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FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FIRE MARSHAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1925 STATISTICS, 1926 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1928]

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Full Text

 FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE FIEE MAKSHAL
FOR   THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS, 1926
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Chaeles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Fifth Annual Report of the Fire Marshal
for the year ended December 31st, 1926.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Victoria, B.C., March Slst, 1927. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Fire Marshal 5,    6
Table I.—Inspections and Orders made ; 7,    S
Table II.—Fires reported 0, 10
Table III.—Causes of Fires 11, 12
Table IV.—Classification of Property 13-20
Table V.—Summary  21
Table VI.—Loss of Life  22 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL.
Office of Fire AIarshal,
Vancouver, B.C., Alarch 31st; 1927.
Honourable A. M. Manson, K.C,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Fifth Annual Report as Fire AIarshal, together with
statistics showing the Are loss in the Province for the year ended December 31st, 1926.
The total for the year covering buildings and contents amounted to $3,638,427, being $538,414
less than 1925 and the lowest for the period covering the four years from 1923 to 1926. These
figures include twenty logging camps and their equipment, but do not include forest fires and
timber.
As in previous years, our heavy losses were in industrial plants and warehouses, due of
course to the large values involved, and, further, to insufficient fire-protection equipment. The
list of preventable fires is still too large, and it is evident that a more extensive campaign must
be conducted to awaken the public to the seriousness of this unnecessary destruction of property.
While we are gratified to note that there has been some reduction this year, yet there is still
much to be done. When the public conscience is properly awakened the person in Whose premises
a fire occurs will be placed in the same category as the one who drives to the public danger,
and the onus will be upon him to prove that he has used reasonable care to prevent fire.
A comparison of the statistics for 1925 and 1926 shows that the decreased losses for this
year were fairly well spread over the entire Province. We are compelled to note, however, that
there has been a decided increase in fourteen cities and eleven district municipalities. This is
not a credit to the persons responsible for the fire-prevention work in these districts. It will also
be noted that in seven cities aild fifteen district and village municipalities they have failed to
carry out the provisions of section 19 of the Act and provide for the regular inspection of
buildings and premises.
You will be pleased to note, however, that some have been diligent in the work of fire-
prevention during the year. Assistant Fire Marshals have made 52,134 inspections and issued
5,003 orders to remove hazards. Forty-five appeals from these orders were received and passed
upon by this office. There were no appeals from my decisions to the Courts during the year.
Twenty-nine convictions were obtained for failure to carry out orders. All fires were investigated and reports are on file in this office. Twelve inquiries were held under section 12 of
the Act and three cases of arson discovered and prosecuted, a conviction being obtained in
each case.
The demand for advice and assistance in the matter of fire-protection in public buildings,
such as schools, hospitals, hotels, assembly-halls, and mercantile buildings, has grown greatly
during the year and has been met as far as possible. There is an insistent demand and a great
need has developed for Provincial regulations governing the methods of fire-prevention in these
classes of buildings, particularly in municipalities and unorganized districts where there are
no building by-laws in force.
Along the line of educational work we have co-operated with the insurance organizations in
bringing the fire-prevention message to the pupils in the public schools throughout the Province.
Gold medals and money prizes were offered for the best essays on the subject. Great interest
was manifested by both teachers and scholars and the results were excellent. In addition to
this, it has been my privilege, as opportunity offered, to address a number of schools throughout
the Province. In the matter of educational propaganda, with your approval space was acquired
in the daily papers' and during Fire-prevention Week display advertisements were inserted
calling attention to the enormous cost of our fires and the best methods of reducing them. It
has been estimated that SO per cent, of the population of the Province was reached by this
method. A number of letters have been received testifying to the excellent results of this
publicity.
Public buildings throughout the Province have been inspected during the year by members
of the office staff and myself and such recommendations made for their protection from fire as were found advisable and necessary. Advice and assistance has been given in the matter of
tire-protection equipment for cities and municipalities. The City of North Vancouver and the
Municipality of Point Grey have passed excellent fire-prevention by-laws. In a number of cities
new fire-protection equipment has been purchased and put into commission.
There has been a very considerable advance in the installation of the new type " down-
draught " refuse-burners in connection with our sawmills. In almost every case these burners
have given complete satisfaction and undoubtedly have reduced the fire hazard in the mills
using them.
With your approval, a hydro-thermograph was purchased and installed at the Provincial
Court-house in charge of the Forest Branch of the Arancouver District. During the dry season
frequent readings were taken each day. When the humidity was found to be nearing the danger-
point sawmills and other hazardous industries were notified to take extra precautions and reduce
fires. The co-operation of the mill-owners was excellent, with the result that in the district
covered by this service the number of fires from sparks and other causes due to excessive heat
and low humidity were greatly reduced.
Moving-picture Theatres Act.—In Alay, 1926, the regulations passed by Order in Council
under the above Act were placed in my hands to administer. During the year 431 inspections
on moving-picture theatres and film exchanges have been made and 137 orders to take care of
unsafe conditions were issued and enforced. Ninety-seven kinematograph-machines were
approved and stamped during the year. Two portable projection-rooms were inspected and
approved. Plans and specifications for the construction of ten new theatres and for the remodelling of seven old ones were received, checked, and approved. On June 1st a film-report system
was inaugurated, whereby we are able to keep a check on every film exhibited in the Province
and to know its physical condition when leaving each theatre. As a result of this system of
checking 22,000 feet of hazardous film was removed from circulation. In addition to this, the
film exchanges voluntarily removed from circulation 36,000 feet of film, making a total of 58,000
feet of film which has been removed from circulation and destroyed during the year. Film
fires in theatres during the year consumed 3,000 feet of film. Smokers' carelessness was responsible for two fires, while two fires with a loss of $10,S37 were of unknown origin, one of which
originated in a furnace-room.
Pursuant to regulations passed under the " Fire AIarshal Act," the revisers employed in the
exchanges operating in the Province have been examined as to their fitness for the work which
they are called upon to do. In addition to this, Air. Oswald has been assisted in the examination
of seventeen projectionists during the year.
Thanks are due to the members of my staff for their efficient assistance in compiling the
statistics in connection with this report and carrying out their duties under the Act; also to the
Municipal and Provincial Police for their assistance in investigating fires and carrying out the
dutes of Assistant Fire Marshals in unorganized districts and for valuable assistance rendered
in the conviction of the offenders in the arson cases mentioned.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. ALFRED THOA1AS,
Fire Marshal. REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL, 1926.
D 7
TABLE L—INSPECTIONS  MADE AND  ORDERS  ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
City Municipalities (S3).
37
22
1
300
41
149
35
6156
5
4
10
104
11
29
42
3
508
6
70
45
696
1,141
1,187
1,746
24
14
17
10
78
124
160
19
55
312
355
327
309
6
104
150
5
124
Trail	
1,353
29,375
245
6,922
6
3,311
2
Victoria	
179
Totals	
45,91©
4,518
District Municipalities (29).
120
43
33
Chilliwack -	
Delta	
51
28
32
Fraser Mills	
8
54
290
116
Oak Bay	
100
6
47
9
Pitt Meadows	
2,254
37
10
25
22
8
1,865
59 D S
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS  A1ADE AND  ORDERS  ISSUED BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS—Continued.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
District Municipalities—Continued.
25
1
262
60
7
11
16
Totals.
5,275
344
Village Municipalities (C).
17
11
201
32
Totals.
229
43
Fire Districts (24).
1
3
1
1
0
9
Hazelton	
Hedley	
14
147
47
Moyie	
Oliver	
38
 "
-
12
8
Powell  River	
420
33
11
Princeton          .          	
20
Quesnel	
Rolla	
Sandon	
Stewart	
9
6
10
Terrace	
8
Totals.
711
98
totals.
Grand
52,134
5,003
totals,
totals,
totals,
1925	
Grand
49,889
49,677
40,573
4,759
5,304
5,468  .
Grand
1924	
1923	 REPORT  OF  FIRE  AIARSHAL.  1926.
D 9
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED.
Districts  reporting'.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
City Municipalities (33).
Alberni	
Armstrong	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay :	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Merritt t	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
North Vancouver	
Port  Alberni	
Port  Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Totals	
District Municipalities (29).
Burnaby	
Chilliwack	
Coldstream	
Coquitlam	
Delta	
Esquimalt	
Fraser Mills.....	
Kent	
Langley	
Maple   Ridge	
Matsqui	
Mission	
North   Cowichan	
North Vancouver	
Oak Bay	
Peachland	
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows	
Point Grey	
Richmond	
Saanich	
Salmon Arm	
South Vancouver i:	
Spallumcheen	
Sumas	
Summerland	
2
$    255
1
500
3
12,334
19
47,005
17
3,559
1
258
5
6,927
1
1,000
15
8,071
7
3,726
2
3,934
7
7,235
1
250
13
1,092
7
2,894
5
1,560
38
18,919
16
6,551
44
52,545
30
13,804
8
8,'548
5
8,068
11
21,063
2
2,639
15
161,175
21
24,820
13
6,240
2
775
14
2,746
549
864,061
'o
4,216
99
32,656
978
$1,329,426
64
$  80,706
20
62,875
12
21,092
3
5,894
4
998
2
1,932
18
59,533
19
38,960
13
4,513
5
8,604
o
11,489
1
16,755
13
2,262
0
4,400
17
20,268
4
7,246
112
18,154
8
31,410
26
10,684
4
4,220
85
211,646
3
10,300
8
13,001
7
32,753 D 10
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED—Continued.
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
District Municipalities—Continued.
15
4
7
$
72,796
1,520
4,170
Totals
487
$
758,181
Village Municipalities  (6).
2
4
8
4
$
2,198
36,098
12,4n
639
Totals	
IS
$
51,356
Fire Districts (21,).
3
1
2
4
1
1
1
2
4
2
7
$
21,304
25
Hedley	
18,106
Kimberley	
1,289
Nakusp	
Pacific Mills, Limited	
30
Port Essington	
124
4,570
Princeton	
3,004
Quesnel	
Rolla	
Stewart	
5,926
Telkwa	
Terrace	
39
10,489
Totals	
28
$
64,936
Unorganized Districts (15).
16
10
2
4
23
13
37
28
9
81
6
36
25
217
6
$
40,315
97,228
Fort  George	
Fort St. John ;	
4,000
Hazelton	
9,063
Kamloops	
51,771
Kootenay,   North-east	
121,497
170,178
138,405
15,783
Lillooet	
Nanaimo	
217,605
Prince Rupert	
42,158
Vancouver-New Westminster	
307,152
Vernon	
46,793
Victoria	
138,214
Yale                 	
34,366
Totals	
323
$
1,434,528
1,834
$
5,638,427
Note,—Construction
Fire-resisting
of   buildings—
1, loss $
Brick  or  concrete      251,
Frame     1,582,
1,834,
73
703,732
2,934,622
$3,638,427 REPORT OF FIRE AIARSHAL, 1926.
D 11
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Ammonia-fumes  burning tires  	
Ashes  against wood  	
Boiler insufficiently protected 	
Candle carelessness 	
Canned heat left burning 	
Carburettor back-firing 	
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe 	
Coal-gas explosion 	
Coal-oil carelessness 	
Coal-oil, children with	
Collision   	
Curtains from candle 	
Curtains from lamp  	
Curtains from stove 	
Defective battery connection 	
Defective blower 	
Defective brooder 	
Defective chimney 	
Defective film	
Defective fireplace 	
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe	
Defective heater 	
Defective lamp 	
Defective matches 	
Defective muffler 	
Defective oil-stove 	
Defective oven 	
Defective stove or stove-pipe 	
Defective  wiring  	
Dust explosion 	
Electrical   appliances   	
Engine back-firing 	
Exposure 	
Fire-crackers   	
Friction in pulley 	
Fumigation  	
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected
Gasolene carelessness 	
Gasolene, children with 	
Gasolene  explosion  	
Gasolene leaking on exhaust-pipe 	
Gasolene-torch  explosion   	
Gas-plate insufficiently protected 	
Grease  on  stove  	
Gunpowder,   child  with   	
High-tension wires falling on building 	
Hollow-shaft explosion 	
Hot box 	
Hot chain put in barrel of tar caused explosion
Hot gravel against wood 	
Hot poker left against woodwork 	
Hot soldering-iron laid on tray 	
Ignition of escaping gas by pilot-light 	
Incendiary	
Lamp explosion 	
Lamp  upset 	
Lantern explosion 	
Lantern hung too near rafters 	
Lantern upset 	
Lightning   	
Lime ignited by water 	
Live coals 	
Match  carelessness 	
Matches, children with 	
Matches, mice with 	
1
16
1
17
1
27
30
3
9
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
4
31
9
1
3
7
2
1
1
25
15
1
53
1
204
1
1
1
11
25
2
4
12
2
4
23
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
23
7
9
1
1
1
42
32
4
202
9,865
10,426
1,424
15
14,928
6,516
5,233
12,649
2,200
2,350
8
10
77
10
68
2,343
171,512
367
14,122
5,923
800
280
321
633
110
275
31,237
10,444
16,000
19,537
304
777,924
7
117
50
8,329
21,844
303
24,250
2,475
165
779
15,056
30
450
66
8,833
4,064
3'6'7
60
3
76
55,203
26,738
12,120
5,500
7
5,600
3,396
250
108
17,528
10,332
1,526 D 12
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES—Continued.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Mattress too near stove 	
Oil overflowing from furnace 	
Oil-stove upset	
Overheating of dry-kiln 	
Overheating of lime-kiln  	
Paper from fireplace 	
Phosphorus 	
Pressure-tank explosion  	
Rubbish  around  furnace  	
Short circuit 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Sparks from boiler 	
Sparks from burning rubbish 	
Sparks from bush fire 	
Sparks from chimney 	
Sparks from copper mould 	
Sparks from cupola 	
Sparks from cutting-machine 	
Sparks from Dutch oven 	
Sparks from engine 	
Sparks from fireplace 	
Sparks from furnace or furnace-pipe  	
Sparks from locomotive  ...
Sparks from mill burner 	
Sparks from oven fire 	
Sparks from slash fire 	
Sparks from smoke-stack 	
Sparks from steam-shovel 	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe 	
Spontaneous combustion 	
Stove explosion  	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Sun's rays 	
Tar boiling over 	
Thawing pipes  	
Torch explosion 	
Unknown 	
Varnish boiling over on stove 	
Wood too near furnace	
Wood too near stove 	
Totals	
3
1
1
1
1
2
67
231
3
7
18
19'5
1
1
1
1
S
57
17
1
1
6
1
19
36
2
92
6
1
222
1
3
10
$ 80
226
6,071
35,350
2,897
10
32
600
2,870
112,550
150,648
1,062
2,486
88,091
125,711
20
2,460
3,000
1,494
27,450
5,268
30,357
24,520
288,136
568
2,975
1,370
1,424
12,184
139,063
1,501
115,929
49,608
6,912
885
95
1,041/588
185
934
8,175
1,834
S3,638,427 REPORT OF FIRE AIARSHAL, 1926.
D 13
TABLE IV—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED A'ND CAUSES.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Apartments      38
Automobiles      144
Bakeries
Banks           1
Barber-shops           2
Barns         44
Barns and stables
Ashes against wood  1
Coal-oil carelessness   1
Defective chimney  2
Defective furnace   1
Defective wiring   1
Electrical appliances   1
Exposure     1
Gasolene carelessness  ,  1
Hot soldering-iron laid on tray   1
Lamp upset   2
Match carelessness   1
Matches,  children with    1
Short circuit    2
Smokers' carelessness  16
Sparks from chimney  1
Sparks from fireplace  1
Spontaneous combustion   1
Torch  explosion  1
Unknown  2
Ammonia-fumes  burning tires  1
Carburettor   back-firing  23
Collision   *  5
Defective battery connection    1
Defective   muffler    '.  2
Defective wiring  2
Exposure    : :  17
Gasolene carelessness   4
Gasolene leaking on exhaust-pipe   2
Match carelessness   5
Matches,  children with   1
Pressure-tank explosion   1
Short circuit  47
Smokers'   carelessness     11
Unknown     22
Ashes against wood   1
Defective oven   1
Grease on stove   1
Sparks from oven fire   1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     1
Exposure  1
Ashes against wood   1
Sparks from  stove   1
Exposure  1
Incendiary     1
Lantern explosion  1
Lantern upset   1
Lightning  1
Match carelessness   2
Matches, children with   3
Smokers'   carelessness     10
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from cutting-machine   1
Sparks  from  locomotive  1
Sparks from mill burner   1
Spontaneous combustion    7
Unknown     13
Incendiary     1
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Unknown     1
90
8
110
300
13
24
00
50
3
9
25
119
332
520
100
22
1,822
95
427
202
3,910
2,350
10
633
675
12,752
1,315
2,475
5,091
100
600
12,883
1,368
11,832
20
275
239
668
324
1,000
7
125
800
500
5,500
5,500
3,000
3,800
1,673
25,615
321
3,000
1,437
50
14,748
25,562
3,000
2,071
228
4,159
56,196
2,426
633
132
91,506
5,299 D 14
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Barracks	
Blacksmith-shops
Boarding-houses
Canneries
Chicken-houses
Dry-cleaning establishments..
Dry-kilns	
Boat-houses          1
Bowling-alleys         1
Bunk-houses          7
Churches   6
Churches and dwellings   1
Clubs   6
Dairies     3
Dwellings      952
Sparks from chimney   1
Gasolene explosion   1
Oil-stove upset    1
Sparks from bush fire   1
Sparks from chimney  1
Smokers'   carelessness     2
Sparks from  fireplace   1
Stove insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     2
Gasolene carelessness   1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Incendiary    :.... 1
Match carelessness   1
Sparks from engine   1
Sparks from mill burner   1
Stove insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     2
Hot chain put in barrel of tar caused explosion „  1
Sparks from chimney   1
Ashes against wood   1
Defective brooder.   2
Defective lamp    1
Fumigation  1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Unknown  2
Electrical appliances   1
Furnace-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     3
Defective fireplace   1
Exposure     2
Smokers'   carelessness  2
Sparks  from   chimney    2
Short circuit   1
Sparks from smoke-stack   1
Spontaneous  combustion   1
Electrical appliances   1
Sparks from locomotive   1
Spontaneous combustion  1
Unknown  1
Ashes against wood  .  5
Candle carelessness   IS
Canned heat left burning  1
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe  29
Coal-gas  explosion    3
Coal-oil carelessness   8
Coal-oil, children with   1
Curtains from candle   1
Curtains from lamp   1
Curtains from stove   1
Defective brooder   2
Defective chimney   83
Defective fireplace   27
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe   7
Defective  lamp  1
Defective matches   6
500
6,000
1,200
2,000
16
7
635
1,426
934
46
452
150
500
3,700
4,064
124
150
262
75
50
505
704
$
10
415
468
¥
109
7,692
2,035
2154
61
59
4,598
200
28,192
$        670
1,171
15 ,
5,602
5,233
12,641
2,200
8
10
77
2,081
105,330
2,664
5,188
5
268
20
9,700
2,083
4,570
'75
5,782
4,188
1,746
893
11,290
9,836
374
22
32,990 REPORT OF FIRE AIARSHAL,  1926.
D 15
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of
Loss.
1
1
1
2
1
9
1
1
1
1
19
7
40
38
1
8
7
2
4
17
1
1
10
5
6
3
6
16
23
2
3
1
1
8
95
4
9
163
53
2
1
1
1
13
12
2
75
1
3
5
80
1
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$        110
27,605
4,684
18,903
26,480
7
6,914
1,258
303
779
12,527
30
450
12,877
17,187
12,086
224
106
2,680
7,697
430
80
10
67
15,555
22,254
2,070
24,861
92,949
3,315
2,250
500
264
1,424
4,398
39,764
1,501
103,781
25
1,400
468
117,364
185
58
7,375
•
Defective stove or stove-pipe 	
Defective wiring 	
Electrical appliances  	
Exposure   	
Furnace or furnace-pipe insufficiently protected
Gasolene carelessness 	
Gasolene, children with 	
Gas-plate insufficiently protected 	
High-tension wires falling on building 	
Lamp explosion 	
Lamp upset 	
Match carelessness 	
Matches,  children with 	
Matches, mice with 	
Mattress too near stove 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Sparks from burning rubbish 	
Sparks from bush fire 	
Sparks from chimney 	
Sparks from fireplace 	
Sparks from furnace 	
Sparks from mill burner 	
Sparks from steam-shovel 	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe 	
Spontaneous  combustion  	
Stove explosion 	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Sun's  rays 	
Tar boiling over 	
Thawing  pipes   	
Unknown 	
Varnish boiling over on stove
Wood too near furnace 	
Wood too near stove	
Gasolene carelessness 	
Unknown   	
Hollow-shaft explosion	
738,418
626
910
Electrical plants 	
Electrical repair-shops ..
$          77
5
66
Electric-light poles 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Hot gravel against wood 	
82
367
Factories (asphalt) ...   .
$    2,500
117
2,501
'7,485
25,049
200
203
1,266
Factories (box) .
Friction in pulley 	
Hot box 	
Overheating of dry-kiln 	
Sparks from furnace 	
Sparks from mill burner ...
Sparks from smoke-stack ...
Spontaneous combustion ..
Unknown   	
39,321
20,000
16,000
1,814
Factories   (brick and tile)....
Factories (fish meal and oil)
Factories  (hat and cap)	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Unknown   	 D 16
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount oi
Loss.
Factories   (sash and door).-.
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
4
5
39
4
1
3
4
1
1
51
5
Sparks from smoke-stack 	
        1
        1
$
150
3,145
Sparks from chimney 	
        1
1
3,295
1,500
Factories (steel products)
Ashes against wood 	
Spontaneous  combustion	
Carburettor back-firing	
        1
        1
        1
         2
10
258
$.
3,800
3,500
4,000
1
Ashes against wood	
         1
         1
11,300
75
Fish-packing plants	
Foundries	
$
622
2,460
1,030
150
Sparks from  cupola	
1
         1
         1
3
4,262
$
1,550
30
600
Sparks from locomotive 	
         1
         1
Carburettor back-firing	
Defective stove	
         1
         1
         6
2,180
Garages 	
$
6,193
2,812
19,261
6,442
4,750
165
100
3,020
9,817
2,058
5,681
9,914
         5
Gasolene explosion 	
Gasolene-torch explosion 	
Match carelessness 	
Short  circuit  	
         1
         2
         1
         2
         3
Sparks  from  chimney  	
Spontaneous  combustion  	
Unknown   	
Defective fireplace	
Sparks from chimney 	
Unknown   	
Sparks from mill burner 	
Furnace insufficiently protected 	
Lantern too near rafters 	
Matches,  children  with 	
Defective chimney 	
Sparks  from   chimney   	
         1
         3
      13
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
         1
..    .           1
70,213
0,383
20
307
Golf-club houses  	
$
36
10
12
5,325
Gravel plants 	
Greenhouses  	
$
150
7
150
Halls 	
$
22
2,723
7
726
            1
Sparks from chimney 	
         1
1
3,478
200
417
$
3
14,366
30
21,454
28,592
150
8,709
62
70,846
Hospitals (dog) 	
Hotels 	
Candle carelessness 	
Defective  chimney  	
Electrical  appliances  	
Exposure	
         1
9
2
2
Incendiary     ■
3
Match carelessness 	
         1
32
Sparks from chimney 	
Unknown	
.'.         1
7
2
144,212
Launches   	
$
1,025
2,300
500
Gasolene carelessness 	
9
Match carelessness	
         1
3,825 REPORT OF FIRK MARSHAL, 1926.
D 11
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Laundries
Lime plants ....
Logging camps
Lumber-piles
Lumber-yards 	
Machine-shops  ....
Mining  property
Offices
Oil-tankers  	
Photograph studios
Planing-mills   	
Playhouses  (children's)	
Post-offices	
Post-offices and dwellings-
Pottery plants
Printing-offices
Railway stations
Refineries (sugar)
Restaurants  	
Road-houses 	
IS
Clothes too near stove 	
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe
Sparks from smoke-stack 	
Unknown	
Wood too near stove 	
Overheating of lime-kiln
Ashes against wood 	
Defective chimney 	
Engine back-firing 	
Exposure 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Sparks from bush fire
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from engine 	
Sparks from slash fire ....
Sun's  rays 	
Unknown   	
Sparks from bush fire ....
Sparks from mill burner
Unknown   	
Exposure 	
Sparks from mill burner ....
Defective heater 	
Short circuit  	
Sparks from bush fire 	
Sparks from copper mould
Sparks from furnace 	
Defective stove-pipe 	
Defective wiring 	
Exposure   	
Hot poker left against woodwork
Match carelessness 	
Short circuit 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Spontaneous  combustion  	
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Unknown	
Gasolene explosion
Defective wiring ...
Exposure   	
Unknown   	
Matches, children with 	
Exposure   	
Sparks from mill burner 	
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Sparks from furnace or furnace-pipe
Defective chimney 	
Exposure 	
Match carelessness 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Stove insufficiently protected
Unknown    ,
Dust explosion ..
Grease on stove
Incendiary  	
1
%
914
1
435
1
911
1
70
1
800
r
3,130
2,897
1
1
%
8,733
1
6,232
1
304
1
164,234
o
1,502
2
7,037
1
3,620
0
23,885
1
2,975
1
49,583
4
109,024
377,729
1
*
500
1
19,313
1
2,158
21,971
1
27
1
2,670
1
$
800
1
79,570
2
7,000
1
20
1
100
S7.490
1
.$
25
1
103
6
2,073
1
60
1
80
1
30
3
42
1
5
2
341
1
417
3,182
1
15,000
1
$
1,312
1
94
1,406
1
23 780
1
1
1,730
1
$
2,597
1
85
2,682
2 900
1
1
$
22
2
1,230
1
3,443
1
56
4,751
1
$
650
1
1,800
2,450
1
16,000
257
1
1
45 D 18
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF. PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Rooming-houses        13
Rooms and offices         2
Sacked  wheat          1
Sawmills       29
Schools
Sheds
Shingle-mills
Slaughter-houses
Stables   	
Stores
10
77
Electrical appliances  3
Exposure   1
Furnace insufficiently protected  1
Rubbish around furnace  1
Short  circuit   1
Smokers' carelessness   3
Sparks from chimney   2
Sparks from fireplace   1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Sparks from chimney  1
Unknown     1
Exposure  1
Hot box     2
Incendiary  1
Match carelessness  1
Sparks from boiler   3
Sparks from bush fire   3
Sparks from Dutch oven   1
Sparks from  engine    1
Sparks from mill burner   8
Unknown     8
Defective chimney   1
Lightning   1
Phosphorus     1
Sparks from chimney   4
Spontaneous  combustion  1
Unknown     2
Ashes against wood   1
Candle   carelessness     1
Defective   lamp  1
Defective stove-pipe  2
Exposure     1
Grease  on  stove  1
Lime ignited by water   1
Hatch  carelessness  1
Matches, children with   5
Short  circuit   1
Smokers'   carelessness     3
Sparks from chimney  1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     7
Overheating of dry-kiln   1
Sparks from chimney   1
Sparks  from  locomotive    1
Sparks from mill burner   1
Unknown     4
Sparks from locomotive  :......... 1
Ashes against wood   1
Exposure     1
Smokers'   carelessness     4
Sparks from chimney   1
Ashes against wood  1
Defective chimney   5
Defective wiring  1
Electrical  appliances    5
Exposure  25
Gasolene carelessness   1
Grease on stove   2
Incendiary    3
23
152
850
2,803
350
29
780
24
9
t    1,780
6,332
2,000
250
1,062
46,893
1,494
3,000
249,026
275,180
37,257
172
32
138
627
1,450
30
250
200
05
505
29
2'50
100
725
375
315
10
100
1,005
27,865
302
14,755
13,846
49,895
15
24
3,738
829
23
5,701
350
525
42,372
1,483
1,444
2,788
5,011
14
300
587,017
39,670
3.950
106.663
3,200
4,000 REPORT OF FIRE AIARSHAL, 1926.
D 19
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Stores and apartments
Stores and dwellings
Stores and hotels
Stores and offices       10
Stores, offices, and apartments 1
Stores, offices, and rooms  1
Stores and post-offices   1
Stores and rooms   19
Street-cars    2
Tanneries    1
Telephone exchanges   2
Tents   1
Theatres   6
Lamp upset   1
Match carelessness   3
Short  circuit   1
Smokers' carelessness   13
Sparks from chimney   3
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe   1
Spontaneous combustion   2
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected .... 3
Unknown     7
Defective wiring   1
Exposure   1
Oil-stove upset   1
Smokers'   carelessness     2
Unknown     2
Ashes against wood  1
Defective chimney  1
Defective  fireplace    2
Exposure     6
Gasolene carelessness   1
Lamp explosion   2
Match carelessness   2
Smokers'   carelessness     2
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from chimney   4
Sparks from furnace   1
Sparks from stove   1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected .... 3
Unknown     10
Smokers' carelessness   4
Sparks from fireplace   1
Unknown  1
Defective matches   1
Defective wiring   1
Exposure  1
Matches, mice with   1
Smokers' carelessness   2
Sparks from engine   1
Spontaneous combustion  1
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Tar boiling over   1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Matches,  mice with   i
Unknown     1
Defective  stove   2
Exposure     1
Grease  on  stove    1
Incendiary     i
Smokers' carelessness   11
Stove insufficiently protected   2
Tar boiling over  l
Short circuit   2
Unknown     1
Exposure     i
Sparks from chimney   l
Sparks from stove   l
Defective film   2
Smokers'   carelessness    2
Unknown     2
251
50
8,916
40
4,800
3,301
3,951
42,524
$   118,544
14
59
71
308
47
42
2,450
132
19,497
300
9,551
445
770
20
17,006
58
1,839
3,842
45420
191
1,900
5,776
53
3,293
4,522
1,062
28,092
113
1,169
5
112
730
138
560
67
3,619
1,715
5,400
150
25
367
277
10,837
409
101,072
7,807
38,421
7
34
11,839
12,229
125
50,990
175
10
11,481 D 20
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount
of Loss.
1
         1
$  10,426
68
453,631
75
4,400
430
226
10,276
5
1,000
68,092
102,983
$           400
    103
Boiler insufficiently protected ..„	
1
         1
Defective blower 	
1
       80
        1
         1
Match carelessness 	
9
            1
         3
         1
Sparks from  stove 	
1
         3
Unknown    .'	
8
         1
051,612
40
als	
1,834
1,834
To
$3,638,427 REPORT  OF  FIRPj  AIARSHAL,  1926.
D 21
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Z D 22
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
TABLE VI.—LOSS OF LIFE, 1922-26.
Occupancy.
Cause of Fire.
Loss of Life.
Adults.
Children.
5
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
4
Totals,  1926	
8
5
1
&
8
10
Totals, 1925	
4
Totals,  1921..	
Totals,  1923	
9
Totals,  1922	
2
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Chakt.es F. Banfikld, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1927.
-027-7750

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