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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA REPORT OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 1926-27 NORMAN F. BLACK, Vancouver,… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1928]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EEPOET
OF   THE
PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION
1926-27
NORMAN F. BLACK, Vancouver, Chairman.
CHRISTINA ROSS FRAME, Victoria.
LAURA E. JAMIESON, New Westminster.
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Charles F.  Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1D2S.  -
REPORT OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION,
1926-27.
FUNCTIONS OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION.
The " Public Libraries Act" of 1919 made provision for the appointment by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council of a Board known as the " Public Library Commission." It consists of
three members who serve without compensation. The powers and duties of the Public Library
Commission, as defined by law, include the following:—■
(a.)  To co-operate with public library associations, public library boards, and librarians
on matters pertaining to the organization,  maintenance, and administration of
public libraries under this Act:
(6.)  To apportion the moneys annually appropriated by the Legislature for the aid of
public libraries:
(c.)  To promote by counsel and encouragement the establishment and extension of
public-library facilities, and generally superintend public-library activities in the
manner provided in the Act:
(<?.)  To operate a system of travelling libraries:
(e.)  To submit an annual report of its doings to the Provincial Secretary, to be laid
before the Legislature.
PUBLIC LIBRARIES.
The number of public libraries remains the same as a year ago. Of the six public libraries,
five of them are administered according to the terms of the Act. These are Victoria, Vancouver,
Nanaimo, Nelson, and Prince Rupert. The voters of New Westminster will in January, 1928,
decide whether the Public Library in that city is to be so administered.
PUBLIC LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS.
Three Public Library Associations have been incorporated since the report of the Commission
for 1925-26 was issued. These are at Alberni, Kimberley, and North Burnaby. There are now
twenty-three such associations, as defined in the " Public Libraries Act"—Alberni, Collingwood
East, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Creston, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Ganges, Hollyburn, Inver-
mere, Kaslo, Kimberley, Merritt, Nakusp, North Burnaby, North Vancouver, Penticton, Revelstoke, Salmon Arm, Shawnigan, Sidney, and Telkwa. Collingwood East and Telkwa own their
library buildings;   the other associations are in rented quarters.
Four of the associations borrow books under contract, as provided for by section 37 of the
Act, with the Victoria Public Library, paying about $55 per annum for each 100 books received
each three months.    Twenty-two associations receive loans of books from the Commission.
The library of a Public Library Association may be made a fair substitute for a public
library in an unorganized district, a municipality with a small population, or a city which is
unable for various reasons to establish a municipal library. It was the hope and intention of
the framers of the " Public Libraries Act " that the officers of all associations would endeavour
to give free book-service to all persons in their communities; but it would appear that in very
few cases has any effort been made to serve the general public. This is a serious omission and
the Public Library Commission has this year advised all parties concerned that henceforth it
will not issue travelling libraries to these associations unless the books are made available to the
general public. It was expected by those responsible for the passage of the present " Public
Libraries Act" that the libraries maintained by Public Library Associations would rapidly tend
to be transformed into municipal libraries. Perhaps the restricted range of service with which
most Public Library Associations have been content has been a factor in the failure of these
hopes. The Public Library Association at Nanaimo was at all events one of the very few
providing services to all citizens alike, and this is the only library established by a Public
Library Association which has become a municipal library proper. The city took over the assets
of the association in September, 1924, and has since then conducted it as a free library available
to all citizens. H 4 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Three Public Library Associations—at Corbin, Fernie, and Port Alberni—have gone out of
existence, partly because of the inactivity of the boards, but chiefly on account of the lack of a
sufficient stock of books and of funds adequate to their renewal. It has been the experience of
Great Britain, Eastern Canada, and of other States and countries that little isolated libraries
rarely succeed. Many of our Public Library. Associations are doing work that is quite invaluable, but experience shows that they are suffering under handicaps of a very discouraging character. Some means must be devised under which there may be more efficient co-operation and
interchange, particularly in rural and pioneer communities. The problems involved in such a
reform are receiving the very serious study of the Public Library Commission.
SCHOOL LIBRARIES.
It is a matter of notoriety that in very many school districts no adequate school library is
at present maintained and numerous requests come to the Public Library Commission from
teachers and others who realize the imperative need of some book-service and are at a loss
where else to secure it. It is the policy of the Commission to comply with these requests in so
far as the resources at its disposal will permit. The book-stock of the Commission contains a
considerable number of books suitable for children's general reading and for supplementary
reading in schools. During the past year forty-three one-room rural schools were supplied with
books by the Commission, but many other applicants wrere refused whose needs and claim were
equally great. Very many of the teachers are keenly alive to the value of books other than
texts, and it is a pity that some adequate provision is not made in this regard. Teachers and
trustees need guidance in choosing the best books, buying at the lowest rates, taking care of the
books in their possession, and using them to the best advantage.
TRAVELLING LIBRARIES.
A recent investigation shows that 44 per cent, of the population of the United States and
Canada are without access to public-library service, and that 93 per cent, of the people without
public-library service live in the open country or in villages of less than 2,500 population. If it
is the duty of the State to care for the intellectual development of the townsman, it is certainly
an equal duty to give the same opportunities for development to those who live far from the
crowd. It has been said that " The most fundamental handicap upon the farmer . . . seems
to be restricted freedom of contact with people and with the human mind." As far as this
handicap can be overcome by the use of books, the various States and Provinces have sought to
overcome it through methods of library extension.
In such a Province as British Columbia, where most of the territory is unorganized, and the
rural population is something less than one to the square mile, it is impossible for the people in
the country to give themselves adequate library service; and it therefore devolves upon the
Provincial Government to supply these people with books. Travelling libraries have been, and
will probably continue to be for some time, the only method of service. British Columbia began
this work in 1898, being the first Province in Canada to establish such a service. During the
period covered by the present report 386 travelling libraries, averaging about ninety volumes
each, have been loaned by the Commission. Interesting comparative statistics are appended to
this report. Those relating to borrowers and circulation are, quite inevitably, very incomplete.
All library field-workers have encountered the impossibility of having such statistical records
correctly kept by voluntary librarians; and, indeed, it is unfair to expect unpaid workers to
burden themselves with the labour involved in keeping elaborate records. Furthermore, it
very commonly happens that a book is borrowed by one person, is read by the several members
of his family, and is afterwards passed on to neighbours before being returned to the local
custodian. Consequently, no accurate statement of the actual number of readers using the
travelling libraries is possible. For this reason the authorities in charge of the travelling
libraries in certain countries and States distinguished for library efficiency—as, for example,
Wisconsin—now estimate circulation on the basis of five readers for each book issued.
An application for the use of a travelling library is signed by ten adult residents who make
themselves responsible for the welfare of the books, agree to lend them free of charge to all
persons in the community, choose the librarian, and decide where the books are to be kept. A
travelling library is lent by the Commission for six months, and is then returned to headquarters
to be exchanged for a new library.    The borrowing community pays the return freight charges. PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION REPORT, 1926-27.
H 5
The books are selected at headquarters from the general stock, with the needs and desires of the
special community in mind;  but requests for books specially desired are always welcomed.
BOOKS BY MAIL.
Important as is the service rendered to thousands of general readers through the travelling
libraries discussed above, from the point of view of serious students a still more valuable source
of assistance is what is called the " Open Shelf." This is a carefully selected reference library
of some 7,000 volumes, supplemented at need by approximately 20,000 additional books available
from the well-stocked shelves of the Provincial Library. These books are for the use of any
person in the Province who cannot use one of the public libraries. Books may be borrowed by
mail for a period of six weeks, and the loan will be renewed for a further period of four weeks
if the books have not been asked for by others. Any reasonable number of books may be
borrowed at one time.    The borrower pays return postage.
The following list of titles of books sent out in a single day illustrates the wide range of
subjects studied by the readers who make use of the " Open Shelf " :—
Art of Florence.
Ibsen's plays.
Life of Schumann.
General introduction to psychoanalysis.
Handbook of nature study.
The Normans in European history.
A half-century of conflict.
Montcalm and Wolfe.
Inge's Outspoken essays.
Your heart and how to take care of it.
Bees and bee-keeping.
Successful teaching in rural schools.
High school debate book.
Rural education.
Education and the good life.
•Man's judgment of death.
Adventures of missionary explorers.
Men and missions.
Goldberg's Havelock Ellis.
The number of requests for lists of our books has become so large that the Commission plans
to print a number of book-lists next year.    This will mean a still larger increase in the number
of books circulated, just as soon as people learn of our resources.    The growth of this service
will be seen by comparing the statistics for several years:—
1923-24.
1924-25.
1025-26.
1926-27.
392
1,024
500
|   1,185
1
1,185
2,527
2,222
6,033
GRANTS TO LIBRARIES.
Grants in aid of libraries are based primarily on the amount spent for non-fiction or for
contracts for book-service. Grants were paid as follows: Alberni, $27.50; Courtenay, $17.62;
Cumberland, $200; Hollyburn, $12.94; Nakusp, $9.50; Nanaimo, $200; Nelson, $200; North
Vancouver, $42.81;  Prince Rupert, $200 ;   Shawnigan, $34;   Sidney, $9.05.
RESTORATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION.
The former Chairman of the Public Library Commission, Miss Helen Stewart, of Victoria,
to whom the libraries of British Columbia are so deeply indebted, removed from the Province
in 1923. The commissions of the other members, Mr. M. B. Jackson, K.C, and Professor G. G.
Sedgewick, expired by efflux of time. For a considerable interval the appointment of any successors, as provided for in the " Public Libraries Act," was left in abeyance.
In December, 1926, however, the appointment of the present Commissioners was gazetted.
It is evident that in the interval the work for which the Public Library Commission is
responsible under the law had been carried forward with commendable faithfulness by the
Secretary of the Commission and his staff. Nevertheless, the Commission found itself facing a
situation that seemed to necessitate a general inquiry into British Columbia library conditions
and the problems incidental thereto.
So far as the Commission was aware, there was almost a complete lack of library facilities
outside the larger towns, except for the travelling libraries and " Open Shelf," and the proportion of the general population that was being reached by these means seemed very small. Were the services that by law are available to the public, through the Public Library Commission, widely known? AVas there any real desire for any reading-matter in the districts not
heard from? What other avenues of book-supply were available to the people? Why were there
only half a dozen municipal libraries in the Province? Why were the Public Library Associations not stronger and more numerous? These and many similar questions faced the Commission. An unusual number of Commission meetings and of other conferences have therefore
been necessary during the past twelve months, apart from a total of hundreds of hours of labour
and study by the members of the Commission working independently or in association with
various committees.
STATEMENT OE PROGRAMME AND POLICY.
With a view to clarifying the situation, the Commission, on January 8th, 1927, drafted and
adopted a memorandum couched in the following terms:—
At the organization meeting of the recently appointed Public Library Commission it was the
unanimous opinion of the members that the first important step should be a survey of existing
library conditions in British Columbia and the collection of relevant information from other
Provinces and States where similar problems and conditions are being or have previously been
faced.
It was the consensus of opinion that the attitude and policy of the Commission should be
characterized by the freest and most friendly co-operation with all other bodies directly interested in the promotion of library facilities throughout the Province. In accordance with this
policy it was agreed to approach the .executive committee of the British Columbia Library
Association forthwith, requesting active collaboration in the projected initial survey. Similar
co-operation with other associations was also discussed and will be given definite attention at the
next meeting of the Commission.
It was furthermore agreed that the Commission should proceed without undue haste, and
after the freest possible consultation with the Provincial Secretary and other persons immediately concerned, to formulate a general library policy for gradual development during a term of
several years. Such a policy, it was thought, should probably include such matters as the
following:—■
(1.) The promotion, by every means at the command of the Commission, of plans for the
further extension of library facilities to localities in which the creation of an independent
library is at present impossible or would be inadvisable. In this connection the Commission will
study the following possible lines of activity:—
(</.)  The further development of travelling libraries.
(6.)  Inter-library exchanges.
(c.)  Further means whereby the municipal libraries of the larger cities might be used
to supplement the book-supplies of the Government that are available for use in
localities less advantageously placed.
(d.)  Library-vans, particularly to serve such regions as the Fraser Valley,
(e.)  Library-cars for use on railway-lines in parts of the Province in which library-vans
would have difficulty in functioning to advantage.
(/.)  The loaning of music and phonograph records.
(g.)  Further developments in book-lending by mail and express.
(2.) The systematic development of the existing reference library in  education  and  of
technical reference libraries in other desired subjects, for use of students throughout the
Province.
(3.) More active and fruitful co-operation between school authorities and library boards.
(a.) Local " transfer " libraries for city schools.
(6.)  Co-operation of teachers and librarians in the preparation of library bulletins for
school use.
(c.) Training of pupils in the wise use of a library, both for general reading and,for
reference.
{d.) Training of teachers as librarians.
(e.)  Co-operation with the librarians of Normal Schools, the appointment of whom has
been recommended in the recent school survey.
(4.)  The encouragement and development of library service for the blind and for inmates
of various public institutions. PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION REPORT, 1926-27. H 7
(5.) Affiliation with the League of Library Commissions and the systematic collation of
information as to the most profitable forms of Commission activity. In this connection it was
felt that the Commission should be represented at the convention of the American Library
Association to be held this year at Toronto.
(6.)  Study of library legislation.
Means were discussed whereby the members of the Commission may be kept in constant
touch with the work of the office between meetings, and of maintaining the most intimate possible
association with the Minister, to whom the Commission is directly answerable, and; with the
Government at large.
It was felt that the usefulness of the Commission would depend largely upon the success
with which the general public are kept advised of what is actually being done by the Government through the Commission in the promotion of library welfare. The Commissioners believed
that the good-will and co-operation of the press should be sought in this connection, and the use
of other means of publicity, such as the radio, was taken into consideration.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY SURVEY.
In pursuance of the foregoing statement of policy, the Commission has this year devoted
itself largely to the launching and oversight of the library survey now in progress. That survey
is still uncompleted and ft would be premature in this report to go into the matter of its probable
findings. It seems necessary, however, to outline certain features which make this survey
unique in library history and to explain the machinery through which the inquiry is being
conducted.
It has been the aim of the survey to include within its scope every form of book-service,
regarding which information could be secured. The stock-taking is planned to reach every
corner of the Province. No survey involving such varied forms of book-service, official and
unofficial, has ever been attempted before on any such scale. The survey is absolutely voluntary,
co-operative, and non-official, there being nothing mandatory about the requests for information.
A chief.function of the Commission has been to act as a liaison body, through whose friendly
offices those persons actively interested in library service might join hands for mutual assistance
and the general betterment of library facilities of whatever sort.
The collection and organization of the required data has been placed by the Commission in
the hands of a Research Board consisting of six professional librarians, a representative of the
British Columbia Teachers' Federation, and the three members of the Public Library Commission.
The Research Board itself, however, will not be directly responsible for the recommendations
as to library policy which it is hoped will emerge as a result of the survey. It helps to prepare
the evidence, but that evidence is for the study by a lay jury known as the Survey Council.
That body consists of some thirty outstanding laymen, appointed by the Commission, in most
cases on the nomination of such bodies as the Parent-Teacher Federation, the Provincial School
Trustees' Association, Canadian Clubs, the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire,
Boards of Trade, Service Clubs of many names, Women's Institutes, and other Province-wide
organizations of a non-political and non-ecclesiastical character existing for the promotion of
the public weal. The Executive Committee of the Survey Council included R. L. Reid, Esq.,
K.C, Chairman, and three members of the Legislature, Mrs. Ralph Smith and Messrs. A. McC.
Creery and Francis A. Browne.
Since April the headquarters of the survey has been Room 414 in the Dominion Building,
Vancouver, where an enormous amount of clerical work has been carried out.
The aid of members of the Legislature, inspectors of schools, municipal clerks, and many
others possessed of exceptional familiarity with various parts of the Province was invited in an
effort to secure, in every locality in British Columbia where a post-office exists, one or more
correspondents from whom information might be secured and through whom information might
be given out. The resulting mailing-lists include the names of approximately 2,300 persons of
outstanding prominence in their respective communities, in addition to practically the whole
teaching force of British Columbia. In various places these correspondents have organized
local survey committees, enlisting the co-operation of many of their fellow-citizens.
Some of the most interesting and important results of the inquiries of the Research Board
have been included in bulletins published for the information of the Survey Council and of all
others concerned.    These reports are mailed gratis to every one on the survey mailing-list and to any one else signifying his wish to receive them. By the end of December, 1927, about half the
projected series of bulletins had been completed, the titles being as follows:—
No. 1. An Address by the Public Library Commission to the People of British
Columbia.
No. 2. The Present Status of B.C. Library Associations, March, 1927.
No. 3. Public Libraries in B.C. Urban Communities.
No. 4. Libraries in One-room Schools, a Preliminary Study.
No. 5. Library Service for the Blind.
No. 6. Special or Occupational Libraries.
No. 7. Provincial Travelling Library System.
No. 8. Libraries in Hospitals, Orphanages, and Correctional Institutions.
No. 9. The Open Shelf.
No. 10. What has British Columbia to learn from the Rural Library Systems of the
Mother Land?
COST TO THE PROVINCE.
An enterprise of this magnitude has necessarily cost money, in spite of an almost unprecedented draft upon voluntary unpaid labour. The Commission asked and ultimately received
permission from the proper authorities for the expenditure of not mqxe than $1,500 of public
money for the expenses of the survey, and by December, 1927, $896.48 of this allowance had
been so expended, on printing, postage, and clerical assistance.
PRIVATE FUNDS MADE AVAILABLE.
The famous British Library Survey of 1915 was financed by the Carnegie United Kingdom
Trust from funds the proceeds of which are exclusively for use in Great Britain and Ireland.
Another similar $10,000,000 fund has been created for use outside the boundaries of the British
Isles or of the United States, and early in the year the Commission made application to the
trustees for financial aid in the solution of British Columbia library problems. The upshot of
this correspondence and of personal interviews between the Secretary of the Commission, other
members of the Research Board, and the Assistant to the President of the Carnegie Corporation,
on the occasion of the International Library Convention at Toronto in June, 1927, is indicated
in the following letter:—
" Office of the President.
" Carnegie Corporation
of New York,
522 Fifth Avenue, New York, October 21st, 1927.
" Mr. Norman F. Black,
Chairman, Public Library Commission,
2309 Trafalgar Road, Vancouver, B.C.
" Dear Mr. Black,—We are very glad to be able to tell you that the Trustees of the
Carnegie Corporation at a meeting yesterday made the following appropriation:—
" Sum:   $6,000.
" To: Public Library Commission of British Columbia.
" For:   Support of library survey.
" WilTyou please express your preference as to time and manner of payment?
" Sincerely yours,
"(Signed)    F. A. Kef-pel."
While no conditions whatever are attached to this grant, there was an understanding that
it should be used chiefly to secure expert professional advice for the guidance of the Commission,
the Research Board, and the Survey Council. The Commission accordingly requested the
Executive of American Library Association (the President of which society"' was last year a
Canadian, Dr. George H. Locke, of Toronto) to nominate a number of librarians of international
distinction whose services might be secured. From among the nominations thus submitted the
Commission chose Mr. C. B. Lester, Secretary of the Free Library Commission, Madison, Wisconsin. He accepted the invitation and arrived in the Province on December 9th, 1927. Meantime the first instalment of the money voted by the Carnegie Trustees had arrived and all
survey expenses arising since that date have been met from this fund.    As for its administration, PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION REPORT, 1926-27. H 9
the members of the Commission are acting in a quasi-private capacity as trustees; these moneys
have been kept distinct from all Government funds, being deposited with a trust company and
disbursed on the order of the Chairman and one other member of the Commission.
RESPONSIBILITY.
At every stage the Commission has been at the utmost pains to keep the Government fully
advised as to its plans and policies and to benefit by advice and suggestions from members of the
Government and departmental heads, but for the decisions ultimately reached in everything
connected with its conduct of the library survey the Commission assumes full responsibility.
PROSPECTIVE REFORMS.
Pending the completion of the library survey, the Commission has during 1927 refrained from
inaugurating any important changes that could well be postponed. Mr. Lester will require
several months to complete his labours, and some time during 1928 the Survey Council, with his
assistance, will doubtless submit its report, which the Commission at the earliest possible date
will make known to the Government, the Legislature, and the public at large. It is the belief
of the Commission that at very moderate expense to the Province reforms of very great magnitude can be effected, that will bring an abundance of the very best reading-matter within easy
reach of the boys and girls and adult citizens of every quarter of British Columbia.
FINANCIAL ESTIMATES.
As shown elsewhere in this report, the demand for book-service through the Open Shelf
reference library or through travelling libraries is steadily and rapidly increasing, and the
Commission respectfully recommends that the sums voted in support of this service be increased
accordingly. The public moneys spent in recent years under the " Public Libraries Act " have
been as follows: In 1921-22, $13,020; in 1922-23, $9,936; in 1923-24, $10,140; in 1924-25,
$9,990; in 1925-26, $8,970; in 1926-27, $11,710. These figures by no means reflect the expansion
that has occurred in the work of the travelling library and Open Shelf department. No large
increases are recommended in any particular items, but a moderate general advance seems more
than merely justifiable.
MAINTENANCE OF BOOK-SUPPLIES.
Books in frequent use deteriorate rapidly; others, particularly scientific reference works,
often get out of date very soon. During the past five years, 4,681 books have been discarded, the
discards for the year just ended numbering about 800. The necessity of taking care of this
inevitable depreciation must be borne in mind when determining grants for library maintenance.
Annual estimates for book purchase should, therefore, increase with the size of the stock to be
replenished, if needed replacements are to be covered. Moreover, as the system of book loans
administered by the Commission under the " Public Libraries Act " becomes increasingly popular
and useful, due provision should be made for additional travelling libraries and for reference
works which at present we lack.
In 1927 there were 386 travelling libraries in operation and loans from the Open Shelf
numbered 6,633. There is every indication that the popular demand for good reading, especially
for non-fiction, will continue to grow rapidly next year. Additional travelling libraries will be
needed and certain sections of the Open Shelf collection reference books for loan by mail are
conspicuously wanting in certain important and expensive types of books. Since 1920-21 the
average annual expenditure for new books has been $3,995.05. For the past two years the
amount allowed has been $4,000. Allowing for ordinary depreciation, it is doubtful whether this
sum is sufficient to secure any net increase in the actual value of the library. The Commission
accordingly hopes that the sum allotted for book purchase will be substantially increased.
FREIGHT, EXPRESS, AND CARTAGE.
The grant of $1,300 voted last year has not proved sufficient to pay the expenses of the
carriage of books. Moreover, experience has shown that hitherto many of the travelling libraries
have been allowed to remain out too long; hereafter it will be the policy of the Commission to
call these collections in and to exchange them more frequently. This will involve increased
expense for transportation, but will result in economies in the care of the books and in better
service to the public. INCREASED PROVISION FOR GRANTS.
Hitherto Victoria and Vancouver have foregone any claim upon the Commission for grants
under the " Public Libraries Act," but these libraries and that of New Westminster will expect
their legal allotments hereafter. Under present usage this will be $200 for each of these
libraries.
TRAVELLING EXPENSES.'
The Commission was at work during only nine months of the past year, which for statistical
purposes in this connection ended on September 30th, 1927. The expenditures for the travelling
expenses of the Commissioners has been proportionately less than intimated. These expenses,
together with the travelling expenses of the Secretary of the Commission, amounted to $229.42,
just within the estimate.
POSTAGE.
During the past year the outlay under this heading has amounted to $366.57, largely for the
issue of books by mail to individual students. Such borrowers pay the return postage. These
patrons of the Open Shelf increased from 1,185 in 1926 to 2,222 in 1927, and may reasonably be
expected to double their numbers next year.
PRINTING AND STATIONERY.
Routine supplies will cost only slightly more than for the past year, during which they
amounted to $215.02.
There is, however, manifest urgent necessity for the printing of classified book-lists as a
guide to the increasing number of serious readers and students. Requests for such catalogues
reach the Commission almost daily. Without these keys to available book-supplies many of our
books necessarily tend to become dead lumber. A special list of educational works issued in
the autumn of 1926 proved invaluable, but the edition was not sufficiently large and book-lists
on many other subjects are in keen demand. These needed partial catalogues should, for
economy, be issued in editions large enough to last for several years. Hitherto there has been
practically no financial provision for printing of this sort, but it really cannot be delayed any
longer without crippling the service.
TRAVELLING LIBRARY DEPOSIT STATIONS.
Agassiz.
Aiyansh.
Alberni (P.L.A.).
Aldergrove.
Aleza Lake (School).
Anglemont.
Annable (School).
Appledale.
Arrandale Cannery.
Arras.
Arrow Park.
Atchelitz.
Atlin.
Auldgirth.
Balaclava Island.
Balfour.
Banfield.
Barrett Rock Fog Alarm.
Beaver Creek.
Beaver Lake (School).
Bella Bella.
Bella Coola.
Bestwick.
Big Lake (School).
Birch Island (School).
Boswell.
Bouchie Lake.
Bowser.
Brackendale.
Bull River.
Burquitlam.
Burton City.
Cape Beale.
Capilano Light.
Carmanah Light.
Cawston.
Cedarvale.
Ceepeecee.
Celista.
C.G.S. " Estevan."
Chapman's Camp.
Chase (School).
Chemainus (School).
Chilco.
Chilliwack.
Chinook Cove.
Chu Chua.
Clayburn.
Cloverdale.
Cobble Hill.
Cobble Hill (School).
Collingwood East (P.L.A.).
Copper City.
Copper Mountain.
Courtenay (P.L.A.).
Cranbrook (P.L.A.).
Crawford Bay.
Creston (P.L.A.).
Cumberland (P.L.A.).
Daisy Lake.
Delta Manor.
Denman Island.
Deroche.
Driftwood Creek (School).
Duncan (P.L.A.).
Duncan High School.
Eagle Bay.
East Kelowna.
Edgewater (School).
Edgewood.
Enderby (P.L.A.).
Englewood.
Entrance Island Light.
Erickson.
Errington. PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION REPORT, 1926-27.
H 11
Estevan Light.
Evelyn.
Ewing's Landing.
Falkland.
Fanny Bay.
Fernie (School).
Fort Langley.
Fort St. James.
Fort St. John.
Fort St. John (School).
Fraser Lake (School).
Fruitvale.
Galena Bay.
Galiano Island.
Ganges (P.L.A.).
Glenora (School).
Goldstream.
Graham Landing.
Grande Prairie (School).
Gray Creek.
Great Central.
Greenlake (School).
Greenwood.
Grindrod.
Grindrod (School).
Happy Valley (School).
Heffley Creek.
Heriot Bay.
Heywood's corner.
Hilliers.
Holberg.
Hollyburn (P.L.A.).
Hope.
Hope Bay.
Hornby Island.
Houston.
loco.
James Island.
Jesmond.
Kaslo (P.L.A.).
Keating (School).
Keating.
Keefers (School).
Kennfalls.
Kettle Valley.
Kimberley (P.L.A.).
Kitimat.
Kitwanga.
Klemtu.
Knob Hill.
Koksilah (School).
Lakelse Lake.
Langford.
Langley Prairie.
Larkin.
Lasqueti Island.
Lavington (School).
Lawn Hill.
Laxton.
Lazo.
Lennard Island Light.
Little Qualicum.
Little Qualicum (School).
Lumby.
Lytton (School).
McMurdo (School).
Magna Bay.
Malakwa.
Mamette Lake (School).
Mapes (School).
Mara.
Matsqui.
Mayne Island.
Mayo (School).
Mazama.
Merritt (P.L.A.).
Metchosin.
Metchosin (School).
Mill Bay.
Mill Bay (School).
Mount Ida.
Mount Olie.
Moyie.
Naas Harbour.
Nadina.
Nakusp (P.L.A.).
Nanaimo.
Nanoose.
Naramata (School).
Nelson (School).
Nelson.
New Denver.
Nichol.
Nithi River.
Nootka.
North Burnaby (P.L.A.).
North Vancouver (P.L.A.).
Norwegian Creek (School).
Ocean Falls.
Ocean Park.
150-Mile House.
Oona River.
Ootsa Lake (School).
Osland.
Otter.
Oyster Bay (School).
Pachena Point Light.
Palling.
Parksville.
Parson.
Passmore.
Pemberton Meadows.
Pender Island (School).
Penticton (P.L.A.).
Perow.
Port Edward.
Port Essington.
Port Hammond.
Port Haney.
Port Hardy (School).
Port Mann.
Port Moody (School).
Port Renfrew.
Port AVashington.
Pouce Coupe.
Powell River.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Procter.
Quathiaski Cove.
Queen Alexandra Solarium.
Queen's Bay.
Quesnel (School).
Quick (School).
Raft River (School).
Revelstoke (P.L.A.).
Roberts Creek.
Robins Range.
Robson.
Rock Bay.
Rolla.
Rose Harbour.
Rutland.
Sahtlam (School).
Salmo.
Salmon Arm (P.L.A.).
Sandon.
Saturna.
Sayward.
Seaford.
Sechelt.
Shawnigan Lake (P.L.A.).
Shawnigan Lake (School).
Shelter Arm.
Sheringham Point Light.
Shushartie.
Sidney (P.L.A.).
Silver Valley.
Skidegate.
Skidegate (School).
Slocan City.
Slocan Park.
Smithers.
Sointula.
Sointula (School).
Solsqua.
Sooke.
South Bulkley.
South Bulkley (School).
South Francois Lake
(School).
South Gabriola Island.
South Meridian. H 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
South Pender.
South Slocan.
South Saltspring.
South Westminster.
Spirit River.
Stevenson Creek (School).
Stewart (School).
Stratlmaver.
Strawberry Hill.
Streatham (School).
Surge Narrows.
Tappen.
Tarrys.
Telkwa (P.L.A.).
Terrace.
Thetis Island.
Thetis Island (School).
Thurston Bay.
Tintagel.
Tofino (School).
Topley.
Tranquille (School).
Upper Tranquille (School).
Trepanier.
Ucluelet.
Vanderhoof.
Vavenby.
Vedder Crossing.
Victoria High School.
Vimy.
Waldo (School).
Waneta.
Wardner.
Westbank (School).
Whaletown.
Wilkinson Road.
Williams Lake.
Willoughby.
Wilson Creek.
Winlaw.
Wistaria.
Woodpecker.
Yahk.
Yellow Rock Light.
TRAVELLING LIBRARIES.
Libraries
sent out.
Volumes.
Borrowers.
ClBCULATION.
Year.
Fiction.
Non-fiction.
Juvenile.
1919	
224
231
219
238
232
219
228
276
386
12,022
16,013
15,779
20,071
18,887
18,094
20,738
23,232
34,322
3,669
4,329
4,086
4,709
9,457
7,869
8,766
11,521
16,962
13,218
26,299
16,364
20,705
32,659
3-0,423
37,153
43,658
01,593
3,033
4,396
5,681
5,138
10,543
10,306
12,742
12,779
12,410
4,246
1920	
3,294
1921, Jan.  Sept.
5 649
1921-'>2	
8,449
1922-23	
1923-24	
12,659
12,448
1924-25           	
13,914
18,192
20,516
1925-26     	
1926-27	
Totals	
2,253
179,158
71,368
282,072
I
77,028
99 367
Total circulation, 458,467.
OPEN SHELF.
ear' Borrowers.
1923-24  392
1924-25  500
1925-26  1,185
1926-27 ,  2,222
Totals ,  4,299
Volumes sent.
1,024
1,185
2,527
6,633
11,369 PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION REPORT, 1926-27.
H 13
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