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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1924]

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 PROVINCE  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN
TEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1923
PRINTED   BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chabi.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1924.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Ntchol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Beport of the Brovincial Game
Warden for the year ended December 31st, 1923.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., February 2nd, 1924.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General. Provincial Game Warden's Office,
Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1924.
Honourable A. M. Manson, K.G., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Beport for the year which ended
December 31st, 1923.
I have the honour to be, x
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. II. McMULLIN,
Provincial Game Warden. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Report— Page.
Summary  7
Game Animals   7
Fur-bearing Animals  9
Game Birds  0
Noxious Animals and Birds   10
Protection   11
Propagation  13
Acknowledgments   11
Fur-trade Regulations  11
Bounty Regulations  15
Game Regulations  15
Accidents  15
Revenue  16
Appendix A.—Financial—
Revenue from Resident Firearms Licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1923   19
Revenue from Resident Firearms Licences from June 1st to December 31st, 1923  20
Revenue from Non-resident Firearms Licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1923   21
Revenue from Non-resident Firearms Licences from June 1st to December 31st, 1923  22
Revenue from Big-game Trophy Fees from January 1st to December 31st, 1923   23
Revenue from Fur-traders' Licences and from Royalty or Tax on Fur from January
1st to May 31st, 1923   25
Revenue from Fur-traders' Licences and from Royalty or Tax on Fur from June 1st to
December 31st, 1923  26
Revenue from Guides' Licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1923   19
Revenue from Guides' Licences from June 1st to December 31st, 1923   20
Revenue from Taxidermists' Licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1923   25
Revenue from Taxidermists' Licences from June 1st to December 31st, 1923   26
Particulars of Skins on which Royalty paid from January 1st to May 31st, 1923   27
Particulars of Skins on which Royalty paid from June 1st to December 31st, 1923   2S
Appendix B.—Enforcement of the " Game Act "—
Prosecutions   29
List of Skins confiscated  32
List of Firearms confiscated  33
t
Disposition of Confiscated Skins  33
Accidents with Firearms  31
Appendix C.—Officers and Guides—
List of Provincial Police Officers   35
List of Guides    39
Appendix D.—Regulations and Bounties—
Bounties paid during 1923  41
Pelts surrendered for Bounty  42
Game Regulations, 1923   41
Shaw Creek Game Reserve   50
Nelson, Hardy, and Captain Islands Game Reserve  50  REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1923.
I am pleased to be able to report that the year ended December 31st, 1923, has been a very
successful one in respect to the enforcement of all the provisions of the " Game Act" ; the
revenue derived from the sale of game licences and fees amounting to the sum of $182,233.68,
which is the largest annual amount yet derived from this source, being $4,028.29 more than that
obtained from the same source during the year 1922, and nearly three times the amount derived
during 1917.
During 1923 a total of 309 informations were' laid for infractions of the " Game Act,"
resulting in 280 convictions, the fines imposed amounting to the sum of $5,676.50; twenty-four
firearms being confiscated, together with 140 beaver, 56 marten, 9 mink, 103 muskrat, 14 weasel,
3 bear, 8 racoon, and 7 wolf pelts.
Particulars in tabular form of all prosecutions under the " Game Act" during 1923 are
given in Appendix B, on page 29 of this report, and similar particulars relative to pelts or skins
and firearms confiscated are given on pages 32 and 33 respectively, while particulars of the
disposition of the confiscated fur is given on page 33.
The Provincial Police Force, who administer the " Game Act" as part of their duties,
consisted on December 31st, 1923, of 170 regular officers, which during the open game season
were augmented by 24 Special Constables, who were employed solely on game-protection duties.
A list of the regular officers above referred to is given, in Appendix C on page 35 of this report.
The following statistics in tabular form relative to prosecutions under the " Game Act"
and revenue derived from the sale of game licences and fees from 1917 to 1923, inclusive, gives
a brief comparison, and shows the steady increase in connection with the revenue derived from
this Act from 1917 to date:—
Calendar Year.
i 13
cS-j
a~
rt  K
£ a
a.2
C/3
Fl
o
">
a
o
u
a
at
t/3T3
■d
Q3
« -Jh
03 C3
M 5
Ota
13
a g
Is
u fl
V o
Ui «
a; O
ii
■Revenue
derived
from the Sale
of Game
Licences
and Fees.
1917    	
1918	
1919       .  ..
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
97
107
242
266
312
317
280
4
9
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
5
36
46
74
44
24
$1,763 50
3,341   00
6,024 50
6,073 00
6,455 00
7,275 00
5,676 50
$ 65,487 50
75,537 00
116,135 00
1920 	
1921	
137,587 39*
139,437 80*
1022 	
1923	
178,205 39*
182,233 68*
* Including fur-tax.
For convenience I am dividing this report into the following sections:—
Section I.—Game Animals.
Section II.—Fur-bearing Animals.
Section III.—Game Birds.
Section IV.—Noxious Animals and Birds.
Section V.—Protection.
Section VI.—Propagation.
SECTION I.—GAME ANIMALS.
Bear.—In that portion of " A " Division situated on the Mainland there is no doubt but that
these animals are on the increase, and judging from the number killed during the open season
I do not think any further restrictions, other than the regulations in force at the present time,
should-be placed on bear. The chief reason for this increase is, without a doubt, the elimination
of trapping.
On Vancouver Island and the islands adjacent thereto bear appear to be fairly plentiful in
certain parts, particularly in the mountain valleys in the Cowichan Lake District. There are
also a few black bear in the Duncan District, and in this particular portion of the Province
I am of the opinion that the season for bear should be closed. Y 8 British Columbia. 1924
In " B " Division black and grizzly bear are numerous, and in " C " and " D " Divisions they
seem to be holding their own well.
Caribou.—Inspector Parsons states that reports received by him confirm the presence of
caribou in large herds north of the Canadian National Railway (Grand Trunk Pacific Division),
west of the Rocky Mountains, and also points out that the reactive value of Colonel Rogers's
game enforcement in the Jasper National Park cannot be overestimated.
-Deer.—In " A " Division deer appear to be plentiful in most parts, which is mainly to be
attributed to the " buck " law. For instance, Bowen Island, which is easily reached from the
City of Vancouver, has been hunted for years, yet deer are more plentiful on this island this
year than for a number of years past. Probably the most hunted district in this portion of the
Province is on the islands in Howe Sound, Bowen and Gambier Islands, which are the chief
points where excessive hunting is carried on by Vancouver and outside sportsmen. In the
Highland District of Vancouver Island deer are plentiful, due to two years' closed season. Some
very fine specimens of deer were obtained by hunters during the open season, some weighing
from 140 to as much as 1S5 lb. each.
In the Nanaimo District deer are more numerous than they have been for several years past
owing to the close season for the female, and more particularly to the almost complete eradication
of pit-lamping owing to the strict enforcement of the Act and the heavy penalty.
In " B " Division black and white-tailed deer are numerous. Reports of game killed during
the open season might not indicate this owing to the fact that during the early part of the
season extremely dry weather prevailed, with the result that little hunting was done and any
hunters venturing out met with very little success, but as the open season extended beyond the
dry spell hunters who went out in the latter part of the season in many cases obtained their
bag limit. At this juncture I would like to state that few infractions of the " buck " law in
" B " Division were brought to the attention of this Department. Some hunters from Nelson,
however, who were hunting in the Kettle River Valley brought to the attention of Inspector
Dunwoody the fact that Indians hunting in that locality had killed several does, which under
the provisions of section 9 of the " Game Act" they had the right to do. This matter was drawn
to the attention of the Game Conservation Board through Mr. Guimout, a member of that body,
with the result that the Act was amended to prohibit Indians from killing doe deer at any time.
In " C " and " D " Divisions deer remain much the same. Along the Coast in " D " Division
hunters appear to have very little trouble in procuring bag limits.
Elk.—In " A " Division the herds of elk in the Shaw Creek, Upper Nanaimo, and L'pper
Nitinat Valleys of Vancouver Island are now estimated at about 300 head. Smaller bands exist
in the Little Nitinat River (Francis Lake), headwaters of Nixon Creek, and San Juan River,
also at Quatsino, Comox, and north of Home Lake.
In " B " Division a short season was declared open in the Elk River Game Reserve, and from
reports to hand a conservative estimate would place the number of these animals killed at
twenty-five. They were reported plentiful and in excellent condition, and in my opinion, from
the view-point of game conservation, it is very gratifying to have such a game sanctuary.
In " C " Division the elk which were recently introduced to the Yalakom Game Reserve are
doing very well.
Mountain-goat and Mountain-sheep.—In the Mainland portion of " A " Division there is no
doubt that mountain-goat are increasing and are well adapted for the purpose of protecting
themselves.
Fewer mountain sheep and goat were killed this season in " B " Division than in the last few
years. This is not an indication of a decrease in these species, but is due entirely to the fact
that, owing to the open season on elk, game-hunters devoted most of their attention to procuring
one of these latter specimens.
In " C " Division these animals seem to be increasing and in the Whitewater portion of this
division mountain-sheep are numerous and doing well.
In " D " Division mountain-goat are doing well, and in the Coast portions of this division
no trouble seems to be experienced by hunters in obtaining their bag limit of mountain-goat.
Moose.—In " B " Division there is a very decided increase in these animals, while in " C "
Division they appear to be also on the increase and are gradually coming farther south.
In " D " Division from what information can he obtained from Indians and old-time residents,
there were never more of these animals than at the present time. 14 Geo. 5 Report of Provincial Game Warden. Y 9
SECTION II.—FUR-BEARING ANIMALS.
In " A " Division the beaver are nearly exterminated, and in order to protect this very
valuable fur-bearer a closed season should still be kept in effect. Wolverine and fisher are also
very scarce and the number of marten appeared to be at its lowest limit, due no doubt to the
normal periodic fluctuation so pronounced in this animal. The trapping season this year on
marten was very poor, the weather conditions making trapping impossible for part of the open
season. Racoon and otter have maintained their numbers well throughout " A" Division,
although otter are not present in all parts of the division. Weasel or ermine are fairly plentiful
in most parts and mink are about holding their own.
On the Mainland portion of " A " Division, muskrat or musquash are very plentiful and the
present regulations seem to be satisfactory for their protection, but on Vancouver Island muskrat
appear to be entirely absent, with the exception of a small number which were liberated in the
Cowichan Lake District, and which I am pleased to state are doing well. From various reports
received it would appear that otter and mink are responsible for the killing of a large number
of muskrats each year. There are no skunk on Vancouver Island, but in some parts of the
Mainland portions of " A " Division they are quite numerous.
In " B " Division fur-bearing animals are now protected by a closed season, and although
there may be a demand in some sections for a reopening of trapping, it does not seem to be
advisable that trapping should be reopened, as any data I have secured in this connection, except
in a few isolated instances, show a serious depletion in this division of these animals, and this
also applies to that portion of " C " Division lying to the south of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
In " D " Division the late opening dates have had an excellent effect, and while unprime
fur is still trapped, it is in lesser quantities than formerly.
SECTION III.—GAME BIRDS.
In the Mainland portion of " A" Division pheasants were never so plentiful as this year,
due to a certain extent, no doubt, to the early release of a large amount of breeding stock by
the Department. The shooting season was exceptionally good owing to weather conditions and
the larger amount of hunters out after these birds. On Vancouver Island pheasants on the whole
are fairly plentiful.
In the North Vancouver District blue grouse have decreased in numbers to a great extent,
due to the inroads made upon them by campers during the summer months and also by stray
cats, while on Vancouver Island these birds are fairly plentiful in most parts.
The willow-grouse are increasing in some localities on the Mainland, while on Vancouver
Island, particularly in the Sooke Lake and Highland Districts, which seem to be a favourite
ground for this bird, they are fairly plentiful, few being shot during the open season on account
of weather conditions being against good hunting.
In the Delta Municipality quail are on the increase and the birds liberated in North
Vancouver and Surrey Municipalities are doing well. On Vancouver Island quail suffered rather
severely on account of the heavy snow in February and are, generally speaking, below normal.
In places where there was plenty of broom they came through fairly well, but where there was
no broom they were almost exterminated. However, they did well during the breeding season
of this year and are showing up well for 1924. The bob-white quail which were turned out at
the Uplands, Victoria, about three years ago seem to have disappeared. Two or three of these
birds were seen the following year, but since then none have been seen or heard of.
In the Delta Municipality excellent shooting was obtained on partridge, and oh Vancouver
Island these birds are plentiful and increasing in number, but are chiefly to be found in the
North and South Saanich Districts. They are able to stand a great amount of cold weather
and consequently were not affected by the cold spell in February, 1923.
Ducks throughout " A" Division are in good numbers and appear to be increasing. The
hunting season this fall for all migratory birds has been poor owing, no doubt, to weather
conditions, as since the season closed they have been seen in thousands, in most parts of the
division which they frequent, the weather having been very suitable.
The season for geese and brant has not been up to the average this year, but a large
number of these birds have also been seen this fall, particularly in the Richmond and Delta
Municipalities, and on Sidney Spit  (Sidney Island)  and Patricia Bay, Vancouver Island. Y 10 British Columbia. 1924
Snipe and plover seem to be on the increase and are fairly plentiful in most parts of " A "
Division. The kildeer plover were exceptionally plentiful in the Vancouver District, and a
number of these birds were shot, although a close season was in effect, resulting in a number of
prosecutions being conducted for violations of this nature.
Probably the most important item of interest is the report of a number of swans in the
Vancouver District, which has not been the case during the past few years. A total of eight
birds were seen on Lake Lucille, but unfortunately one of these birds was shot and mortally
wounded. It is to be regretted that hunters do not take more care in what they shoot at,
as if this was the case we would be certain of having these swans with us each year and they
would no doubt increase in numbers.
In " B " Division game birds, particularly blue and willow grouse, were plentiful in most
parts. In some parts of the East Kootenay owing to the prevailing wet weather during the
hatching season, and in the low-lying lands, fewer birds were hatched, although reports received
indicate that on the opening of the shooting season the birds were fully matured.
With reference to the pheasants and quail in the Okanagan and Keremeos Districts, it is
satisfactory to note that these birds have sufficiently increased to allow an open season without
seriously affecting their numbers, and I am satisfied that, particularly in regard to the Keremeos
District, these birds with reasonable protection are firmly established.
The flight of migratory birds in this division compares very favourably with former years,
and owing to the late fall these birds remained longer than usual.
In " C" Division the birds of the grouse family appear to be holding their own, but the
flight of water-fowl is decreasing from year to year. Pheasants have been introduced, and in
most localities are breeding and increasing in a satisfactory manner, the greatest difficulty being
experienced in the immediate vicinity of the City of Kamloops, probably on account of the lack
of suitable cover.
In " D" Division grouse are exceedingly plentiful. The closure on prairie-chicken at
Vanderhoof is producing the effect intended, so that a short open season may be safely considered
within the next few years.
At Prince George the Mongolian pheasants hatched from eggs supplied by the Game
Conservation Board did well, and great credit is due to Mr. J. H. Johnson, who undertook their
upkeep and supervision. If it is possible to satisfactorily acclimatize this species, the nature
of the country will, in itself, offer sufficient protection. The pheasants placed by the Game
Conservation Board on Queen Charlotte Islands have multiplied to an enormous extent and
seem to be doing particularly well, while geese and ducks, so far as quantity is concerned,
are greatly benefiting by the " Migratory Birds Convention Act."
SECTION IV.—NOXIOUS ANIMALS AND BIRDS.
Cougars are now comparatively scarce throughout " A " Division. A few years ago they
were quite abundant, but persistent hunting and possibly an epidemic of disease has very much
reduced their numbers. A few wolves are still to be found in the more mountainous parts of
this division and one wolf was killed in the Pitt Meadows District early in the spring. I am
sorry to state that the coyote has again made its appearance on the Lower Mainland. Dogs that
are allowed to run at large during the breeding season are also responsible for the destruction
of a good many young birds. It is almost impossible for officers to catch these dogs in many
cases, as after they have been allowed to run in the bush for a short time they become very
wild and cannot be caught. There is no doubt that the domestic house-cat is one of the worst
offenders in the destruction of game birds. Campers and loggers are to some extent responsible
for this situation, as, after ceasing their camping or logging operations, they leave cats behind
to forage for themselves, and after a few days in the bush these eats become wild and feed
mainly on the insectivorous game birds. Crows are another source of worry, as there is no
doubt but that they destroy quite a number of the eggs of song, game, and insectivorous birds,
as well as the young of these birds.
From reports received there are still quite a few cougar in " C " Division, and these animals
do more harm to mule-deer than any other thing that deer have to contend with. Coyotes,
I am sorry to state, seem to be increasing slightly in this division, and on the Clinton Plateau
the great horned owl is also on the increase, while in " D " Division timber-wolves are again
reported to be prevalent north of the Grand Trunk Pacific in the Fort George Police District. 14 Geo. 5 Keport of Provincial Game Warden. Y 11
SECTION V.—PROTECTION.
On Vancouver Island one of the most important events of the year was the creation of the
Shaw Creek Game Reserve, consisting of about 37 square miles. This reserve affords complete
protection to bands of wapiti or elk, whose main wintering-grounds and summer feeding-grounds
are situated within the confines of this area. It also affords protection to large numbers of
deer and game birds. A full description of this reserve is given in Appendix D on page 50 of
this 4-eport.
In the Mainland portion of "A" Division the setting apart of Nelson, Hardy, and Captain
Islands as a game reserve was also a good step in game conservation, as these islands afford
protection to a large number of deer, particularly Hardy Island. Particulars of the Order in
Council, dated July 21st, 1923, creating this game reserve are given in Appendix D on page 50
of this report.
In " B " Division the main achievement during the year, in so far as game conservation is
concerned, was the marking of the boundaries of the Elk River Game Reserve and the extension
of territory of the game reserve north of the West Arm of Kootenay Lake, opposite the City of
Nelson. Owing to the fact that this game reserve was so ill-defined it was a source of considerable annoyance to big-game hunters. The marking of the reserve, which was done by Constables
Brown, Thomas, and Grainger, was attended by many difficulties and is now very complete, with
the exception of the northern part, which is naturally and well defined by high mountain ranges.
In the report of Constable Brown, which is quoted hereunder, it is suggested that two cabins
be built—one at Monroe Lake and one at the mouth of Crossing Creek—for the purpose of
maintaining an organized game patrol and also to allow access to the heart of the game reserve
in the case of forest fires. The latter, in my opinion, is very important in the matter of game
preservation, as during the month of August Constable Brown extinguished two fires on the
game reserve which had been caused by lightning.
" On July 26th I went to Natal in company with Constable Thomas, where I procured
provisions and proceeded to the south-east corner of the game reserve, where Brule Creek
joins the Elk River. Starting from this point we marked the southern boundary. We found
this a difficult piece of work, as the country is all windfall or brule and the old trail almost
obliterated by slides and snow-brush. Along Norboe Creek we lost much time getting our horses
and outfit through, one horse falling down the mountain-side. Rain, sleet, and snow also
impeded our progress. On the summit we erected a cairn, and discovered that Brule Creek
has no south fork and that Norboe Creek, rising in a glacier, flows due north for nearly 2 miles,
then turns at a right angle and flows west. At this angle I placed the first post on this creek,
as shown on my map accompanying this report. This pass (which I have named Dunwoody
Pass) is a natural boundary from Spiller Lake (also named by me) to the angle of Norboe Creek.
" At the junction of Norboe Creek and the Bull River I placed a corner post (blazed on a
large spruce-tree) marked ' South-west corner of the Elk River Game Reserve,' cut in with
a knife.
" It was originally my intention to ascend the Bull River as far as its head and then proceed
to Monroe Lake and to Blackfoot Creek via East Fork of White River, but after working up
the Bull River some 15 or 18 miles, we found it too difficult, owing to extraordinary spring
floods having washed away all semblance of a trail, and also encountering muskeg and windfalls.
We therefore posted the western boundary to this point and returned, intending to go in by
Lost (or Crossing) Creek.
" On August 10th, while we were away from camp clearing away a flide which had blocked
the trail, bears raided our camp, cleaning up all our food, tearing our tent into ribbons, and
destroying most of our clothing. I may mention that this part of the reserve is fairly swarming
with bears, elk, and other large animals.    Goats are also very numerous.
" We returned to Natal, reaching there August 13th, and meeting Constable Brindley, who
was going to Fernie by car, accompanied him and reported to Chief Constable Spiller in person.
On August 14th we proceeded to Round Prairie after purchasing a new tent and fresh supplies.
Here we found good horse-feed and camped, our intention being to go up Crossing Creek and
over the summit to Monroe Lake. AVith great difficulty we cleared about 8 miles of this trail;
then we encountered so many slides and windfalls that it was folly for two men (William
Bovine, who was with us, remained only four days) to attempt to clear them in the time at our
disposal.    We therefore proceeded to mark the eastern boundary.    This we marked to a point Y 12 British Columbia. 1924
on the summit of the range opposite the head of Iron Creek, and on September 2nd we returned
to Fernie and reported to the Fernie Office.
" Constable Thomas went to Canal Flats to accompany Game Warden Grainger. On September 5th, accompanied by Joe Cosley, I proceeded to Natal and thence to the northern end
of the eastern boundary. I reached Riverside on September 12th, and leaving the horses
proceeded up Couillard Creek (West Fork), following an old trail to the summit. I tried to
work north after posting the low divide, but found the summit too high and the glaciers too
dangerous to cross. I therefore turned south and crossed the McDonald and Abruzzi Glaciers,
marking the boundary as shown on the accompanying map. You will note that the game reserve
is now marked at all points of ingress on the western, southern, and eastern boundaries.
" I regret that there is not a good trail into the reserve at Crossing Creek; the divide is
low here and a good trail could be made which would give the Game Warden a chance to reach
the heart of the reserve in a few hours. A cabin at Round Prairie and another at Monroe Lake
would not cost much and would be invaluable for the proper patrolling of this section. A fire
once started near the head of Bull River would destroy the whole reserve. Immediately to the
north of Crossing Creek is a high basin which probably contained more mountain-sheep than
any other spot in North America. A trail to Monroe Lake would make it nearly impossible for
a poacher to reach this basin without being caught. I do not think it wise to have too many
trails into the reserve; in fact, I think one on the eastern side is plenty, but that one, together
with two cabins, one at Round Prairie and one at Monroe Lake, is badly needed, and I think the
Department should be urged to have this work done next year. The danger from fire alone would
warrant the comparatively small expense.
" I would further suggest that notices be printed warning persons that they are on the game
reserve. You will see by the map that a public highway runs through the reserve. These notices
should be large and conspicuously posted all over the reserve.
" If properly watched and patrolled, the Elk River Game Reserve will in a few years be
the finest sanctuary for big game and wild life in Canada."
Among the special patrols which have been made in connection with game in " C " Division,
the principal one was made by Constable H. C. Clarke, of Hanceville, Chilcotin, who proceeded
into the Whitewater country,to prevent by his presence and supervision any wanton destruction
of game by prospectors who had been attracted to that locality by the reports of rich strikes
which had occurred there, and who reported upon his return, amongst other things, that sheep
were numerous and'doing well in that locality.
In " D " Division perhaps the most important special patrol was carried out by Constables
Forfar and Barber. Leaving the Peace River, these officers patrolled to Fort Nelson, covering
in all some 80O miles of trail, and some of the more interesting features of their report are
submitted hereunder:—
" Leaving Fort St. John on August 30th, 1923, we arrived at the mouth of Conroy Creek on
September 15th, distance about 225 miles, the last 60 of which quite a bit of cutting had to be
done to get the horses through, as there was not a trail leading down the Conroy. Instructions
were to proceed over Treaty Trail, but on account of having received information that the river
was not navigable between the point where the old Treaty Trail came out on the Nelson and
the mouth of the Conroy, coupled with the fact that a boat could be procured at the Conroy and
arrangements made for care of the horses while we were down the river, we decided to proceed
down the Nelson by boat.
" On arrival at the mouth of Conroy Creek we hired a boat and boatman to assist in carrying
the boat over gravel-bars and pole back up-river, which owing to the state of water turned out
to be a slow and tedious job. Leaving the mouth of Conroy Creek on September 17th, we
arrived at Fort Nelson on September 21st, distance 125 miles. There are two trading-posts at
Fort Nelson—namely, Hudson's Bay Co. and Lamson. Ltd., of Edmonton. Regarding white
trappers, there are at present only nine in the entire district between the mouth of the Conroy
and the boundary of the North-West Territories, all of whom took out trapper's licences. The
estimated number of Indians in the same locality are: Hunters, 92; total, including women and
children, about 350.
" The country from Fort St. John to the head of Conroy Creek showed many signs of lynx
and fox, with fresh beaver cuttings on the boggy and slow-flowing creeks flowing into the North
Pine River, but beaver are far from plentiful and this section of the country would carrj^ many 14 Geo. 5 Beport of Provincial Game Warden. Y 13
more, as their favourite food, the poplar and willow, is plentiful. The many old beaver dams
and cuttings, now rotten, show that at one time there were many more heaver than there are
now. The marten, favouring as he does the big stretches of dark spruce timber, would not. be
plentiful in this section, there having been too many fires, and only in places that are naturally
protected by muskeg or creek is there any of the old forest left. In these places there no
doubt are a few marten, but the number would not be large. We were told there is a country
to the east where marten are more plentiful. Bear are not very plentiful, but this would not
necessarily indicate any decrease in their numbers, as at this time of the year they frequent
the hillsides and open places of the larger rivers on account of the toerry-crop being more
plentiful. There are a few moose, but, judging from the signs seen along the route, should say
they are far from plentiful.    There are very few signs of deer in this section.
" From the head of Conroy Creek to its mouth lynx and fox are plentiful. Beaver are
scarce, but this section has never carried so many beaver as the country to the south because
the food of the beaver is not so plentiful, it being a spruce and jack-pine country. It was in
this section we saw alder cut by beaver, a thing he would not do unless driven to it by the
scarcity of his favourite food. In the valley of the Conroy there are fine stretches of spruce
timber and on the high land east of the creek good spruce stretches as far as the eye can see.
This country has not been trapped to any extent and marten are plentiful. Along the creek mink
signs are plentiful and become more so as we approach the Nelson River. There are a few moose,
but they are not plentiful. There are not so many bear as on the Peace River. There are a few
deer, supposed to be white-tail, but we did not see any. Wolf-tracks are numerous, far more
than is good for the deer and moose. f
" From the mouth of Conroy Creek to Fort Nelson was travelled by boat. Beaver were very
scarce, but as they prefer the quiet, slow side-streams, the scarcity of signs on the Nelson River
would be no indication of their numbers through the country in general. Judging from the
amount of beaver bought in Fort Nelson and information picked up, they are certainly not as
plentiful as they ought to be. The river is tracked on both sides from one end to the other
by mink; they are everywhere, along the mud, up the side-streams, and on any piece of ground
soft enough to take the impression of a track. Fox and lynx are fairly plentiful, there being lots
of rabbits. Marten are in fair numbers in the heavy timber on both banks. The moose looked
scarce going down, but in coming back the rutting season was in full swing and the tracks of
the wandering bulls were frequently seen where he had crossed the river in his search for a
fight or a harem. A few deer-tracks were seen, supposed to be white-tail. Wolf-tracks were
common.    There are a few otter, but they do not appear to be plentiful."
Constable Van Dyk also made an arduous canoe trip of several hundred miles from Fort
George to Fort Grahame, on the Finlay River, while Constable Martin carried out a thousand-
mile patrol to the Atlin and Taku River areas.
SECTION VI.—PROPAGATION.
There is no doubt but that the practice of liberating pheasants, quail, etc., each year has
been very successful, and in this connection I would recommend that due notice be given to the
sporting public when and where birds are liberated.
In " A " Division the game birds which were liberated during the year appear to have done
exceedingly well, as well as the muskrats which were liberated at Cowichan Lake.
In " B " Division, whether the present system of game conservation is responsible or not,
the fact remains that reports from all sources indicate a very decided increase in all species of
big game.
In " C " Division the only established game reserve is the Yalakom, which is the natural home
of the mountain-sheep and in which elk, which have been recently introduced, are doing well.
There are three areas in " C " Division which I would suggest be laid aside as game reserves,
namely :—
The Bowron Lake quadrangle, particularly suitable for moose;
The Momitch Lake Country, near Adams Lake, particularly suitable for mule-deer;   and
The Paul Lake Reserve, a small section of country near Kamloops, more particularly
suitable for water-fowl.
Fairly complete reports on all these game areas are available, and as very little expense
would be attached to their being properly established it would seem that now is the time while Y 14 British Columbia. 1924
the game is there, and before any influx of settlers embarrass the Government by squatting or
trying to pre-empt on these areas which are really not suitable in any way for agricultural
purposes, but on which the presence of game will attract a certain class to settle.
Twenty miles north and south of the Canadian Pacific Railway in " C " Division extends a
strip of Dominion lands known as the " 20-Mile Belt," and in this strip the Dominion Government
have laid aside a certain number of suitable tracts of land of different areas for forest and game
reserves. In most instances the boundaries of these reserves are cut out and defined. The
Dominion Government naturally do not take any serious steps to protect the game on these
reserves and hunters are allowed free access, but the Provincial Government would have a
sympathetic co-operation from them if it was thought advisable to close any of these for a certain
number of years, and I should consider it advisable to give the game animals a chance to
recuperate on some of these reserves toy closing them to hunters for a period of, say, two years,
the choice of the particular reserve or reserves to be closed to be governed by the report of
sportsmen, Forest Rangers, or Game Wardens familiar with them.
At the present time there are two game reserves in " D " Division—the Fort George Game
Reserve and the Kunghit Reserve on the Queen Charlotte Islands. Other reserves are needed,
particularly on the Taku and Stikine Rivers, hut unless special provision for their control is
made the mere creation of a " map reserve " is not recommended.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
Owing to the splendid work of all officers under my command this has been a very successful
year, as although there were less informations laid *or infractions of the Act this year in comparison with last year, the success of the enforcement of the law cannot be measured entirely
by the number of informations laid or convictions recorded, but rather by the prevention of such
violations. I also wish to express my appreciation to the Chairman, Secretary, and members of
the Game Conservation Board for their assistance and co-operation during the year, as well as to
all sportsmen who have the interests of the game of this Province at heart.
FUR-TRADE REGULATIONS.
The royalty or tax payable pursuant to section 30 of the " Game Act" during the year 1923
was as follows :—
(a.)   On each bear   $0 40    On each mink     ?0 25
„        beaver     1 00 „        muskrat or musquash          05
fisher       1 50 „        otter      1 00
„        fox, silver or black      5 00 „        racoon           10
„        fox, cross      1 50 „        skunk          10
„        fox, red          75 „        wolverine    ■-         50
„        lynx         75 „        weasel         03
„        marten      1 00
The amount of fur-tax collected under these regulations amounted to the sum of $60,594.18,
and particulars showing the number and variety of pelts or skins on which this amount was
collected is given in Appendix A on page 27 of this report. 14 Geo. 5
Eeport op Provincial Game Warden.
Y 15
For purposes of comparison a table showing skins on which fur-tax has been collected since
the Fur-trade Regulations came into effect on June 1st, 1020, is given hereunder:—
Variety.
June 1st to
Dec. 31st,
1920.
Jan. 1st to
Dee. 31st,
1921.
Jan. 1st to
Dec. 31st,
1922.
Jan. 1st to
Dec. 31st,
1923.
900
271
222
148
2
32
60
250
1,869
1,745
17,992
132
181
66
5,746
105
353
10
2,481
68
1,965
695
62
256
292
1,215
11.123
10,601
71,647
661
2,651
363
25,958
117
354
76
99
113
2,127
26,359
3,688
536
88
356
443
1,855
12,181
18,932
139,232
915
6,069
715
24,603
244
298
273
1,397
32,212
431
575
Fox, silver....   	
114
422
Fox, red 	
650
2,666
10,043
Mink	
19,276
127,846
Otter      	
832
5,204
Skunk..  	
813
37,408
Wolf - -	
27
216
82
112
Totals   -    -  -- 	
30,196
 I
130,797
238,914
240,214
BOUNTY REGULATIONS.
The Bounty Regulations approved by Order in Council No. 1473 of December Sth, 1022, were
amended as on and from the 1st day of January, 1023, by adding the following proviso, namely:—
" Provided always that to receive the bounty claimed in respect of coyotes and wolves the
whole pelt of such animal must be forfeited to the Government."
And on June 22nd, 1923, a further amendment to take effect as and from the 1st day of
July, 1923, was made by striking out clause (6), section 1, of the regulations of December Sth,
1922, and substituting therefor the following, namely :—
"In respect of each timber-wolf (black or grey), not less than one week old when killed,
fifteen dollars ($15)."
The provision made for the surrendering of the pelts of coyotes and wolves to the Government as stated above was also rescinded as and from the 1st day of July, 1923.
A table showing the bounties paid by the various Government Agents throughout the
Province is given in Appendix D on page 41 of this report. The total bounties paid during the
year 1923 amounted to the sum of $14,S40, covering 162 wolves, 195 cougars, 1,687 coyotes, 172
owls, 70 magpies, and 20 eagles.
GAME REGULATIONS.
The usual regulations in respect to the open seasons for 1923 were made on July 18th, 1923,
and such regulations are shown in full in Appendix D on page 44 of this report.
These regulations were amended on August 31st, 1923, and such amendment is given on
page 48 hereof. A further amendment was made in respect to pheasants on October 5th, 1923,
which is shown in Appendix D on page 49 hereof, and on November 6th, 1923, an amendment
was made relative to fur-bearing animals, which is shown in full in Appendix D on page 49.
ACCIDENTS.
It is with regret that I have to report that during the year 1923 there were three accidents
to hunters. Two of these were not serious, while the third accident was fatal. The fatal
accident, however, was not due to the result of gunshot wounds, but was caused by a falling
tree;  therefore could not be attributed to the careless handling of firearms.    This year, however, Y 16
British Columbia.
1924
I am pleased to be able to state there has been a great decrease in the number of accidents
incurred by hunters during the open game season; as, for instance, during the year 1922 there
were fourteen accidents, resulting in a total of three deaths, and in 1919 there were twenty-three
accidents, resulting in ten deaths.
Particulars of the hunting accidents occurring during the year 1923 are shown in Appendix B
on page 34 of this report.
REVENUE.
During the year 1923, as has already been stated, the revenue derived from the sale of game
licences and from fees thereunder amounted to the sum of $182,233.68, or $4,028.29 more than the
amount received from a similar source during the year 1922; fur-tax amounting to the sum of
$60,594.18, as against $51,093.89 during 1922, or an increase of $9,500.29. While there was a
general falling-off in the purchase of resident firearms licences, there was an increase in the
amount of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences. For comparison a table is shown hereunder setting forth the numbers and amounts derived from the various licences issued during
the years 1922 and 1923, showing the increase or decrease, as the case may be, during these two
years :— 14 Geo. 5
Beport of Provincial Game Warden.
Y 17
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1924
In Appendix A of this report is given an analysis of the sources of revenue derived during
the year 1923, as follows:—
(a.)  From the sale of resident firearms licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1923
(page 19):
(6.)  From the sale of resident firearms licences from June 1st to December 31st, 1923
(page 20) :
(c.)  From the sale of non-resident firearms licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1923
(page 21) :
(d.) From the sale of non-resident firearms licences from June 1st to December 31st,
1923 (page 22) :
(e.)  From big-game trophy fees from January 1st to December 31st, 1923 (page 23) :
(/.)  From the sale of fur-traders' licences and from royalty or tax on fur from January
1st to May 31st, 1923 (page 25) :
(g.) From the sale of fur-traders' licences and from royalty or tax on fur from June
1st to December 31st, 1923 (page 20) :
(h.)  From the sale of guides' licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1923 (page 19) :
(i.)  From the sale of guides' licences from June 1st to December 31st, 1923 (page 20) :
(j.)  From the sale of taxidermists' licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1923 (page
25):
(fc.)  From the sale of taxidermists' licences from June 1st to  December 31st,  1923
(page 26). 14 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
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Report op Provincial Game Warden.
Y 33
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1923,
to December 31st, 1923.
Confiscated from.
Magistrate.
Date of
Confiscation.
Place of
Confiscation.
Kind
confiscated.
G. B. Robb (J.P.)	
G. B. Robb (J.P.)	
102;'
Oct.      22
19
Jan.     26
Mar.    29
Sept.      7
28
Oct.       1
25
April   19
Sept.   25
Feb.     15
8
May     10
Oct.     19
24
30
Nov.      3
Dec.       8
Nov.    26
April     7
7
Nov.     14
15
Feb.       8
1 rifle.
Clark, F..
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
C. H. Beevor-Potts	
C. H. Beevor-Potts	
C. H. Beevor-Potts	
1 rifle.
Mellish, C. W.
1 rifle.
J. Baird...             	
1 rifle.
G. H. Hill
1 rifle.
D. Ml McNeil (J.P.)	
L. H. Edmonds. 	
H. 0. Alexander 	
J. McKee	
Smith, —  (S.M.) 	
J. S. Finlay	
Araki, B.              	
1 rifle.
Joseph, C. F	
Coquitlam	
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
A. Deans 	
J. S. Jamieson	
R. J. Walker        	
Fukunago, G	
Ilavelock, T	
Edmonds	
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
Penticton	
Penticton  	
1 rifle.
Appelle, W.-.	
Pow, B ....
1 rifle.
Neville, T           	
G. Jay	
0. E. Dent             	
1 rifle.
Disposition of Pelts or Skins confiscated during the Year 1923.
Disposition.
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47
56
5
4
26
70
7
9
5
3
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7
Totals	
140
56
9
103
14
3
8
7 Y 34                                                  British Colombia.                                                  1924
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fiSO 14 Geo. 5 Report of Provincial Game Warden. Y 35
APPENDIX 0.
OFFICERS AND GUIDES.
List of Provincial Police Officers.
Superintendent I. H. McMulliii Headquarters, Victoria.
Assistant Superintendent W. Owen  „
Headquarters Staff.
Chief Clerk G. A. Hood Victoria.
Clerk * 0. Clark	
 H. H. Clarke	
 R. Peachey (C.I.D.)	
 W. J. Voisey (C.I.D.)	
 T. F. C. Salt.	
 - T. Conly (Game)         „
Motor Licence Department.
Clerk in Charge C. A. Booth Victoria.
Clerk G. H. Jennings         „
" A " Division.
Vancouver Subdivision.
Officer Commanding Sub-Inspector F. Cruickshank Vancouver.
Clerk J. C. Lowe 3         „
New Westminster District— „
Chief Constable ,T. McDonald New Westminster.
Acting Chief Constable..- J. Kelly	
Constable 0. H. Dawson  „
,. '     —-- - P. Corrigan  „
 J. Murray Port Moody.
 W. V. Fenton Langley Prairie.
 F. Brotighton Abbotsford.
 H. C. Pyke Chilliwack.
 A. H. Silk Mission.
 - W. J. Mcintosh Fort Langley.
, G. C. Sharpe Huntingdon.
Vancouver District—
Chief Constable S. North Vancouver.
Acting Chief Constable ...O. Wilkie         ,,
Constable....  J. W. Cruickshank         ,,
 J. P. M. Hannah	
 3 R. H. Tebb	
 R. A. Sims	
 W. H. Cameron Ladner.
 -.- F. J. A. King North Vancouver.
—-  --- S. S. Saunders Britannia.
  T. Renner Squamish.
 C. F. Kearns Vananda.
 A. C. Sutton Powell River.
 S. Marshall Quathiaski Cove.
 W. H. Hadley Alert Bay.
 A. W. Stone Rivers Inlet.
 - W. H. Handley Vancouver. Y 36
British Columbia.
1924
" A " Division—Continued.
V
ancouver- S ub d Ms ion—Continued.
Vancouver District—Continued.
Constable	
 E. McArthur	
...Vancouver.
....E. Baker	
33
 J. R. Shannon	
Launch " Watla."
...Vancouver.
 T. R. Baker	
 D. C. Campbell	
-        "
Victoria Subdivision.
Nanaimo District—
Chief Constable	
 A. T. Stephenson .*..
Nanaimo.
Constable	
 F. E. Bradner	
 A. D. I. Mustart	
„
 R. Marshall	
 W. V. Shepherd	
,,
 H. N. Wood	
Alberni.
i
 S. W. Dawson	
...Campbell River.
 J. A. Anderson	
... Clayoquot.
 J. Russell	
...Courtenay.
 R. M. Stewart	
„
 R. L. Matthews	
...Cumberland.
Victoria District—
...G. Williams	
...Port Alice.
Chief Constable	
 R. Owens	
...Victoria.
 M. C. McPhail	
„
 ,T. A. Smith	
,,
 W. J. Hatcher	
,,
 W. Kier	
..Duncah.
 J. N. Rogers	
...Ganges.
 F. Philp	
...Sidney.
 E. G. Stedharn	
...Duncan.
 G. B. Simpson	
...Cowichan Lake.
 R. Gidley	
Victoria.
" B " Division.
Officer Commanding	
W. R. Dunwoody	
...Nelson.
Divisional Clerk	
C. K. McKenzie	
,,
Boundary District—
Chief Constable	
J. A. Fraser	
Greenwood Dist. Hqrs.
Constable	
.1. M. Bella	
Greenwood.
Coalmont.
C. H. Martin	
D. A. McDonald	
...Fairview.
G. F. Killam	
...Grand Forks.
A. E. Spall	
...Keremeos.
W. B. Stewart	
...Midway.
Cranbrook District—
F. Fryer	
...Princeton.
Chief Constable	
G. C. Mortimer	
....Cranbrook Dist. Hqrs.
....Cranbrook.
G. Thomas           	
M. J. Condon	
...Kimberiey.
G. W. Donahoe	
...Wardner.
W. A. Walker	
...Yahk.
 H. McLaren	
Creston. 14 Geo. 5                       Report
of Provincial Game
Warden.                                Y 37
Fernie District—
Chief Constable	
Constable	
North-east Kootenay District—
Chief Constable	
" B " Division—Continued
G. H. Greenwood	
.. G. D. Mead	
 Fernie Dist. Hqrs.
 Fernie.
S. J. McNallv	
 Coal Creek.
...A. J. Smith	
. F. Brindley	
...F. G. Brown	
...I. J. Brown	
F. Yearbv	
 Elko.
 Natal.
 Waldo.
 Elk Prairie.
 Corbin.
...R. J. Sutherland	
...J. P. Green	
 Golden Dist. Hqrs.
 Golden.
West Kootenay District—
Chief Constable	
Constable	
...F. H. Butwell	
...F. F. O'Halloran	
...W. R. Henley	
 Arrowhead.
...G. H. Soles	
...H. Grainger	
...F. D. Markland	
...E. Gammon	
...H. W. King	
 Canal Flats.
 Revelstoke.
 Nelson Dist Hqrs.
 Nelson.
...C. F. Oland	
...P. W. Jupp	
...W. H. Laird	
 Kaslo.
 Nakusp.
 New Denver.
Officer Commanding	
...E. A. Vachon 	
 Salmo
...J. F. Johnston	
 Trail.
" C " Division.
.. W. L. Fernie	
 Kamloops.
Divisional Clerk	
Kamloops District—
Chief Constable	
Constable	
...E. Patterson	
...G. H. Adam	
...G. F. Bradley	
...W. E. Giles	
J. W. Chadwick
 Kamloops Dist. Hqrs.
 Kamloops.
...J. Urquhart	
...F. N. Emmott	
 Ducks.
 Mount Olie.
 Savona.
 Sicamous.
 Quesnel Dist. Hqrs.
 Quesnel.
 Barkerville.
 Clinton.
 Hanceville.
 Lillooet.
 Likely
...J. P. Eggleshaw	
...R. Pritchard	
Lillooet District—
Chief Constable	
Constable	
...A. 0. Minty	
...G. H. Clark	
...G. F. Turner	
...M. Gorman	
...H. C. Clarke	
...T. Higginbottom	
...D. G. McKenzie	
...Tan McRae	
...F. W. Gallagher	
...E. J. Breckon	
 Williams Lake.
 Vernon Dist. Hqrs.
 Vernon.
 Enderby.
Vernon District—
Chief Constable	
Constable	
...G. A. Carter	
...G. A. Johnson	
...J. M. Smith	
...P. Pentecost	
 Kelowna. Y 38 British Columbia. 1924
" C " Division—Continued.
Vernon District—Continued.
Constable J. J. McConnel! Penticton.
„        R. M. Robertson         „
Yale District-
Chief Constable R. W. Bowen Ashcroft Dist. Hqrs.
Constable J. Rankin Ashcroft.
, D. A. Hazelton Hope.
, W. Greenwood Lytton.
, P. Badman Merritt.
„        A. T. Regan North Bend.
" D " Division.
Officer Commanding T. W. S. Parsons Prince Rupert.
Divisional Clerk R. P. Ponder  „
Fort George District—
Chief Constable A. McNeill Prince George Dist. Hqrs.
Constable H. Avison Prince George.
 H. H. Mansell	
 T. Van Dyk 	
 C. Kench Hutton.
 A. F. Sinclair Lucerne.
 S. Service McBride.
Hazelton District—
Chief Constable Smithers Dist. Hqrs.
Constable W. J. Service Smithers.
 C. C. Canning         „
„        P. Carr Burns Lake.
 S. Cline Hazelton.
,,        A. Fairbairn Telkwa.
Peace River District—
Chief Constable Pouce Coupe Dist. Hqrs.
Constable , W. A. S. Duncan Pouce Coupe.
 C. G. Barber Fort St. John.
„        E. Forfar Hudson Hope.
 G. E. Ashton Rolla.
Prince Rupert District—
Chief Constable W. Spiller Prince Rupert Dist. Hqrs.
Constable H. Martin .■ Prince Rupert.
Senior Constable A. Saint  „
Constable A. Dryden Anyox.
 R. Webster Atlin.
 F. Islip Bella Coola.
 T. F. Harper-Reed Boundary.
 A. W. Collins : Masset.
 R. A. Beavan.. Ocean Falls.
 R. Gibson Port Essington.
 J. A. Williams Stewart.
 J. Gillies Alice Arm.
 C. A. Mancor Terrace.
 J. G. Blaney Firvale. 14 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
Y 39
List of Guides, Season 1923.
Atlin District.
Williams, T....
Williams, B...
Williams, F...
Noland, J. W.
.Atlin.
Johnson, G Atlin.
Williams, A. B     „
Murphy, N     „
Ward, J     „
Cassiar District.
Guillout, E. J...
Shorty, T	
Jackson, S	
Shangle, R. O...
Harrington, C.Frank, B	
Hyland, D	
Henyu,   P	
Fox, C	
Williams, G	
..Taku River.
. Boundary.
.Telegraph Creek.
McC'lusky, M Telegraph Creek,
Decker, L	
Frank, T	
Fann, B	
Dick, L	
Dougan, —	
Neustrada, J	
Inkster, D	
Fowler, J. J	
Conover, A. B Clearwater.
Hazelton District.
Hunodam, P Hazelton.
Austin, A. R	
Cochrane,  W	
Colebank, G. F...
Allgeier, L	
Goodell, W. R	
Goodell, T. R	
Renshaw, J. H...
Sweeney, W	
Johnson, O	
.Teslin Lake.
.Croydon.
.Woodpecker.
.Dunster.
.McBride.
Kibbee, F	
Cochrane, J. D..
Thompson, R	
. Barkerville.
Fort George District.
Woods, L. N. W McBride.
Lamma, L         „
Brittain, H         „
Anderson, F        „
Sykes, B. S Penny.
Hargreaves, F Lucerne.
Hargreaves, J        „
Hooker, J. B Dome Creek.
Barkerville District.
Mason, II Barkerville.
Thompson, N  „
Reed, F. de W	
Lillooet District.
Tyre, J	
Shield, S	
James, J	
Gott, F	
Gaspard, E	
Walters, L. E	
Gaspard, F	
Walters, G. H	
Patenaude, G. B..
Fletcher, J	
.Lillooet.
.Horsefly.
.Keithley Creek.
Hasbrouch, W. C Keithley Creek.
Shaver, F. W Likely.
Marquardt, W. J	
McGregor, H	
Mansfield, B	
Brammer, C	
McChesney, D	
FarIer,'G	
Hooker, F. C	
Phillipine, S Big Bar Creek.
Kootenay District.
Bergenham, P...
Aemmer, R	
Sheek, W. P	
Thomas, G	
Potts, W. G	
.Golden.
..Field. .
Nicol, A. H Fort Steele.
Nixon, W. J Invermere.
Schofield, B Winner.
Kain, C       „
Tegart, L       „ Y 40 British Columbia. 1924
Kootenay District—Continued.
Hook, W Fort Steele. Frearson, A Fernie.
White, J  „ Lum, G Athalmer.
Watt, J  „ McQuarrie, N Natal.
Nanaimo District.
Smith, J. C Comox.
Peace River District.
Garbett, H Hudson Hope. Thomas, J Hudson Hope.
Esswein, P  „
Prince Rupert District.
Heckmann, M Atnarko.
Vancouver District.
Mansell, F N. Vancouver. 14 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
Y 41
APPENDIX I).
REGULATIONS AND BOUNTIES.
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1923.
Government Agents.
XL
CD
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333
03
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333
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2
1
2
1
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21
1
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30
1
10
17
0
2
22
12
31
1
1
13
6
1
10
8
0
16
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16
16
1
1
3
4
1
11
1
25
118
4
5
	
7
$      680 00
3 00
131  00
Anyox	
Atlin	
1
149
73
2
34
25
62
14
272
5
199
17
6
34
208
112
14
116
1
3
8
30
10
141
151
683 00
226 00
1,080 00
Duncan	
Fernie  	
520 00
1,244 00
123 00
140 00
644 00
29 40
    1   	
785 00
53
8
8
50 00
398 00
400 00
375 60
397 00
1,647 00
449 00
      1     	
1.219 00
4
6
1
2
1
28 00
376 80
122 00
6 00
41 00
792 00
Victoria	
65 00
915 00
923 20
Williams Lake _	
347 00
162
195
1.687
172
70
20
$14,840 00
1
_| Y 42
British Columbia.
1924
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C2 Y 44 British Columbia. 1924
" GAME ACT."
Pursuant to the provisions of this Act, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has been pleased
to make regulations as follows:—
Game Regulations, 1923.
1. The prohibitions declared toy section 9 of the " Game Act," being chapter 33 of the Statutes
of 1914, as to the hunting, trapping, taking, wounding, and killing of game, are, subject to the
provisions of section 2 of these regulations, hereby removed to the extent and within the periods
and limits and subject to the provisions hereinafter set out respectively, as follows:—
For the purpose of denning the open season for big game, game birds, and trapping of fur-
bearing animals, the Province shall be divided into three districts, to be known as the Northern,
Eastern, and Western Districts.
" Northern District" shall mean and include the Electoral District of Atlin, and all that
portion of the Province situate and lying to the north of the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and to the east of the summit of the Cascade Mountains.
" Eastern District" shall mean and include all that portion of the Province situate and
lying to the east of the summit of the Cascade Mountains and south of the main line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
" Western District" shall mean and include all that portion of the Province situate and
lying to the west of the summit of the Cascade Mountains and south of the Electoral District
of Atlin.
Big Game.
(a.) Moose, of the male sex, in the Electoral Districts of Atlin, Fort George, and Omineca,
north of the main line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, open season from September 1st,
1923, to December 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In the Electoral Districts of Cariboo and those portions of the Omineca and Fort George
Electoral Districts situate and lying to the south of the main line of the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway, open season from September loth, 1923, to December 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive,
(ft.) Caribou, of the male sex, throughout the Province, except Queen Charlotte Islands, and
except all that portion of the Province, lying to the south and east of the main line of the
Canadian Northern Railway, open season from September 1st, 1923, to December 15th, 1923,
both dates inclusive.
(c.) Wapiti (Elk), of the male sex, in the Electoral Districts of Fernie, Cranbrook, and
Columbia, open season from October 1st, 1923, to October 20th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
(d.) Mountain-sheep, of the male sex, in that portion of the Province north of the main
line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, open season from September 1st, 1923, to November
15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In the Electoral Districts of Columbia, Cranbrook, and Fernie, open season from October 1st,
1923, to November 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In that portion of the Electoral District of Lillooet situate and lying to the west of the
Fraser River and to the south of the Hanceville-Clinton Wagon-road, from the Fraser River
Bridge at Churn Creek to the northern boundary of the Lillooet Electoral District, open season
from September 1st, 1923, to November 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
(e.) Mountain-goat, throughout the Eastern and Northern Districts, except that portion of
the Eastern District south of the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway, open season from
September 1st, 1923, to December 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In that portion of the Eastern District south of the main line of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, open season from September 15th, 1923, to December 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In the Western District, open season from September 15th, 1923, to December 15th, 1923,
both dates inclusive.
(f.) Bear, throughout the Northern District, open season from September 1st, 1923, to June
30th, 1924, both dates inclusive.
Throughout the Eastern District, open season from September 15th, 1923, to June 30th, 1924,
both dates inclusive.
Throughout the Western District, except that portion thereof known and defined as Vancouver Island, open season from September 1st, 1923, to June 15th, 1924, both dates inclusive. .1.4 Geo. 5 Report of Provincial Game Warden. Y 45
In that portion of the Western District known as Vancouver Island, open season from
November 1st, 1923, to May 31st, 1924, both dates inclusive.
Provided that no bear shall be trapped in any part of the Province.
(g.) Deer (Mule, White-tail, and Coast), bucks only, throughout the Northern and Eastern
Districts (except White-tail Deer in those portions of the Eastern District known as North and
South Okanagan, Similkameen, and Greenwood Electoral Districts), open season from September
15th, 1923, to December 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In the Western District, bucks only, except on Queen Charlotte Islands and those portions
of Vancouver Island known as North and South Saanich and Highland Districts, open season
from September 15th, 1923, to December 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
Fur-bearing Animals.
(h.) In the Northern and Eastern Districts, all fur-bearing animals (except Beaver), north
of the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway, open season from December 1st, 1923, to April
30th, 1924, both dates inclusive.
Beaver, in the Northern District and in the Electoral Districts of Prince Rupert, Omineca,
Cariboo, and Fort George situate and lying in the Eastern District, open season from December
1st, 1923, to April 30th, 1924, both dates inclusive.
In that portion of the Eastern District south of the main line of the Canadian Pacific
Railway there shall be a close season on all fur-bearing animals for a period of three years,
except in regard to Muskrats in the Columbia Electoral District.
Muskrats, in the Columbia Electoral District, situate and lying in the Eastern District, open
season from December 1st, 1923, to April 30th, 1924, both dates inclusive.
In the Western District all fur-bearing animals (except Beaver), open season from December
1st, 1923, to April 15th, 1924, both dates inclusive.
Beaver, in that portion of the Western District known as the Prince Rupert Electoral
District, open season from December 1st, 1923, to April 15th, 1924, both dates inclusive.
Game Birds.
(i.) Ducks (except Wood andEider Ducks), Wilson Snipe, Coots, Black-breasted and Golden
Plover, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, in the Northern and Eastern Districts, open season from
the loth day of September in any year to a date three months and fifteen days later, both dates
inclusive—namely, September 15th, 1923, to December 30th, 1923.
In the Western District (in that portion of the Western District to the north of the 53rd
parallel of latitude), open season from the first Saturday next following September 7th in any
year to a date three months and fifteen days later, 'both dates inclusive—namely, September Sth,
1923, to December 23rd, 1923.
In the Western District (in that portion of the Western District to the south of the 53rd
parallel of latitude), open season from October 1st, 1923, to January 15th, 1924, both dates
inclusive.
(/..) Geese and Brant, in the Northern and Eastern Districts, open season from September
loth, 1923, to December 30th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In the Western District (in that portion of the Western District to the north of the 53rd
parallel of latitude), open season from the first Saturday next following September 7th in any
year to a date three months and fifteen days later, both dates inclusive—namely, September Sth,
1923, to December 23rd, 1923.
In the Western District (in that portion of the Western District to the south of the 58rd
parallel of latitude), open season from the first Saturday next following November 7th in any
year to a date three months and fifteen days later, both dates inclusive—namely, November 10th,
1923, to February 25th, 1924.
(7c.) Grouse and Ptarmigan (except Prairie-chicken and Sharp-tailed Grouse), in the
Northern District and those portions of the Omineca, Fort George, and Cariboo Electoral Districts
situate and lying in the Eastern District, open season from September 1st, 1923, to November
15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In the remainder of the Eastern District, open season from September 15th, 1923, to October
15th, 1923, both dates inclusive. Y 46 British Columbia. 1924
Prairie-chicken and Sharp-tailed Grouse, in the Electoral District of Fort George, situate
and lying to the north and east of the Rocky Mountains, open season from September 7th, 1023,
to October loth, 1923, both dates inclusive.
Blue Grouse, in the Western District (except South Saanich and Highland Districts), open
season from September 15th, 1923, to October 31st, 1923, both dates inclusive.
Willoiv-grouse, in the Western District, in those portions of Vancouver Island known as the
Electoral Districts of Cowichan, Esquimau, and Saanich (except in the Municipality of Oak
Bay), and North Saanich District, open season from December 1st, 1923, to December 15th, 1923,
both dates inclusive.
Throughout the remainder of Vancouver Island and Islands Electoral District (except South
Saanich and Highland Districts), open season from September 15th, 1923, to October 31st, 1923,
both dates inclusive.
Throughout the remainder of the Western District, open season from October 15th, 1923. to
October 31st, 1923, both dates inclusive.
(I.) Quail, in the Eastern District, in those portions known as the Electoral Districts of
Similkameen and South Okanagan, open season from October 20th, 1923, to November 17th, 1923,
both dates inclusive.
In the Western District (California Quail only), in those portions known as the Electoral
Districts of Cowichan, Esquimau, Saanich (except Oak Bay Municipality), Nanaimo, Newcastle,
and the Islands Electoral District (except Saturna Island), open season from October loth,
1923, to November 30th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
(m.) Pheasants (except Golden and Silver Pheasants), in the Eastern District, cock birds
only, in the Electoral Districts of South Okanagan and Similkameen and in the Municipality
and District Municipality of Salmon Arm, open season from October 20th, 1923, to November
17th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In the Western District, in that portion thereof known and defined as Vancouver Island
(except in Oak Bay Municipality and the Electoral Districts of Alberni and Comox), and on
the Mainland and on Gabriola Island, open season from October 15th, 1923, to November 30th,
1923, both dates inclusive.
In that further portion of Vancouver Island known and defined as the Electoral District
of Alberni, south of the Little Qualicum River, and in the Electoral District of Comox, situate
and lying on Vancouver Island, open season from October 15th, 1923, to October 27th, 1923, both
dates inclusive.
In the Western District, in those portions of the Islands Electoral District known and defined
as Sidney, Moresby, Pender, Mayne, and Saltspring Islands, and in those portions of the Comox
Electoral District known and defined as Dennian and Hornby Islands, cock birds only, open
season from October 15th, 1923, to December 31st, 1923, both dates inclusive.
In the Western District, in that portion of Vancouver Island known as the Cowichan Municipality, and on the Mainland, hen birds, open season from November 17th, 1923, to November 30th,
1923, both dates inclusive.
In the Western District, in that portion of the Islands Electoral District known and defined
as Saltspring Island, and in those portions of the Comox Electoral District known and defined
as Dennian and Hornby Islands, hen birds, open season from December 1st, 1923, to December
31st, 1923, both dates inclusive.
(n.) European Partridge, in the Western District, in that portion thereof situate and lying
on the Mainland known and defined as the Delta Municipality, open season from November 17th,
1923, to November 30th, 1023, both dates inclusive.
In that portion of the Islands Electoral District known and defined as North Saanich, and
those further portions of Vancouver Island known and defined as South Saanich and Highland
Districts, open season from October 15th, 1923, to October 25th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
Bag Limits.
Big Game.
In respect of big game throughout the Province as defined in the " Game Act," no person
shall anywhere kill or take or have in their possession during the open season more than three
Deer, all of which must be of the male sex, and no person shall kill or take or have in their
i')i_ 14 Geo. 5 Report of Provincial Game Warden. Y 47
possession during the open season more than three Bear of any species other than Grizzly, and
north of the main line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway two Grizzly Bear; south of the main
line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, one Grizzly Bear.
In that portion of the Province north of the main line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway,
no person shall at any time kill or take or have in their possession during the open season more
than two Sheep of any one species, or three altogether, of the male sex.
In the Electoral Districts of Columbia, Fernie, Cranbrook, Cariboo, and Lillooet, no person
shall at any time kill or take or have in their possession more than one Mountain-sheep of the
male sex.
Game Birds.
No person shall in any district hereinafter designated kill or take on any one day any
greater number of game birds than the daily bag limit hereinafter set out respectively; nor kill,
take, or have in their possession during the entire open season any greater number of game birds
than the total bag limit so set out.
Western District.—Pheasants, cocks only:   Daily bag'limit, 6;   total bag limit, 25.
In the districts where the season is open for the shooting of cock and hen pheasants: Daily
bag limit, 6, of which only 2 shall be hens;   total bag limit, 25 in the aggregate of all kinds.
Quail: Daily bag limit, 20; total bag limit, 150.
European Partridge: Daily bag limit, 6;  total bag limit, 25.
Grouse: Daily bag limit, 5 Blue and 5 Willow Grouse; total bag limit, 50 in the aggregate.
Eastern District.—South Okanagan and Similkameen Electoral Districts and the Municipality and District Municipality of Salmon Arm: Pheasants, cock birds only, 4 in one day;
total bag limit, 12.
Quail (Similkameen and South Okanagan Electoral Districts) : Daily bag limit, 10; total
bag limit, 50.
Grouse and Ptarmigan (Northern and Eastern Districts) : 6 of one species or 12 of all
species in one day;  total bag limit, 50.
Throughout the Province.—Ducks: Daily bag limit. 20;  total bag limit, 150.
Geese: Daily bag limit, 10;  total bag limit, 50.
Brant: Daily bag limit, 10;  total bag limit, 50.
Black-breasted and Golden Plover and Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs: Daily bag limit, 15 in
the aggregate of all kinds ;  total bag limit, 150 in the aggregate.
Wilson Snipe: Daily bag limit, 25;  total bag limit, 150.
Coots: Daily bag limit, 25;  total bag limit, 150.
Every person shall, upon the request of any constable or Game Warden, furnish satisfactory
proof to him of the dates on which any big game or game birds were killed or taken.
2. The open seasons declared by these regulations shall not apply to the following parts
of the Province, namely :—
(a.)  Kaien Island, in the Prince Rupert Electoral District.
(8.)  That portion of the Dewdney Electoral District known as the Colony Farm.
(c.) That portion of the District Municipality of Burnaby bounded as follows: Commencing
at the junction of Sperling Avenue and the right-of-way of the British Columbia Electric Railway
Company, Limited; thence due north to the line of the Great Northern Railway; thence following the said railway in an easterly direction to the Cariboo Road; thence southerly along the
Cariboo Road to the right-of-way of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited;
thence westerly along the line of the British Columbia Electric Railway to point of commencement.
(d.) Those further portions of the said District Municipality of Burnaby known respectively
as the Oakalla Prison Farm and Central Park.
(e.) That portion of the Municipality of Point Grey lying to the north and to the east of
Marine Drive.
(/.) That portion of Nanaimo Harbour described as follows:—Between the high-water mark
on Vancouver Island and a line drawn as follows: Commencing at Brechin Point, Departure
Bay, near the City of Nanaimo; thence in an easterly direction to the most westerly point of
Newcastle Island; thence south-easterly to the most easterly point on Newcastle Island; thence
to the most westerly point on Protection Island;   thence south-easterly to Gallows Point on Y 48 British Columbia. 1924
Protection Island;   thence to Jack's Point on Vancouver Island;   thence in a westerly direction
■to Stevens & Wright's shingle-mill on Vancouver Island.
(g.) That portion of the Nelson District described as follows: Commencing on the north
shore of the West Arm of Kootenay Lake at Willow Point Wharf; thence following the north
shore and Duhamel or 6-Mile Creek Roads to the Intersection of the said Duhamel Creek Road
with the First West Fork of Duhamel Creek; thence following the said First West Fork, to its
source; thence in a southerly direction following the divide between Duhamel Creek and the
West Arm of Kootenay Lake and Grohman Creek to the mouth of said Grohman Creek; thence
following the north shore of the said West Arm of Kootenay Lake to the point of commencement.
3. The prohibitions declared by subsection (1) of section 34 of the " Game Act," as to the
buying, selling, and having in possession of big game and game birds, so far as the same relate
to game lawfully killed or taken, are hereby removed to the extent and within the periods and
limits and subject to the provisions hereinafter set out, as follows:—
(a.) Moose and Caribou, bulls over 1 year of age, in the Electoral Districts of Atlin and
Omineca, from October 1st, 1923, to December 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive.
(b.) Bear, in the Northern District, from September 1st, 1923, to June 30th, 1924, both dates
inclusive; and in the Eastern District, from September 15th, 1923, to June 30th, 1924, both
dates inclusive.
4. The open seasons declared by these regulations shall not apply to the hunting, taking, or
having in possession of Quail, Pheasants, Prairie-chicken, or Partridges when snow is on the
ground.
Further, that no game birds shall be hunted from an automobile or any other vehicle either
oft or on a highway at any time.
Department of Attorney-General,
Victoria, B.C., July 18th, 1923.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
"GAME ACT."
Pursuant to the provisions of this Act, His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has
been pleased to amend and vary the regulations approved by Order in Council No. 859, dated
the 19th July, 1923, as follows :—
Wherever the wording " Grand Trunk Pacific Railway " has been used in the above-mentioned
Order in Council, that it be eliminated, and the following substituted: " Canadian National
Railway, formerly known as the Main Line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway."
In paragraph 1 of clause (m) the words " and in the Municipality and District Municipality
of Salmon Arm " be eliminated, and the following substituted therefor: " except that portion of
the Similkameen Electoral District lying to the west of a line running due south from the
boundary of the Yale Electoral District to the source of 20-Mile Creek; thence following the
said creek to its outlet into the Similkameen River; thence following the said Similkameen River
in a south-easterly direction to the East Fork of the said river; thence in a southerly direction
along the said East Fork to the International Boundary-line."
And, further, in this paragraph the words " November 17th, 1923," be eliminated, and the
following substituted therefor: "November 11th, 1923"; and the following is inserted after
paragraph 1 of clause (to) : " Cock birds only, in the Municipality and District Municipality of
Salmon Arm, open season from October 20th, 1923, to November 2nd, 1923, both dates inclusive."
In the second section of that portion of the above-mentioned Order in Council entitled " Bag
Limits," the wording of that part headed " Eastern District," first paragraph, be eliminated,
and the following substituted therefor: " Municipality and District Municipality of Salmon Arm,
Pheasants, cock birds only, 4 in one day; total bag limit, 12. South Okanagan and Similkameen
Electoral Districts, Pheasants, cock birds only, 4 in one day;  total bag limit 15."
That in the second paragraph of the above section marked " Quail " the words " total bag
limit, 50 " be eliminated, and the following substituted therefor :   " total bag limit, 100."
The following section be added after clause (.or), paragraph 2: " Bucks only, in that portion
of Vancouver Island known as the Highland District, open season from September 15th, 1923, to
September 30th, 1923, both dates inclusive." 14 Geo. 5 Report of Provincial Game Warden. Y 49
After paragraph 4 of clause (7c) the following be added: "Blue Grouse, in that portion
of Vancouver Island known as the Highland District, open season from September 15th, 1023,
to September 30th, 1923, both dates inclusive."
The following be added after paragraph 0, clause (7c) ; " Willow-grouse, in that portion of
Vancouver Island known as the Highland District, open season from December 1st, 1923, to
December 15th, 1923, both dates inclusive."
And, further, for the purpose of describing the Highland District the same be hereby defined
as follows : " Starting at the junction of Finlayson Arm Road and the Malahat Highway ; thence
south along the Malahat and Island Highway to Atkin Road; thence east along Atkin Road to
Thetis Lake Road; thence north along Thetis Lake Road to Munn's Road; thence easterly and
south-easterly along Munn's Road to Prospect Lake Road; thence along Prospect Lake Road
north and east to the interurban line of the British Columbia Electric Railway; thence along
said railway to Tod Inlet Road; thence along Tod Inlet Road to Saanich Arm; thence along
Saanich Arm to Coldstream Creek; thence following Goldstream Creek to the Finlayson Arm
Road to the Malahat Highway."
Further, that the second paragraph of clause (I) be eliminated, an"d that portion under the
heading " Bag Limits, Game Birds, Western District," entitled " Quail" be also eliminated.
In the third paragraph of clause (m) and after the word "River," in the third line thereof,
the following be inserted: " the Alberni branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway, Alberni Canal,
and Barkley Sound."
That in the second paragraph of clause (a) the words " September 15th, 1923 " be eliminated,
and the words " September 1st, 1923 " substituted therefor.
That in the second paragraph of clause (/) the words " September 15th, 1923 " be eliminated,
and the words " September 1st, 1923 " substituted therefor.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., August 31st, 1923.
" GAME ACT."
Pursuant to the provisions of this Act, His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has
been pleased to amend and vary the regulations approved by Order in Council No. 859, dated the
19th July, 1923, as amended by Order in Council 1065, of August 31st, 1923, by striking out, where
they occur in clause (m) of said regulations, the words " October 15th," and inserting in lieu
thereof the words " October 13th."
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., October 5th, 1923.
" GAME ACT."
Pursuant to the provisions of this Act, His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has
been pleased to amend and vary the regulations approved by Order in Council No. 859, dated July
19th, 1923, as regards the open seasons for fur-bearing animals, as follows:—
That the following words be added to the first paragraph of clause (h) : "except as hereinafter provided."
And that the following be added after the first paragraph of clause (h) :—
" All that portion of the Northern District described as follows: Commencing at the intersection of the 60th parallel of latitude and the 120th parallel of longitude; thence south along
the 120th parallel of longitude to the intersection of the 55th parallel of latitude; thence west
along the 55th parallel of latitude to the intersection of the Parsnip River; thence north-west
along the said river to the mouth of the Finlay River; thence north-west along the Finlay River
to the mouth of the Fox River; thence along the Fox River to its source; thence in a northwesterly direction to the source of the Kachika River; thence north-west along the Kachika
River to the mouth of the Coal River;   thence north along the Coal River to the 60th parallel Y 50 British Columbia. 1924
of latitude;   thence east along the 60th parallel of latitude to point of commencement;   open
season November 1st, 1923, to April 30th, 1924, both dates inclusive."
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., November 6th, 1923.
"GAME ACT."
Pursuant to the provisions of this Act, His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has
been pleased to make the following game reserve:—
Shaw Creek Game Reserve.
That pursuant to the provisions of section 36 of the " Game Act," that tract of Crown land
situated in the County of Nanaimo, in the Province of British Columbia, bounded and described
as follows, namely: Beginning at the head of Cowichan Lake; thence on a bearing of approximately north twenty degrees east astronomic a distance of about one and one-quarter miles to
a peak on the westerly boundary of the watershed of Shaw Creek; thence northerly, easterly, and
southerly along the boundary of the watershed of said Shaw Creek to the summit of the pass
between the easterly branch of Shaw Creek and Jump Creek; thence south-easterly on a straight
line to the headwaters of a small branch of McKay Creek, which enters said McKay Creek from
the west, about three and a half miles from its mouth; thence down-stream along said branch
and said McKay Creek to the mouth of said creek; thence westerly along the northerly shore
of Cowichan Lake to the point of beginning—is set apart for the purpose of a game reserve for
the protection of birds and animals.
No person shall at any time hunt, trap, take, wound, kill, or have in his possession or within
the boundaries of the above-described game reserve any or any part of any animal or bird
whatsoever.
No person shall at any time use, set, carry, or have in his possession on or within the
boundaries of the above-described game reserve any firearm, trap, snare, net, drugged or poisoned
bait, baited lines, or other contrivance for the taking or killing of any bird or animal.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Department of the Attorney-General,
Victoria, B.C., April 6th, 1923.
" GAME ACT."
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor has been pleased to order as follows:—
That, under the provisions of section 36 of the " Game Act," those islands known as Nelson,
Hardy, and Captain Islands, in the County of Vancouver, Province of British Columbia, be set
apart for the purpose of a game reserve for the protection of birds and animals.
No person shall at any time hunt, trap, take, wound, kill, or have in his possession or within
the boundaries of the above-described reserve any or any part of any animal or bird whatsoever.
No person shall at any time use, set, carry, or have in his possession, on or within the
boundaries of the above-described game reserve, any firearm, trap, snare, net, drugged or poisoned
bait, baited lines, or other contrivance for the taking or killing of any bird or animal.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1923.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chaei.es F. Bantield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1925.

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