      ;   ri.
ri
•IJ9JJEK
b-         Oj                                     fc-      . CD
b-
fc
cT
a
|
CO
©  01
:   rfi
CO      I  b-
©
: io
ri    ;
ri
*c
-XU.i'J
: io
©    :
fc-
M
|M
co
O
10
01
juj
©CO  10      1  Ol ri ri  CI  b
rH   -:    :
CO
•paa 'xoj:
©  10             ;   rH                       CO
CO     "                :                                  rH
oi    :    :
rH      I      ',
CI
b-
Oi
ri
00  ©   ri      !   ©   ©   CO  CJ  Ci
B
•sso.to
,_(
^r   ©             !   ri  rH                ©
©    i    i
lO
0
M
'xo^
ci              :                     ri
10
K
£
•jaAiig
00
b- © co    : oi co ri ri io
©    :    :
b*
fc
0
CO
•xoj;
CO   rH                                                 CO
s
2;
rH
01
b- ©  ri     :  CO CO Cl ci  ©
rH
M
■jaqsT^
ri   CI   rH       I   rH                          ri
ri      |      j
©
(vj
1                                  rH
Cl
Ol
CO
p
0
•OJOA'OO
r-H
Cl
©
ri
b-    : © ri
©    : oi ri
! °
: b-    :
10
IO
rH
CI
M
K
<
CJ
CI
IO  ri   ©       1   ri   ri
a io
JO  rH       I
ri
E>
■jSABag
00
rH
10
CI  CO   ri      :   Cl
io ri          : rH
©
00
io         :
oi         :
lp
Eh
CO"
10
O
CO
Bj!
IO  ©  ri
CO  CO    '
CO
CO
©©oo     : © Ol ri  co  © Ol  CO ri     ;
©
p
0
•juag
ri
01
l-   ©   CO       :   ri   rH                  CO          ri
co         :                     cj                   :
Cl
CO
,
H
«
<!
fa
00*
a
OJ
M
<l
jy
o
: „i    :    w3
fli   4->       .
a>
; o    ;   •—i
a
a
p
M
0
fc-
a
S-
fa
Cj,
1    ^
4P
c
c
fa
1
a;
T.
z
i
I
a
1
fc
XL
fl
u
fc
t
a
-z
oc
C
i
1
4
c
■5
a.
c
c
c
1
2
1
c
t
a
p
c
fc
a
c
P
ince  Georgi
ince Rupor
inceton	
OJ
U
OJ   4-
M
u
.fl j
ft >
0  c
c
c
fl
C
i;toria	
lliams  Lak
lmer	
Tota
^n«i4-jtJsflajOOOc;rflTOOajo^t-'fc-iflajacufla
<
<
<
<
c
c
c
&
&
C
k
fc
-
£
[Z
P.
P-
Ph    P-
Ph C
>Ph k
EH >
>
>WJP H 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Bounties paid duking the Yeae ewded December 31st, 1926.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Totals.
1
5
'5
2
3
107
12
23
8
2
'2
4
53
1
108   .
13
20
5
9
17
'7
1
2
'9
11
2
2
36
3
2
2
7
19
16
S2
10
$     528.20
839
368
1,478
254
1,694.00
Atlin	
Clinton	
811.00
20
816
86
69
2,958.00
589.60
883.60
206.90
58
1,282
181
949
22
31
340
476.00
'2,594.00
818
376
1,123.80
2,215.60
Kaslo	
84.00
142.00
16
45
1,454
66
417'
6S1.60
364.50
86
9
39
'2,511
478
1,472
645
314
6
3S2
475
757.40
149.60
1,724.70
5,282.00
225
2,763.50
Prince George...	
3,064.00
1,443.30
33
20
740.00
92.00
824.00
1,745.00
299.10
41
486
690
Vancouver	
471
255
1,125
3,370.60
1,219 00
Williams Lake          	
2,250.00
Totals	
336
183
14,070
5,770
$41,077.00
Recapitulation.
Wolves, 330 at $15 each   $ 5,040.00
Cougars, 183 at $40 each        7,320.00
Coyotes, 14,070 at $2 each      28,140.00
Crows, 5,770 at 10 cents each   577.00
Total  $41,077.00 	
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 41
List or Fur confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act,"
to December 31st, 1926.
January 1st, 1926,
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Police
Division.
Pelts.
1926.
Feb.      13
Aug.      10
Sept.     13
Jan.      27
8
March 25
Nov.      17
Dec.        8
13
9
22
Feb.      19
March 31
May        4
27
22
20
12
3
21
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Adirim, N	
Bon, W	
Carson, P	
Fisher, J	
Moses, I.......	
Williamson, P	
Wilde, W	
Milne, B	
Noren, C. S	
Francois, W. S	
Wilson, W	
Julian, W	
Conradson, B	
Prince, F...	
Beatton, F. W	
Machadeah, Chief..
Pierroway, P	
Joe, A	
Tamboline, J	
Noble, F	
Totals	
Nanaimo	
Courtenay 	
Alberni  	
Cranbrook:	
Wilmer	
Penticton	
Salmo	
West Summerland..
Christian Valley	
Wilmer	
Westwold	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Fort St. James	
Fort St. John	
Hudson Hope .....
Prince George	
Chilliwack	
Ladner	
Ladner	
"A'
"A'
"A'
"B '
"B '
"B '
"B '
"B'
" B '
"B '
"C
"D'
" D '
"D'
"D '
"D '
"D'
" B '
"B '
"E'
44
16
20
34
3
2
8
"77
12 H 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the "-Game-Act,"
to December 31st, 1926.
January 1st, 1926,
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Police
Division.
Kind
confiscated.
1926.
March    6
May      17
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
May
Aug.
Sept.
Aug.
Nov.
Feb.
18
26
19
24
21
21
27
10
24
24
2
11
29
23
23
24
'23
30
13
15
10
15
March
July '
Aug.
Feb.
May
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Hoo, T 1	
Green, T	
Boomer, J	
Moore, R. S	
Lundy, W	
MacCrostie, Dr. J. R
Aura, S	
Ikada, T	
Maxwell, F	
Wow, L	
Frank, J. (Indian)...
Manning, H. J	
Parker, G	
Fisher, J	
Anderson, O	
Bavin, R	
Kostseletsky, K. K...
Le Grande, E	
Anderson, G	
Newman, J	
Bertucci, C	
Owen, R. W	
Christenson, S ...
Wheeler, E	
Wheeler, H. W	
Wedge, J	
Burk, E. J	
Bedell, J. P	
Sue, B	
Kawanishi, S	
Bain, L	
Tokunatsu, H	
De La Giroday, B	
Hindle, A	
Lee. W	
Borne, A	
Jiarr, W	
St. Lawrence, J	
Sanura, I	
Campbell River.
Nanaimo	
Nanaimo	
Campbell River.
Ganges	
Courtenay	
Campbell River
Campbell River.
Ganges	
Rorston	
Victoria	
Nanaimo	
Campbell River.
Cranbrook	
Nakusp	
Wilmer	
Wilmer	
Athalmer	
Vernon	
Salmon Arm	
Kelowna 	
Ocean Falls	
Ocean Falls	
Ocean Falls	
Ocean Falls •.
Ocean Falls	
Pouce Coupe	
Pouce Coupe	
Port Coquitlam.
Alert Bay	
Ladner	
Vancouver	
Chilliwack	
Chilliwack	
Chilliwack	
Ladner	
Vancouver	
Port Moody	
Mission	
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A "
'A*'
'A "
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
, B „
' B "
'B"
'B "
' B "
•C"
•C"
'C"
! D "
' D"
• D "
• D "
' D"
' D "
' D "
'E "
'B "
'E "
'E "
' E "
'E"
'E"
' E "
' E "
' E "
■E"
1 rifle.
1 auto, shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 pump shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 22 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 44-cal. rifle.
1 auto, shotgun.
1 pump shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 22 rifle.
1 22 pistol.
1 shotgun.
1 22 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 pump shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 pump shotgun.
1 pump shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 22 pistol.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 auto, shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 shotgun.
1 revolver.
1 pump shotglm.
1 revolver.
1 pump shotgun.
Firearms confiscated :   Shotguns, 23;   rifles, 12 ;   revolvers, 4 ;   total, 39. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 43
>i
B
H
IS'
■4-J  <d
s2
Ui   CJ
c cj
Died.
Not serious.
Not serious.
Died.
Not serious.
Serious.
Died.
Died.
Died.
t4
CJ
©
S
cs
<
3
d
05
e
c
w
*s +.
. ;-
W c
1-5
0   r-
a
B
P
tr
1-
it
a
a
s
a
5
EQ
s
C
1—1
*i-i
o
o
fcH
P
X\
4-
a
a
t
c
c
C
1
s
-1-
0
-=
E
CC
&
&
4-
C
S
c
a
*
=
c
rS
EC
C
A
'S,
CC
a
4=
c,
X
c
CJ
a
c
-c
a
9
1
c
c
cs
ja
M
a
B
a
o
ai
P
.a
rt" ■•-
«   «:
iJD 0,
a c
+J   4-
o  c
m a
+3
ti
OJ
£
"e~!
CJ
«1
<D
<D
UI
ti
O
CC
c
a
c
c
-fl"
*
c
a.
US
c
c
-4
c,
c.
a
a.
us
c
c
EI
<1
B
x
CJ
Si
p
ai
13
CJ
a
f
a
c
»
c
a.
•a
Cl
£
<
4J
o
ril
°-
0
c
c
C
cd
1
C
>
s
C
a
c,
IH
a
5
c
c
8
C
P
ss
0
9
a
oj
s
cs
e
X
£
u
Pi
h
c
EH
pt
© *  > g & o  g
3 a S£ £3 §
Hi m m M cj fc fc
13
0
ri
Cl
CO
CJ
©
rH   P
d
to
e
H
-t
c-l
>
5
ri
ri
i
oj
02
rH
CJ
K5
01
cr;
c-1
K
O
H
Cl «
H 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List or Guides, Season 1926.
Xoland,
Auston,
Atlin District.
Cole, C. B Atlin.
Lemienx, L. O      „
Murphy, N      „
Cassiar District.
Brooks, N Telegraph Creek.
Creyne, J  „
Dick, L	
Decker, L  „
Escardi, A  „
Fann, B	
J. W Atlin.
A. R Toochi.
Frank, B Telegraph Creek.
Henyu, P  „
Jackson, D  „
Lawrence, C  ,,
Williams, M	
Fort George District.
Colebank, G. F Hixon Creek.
Moski, S Fort St. James.
McCorkell, B	
McNeill, J. N Wistaria.
Goodel, O. D McBride.
Goodel, W. R	
Lamina, L. L	
Sweeney, W	
Wylie, R. M	
McDonald, F. J	
Allgier, L Mount Robson.
Abram, E	
Brittain, H	
Hargreaves, F. N  ,,
Hargreaves, G. E  ,,
Hargreaves, R. F  „
Hargreaves, R. S  „
Bowen, F Red Pass.
Smith, J. M	
Woods, L. N. W. Prince George.
Hooker, J. B Dome Creek.
Jensen, E. H  „
Jensen, E. W  „
Cochrane, R. R Croydon.
Biernes, G. M Hazelton.
Hiamadow, T         „
Holland, J Telkwa.
Pierre, P      ,,
Dick, H Shelley.
Crowley, D Swift Creek.
Case, D._ Tete Jaune Cache.
Hamilton, R Burns Lake.
Mulvaney, B  „
Purjue, O Redstone.
Barkerville District.
Wendel, J Bear Lake.
Booth, L. E. R Barkerville.
Cochrane, J. D  „
Duffy, J. C	
Kew, J. E  „
Mason, H Barkerville.
Reed, F. W	
Thompson, N. W	
Thompson, R  „
Thompson, W. E  „
Glover, G. M..
Kamloops District.
Clearwater Station. Ray, J. B..
..Clearwater.
Lillooet District.
Farey, A. E Lillooet.
Janus, J       ,.
Prosser, G. E       ,.
Moore, K. B latla Lake.
Nesbitt, E Beaton.
Harrison, G. H Hector.
MacDonnell, R Invermere.
Nixon, W. J	
Stork, W Fort Steele
Gilbert, F Field.
Thomas, G     „
Manson, W. M. Lillooet.
Fletcher, J Pavilion.
Stewart, J. H	
Lindsey, N. M .Shalalth.
Kootenay District.
Stevens, P. V Wasa.
Weidenman, O. W Palliser.
Hiren, N. O Revelstoke.
Larsen, O. B  „
Munro, J. H  „
Krivensky, J Elk Prairie.
Canning, R. F Sheep Creek. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 45
Kootenay District—Continued.
Sheek, W. P Castledale. Lightbown, J. H .....Golden.
Boiven, W Natal.
Couillard, H. E       ,,
McGinnis, E	
Dainard, C. J Golden.
Fenz, W	
Haesler, C ,
Lightbown, D       „
Lawrence, C. G ,
Nixon, W. W Radium Hot Springs.
Schofield, B Windermere.
Tegart, W	
Kain, C Wilmer.
Yearling, W.... Athalmer.
Frearson, A Fernie.
Nanaimo District.
Smith, J. C Comox. Sutherland, G..
Forbes, J - Campbell River.
..Campbell River.
Peace River District.
Belcourt, J Big Slough.
Hunter, T Hudson Hope.
MacLadean, J Hudson Hope.
Thomas, J  „
Quesnel District.
Fletcher, J Keithley Creek.
Kirby, C. B	
Bremner, C Likely.
Collins, J. M      „
Dewees, R. G	
Dickson, F       „
Girwood, J. B       ,,
Hamilton, M	
Johnson, J       ,,
Larsen, L       „
Meniser, D. L      ,,
McLeese, P       „
McCarthy, G      „
McGregor, H       „
McGee, T	
Phillips, M	
Parminter, R ,
Vancouver
Mansell, F North Vancouver.
Sykes, B. S Abbotsford.
Stephenson, A Likely.
Tilton, R. M	
Shaw, J Quesnel Forks.
Felker, W. L Horsefly.
Hockley, G         ,.
Loetgen, C        ,.
MacEachern, R. H         „
Patenaude, G. B         „
Parminter, J. W        ,.
Hooker, F. S	
Hooker, T. O	
Reid, W. H	
Stevenson, O. J        ,.
Walters, L	
Walters, G	
Gaspard, E         „
District.
Utterstrom, J Vancouver.
Williams, A. B  „
Record or Big Game in the Cassiar, 1926.
(Compiled by the Provincial Game Department per H. W. Dodd, Government Agent.)
Licence
No.
Hunter.
Guide.
Licence
No.
Locality.
2537
2538
2539
2340
2541
2542
2543
2544
2:545
2546
2547
2548
2549
Harper, Dr. H. C, New Castle, Pa...
Cottom, H. Tom, New Orleans	
Jermyn, W. S., Scrantou, Penn	
Downey, J. J.,  Oswego,  N.i"	
Boyd, R. H., New York	
Frost, C. S., New York	
Briggs, Geo. S., Santa Anna, Cal	
Timmons, Howard, Santa Anna, Cal.
Robb, Thomas, Philadelphia	
Newbold, C. B., Philadelphia	
Evans, Thomas, Philadelphia	
Darwin, Gilbert, New York	
Sauford,   Gertrude	
Chas. Lawrence
Loo Decker	
Billy Fann	
Bseardi	
Little Dick	
Mike Williams....
John Creyke	
Dick  Jackson	
Pete Henyu	
Benny Frank	
Billy Fann, 2....
Escardi,  2	
Ned  Brooks	
1449
1448
1450
1620
1627
162 S
1629
1630
1631
1632
1450
1626
1633
Did not hunt (unwell).
Nahlin.
Nahlin-Nakina.
Nahlin-Nakina.
Shesley-Nahlin.
Shesley-Nahlin.
Shesley-Nahlin.
Shesley-Nahlin.
Klappan.
Klappan.
Iskoot Lakes.
Iskoot Lakes.
Iskoot Lakes. .
H 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Record of Big Game in the Cassiar, 1926—Continued.
MOOSE.
Cariboo.
Goat.
Sheep.
Ghizzly
Bear.
Blace
Bear.
d
Oj
U
a
in
a
01
O
Ai
d
1
u
a
ti
G
01
i3
m
"6
Oh
d
J3
to
a
01
cS   •
d
Z
id
cS
01
3.
rS
ti
a
o
oi
caps
d
oi
g
d
oi
N
CO
491
461
525
48
55
541
561
52 J
471
491
54J
22
28
41
34
34
31
31
33
27
28
25
2
2
2
2
•2
2
2
1
2
1
46
43
45
341
47
371
441
421
391
371
S3
501
5'21
501
501
52
57
54
32
465
29
26
37
36
31
32
44
38
29
30
2
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
91
10
10i
91
91
9
93
11
10
101
10
5i
'51
'5|
51
51
'5
oi
6
51
51
6
2
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
24
271
281
231
211
251
25
23
231
26
40
35
32
331
37
401
38
34
34
36
131
13i
131
141
141
131
14i
12
131
131
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
Medium
Large
Medium
8' 0"
Medium
Medium
3
1
1
1
1
1
29
291
33J
38i
43
29
34
251
25
by 101
by 12
by 141
by 141
by 131
by 141
by 121
by IS
by'121
1
1
Medium
1
1
'6' 111"
1
1
1
1
Medium
Medium
6' 8"
Small
1
35 i
30
by 121
by    81
Small
1
'
Weather conditions very fine throughout.
Returns from 760 Holders of Trappers' Licences, showing the Big Game, Fur-bearing
Animals, and Noxious Birds killed.
Big Game.
Bear    196
Deer  443
Caribou  54
Moose  183
Mountain-goat  7S
Mountain-sheep    - , -  2
Wapiti  (elk)	
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver  2,577
Fox   526 '
Fisher  249
Lynx   1,173
Marten  '.  2,107
Muskrats   13,985
Mink   4,907
Otter   193
Racoon   1,162
Skunk  ..'.  103
Weasel  12,540
Wolverine     49
Noxious Animals.
Coyotes   384
Cougar   16
Wolves   8 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 47
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1926, to December 31st, 1926.
Species.
Name and Address.
ri.2
«o
Cl    .
s a
rq S
cs«
01 ._,
Mo
fl
o
.a
CJ
o
oi
s
a
a*
0)
fl
o:
ri
o
O
lei
at
a
ri
c .
o ri
01
O
O
a
ri
+j   .
fl 01
o 01
r^i CQ
Is
Amount.
Ashcroft—
Hogan, E  F . Randolph, N.Y	
l
l
l
l
i
l
l
i
l
l
l
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
o
1
1
3
2
1
3
1
1
!
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$     50.00
i
i
i
i
i
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
40.00
25.00
Atlin—
130.00
155.00
Barkerville—
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
'25.00
65.00
65.00
Harlev, C. S., Seattle, Wash	
50.00
75.00
Bowman, T. W., Seattle, Wash	
50.00
Cranbrook—
25.00
25.00
Clifford, R., New York	
40.00
15.00
White, J. G., Walla Walla. Wash	
55.00
95.00
Cumberland—
Sutherland, G. W., Seattle, Wash	
15.00
Clinton—
Gaudy   0. M., Seattle, Wash	
2-5.00
25.00
Fernie—
10S.0O
80.00
05.00
25.00
Rigall   F   H.   Twin Butte, Alta	
30.00
Fort Fraser—
105.00
5-5.00
15.00
80.00
15.00
Golden—
Houston, D   F., Kimball, W.V	
95.00
Kelso, C. N, Dayton, Ohio	
35.00
90.00
Hanger, H., New York	
55.00
55.00
Leahy, G. D., Murray Bridge, Aus	
Grand Forks—
30.00
25.00
Lillooet—
McDonald, D. K., Seattle, Wash	
30.00
25.00
New Westminster—
Silver, C. W., Everett, Wash	
15.00
Nanaimo—
John, C. J., Seattle, Wash	
S.00
5.00 Nanaimo—Continued.
Quick, H. B., Chehalis, Wash	
Morrison et at, R. A., Warn Beach, Wash
Prince Rupert—
Mullendore, H., Harper, Kansas	
Mackay, M. S., Tenafly, N.J	
Pouce Coupe—
Kenny, Dr. H. R., Chicago, 111	
Snyder, H., Chicago, 111	
Carr, J. R., Morristown, Pa.	
Keyser, J. C, Collegeville, Pa	
Prince George—
Woodward, R. W	
Watson, E. F., New York	
Kemp & Clooman, Pontiac, Mich	
Payne, Dr. K. L., Norfolk, Va	
Nash, W. IC, Cleveland, Ohio	
Curless, J., Liberal, Miss	
Thompson, E., Louisville, Penn	
Thompson, Mrs. E., Louisville, Penn	
Wolf, B. R., Miami, Fla	
■Robinson, L. A., New York	
Stimpson, S. C, Oklahoma	
Jensen, P., Ranger, Texas	
Morrison, J. P., Oklahoma	
King, C. J., Cleveland, Ohio	
Swarthout, O. R., San Bernardino	
Gentry, J. D., San Bernardino	
Cadmus, E., Bloomfleld, N.J	
Hagedora, O., Portland, Ore	
Swartz, H. W., Montpelier, Ohio	
Martin, C. J., Miami, Fla	
Cobb, J., Middlesborough	
Whitcomb, E., Armhurst, Mass	
Wright, A., Toledo, Ohio	
Beayer, E., Toledo, Ohio	
Wright, Miss M., Toledo, Ohio	
Quesnel—
MeNutt, J. F., Spokane, Wash	
Mills, H. W., San Bernardino	
Ewing, R. C, San Bernardino	
Cambern, R., Spokane, Wash	
Smithers—
Zappettini, E. J., San Francisco	
Hoeppner, C. H., New York	
Clements, J., Boston, Mass	
Bodwell, W. J., Sanford, Maine	
Telegraph Creek—
Tom, C. H., New Orleans	
Jermyn, W. S., Scranton, Penn	
Downey, J. J., Oswego, N.Y	
Boyd, R. H., New York	
Frost, C. S., New York	
- Briggs, G. S., Santa Anna, Cal	
Timmons, H., Santa Anna, Cal	
Robb, T., Philadelphia	
Newbold, C. B., Philadelphia	
Evans, T., Philadelphia	
Darwin, G., New York	
Sanford, G., New York	
5.00
30.00
25.00
25.00
80.00
75.00
80.00
■55.00
40.00
25.00
60.00
55.00
80.00
40.00
75.00
2-5.OO
25.00
55.00
55.00
25.00
25.00
S0.00
75.00
65.00
40.00
40.00
25.00
75.00
65.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
40.00
25.00
75.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
95.00
40.00
180.00
250.00
205.00
220.00
130.00
100.00
140.00
195.00
220.00
105.00
120.00
105.00 REPORT OP THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 49
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1926, to- December 31st, 1926—Continued.
SrECiES.
Name and Address.
si
01 t.
CJ    .
.3 a
Kg
|m
So
fl
o
0
rn
U
0
©
tH
QJ    ■
GJ  O
at
a
ri
a .
si
1*5 CJJ
oi
m
O
©
3
a p,
fl 01
*% Ui
+0     ■
ftS"
Amount.
Vancouver—
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
■2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
i
i
i
2
1
i
i
i
i
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
o
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
$     25.00
80.00
90.00
25.00
75.00
50.00
Rathye, F. C, Chicago, III	
50.00
Burke, F. L., Fresno, Cal	
25.00
-50.00
Moore, It. W., Deland, Fla	
25.00
15.00
50.00
25.00
Leadbetter, T. W., Portland, Ore	
25.00
Hill, R. L., Miami, Fla    '
90.00
15.00
5.00
Victoria—
Purdy   P   A., Seattle, Wash.   >
5.00
Ward, R., Seattle, Wash.             	
5.00
Bird, S. E., Seattle, Wash.    .
Holzworth, J. M., White Plains, N.Y	
7'5.00
Wilmer—-
25.00
25 00
Everett, R. W., Brevard, N.C...                  	
90 00
Hart, G. W., Brevard, N.C	
60 00
50.00
30 00
Smith, E. L., New York	
40.00
55.00
25.00
Williams Lake—
80 00
40.00
■50.00
75.00
55.00
Leo Wolf, C. G., Niagara Falls, N.Y	
Whitten, B. L., Miami, Fla	
50 00
85.00
Totals	
■54
34
71
10
26
86
'52
'42
13
$7,880.00 H 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions (Provincial Police Divisions), January 1st, 1926, to December 31st, 1926.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
- P
= a
: a
at
- a
mi,
- a
so
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Game Animals.
Buying moose head and horns	
Exporting game without a permit	
Exceeding bag limit on game	
Game on premises of shop, logging camp, etc	
Hunting deer between sunset and sunrise	
Keeping game animals in captivity without permit
Killing or having game animals in possession of
the female sex	
Killing or hunting game during close season..	
Killing or having pelts of fur-bearing animals in
possession during close season	
Non-resident hunting big game without a guide....
Possession of game during close season	
Possession of deer under 1 year of age	
Running deer with dogs.....	
Shooting game while acting as a guide	
Game, Birds.
Allowing  dogs  to  hunt  game  birds  during close
season.	
Game birds on premises of shop, etc	
Hunting game birds from power-boat	
Hunting game birds in prohibited area...	
Hunting upland  game birds between  sunset and
sunrise.	
Killing or hunting upland game birds during close
season	
Killing or hunting migratory  birds  during close
season	
Possession   of   upland   game   birds   during   close
season 	
Possession of migratory birds during close season
Selling or offering for sale game birds	
Setting traps for game birds	
Licences.
Buying fur without a licence	
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Failing to produce licence on request	
Guiding without a licence	
Killing game without a licence	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence..
Non-resident angling without a licence	
Using another person's licence	
Firearms.
Carrying firearms in or discharging same from an
automobile or other vehicle	
Carrying pump shotgun not properly plugged	
Carrying or discharging firearms in restricted area
Discharging firearms on or across a highway	
Possession of an automatic shotgun ,
Trapping.
Interfering with a licensed trap-line	
Trapping without registering trap-line	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence	
1
14
14
11
19
10
11
21
3
13
8
1
1
1   j   15
....  ]   10
... j 21
... j 13
.... | 1
1
'68
2
1
4
7
7
1
89
9
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
4
14
76
2
1
-5
7
7
3
40
,9
35.00
45.00
18-5.00
125.00
25.00
310.00
160.00
450.00
150.00
275.00
7S2.00
10.00
10.00
50.00
35.00
50.00
200.00
40.00
550.00
280.00
440.00
170.00
40.00
25.00
50.00
675.00
20.00
10.00
110.00
350.00
110.00
50.00
410.00
95.00
80.00
50.00
30.00'
40.00
Sus. sentence
120.00 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 51
Prosecutions (Provincial Police Divisions), January 1st,. 1926, to December 31st, 1926
—Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
s a
3 a
a>
• a
- n
rU O
_ «1
So
°-+l
Eho
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Trapping—Continued.
Trapping during close season	
Trapping on a game reserve	
Trapper refusing to give information to Constable
Miscellaneous.
Being a guide did fail to report an infraction	
False information to an officer	
Failing to keep record-book of fur purchased	
Hindering an officer while in pursuit of his duty
Trespassing in pursuit of game.	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Catching sturgeon under 3 feet in length	
Exceeding bag limit on trout	
Fishing or possessing trout during close season	
Fishing with salmon-roe in prohibited waters	
Fishing for or selling salmon or trout without a
permit	
Killing salmon in spawning-grounds	
Illegally fishing with gill-nets	
Jigging salmon or netting trout	
Taking trout under S inches in length	
Unlawfully catching ling-cod or bass	
Gaol Sentences.
Carrying firearms without a licence	
Killing game or game birds during close season	
Possession of game during close season	
Possession of pelts of fur-bearing animals illegally
Pit-lamping	
Shooting ducks from a power-boat  	
Trapping during close season	
Unlawfully selling sturgeon	
Totals	
107   I   63
66
66    137   |   44
_l	
11
12
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
'2
2
17
18
1
1
5
5
5
5
2
2
7
7
1
1
3
4
-5
8
17
17
3
3
'2
2
2
2
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
80.00
25.00
10.00
10.00
20.00
60.00
15.00
170.00
20.00
40.00
35.00
30.00
' 45.50
15.00
50.00
22.00
144.50
20.00
$7,454.00
weeks each.
weeks each.
,  2 weeks ;
1, 30 days.
weeks each.
,   30  days;
1, 90 days.
0 days.
,  10 days;
1, 30 days.
3  days.
439
483
Note.—" A " Division : Vancouver Island area. " B " Division : Kootenay and Boundary areas.
" C " Division : Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division : Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division : Vancouver, Coast, and
Lower Mainland areas. Ii 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Tpnuis
•uoooua
•J3J40
IB
fc
H
H
•}-BJ5[Snpi
•uajjuji
'xua't;
•juqsijj
■ajo.too
'PUUTT UO
saxo^ iiqox
•piog
CO
CM
O
M
B
rM
•paia
■pio -jx I
jopnn
'Pio 'JA I
jaAQ
'Pio MV. T
.ISPUQ
'PIO x\ I
J9AO
'Pio -JJ I
.TOPUQ
'PIO   IJ I
J3AO
PIO MX I
J8PHQ
'Pio Ii I
J3AQ
rH   rH       j
tN
CD  CM  ^      !
t-i T-i          :
:    :      o -* t-i (M
:    ;       co      t-i
cd os    :
T-i         J
SO   W
01
^ o: o •* ci
T-i    TTl
co o    ;    : co       t- cd ^
cm    : th    ;      cd
: co    : cq co cd •*
ti  M
:cqg
ss
S 3
fc Q
a s g
a 05
o =o
Oh    H
a Wo
a s
!   £ fl
O >
i w P-
cw   A   o   fl £
& s w
©
o    „
s-i a a
us
lis
£fe =.
si «  - <
fl =8 a !
O   M   O  i
..° £ '
r: fc  a
■a 05 '
M §
: m
C3
Sq
u  ft
10 fi
en   .
I a x
o o    -
! tS M S
1 ° • -S
I .S O M
II fc ..
!.rnrS3
3
5    : b
1    >fi     !   +■"
t  •* fi
H3
f/J
a
cs
fl
S
fl
fl
3
Bfe
fl
2    i  «i  a
is §■§>
«is «
.    O    V*   t*-K    Ui
! fc,   0     „ <1>
: ^  r ■  fe
M if a H   r
'-1 3
,3   f>
^ 8
$?£
I-H   w o
.< o fc
.   r«W
■"1 jj B
K go
, 3 ^ n,
'god
*! §
e"S|
1 =-§
0   .«.
o M
B fl
5 £ cq 02 >3    £ h K B
~o«
3   3      ,&
o  ci
1™ a1
O O O I
■ •xats
! a     ■?
1 rt  u g
ffl w fc
ci fc r^
cr* ci
■°       5 M
SS B
S^o
«  S o
o a k
S 6 3
O    ^ 41
Ph O Ph ■
,-.';,-.
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 53
co o c-i h    :      w    : © o
ifti' c.    : ca
GO CM   GO   CM   t-1 -*
:    : H m
-#    :    : oo    ; cm
cm    : p go
-tf o      cici
in S
^Sn,
o  .
te   d
i-O
Oi ^
CD   £ *
*   3 5
O ."ti
k~0 s
t>     .02
t> £ d
1HC1
^ '3 j
a  a
«    fife
O" ri
a"oi Q
fl fe o
01   ^    «
*• 3
3 fl
)    - ci .L
* £ a
o o
& i.
d
ti a M  oi
O S
o 0 W ■
: J  a
a a      5
S fl   r«
a   C3 rj     .
ofe
a 3 d
„5h
02   cr
.      .   01
i o o
fc" | B
-fc fl
w ^ fl
ra   .05
fl Cl
°   ■ >,
ob K
o 01
o o a*
u o a
a aS
M fc j;
. . >
O CJ bJJ
fc fcl 3 t>
tH n P
■5 a" a
0MS
Mfe-<( a
■a ^' '?    - fl" a
K
fc M '
d J !
fc§
k a a f.
a m ,? 5
d fc
p
o =a
01
3 H
o
■3    -
B 2
a fl
~ a
" £
5<j a
;§ffl,
fc rt
KS    ■
& fl a .
o  ^ fl 3 ,
i W. -a P -
3 p 3
KgfcMO-siOM^aM^SStn
atop    a
oi oi a b fci fl i
fc 05  S M 05 P
fc«
.flK
fc    -
a o
-a oi
« a
oi a
h a
PH   f>  a
w a t-
g SS
a 3 a
fcf>^
31 a
- yf
■  01
^ cd a
> rt 3
a
° *? g
a gfl
It s &
0) o
02        fc H 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
'I0SB8AV
•spmjjs
U8}10
•^Bissnm
■3[njK
•uoijuk
■xuA'q
•joqsi^i
■e^oAoo
'J9AU0a
•pu&TI UO
saxo,i imox
'Ptog
'paiUH
'P^ra
'Pio i\ x
.lapun
'Pio i\ X
laAQ
'Pio *X I
.lapu.q
'Pio -IX I
J3AQ
'Pl° '-'A 1
.iepuri
'Pio [IS. X
jaAQ
■pio ja. I
japqiQ
'Pio 'II I
jaAQ
cm      -ii    : t-
o    : as      co oo
a fc
3 fc
a 3
F?5
a's"oi
►ess
fl 2 ^
fl   g fl
5 M
g > ?»
!>ao
Ha 2
C       ■     O     O
«w   l.   cj   X
O Ch
M ,2
M   SB
" a
5 *•
05     -
a t H « ;
M us
.3 a
t-.—. +j a
a it go cp m
.£ B
02 Ol    .
- o    . '
»>o
i*
'   r-i.W    ti   S
c
i M .ti     -. <H
! ? 3 8 s
2 W
at?
a o o .ai
J   co   It C
. ca fc  co" fc
. <) * ^ j B
fc 3
a fc >  . o
r to
•3  r    fl
3  fa   «  '
ro^-d
+-
■-!
r^
i>
.
0
•M
to
■
T3
UJ
■$
7Z
Cfi
s a if S b a ■;
o 2
a a
hJfSBoJS
~
BI
rT-
c
-
3
O
K
ert
UHhOU
"H        -    CO     g        -        -     i      _   ' -   >> cl
'O^ariUi+^ViOW
TH   £
&H
3  l-H    -h    t*
ti   £
^    o    w    ^  L^i   ii    CJ    qjo
•
I* SB
o £ K REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1928.
H 55 H 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
-n
•5IUU5[g
•uooaua
'J3110
■^BjqSllM
•5IUIH
'U3JJBJ1J
'xuA*t;
■jaqsiji
•8}0.foo
'.TOAUOg
•pu-eq uo
saxo.j itqox
no
p
6
ci
P
o
fc
'Piog
'paia
'Pio 'Ji T
japun
'Pio 'Ji I
MAQ
'Pio *S I
jopua
h    : Tti    :
'Pio Mi I
aOAQ
Pio MA. I
jopun
'Pio '« I
aSAQ
OO       I   rH   OO
'Pio MX I
.lopun
'PIO MA I
I3AQ
: w
a
a
i O
.<!
« 2
cj a
B B
1-5    ^
.di^ll
Mr%U
'  ^    *     J   I
. . « a i
s co- g 3 f
Cl   so   d
i%<
*
a ifc
^ "to fc
x .2 u
fc \$
™ fc fc
:Q      3
: ca
: a
a
o'?-2
a o M
,     ;   3   2     r
I M
u  o
cm
^     "J     <U
! H  5' S ,
t-i   ^ '
■S  H
.S as
oi S>;
it 2
lOO ■-£
f^    -fc
; 31'.„, S ri
do
>. it
a
o
jl
3
£ ri
j a &
Op  S
, 3d
i fc    '
i  K  fc
O    i fc
a
k a   i
O   U   Hj
fc °    ■
J a
L'      rH       <J       M
on
a  cc"
E° fl
to £
; K o a
H'-a
^  E°  3 ^ fc  •- co tJ
ri prj S .57:
-O 02
o
;     fl
CJ 3,'w
a _ °
- ° a
CO   1-3
fc a
a
m ■
ri **
fall
_ -i a I1 ►.
.3 s C o £>
'.gfloaaoSd-
o2>BtHfcQO!?KOOBg REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 57
: ^
a    :
th    :
h- CM cm     ; ■# ?H go
3   O nF
A ."g cf
t! *-•
U   ti cj
cj CO ti
SO   M M
Eh a ••
o -i
r i-s h
H    . ■
S-i 1-5
"   Cj
•-J    fcl) U
Ci     Cj    '
■S3,
5  to)
"^  o i-s ■
h3
■J
O
r
'A
..
o
-
Q
K
O
7Z
A
fc
s-
£
Ui
ci
a
Tfi
CD
to
O
CJ
^ a
rt
ci  CO
CJ
r—1
A   rH
o
CO
M
5 *a
^
1—1
o
o
^w
6j
1-1
3   of
X
3
c
C
c
5;
A
n
s
s
o
CO
Ii
i   ci.
: c
so   «
a
0
z
a
5C
r-
a
a
g
c
o
a"
fc
.a
ft
ec
X
E-
E
+-
a
no*
a
ri
a ,
fa S
B   3
fc   a
3 fc
3 a
•a*
a   r
s a
a '
a 8 ft.S
a 34 s
a 2
a s
03  fc   Oj ,
S'aC
d .s 2 ;
; *
w it a a
: B 3 M O O K -1
fl £ P
5 m n i
SM
. it h g
•   a   a   >-*
r^SiSg
I d * & §
- . _r a a
2 -a a   r
IS 2 gr-
•    X    .ti      rH
H J O
co   ci
8^
to t-i
It a
a -io
II
B O
l^^d
o >     .
ft    rii
K w it a
M
.M fl
a o
ra fl !2
a p
o
£oS
a fl 5
a\4o
a   . -r  .
r t-j o <!
H d g »
ri   -fl  S
O;   CS    ft   ^
.& '53 2 S
fc B a> P
a oi   : a
X to a   co
a '-< to -hj
j o t.  o
r-i a   o O
HJ O     «
5 O   r
£ a       o
Ji o   u
B TC -3
a . M   C
a
a M
ffi-2
»S°
« 3
01    fc
fe JQ
-HH   a   oi
2 .i h; fi
a a 3 i
od as a
fcc   3   K 3
a a -   -
iri O
<3 °     £
M h o !z; p o a H
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
■JlimjIS
M8MO
■j-BasjanK
■wm
•ua}jBH
•ajoiCoo
13X8&8
•puuq uo
mo    : -ti    :      -+ co co t-
^H        Cl H1 hi a
I-  H   fl  Cl  C
'PIOS
'ponui
01 a ci a
'PIO MX I
Mpufl
'PIO MX I
J3AQ
■*      ci    : Hti
m
m
p
HH
'PIO MX I
.lapun
t- CO   GO
'PIO MX I
jaAQ
co      o oi    i ci oa
'PIO MX I
.iepu0
'Pio MX I
J9AQ
PIO MX I
.lopur^
"Pio MA I
ISAQ
W O
-, a
; fc cc
a-1
r§ ts a
3« g
Sd5
•3 3 0
■§ 6 5
■rH       ?3       C3
2 O >
*K&\
ft u
ot
© *
<f g
n'O
cs
■a fc
a 3 g <! 02  a
fc a & '    e
.fc
M
.   CJ    so
' .a
• C-i -
!?.J
Sfc
.2   M
ti
02'g
.2 o
£ EH
a a a
3    tt
§£
ri 5
K OS i
h.        -!   r   --1   -*   3
ri     SO    SO
r>    3    -0
-. a
a a fl
a h3 a
p b "a  °
O B t* O
a >. .
• S a a ,
,-H 1 o c
a i-s
fl   .
"    £
fl o
-o   .!
(-i    :
CD
ti    i
q
©    ;
■9
CJ
t>
Ui
CM
U      !
£
m  o   .:
■ae* \
£
a   - .-  i
H
rH   _
+j en
Ui ;
' co a as a"
i * a g
M a 02 a
' ♦* a _, a
.   o «
3fl cf
If. US -
° 2
.ft
Mfa
boo:
; W
?.£
ri
J   a
!   li^SCS',
ft a 02    n i
m ch
5     •
5PK
oa a
ifc>d
o  o r?   s>   h
I   o   50   O   •>
I fc AH. © o
M H B M
r so to
H = a
■< Kri
- a a
-H S   J^
t» a •
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 182C.
H 50
co co     ;     ; iO
ci     ;     ; 01
w ci    :    ;    : ci
i_f?    : -*i ci    : t~-    ; to
ci    :    : ci    : -rfH    :    ; h.
: ci    :    : ci    : ^
CO   7$
o
3 fc
I     01    -H      r*
tsi    - o
l>   .fl
■ &B   r
ri3 b.-"1
1>   -Cl    r\   _j
;.-2 S a 2
a 3
■a a
B
UTS
3  a   s *£<   t.
n < Q a»
A   a
§3 .
c,   a-S
ci  a  a
h o a
HI     J
a fl   o
£ o a
3.. g
. A   o
fc -g a
m-M  a"
se
-S   3.
H* 3
ft .-
. CO
fe 2
O   CQ
fc
H-
a a
3   g
fa a
.w
O    r
rio 'J
"' fl 3
o S3
a a & £
tw   *^    CD   ^
cs 23
r-H "     Ui
fcdi>dOfcH5Bo2020<!CifcBBfai»<jdo2«fa
©   o   a   a   a   o
."
r^
a
w
o
EH
CJ
Ph
h
fl
K*
-
tf
>
<
>
rH
fH
fc
_c
1
HH
—
«
g*
to   .
"* ,s
or'
a
^ H g
>H   r< -
Z O a
50 •     r>H       w
1 a fc -■"
a L fl a,
a a a J
r »5 j
fc* h * a
P1 § fc a
dM •- a
a g-4M
»** a
■a « >■■ vS «
5 3 a
' S a" ° 3
. §• ft m b
j O   n    •    .
d-ft^w
^      ri   •
rf   a   a fe
fl a O ^
1*1
st* a
3*<
ssg
ril  h,   S
. ft
-T ^  J k'
!«£*
r,        .    CO        .
"   a T3  ri
15 ° a'3
a -o M 8
fl    . fl
t»' a  a  a
PS J a a
fl o
< H ft B a a
a 0 5 3
3       a o
E c a o
■9  3  a a a
*3  rH. ^ *3 ^
3'b'O
a H   .
CO   ,-   fl
aHB2;aaB>aaor,
i£  2h a a
o H l-s O
£  3 .1      '
fl  O g fl
sill '
H 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
m
'A
'lasuaxv
•2IUU1IS
a
•nooorajj
CO
m
S
•*»MO
a
<
:    :    : oo   : c
o
■j/MJisnH
:    :         : c.
Q
a
«
<
'P!H
Cl
a
a
P
fc
«
•uejjJM
:    :    :    : cm
Cl
CO
'XUXcj
CO
ft
O
Maqsi^
■ajoAoo
MOAT30CJ
:    :    : o    :
:    :   : co   :
CC
CD
iH
HH
•pnuii no
o
saxoa ibiox
$f
Cl
•Piog
CO
rH
•pains
Cl
CO
rH
■psia
Cl
'PIO MX I
r-
.tapuQ
>0
s
B
'PIO MX 1
J9A0
o
•pio MX T
-f
ri
japun
CO
fc
S>
Oj
'Pio MX I
j^ao
o
S3
1-1
'PIO MX I
CD
m
o
O
.lOpuQ
Cl
'PIO MX I
HH
jaAO
at
'PIO MX I
H
ra'
a
japufl
a
'PIO MX I
J9A0
Cl
<i
JaJ
o
0)
a
P3
+H
1
Q
0
1
H
3
3
r a;
H  s
ti
a1
fc
P3
A
a
i
3
3
s a a a M
O "3 .°   3        o.
w £ fc w a >
i
5
+j o ^ c £ c
03 tJ a a w *-
a M   a   (i   52 r.
5J        02 HH   5 C
3 ■-  .a<jj.
■            a d £
2
ft dd-Safc
ri
a § £ "  cp <
•H
5 a 3 ■»' a
i-3 O O Q W w
* ,
REPORT OP THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 61
List of Game Constables, British Columbia Provincial Police.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General (Minister) A. M. Manson, K.C Victoria.
Provincial Game Warden Lieut.-Col. J. H. McMullin  „
Chief Game Inspector M. Furber  „
Staff-Sergt. Game Warden P. R. Butler •.  „
Stenographer Miss A. McGregor  „
Game Warden T. H. M. Coaly  „
„  W. H. Vickers  „
" A " Division (Vancouver Island, District).
Inspector T. W. S. Parsons , Victoria.
Staff-Sergt. Game Warden .P. R. Butler '.      „
Game Warden R. Gidley       „
 H. Bishop Sidney.
 D. C. Campbell .Duncan.
 G. B. Simpson Lower Cowichan.
.., H. C. Pyke Nanaimo.
 W. V. Fentcii Cburtenay.
 A. Monks Alberni.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector .W. R. Dunwoody .Nelson.
Corporal-Game Warden (Appointment to be made)     „
Game Warden R. M. Robertson Penticton.
 G. Thomas .Cranbrook.
 I. J. Brown Elk Prairie.
 G. H. Soles Athalmer.
 M. G. Rutherford	
 W. J. McKay	
 D. Greenwood Canal Flats.
 F. H. Butwell Golden.
 G. H. McDermott 	
 : C. W. A. Smythe Revelstoke.
"C" Division (Kamloops, Tale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
Inspector.....1 W. L. Fernie Kamloops.
Corporal-Game Warden R. D. Sulivan         „
Game Warden W. R. Maxson .Kelowna.
 J. A. Quesnel Xumby.
 G. D. McKenzie Clinton.
 Tan McRae .Hanceville.
 H. P. Hughes Likely.
 G. F. Turner Barkerville.
 F. Kibbee	
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector W. Spiller Prince Rupert.
Sergeant-Game warden T. Van Dyk  „
Game Warden O. L. Hall Smithers.
 E. Forfar Fort St. James.
 C. Muirhead Prince George.
 C. Stephens (Atlin) Prince Rupert.
—.: J. Hayes (Atlin)  „
 I. Gunnell .Fort Nelson. .
H 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" D " Division  (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts)—Continued.
Corporal-Game Warden C. G. Barber Fort Nelson.
Game Warden To be appointed when weather permitsBoundary (Stikine R.).
 Ditto '. Ditto.
„  A. T. Bafchelor Hudson Hope.
" E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Staff-Sergeant S. North Vancouver.
Corporal-Game Warden J. G. Cuimingham  „
Stenographer Miss N. Bryce  „
Game Warden V P. Cummins  .,
 W. Clark	
 I. Moir North Vancouver.
 J. Murray Port Moody.
 R. M. Stewart Chilliwack.
 P. Prquhart Langley.
 E. G. Stedham Pitt Meadows.
 W. H. Cameron Ladner.
 F. Ledoux JVfatsqui.
 G. F. Elliott '. Mission.
 A. J. Collison Agassiz.
(Special) N. McGillivary Chilliwack.
Game Warden..
Predatory-animal Hunters.
....O. Shuttleworth	
.Penticton.
Elk Lake Game Farm..
Game Warden (in Charge) J. W. Jones Victoria..
„  E. Boorman        „
 S. H. McCall	
,,  , S. Townsend         ,,
 G. Cuthbert-	
Game Conservation Board (Advisory Body).
Chairman M. B. Jackson, K.C Victoria.
Secretary P. R. Butler	
Member Hon. J. A. Buckham, M.L.A Golden.
 F. H. Kergin, M.L.A Alice Arm.
 Major Allan Brooks Okanagan Landing.
 Dr. P. D. MacSween New Westminster.
 J. Murray Vanderhoof.
 T. B. Booth .Nanaimo. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1926.
H 63
^e of  British   oo^-
*^ 1326 *»*
ATTORNEY GENERAL
GAME    ADMINISTRATION
GAME
CONSERVATION
BOARD
PROVINCIAL  GAME WARDEN
CrHEF    GAME!     INSPECTOR
Headquarters
Office
and
Staff
Victoria   B.C.
HI
LTJ
Ifl
LE
3L
u.
1
<u B
CV
j?
o--y
if
■fl   'M
.Slice:
ccE'-ec
■r to tu ro
oO JJU.
et    ID
L -O
o c
U o
GAME    DIVISIONS
D
INSPEC TO R S
GAME SERGEANTS
AND
GAME. CORPORALS
13
go*
GAME   WA R D E N S H 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
({
 s\
r-
Z
<
n
z
0
E
Ej
i
GO
D
Divisions
Wardens
Detach mer
z
u
1
o
0
I.  5
<
1-
k
S       0
«    "o
0
0
«
I
J
in
Id
J
u
<
D
h
0
(j
C
z
CD
<  • •
1	
 J
4>
r
A
<*8
F
..j
tf.:\ a
V\   <
• - -\   K
V
V
r-.r
\-
VICTORIA,   B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Bayfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.
S'2'5-827-8927

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0226064/manifest

Comment

Related Items