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SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIES OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE YEAR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1921

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 *
SECOND ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIES
OF  THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR   THE
YEAR ENDING-DECEMBER 31ST
1920
PHINTED BY
AUTHORITY   OF  THE   LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by William H.  Cullin,  Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1921.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Second" Annual Report of the Department of Industries of this Province
is herewith respectfully submitted.
JOHN OLIVER,
Premier.
Premier's Office,
February 9th, 1921. Department obi Industries.
Victoria, B.C., February 9th, 1921.
The Honourable John Oliver, Premier,
Minister of Industries, Victoria, B.C.
Dear Sir,—In pursuance of section 9 of the " Department of Industries Act,"
I enclose herewith Annual Report.
Yours truly,
D. B. MABTYN,
Industrial Commissioner. Report of the Department of Industries.
To the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In accordance with the " Department of Industries Act," the following report is made.
It contains:—
(a.)  Organization:
(&.)  Research-work:
(c.)  Summary of Applications received:
(d.)  Loans granted:
(e.)  Statement of Repayments and Interest Overdue:
(/.)  Classification of Applications:
(g.)  Financial Statement showing the Disbursements from the Development Fund:
(ft.)  Industrial Summary of Provincial Industries:
(i.) Report of Nichol Thompson on the Markets for Iron and Steel:
(;'.)  Classification of British Columbia Industries.
(a.)  Organization.
The Department of Industries as at present organized consists of the Minister of Industries,
the Honourable John Oliver; a Deputy Minister, known as the Industrial Commissioner, Major
Donald B. Martyn; and an Advisory Council to the Industrial Commissioner, acting without pay,
who are: Major R. J. Burde, M.C, M.P.P., Port Alberni; F. G. Dawson, Prince Rupert; Joshua
Kingham, 1004 Broad Street, Victoria; James H. McVety, Labour Temple, Vancouver; J. E. W.
Thompson, c/o Restmore Manufacturing Co., Vancouver; Nichol Thompson, 847 Beatty Street,
Vancouver.
The Advisory Council of the Department of Industries held five meetings during 1920 to
consider the applications for loans made to the Department; a complete summary of them is
embodied in this report.
(/).)  Research-work.
During the year 1920 considerable activity has been manifested in developing the iron and
steel industry on the Pacific Coast. There are several syndicates in the field making surveys
of the ore flux and fuel. The Department has co-operated in every instance, and to complete
the information at present available in respect to markets, the Department had Mr. Nichol
Thompson, a member of the Advisory Council, make a survey of the Coast markets and collect
data in respect to possible export markets. He reports a present market on the Pacific Coast
for 1,000 tons of pig-iron per day, sufficient to absorb the output of blast-furnaces of considerable
size.    A copy of this report is included herein.
During the year the Department made a survey and list of the various industrial plants
in operation in the Province and prepared a summary of the number of firms engaged in each
industry, the wages paid, the number of employees, and the average wage. As an addition to
this a complete list of the industries of British Columbia has been compiled showing the nature
and location.   Copies of this summary and list are attached.
The large number of applications coming under the review of the Advisory Council of the
Department, which in their opinion did not possess a reasonable prospect of success, prompts
them to recommend the introduction at an early date of a blue-sky law. In many cases applications were submitted in respect to industries where the promotion could be placed in the category
of a wild-cat promotion. It is the opinion of the Advisory Council that the industrial development
of the Province would be furthered by a blue-sky law.
(c.)   Summary or Applications received.
Total number of applications under advisement at Dec. 31st, 1919 6
Total number of applications under investigation at Dec. 31st, 1919 45
Total number of applications received to end of Dec. 31st, 1920 .. 362
Total amount applied for during 1920  $3,044,050.00
Total amount of loans approved   $630,658.48
Total amount of loans under advisement  $75,000.00
Total number of applications refused  306
Total number of applications granted  60
Total number of applications under advisement    4
Total number of applications under investigation  43 P 6
British Columbia.
1921
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H British Columbia.
1921
(e.)  Statement of Repayments and Inteeest Ovebdue.
Principal overdue  $4,SS3 37
Interest overdue   351 94
Total  $5,235 31
(/.)  Classification of hApplications.
Industry.
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Saw and shingle mills 	
Garage, etc	
Furniture    	
Boots and shoes 	
Toy-factories  	
Cut-to-fit buildings	
Wood-workers  	
Iron-workers and machinery plants  	
Fish packing and curing	
Other fishing proposals	
Fish by-products plants  	
Ladies' and children's wear	
Neckwear    	
Wood and coal  ,	
Trucking   	
Boat-building    	
Boat-hiring   	
Greenhouses and nurseries	
Box-factories  	
Manufacturing electrical fixtures	
Bakeries	
Groceries   	
Gloves    	
Logging   	
Fruit-canneries   	
Woollen-factories   	
Broom-handles    	
Phonographs   	
Glass-works     	
Patent rights   	
Canoe-factory   	
Bottling-works	
Saws  	
Paper bags   .	
Brick plants   	
Slate  	
Cooperage   	
Turpentine	
Eau de Cologne   	
Invention re sunken vessels	
Upholstery    	
Dyeing   	
Plating-works   	
Polishes   	
Tailoring   .(	
Manufacturing new food	
Transfer of equity in manufacturing concern
Sifter-spout    	
Brokerage business   	
Seeds    	
Sausage-factory    	
Carried forward	
50
7
9
4
a
23
6
32
2
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1
4
12
3
5
5
5
3
14
0
4
2.
3
3
5
1
1
2
10
3
1
2
1
4
33
251
46
32 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 9
(/.)  Classification of Applications—Continued.
Industry.
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Brought forward	
Hair dyes    	
Auto knitters   	
Purchase of stock   	
Trading    	
Motor  transportation   	
Importers and exporters	
Survey-work   	
Commercial agencies  	
Restaurant   	
Electric culture of farm produce
Cleaning and pressing	
Fish-peddling    	
Commission agent  	
Steam-shovel   	
Pool-room     ,	
Manufacturing men's clothing . .
Iron-pipe foundry    	
Merritt  industries	
Baby-carriages   	
Pickles   	
Spruce products  	
Steel   	
Concrete  blocks   	
Caskets    	
Sheep-raising    	
Wall-board     '.	
Flour-mill    	
Engines    	
Carbine    	
Soap   	
Cigar-factory    	
Tannery   	
Fruit-growing   	
Crispettes    	
Sandpaper   	
Jam-factory     	
Printing   	
Motion-pictures    	
Meat-packing    	
Lignite   	
Explosives   	
Whaling   	
Powdered milk   	
Plumbing   	
Sight-seeing  car   	
Lime-kiln   	
Spices and coffee  	
To purchase hotel   	
Silica    	
To build 	
Commercial piggery 	
Egg substitute   	
Monumental works   	
Photography   	
Trading-steamer   	
Buying of horses  	
Private schools 	
Chimney-sweeping   	
Ranching   	
Ochre   	
Adding-machine   	
Carried forward	
33
251
1
1
8
46
32
34
346
52
41 P 10
British Columbia.
1921
(/.)  Classification of Applications—Continued.
Industry.
Brought forward	
To pay promissory notes  	
Candied peel  	
Manufacturing small advertising novelties	
Umbrellas   	
Lath and crating   	
Manufacturing jewellery   	
Coke and by-products  	
Manufacturing paint 	
Manufacturing felt and building-paper	
Manufacturing chemicals and chemical fertilizer
Development of mineral claims  	
Stoves and furnaces  	
Water-proofing oils   	
Household specialties  	
Cigar-factory  	
Knitted goods 	
Reconditioning of canned goods	
Marble-works    	
Canned goods  	
Rubber soles and heels 	
Miscellaneous   	
Totals  	
©JS-ti
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34
45
wo
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346
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1
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1
1
360
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52
58
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41
43
(g.) Financial Statement showing the Disbuesements and Receipts of the
Development Fund, 1920.
Disbursements.
Receipts.
To Balance   at   credit   of   fund,
January 1st, 1920    $ 19,576 93
Advances     from     Provincial
Treasury        815,000 00
Refunds of loans and interest     11,642 15
By Disbursements  on account  of
loans granted    $836,671 44
Balance   at   credit   of   fund,
December 31st, 1920          9,547 64
$S46,219 OS
$846,219 08
(h.) Industbial Summary of Beitish Columbia Industeies.
Nature of Industry.
Creosoting    	
Logging  	
Pulp-mills    	
Saw and shingle mills	
Artificial limbs   	
Brooms and mops 	
Sash and door factories	
Cooperages  	
Furniture-manufacturing    	
Caskets and undertaking supplies ....
Veneer and excelsior  	
Planing-mills and wood-working plants
Vehicle-manufacturing   	
Wooden boxes  	
Wooden-toy manufacturing   	
Carpentering  (shop only)   	
No. of
Firms
engaged.
1
567
5
385
1
7
20
7
14
2
2
61
5
13
6
S
Total Wages
paid.
$      30,132 00
15,336,155 00
3,627,223 00
14,426,922 00
820 00
50,563 00
201,952 00
79,211 00
201,501 00
51,486 00
93,655 00
1,711,496 00
46,041 00
313,526 00
15,256 00
22,683 00
No. of
Employees.
23
11.250
2.822
12,645
1
113
231
74
183
43
112
1,902
36
355
18
16
Average
Wage
per Day.
$5 04
5 25
4 12
4 42
6 67
93
36
12
25
62
22
46
00
40
23
46 11 Geo. 5
Department op Industries.
P 11
(ft.)   INDUSTRIAL   SUMMARY  OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA   INDUSTRIES Continued.
Nature of Industry.
No. of
Firms
engaged.
Total Wages
paid.
No. of
Employees.
Average
Wage
per Day.
Coal-mining   	
Sand, shale, clay, and gravel pits	
Lime-kilns    	
Metal-mining   	
Monuments, lettering or setting	
Quarrying	
Stone dressing or cutting 	
Reduction of ores and smelting	
Brick-manufacturing, tiles, etc	
Cement-manufacturing   	
Nut, bolt, nail, spike manufacturing	
Can-manufacturing  	
Engine and boiler manufacturing	
Iron and steel foundry	
Manufacturing furnaces and stoves	
Machine-shops 	
Iron and steel products manufacturing	
Babbitt-metal manufacturing  	
Ornamental-iron works (shop only)   	
Rolling-mills  .'...."	
Sheet-metal works   	
Tent and awning manufacturing	
Confectionery-manufacturing  	
Liquors and beverages manufacturing   	
Canning fruit and vegetables, also packing ..
Manufacturing compounds  	
Cigar-manufacturing   	
Drug-manufacturing  .. ,
Flour and rice milling  	
Manufacturing food products 	
Bevelled, leaded glass, and silver-plating works
Jewellery-manufacturing   	
Knitting-mills   	
Leather-tanneries   	
Manufacturing leather shoes  	
Oil-refining    	
Manufacturing paint  	
Mfg. paper  (tarred, pitched, or asphalted)   ..
Manufacturing rubber goods    '.	
Manufacturing stationery  	
Upholstering    	
Creameries   	
Ice-cream manufacturing	
Condenseries    	
Cheese-factories  	
Explosives-manufacturing   	
Chemical manufacturing  	
18
5
4
117
1
7
9
5
11
1
2
3
2
15
S
110
2
2
34
7
18
44
45
7
11
2
9
22
5
15
3
6
8
2
19
5
14
25
19
2
3
3
3
$9,700,000 00
69,237 00
66,658 00
4,656,358 00
4,518 00
134,563 00
59,347 00
1,407,786 00
138,236 00
96,000 00
45,992 00
277,722 00
14,295 00
299,190 00
40,545 00
1,974,093 00
73,512 00
14,653 00
5,925 00
27,663 00
148,301 00
57,229 00
347.448 00
375,254 00
956,761 00
76,228 00
115,546 00
18,017 00
48,441 00
653,362 00
21,095 00
117,887 00
25,207 00
32,814 00
81,900 00
426,965 00
95,601 00
21,153 00
59.947 00
73,455 00
82,644 00
219,403 00
101,336 00
69,233 00
11,940 00
341.449 00
50,818 00
7,147
63
66
3,663
3
128
36
1,081
106
150
44
335
10
247
46
1,684
57
32
7
20
131
72
569
359
858
104
134
22
47
611
33
90
35
23
90
332
122
30*
53
159
75
269
120
84
14
322
47
22
24
88
89
93
05
6 30
01
00
00
03
19
78
66
42
51
93
16
39
59
35
07
35
02
29
81
33
23
98
11
50
07
77
54
50
95
01
75
36
78
23
28
28
17
28
08
15
* Increased in November, 1920, by approximately 74. P 12 British Columbia. 1921
Report on the Markets for Iron and Steel on the
Pacific Coast.
By Nichol Thompson, 847 Beatty Steeet, Vancouveb, B.C.
At the request of individuals and syndicates interested in the development of the iron and
steel industry on the Pacific Coast, the Department of Industries undertook to obtain definite
information in respect to" the local markets in British Columbia, Oregon, Washington, and
California. To this end they engaged the services of Mr. Nichol Thompson, who has had
considerable experience in collecting data in respect to the iron and steel industry. He has
made a detailed survey of the iron-foundries and steel plants on the Pacific Coast, and has
obtained first-hand information and opinions from the men in this line of industry. The
information obtained is very valuable, in that it admits of a ready checking-up by persons
interested in this industry, and is, to date, the most complete survey obtainable. While undertaking this survey Mr. Thompson interested all persons in this line of business in British
Columbia as being the one logical location for the development of blast-furnaces, in that all
the essential materials were to be obtained in British Columbia. His report is submitted
herewith as a part of the Report of the Department of Industries.
D. B. Martyn, Esq.,
Commissioner of Industries, Victoria, B.C.
Sib,—The main object in gathering the information embodied in this report is to prove the
extent of the local market on the Pacific Coast for the products of iron and steel, and especially
the market for pig-iron, as the first essential in the iron and steel industry is a blast-furnace
plant for the production of the various grades of pig-iron. I am, of course, aware of the fact
that the success of ship-building and kindred industries on the Coast depends absolutely on being
able to procure material for their various purposes manufactured on the Coast, so as to enable
them to compete with Eastern and Old Country firms.
There is a market on the Pacific Coast for 2,000,000 tons per annum of iron and steel;
i.e., this is the aggregate consumption of all grades, including tank, ship and boiler plate,
merchant bar, tool and mining steel, structural steel, shapes and angles, and also light rails.
Any one plant capable of turning out all these grades and sections of steel would require
tremendous capital outlay in rolls and other equipment. If blast-furnaces were established
here and supply of tbe various grades of pig-iron assured at reasonable price, subsidiary
companies would undertake the manufacture of the different grades and sections of steel to
suit the market.
There is, beyond a doubt, a local or domestic market on the Pacific Coast, from Los Angeles
to British Columbia, for foundry pig-iron alone of at least 1,000 tons per day; and if produced
at anywhere near the cost of steel scrap—$27 to $30 per ton—I think I can safely say there is
a market for 2,000 tons per day. There are five scrap-mills in California, at San Francisco
and Los A.ngeles, with monthly output of 27,0CO tons, and one in Washington, at Seattle, with
present output of 4,000 tons per month. These mills, turning out over 1,000 tons per day of
merchant bar from steel scrap, would use at least 40 per cent, pig-iron if they could get it;
in fact, Mr. Denman, of the Southern California, and Mr. Botehford, of the Columbia Steel Mills,
informed me they would undertake, on behalf of the five California mills, to contract for 500
tons of pig-iron a day. The cast-iron foundries in Washington, Oregon, California, and British
Columbia will easily consume 1,000 tons per day. Undoubtedly the time is opportune and there
is every inducement for capital, properly organized and managed, to get in on the ground floor
with the nucleus of this basic industry.
Expobt Maeket.
In addition to the local market, there is an e.xport market looming large in the future
development of the Orient, Australasia, and Isles of the Pacific, and the west coast of Mexico
and South America.    The present export through British Columbia ports is now practically nil,   11 Geo. 5 Department of Industries. P 13
because of the fact that Canada does not manufacture nearly sufficient for domestic requirements
and at present is a large importer of iron and steel. There is, however, a very different story
to tell regarding the exports through the ports of Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, San Francisco, and
Los Angeles; though even here it is somewhat difficult to obtain the correct data, as many of
the items are not listed by weights but rather by value, or perhaps by number and value.
In point of value this export trade through United States Pacific ports in 1918 amounted to
approximately $100,000,000. The tonnage of pig-iron, steel billets, ingots, blooms, rails, and
structural iron and steel in the same year totalled 1,000,000 tons and $68,000,000 of the total
valuation of exports, the balance consisting of machinery or iron and steel. It is interesting
to note in this connection that for the ten months ending April 30th, 1920, approximately
$14,000,000 in steel rails was shipped to Pacific Ocean countries, and that this item represented
60 per cent, of the total United States exports in this commodity. These rails were mostly
smaller and medium sizes, the percentage above 60 lb. being almost negligible.
m
Ibon and Steel Workers consider Plant a Necessity.
Heads of the various iron- and steel-working plants of the Pacific Coast in Washington,
Oregon, and California, who were interviewed, and gave information freely regarding their
plants, consumption, etc., were practically agreed that the establishment of blast-furnaces and
a steel plant on the Pacific Coast was a necessity. The time was opportune and the project
would be warmly welcomed. They said they would gladly co-operate with owners of mills
producing merchant bar from scjap in California, and offered to make a contract at once for
SCO tons per day of pig-iron as soon as blast-furnaces were started on the Coast. All gave
numerous instances of trouble and difficulties through congestion of orders and lack of cars for
transportation and delivery. Prominent mill-owners in California told of investigations made
by them with a view to establishing a blast-furnace, but coking-coal supplies in Washington were
found unsatisfactory, and they would welcome the establishment of a Coast plant. Washington
iron and steel workers said that in 1916 a number of them, including also the manager of the
Bethlehem Steel, offered Mr. Piggott, of the Pacific Steel Company, a contract for 250,000 tons
of ship-plate at the same price paid in the East, but he could not undertake the work. All
agreed that an iron and steel plant on the Pacific Coast would not only be a distinct advantage,
but profitable to the company undertaking it, the raw -materials being assured—there was no
difficulty about the market—but would also be of great aid to those now engaged in the iron-
and steel-working industries of the Coast, and would stimulate many new industries and additions
to present industries; and, moreover, would do much for the general upbuilding of the Pacific
Coast.
Those interviewed in California who agreed that a plant was a necessity and the time
opportune for its establishment included D. H. Botchford, Columbia Steel Company; Mr. Burgess,
Pacific Steel Company; Mr. Booth, Judson Iron and Steel Company, San Francisco; A. C.
Denman, Southern California Iron and Steel Works; Mr. Hill, Llewellyn Steel. Company, Los
ningeles—these firms being engaged in manufacturing steel, merchant bar. mainly from scrap;
Mr. Rickard, of the Mining and Scientific Press; Mr. Smith, of Smith-Emery Company, Chemical
and Testing Engineers, who was United States Government Commissioner for Iron and Steel
during the war; J. J. Tynan, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation; F. Baker, Baker .Iron Works
—all of California. In Washington and Oregon the same consensus of opinion was held by
Mr. Monteagle, Pacific Construction and Engineering Company; Mr. Smith, Smith-Watson
Engineering Company; Mr. Cullers, Northwest Steel Company; Mr. Morris, Puget Sound Iron
and Steel Company; B. C. Ball and H. T. Humphrey, of Willamette Iron Works; John Hartman,
Atlas Foundry ; F. M. Foley, Griffen Steel Works ; Mr. Wylie, Tod Dry Dock Company; George
Danz, Hofius Steel Company; and others. Mr. Scott, representative of Midvale Steel Company,
Pennsylvania, notwithstanding that his principals owned their mills in the East, was also of
the same opinion, as were other dealers representative of Eastern mills, they stating that
conditions were now such that owing to congestion of orders and difficulties of transportation
a plant on the Coast was a necessity.
Eaeliee Effobts to establish Plant.
The question of a steel plant on the Pacific Coast is one that has been long considered by
those interested in the iron- and steel-working industries of the Pacific slope and others, and P 14 British Columbia. 1921
has received serious attention from many engineers and metallurgists. Attempts to establish
an iron and steel industry on the Coast are not new or of recent origin. Not only has promotion
been carried on, but actual metal has been produced.
The first metal-producing plant on record on the Coast was established in 1865, when the
Oregon Iron Works built and operated a small plant at Oswego, near Portland, Oregon. This
plant was operated for some years. Until 1882 it had an average production of about 5,000
tons of pig-iron a year. In 1S93 a shipment of magnetite of 626 tons mined at the Elsie Claim,
a great bluff of magnetite on the north shore of West Redonda Island, B.C.—the only ore mined
so far on that island—was shipped to the Oswego plant for treatment and made good iron. The
industry was abandoned many years ago owing to inability to compete with Eastern iron-works
at a time of industrial depression.
The Puget Sound Iron Company, organized by San Francisco men who acquired large
magnetite-deposits on Texada Island in 1873, soon afterwards erected a blast-furnace af. Irondale,
Wash., and between 1883 and 1907 shipments of over 60,000 tons were made by scow and mixed
with bog-iron from Hamilton, Skagit County, Washington, in manufacture of charcoal pig-iron.
The original owners, in addition to the Texada mines and the Irondale blast-furnace, owned
the Union Iron Works, a pioneer iron-working plant of Sau Francisco, now together with the
Risdon Iron Works incorporated in the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation. The Irondale
plant suspended operations some years ago.
The late Homer Swaney in 1903-4 became interested in iron-deposits on Vancouver Island
and also in the Irondale furnace, and had practically completed arrangements for the necessary
capital to establish an iron and steel industry on a commercial basis on the Pacific Coast when
lie was drowned in the wreck of the steamer " Clallam " in 1904.
Some time ago a number of those interested in the manufacture of merchant bar steel in
California, chiefly from scrap, made investigations with regard to establishment of a blastfurnace on the Pacific Coast States, but it was found that the coal-deposits of the Coast States
for coke-supply were unsatisfactory; the only coal which met requirements was that of
Carbonado, Wash., but uncertainty of supply and cost of production made it almost prohibitive.
Mr. Boothin, principal owner of the Judson Iron and Steel Company, San Francisco, one of
five mills in California producing merchant bar of small sizes from scrap, said he and associates
had seriously considered the question of establishing blast-furnaces with Puget Sound interests
headed by B. L. Thane. Options had then been taken on iron properties with this end in view,
but nothing had been accomplished.
During 1916 a number of men in Seattle, Tacoma, and San Francisco, including the manager
of the Bethlehem Steel, offered Mr. Piggott, of the Pacific Steel Company, a contract for
250,000 tons of ship-plate at the cost being paid in the East, but he was unable to undertake
the contract.
Opinion of Ibon and Steel Woekees.
The consensus of opinion of owners and managers of the California iron-working plants
is that the establishment of a blast-furnace and heavy-plate mill on the Pacific Coast is a
necessity. D. H. Botchford, of Columbia Steel Company, San Francisco, said mill interests in
San Francisco and Los Angeles had been seriously considering a blast-furnace on the Pacific
Coast, and had made investigations regarding coal-deposits in Washington with view to coke-
supply, but these were unsatisfactory; the only coal which met requirements was Carbonado,
and uncertainty and cost of production made it almost prohibitive. Mr. Boothin, of Judson
Iron and Steel Company, San Francisco, said he and associates had been considering this
question with Puget Sound interests headed by Mr. Thane, which bad paid a large sum for
options on iron properties in which Mr. Boothin and wife and the Crockers had been interested.
Nothing had come of the matter.
Mr. Rickard, of the Mining and Scientific Press, said the Noble Electric Smelting Plant had
been started in Shasta County, Gala, but had not proven a success so far and was at present
closed down. Mr. Smith, of the Smith-Emery Company, Chemical and Testing Engineers, who
was Government Commissioner for Iron and Steel during the war, said there was not sufficient
ore in Shasta County, where a great deal of money had been spent in experimenting with the
electric furnace to justify the erection of a blast-furnace, although the quality 'of tbe ore
was good. 11 Geo. 5 Department of Industries. P 15
Mr. Booth, manager of Judson Iron and Steel Company, said that if we had the coal and
iron in British Columbia and could get a blast-furnace going we had the best business proposition
on the Coast. Mr. Smith, of the Smith-Emery Company, San Francisco, a member of the
Iron and Steel Institute of America, said he had covered the whole Pacific Coast from
Mexico to British Columbia during the war, and had no hesitation in saying there was
a market for output of a 400-ton blast-furnace, and if a plat'e-miil was added he would
advise two 400-ton furnaces at least. Pig-iron, ship-plates, heavy shapes, I beams, channels,
and angles were needed. At present California mills were exporting large shipments of what
is known as " Bamboo steel" to China. A company, properly financed, should have no difficulty
in attaining success when their plant was placed on a commercial basis. While he considered
San Francisco offered great facilities, it might be more economical to locate farther north.
Generally it was more economical to take the ore to the coal, and as British Columbia had the
coking-coal, and also large deposits of high-grade iron ores, it seemed the logical place, as it
would undoubtedly be cheaper to transport the finished product to the market rather than ship
the raw material. The time was most opportune for commencement of a blast-furnace and
heavy-plate mill.
Mr. Botchford, of the Columbia Steel Company, was decidedly of tbe opinion that a blastfurnace installation was a necessity. He considered present mills with good supply of pig-iron
could take care of present local market for merchant bars and small angles and channels,
and even have a small surplus for export. Whilst not sure that a plate-mill would pay from the
start, he was of the opinion that a mill capable of turning out ship-plate and heavy I beams
and shapes would follow installation of a blast-furnace plant. He could give the assurance, he
said, that mill and foundry interests of the Pacific Coast would welcome and support such an
undertaking. Mr. Booth, manager of Judson Iron and Steel Company, said, while he would
not like to see a bar-mill in connection with a new plant, as local mills could probably take care
of the local market, he considered there was an opening for a plate-mill for ship-plates, heavy
shapes, I beams, and channels. He hoped a blast-furnace would be established, with as little
delay as possible, as undoubtedly a market existed for the product and the time was opportune
for commencement of such a plant. Mr. Boothin, of the Judson Iron and Steel Company,
concurred. He said there was a market for anywhere from 500 to 1,000 tons a day on the
Coast, and he and associates would gladly assist and enter a business arrangement with any
company prepared to commence at an early date. He thought part of the capital could be
secured in San Francisco.
A. C. Denman, of Southern California Iron and Steel Works, Los Angeles, said a market
existed in that district for the output of a 500-ton blast-furnace. His own plant would take
100 tons a day, and Mr. Hoswell, who represented the Los Angeles Foundrymen's Association,
said cast-iron foundries of Loss Angeles consumed 300 tons of pig per day. He agreed that
British Columbia was the most suitable location for a plant. Having all water transportation,
vessels could land the finished production as pig-iron or billets cheaper and more economically
than by bringing ore and coke to the market. Moreover, if a supply of haematite ore was
required, good haematite existed in Southern California and could be put on board the steamer
at San Pedro at about $4 per ton, providing return cargo for the boat landing the pig-iron.
Mr. Denman said his firm used 1,500 tons of pig-iron a month and could use 3,000 tons if supply
was available. He and Mr. Botchford, on behalf of the five steel and iron plants of California,
gave the assurance that they were willing to enter a firm contract with a blast-furnace, even
if established in British Columbia, to take 500 tons a day for a term of years if pig-iron could
be delivered anywhere near present price of scrap steel—$30 per net ton. They further said
there would be nothing to fear from a high tariff being imposed, as business interests en the
Coast would not stand for it. Delays in delivery and recent increase of railway freights made
an iron and steel plant on the Coast an urgent necessity.
Mr. Hill, of Llewellyn Iron Works, Los Angeles, said his firm would gladly support establishment of a blast-furnace and mill and considered Southern California could consume the
output of a 500-ton blast-furnace. Scrap steel was getting scarcer all the time, and if suitable
pig-iron was obtainable they would use a large percentage. P 16 British Columbia. 1921
J. J. Tynan, general manager, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, which builds many steel
steamers and handles a large amount of ship repairs—it has an extensive plant, with four
floating and one large graving dock, also a large cast-iron foundry and machine-shop—and is
now building seven large tankers, one steamer, and several torpedo-boats, said his firm, though
connected with tbe Bethlehem and Schwab interests in the East, would now welcome not only
a blast-furnace on the Pacific Coast, but would also like to see a good ship-plate mill in operation.
They would certainly buy from the plant. Now they were compelled to buy wherever they could
get delivery. They buy all their steel castings principally from the Columbia Steel Company.
Their present consumption of pig-iron is about 150 tons per month, blooms and billets about
200 tons per month, and 50,000 tons per year of general merchant steel, including plates, shapes,
angles, and channels. Though at one time Mr. Schwab and others thought a steel plant on the
Coast could not compete with the East and Orient, the war had brought a complete change of
conditions, and Mr. Tynan considered there was excellent opportunity for such a plant, and if
by having the coal and iron in British Columbia we could manufacture cheaper than on Puget
Sound or California, then British Columbia was the logical place.
F. Baker, of Baker Iron Works, Los Angeles, which principally fabricated structural steel
for bridge and building purposes, and also had a large foundry and machine-shop, said his firm
bought merchant bar from local mills, and all plates, shapes, angles, I beams, and channels, as
well as pig-iron, from Pittsburgh, and great inconveniences and losses by delays in delivery
occurred, Eastern manufacturers always getting preference. Any bona-fide company starting a
blast-furnace and heavy-plate mill would get whole-hearted support from his firm.
Mr. Burgess, general manager, Pacific Steel Company, San Francisco, said bis company,
producing 1,100 tons of merchant bar per month, all made from scrap steel costing $27 to $30
per net ton, would gladly use 30 to 40 per cent, suitable pig-iron if reasonable price and delivery
could be depended upon. His company would gladly see a blast-furnace plant turning out
pig-iron on the Coast. It was not concerned as to location; what they wanted was supply and
reasonable delivery, and any one fulfilling those conditions would have their support.
The opinion of those interested in iron- and steel-working concerns in Washington and
Oregon is that the time is opportune for the establishment of blast-furnaces and a steel plant,
for which well-informed men state there is an ample market.
Mr. Scott, representative of Midvale Steel Company, of Pennsylvania, said that, notwithstanding that his company owned their own mills in the East, conditions were such now that
some of his principals were very much in favour of a works on the Pacific Coast. He gave
many instances of trouble and difficulties arising through congestion of orders, lack of cars for
transportation and delivery. His candid opinion was that there was a market on the Pacific,.
Coast for steel products amounting to over 2,000,000 tons a year; he had one customer good
for 25,000 tons a year. The products would consist of structural steel, including boiler and
marine plate, merchant bars, rounds, squares, and flats; steel rails up to 60 lb., also nail-rods
and fence-wire. He considered the Coast market would take 300,000 tons of light rails, 600,000
tons of plates, 600,000 tons of bars, and 500,000 tons miscellaneous. The bars would include
all soft machinery or mild steel and drill-steel, plates, marine, boiler, tank sheet plates, and
structural steel, miscellaneous, nail-rods, fence-wire, etc.
Mr. Monteagle, president of Pacific Construction and Engineering Company, Seattle, said
his company would gladly co-operate with any bona-fide company in the establishment of an
iron and steel plant on the Coast. Heads of the Vulcan Iron Works, Seattle, were of the opinion
that the time was opportune for establishing a plant. E. S. Harbauch, sales agent of the
United States Steel Products Company, who admitted that requirements of Coast States was
from 750,000 to 1,000,000 tons a year of all grades, including light rails, structural steel,
reinforcing steel, merchant bar, tank and ship plate, but was doubtful if the time was ripe for
a Coast plant; the United States Steel Company had always so far anticipated the market, he
said, instancing such places as Garry, Duluth, and the Canadian plant in Ontario, and if there
was opportunity he thought the company would take advantage of it. He admitted, however,
the  tin-plate industry  would stand investigation, there being a  market for probably 200,000 11 Geo. 5 Department of Industries. P 17
tons a year; mining, drill, and tool steel might also be considered, but he doubted if it would
be profitable to compete in such lines as steel rails, ship-plate, beams and shapes such as I beams,
channels, and even heavy merchant bar or ingots and billets, owing to wide diversity of sections
to the amount consumed. He thought, however, the time was drawing near when a works would
be a necessity on the Coast.
S. C. E. Smith, manager, .Smith-Watson Engineering Company, Portland, considered an iron
and steel works on the Coast would be a direct and infinite benefit and hoped that a works
would be started. Mr. Cullers, manager, North West Steel Company, Portland, said he was
pessimistic so far as a steel-works on the Coast was concerned, as he doubted whether ore, coal,
and limestone existed to warrant establishment. On being asked his opinion, if assured that
the raw materials did exist, he said he would be enthusiastically in favour. He said: " If you
have the iron ore, the coal and fluxes, then there is no doubt about the market." B. C. Ball,
president, and H. T. Humphrey, manager, Willamette Iron Works, Portland, said the establishment of a plant which could compete with Eastern mills at reasonable cost and delivery would
be a great benefit to manufacturers and stimulate other business. Mr. Morris, superintendent,
Puget Sound Iron and Steel Company, Tacoma, said they were greatly handicapped by having
to ship all their material from the East at a freight of $20 to $25 per ton, and were often held
up for weeks in delivery, and an iron and steel works on the Coast would be not only of infinite
benefit to manufacturers now in existence, but would stimulate establishment of many others.
Mr. Eves, superintendent of Tod Shipbuilding Company, Tacoma, was heartily in support; he
said if steel-shipbuilding was to continue on the Coast the material would have to be manufactured from our own raw material here. John Hartrnan, proprietor of Atlas Foundry,
Tacoma, complained of the high costs and delay in getting material from the East and was
strongly in favour of steel-works on the Coast. F. M. Foley, Griffen Wheel Works, said a
steel-works could not be started too soon; the high freights and delay in getting material was
a serious question, and his firm was compelled to refuse business on that account. He thought
. the time opportune for establishment of steel-works if we are satisfied as to the iron ore, coke,
and limestone in quantities to justify it; the market was here and steadily increasing.
Mr. Wylie, of Tod Dry Dock Company, Seattle, said that in 1916 he with a number of men
in Seattle, Tacoma, and San Francisco, including the manager of the Bethlehem Steel, offered
Mr. Piggott, of Pacific Steel Company, a contract for 250,000 tons of ship-plate at the same cost
they were paying in the East, but Mr. Piggott could not make it go. Mr. Wylie thought the
time opportune for a Coast steel plant. George Danz, manager, Hofius Steel Company, Seattle,
considered a plant on the Coast would be a distinct advantage both to manufacturer and
consumer. W. B. Hund, Eastern buyer of A. M. Castle & Co., dealers in iron and steel, said,
while they were directly interested in mills in the East, owing to congestion of business and
difficulty in getting delivery they bought largely from Pacific Iron and Steel Works, Seattle;
although it might not appear in the interest of their company, he considered a steel-works on
the Coast would fill a long-felt want.
Metal-wobking Plants on Pacific Coast.
There are a large number of metal-working plants on tbe Pacific Coast which at present,
in addition to other material, consume approximately 1,000 tons of pig-iron and would use much
more if it was procurable at a reasonable price.
Six plants, five in California and one in Washington, are engaged in manufacturing steel
in open-hearth furnaces, producing 31,000 tons per month, about 65 per cent, merchant bar, % to
4 inches, in rounds, squares, and flats, and reinforcing-bars, % to l1^ inches, and the balance
angles up to 6 inches and beams and channels up to S inches. These mills now use about
96 per cent, scrap and 6 per cent, pig-iron, and would use 40 to 50 per cent, pig-iron if obtainable.
California has twenty-one iron-foundries, employing 2,300 men, using 30 to 50 per cent,
pig-iron, the balance scrap, consuming about 4,500 to 5,000 tons of pig-iron per month. They
could use at least 200 tons per day of pig-iron. The five steel-making plants are willing to
enter into a contract at present for 500 tons of pig-iron a day.    Other metal-working plants,
2 P 18 British Columbia. 1921
such as the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, now using 150 tons pig-iron, 200 tons of blooms
and billets, and 50,000 tons of plates and shapes per annum; Baker Iron Works, of Los Angeles,
engaged in fabricating structural steel for bridge and building purposes, with engineering-works,
machine-shops, etc., would increase the market.
In Washington data compiled by the Seattle Chamber of Commerce shows present consumption of pig-iron would be about 75,000 to 100,000 tons a year. The only plant now manufacturing
steel in open-hearth furnaces is the Pacific Steel Company, with normal output of 4.000 tons
per month. This plant uses mostly scrap and a small percentage of magnetite from a deposit
owned by the company on Texada Island. The engineering, forging, and manufacturing plants.
car wheel and axle, and other plants and foundries and machine-shops consume a considerable
amount and offer a growing market for pig-iron.
Oregon has thirty-five iron- and steel-working plants, of which thirty-three are foundries;
the consumption of this State at present being estimated at 100,000 tons per year.
British Columbia has seventeen plants, ship-building yards, engineering and other works
engaged in iron- and steel-working industries, in addition to a number of foundries, machine-
shops, and smaller plants, now consuming 3,010 tons of pig-iron and offering a market for much
more if available; 6,050 tons of scrap cast-iron; 1,190 tons of scrap steel; 163 tons of billets;
1,825 tons of merchant bar; 15,270 tons of ship, tank, and boiler plate; 8,715 tons of angles
and shapes;   2,500 tons of rivets and rivet-bars;   and 200 tons of structural steel a year.
Bbitish Columbia.
While I have endeavoured to get as near as possible to the actual consumption of pig-iron
in British Columbia, I do not think the returns given by the various foundries offer a fail-
criterion as to what the actual consumption would be if a blast-furnace plant was in operation
in the Province and pig-iron procurable as a result at a reasonable price. The abnormal
amount of cast scrap used is evidence of this. The increase in the cost of pig-iron since 1912
from, let us say, an average of $30 to over $70 compelled foundrymen to use scrap wherever
possible.
The combined consumption of pig-iron and cast scrap in 1920 was approximately 9,060 tons.
A-Ccording to data furnished by the Minister of Customs, Ottawa, the quantity and value
of pig-iron imported into British Columbia for the fiscal year 1912 was 7,648 tons, valued
$102,736; this value, of course, being the f.o.b. price, Liverpool, and not the selling-price here.
If British Columbia could use practically 8,000 tons of imported pig-iron in 1912, it is reasonable
to conclude that, owing to the increase in the industrial life of the Province, the requirements
of pig-iron should be at least 15,000 to 20,000 tons per annum; and that bears out my own
personal observation and conclusion that present consumption of pig-iron in British Columbia
will approximate 50 tons per day. When it is considered that in 1910 the consumption of
pig-iron was only 2,000 tons the increase is remarkable.
The total quantities of the products of iron and steel imported in British Columbia for tbe
fiscal year ending March 31st, 1912, was 58,674 tons, the invoice value of which was $1,988,701;
for the nine months ending December 31st, 1917, the value of the principal items of iron and
steel entered for consumption through ports of British Columbia was: Dutiable, $3,988,159;
free, $1,664.576; a total of $5,652,735. This shows a great increase in consumption of products
of iron and steel during the past five or ten years, and taken in conjunction with the greater
market to the south, and across the Pacific to the Orient and Australasia, forms an interesting
basis for any one contemplating establishment of an iron and steel industry in British Columbia. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 19
The following table shows present consumption by foundries and metal-working plants of
British Columbia :—
Tablo A.—Present Consumption reported by British Columbia Plants.
Plant.
Eh
PQ
©oj
a ©
aaa
EH o
■a'2 5
na □-.
cB drH
O) ©
'a cc
a £
©H-"
a ©
u ©
+h 4->
EKtTJ.
Wallace Shipbuilding & Drydock
Co., Ltd., North Vancouver. .
J. Coughlan & Sons, Ltd., Vancouver   	
Vulcan Iron Works, Vancouver.
Canadian Northwest Steel Co.,
Ltd.,  Vancouver 	
Ross & Howard Iron Works,
Vancouver  	
Yarrows, Ltd., Victoria	
Victoria Machinery Depot, Victoria  	
Heaps Engineering Co., Ltd.,
New Westminster  	
Westminster Iron Works, New
AVestminster   	
Boundary Iron Works, Grand
Forks   	
Nelson Iron Works, Nelson  ...
Mainland Engineering Co., Vancouver   	
Sumner Iron Works, Vancouver
Vancouver Machinery Depot,
Vancouver   	
Vancouver Engineering Works,
Vancouver   	
Opsal Steel Co., Vancouver ....
Hutchison Bros. & Co., Ltd.,
Victoria   	
Miscellaneous foundries  	
Totals   	
Tons.
500
'20Q
400
100
100
300
50
150
150
100
500
10
150
300
Tons.
2,000
SOO
350
150
200
600
250
200
350
200
400
250
600
Tons.
GO
300
840
Tons.
60
50
50
50
Tons.
500
ioo
50
125
200
250
50
100
ioo
50
50
200
50
Tons.
12,000
400
1,500
1,000
50
250
250
50
20
200
Tons.
6,000
"56
1,950
150
100
100
30
50
10
200
Tons.
2,400
Tons.
200
100
3,010
6,050
1,190
213
1,825
15,720
(,715
2,500
200
Ibon- and Steel-working Industries of British Columbia.
Wallace Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., 'North Vancouver, is one of the pioneer ship-building
and ship-repairing firms, Mr. Wallace having been in business for over twenty years. In 1907 an
order was secured for a steel freight for English interests—a steamer of 5,000 tons—and since
and particularly during the war this yard built a number of steamers, as well as carrying out
considerable repair-work. At present two steamers are being built for the Dominion Government and a passenger-steamer for the Canadian Pacific Railway steamship service in British
Columbia waters. The yard consumes now about 500 tons of pig-iron, 2,000 tons of scrap,
60 tons of billets, 500 tons of merchant bar, and 18,000 tons of structural steel per annum.
J. Coughlan & Sons, Vancouver, a firm established for fabricating structural steel for
building purposes, took up ship-building in 1907, becoming very active during the war. Many
steamers—over fifteen—up to 8,800 tons dead weight each, were built, and the firm has considerable work on hand, including two steamers for the Dominion Government. This firm has
secured a contract from the Dominion Government for a large graving-dock at Vancouver, which
carries a subsidy, and will then be in a position to undertake ship-repair work of any size.
At present this firm, which has a large machine-shop, has no cast-foundry, iron castings being
procured principally from the Wallace Foundry and heavy steel castings from Seattle and San
Francisco, and light steel castings from the Opsal Steel Company or Vancouver Engineering
Works.    Mr. Coughlan, Sr., has been in business over thirty years in British Columbia.   Present P 20 British Columbia. 1921
consumption per annum is about 200 tons of structural steel, 50 tons of billets and ingots, 200
tons of ship and boiler plate, 200 tons of tank-plates, and 2,400 tons of rivets and rivet-bars.
Vulcan Iron Works, Vancouver, commenced business about fifteen years ago at New Westminster, manufacturing logging and sawmill boilers, and later started building marine boilers.
Most of the boilers for steamers built at the Wallace and Coughlan yards were built by this
firm, and several boilers are now in hand for those two firms. The firm also constructs all kinds
of tanks and digesters for pulp and paper mills. Present consumption is about IOO tons of
pig-iron, 500 tons of scrap, 100 tons of merchant bar, 1,500 tons of ship and boiler plate, and
35 tons of structural shapes per year.
Canadian Northwest Steel Co., Vancouver, was originally a branch of Northwest Steel
Company, of Portland, Ore., but is now a separate concern. Principal business is fabricating
of structural steel for buildings and bridges. Annual consumption is about 50 tons of merchant
bar, 1,000 tons of ship and boiler plate, and 1,950 tons of structural shapes.
Ross & Howard Iron Works, Vancouver, established about 1890 by John Ross, Sr., and
Jas. Howard, has since carried on business of ironfounders and general machine-shop work.
Present plant consists of machine-shop and large cast-iron foundry. During the building boom
a considerable business was done in fabricating structural steel. They also build land- and
logging-engine boilers. Present consumption (annual) is 400 tons of pig-iron, 250 tons of
cast scrap, 50 tons of steel scrap, 125 tons of merchant bar, 50 tons of ship and boiler plate,
and 150 tons of structural steel.
Vancouver Engineering Works, Vancouver, was established over twenty years ago by
Armstrong & Morrison principally for manufacturing steel pipe for water and hydraulic purposes.
Later it was acquired by Colon F. Jackson and associates, who extended the business into
engineering manufacturing. In addition to large machine and boiler shops, a cast-iron foundry
and also a Bessemer cast-steel foundry is operated. It is practically the largest industry of
the kind in the Province and would be in a position to extend the business very considerably
if pig-iron could be purchased in the Province at a reasonable price. Present consumption per
annum is about 500 tons of pig-iron, 400 tons of cast scrap, 300 tons of steel scrap, 50 tons of
billets, 300 tons of merchant bar and steel, including rivet-steel, 200 tons of ship and boiler plate,
and 200 tons of structural shapes.
Opsal Steel Co. was established some years ago principally for manufacturing logging tools
and lumbering equipment generally. When first established castings were purchased outside,
principally from Sheffield. About four or five years ago an electric furnace was installed and
castings are now being made by this process for the firm's own use and for the trade, principally
from scrap steel. About 10 tons of pig-iron and 840 tons of scrap is being used at present
per annum.
Mainland Engineering Co., Vancouver, has been established for some years and does a very
fair business in marine- and logging-engine repair-work. Present consumption per annum is
about 150 tons of pig-iron.
Sumner Iron Works, Vancouver, uses about 100 tons of pig-iron and 200 tons of scrap
per annum.
Vancouver Machinery Depot, Vancouver, carries a large stock of second-hand machinery
and has a machine-shop in connection with the warehouse, whereby alterations and repairs are
made to logging-engines and other machinery. The firm also is agent for manufacturers of
logging and other machinery in Seattle and San Francisco. Its annual consumption is about
50 tons of merchant bar, 20 tons of boiler-plate, and 10 tons of structural shapes.
Heaps Engineering Co., New Westminster, carries on the business of building logging, sawmill, and other machinery. Present consumption per annum is about 300 tons of pig-iron, 600
tons of scrap, and 80 tons of merchant bar, plate, and shapes.
New Westminster Iron Works, New Westminster, has been in operation for a number of
years. Principal business is repair-work, and the firm does not enter to any extent into construction of new machinery. It uses about 3 tons of billets, 100 tons of merchant bar, 50 tons
of plate, and 75 tons of shapes per year.
Yarrows, Ltd., Victoria.—This firm was originally carried on by Messrs. Bullen, Limited,
as engineers and ship-repairers and was bought out by Yarrows, Limited, about ten years ago.
Several steamers of both wood and steel have been built, as well as transfer-barges of steel for
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.    The firm has not entered to any extent in the building 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 21
of large steamers during the war, but secures a large percentage of the repair-work, using in
conjunction with its marine railway the Government dry-dock at Esquimalt. Present annual
consumption is about 100 tons of pig-iron, 150 tons of scrap, 50 tons of billets, 200 tons of
merchant bar, 250 tons of plate, and 100 tons of shapes.
Victoria Machinery Depot, Victoria, established over twenty ye"ars, has been engaged in
general engineering, such as building of logging and sawmill machinery and small marine engines
and boilers. Recently a steel-shipbuilding yard was added under the name of the Harbour
Marine Company, Limited, and several steel steamers were built for the Dominion Government.
Consumption of pig-iron is about 100 tons; scrap, 200; merchant bar, 250; plate, 250; and
shapes, 100 tons.
Hutchison Bros & Co., Ltd., Victoria, engages in general engineering construction, annual
consumption being about 150 tons of pig-iron and 250 tons of scrap.
Boundary Iron Works, Grand Forks, have an iron-foundry established about the time the
Granby smelter was built in Grand Forks, and supplied castings to various mines in the district
as well as to the smelters.
Nelson Iron Works was established over twenty years ago by Mr. Hinton, who was later
joined by Mr. Cunliffe, who at the time was running a small works at Rossland. This firm
does an extensive business in repairing mining machinery and equipment, and uses about 150
tons of pig-iron, 200 tons of scrap, and 150 tons of merchant bar and general structural steel
per annum.
In addition to the foundries and plants mentioned, there are a number of small machine-
shops which have small cupolas in connection with the motor-boat and automobile business
where they make their own castings. Consumption of these foundries would run approximately
100 tons of pig-iron and 150 to 200 tons of scrap per annum.
State of Washington.
According to data compiled by the Seattle Chamber of Commerce, consumption of pig-iron
alone in Washington would be from 75,000 to 100,000 tons per year. The only plant now
manufacturing steel in open-hearth furnaces, mostly from scrap—a small percentage of magnetite-
iron ore is used, secured from Texada Island—is the Pacific Steel Company, Seattle. There are
a number of other plants designated iron and steel works, as are many foundries and machine-
shops on the Coast, but this designation is misleading. They are mechanical engineering-works
manufacturing engines and boilers, logging-engines, marine engines, and doing general repair-
work.    Some have an iron-foundry in connection with the plant and some have not.
The Pacific Steel Company, Seattle, have four 40-ton open-hearth furnaces, all installed
since 1916. Their capacity equals 10,000 tons per month and during the war and ship-building
boom were kept fully employed. Since the cessation of ship-building output has fallen off.
Normal output will not exceed 4,000 tons per month, for which two furnaces will more than
suffice. The product is merchant bar, or what is known as soft machinery steel, in rounds
from % to 3% inches, also squares and flats from % to 8 inches and 1% to 8 inches. They
also roll angles up to 6 inches. The plant makes its own billets from scrap, using a small
percentage of magnetic-iron ore from a small deposit owned by the company on Texada Island,
B.C. During the ship-building boom the shipyards produced about 50,000 tons of scrap per
month, which has now ceased, and some of the mills are closed down for lack of scrap.
Other than the Pacific Steel Company, the principal iron- and steel-working plants of
Washington have the following normal consumption at present:—
Plant.
Pig-iron.
Scrap.
Billets.
Merchant
Bar.
Angles
and
Shapes.
Seattle Pacific Construction Co. .
Washington Iron Works  	
Vulcan Iron Works, Tacoma
Puget Sound Iron & Steel Works
Atlas  Foundry   	
Griffen Wheel Co	
Miscellaneous foundries   	
Totals 	
Tons.
5,666
7,500
1,800
500
2,000
75,000
91,800
Tons.
5,666
6,000
1,800
500
1,500
Tons.
12,000
100
14.800
12.100
Tons.
150
800
Tons.
50
950
50 W. G. Oves, Industrial Bureau Secretary, Spokane Chamber of Commerce, furnished the
following estimate of approximate consumption in the Inland Empire district of Washington:—
Tons.
Light rails        500
Merchant bars      3,000
Structural steel         500
Angles, channels, and shapes       500
Tank plates and sheets    1,000
Boiler-plates          IOO
Tin-plate   1,000
Plants in Washington.
The Pacific Construction & Engineering Co., Seattle, is a well-equipped forging plant with
twenty-one heating-furnaces, oil-fired, and three hydraulic forging-presses. During the shipbuilding boom consumption of ingots and billets was about 25,000 tons a year; the normal
consumption is placed at about 12,000 tons a year, with a steadily growing increase. This plant
cost about $500,000. It is equipped with a huge travelling crane running the whole length of
the shop and serving the furnaces and forging-presses. Ingots and billets from 6 to 54 inches
square or diameter are handled, and one ingot handled weighed 51 tons. The work turned out
is varied considerably. The machine-shop is fitted with modern high-speed lathes capable of
turning and finishing the largest shafting. The forgings include stern and rudder frames for
the largest steel steamers. Mr. Monteagle, president of the company, states he is anxious to
co-operate with any bona-fide company in the establishment of an iron and steel plant on
the Coast.
Washington Iron Works, Seattle, is a general engineering company, the principal product
being logging-donkeys, small marine and stationary work. Consumption of pig-iron is from
300 to 500 tons per month, according to nature of the work and the proportion of scrap. The
pig costs approximately $45 per ton f.o.b. East. This plant also consumes from 60 to 100 tons
of billets per year. The consumption of scrap, cast, is about equal to that of pig-iron. Mr. Frank,
manager, considers that an iron and steel plant on the Coast would greatly benefit the manufacturing concerns not only from a cheaper cost standpoint, but also from a delivery standpoint.
Vulcan Iron Works, Seattle, a manufacturing concern with au extensive foundry with
melting capacity equalling 100 tons a day, consumed about 50 tons of pig-iron daily during the
ship-building boom and now uses about 25 tons per day and a like amount of scrap. This plant
handles a large quantity of structural steel and merchant bar. The management computes the
consumption on the Pacific Coast will easily approximate 2,000,000 tons a year, and considers
the time opportune for establishing iron and steel works on the Coast.
Puget Sound Iron and Steel Works, Tacoma, manufactures engines and boilers, logging-
engines, marine engines, and does general repair-work. A cast-iron foundry is operated in
connection with the plant. Castings for sawmills are also turned out. Consumption of pig-iron
is about 150 tons per month and business is steadily increasing. A like amount of scrap is used.
Merchant bar, principally round bars for shafting, is consumed to extent of about 12 tons
per month and about 50 tons of I beams per year. Mr. Morris, the superintendent, said they
were greatly handicapped by having to ship all their material from the East affreight cost
of $20 to $25 per ton, and often were held up for weeks in delivery. He considers establishment
of an iron and steel works on the Coast would not only be of infinite benefit to manufacturers
now operating, but would stimulate many new establishments.
Hofius Steel Co., Seattle.—Details of consumption of iron and steel by this plant were not
obtainable. George Danz, manager, said an iron and steel plant on the Coast would be of
distinct advantage both to manufacturers and consumers. He considered a start should be
made with manufacture of pig-iron, as it was the base of all industries and the market sure.
The many different sections and sizes in structural steel and merchant bar would necessarily
entail large expenditure in rolls and the carrying of considerable stock to ensure quick delivery, 11 Geo. 5 Department of Industries. P 23
as success would depend on not only being able to undersell the Eastern competitor, but to give
prompt delivery; the trouble at present was more in connection with delivery than price.
There was a large amount of tin-plate used on the Coast, but tin-plate was sold on a brand,
and any new concern would not only have to guarantee quality, but would for a time have to
put up bonds against their guarantee, which would require large capital. However, the market
is not only here for tin-plate, but the tin goes through here to the East for manufacture and is
shipped back in sheets, paying double freights. Therefore there is good opening for a tin-plate
mill. The Coast market for structural steel, tank-plate, and merchant bar, including reinforcing,
also light rails, might run to 1,500,000 toils for the three Coast States.
Atlas Foundry, Tacoma, is a purely cast-iron foundry, consuming over 500 tons of pig-iron
a year and about the same amount of cast-iron scrap. The scrap is becoming hard to procure
and more pig-iron will be required in future. Mr. Hartman, manager, says the high cost of
material and delay in getting it from the East strongly favours a steel-works on the Coast.
Griffen Wheel Co., Tacoma, manufactures chilled cast-iron wheels and axles for railway
freight-cars and electric-railway cars, also mining-car wheels and axles. Average annual consumption of pig-iron is about 2,000 tons a year. About 500 to 600 tons per year of mild-steel
bars are used for mining and other car axles and about 200 tons a year for railway-car axles.
This company is building an addition to its plant and will increase its consumption of both
pig-iron and bars considerably. At present, in addition to the pig, about 2,000 tons a year of
scrap is used. Mr. Foley, manager, thinks the time opportune for a steel-works if the iron ore,
coke, and limestone supply is assured;   tbe market is here and is steadily increasing.
The Crucible Steel Co., Seattle, supplies mining and machine shops with drill and tool steel.
The manager stated that California, including the oilfields, consumed not less than 2,000 tons
per year; Washington, 500 tons; Oregon, 350 tons; Alaska, 250 tons per annum. If steel-works
were established on the Coast the manufacture of crucible steel, tool-steel, and tin-plate would
naturally follow and be important subsidiaries.
Todd Drydock and Shipbuilding Co., Seattle.—Mr. Wylie, manager, was unable to give in
detail the consumption of iron and steel. He said that in 1916 he, with a number of men in
Seattle, Tacoma, and San Francisco, including the manager of the Bethlehem Steel Company,
offered Mr. Piggott, of the Pacific Steel Company, of Seattle, a contract for 250,000 tons of ship-
plate at the same cost they were paying in the East, but he was unable to undertake the work.
Mr. Wylie considers the time opportune for commencement of a blast-furnace and ship-plate mills
on the Pacific Coast.
Representatives of Eastern Companies and Jobbers.
Mr. Scott, representative of Midvale Steel Company, of Pennsylvania, said the market on the
Pacific Coast for steel products exceeds 2,000,000 tons a year; he had one customer for 25,000
tons a year. The Coast market would take 600,000 tons of plates—marine, boiler, and tank
sheets and structural steel; 600,000 tons of bars, rounds, squares, and flats, and including soft
machinery or mild steel and drill-steel; 300,000 tons of steel rails up to 60 lb.; and 500,000 tons
of miscellaneous—nail-rods, fence-wire, etc. Notwithstanding that the company owned its own
mills in the East, he said conditions were such now that some of his principals were much in
favour of a works on the Pacific Coast. He gave many instances of trouble and difficulties
arising through congestion of orders and lack of cars for transportation and delivery, and offered
every assistance, including the address of one of his associates in Pittsburgh, who would become
interested in a plant on the Coast.
A. M. Castle & Co., Seattle, jobbers and dealers in heavy hardware, iron, and steel.
Mr. W. B. Hunt, the Eastern buyer, said the company's normal consumption of tank, flange,
marine plate, and merchant bar is 750 tons per month. While directly interested in mills in
the East, owing to congestion of business and difficulty in getting delivery, the company bought
largely from the Pacific Iron and Steel Works, Seattle; he showed shipping bills for three carloads bought from this source the previous week. Although it might not appear in the interest
of their company, he considered a steel-works on the Pacific Coast to manufacture our raw
material into the finished product would fill a long-felt want. P 21 British Columbia. 1921
Karl S. Harbauch, sales agent, United States Steel Products Company, a branch of the
United States Steel Company, who was cautious and conservative in his remarks, admitted
requirements of the Coast States would aggregate 750,000 to 1,000,000 tons of all grades,
including light rails, structural steel, reinforcing-steel, merchant bar, tank and ship plate, and
sheet iron. He doubted if the time was ripe for works on the Coast, basing his opinion on the
fact that the United States Steel Company had always so far anticipated the market and
established works, instancing such places as Garry, Duluth, and the Canadian plant in Ontario.
He thought, if there was an opportunity, his company would not hesitate to take advantage of
it. He admitted, however, the tin-plate industry would stand investigation. There was a market
on the Coast for probably 200,000 tons per year; mining, drill, and tool steel might also be
considered. He doubted if it would be profitable to compete in such lines as steel, rails, ship-
plates, beams and shapes such as I beams, channels, and even heavy merchant bar or ingots
and billets, owing to the wide diversity of sections in the amount consumed. He thought,
however, the time was drawing near when a works would be a necessity on the Coast.
Oregon.
Oregon has thirty-five iron- and steel-working plants, of which thirty-three are foundries.
Consumption of pig-iron in this State is equal to 100,000 tons per year.
Willamette Iron Works, Portland, has the following consumption of iron and steel: Tanks
and boiler-plates, 10,000 tons; shapes, 500 tons; bars, 1,500 tons; rivets, 1,000 tons; billets,
blooms, and forgings, 500 tons; boiler-tubes, 1,000 tons; sheets, 250 tons; pig-iron, 1,500 to
2,000 tons. This is the normal consumption. During the war it was much greater, and the
company now has a contract for water-pipe installation which will take about 3,000 tons, but
the difficulty is to get this material in reasonable time. During the war this firm turned out
more marine boilers than any other firm in the United States. B. C. Ball, president, and
H. T. Humphrey, manager, both were of the opinion, with the business on the Coast steadily
increasing, that establishment of an iron and steel works on the Coast which could compete
with Eastern mills at reasonable cost and delivery would be a great benefit to manufacturers
and stimulate other business.
Smith Watson Engineering Co., Portland, consumed 1,500 tons of pig-iron last year, 2,000 tons
of scrap, and consumption of mild steel runs from 200 to 300 tons a year. Business was steadily-
growing. S. C. E. Smith, manager, considered a Coast iron and steel plant would be of direct
and infinite benefit to the manufacturer, and he hoped a works would be started. He would not
hazard an estimate of aggregate consumption of all grades of iron and steel on the Coast, but
admitted it must be considerably over 1,000,000 tons.
Northwest Steel Co., Portland.—This company has no foundry. Its consumption of structural steel was about 1,500 tons per month, including angles, shapes, beams, and plates, and
500 tons of rivet-bars. The company has contracts for seven steel oil-tank steamers of 12,000
tons each, and will consume 35,000 tons of plates and shapes in building these during the next
sixteen months. His opinion was that they would continue to build steel vessels, and if steel
for these can be made on the Coast it would undoubtedly help the industry. Freight on the
material was now costing $22.50 per ton.
A. C. Callan, general broker and importer, Portland, said jobbers in Oregon handle over
20,000 tons of merchant bars a year, 1,500 to 2X00 tons. He estimates Washington will
handle 30,000 to 50,000 tons of merchant bar and considerably more rails. Relaying rails
were practically unobtainable now and there was a much greater demand for new rails up to
60 lb.    He considered an iron and steel plant would be of great benefit to the Coast. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 25
Mr.  Crawford,  Industrial  Commissioner,  Portland Chamber  of  Commerce,  furnished the
following list of cast-iron foundries in Oregon:—
Name of Foundry.
Location.
Capacity of Pig-
iron per Day.
Tons.
Peninsula  Iron  Works   	
Wood-Ewing Iron Works	
Independent Foundry  Co	
American Marine Iron Works  	
Marine Iron Works  	
Smith-Watson Iron Works	
John Wood Iron Works   	
Pacific Iron Works   	
Crawford & Dougherty  	
J. M. Leach Iron Works	
Hesse Martin Iron Works   	
Beaver Foundry & Machine Works
Phoenix   Iron   Works   	
Liberty Foundry	
Oregon Iron & Steel Works	
Portland Stove Works	
O.W.R. & N. Shops   	
Commercial Iron Works	
Beaver State Motor Co	
Vaughn Motor Works  	
Coos Bay Iron Works	
Astoria Marine Iron Works	
Ashland  Iron   Works   	
Anerson Steel Furnace & Boiler
Cross Bros'. Iron Works	
Albany Iron Works	
W. F. Rogers' Foundry  	
Scow Bay Iron and Brass Works . .
Dallas  Iron  Works   	
Vancouver   Iron   Works   	
Salem   Iron   Works   	
Shofner Iron Works   	
Huffschmidt & Dougan  	
Hlner & Reed 	
Willamette Iron & Steel Works
Northwest  Steel Co	
Portland
Gresham   	
Marshfleld  	
Astoria    	
Ashland   	
Salem    	
Eugene   	
Albany   	
Bandon    	
Astoria    	
Dallas    	
Vancouver,   Wash.
Salem    	
Iianier   	
Bend	
Tillamook    	
Portland	
Total
20
31/2
50
17
1
30
10
5
4
10
1%
8
7
23
10
10
1%
10
15
1
1
5%
5
4
1%
5
3
1%
4
iy2
201%
Table B.—Present Consumption reported by Oregon Plants.
Plant.
a
o
in
s
a
o
«£
CJ02
s
Merchant
Bar.
a a)
H 0
CO oJPh
-a
a
<s .
I»   H^
So,
aa
Rivets and
Rivet-bars.
Structural
Steel.
Willamette Iron Works	
Northwest Bridge & Iron Co.  . .
Smith-Watson Engineering Co...
Miscellaneous  foundries   (35)    ..
Tons.
1,500
1,500
90,000
Tons.
1,500
2,000
90,000
Tons.
500
Tons.
1,500
SOO
Tons.
10,250
Tons.
500
Tons.
1,000
6,000
Tons.
18,000
Totals   	
93,000
93,500
500
1,700
10,250
500
7,000
18,000 P 26
British Columbia.
1921
In reply to a questionnaire on the demand
for malleable castings in Portland, Ore., the
following
statement was furnished by the Chamber of Commerce:—
No. of
Reply.
Lb. per Year
used at Present.
Lb. which could be used
if  readily  available
per Year.
Remarks.
1	
2	
3	
4	
6	
7	
8	
9	
2,000
1,000 (approx.)
200,000
S,000
15 tons
Very few
None
3,000 to 5.000
10,000
30,000 to 40,000
3,000 (approx.)
200.000
12,000
Small and medium  castings used.
Castings for general use.
10 lb. and under, agricultural implements.
Mostly small;  street-car truck.
Use considerable quantity of stamped hardware
for trunks, etc.
Small castings for washing-machines.
Used for devices and machines for mill-saws.
Small   castings   used   in   Willamette   logging-
2,400  (approx.)
5,000 to 6,000
15,000
10	
11	
12	
13	
14   	
15	
16	
17	
18	
19  	
20	
21
22
23	
24	
25	
26	
27	
28	
30	
31	
32	
33	
34	
35	
36	
37	
38  	
39	
40	
41	
20,000
60,000
2,000
400,000
150,000
10,000
6,000
None
10,000
200,000
None
None
25,000
25,000
2.000
None
engines.
6.000
80,000
5,000 (if   right   price)
500,000
Mostly small for drag-saws.
Logging and general purposes.
Various used, large and small.
Malleable cast-pipe fittings, % to 6 inches.
150,000
15.000
6.000
1,000 to 2,000      •
60,000
350,000
Several tons
500
castings for furniture used.
Used   for   portable   drag-saws;   average   about
10 1b.
Used  for  machine-manufacturing.
Used for auto and wagon repairs.
Used   for  hoist   and   gear   parts;   considerably
more used if price right.
Small; miscellaneous supplies.
Used for railroad-cars.
Sawmill and ipaper-mill work.
Used for beds.
In need of malleable cast; can give more or less
2,000
business.
Used for small elevator parts.
Very small business.
Used for tanks ; about 1 lb. each.
Quantity used depends upon contracts in hand.
Use small cast; in need of malleable castings.
Use y2 to 50 lb. in size.
Not  much  use  for  cast,  but in  sympathy  for
25.000
Questionable
30,000
50,000
such a factory.
In favour of local concern, but not much use for
4.000
None
cast; use small castings.
Use steel instead of malleable.
»
i
Quantity would depend upon price.
Do not use malleable cast.
Business does not require any.
42	
43	
44	
45	
5!
y
May use some next year.
Would do good business.
Califoe
NIA.
Calif
ornia steel and
ron plants offer a stea
ly market for at least 1,000 tons per day of
pig-iron.
In San Francis
co and Los Angeles set
tions are five steel and iron mills operating
seventeen
open-hearth fur
naces, with capacity fro
m 25 to 50 tons, a total capacity of 635 tons.
They pro(
luce 27,000 tons i
l month;  65 per cent, nn
>rchant bars, % to 4 inches, in rounds, squares,
- 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 27
and flats, and reinforcing-bars from % to iy± inches;   35 per cent, angles up to 6 inches, and
I beams and channels up to S inches.    These mills are:—
Company.
Furnaces.
Capacity.
Monthly
Output.
San Francisco—
Pacific Coast Steel Co	
3
3
3
3
3
2
Tons.
50 )
40 j
25
30
40
40
Tons.
Pacific Coast Steel Co	
Over 10,000
About 6,000
Los Angeles—
Llewellyn Steel Co	
Over    5,000
3,000
3,000
These mills use scrap, approximately 1,500 tons a day, consuming about 94 per cent, scrap
and 6 per cent, pig-iron. Scrap costs from $27 to $30 a ton f.o.b. San Francisco, and is hard
to get at that. The price is $2 lower at Seattle. Managers say that they would use at least
10 to 25 per cent, more pig-iron if obtainable at reasonable cost.
The Columbia Steel Company have also a large cast-steel foundry, capacity of which is about
1,500 tons per month. They supply heavy steel castings, such as stern and rudder frames, and
heavy engine castings, not only to shipyards of San Francisco and Los Angeles, but also to
shipyards of Portland, Tacoma, Seattle, Victoria, and Vancouver.
There are twenty-five iron-foundries, employing 2,300, using 30 to 50 per cent, pig-iron, the
balance scrap, consuming 4,500 to 5,000 tons of pig-iron monthly at present. They could use at
least 200 tons of pig per day. Other plants, such as Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, now
using 150 tons of pig, 200 tons of blooms and billets, and 50,000 tons of plates, shapes, angles,
and channels, and Baker Iron Works, of Los Angeles, engaged principally in fabricating
structural steel for bridge and building purposes, also a large machine-shop and foundry, would
add to the market. Steel and iron workers interviewed in San Francisco District concur that
there is a present market for at least 500 tons a day in that district, and those interviewed in
Los Angeles District say it offers a market for a like amount. Mr. Hoswell, manager of the
Los nAngeles Foundrymens Association, said cast-iron foundries of Los A.ngeles consumed now
300 tons of pig-iron a day.
Pacific Coast Steel Co., San Francisco, have six open-hearth furnaces—three of 50 tons
and three of 40 tons capacity. Output is over 10,000 tons per month. Mr. Burgess, manager,
said thirty to 40 per cent, more pig-iron would be used if obtainable at reasonable price and
delivery.
Columbia Steel Co., San Francisco, have three open-hearth furnaces of 25 tons capacity,
with normal output of merchant bar, small beams, and shapes of 6,000 tons per month; also
a large cast-steel foundry with capacity of 1,500 tons per month. Heavy steel castings, such
as stern and rudder frames, and heavy engine castings are supplied not only to the shipyards
of San Francisco and Los Angeles, but also to those of Portland, Seattle, Tacoma, Victoria, and
Vancouver. Mr. Blotchford, manager, said the plant would use 10 to 25 per cent, more pig-iron
if obtainable at a reasonable price.
Judson Iron & Steel Works, San Francisco, have three open-hearth furnaces of 30 tons
capacity and monthly output of 5,000 tons.
Southern California Iron & Steel Works, Los Angeles, have three open-hearth furnaces of
40 tons capacity and output of 3,000 tons per month. The plant now uses about 1,500 tons of
pig-iron, 2,000 tons of cast-scrap, and 25,000 tons of scrap steel per annum. A. C. Denman,
manager, said the plant would use 3,000 tons of pig-iron per month if the price was on a par
with scrap-steel prices.
Lleivcllyn Iron Works, Los Angeles, have two open-hearth furnaces of 40 tons capacity and
output of 3,000 tons per month. This plant uses per annum 6,000 tons of pig-iron, 6,000 tons
of cast scrap, 33,000 tons of scrap steel, 1,500 tons of merchant bar purchased in addition to the
amount produced from scrap, 5,000 tons of ship and boiler plate, and 15,000 tons of structural
shapes. Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, San Francisco, took over the Union Iron Works and
Risdon Engineering Works, of San Francisco. This plant is a large one and built many steel
steamers during the war and handled during the same time SOO repair jobs. It has four floating
docks and a large graving-dock. At present seven oil-tank steamers are under construction,
each of 12,000 tons, a large steamer for private owners, and several torpedo-boats. In addition
to the ship-building plant, there is a large cast-iron foundry and machine-shop. Most of the
steel castings are bought outside, principally from the Columbia Steel Company. Present consumption per annum is 1,800 tons of pig-iron, 2,400 tons of billets and blooms, and 50,000 tons
of structural shapes.
Baker Iron Works, Los Angeles.—This firm is principally engaged in fabricating structural
steel for bridge and- building purposes. It has a large machine-shop and foundry. Merchant
bar is bought from local mills, but all plates, shapes, angles, channels, and beams, as well as
pig-iron, comes from the Carnegie Steel Works in Pittsburgh, and delays, inconvenience, and loss
in delivery occur, Eastern manufacturers getting the preference. A blast-furnace and steel-plate
mill on the Coast would have the hearty support of this firm. Mr. Baker estimates the consumption in Los Angeles section, which he says represents 50 per cent, of California, per month
at 1,500 tons of pig-iron, 2,000 tons of cast scrap, 6,000 tons of steel scrap, 2,000 tons of ship
and boiler plates, and 1,000 tons of structural shapes; the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce
concurred in this estimate.
Foundries, San Francisco and Vicinity.—Mr. Metcalf, secretary of the Metal Trades
Association, of San Francisco, said the association is composed of the majority of the cast-iron
foundries of San Francisco and vicinity, comprising twenty-five foundries, working on the open-
shop principal as opposed to the California Metal Trades, with closed shops, which Mr. Metcalf
said was now practically dead. The twenty-five foundries employ 2,300, use 30 to 50 per cent,
pig-iron, the balance scrap. Present consumption of pig-iron is from 4,500 to 5,000 tons per
month.
Foundries, Los Angeles and Vicinity.—Mr. Hoswell, manager of the Los -Angeles Foundry-
men's Association, said foundries of Los Angeles and neighbourhood could use about 300 tons
of pig-iron per day.
Table C.—Present Consumption reported by California Plants.
Plant.
a'
c
in
H
3
cfl
s
a
d
hJ     .
3 3
SP3
a <£
S3«h
rH O
dF>2
—■a d
-a a~ *
CO c3H
a
aja
Los Angeles Section, miscellaneous foundries
Miscellaneous foundries in  San Francisco
Tons.
6,000
1,800
18.000
1,500
60,000
Tons.
6,000
1.000
24,000
2,000
60.000
Tons.
2,400
Tons.
1,500
Tons.
5,000
24,000
Tons.
15.000
12.000
81.900
93,000
2,400
1,500
29.500
17.000
Note.—Southern California Iron Works would use 3,000 tons pig-iron per month if prices for same
were on par with scrap-steel prices. Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, ship and boiler plate and shapes,
50,000 tons.
Requibements op California.
C. A. Day, director of Industrial Bureau, San Francisco, Chamber of Commerce, said local
steel-mills consume 40,000 to 50,000 tons of raw material per month, 94 per cent, scrap, 6 per cent,
pig and iron foundries using 30 to 50 per cent, pig, balance scrap, used about 4,500 to 5,000 tons
of pig.   Based on standard percentage and run of scrap and subject to change as increased 11 Geo. o Department of Industries. P 2!)
pig production displaced scrap, practical foundrymen submitted the following analysis for a
good average grade of pig-iron which would command ready local sale:—
Silicon      3.00 to 3.25
Manganese   1.00   „   1.25
Phosphorus, between     0.30   „  0.80
Sulphur,  under     0.05
Total carbon, n.pt less than    3.25
jAdvantages of a Coast blast-furnace which would have direct bearing on sales are:—
(1.) Foundries would not have to carry extensive stocks as they now are obliged to do
owing to great distance from supply.
(2.) Removal of uncertainties of transportation due to strikes, rail congestion, car
shortages, etc.
(3.)  Saving in transportation charges.
(4.) Assurance of steady supply adapted to special needs of local consumer.
A. G. Arnoll, manager, Industrial Department, Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, said at
present the entire Pacific Coast is dependent on the East and South for supply of pig-iron and
steel, with exception of small tonnage of open-hearth steel produced from scrap at San Francisco
and Los -\ngeles. Imports of foreign iron and steel are negligible; never likely to be of
importance owing to cost of transportation. Therefore a blast-furnace and steel plant would
have the whole Pacific Coast area as a market, which can only be reached by the Eastern
manufacturer after paying transcontinental freight or a minimum water freight from Atlantic
ports. The markets of South America are open on more than equal terms, and the great markets
of -Australasia, the Orient, and Siberia are available. Simply stated, pig-iron can be made on
the Coast in the regular blast-furnace way at approximately two-thirds of cost of Pennsylvania
pig-iron laid down in this market. Smelting of iron and manufacture of steel commercially is
the most necessary of basic industries to tbe upbuilding of the Pacific Coast.
Mr. Arnoll said that, while it was difficult to get detailed information as to local production
of ingots, billets, and merchant bars, it appears that not less than 20,000 tons of pig-iron is
used per annum in this section (Los Angeles). Output of a 500-ton blast-furnace could readily
be absorbed. A great tonnage of material could be secured from this section if a blast-furnace
was in operation on the Coast, such as rails and other items now purchased elsewhere owing
to lack of local facilities. Each month brings a greater call on local steel producers for large
tonnage of high-grade machine and tool steels which have been shipped to this market in great
quantities from the East. Only recently the Rich Steel Products Company, of Battle Creek,
Mich., moved their large plants here, which will employ 1,500 and use large quantities of
high-grade steels.
Owing to enforced use of scrap, local foundries and steel-mills have attained great efficiency
in combining materials available for their operations. Steel-mills in their district consume
3S,000 to 47,000 tons of scrap monthly. In war-time much difficulty prevailed in securing scrap,
but the supply now fairly equals demand. Operators, however, are now limited by materials
available and are discouraged from making extensions warranted by volume of local business
owing to uncertainty of future increase in raw-material supply.
Markets for Iron and Steel.
Mr. Scott, representative of Midvale Steel Company, Pennsylvania, computes the market for
steel products on the Pacific Coast, California to Alaska, at over'2,000,000 tons per annum; he
had one customer good for 25,000 tons a year. There was market for 300,000 tons of light rails,
600,000 tons of plates, including marine, boiler, and tank sheet plates and structural steel;
600,000 tons of bars, including merchant bars, rounds, squares, and flats, and soft machinery
or mild steel and drill-steel; and 500,000 tons miscellaneous, including nail-rods, fence-wire, etc.
Heads of the Vulcan Iron Works, Seattle, consider consumption on the Pacific Coast from
California to Seattle will easily aggregate 2,000,000 tons a year. S. C. E. Smith,, manager of
Smith-Watson Engineering Company, Portland, said he would not hazard an estimate of the
aggregate consumption of all grades of iron and steel on the Coast, but admitted it must be
considerably over 1,000,000 tons. A. C. Callan, broker and importer, Portland, Ore., said jobbers
in Oregon handled over 20,000 tons a year of merchant bar and 1,500 to 2,000 tons of light rails.
He estimated Washington jobbers to handle 30,000 to 50,000 tons of merchant bar and consider- P 30 British Columbia. 1921
ably more rails. Mr. Outcoult, Industrial Commissioner, Tacoma Chamber of Commerce, said
that in 1919 there were exported through Tacoma 105,301 long tons of iron and steel, all of which
could be made here if a plant had been in operation. Mr. George Danz, manager, Hofius Steel
Company, Tacoma, said consumption in the three Pacific States of structural steel, tank-plate,
and merchant bar, including reinforcing and light rails, would run to 1,500,000 tons a year.
J. F. Thorne, business manager of Pacific Ports, published by Frank Waterhouse & Co.,
Tacoma, said consumption of iron and steel in the territory embraced by Washington, Oregon,
California, Idaho, Montana, and Utah, just prior to the abnormal increase caused by the shipbuilding boom during the war, amounted to approximately 923,000 tons per annum. Then there
were six blast-furnaces west of the Mississippi—six in Colorado, two in Montana, and one in
Oregon—but only three were in operation, two in Colorado and one in Montana. Of course, since
that time, due to shortage of steel in the production centres of the East and to the greatly
increased local demand on account of ship-building, the conditions have changed materially
and local production has greatly increased. However, the year 1915, which was at the beginning
of the ship-building era on the Coast, will more nearly approximate normal conditions of the
district. Because of erratic conditions existing it has been difficult to obtain accurate figures
for a later period.
Analysis of consumption of iron and steel in the States under discussion in 1915, placed at
923,000 tons, shows the relative amounts approximately as follows:—
Tons.
Pig-iron     100,000
Reinforcing-steel for concrete buildings       30,000
Sheets     136,000
Plates       217,000
Corrugated       15,000
Bar   175,000
Structural      250,000
Total      923,000
Of course, it is thoroughly understood that since the compilation of these figures the
consumption has considerably more than trebled. But any figures we might aim to give during
the recent high stages of the ship-building industry would be erratic and would not give a
fair estimate of the normal demand. Normal consumption, as the Coast industries become
straightened out, will be for domestic trade somewhere around 2,000,000 tons a year. This
amount will increase as industrial progress becomes greater on the Coast.
Consumption of iron and steel on the Coast would be materially increased if there were an
abundant local supply. Industries whose primary consumption is of iron and steel would be
greatly increased if there were an abundant supply of iron and steel at hand; for instance,
there would be a greater manufacture of bolts and nuts, perhaps of foundry material. The
ship-building industry would be continued to a much greater extent and other manufacturing
would become more highly developed by the mere presence of a local supply.
• W. B. Henderson, of the Industrial Trade Department of Pacific Ports, Seattle, said exact
and authentic information regarding markets for steel and steel products is difficult to secure.
In ascertaining present consumption leading steelmen of Puget Sound were interviewed, but
results obtained are not considered as complete. Consumption in Pacific States and that territory
which may be considered as tributary is estimated as follows:—
Tons.
Pig-iron       160,000
Reinforcing-steel         90,000
Sheets     100,000
Plates       125,000
Corrugated         25,000
Bar       150,000
Structural    '    510,000
Total  1,160,000 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 31
Considering these facts, Mr. Henderson said it is the opinion of steelmen that a blastfurnace having a capacity of 500 tons per day, together with the refining and rolling equipment
necessary to manufacture the pig-iron into the various merchantable forms and shapes, would
be a success. Markets are constantly expanding in the Western country and soon a much larger
trade would be built up.
Imports and Exports, British Columbia.
The Commissioner of Customs, Ottawa, advises me that the value of iron and steel products
entered for consumption in the Province of British Columbia during the fiscal year ending
March 31st, 1920, amounts to $12,352,715, but, unfortunately, he does not give the tonnage or the
details of these products.
Appended are tables showing the quantities and values of the products of iron and steel
imported into British Columbia during tbe year 1912, the nine months ending December 31st,
1917, and the six months ending September 30th, 1919.
Quantities and Values of Iron and Steel imported into British Columbia for the
Fiscal Year March 31st, 1912.
Item.
Quantity.
Value.
Bar iron or steel, rolled, whether in coils, bundles, rods, or bars, comprising
rounds, ovals, squares, and flats, n.o.p	
Canada plates, Russia iron, terne plates and rolled sheets of iron or steel
coated with zinc, spelter, or other metal, of all widths or thicknesses,
n.o.p	
Casting's, iron or steel, n.o.p	
Iron or steel bridges or parts thereof, iron or steel structural work, columns,
shapes, or sections, drilled, punched, or in any further stage of manufacture than as rolled or cast, n.o.p	
Iron in pig  	
Iron and steel railway bars or rails of any form, punched or not, n.o.p., for
railways, which term for the purposes of this item shall include all kinds
of railways, street-railways, and tramways, even although they are used
for private purposes only, and even although they are not used or
intended to be used in connection with the business of common carrying of goods or passengers  	
Rolled iron or steel angles, tees, beams, channels, girders, and other rolled
shapes or sections, not punched, drilled, or further manufactured than
as rolled, n.o.p	
Rolled iron or steel sheets or plates, sheaved or unslieaved, and skelp iron
or steel, shared or rolled in grooves, n.o.p	
Rolled iron or steel plates, not less than 30 inches in width and not less
than %  inch in thickness, n.o.p	
Rolled iron or steel sheets, polished or not, No. 14 gauge and thinners, n.o.p.
Sheets, flat, of galvanized iron or steel .	
Steel plate, universal mill or rolled edge plates of steel over 12 inches wide,
imported by manufacturers of bridges or of structural work or in car-
construction   	
Rolled iron or steel beams, channels, angles, and other rolled shapes, of
iron or steel, not punched, drilled, or further manufactured than rolled,
weighing not less than 35 lb. per lineal yard, not being square, flat, oval,
or round shapes, and not being railway bars or rails	
Boiler-plate of iron or steel, not less than 30 inches in width and not less
than J/i inch in thickness, for use exclusively in the manufacture of
boilers   	
Iron or steel beams, sheets, plates, angles, knees, masts or parts thereof,
and cable chains for wooden, iron, steel, or composite ships or vessels . .
Tin plates and sheets 	
Totals 	
Tons.
6,009
642
1,693
7,648
20,104
1,640
1,005
4,850
327
3S5
4,914
1,038
757
7,653
58,674
$   203,851
30,727
71,656
89,696
102,736
527,9S9
47,938
32,434
124,272
19.696
22,094
523
120,556
37,898 ~
27,438
530,199
$1,988,701 P 32
British Columbia.
1921
Statement showing the Principal Items of Iron and Steel entered for Consumption through Ports
in British Columbia during the Nine Months ended December 31st, 1917.
Item.
Quantity.
Value.
Dutiable Goods.
Bar iron and steel, n.o.p	
Canada plate, Russia iron, etc.
Castings, n.o.p	
Cast-iron pipe   	
Chain   	
. cwt.
. cwt.
Railway  locomotives    No.
Gas and gasolene engines   „
Steam-engines      ,,
Pipe-fittings   	
Forgings     lb.
Pig-iron     tons
Iron ore        ,,
Ore-crushers, rock-drills, etc.  	
Portable saw and planing mills No.
Printing-presses    	
Coal-handling machinery     »	
Paper- and pulp-mill machinery	
Sawmill machinery   	
Machinery,  n.o.p	
Railway-spikes     cwt.
Wire  nails      „
Power-pumps  No.
Railway rails and bars   tons
Rolled iron and steel angles, beams, etc cwt.
Rolled iron and steel hoop, band, etc .   ,,
Rolled iron and steel sheets  .  ,,
Wire rods for the manufacture of wire    „
Galvanized  sheets      ,,
Stoves   	
Railway switches, frogs, and crossings	
Tubing    	
Household hollow-ware  	
Wire cloth  	
Wire, n.o.p lb.
Wire rope, twisted or stranded wire
Scrap iron or steel cwt.
Universal mill-plates      „
Rolled iron and steel in bars, bands, sheets, or plates, etc., over 3V2C. per lb.    „
Tools    	
Other manufacturings of iron, n.o.p	
Total
Free Goods.
Anchors   cwt.
Boiler-plate       „
Steel and iron for ship-building    „
Mining machinery   	
Boiler-tubes   	
Wire     cwt.
Printing-presses     No.
Typesetting machinery   	
Ferro-manganese    tons
Total  	
2,694
2,828
5,049
11
629
22
61,548
871
3,385
69
3.736
6,092
237
2,866
21,507
3.295
2,182
33,496
5,134
556.830
24,358
5939
25,988
1,682
8,385
278,950
2,541
5
9,013
15,675
37,855
21,814
39,088
39,609
146,404
79.466
119,044
6,624
29,171
13.542
156,336
8,137
14,844
13.274
381.558
113.902
945.876
12.S71
45.238
57,972
92,080
85,169
27,428
15,545
117.089
41,188
14,196
14,955
91,304
16.613
15.237
28,826
362,442
30.213
27.301
172,576
80,490
448.194
$3,988,159
$     10,927
48,052
1,294,106
116,766
96,705
11,477
54,550
29,873
2,120
$1,664,576 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P.33
Statement showing the Principal Items under the Classification of Iron and Steel entered for
Consumption through Ports in British Columbia during the Six Months ended September
30th, 1919.
Item.
Rolled iron or steel in bars, bands, hoop, scroll, strip sheet, or plate, costing-
over 3%c. per lb cwt.
Boiler-plate, 30 inches wide and % inch thick	
Steel plate, etc., for structural work	
Tin-plate   	
Rolled iron or steel sheets, 14 gauge and thinner  	
Sheets, flat, of galvanized iron or steel  	
Rolled iron or steel sheets or plates, unsheared or sheared, and skelp-iron,
sheared or rolled grooves, n.o.p cwt.
Rolled iron or steel plates, 30 inches wide and XA inch thick, n.o.p „
Iron or steel beams, sheets, plates, etc., for vessels   ,,
Rolled iron or steel beams, channels, etc., not further manufactured than
rolled, weighing 35 lb. per lineal yard   cwt.
Rolled iron or steel angles, tees, beams, channels, girders, etc., not further
manufactured than rolled, n.o.p.   . cwt.
Railway tie  plates     , „
Manufactured articles of iron, steel, or brass of a class not manufactured
in Canada, for use in construction of ships 	
Seamless-steel or wrought-iron boiler-tubes  	
Pipe-fittings   	
Wire cloth or woven wire and netting	
Wire rope, etc., wire cables, n.o.p	
Traction-engines for farm purposes costing $1,400 and less No.
Cable-chains for vessels  cwt.
Chains, n.o.p	
Locomotive parts  	
Engines, gas and gasolene, n.o.p No.
Engines, steam      „
Ore-crushers, rock-crushers, stamp-mills, Cornish and belted rolls, rock-drills,
and percussion coal-cutters   	
Articles for mining and metallurgical operations	
Sawmill machines   	
Pumps, power, and parts   No.
Paper-mill machines    	
Machinery and parts, n.o.p	
Tools, hand, n.o.p	
Automobiles, passenger   No.
Automobiles, freight   „
-Automobile  parts   	
Motor-cycles and motor-vehicles, n.o.p No.
Cars, other, n.o.p    „
Anchors   cwt.
Nails, wire, n.o.p   „
Railway-spikes     „
Nuts, rivets, and bolts, etc „
Baths, bath-tubs, closets, and sinks, etc	
Guns, rifles, firearms  	
Stoves  	
Quantity.
15,798
12.741
6,082
S5,315
6,048
4,386
5,871
6,072
176,231
13,284
7.822
7,613
83
5,393
473
231
323
245
"135
113
5,595
2.493
4,131
1,734
Aralue.
$ 118,427
51,703
16,207
628,366
26,806
25,526
18,227
16.912
1,430,302
36,865
23.483
15,498
161,205
57.823
43,060
17.288
255,651
47,676
51,016
103,760
16,583
111.803
59,757
35,648
77,001
62.632
52,265
19,703
660,016
45,954
365,048
459,124
56,988
14,077
118,072
46,774
13,532
11,810
11.770
10,668
35,722
18,738
Imports to California.
Mr. Booth, manager of tbe Judson Iron Works, San Francisco, computes the structural
and other steel for construction coming into San Francisco from the East at 3,000 tons per
month. C. A. Day, director of the Industrial Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce,
said the local mills roll only small structural shapes—flats, tees, angles, rounds, squares, and
deformed bars for concrete reinforcement—and San Francisco depends entirely on the big steel-
mills in Pittsburgh and Chicago Districts for the great tonnage of beams, columns, and plates
used for structural purposes and ship-building. Requirements in 1920 for building purposes
alone in the California city approximated 100,000 tons, which, if anything, was below normal.
3 P 34
Bi
)LUMBIA.
1921
Shipments of iron and steel to San Francisco by water were practically nil during the war.
In 1920, to August, they totalled 11,672 tons—5,416 tons during the first six months, 2,142 tons
in July, and 4,114 tons in August. Foreign shipments are principally from England and, in
the pre-war period, from Germany. The best grade of pig-iron now coming from China, with
freight of $6 to $10 per ton, added to the low cost of production owing to the small pay for
labour and present moderate duty, is a keen competitor with Eastern pig-iron and likely to shut
it out from the Californian market under the recently increased freight rates. Eastern rail
shipments are principally from Alabama. The totals of the pig-iron shipments by rail are not
now available. Rail shipments of steel to this market in 1918 totalled 636,000 tons. Later
figures are not available.
Exports through Pacific Coast Ports.
Export markets are now large and probably will amount to a large export trade. In the
past few years large quantities of iron and steel products have been sold to the Orient and
the trade has been constantly expanding. We have been importing some pig-iron from China
and the Orient to the Pacific Coast in competition with the Eastern manufacturers. This iron
would still offer a little competition to a Western company, but could well be neglected. Average
freight rate on iron and steel products from the Eastern producing centres to the Pacific Coast
is $20 per ton. This would allow Western plant a margin of, say, $15 in extra costs to produce
a ton of pig-iron. The costs to a local firm would be greater than those to Eastern companies,
but after active co-operation was begun the margin would be smaller, thus leaving more money
for selling costs and profit.
The exports of iron and steel through Washington Customs District during the calendar
year 1919 were:—
Item.
Quantity.
Value.
Pig-iron   ; tons
Scrap iron and steel   „
Bar iron      „
Wire rods     „
All other rods of steel   ,,
Billets, ingots of steel	
Bolts, nuts, rivets     „
Car wheels and axles   	
Castings   	
Chains    	
Boilers   	
Locomotives, steam   engines
Boiler-tubes   	
Wire  nails    tons
Pipes and fittings, cast   ,,
Pipes and fittings, wrought   „
Railroad-spikes       „
Steel rails     „
Switches, frogs, etc	
Sheets and plates, galvanized  tons
Sheets and plates, iron   „
Plates,  steel     „
Sheets, steel     „
Ship and tank plates      „
Structural steel and iron ,
Wire, except barbed, steel ,
All other manufacturings of steel and iron	
10,062
$ 399,108
9,348
234.602
14,000
1,175,001
30,000
1,893,345
126,000
9,371,909
937
122,450
4,000
562,187
3,378,146
220,109
471,756
1,018.957
115
3,641,497
591,762
14,000
1,167,724
850
94,777
11,000
1,587.927
2,360
182,853
95,708
6,478,156
598,211
4,170
617.029
9,360
1,105,183
152,500
12,103,316
24,000
2,814.504
5,100
542,077
12,700
2,180.004
18,150
1,983,619
2,034,316
This shows a total value of iron and steel products exported through the Washington District
Customs-houses of $46,560,525. The imports of this district are negligible and may well be
neglected. It will be easily seen that the port business through the Washington Customs District
would be sufficient to take care of the output of a moderately sized mill on the Coast. ■
11 Geo. 5 Department of Industries. P 35
Referring to the export trade, Mr. Thorne, business manager of Pacific Ports, said total
tonnage is rather difficult to obtain, as many items are listed not by weights, but rather by
value, or perhaps number and value. In point of value this export trade in 1918 amounted to
approximately $100,000,000. The tonnage of pig-iron, steel billets, ingots and blooms, rails and
structural iron and steel amounted in this same year to something more than 1,000,000 tons.
Of the valuation given above, $31,000,000 consisted of machinery of iron and steel and slightly
more than $68,000,000 of other iron and steel articles, including the 1,000,000 tons just described.
Following is a table showing export tonnage of principal commodities of basic iron and steel
articles from Pacific Coast ports during 1918:—
Pig-iron:  Ferro-manganese— Tons.
Washington      25
Pig-iron :   All other— Tons.
Washington      12,027
San Francisco     -.     1,476
       13,503
Steel: Billets, ingots, and blooms of steel—
Washington      22,926
Southern  California     20
San Francisco     7,879
Hawaii        517
       31,342
Rails—
Washington   76,903
Southern  California           420
San Francisco    21,232
       96,555
Structural iron and steel, including shapes, I beams, etc.—
Washington     21,104
Southern California  4
San Francisco    16,228
       37,336
Total        180,741
Prospects of Export Trade.
At present the entire Pacific Coast is dependent on the East and South for its supply of
pig-iron and steel, with exception of a small tonnage of open-hearth steel produced from scrap
at San Francisco and Los Angeles. Imports of foreign iron and steel are negligible; never likely
to be of importance owing to cost of transportation. Therefore, as our principal market, we have
the Pacific Coast area, comprising California, Oregon, and Washington, which can only be
reached by the Eastern manufacturer after paying transcontinental freight or a minimum water
freight from Atlantic ports. The markets of South America are open on more than equal terms,
and the great markets of Australasia, the Orient, and Siberia are available.
Regarding future prospects for development of the iron and steel commodities, at present
Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Dutch East Indies, and most of the other countries on the
Pacific are now importing practically all their iron and steel. There have been sporadic
attempts by the Australian Government to develop an iron industry, but up to this time little
progress has been made. During the next decade there will undoubtedly be a tremendous
demand for railroad material, particularly iron and steel, principally in China, but also in India,
the Dutch East Indies, Philippines, Australia, Borneo, and the west coast of South America.
It is interesting to note in this connection that for the ten months ending April, 1920, slightly
more than $14,000,000 in steel rails were shipped to Pacific Coast countries, and that this item
represented 60 per cent, of the total United States exports in this commodity. These rails were
mostly of smaller and medium sizes, tbe percentage over 60 lb. being almost negligible.
Imports to the Pacific Coast States from the Pacific Coast countries are negligible for
practical purposes.    There is very little probability of serious competition for a Pacific Coast plant from this source, for the reasons that, in the first place, the quality of the foreign production is not high, and, in the second place, that they are unable to compete on a cost basis owing
to the high freight rates and cost of production at home.
With this extra business which would be open to a Coast plant, together with the local
trade on the Coast, it is evident that no lack of market exists. In fact, the Eastern mills have
been unable to supply the Western demands of late years and will have their entire capacity
absorbed by the Eastern markets for a number of years yet. With operation of a steel-mill in
this section naturally comes the establishment of subsidiary industries—foundries, tool-makers,
machine-shops, large equipment and supply houses, and companies producing specialized articles,
such as wire nails, pipes and tubes, etc. These likewise create a demand for more steel and
cause an extension of the steel plant. Other industries depending on the use of machinery will
also locate in the district.
The Tin-plate Industry.
The tin-plate'situation on the Pacific Coast is also interesting in this connection. Consumption of tin-plate on the Pacific Coast is well over 150,000 tons per year, but it is to the import
and export phase of the subject I would refer to here. Importation of the ingots through
San Francisco in 1917 was 376,085; in 1918, 537,794. In 1918 the United States imported
105,746,232 lb. of pig-tin from Asia and Oceania; 43 per cent, or 58,629,SS1 lb., was imported
via Pacific Coast ports. Nearly all this pig-tin was shipped East at the then freight rate of
75 cents per IOO lb., and freight charges amounted to $439,724, or 1.40 per cent, of the total value,
and much of this tin was manufactured in the East and reshipped back to Pacific Coast ports
for export and domestic consumption.
In 1917 exports of tin-plate to foreign ports from San Francisco totalled 328,141 cases;
in 1918, 358,655 cases; and during the first eleven months of 1919 the tin-plate exported through
San Francisco totalled 14,127,213 lb. This is in addition to the large amount used on the Coast
for domestic purposes, such as manufacture of cans and containers.
In 1918 558,170,371 lb. of tin-plate was exported to Asia, and 29 per cent., or 162,014,832 lb.,
was exported via Pacific Coast ports. Tbe freight from Eastern tin-plate mills to the Coast,
at 60 cents per 100 lb., amounted to $972,0S8, or 5.40 per cent, of total value of the tin-plate
at the then market price. Practically 3,180 car-loads of tin and tin-plate were transported to
the East for manufacturing and returned as tin-plate at expense for freight carriage of $1,411,813.
This represents the tin-plate exported and does not include the amount used for domestic
consumption on tbe Pacific Coast, which tonnage is unquestionably as large, or larger, than the
export.
There is obviously great necessity for blast-furnace and steel-mill plants on tbe Pacific
Coast. Normal demands of the district are sufficient to maintain a large plant in continued
operation and the entire metal industry would expand under its influence, and business, both
domestic and foreign, which naturally belongs to the Pacific Coast, would be kept there.
A blast-furnace on the Pacific Coast would also provide material from which local mills, or
new mills established for that purpose, could roll the steel for manufacture of the vast tonnage
of tin-plates now shipped here from the East under heavy economic loss and subject to delays
and uncertainties of trans-continental shipment. It is reasonable to suppose that with an
established local source of raw material capital would readily be found to build and equip the
necessary plants for manufacture of tin-plate and galvanized sheets and other light material
for which there is a large and growing market.
As a result of the investigations I have made in British Columbia and in the several
States of the Pacific Coast, I have compiled a table showing the normal consumption of British
Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California plants, and while this does not include a complete
roster of all the plants, it shows that, based on the present normal consumption, there is an
ample market for at least 1,000 tons a day of pig-iron, and if it can be produced for anything
like the prevailing price being paid for scrap—now ranging from $27 to $32 per ton—I am
convinced that there would be a market for at least 2,000 tons. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 37
The following table shows the totals as checked by me at the various iron- and steel-working
plants of the Pacific Coast of present normal consumption:—
Present Consumption of Iron and Steel by Pacific Coast Iron-working Plants.
Province or State.
a
o
in
s
&
el
CJ
s
a
d
na
cj .
a cj
b 5
-M«i
a._+H
-a a —
■a
a
d .
VI <fl
QJ CJ
Mc3
5J
si
<g "l
CJ CJ
22
03
p CJ
t- CJ
teco
British  Columbia   	
Tons.
3.010
91,800
93,000
81,900
Tons.
7,140
14,800
93,500
93,000
Tons.
163
12,100
500
2,400
Tons.
1,825
950
1,500
1,700
Tons.
15,270
10,150
29,000
Tons.
8,715
50
500
27,000
Tons.
2,500
7,666
Tons.
200
18,000
Totals  	
279,710
208,440
15,163
5,975
54,520
36,865
9,500
18,200
* In addition, ship, tank, and boiler plate and angles and shapes  (combined), oOjOO'O tons.
This table will show that there is no doubt that the market exists for the products of iron
and steel, and essentially for pig-iron.
As the basic plant for the establishment of an iron and steel industry is a blast-furnace.
I have taken every care to show the extent of the local market for the output of such a plant
producing the various grades of pig-iron. I am, of course, aware of the fact that the success
of ship-building and kindred industries on tbe Coast depends on absolutely being able to procure
material for their various purposes on the Coast, so as to enable them to compete with Eastern
and Old Country firms. All those interviewed say there is a market on the Coast for 2,000,000
tons of iron and steel a year; that is, the aggregate consumption of all grades, including tank,
ship, and boiler plate, merchant bar, tool and mining steel, structural steel, shapes and angles,
and also light rails. Any plant capable of turning out all these grades and sections of steel
would mean a tremendous outlay in capital for rolls and other equipment, but if blast-furnaces
can be established here and a supply of the various grades of pig-iron assured at a reasonable
price, subsidiary companies would undertake the manufacture of the different grades and sections
of steel to suit the market. Therefore I have obtained the information as to the local market
for foundry pig-iron, and that, I find, is ample to keep a plant fully occupied. The present-day
consumption alone offers a market for 1,000 tons—tbe five plants manufacturing merchant bar
from scrap in California are willing to at once undertake a contract for supply of 500 tons a
day—and I feel sure that I can safely say that, without consideration of the great and growing
export trade, there is a market now on the Coast for about 2,000 tons per day of foundry pig-iron.
I have, etc.,
N. Thompson,
Consulting Engineer. British Columbia.
1921
Classification of British Columbia Industries.
Manufacture o f Beverages.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
W. E. Kunning	
Manufacturing beverages.
Manufacturing aerated waters.
Manufacturing beverages. £
Thorpe & Co., Ltd	
-Manufacturing beverages.
Manufacturing liquid carbonic-
acid gas.
Manufacturing beverages.
Eleventh and Yew, Vancouver  . . .
38 Lansdowne Ave. E.
■ Vancouver
Manufacture of Brick, Lime, etc.
The Clayburn Co., Ltd	
Rosebank Lime Co	
Nicomen Sand & Gravel Co., Ltd	
Western Canada Lime Co., Ltd	
Coast   Quarries,   Ltd	
Deeks Gravel & Rock Co., Ltd	
Fairview Sand & Gravel Co., Ltd	
,T. B. Newell   	
Vancouver Granite Co., Ltd	
Pacific Lime Co., Ltd	
Patterson. Chandler & Stephen  	
Port Haney Brick Co., Ltd	
Sechelt Granite Quarry; Ltd	
Sidney Island Brick & Tile Co	
John Mortimer & Son	
Baker Brick & Tile Co	
Phillips Stone Works	
Producers Rock & Gravel Co., Ltd	
Stewart Monumental Works	
Granite Quarries, Ltd	
Victoria Brick Co.. Ltd	
Canadian Marble & Granite Works, Ltd.
Gabriola  Shale  Products,  Ltd	
Humber   Brick   Co	
Stewart & Willev  	
J. A. & C. H. McDonald  	
C. H. Colgrove   	
Ceramic  Industries,  Ltd	
North-west   Lime   Co..   Ltd	
Art Monument Co., Ltd	
Warren, Doran & Mowatt   	
Henson & Dyson   	
Terrace Brick Co	
The Polvchrone Cement, Brick & Tile Co.,
Ltd.
Lakeside Clay Products, Ltd	
The Land Limes, Ltd	
Vernon Granite & Marble Co., Ltd	
Enderby Brick Co	
Clayburn   	
Victoria   	
e/o Foundation Co., Vancouver. .
Westminster    Trust    Bldg.,    New
' Wesminster
Oil Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver
712 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver  ....
1527 Main St., Vancouver	
5085 Fraser Ave., Vancouver . . .
815 Bower Bldg., Vancouver ....
316 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver  ....
3140 Main St., Vancouver  	
Port Haney	
Winch Bldg., Vancouver  	
Sidney Island  	
720 Courtenay St.. Victoria ....
Douglas and Tolmie Sts., Victoria
1502  Fairfield  Rd.,  Victoria   	
Store \ St.,   Victoria   	
Victoria   	
315 Bower Bldg.. Vancouver  ....
Douglas St.,  Victoria   	
Nelson   	
Moody Block, Victoria	
207 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria . .
5332 Fraser Ave., Vancouver   ...
15'el Main St., Vancouver   	
Prince   George   	
304 London Bldg., Vancouver . .
514 Savward Bldg., Victoria ....
■602 Fifteenth Ave. E., Vancouver
1345 Lyall St., Esquimalt  ......
Victoria   	
Terrace    	
Granville Island, Vancouver   ....
Vernon  	
Armstrong	
Vernon  	
Enderby	
Manufacturing bricks.
Manufacturing lime.
Operation of gravel-pit.
Lime-kiln and  quarry.
Quarrying.
Sand,  shale,  and gravel.
Sand and gravel bankers.
Stone-cutting.
Operation of Quarry.
Lime-kiln.
Stone-cutting and marble w'ks.
Manufacturing brick.
Quarrying.
Manufacturing brick (suspended operations).
Stone-cutting.
Manufacturing brick.
Stone-cutting.
Sand and gravel pits.
Stone-cutting.
Quarrying.
Manufacturing brick.
Quarrying and stone-dressing.
Manufacturing brick.
Brickyard.
Monumental works.
Stone-cutting.
Sand and gravel.
Manufacturing brick.
Lime-quarry.
Stone-cutting.
Quarrying (suspended operations).
Concrete  blocks.
Manufacturing  brick.
Ground limestone for fertilizer.
Stone dressing or cutting.
Brick-making.
Manufacture of Brooms and Broom-handles.
Crown Broom Works,  Ltd.
Western   Broom   Works   . . .
B.C.   Wood  Turners,   Ltd.   .
Vancouver Handle Co., Ltd.
B.C. Brush Works, Ltd.   . . .
B.C. Handle Co., Ltd	
Giffen  & Begg   	
Manufacturing brooms.
Manufacturing broom-handles.
Manufacturing brooms and
brushes.
Manufacturing broom-handles. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 39
Canneries.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Babington & Simpson   	
Clayoquot  Sound  Canning Co.,  Ltd.   . . .
Sooke  Harbour  Fishing & Packing  Co.,
Ltd.
Nanaimo Canners & Packers,  Ltd	
Glenrose   Canning  Co.,   Ltd	
St. Mungo Canning Co., Ltd	
Great  West Packing Co.,  Ltd	
Anglo B.C. Packing Co., Ltd	
B.C.   Fishing  & Packing Co.,   Ltd	
Defiance Packing Co.,  Ltd	
Cassiar Packing Co., Ltd	
M.  DesBrisay  Co	
Giffin   Canneries,   Ltd	
Gosse-Milierd  Packing   Co.,   Ltd	
Gulf Island Fishing & Canning Co., Ltd.
C.  L.  Packing Co., Ltd	
Kildala Packing Co., Ltd	
Preston Packing Co., Ltd	
Wallace  Fisheries,  Ltd	
Nootka Packing Co.,  Ltd	
Western Salmon Packing Co., Ltd	
Canadian Fish & Cold Storage Co., Ltd.
Quatbiaski Canning Co., Ltd	
The   Provincial   Cannery  Co.,   Ltd	
Western   Packers,   Ltd	
Sidney  Trading  Co.,   Ltd	
Liverpool Canning Co.,  Ltd	
Lockeport  Canning  Co.,   Ltd	
Sidney  Canning Co.,  Ltd	
J. H. Todd & Sons  	
Lummi Bay Packing Co., Ltd	
Maritime Fisheries,  Ltd	
Star  Cannery,   Ltd	
Sugarman  &  Greenberg   	
McTavish Fisheries, Ltd	
H.  M.  Frazer   	
Bamfield   Fisheries,   Ltd	
Ocean Packing Co.,  Ltd	
Prince   Rupert   	
Victoria   	
Nanaimo   	
New   Westminster   	
Steveston  	
Vancouver   	
Nootka  	
c/o Evans, Coleman & Evans, Vancouver
Prince   Rupert   	
Quatbiaski Cove	
Fort and Wharf Sts.,  Victoria   . .
Vancouver   	
Sidney   	
Vancouver  	
Sidney   	
Victoria   	
Birmingham, Wash.   (Two canneries on Vancouver Island).
Vancouver  	
Foot of Alberta St.. Vancouver..
Vancouver   	
Gore Wharf, Vancouver  	
Bamfield	
304   Credit   Foncier   Bldg.,   Vancouver
Canning crabs.
Cannery.
•Cannery  and fishing.
Canning and fishing.
Cannery and fishing.
Canning fish (suspended operations).
Cannery and fishing.
Cannery.
Cannery and fishing;
Canning fish.
Cannery.
Cannery  and  fishing.
Cannery.
Cannery  and  fishing.
Cannery.
Cannery and fishing.
Cannery.
Cannery and fishing.
Cannery.
Cannery and fishing.
Cannery and fishing (suspended
operations).
Cannery.
Cannery  and  fishing.
Canning  crabs.
Cannery.
Cannery and fishing (suspended
operations).
Chemicals and Explosives.
Nichols Chemical  Co.,  Ltd	
Giant Powder Co. of Canada, Ltd.
Canadian Explosives, Ltd	
Victoria Chemical Co., Ltd	
Sabulite Explosives, Ltd	
Electro  Products   	
Barnet   	
Nanoose Bay  	
013 Birks Bldg., Vancouver
Victoria  	
1001 Rogers Bldg., Vancouver  . .
c/o Marine Iron Works, Victoria.
Manufacturing chemicals.
Manufacturing   explosives.
Manufacturing   explosives.
Manufacturing chemicals (suspended  operations).
Manufacturing   explosives.
Manufacturing chemical compounds.
Manufacture of Cigars.
Pioneer Cigar Factory	
P. & R. Cigar Factory	
Province  Cigar  Co	
Stettler Cigar Factory, Ltd.
F. E. Davidson	
Phillip Gable Co	
J.  C.  Thelim   	
B.C. Cigar Factory   	
Beaver Cigar Factory  	
Solo Special Cigar Factory
Terminus Cigar Factory  . . .
1120 Haro St., Vancouver  	
1022  Seymour St., Vancouver   . . .
Victoria   	
Vancouver   	
Kamloops	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
37S' Fifteenth1 Ave. E., Vancouver
Manufacturing cigars.
Manufacturing cigars   (suspended operations).
Manufacturing cigars.
Manufacture of Clothing, Knitting-mills, etc.
Guarantee   Wholesalers   ...
Turner.   Beeton  &  Co.,  Ltd.
G.  A.   Campbell   	
Victoria Hat Factory	
806 Granville St., Vancouver
Victoria   	
50'0' Beatty St., Vancouver ..
Victoria  	
Manufacturing clothing.
Manufacturing  hats. British Columbia.
P 40
1921
Manufacture of Clothing, Knitting-mills, etc.—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Gault  Bros.,   Ltd	
Vanity Waist & Neckwear Co.,  Ltd.   .
Paris Hat & Frame Co	
Dal Real Lace Co., Ltd -	
Kerr  Manufacturing Co	
Maple   Leaf   Knitting  Co	
H.   L.   Finlayson   	
Cravat and Regalia Company, Ltd.  ..
Comfort Blouse Manufacturing Co.   . .
Hamilton-Carhartt Cotton Mills, Ltd.
Pride of the West Knitting Mills, Ltd.
Vancouver   Knitting  Co.,   Ltd	
Universal Knitting Co., Ltd	
261  Water St., Vancouver   	
136 Water St., Vancouver   	
305-17 Cordova St. W., Vancouver
Vancouver   	
135 Hastings St. W., Vancouver.
Vancouver  ,	
436 Howe  St.,  Vancouver   	
367 Granville St., Vancouver . . .
500 Beatty  St.,  Vancouver
Vancouver   	
Manufacturing clothing.
Manufacturing
hats.
Manufacturing
and lace.
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
ladies' & men's
clothing,   silk,
neckwear,
knitted  goods,
ladies' waists,
neckwear,
ladies'  waists,
clothing,
knitted goods,
clothing,
knitted goods.
Coal-mining.
Telkwa Collieries, Ltd	
Coalmont  Collieries,   Ltd	
Corbin Coal & Coke Co	
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd	
Middlesboro Collieries, Ltd	
Canadian Western Fuel Co	
Vancouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co., Ltd.
Nanoose-Wellington Coal Co., Ltd	
Princeton Coal & Land Co.,  Ltd	
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir), Ltd....
Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Ltd	
Fleming Coal Co., Ltd	
Chu Chua Coal Mines Co	
Harvard  Coal  Co.,  Ltd	
A. G. King & E. R. Foster	
The East Wellington Coal Co	
Granby Consolidated  Mining &  Smelting
Co..   Ltd.
Merritt Collieries  	
Telkwa
Coalmont  . .
Corbin ....
Fernie
Middlesboro
Nanaimo   . .
Wellington
Princeton ..
Victoria   . . .
Merritt . . .
Kamloops .
Princeton .
Nanaimo   ..
Cassidy   . ..
Merritt    . . .
Coal-mining  (suspended operations).
Coal-mining.
Coal-mining   (suspended operations).
Coal-mining.
Coal-mining  (suspended operations).
Manufacture of Confectionery.
John P.  Matthews Candy Co.
Mainland   Confectionery Co.   .
H. A.  Lilley   	
Ormonds,  Ltd	
H.  iS.   Stevenson   	
Bullen Bros	
Kelly  Confection   Co.,  Ltd.   . .
Wiper & Co	
R.  C.  Purdy   	
Hamsterley Farm Products   . .
Howards.   Ltd	
Royal Candy Co	
Phillips Confectionery Shop  . .
F.  S.  Clark  	
Ramsay Bros. & Co., Ltd.   . . .
J. P. Matthews Candy Co.  ...
National Biscuit & Confection
1308 Wharf St., Victoria  	
12S'0 Homer  St., Vancouver   . .
Victoria   	
1974 First Ave. W., Vancouver
1106 Mainland St., Vancouver
Victoria   	
Vancouver   	
Victoria   	
1027 Second Ave. W., Vancouver
Victoria   	
1420' Government St., Victoria
Nanaimo  	
000 Powell St., Vancouver ....
Vancouver  	
Manufacturing confectionery.
Manufacturing candy.
Manufacturing confectionery.
Manufacturing confectionery
and biscuits.
Manufacturing confectionery.
Manufacturing candy.
Manufacturing candy and biscuits.
Manufacturing candy.
Manufacturing  biscuits.
Cooperages.
Joseph   R.  Robertson   	
Sweeney Cooperage Co.,  Ltd.   .
B.C.  Stave & Heading Co., Ltd.
British Columbia Barrel Co.  ..
L. J.  Champion   	
Fraser River Cooperage  	
Vancouver  	
Victoria  	
Vancouver     	
South Vancouver   	
Foot of Fraser Ave.,  South Van
couver
Cooperage (suspended operations).
Manufacturing    staves    and
heads.
Manufacturing  staves.
Manufacturing   barrels    (suspended operations).
Cooperage.
Cooperage and manufacturing
heads. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 41
Creameries, Condenseries, and Cheese-factories.
Firm.
P. Burns & Co	
Comox  Creamery Association   	
Cowichan Creamery Association   	
Clayburn Creamery   	
Curlew Creamery  Co	
Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association
Heffley Creek Creamery   	
Kamloops District Creamery Association
Kelowna Creamery Co., Ltd	
Meadowbrook  Creamery  Co	
Nanaimo   Creamery  Association   	
Nechako Valley Co-operative Creamery
Association
Northwestern   Creamery,   Ltd	
Northern Okanagan Creamery Association
New Westminster Creamery Society, Ltd.
Revelstoke Creamery Co., Ltd	
Royal  Dairy  Co '	
Saltspring   Island   Creamery   Association
Salmon Arm Creamery Association   ....
David Spencer, Ltd	
Vancouver Creamery Co.,  Ltd	
Vancouver Island Milk Producers' Association
Vernon Creamerv	
The Borden Milk Co.,  Ltd	
The Pacific Milk Co., Ltd	
Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association
Ferrara  Cheese Manufacturing Co	
Revelstoke Creamery Co., Ltd	
Location.
Woodland Drive, Vancouver . . .
Vernon 	
Courtenay   	
Duncan	
Clayburn   	
Grand Forks  	
Nelson   	
703 Rogers Bldg., Vancouver  . .
Heffley Creek	
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
109 Water St., Vancouver
Nanaimo    	
Vanderhoof   	
1131 Broad St., Victoria	
Armstrong  	
442  Front St.,  New Westminster
Revelstoke  	
Victoria   	
Ganges  	
Salmon Arm   . .	
Vancouver   	
15—23 Alexander, Vancouver   ....
930  North  Park,  Victoria   	
Vernon 	
Sardis	
Ladner 	
Abbotsford  I
Sardis     Cheese-factory.
Chilliwack
Revelstoke
Industry.
Creamery.
Creameries.
Creamery.
Condensery.
Curing and Packing Fish.
Atlin   Fisheries,   Ltd	
Butterfield Mackie & Co	
Canadian Fishing Co., Ltd	
Pacific Coast Fish tic Oyster Co	
Nisbihama & Tanaka   	
Royal   Fish   Co	
C. Teranishi   	
Ritherdon  Bay  Packing Co..  Ltd	
Watson   Bros.   Fishing   &   Packing   Co.
Ltd.
Tjugimoto & Partners   	
Yip   Sang	
Charles Quong	
Royal   Fish   Co	
Booth Fisheries Co. of Canada, Ltd.   . .
Alfred Linford   	
Pacific  Fisheries  Co.,   Ltd	
Union Fisheries & Cold Storage, Ltd.   .
Charles  Anderson  Fish  Curing Co.   . . .
Kaslio    	
Barclay  Sound  Fisheries,  Ltd	
Calvert   Fisheries   	
Prince   Rupert   	
Vancouver   	
Vancouver  	
Prince Rupert	
Port Alberni  	
Prince Rupert   	
Gore Wharf, Vancouver   ....
1547 Main St., Vancouver   . .
15 Cordova St. E., Vancouver
Vancouver   	
1551 Main St., Vancouver   . .
Packing fish.
Curing fish and fishing.
Packing fish.
Curing fish and fishing.
Curing fish.
Curing fish and fishing.
Curing  fish   and  fishing   (suspended  operations).
Curing fish and fishing.
Packing fish.
Curing fish.
Packing fish.
Curing and packing fish (suspended operations).
Curing  and   packing  fish.
Curing and packing fish and
fishing.
Curing fish.
Fish Oil and Fertilizer.
Canada Fish Products,  Ltd	
Consolidated   Whaling   Corporation,   Ltd.
Tucks  Inlet  By-products   	
Consolidated Fish & By-products, Ltd...
Prince Rupert Oileries  	
Globe  Fertilizer  Co	
J. B. Jardine   :	
Pioneer Fish & By-products Co.. Ltd.   . .
William  James  Sturgeon,   Sea  Products
Co.
Pacific Guano Co..  Ltd	
Rendezvous  Fisheries,   Ltd	
Henshall   Fish   Products.   Ltd »..
Ladner  	
Victoria   	
Victoria Drive, Vancouver   	
Vancouver  	
Skidegate, Q.C. Islands	
Campbell Road,  South Vancouver
Nanaimo   	
Deceit   Bay	
Barnet  	
Rendezvous Island  	
Sooke   	
Fish oil  and fertilizer.
Fish oil.
Fish-oil  and  poultry-food.
Fish-oil (suspended operations).
Dogfish-oil (suspended operations).
Manufacturing fertilizer.
Fish oil and fertilizer.
Liver-oil. fish-oil. feed, and
fertilizer (suspended operations) .
Manufacturing   fertilizer.
Fish oil and fertilizer.
Fish-oil and  poultry-food. P 42
Jritish Columbia.
1921
Flour and Bice Milling, etc.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Flour and grain milling.
Co.,   Ltd.
Marten   &  Robertson,   Ltd	
320 Railway  St.,  Vancouver   ....
,,
821 Powell St., Vancouver	
Rico-milling.
Flour-milling.
Soda Creek   	
"
Fruit Canning and Evaporating Plants, etc.
Mrs.  Geo.  Pound   	
Chilliwack  Evaporating  &  Packing  Co.
Ltd.
Okanagan Canning Co., Ltd	
William   Robinson   	
W.  B.  M.  Calder,  Orchard  City  Evapo
rator
Dominion Canners, Ltd	
Mrs.  Haines, Ltd	
B.C.  Hop Co.,  Ltd	
Victoria Pressing & Canning Co	
H. J. & J. A. Wattie  	
B.C.  Hop  Co., Ltd	
Keremeos  Packing Co.,  Ltd	
Alice   Stanley   	
White  Manufacturing Co	
Hamsterley Farm  Jam  Co., Ltd	
O.U.G.  Fruit Products.  Ltd	
North   Kamloops  Fruit Growing &  Can
ning Association
MacDonald Jam  Co	
Empress   Manufacturing   Co.,   Ltd	
W. A. Jameson Coffee Co	
Western Pickling Works. Ltd	
Harvey Coffee & Spice Mills, Ltd	
Vancouver Pickle Co., Ltd	
Broder Canning Co., Ltd	
619 Fifteenth St. E., Vancouver. .
Chilliwack  	
Rutland   	
3639 Fourth Ave. W., Vancouver
Kelowna	
332 Drake Street, Vancouver ....
2645  Fourth  Ave.  W., Vancouver
Sardis	
648 Cormorant St., Victoria ....
1749 Keefer St., Vancouver ....
Agassiz	
815 Bower Bldg., Vancouver  ....
nilta Vista  	
149 Alexander St., Vancouver  . . .
Victoria   	
Vernon  	
Kamloops	
Nelson   	
Vancouver   	
Victoria   	
Vancouver   	
New Westminster	
Manufacturing jams and jellies.
Evaporation of vegetables (suspended  operations).
Fruit-canning.
Manufacturing food products.
Evaporating plant.
Manufacturing food  products.
Manufacturing jams and jellies.
Evaporating vegetables.
Canning and packing fruit.
Manufacturing marmalade.
Evaporator   (suspended   operations).
Fruit-canning.
Manufacturing jam.
Manufacturing food  products.
Manufacturing jam.
Cannery and evaporator.
Fruit-canning.
Manufacturing jam.
Manufacturing   jams
and spices.
Manufacturing
spices.
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
c o :
jellies,
e e   and
pickles,
coffee and
spices.
Manufacturing  pickles.
Fruit-canning.
Manufacture of Furniture.
'
Province   Furniture   Manufacturing   Co.,
Ltd.
Western Toy & Furniture Manufacturing
Co., Ltd.
Connaught Furniture Manufacturing Co.
Furniture   (suspended   operations).
Dominion   Composition   Furniture  &  Toy
Manufacturing Co.,  Ltd.
Steel  & Dodd   	
Manufacture of Ice-cream.
Almonds.   Ltd	
City Dairy Co	
F.  S. Clarke   	
Comox  Creamery Association
Curlew Creamery Co	
Fraser Valley Dairy   	
Kelowna Creamery  Co., Ltd.
+00 Pender St. E., Vancouver
New Westminster	
Nanaimo	
Courtenay   	
Grand Forks  	
Nelson   	
1170 Hornby St.. Vancouver
Kelowna	
Ice-cream. -
II Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 43
Manufacture of Ice-cream—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
J.  E.  McKenzie   	
Westminster Ice & Creamery Co	
Northern   Okanagan   Creamery   Association
Royal Dairy   	
David  Spencer,  Ltd	
W.  S.  Terry   	
Victoria City Dairy Co., Ltd	
White  Lunch,   Ltd	
Crescent Ice Cream Co	
Northwestern   Creamery,   Ltd	
Nanaimo   	
New Westminster	
Armstrong	
Victoria   	
1001 Pender St., Vancouver  ....
Vancouver   	
Fort St., Victoria	
1111 Fort Street, A'ictoria	
123 Hastings St. W., Vancouver. .
1002 Hastings St. W., Vancouver
Victoria   	
Ice-cream.
Logging.
D. McConvey	
H.  A.  Corns   	
Slocan Valley Lumber Co.   	
H.   Imada   	
McDonald Murphy Co	
Capilano Timber Co., Ltd	
Nimpkish Timber Co	
Ira A. Reid  	
S. McKee	
Little   Bros	
Geo.  Lake   	
Edwin Sands	
Vanstone Logging Co	
J. Anger	
Ralph Simpson  ..."	
Vedder River Shingle Co., Ltd	
Hardv & Barber  	
J.  S. Williver  . ;	
Louis Schulz  	
Dickey & Herd  	
Adolph Lumber Co	
J.  M.  Watkins  	
Floyd Bros	
Benton Lumber & Pole Co	
S. C. Mitchell Co	
M. Dumond  	
Russell  Logging Co	
Dahl & Falk, Ltd	
J. W. Milligan  	
Y.   Yakatsui   	
Wm.   Graham   	
G. O. Guise & Weed  	
J. A. Birtois  	
.ludd   Moore   	
Adams River Lumber Co., Ltd.   .	
Victoria   Lumber   tic   Manufacturing   Co.
Ltd.
R. H. Williams Cedar Co	
Dempsey,   Ltd	
Orion Bowman   	
Eugene Patterson	
G.L. Logging Co., Ltd	
Nitinat Logging Co	
John K. Urquhart   	
Beaver Creek Lumber Co	
Eastern Lumber Co	
Gordon Development Co	
J. Manson  	
Hoard & Flaherty Logging Co	
Eagle Timber Co	
Cranbrook Sash & Door Co	
Red Mountain Lumber Co	
F. S. Uyohara	
Port Moody Lumber Co	
J. T. Knapps	
Andrew Piercy  	
Joseph Rush   	
Graham & McFarland	
North Gabriola  Island   	
Thurlow   P.O	
Koch's Siding  	
205  Powell  St.,  Vancouver   ....
B'06 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
North Vancouver   	
1527 Standard Bank, Vancouver.
New  Westminster   	
Langley Prairie
Texada  Island   .
Fernie    	
c/o R. V. Winch, Vancouver
c/o  B.C.   Manufacturers'   Association, New Westminster
Maillardville  	
Arrowhead	
412 Yorkshire Bldg
Vancouver.
Rutland Road, North Kelowna
Arrow   Park   	
Atlin    	
Thurston Harbour, Q.C.I	
Baqus Lake	
498 Fifth Ave.,  Vancouver
Greenwood	
Benton Siding
Brideville ....
S29  Standard Bank, Vancouver.
203  Carrall  St., Vancouver   . . . .
Sayward Bldg., Victoria  	
12& Cordova St. E., Vancouver  .
Mackensen  P.O	
Midway   	
Cascade   	
Frederick Arm
Chase  	
Vancouver
Chemainus	
610 Pacific Bldg.,  Vancouver  ..
Sardis    	
Popcum   	
1211 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
10'03 Langley St., Victoria  	
Courtenay   	
Jervis Inlet	
Ladysmith  	
606 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Cortes Island  	
Bainbridge	
707 Northwest Bldg., Vancouver..
Cranbrook   	
Penny 	
Bishop's Landing  	
Strawberry  Hill  P.O	
Langley Prairie   	
Courtenay   	
Gibson's Landing
Denman Island ..
Logging.
Logging   (suspended   operations).
Logging.
Logging   (suspended   operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging   (suspended   operations).
Logging.
Cutting ties  (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging    (suspended   operations).
Logging.
Cutting poles.
Logging:
Logging   (suspended   operations).
Logging.
Logging   (suspended   operations).
Logging.
Logging   (suspended   operations). P 44
British Columbia.
1921
Logging—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
J. E. Bateman  	
Mc & Mc Logging Co	
Upper Fraser Lumber Co.. Ltd.  . . .
Hillcrest Lumber Co., Ltd	
Royston Lumber Co	
Salmon Valley Lumber & Pole  Co.
James H.  Hearn   	
John S.  Shea   	
Frank Beban
Rex Barker  .
Fred Churchill
I.   Andre   	
A. Farquharson
J. S. Mangan . .
T. Bossie	
R. Fujii  	
Rock Creek Lumber Co.
Joseph Morton  	
J.  H.  Hayes   	
J.  W. Vipond   	
G.   Maeda   	
Dr. J. F. Grant
H. M. Okihiro .
J. Carib  	
Virginia Lumber Co., Ltd	
Dome Mountain Lumber Co., Ltd.
C. E. Severus 	
Evans Creek Sawmill   	
Jewell  Sawmill Co..  Ltd	
Elk Lumber Co., Ltd	
Harry Sawyer	
J. C. Wilson Lumber Co	
The Bendickson Logging Co	
D. A.  McNaughton   	
Inland  Timber  Co	
Swift Creek Lumber Co   	
James H. Parkin  	
Gus Olson   	
K. Dowasaka	
T. Aoki	
Copper Creek Lumber Co., Ltd.   . .
Kootenay Lakes Cedar Co	
C. L. iStonehouse   	
Mitchell & Hallett .
Richard Fiddick . . .
Jardine & Skelhourn
J. A. Westwood ..
Hanna & Patchell
T. C. Ross	
J. M. Humphrey .
Chas. Peters
T. Sasaki . . .
W. C. Palmer  	
I. D. ClarkSn	
Lynn Valley Lumber Co.
Mathias Hemingsen
A. L. Patchett	
W. Phillips & Sons
J. H. Jordan 	
Orford Bay Timber & Logging Co., Ltd.
Frank Chartrand  	
O'Hara & Bjorkman	
Bloedel Stewart & Welch	
James Easthorn  	
New Ladysmith Lumber Co., Ltd	
H. T. Wright	
Laviolette & McIntyre   	
Edgewood Lumber Co	
Lindsley Bros.,  Ltd	
Lakeview Logging   	
McGougan & McDonald   	
Laminated Materials Co., Ltd	
Pacific Logging Co., Ltd	
Apex Lumber   	
Michael G. Danaher
Giscome r.MI
612 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
Dome Creek	
Duncan    	
Cumberland	
Koch's Siding  	
Salmo	
Coghlan  	
Extension
Shoal Bay
Porto Rico P.O.
Fernie   	
442 Hastings St. E., Vancouver..
Flagstone	
Seechelt Inlet  ....
Fort Steele   	
Nanaimo    	
126 Cordova St. E.,
Vancouver.
Victoria   	
134 Powell St.,
Vancouver
Midway   	
Coombes	
Dome Creek	
Slocan City 	
Evans Creek  	
Carthness	
Fernie    	
Revelstoke  	
Qualicum Beach   	
1214 Sandard Bank, Vancouver..
Jervis   Inlet	
912 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver. .
Swift   Creek   	
Wattsburg   	
Britannia Beach	
Dominion Bldg., Vancouver   	
323 Hastings St. E., Vancouver..
Cranbrook   	
Nelson   	
134 Nineteenth St. E., North Vancouver
Kitimat   	
Cedar P.O., via Nanaimo	
Sechart 	
1134' Twenty-fourth Ave. E., Vancouver
Harrison Hot Springs	
Ladysmith  	
Malakwa   	
New   Westminster   	
336 Pender St. W.. Vancouver
Lund   	
Fife    	
Lynn Creek, North Vancouver
Cowichan Lake	
Merritt	
Sooke   	
Cranbrook   	
Lund   	
Rock Creek
Standard   Bank   Bldg.,
North Gabriola	
Nanaimo    	
Vancouver
Simoon  Sound   	
Castlegar	
Nelson	
Pitt  Lake   	
510   Northwest   Bldg.,   Vancouver
New  AVestminster   	
924  Vancouver  Block,  Vancouver
810 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver ..
Danaher	
Logging.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging   (suspended   opera
tions).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Ditto. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 45
Logging—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Booth  Logging
W. F. Gibson
Ted   Anderson   .
Domingo   Silrey
H.   Hanson   	
Tahkina Timber Co., Ltd	
Whitman Logging Co	
International Timber Co., Ltd.
Lamb Lumber Co	
Carter & Roberts  	
Northern  Cedar  Logging Co.,  Ltd.
K.   Taniguchi   	
M. A. Barnes   	
W. S. Prescott  	
J.   S. McGregor   	
T. Tracy  	
Comox Logging & Railway Co.
Powell   River   Co..   Ltd	
Mainland  Cedar  Co., Ltd.   . . .
Wolf & Way 	
D.   Bailey   	
Pacific   Mills,   Ltd	
Vogel   tic  Gordon   	
Nanoose Lumber Co., Ltd.
P. B. Anderson	
■iltamont Lumber Co.   . . .
Pacific Shingle Co., Ltd.
Abernethv tic Lougheed   . .
George  H.   Sumner   	
A. Lambert	
James A. Brown   	
J. R. Morgan & Co., Ltd.
H.   L.   McLean   	
Frank M. Barnes  	
A.  E.   Burnett   	
Sam  S. Orser   	
L.  H.  Roberts   	
R. Berrie	
J.  S.  Deschamps   . ..
Jno. Vigene & Sons  .
S.   Miyasaki   	
Bravden & Johnston
Robert Croll  	
Jno.   Nixon   	
F. A. J.  Copley   	
T. J. Vanstone	
R.   Tooshaw   	
Oscar  Salstrom   .
I.  Noda   	
Tack Logging Co.
S. J. Demaresq ..
Iver & Ed. Peterson
Dempsey,  Ltd	
Conrad   Wigen   	
The Baker Lumber Co., Ltd.
Wattsburg Lumber Co., Ltd.
Otis-Staples Co., Ltd	
The Lovering Lumber Co., Ltd	
Crow's Nest Pass Lumber Co., Ltd.
Mrs. F. J. Hawkins   	
George Fennell  	
National Timber Co., Ltd	
Merrill & Ring Lumber Co., Ltd.
A. Peterson	
Beniamin Morgan   	
W.  H. Day Lumber Co., Ltd.
McNeil & Jennings  	
Undine  Logging Co.,  Ltd.   . .
McLean tic Paterson	
Davis Logging & Trading Co., Ltd.
1205   Dominion   Bldg.,   Vancouver
1222 Keefer St., Vancouver  	
Cascade   . .
Ladysmith
Agmont   	
336  Pender   St.   W..  Vancouver..
631  Eleventh Ave.  E.,  Vancouver
Rogers Bldg..  Vancouver  	
0'08   Bank  of  Nova  Scotia,   Vancouver.
Elko   	
1016 Rogers Bldg.. Vancouver...
829 Standard Bldg., Vancouver..
Merritt    	
1462 Eleventh Ave W., Vancouver
Duncan    	
Camagna  	
Comox   	
Powell   River   	
Connaught Bridge, Vancouver . . .
Ruskin  	
Capiiano P.O	
Ocean  Falls   	
Otter   Point   	
Parksville   	
325  Pacific Bldg..  Vancouver   . . .
DeMuth,  Kettle Valley  Rly	
Coquitlam   	
Harvey    	
c/o  Vancouver  Lumber Co.,  Vancouver.
Powell River 	
Port Essington  	
Prince Rupert	
Chase	
Merritt	
906 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver..
Nelson   	
Roberts Creek	
Rossland
Arrowhead . .
Salmon ....
Salmon Arm
Revelstoke . .
Chase  	
Shawnigan .
New Denver
Phoenix  ... .
Nakusn   	
208 Hastings St. B., Vancouver..
811 Rogers Bldg.. Vancouver  . ..
c/o  Mun-Kerr  Logging  Co.,  Ltd.
Vancouver Block
Canoe 	
610 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver
Wynndel   	
Waldo    	
Wattsburg	
South Slocan  	
Wycliffe  	
Wasa   	
Wardner   	
3008 Douglas St., Victoria
Chu Chua   	
905   Credit   Foncier   Bldg.,   Vancouver
Duncan Bay   	
Smithers   	
Nanaimo 	
512 Standard Bldg., Vancouver..
Smithers   	
512 Standard Bldgs., Vancouver..
Powell River	
Standard Bank Bldg.,Vancouver.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Cutting poles.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging   and   box-manufacturing.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily )♦
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging. P 46
British Columbia.
1921
Logging—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Chelsea C. Cornish  	
Kennedy & Co	
Brooks-Seanlon-O'Brien Co.,
Pidcock Bros	
James   Mulroney   	
D. & S. Vaughan .
Russell  M. Evans
Ltd.
Northern Pacific Logging Co., Ltd.
The James Logging Co., Ltd	
H.   Newcomen   	
Asken tic Garson	
Pacific Lumber & Trading Co., Ltd.
Ushizima &c Komatsu  	
W.  Bradburn & Son   	
Victor  Beug   	
Chas.   Sahlstrom   	
O'Connor Logging Co.,  Ltd.
Akbar Logging Co	
A. C. Vickery ..
A. A. Faulkener
J. H. Newton  ..
Harrison  Lake  Logging Co.,  Ltd.
Garlin  tic Co	
Lee Sing  	
N.  K.  Wade   	
Oswald L. Bouhilier  	
W.  T.  Dougan   	
A. A. Plummer Co., Ltd	
James Parslow	
R. W. Brahm   	
The A. McDonald Co	
Rainbow  Creek  Lumber  Co	
Salmon River Saw Mills, Ltd.   . .
Sam Wilkinson	
John C. Eaton  	
The Hanson Logging Co	
Hollings  Bros	
Nakata Kingora  	
Manzer Bros, tic Bain   	
Aeroplane   Spruce   Co.,   Ltd	
D.   A.   McLeod   	
Kayuichi  Naito   	
Wada tic Kaminishi Logging Co.
Leip tic Wilt  	
L. A. Johnson . .
Valley Cedar Co.
Hargreaver Bros.
G.  A.  Hall   	
T.  A.   Wilson   ...
Joseph  Lepore   . .
C.  H.   B.  Reeves
Sumgar  Johnson   	
E. L.  Steeves   	
Jonathan Reed	
Seaside Lumber Co., Ltd.
Carthels & Sorenson
Hind tic Paddon   	
J. P. Dirassar  	
Erie   Cuvetin   	
H. L. Birmingham	
T. A. Mandt  	
James R. Motion  	
Oscar Olson   	
Pine Grove Logging Co., Ltd.
Crane & McKejp  	
F.  J.  Bossley   	
Pollock tic Ross Logging Co.
W.  E.  DeMille   	
H.   Whittaker   	
R.   H.  Brett   	
A. N.  Barbour
Nanaimo  	
808 Third St. E., North Vancouver
1222 Standard Bldg., Vancouver..
Quatbiaski   Cove   	
Green Points Rapids	
Lund    .
Beaton
606   Vancouver   Block,   Vancouver
514  Bank  of Nova  Scotia  Bldg.,
Vancouver
Lardeau 	
North Vancouver   	
Pacific Bldg., Vancouver	
Clowholm  Falls   	
Powell River	
Hardwick  Island   	
Kincaird  	
707 Northwest Bldg., Vancouver.
Mayo Siding, Duncan   	
Langford
Enderby .
Chase  . ..
Harrison Mills   	
Alberni    	
Shawnigan   	
Port  Kell   	
Arrowhead    	
Cobble Hill  	
810 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver..
2264 Fifteenth Ave W., Vancouver
Sicamous   	
Galloway  	
Flagstone	
Prince George	
Elko  	
North. Gabriola  Island   	
Dominion Bldg., Vancouver	
Cobble Hill  	
433 Alexander  St..  Vancouver   . .
Silverdale   	
Port Clements	
Chase  	
227 Main St., Vancouver  	
Vancouver
Alvin
McBride	
Dunster   	
Tete Jaune Cache
Dunster   	
772' Georgia St. E.. Vancouver..
Roberts  Creek   	
Smithers   	
West Bridge  	
Malakwa	
Hillside, Howe Sound
1221 Douglas St., Victoria   	
c/o  W. W.  Hind, Imperial Block,
Vancouver
Wilson Creek  	
Merritt   	
Blind Channel  	
Alvin ....
Alberni ...
Nakusp . .
Abbotsford
Daisy  Lake P.O.
Enderby	
Seechelt	
Blind  Channel   .
Seechelt  	
Chase  	
Powell River
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 47
Logging—Continued.
R.  Fawcett tic 11. Burns   	
Phillip   McBryen   	
Sayward Logging Co	
R.   S.  Burden   	
L.  Setterlund   	
F.   Timberland   	
Holland & Edwards	
Edward   Elder   	
F. J. Downing  	
A. L. Snow	
Yeatman Bros	
Taira   Ikeda   	
E. 0.   Perkett   	
Burrett Lumber Co	
Durant H.  Trgena   	
Deep  Cove Logging Co	
W. J. Gugin   	
A. A. McCormick	
Chas. Eng  	
Robert Munson	
Albert Edgar Burnett	
Messrs.   Roe &  Milne   	
Otto  Johnson   	
F. D.  Treat	
J.   G.   Gilbert   	
H.   Trussler   	
Chas.   Roberts   	
J.  E.  Johnson   	
C. H. Lane   	
Timberland  Development  Co.   . . ■ ■	
I.   C.  Rady   	
John   Harper   	
Peaehland Lumber tic Manufacturing Co.
Swanstrom  & Poison   	
W.   H.   Johnson   	
Brandon tic Daney  	
Thomas   Picard	
W.  H.   Crawford   	
R. Hand & Son   	
B. F.  Somerville   	
August  Erickson   	
Hector MacDonald	
Clevette & Gardiner   	
Whittaker,  Elliott  & McPherson   	
Rice  & Hutchison       	
Charles .S.  Coplev   	
Clark  &  Goddard   	
Murayama,   A	
N.  E.  Charnpayne	
S.   Leary '	
The Lapan Logging Co., Ltd	
United   Logging  Co.,   Ltd	
Laughlin tic Reid   	
House tic Jenkins   	
A.   S.   Williams,   Ltd	
A.  Kelch   	
Roy Denel   	
John Mann  	
A. S. Deigbton  	
Harry  Fiddick   	
Walker's Camp  	
Abe  Mason   	
Berby  Logging Co	
James   Tussee   	
Jno.   Robillard   	
Norman  McLean   	
T. L.  Kennedy & Co	
Ethelbert Collins  	
Wooldridge   Bros	
Chas.   Blair   	
MeLeod  Timber  Co.,  Ltd	
S.   Blaney    	
Location.
Arrowhead    	
Chase 	
Marpole  	
Coquitlam   	
Fife   	
Squamish    	
Bitt Lake   	
Britannia  Beach   	
706 Twelfth Ave. E., Vancouver.
Quatbiaski   Cove   	
75  Cordova  St.  W.,  Vancouver..
Mileno Cove,  Homfray Channel. .
Swift Creek   	
Gibson's Landing	
525  Pacific  Bldg.,  Vancouver   . . .
Seechelt  	
Surge Narrows	
408 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver  ....
Kelowna    	
Rogers Bldg., Vancouver  	
Marblehead, Lardeau	
Malakwa   	
Sicamous  	
Edgewater	
Arrowhead    	
Edgewater	
New   Westminster   	
East Bella Bell*   	
Ladysmith	
Lardeau 	
Siiverdale   	
Peaehland  	
Sicamous   	
Whonnock   	
Lardeau 	
Nakusp 	
Swanson Bay  	
Stillwater   	
Malakwa   	
Seechelt  	
Colwood	
Jervis   Inlet   	
Dollarton	
Cloverdale  	
Atlin    	
666 Alexander St., Vancouver  . . .
Prince George	
Nakusp    	
Jackson Bay 	
130  Water  St.,   Vancouver   	
Egmont   	
Seechelt	
Rogers Bldg., Vancouver	
Craigellachie  	
8 Mill Camp, Revelstoke	
North Vancouver  	
Vananda	
Nanaimo  	
009 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver
Seechelt  	
553 Front St., New Westminster. .
Chase . .4	
Fourteenth    and    Hendry    Ave.,
North  Vancouver
Coghlan   	
Port  Clements    '	
Lynn Creek P.O	
Pacific Bldg., Vancouver	
19'70 McNiehol Ave., Vancouver..
Industry.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations
temporarily).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations temporarily).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging. P 48
British Columbia.
Logging—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Burns   tic  Davidson
W.  L.  Maekin
Simplex   Mills   Manufacturing   Co.
Seth   Klesta   	
K. E. Veregin & N. Tlatoff  	
C.  E.  Garrett & Bell
Leonard Irovo   	
Murphy  &  Hanson   . .
W.   C.   Wood   	
Qeuerson-Smith Logging Co	
The 'Mutual  Co-operative  Logging Co.
Rivers   Logging   	
White  Spruce Co.,  Ltd	
Frank Chappay, c/o C. F. Kealy   	
George Pancoua 	
C.   C.  Thompson   	
W.  J.  Allan   	
George Anderson  	
Etchepare & Partners  .. .
Little  Logging  Co	
Charles Germyn  	
Alluvia Lumber Co.,  Ltd.
W.   S.  Bird   .
John   Grant
Thos.   Reid   	
Bruhn  tic McIntyre
Frederick  W.   Dale
Walters & Gidlow   .
Marshall Bros	
Tway  Logging  Co.
McQueen   Bros	
E. Deschamos	
E.  A.   Hillman   	
The Bella Coola Logging Co., Ltd	
R.  M. Hutchison   	
Clark Mill Co., Ltd., c/o Wilson tic Wilson
D'Ersby Dewar Co	
Bernard Timber & Logging Co.,  Ltd.   . .
E.  N.  Freding   	
Allison  & Murchy   .
Stainey Wayt & Co.
T.  A.  Kelly   	
Collins & Round
Sinclair 'McLean   	
Gordon McArthur & Co.
Chas.   McGarrigle   	
P. D. Garden   	
J.  A.   Mitchell   	
Victor   Enquest   	
William   Louie   	
Allan   Simpson   	
Spicer & Fraser  	
George Albert Coburn
A. V. Armstrong ....
Robert  Somerville   . . .
A. Roberts	
N.  Peterson   	
Austin  Co	
MacKenzie & Siddell .
Angus  &  Nelson   ....
Swan   Bros	
Alex. McQueen  	
Clowholm Lumber Shingle Co.
E.   H.   Belveal   	
Fred   Johnson	
A.   Yarco    	
Fulton,  Sumner & Holbrook   .
Helen  Bay  Logging Co.,  Ltd.
James   Graham   	
I.  T.  Sim   	
Jack   Laitio   	
Alfred  Cosh   	
924 Hastings St. W., Vancouver.
Chilliwack  	
704  Birks  Bldg.,  Vancouver
Solsqua   	
Thompson Island  	
607 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
MeLure P.O	
1205 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
Athalmer	
Rishop's Landing	
Booker's Lagoon, Broughton Island
1312  Standard  Bldg.,  Vancouver.
Fernie   	
614 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver. .
Seechelt Inlet  	
Grand Forks 	
Whytecliff   	
Glen Walker  	
Carmi	
1212 Douglas St., Victoria
Lynn Vallev   	
Sullivan P.O 	
636 Cornwall  St.,  Victoria   	
419 Keith Road  W..  North  Vancouver
Capilano P.O	
Sicamous   	
Hardwick  Island
Lund   	
Port Haney	
Simoon  Sound   . .
Sproat, via Arrowhead  	
Rossland   	
Beaton  	
Bella Coola  	
Nakusp    	
S05 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver. .
122 Cordova St. W., Vancouver..
Orford   Bay   	
Princeton    	
Blacknay Point	
401  Bank of Ottawa Bldg.,
couver
Quesnel   	
Van-
Fort  Fraser   	
1212  Standard Bldg., Vancouver.
Northfield   	
Moyie  	
Merville  	
Solsqua   	
Chase  	
Cobble Hill   	
Courtenay   	
Shuswap
Sperling	
Birgade Lake
Kettle Vallev
Merritt    	
Prince George
Port Moody .
Silverdale   ...
Saltspring Island	
Dollarton    	
722 Rogers Bldg.. Vancouver
Deep Harbour	
Sardis   	
1130 Cotton Drive,
Egmont   	
Carriden Bay   ....
Engen	
Solsqua   	
Metchosin
Vancouver
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging(s u s p e n d e d operations).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Logging
Logging (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Loosing.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging ("suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended opera
tions).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 49
Logging—Continued.
Henry C.  Chamberlain   ....
Cargill Co. of  Canada, Ltd.
R.  Hanna   	
R. Barlow  	
S.  Yoshida   	
Con Hagan   	
Frank Lamora   	
Otto Sirvio   	
Pringle   &   Watson   	
Clarence B. Dougan, c/o I'. B. Anderson
Charter Lumber Co., Ltd	
Elk Bay Timber Co	
Gambier Timber Co., Ltd.   .
Denman Island Logging Co.
Henry March   	
C. E.  Johnson   	
J.  H.  Barmby   	
The   Shamrock  Logging  Co	
Dykes & Warren   	
The Sydney Logging Co., Ltd	
John A.   Smith,  trustee for  creditors of
the Burrard  Sawmills,  Ltd.
J.  E.  Jordan & Horsfall   	
Howard White   	
Kawkawa Lumber Co	
W.   L.  Barrett   	
Henry G.  Andrews   	
Provincial   Lumber   Co	
Anderson   &   Ducharme   	
The Prairie Logging Co.,  Ltd	
S.   P.   Pond
Geo. Browse
The  Port Lumber  Co..  Ltd	
Mavne Timber tic Trading Co.. Ltd.   .
Elliott  Lumber  tic  Shingles  Co.,  Ltd.
James Vincent   	
Fred N. Norton   	
Peck  Logging Co.,  Ltd	
R. Hogino   	
Ingam E. Clark  	
E. Dilts  	
Elias  Alaric   	
Georgia  Lake  Logging  Co.,  Ltd.   . . .
Jamieson  &  Israel   	
Hall   tic  Patterson   	
James   S.   Logan   	
Nightengale & Young  	
The   Valley   Mills,   Ltd	
J. N. & F. Baxter  	
Geo.   Way  &  Co	
Waland,  Doig & Stronberg  	
Jarvis  & Collins   	
Bert 'Sprinkling  	
R.  Lum	
O'Donnell & Madge  	
W.   J.  Carmichael   	
Quenville tic Hane   	
Soam   Ama   	
D.   J.   McDonald   	
Arrow Lakes Lumber Co., Ltd	
H.  S.  Rowling   	
K. Terakura  	
Booth & Hauzon  	
Bailev  Johnson  Logging Co.,  Ltd	
A.   O'Kelly   	
Port   Renfrew   Logging   tic   Lumber   Co..
Ltd.
John  Eck  &  Co	
The  Falls  Logging  Co	
Chas. H. Carter  	
W.  E.  Aickin	
Anderson & Johnson  	
Cliffe,  Guthrie & Higgins   	
C. E. Myren, c/o P. B. Anderson
Straits   Cedars,   Ltd	
J.  C.  Dunwaters   	
Location.
c/o   Pacific    Lumber    &   Trading
Co., Ltd., Vancouver
505 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Brace's Landing	
Arrowhead    	
c/o   D.   J.   O'Brien,   Logging   Co.,
Ltd., Vancouver
Dumaresq   Camp,   Wilber  Channel
315 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver..
Solsqua   	
Kuper Island	
325 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver . .
103 Union Bank Bldg., Vancouver
811 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver
Port Haney	
Denman Island	
Cowichan Lake	
Kootenay  Lake  Shingle  Co.,  Ltd.
Salmo
Whonnock   	
50'9 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver ....
330 Selmour St., Vancouver ....
468 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver . . .
4iO«S Pacific Bldg.,  Vancouver   . . .
Duncan    	
Lynn   Creek   . .
Hope   	
Whaletown   ...
Mount Lehman
Kennedy   	
Othello   	
512   Board  of  Trade.  Bldg.,  Vancouver
Nelson   	
Langley  Fort   	
Port   Moody   	
Sechart   	
335 Princess St., Vancouver  ....
Capilano    	
Raza  Island   	
503 North West Bldg., Vancouver
670 Thurlow St., Vancouver  ....
Coghlan  	
Waldo    	
Solsqua   	
103 Carter-Cotton Bldg., Vancouver
Buckley Bay  	
Grand Forks	
Merritt	
Ganges   	
614 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver..
613 Carter-Cotton Bldg., Vancouver
Swanson Bay   	
Saltspring Island
Rock Creek  	
Ladysmith  . . .
Swanson   Bay
Newton   ......
Kamloops
1603 Fell Ave., North Vancouver.
335 Princess Ave.,  Vancouver  ..
Sayward   	
833 Hastings St.
Victoria  	
Port Renfrew   . .
W., Vancouver.
Alvin   	
Duncan   	
1562 William St., Vancouver ....
726 Rogers Bldg., Vancouver ...
Chase 	
Comox   	
325 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver ... .
302 North West Bldg., Vancouver
Okanagan  Lake   	
Industry.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (s u s p e n d e d  operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended  operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging. P 50
British Columbia.
1921
Logging—Continued.
Firm'.
Location.
Industry.
H.  W.  Barr	
Palmer Owen Logging Co.
Cherry Point Logging Co.   .
George  Campbell   	
The Killarney Loggers, Ltd.
Lewis E.  Jamison   	
Spongberg tic Johnson	
Herrewig &  Scothorn   	
Frank  Timmis   	
Gower & Kennedy  	
G. E.  Holmes  	
W.  McGatty   	
Frank Higgins   . . .
Maxwell   &   Bings
Thomas Spendlove
R. M. Denny	
W. Marlow  	
Kangahure Yamada	
Trudell & Williams  	
Murphy   Bros	
A.   Redpath    	
R.  E.  Chittick   	
The Campbell  Logging Co.,  Ltd.
Greenway Logging Co	
Widman   Bros	
H.  N.  Horel   	
J. W. Gordon   	
J.  Myers   	
San Juan Box Co., Ltd	
J.  E.  Haldcroft   	
A.   W.   Brouse
Alex.   Stewart
The West Coast Loggers, Ltd.
H. Sheaves & W. Reutley . ..
Sumner  &  McDonald   	
The Deserted Bay Logging Co., Ltd.
Silver Creek Logging Co.   .	
Delin  Singh & Namo   	
John  Robertson   	
Adair & Clark  ...
Pye  &  Pye   	
S.   L.  Romano   . ..
Chas.   H.   Murphy
Martin tic Lundquist
D. A. Brewster & Co.
A.   C.   Carlin   	
Eagle Lake Logging Co.
S.   Ellingsen   	
A.  R.  Crooks   	
Phillip H. Welch  	
The Interior Cedar Co., Ltd	
Poison & Anderson  	
S. G. McNutt   	
F.   W.   Sentell   	
H. A. H. Churchill & Mouat . . . :	
T.   Shimoisaka   	
Robert Russell   	
Allen & Gordon   	
Eliason, Eliason tic Shelton  	
Mosher Logging Co	
McKinnon  &  Rusch   	
F.   Soucie   	
James   Simmons    	
Dumaresqu tic Martin   	
Nowat Bros	
R.   Archibald	
Mitchell   Cameron   	
Matilot Logging Co	
Hogan, Bicknell, Inrig & M. Robertson.
Frumento & Heywood   	
Ed.  Johnson & Co	
Barber tic Gibbon  	
Gaskins & Welch   	
Dondale & Jones  	
Wasa
1326 Standard  Bank  Bldg.,
couver
209 Belmont Bldg., Victoria
Dunster   	
728 Rogers Bldg., Vancouver
McBride  	
Swanson   Bay   	
Sointula 	
Parkdale. Howe Sound	
Lang Bay   	
Cloverdale  	
Port   Moody   	
Van-
Logging (suspended  operations) .
Logging.
East Bella Bella   	
Saltspring Island	
Lynn   Creek	
239 West Twenty-second St., North
Vancouver
Sooke Road, R.R. No. 2,  Victoria
143  Dunlevy  Ave.,   Vancouver   . .
Ladysmith 	
606 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Aldergrove   	
Nakusp    	
1464 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
Greenway  Sound   	
315 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver. .
Kennedy Station on B.C.E. Rly...
S!quamish   	
1840  Sixth Ave. E., Vancouver..
Port Renfrew   	
McBride	
Logging (suspended  operations).
Logging.
Lasqueti Island
Ladysmith
Foot of Smythe St.,  Vancouver.
Port Mann   	
Port Neville  	
421  Vancouver  Block,  Vancouver
Mission City  	
Seechelt  	
Strawberry   Hill    	
Haney  	
Minstrel   Island   	
772 Georgia St. E., Vancouver
535 Pender St.  W., Vancouver
Gibson's Landing	
Tribune Channel, Thompson Sound
1421 Richardson St., Victoria  . . .
Newlands   	
c/o   Munn   &   Kerr   Timber   Co.,
Churchhouse
Capilano   	
Crofton   	
Revelstoke    	
Malakwa   	
Belcarra, Burrard Inlet   	
Langley Prairie  	
Ganges  	
1214 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
Capilano   P.O.	
Blind  Channel   	
Green   Point   Rapids   	
Chancellor Channel  	
Rock   Creek   	
Coalmont    	
Cariden Bay  	
Wellbore Channel	
Alta Lake  	
Clowholm Falls via Seechelt  ....
Langley   Prairie   	
Alert  Bay   	
Wadhams Cannery   	
Cowichan  Station   	
Solsqua   	
Lasqueti Island   	
Alert Bay   	
Grand Forks	
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended  operations).
Logging.
Logging (suspended   operations) .
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Logging.
Logging (suspended operations) .
Logging. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 51
Machine-shops and Foundries.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Foundry.
Foundry.
Machine-shop.
W   J   Ellis & Co   	
Geo   R   Mitchell   	
1050 Seaton St., Vancouver   ....
"
Foot   of   Tenth   St.,   New   Westminster.
"
Foundry and machine-shop.
Foundry and machine-shop.
Machine-shop.
726   Front   St..   New  Westminster
66 Tenth St., New Westminster. .
Granville Island, Vancouver   ....
Industrial  Island,  Vancouver   . ..
Front St., New Westminster  ....
109  Powell  St.,  Vancouver   	
77'3 Georgia St. W., Vancouver..
144  Alexander  St.,  Vancouver   . .
Georgia  St.,  foot of Denman St.,
Vancouver.
1200 Powell St., Vancouver  	
2102 Eleventh Ave. W., Vancouver
36  Powell  St., Vancouver   	
524 Pender St. W., Vancouver. . .
1729 Georgia St. W., Vancouver..
1201 Sixth Ave.  E.,  Vancouver..
356 Dufferin St. W., Vancouver..
1225 Alberni St., Vancouver  ....
392 Dufferin St. W., Vancouver..
422 Railway St., Vancouver   ....
1560   Thirteenth   Ave.    W.,   Vancouver.
016 Pender St. W., Vancouver   . .
Cor.   Gore   Ave..   Vancouver   ....
241  Prior St..  Vancouver	
1400 Powell  St..  Vancouver   ....
City Market, Main St., Vancouver
614  Bidwell St.,  Vancouver  ....
1949 Albert   St.,  Vancouver   ....
94'0  Richards  St.,  Vancouver   . . .
1304 Keefer  St.,  Vancouver   ....
51© Sixth Ave. W.. Vancouver  ..
1156; Sixth Ave.  W.. Vancouver..
22 Dufferin  St.  E.,  Vancouver   . .
19'8' Alexander St.. Vancouver . . .
2130 Cedar St.. Vancouver   	
Schaake  Co,  Ltd    	
"
Weeb & Gilford   	
E   C   Atkins & Co., Ltd	
■•
••
V. M. Dafoe   	
National   Cash   Register   Co.  of  Canada,
Ltd.
Machine-shop.
m
Iron-foundry.
Machine-shop.
Gas-lighting and machine-shop.
Machine-shop.
Machine-shop and foundry.
Machine-shop.
R. M. Moore & Co., Ltd	
Machine-shop.
Brass-foundry.
Machine-shop.
Brass-foundry.
Machine-shop.
Ornamental-iron works.
Machine-shop.
Vancouver  Machinery   Depot,   Ltd	
S. M. Morris & Co	
Industrial Island, Vancouver  ....
■"
134 Kingston St., Victoria	
Machine-shop.
Machine- shop (suspended
operations).
Machine-shop.
Wharf and Broughton, Victoria..
503 Powell St., Vancouver  	
12,3 Powell  St., Vancouver   	
2784  Fourth  Ave.  W.,  Vancouver
1128 Richards  St.,  Vancouver   . .
Heatley   Ave.,   Vancouver   	
36W Front St.. Vancouver   	
900' Powell St,,- Vancouver   	
1265  Parker St., Vancouver   ....
422 Railway St.. Vancouver   ....
310   Belleville   St..  Victoria   	
1705 fieorgia St. W„ Vancouver. .
Machine-shop.
McAllister   Spring  Co.,   Ltd	
Manufacturing springs.
Machine-shop.
Haskins & Elliott  	
Machine-shop.
Iron-foundry (suspended operations).
Manufacturing steam-boilers.
Machine-shop.
Wonder  Pump  tic  Engine  Co.,  Ltd	
942  Pender  St.  W..  Vancouver..
Granville Island, Vancouver   ....
»
672 Alexander  St..  Vancouver   . .
Machine-shop. P 52
British Columbia.
1921
Machine-shops and Foundries—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
The Vancouver Spring Co.,  Ltd	
Lome & Columbia, Vancouver  ..
1368 Richards  St.,  Vancouver   . .
Brass-foundry.
Manufacturing springs.
Machine-shop.
Foundry.
Machine-shop.
Manufacturing bolts.
619 Bidwell St., Vancouver	
1090 Sixth Ave.  W„ Vancouver..
1815 Pandora St.. Vancouver  . . .
1063 Hamilton  St.,  Vancouver   . .
Harold   C.   Gunson   	
Vancouver Motor & Cycle Co	
J.   R.   Campbell    '	
82i  Hastings St. W., Vancouver..
1122  Richards  St..  Vancouver   . .
Clendon Tool & Stamping  	
135   Hastings   St.   W.,   Vancouver
605   Bank  of  Nova   Scotia   Bldg.,
Vancouver.
Front St.. New Westminster  ....
425 Alexander St.,  Vancouver   . .
119 Main St., Vancouver  	
Samuel  R.  Jessop   	
Canadian   Summer  Iron   Works,   Ltd.   . .
-
1214 Pender St. E., Vancouver . .
456 Dufferin  St., Vancouver   ....
613 Domiinon Bldg., Vancouver..
410 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver. .
168T Georgia St., Vancouver  ....
1.271 Sixth Ave. W., Vancouver..
Vancouver Pipe & Foundry Co., Ltd.   . .
Northern  Machinery  Co.,  Ltd.   	
Pacific Standard Motor Works   	
T.   J.   Shore  Bolt  &  Nut  Manufacturing
Co.,  Ltd.
Metal-mining.
Belmont-Surf Inlet Mines.  Ltd	
Surf Inlet   	
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Gold, silver
Silver.
Silver,  gold.
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Gold,  silver, lead.
Silver.
Gold, silver.
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Iron.
Silver, copper.
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Gold,   silver,  lead,  zinc.
Gold,  silver, lead.
Silver, lead.
Silver, lead, zinc.
Gold,  silver,  lead.
Silver, lead.
F.  T.  Patterson   	
Taylor Engineering Co., Ltd	
i
Granby Consolidated M.S. tic P. Co	
D. Xj. Pitt	
Ikeda   	
Smelters Steel Co	
Fred Griffin  	
Usk	
Mack   Orr   	
Frank   Guindon   	
Thompson tic McKinney	
Consolidated  M.  &  S.  Co	
Moyie   	
Moyie   	
.T. E.  Stoddart   	
Toby Creek  	
Field    	
R.  R.  Bruce   	
S.  S. Fowler  	
Slade Creek	
W. E. Zwicky  	
F. R. Woffle   	
Silver, lead.
Silver, gold, lead."
Silver, lead.
Gold, silver, lead.
Silver, lead.
Gold, silver, lead.
Gold,  silver.
'Silver, lead, zinc.
Silver, lead.
Gold,  silver, lead.
Silver, lead.
C. F. Olsen  	
W. E. Newton	
J. C. MeDougall  	
J. W. Smith   	
C.  F.  Caldwell   	
G   A. Petty                                            	
J.   P.   McFadden   	
W. R.  Will   	
L. .T. McAttee 	
Britannia M. & S. Co	
Gold, silver, copper. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 53
Metal-mining—Continued.
C. Cunningham	
J.  P. McFadden   	
Thos. Trenery	
A. W. B. Allen  	
H. Cleaver	
T. .T. Llovd  	
O.  V.  White   	
J. M. Harris  	
W.  G.  Clark   	
W. A. Cameron  	
J. Anderson	
J. B. White  	
G. H.  Aylard   	
H. D. Curtis   	
C. E. Cartwright	
H. D. Lea   	
S. S. Fowler   ,	
W.  A.  Buchanan   	
E. F.  Roche   	
A. L. McPhee    r	
W. H. Turner  	
W. Waldbeser	
Vincent Development Co	
Consolidated M. & S. Co	
A. D. Westbv	
H. E. Forster   	
F. S.  Peters   	
John S. Baker	
P. >S. Couldrev   	
.T. W. Evans   	
Consolidated M. & S. Co	
W.  B. Dornberg  	
,7. Anderson	
W.  J.   Banting   	
Consolidated M. & S. Co	
Lewis Johnson   	
F. F. Ketchum  	
P.  E.   Crane   	
J.  P.  Kelly   	
G. Hambly	
L.  Sortoine   	
■T.   McKellar   	
Consolidated M. & S. Co    ->	
Granby Consolidated M.S. & P. Co.
Canada Copper Corporation, Ltd. ..
E. G. Cummings  	
A. J. Morrison   	
H.  B.  Morley   	
E.   Nordman   	
J. Cunningham  	
E. Williamson   	
G. A. Rendell	
D. McEachern   	
E. W.  Condit   	
Gomer P. Jones   	
F. F. Foster  	
F. M. Hawkes  	
F. Calvert  	
R. R. Hedley 	
J.  G.   Miller   	
A. Wallinder  	
C.   E.   Max   	
W. Thompson   	
Stewart-Calvert Co	
F. A. Brewer	
A. F. Noel 	
A.   Ferguson   	
E. J. Donohue   	
James Forbes   	
James Raper	
F. H. Rosher	
W. H. Lee  	
G. H. Kilburne	
C. H. Dickie   	
Sandon
Rosebery   . . .
Zincton
New  Denver
Sandon
Three  Forks
Sandon 	
Silverton   	
Springer Creek
Slocan  	
Enterprise  Creek
.Slocan   	
Enterprise  Creek
Slocan   	
Nelson   	
Salmo	
Granite    	
Kokanee    	
Erie   	
Burton   	
Rossland   	
Renata  	
Rossland   	
Illecillewaet	
Ferguson   	
Lightning Peak ...
Kennedy Creek . ..
Grand Forks  	
Wallace Mountain
Beaverdell   	
Greenwood	
Wallace Mountain
Eholt   	
Phoenix   	
Greenwood	
Wallace Mountain
Greenwood	
Beaverdell   	
Phoenix   	
Kettle River   ....
Lightning Peak . .
Olalla   	
Keremeos	
Hedley	
Princeton	
Stump  Lake
Kruger Mountain
Stump Lake	
Basque   	
KamIoo|js	
Yale	
Clinton	
Cadwallader Creek
Britannia Beach
Vananda    	
Quathiaski ....
Vananda   	
Cowichan Lake
Industry.
Silver, lead, zinc.
Gold, silver, lead, zinc.
Silver, lead.
Silver,  zinc.
Gold, silver, lead.
Gold, silver.
Silver, lead.
Gold, silver, lead.
Silver, lead.
Silver,  lead,  zinc.
Silver, lead.
Silver.
Silver, lead.
Gold,   silver.
Silver, lead.
Silver.
Gold, silver.
Silver, lead.
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Silver, lead.
Gold, silver.
Gold,  silver, lead.
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Silver,   copper,
({old,  copper.
Gold,  silver,  lead.
Silver,  lead.
Fluorite.
Gold,  silver.
Gold, silver, lead.
Silver.
Silver, lead.
Gold, silver.
Silver, lead.
Gold,  sliver,  copper.
Silver, lead.
Gold,  silver,  lead.
Silver.
Gold, silver,  copper.
Gold,   silver,  lead.
Silver, lead.
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Gold,   silver.
Gold,   arsenic.
Silver,  copper.
Gold,  silver,  lead,  copper.
Magnesium sulphate.
Gold,   silver,   lead.
Magnesium sulphate.
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Silver, lead.
Gold,  silver.
Magnesium   sulphate.
Gold.
Gold,  silver.
Gold,  silver,  copper.
Silver,   copper.
Gold, silver, cooper.
Iron.
Gold, silver, copper.
Manganese.
Manufacture of Paints, Turpentine, and Oil-refineries.
British American Paint Co.. Ltd.
Staneland   Co.,   Ltd	
Martin-Senour Co.. Ltd	
Pacific White Lead Co., Ltd.   . .
Ayers  Varnish  Co	
Victoria  	
1505 Powell St., Vancouver .
Industrial Island, Vancouver
Vancouver  	
Manufacturing paint.
Manufacturing white lead.
Manufacturing paint and varnish. British Columbia.
1921
Manufacture of Paints, Turpentine, and Oil-refineries—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
B.C. Impermeate Co., Ltd	
British Columbia Refining Co., Ltd.
Crown Paint Co.   . .'	
Henry Darling   	
Imperial Oil Co., Ltd	
Dust Control Co	
Douglas Fir tic Turpentine Co., Ltd.
Rogers Bldg., Vancouver
1043 Hamilton St., Vancouver  ..
24 Cordova St. E.. Vancouver. . . .
2.8  Powell  St., Vancouver   	
loco   	
2246 Commercial Drive, Vancouver
Vancouver  	
Manufacturing a composition
rendering substances impervious to damp.
Oil-refinery.
Manufacturing paint.
Oil-refinery.
Manufacturing floor-oil and
mops.
Manufacturing turpentine.
Pulp and Paper Mills.
Powell  River  Co.,  Ltd	
Pulp and paper.
Pacific Mills, Ltd    	
Whalen Pulp tic Paper Mills, Ltd	
Western Canada Pulp tic Paper Co	
Beaver Cove Pulp tic Lumber Co	
Mill Creek,  Howe  Sound   	
Pulp.
Sash and Door Factories.
John Arnot & Sons  	
S.  C.   Smith Lumber Co.. Ltd	
James Brooks Woodworking Co., Ltd.
Kamloops Sash & Door Factory   ....
Nelson Sash tic Door Factory   	
T.  H.  Waters Co	
Galbraith & Sons	
Cedar Cove Sash & Door Co., Ltd.   .
F. J. Becker  	
Cornish &  Cooper   	
Johnson Sash & Door Factory	
E. H. Shockley  	
McLeod Dunn  Watson  Co.,  Ltd.   . . .
Canada Sash & Door Co	
Reynolds  Sash & Door Co	
Robertson   &   McLaughlin   	
Mark   Arbutbnot   	
R.   D.   Helmer   	
Reid Sash & Door Factory	
Nanaimo Lumber Co., Ltd	
Vancouver   . . .
Vernon   	
East Burnaby
Kamloops . . .
Nelson   	
.New   Westminster   	
1101 Sixth Ave. W, Vancouver ..
Armstrong	
245 Dufferin St.. Vancouver ....
854  Sixth Ave. W., Vancouver  . .
Prince Rupert	
1260 Charles St., Vancouver ....
13'6 Lome St. W.. Vancouver ....
170 Cordova St. E., Vancouver . .
1758 Fifteenth Ave. E., Vancouver
101 Dufferin St.. Vancouver ....
906 Sixth Ave. W.. Vancouver . . .
1635 Third Ave. W., Vancouver..
Xanaimo	
Sawmills and Shingle-mills, etc.
Abbotsford  Timber  tic Trading Co.   .
A.   J.   Prinsle    	
O. J. Hoffstram   	
Sugar  Loaf Valley Lumber Co., Ltd.
Frederick   Brand   	
Alert   Bay   Sawmills    	
John W. McDonnell,  Ltd.
Sovereign Lumber Co.,
,T.   E.   Murphy  tic  Co.
Armstrong -Sawmill   . .
Chas.   Hoover    	
George MacKenzie  .. .
Ltd.
Diamond Lumber & Shingle Co., Ltd.
North  Pacific  Lumber  Co.,  Ltd	
McVicar Shingle Co	
Barriere  Lumber  Co	
F.   Hendricks   	
Nicola Pine Mills.  Ltd.   . .
Seabird   Shingle  Co..  Ltd.
Hadden  Shingle Co., Ltd.
R. B. McLean Lumber Co.
Guarantee  Sawmill  Co.   ..
Empire Shingle Co	
Daniel   Kilpatrick   . .
Coombs Shingle Mill
Abbotsford	
Adelnhi P.O	
Rolla  	
Kamloops   	
Alberni    	
517 Granville St., Vancouver
Fanny Bay   	
Kamloops
Ladner   ..
Armstrong
Nelson
Revelstoke
Barnet
Burquitlam
Barriere . . .
Bella Coola
Merritt   	
Waieach . .
White Rock
Cloverdale .
Courtenay   .
Craig's Crossing
Courtenay
Coombs   .*.
Sawmill.
Sawmill (suspended operations! .
Shingle-mill (suspended operations).
Sawmilling.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill.
Plnning-mills.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill (suspended opera-
tions).
Shingle-mill (suspended operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 55
Sawmills and Shingle-mills, etc.—Continued.
Firm.
Longworth  Lumber  Co	
Red  Mountain   Lumber  Co.
Lumber  Products,   Ltd	
Calyson   Lumber   Co	
Canyon City Lumber Co., Ltd	
Highland   Shingle Mills   	
Baskin tic Stedman, Ltd	
Reynolds  Co.,  Ltd	
Okanagan  Sawmill,  Ltd	
The  Newlands  Sawmills,   Ltd	
Fraser  Mills  Shingle  Co	
Canadian  Western Lumber  Co.,  Ltd.   .
C.  Waters  	
The Columbia River Lumber Co., Ltd..
Thomas  Alton   	
Pioneer Shingle Mills	
Norris Lumber & Box Co., Ltd	
Prince  Rupert  Lumber  Co	
The Saloomt Lumber Co	
Dr.  R.  H.  Barker   	
East Kootenay Lumber Co.
E. Bashaw Lumber Co. .. .
Arrow Lakes Lumber Co. .
Monarch  Lumber  Co	
Acme   Shingle   Co.
P. J. Pearson
Northern Mills & Timber Co., Ltd.
Crawford  Bros	
Kelowna   Sawmills   Ltd	
Kamloops   Sawmills    	
Cowie tic Stanhope  	
Lumby   Sawmills,   Ltd	
Lakelse Lumber Co., Ltd	
Wm.  Boyd   	
Louis J. Duval 	
.Highland  Lumber  Co.,  Ltd	
Phillips-Hoyt Lumber Co	
Ernest  D.   Mayhue   	
Ehurne   Saw Mill,  Ltd	
Andrew McGeran  	
J. A. Menzies, Ltd	
W. Powers tic Lequme  	
Hutton   Mills   	
Cloverdale Milling Co	
Lincoln Mill   	
Lowrie Lumber Co	
H. G. Lambert Co., Ltd	
Mankin Lumber tic Pole Co	
Western  Box  & Shingle Co	
The King Farris Lumber Co., Ltd.
Iowra Shingle Co	
Hammond Cedar Co., Ltd	
Shull Lumber & Shingle Co.. Ltd.
Beaver River Lumber Co., Ltd.   ..
British  Columbia  Manufacturing  Co.   . .
Brunette Sawmills Co.. Ltd	
Bucklin  Lumber Co., Ltd	
Timberland  Lumber  Co.,  Ltd	
Westminster Mill Co., Ltd	
Dominion  Shingle & Cedar Co..  Ltd.   . .
Alberta Lumber   	
Barclay Shingle Mills	
B.C.  Box Co.,  Ltd	
B.C.  Fire & Cedar Lumber  Co.. Ltd.   . .
British Columbia Mills Timber & Trading
Co.
The Alert Bay Sawmills	
Burrard  Sawmills,  Ltd	
Canada Lumber & Timber Co	
Canada   Shingle  Co.,  Ltd	
Canadian  Robert Dollar  Co.,  Ltd	
Cedar Cove Sash & Door Co., Ltd	
Best Grade Shingles, Ltd	
Craig Taylor Lumber   	
Dominion Creosoting & Lumber Co., Ltd.
Fred M. Singer Co	
False Creek Lumber Co	
Vancouver  Cooperage  Co	
J.  Hanbury & Co., Ltd	
Hastings  Shingle Manufacturing Co.   . .
Location.
Cariboo   	
Penny    	
962   Credit   Foncier   Bldg
couver.
Cloverdale  	
Creston   	
Capital Hill P.O	
Nelson    ". .
Pacific Bldg., Vancouver  .
Enderby	
Prince  George   	
Fraser Mills	
Van-
Fruitvale   	
Golden   	
Galena  	
Victoria   Drive,
Grand Forks . .
Prince   Rupert.
Bella Coola . ..
Happy Valley  .
Jaffray	
Dewey   	
Kamloops   	
Vancouver
707 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver
Nanaimo   	
405 Winch Bldg., Vancouver  ....
Kelowna  	
Kamloops	
Duncan 	
Lumby   	
Amsbury   	
Halcvon  	
Royal Oak	
Cowichan 'Station
McKay Station . .
Malakwa   	
Marpole  	
Merritt	
Midway   	
Hutton  	
Murrayville   	
New Westminster	
New Masset, Graham Island
Nelson   	
Hall   	
Nelson   	
Newton    	
806 Yorkshire Bldg., Vancouver..
New Westminster	
401 Westminster Trust, New Westminster.
New Westminster	
Vancouver  	
iSixth and Willow. Vancouver...
924 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver
Eburne  	
Sixth and Laurel St., Vancouver
Foot of Dunlevy Ave., Vancouver
Alert Bay   	
1211 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
Foot of Smythe St.. Vancouver ..
P.O. Box 212, Vancouver  	
Dollarton    	
1101 Sixth Ave. W„ Vancouver..
901 Sixth Ave. W., Vancouver. . .
96'9 Dominion Bldg.. Vancouver..
P.O. Box 143 Vancouver   	
108 Hastings St. W., Vancouver..
935 'Sixth Ave. W.. Vancouver ..
Foot of Beatty St., Vancouver . .
Fourth   Ave.   and   Granville   St.,
Vancouver
1355 Powell  St., Vancouver   ....
Industry.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill and plainer.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended   operations).
Sawmill.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations).
Sawmill.
Mill!
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Manufacturing shingles.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill  and box-factory.
Sawmill and planing-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill and logging.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill and cooperage.
Sawmill..
Manufacturing shingles. P 56
British Columbia.
1921
Sawmills and Shingle-mills, etc.—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Huntting Merritt  Lumber Co.,
Lake Lumber Co., Ltd	
Robert MeNair Shingles Co.   . .
Pacific Box Co., Ltd	
Rat Portage Lumber Co., Ltd.
Robertson tic Hackett Sawmills
South Shore Lumber Co., Ltd.
Nasmyth  Lumber Co	
Vancouver Cedar Mills  	
Vancouver Lumber Co., Ltd.   . .
Star Lumber Co	
Ltd.
M. P. Batterill
K. Lier Lumber Co	
Alberni  Pacific Lumber  Co.,   Ltd.   .
Sewall Lumber & Trading Co., Ltd.
Burden & Watson   	
Maple   Ridge   Lumber   Co	
Thurston Faville, Ltd	
Big Bay Lumber -Co	
Brooks,  Bidlake & Whittall,  Ltd.   .
Pitt River  Shingle Co., Ltd	
Alberni   Shingle  Co.,  Ltd	
Forest Mills of B.C., Ltd	
Revelstoke Lumber Co., Ltd	
R.   H.   Sawyer   	
MeNair & Grahame  	
Hamilton Lumber Mills,  Ltd	
Stoltze Manufacturing Co.,  Ltd	
Kootenay  Shingle  Co..  Ltd	
William  Crowston & Sons   	
Sardis  Shingle  Co.,  Ltd	
G. B. Ferguson & Co	
W.  B.  Charters   	
W.   H.   Mager   	
Sperling Lumber & Shingle Co	
Day  Shingle   Manufacturing  Co	
Newport   Sawmills,   Ltd	
H.   M.   Ellis,  Ltd	
Surrev  Shingle Manufacturing Co.,  Ltd.
I. R. Reilly & Co	
George  Little   	
Eldorado Lumber Co., Ltd	
McKee  &  Milnes   	
John L. Rutton Sawmills   	
Ross   Saskatoon   Lumber  Co	
Waneta Power Co., Ltd	
Summerland  Lumber  Co.,  Ltd.   .
Campbell River Lumber Co., Ltd.
Straits Lumber Co	
North River Lumber Co., Ltd.   .
A.   Tomkinson    	
Cameron Lumber Co.. Ltd	
Genoa Bay  Lumber Co	
James   Leigh  &  Sons   	
Lemon,  Gonnason   tic  Co	
Moore-Whittington  Lumber  Co.,  Ltd.
Shawnigan   Lake   Lumber   Co	
McCarter Shingle Co	
Albert   Gorton   	
Peers   &   Anderson   	
C.  T.  McPhalen & Co	
Carter  Bros.  Lumber  Co	
M.   A.  Hayes   	
B.CI Iowa Lumber Co., Ltd	
Northern Pacific Logging Co., Ltd.
Mayo  Lumber Co..  Ltd	
Giscome   Lumber  Co.,   Ltd	
Stuart  Lake  Shingle Co	
McCormich & Orser	
B.C.  Cattle Co.,  Ltd	
Sidney Mill,  Ltd	
Bentley Lumber Co	
Northern Lumber tic Mercantile Co.,
Superior  Spruce  Mills   	
Masset  Inlet  Lumber Co.
Ltd.
P.O.   Box  249,   Vancouver   	
Qualicum Beach  	
870 Thurlow St.. Vancouver . . .
Foot of Smythe St., Vancouver.
Vancouver 	
1017    Metropolitan    Bldg.,    Vancouver
Clinton '. ,....•...
Penticton ...
Port Alberni
1312 Standard Bldg., Vancouver.
Crawford   Bay   	
Port   Haney   	
Port Moody	
Georgetown   Mills    .-.
869 Yorkshire Bldg., Vancouver..
Coquitlam   	
Port   Alberni   	
Revelstoke    	
Pingston Creek via Arrowhead  .
Revelstoke  	
Rosedale    	
Royal Oak 	
012 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
Selma	
Soda Creek   	
Port  Moody   	
Six-mile Creek   	
Sooke    	
Salmon Arm  	
Sperling    	
Dewdney   	
Squamish    	
118 Pacific Bldg.,  Vancouver   ..
Sullivan   (B.C.E.   Rly.)    	
Tappen   	
Terrace	
330' Seymour St., Vancouver  . . .
Green Point Rapids
Alexa Lake  	
Waldo    	
Waneta   	
West Summerland   .
White Rock	
Nanoose	
Thunder River   ....
Grindrod
Victoria   .
Anthony  A.   Rerrie
Foot of Birch St.. Vancouver . . .
Foot of Victoria Drive, Vancouver
Hatzic   	
Vananda  	
Armstrong	
506 Yorkshire Bldg., Vancouver..
606 Vancouver Block, Vancouver.
Duncan   	
Pacific  Bldg.,  Vancouver  	
Squamish  	
South of Revelstoke	
c/o W. C. Sampson, 1219 Langley
St., Victoria
Sidney   	
Golden   	
Prince  George   	
S17 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver
c/o    Weir    Machinery   Co.,    1396
Richards  St., Vancouver
Sperling   	
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill and shingle-mill.
Sawmill and planing.
Sawmill.
Sawmill (operated by Northern
Construction   Co.).
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended  opera-
.  tions).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Manufacturing of shingles.
Sawmill.
Manufacturing shingles.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmilling  and   logging   (suspended operations).
Manufacturing shingles.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Shingle-mill, etc.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations).
Shingle-mill   (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill,
Sawmill.
Sawmill,  etc.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
(suspended  opera-
Sawmill
tions).
Sawmill,
Sawmill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill
tions).
Ditto.
etc.
(suspended  opera-
Sawmill, etc. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 57
Sawmills and Shingle-mills, etc.—Continued.
Firm.
Industry.
Smith,  Hutchinson Lumber Co.,  Ltd.
Princeton   Coalmont   Sawmill   	
A.   J.   Graham   	
E.  Kagetsu & Co	
Sutton  & Foote   	
The McLay Sawmill  	
Cedars. Ltd	
Aleza Lake Mills, Ltd	
Graham Island Spruce & Cedar Co.
Hansard Lake Lumber  Co., Ltd.   . .
Croydon  Lumber   Co.,  Ltd.	
Harbour Lumber Co., Ltd	
Gwilt Lumber Co., Ltd. . . .
Bainbridge Lumber  Co.   . . .
Loos   Lumber   Co	
Tynehead  Lumber  Co	
P. Bain   	
Harrison Lake Shingle Co.
Pacific Tie tic Timber Co.   . .
Electric   Lumber   Co	
Renata   Lumber  Co	
Red Cedar Shingle Co. . . .
Penny Lumber Co., Ltd. .
Mountain Sawmills, Ltd. .
Cranbrook Sawmills, Ltd. .
The Milestone Lumber Co.  .
Joseph   Gawley   	
Krim   Singh   . . . ...,	
Moses  Bouchier   	
Red Cedar Shingle Co., Ltd.
North Arm Lumber Co.
Harry Hobson   	
A.  E.  Mann   . . .
J.   E.   Campbell
Barr  Bros	
Silverdale Lumber Co., Ltd	
Sunrise  Lumber Co	
Gerrard Lumber Co., Ltd	
Finley Mcintosh, McDonald'Prendergast,
Dingee
Hamilton   Shingles,   Ltd	
I. B. Dennison   	
Grand Forks Sawmills, Ltd	
North Star Lumber Co., Ltd.
E. C. Walsh Lumber Co., Ltd.
J. W. R. & W. J. Potter . . .
Rex  Shingle  Co.,   Ltd	
Nakusp  Lumber  Co.,   Ltd.
William   Lyne   	
Leask & Boyter  	
Kenney Bros.  Lumber Co	
Giiroy  Shingle  Co.,  Ltd	
R.   S.  Wright. Ltd	
Edham  Shingle  Mills,  Ltd	
Boulder   Lumber   Co	
Port Clements  Box  &  Lumber Co.,  Ltd.
William Kernighan   	
Melrose  Shingle  Co.,  Ltd	
Frank F.  White & J.  C.  Farris   	
Thos. Gwilt Shingle Co., Ltd	
Courtenay Lumber Co., Ltd	
Western Hemlock Mills, Ltd., c/o Wilson
& Brady
McKee & Campbell   	
B.C.   Shingle  Co	
Nelson Lumber Manufacturing Co	
The Gibson Lumber & Shingle Co	
W. H. Hollard  	
Royal Lumber Co	
Keefe Lumber Co	
Quesnel Timber & Trading Co.
Silver Creek Lumber Co	
009 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
Princeton    	
Graham's Landing	
126 Cordova St. E., Vancouver..
Trout Lake  	
Duncan    	
510 North West Bldg., Vancouver
Aleza Lake  	
Prince Rupert	
Prince George   	
Croydon  	
Foot of Salisbury Drive, Vancouver.
Courtenay   	
Bainbridge   	
Loos   	
323 Hastings St. E., Vancouver..
Silverdale   	
Harrison   Hot   Springs   P.O	
529  Pender   St.  W.,  Vancouver..
c/o   Weir   Machinery,   Vancouver
Renata   	
Guilford	
Penny 	
Kamloops    	
Fort   Steele    	
Castlegar   	
Keefers   	
Strawberry Hill P.O	
Hatzic   Prairie,   Durien   P.O	
jFoot of Kerr Road, South Vancouver.
South Vancouver  	
322 Second St. E., North Vancouver.
827 Royal Ave., New Westminster
Avola    	
Mission   City
Silverdale   .'. .
Nanaimo
Gerrard   	
Coalmont
Arrowhead   . .
Nakusp   	
Grand Forks
Kamloops    	
North Vancouver   . .	
Box  566.  Victoria   	
Esplanade and St. George, North
Vancouver.
Nakusp    	
Cariboo Road  	
Wasa   	
Terrace   	
1120  Standard  Bank  Bldg.,  Vancouver.
Usk	
405 Metropolitan  Bldg., Vancouver
Boulder  Mill  via Nelson   	
Port  Clements   	
Salmon Arm  	
White Rock	
403   Central  Bldg.,   Victoria
Courtenay    	
Winch  Bldg.,  Vancouver
Langley Prairie   	
Sperling	
Nelson   	
1022 Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver.
Lynn Creek 	
Usk    	
Francois  Lake   	
Quesnel   	
807 Dominion Bldg., Vancouver.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill,   etc.
Sawmill,  etc.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill.
Sawmill,  etc.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended   operations).
Sawmill.
Manufacturing of shingles.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill,  etc.
Shingle-mill (suspended operations) .
Shingle-mill,   etc.
Sawmill,,   etc.
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Sawmill.
Manufacturing   shingles.
Sawmill.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Sawmill,  etc.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended   operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill,  etc.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations).
Sawmill,   etc.   (assigned).
Sawmill, etc. (suspended operations).
Sawmill. P 58
British Columbia.
1921
Sawmills and Shingle-mills, etc.—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
National  Shingle  Co	
The Border Lumber Co.,  Ltd	
F. M. Smith  	
Major  C.  W.  Justice   	
Lafontaine Bros	
Port Hardy Shingle Co	
Nolan Lumber Co	
The Anthony Lumber Co.. Ltd	
Economy Lumber Co., Ltd	
Telkwa  Lumber Co	
F. W. Engeman  	
Gulf Sawmills.  Ltd	
Brooks & Brooks   	
Fletcher & Richards Lumber Co., Ltd.. .
E. B. de la Giroday	
William MacAndrew   	
Mission  Shingle  Co	
Glenwood Shingle, Tie & Lumber Co.   . .
Coquitlam  Shingle Co	
Guicheon Cove Lumber Co., Ltd	
Wall Lillos Shingle Co	
Mills  Bros	
Campbell tic Osborne  	
Premium Shingle  Co., Ltd	
Qualicum Lumber Co	
G. O.   Buchanan   	
B.C.  Lath' tic Timber Products,  Ltd.   . . .
Norwood Bros	
E.   Mallandaine   	
Bevan Lumber Co., Ltd	
C. V.  Humphrey & O.  E. Butler   	
Harrison  Bay Co.,  Ltd	
Burnaby  Lumber  Co	
Haney Lumber & Lath Mills, Ltd	
The Tyee Lumber  Co., Ltd	
T.   J.   Kirkpatrick   	
Madina Lumber Co.,  Ltd	
Lion Shingle Co., Ltd  .
M. & M. Sawmill Co., Ltd	
Cedar Cove Operations, Ltd	
Charlotte  Islands  Spruce Products, Ltd.
Masset Timber Co.,  Ltd	
Wm.  D. Lukens   	
The  Frondeg Lumber Co	
Northern B.C. Timber Co	
W. H.  Scoutin   	
Aldergrove Sawmills, Ltd	
Yellow Fir Lumber Co	
Chase & Campbell Shingle Co., Ltd	
Maddaugh, Huggard & Nichols  ........
Baker, Malcolm & Doherty   	
H.   McD.   Ferguson   	
MeNair Lumber tic Shingle Co., Ltd	
The Brennan Lake Lumber Co., Ltd.   . . .
James   Taylor   	
The Westminster Shook Mills, Ltd	
Webber Lumber  Co	
Webster, Black & Co	
Townsite Lumber Co., Ltd	
Acme Lath Co	
North Shore Shingles, Ltd	
W. A. MacDonald Lumber Co	
Dimension Lumber Co., Ltd	
Sicamous Saw Mills, Ltd	
Keen Shingle Co	
Errington Lumber  Co	
40'? Hastings St. W., Vancouver.
Deep Creek  	
Door ..
Ganges
Golden
Port Hardy
Flagstone   ..
Aleza Lake
Courtenay   .
Telkwa
Jesmond    . .
Seechelt  	
Otter	
Courtenay	
2757 Cambridge St.. Vancouver.
Dewar's  Wharf, Vancouver
Mission City  	
307 Yorkshire Bldg., Vancouver..
123 Fourteenth Ave. W., Vancouver.
702 B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg.,
Victoria.
766 Fourteenth Ave. E., Vancouver.
Langley Prairie   	
Toba Inlet	
024   Vancouver   Bldg.,   Vancouver
512 Standard Bldg., Vancouver . .
1207 Seventh Ave. W., New Westminster.
Sperling	
Quesnel  	
Creston  	
Bevan   	
Capilano   	
New Westminster	
Metropolitan Bldg., Vancouver
Yennadon   .
Tyee   Siding
Terrace    	
318  Pacific Bldg., Vancouver   . . .
768 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver   . . .
Courtenay   	
866 lTorksbire Bldg., Vancouver..
604 Yorkshire Bldg.. Vancouver..
708  Pacific  Bldg.,  Vancouver   . . .
Palling   	
Cobble Hill   	
Smithers   	
Kamloops   	
Aldergrove  	
Duncan  .	
40 Inns of Court Bldg., Hamilton
St., Vancouver
Fernridge	
Penticton	
Haney   	
North Vancouver   	
Wellington	
Hope  	
New Westminster	
Port Haney	
Fraser Lake   	
Foot of Windermere St., Vancouver.
2022 Douglas St.. Victoria   	
Cor. Esplanade and St. George's
St..  North  Vancouver.
Barriere   	
401 Westminster Trust Bldg., New
Westminster.
306 Victoria St., Kamloops	
Port Alberni
Coombs
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations).
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill (suspended operations).
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Manufacturing shingles.
Manufacturing shingles
(assigned).
Manufacturing shingles.
Manufacturing shingles (suspended operation).
Sawmill (suspended operations).
'Shingle-mill (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Ditto.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Shingle-mill (suspended operations).
Sawmill.
Sawmill (suspended operations).
Sawmill.
Sawmill (suspended operations) .
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Planing-mill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill   (suspended operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended  operations) .
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended   operations).
Lath-mill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill, etc. (suspended operations) .
Shingle-mill (suspended operations).
Sawmill. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 59
Sawmills and Shingle-mills, etc.—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Somerton & IJrofitt  	
Myntti, Puska, Lata Make & Karst
Fanny Bay Lumber Co., Ltd	
Brian   Briscoe   	
Henry Proctor   	
Empire Sawmills, Ltd	
Diamond Lath Mills, Ltd.   . .
Champion  Shingle  Co.,  Ltd.
Harrison. Bates tic Ilanwell  ....
Green River Lumber Co	
Kettle Valley Tie & Timber Co.
North Vancouver Lath Co. . . .
Union Shingle Co., Ltd	
Sahtlam Lumber Co., Ltd.
Wilson Shingle Co., Ltd.   .
Hope   Sawmill   Co	
Red Mountain Shingle Co.
Naruke tic Sato 	
Forest & Mines Products, Ltd.
Tansor Lumber  Co.,   Ltd	
Lawrence  &  Workenaw   	
The Bonsall  Creek Lumber Co., Ltd.
North West Lumber Co., Ltd	
Gilroy McKay Lumber  Co.,  Ltd.   . . .
The Laidlaw Shingle Co	
Erie Lumber Co	
McPhalan Lumber Co.,  Ltd	
Ltd.
Dominion Lumber  Co.,
Osoyoos Lumber Co	
The Ruskin Operations, Ltd	
Frank A. Willis   	
Douglas Fir Products & Shingles, Ltd.
The Holt Creek Lumber Co	
Satuma Saw & Planing Mills  	
Logan-Garcin  Lumber  Co	
De Blac & Bessette  	
Flanagan   Bros	
The Prospect Lumber Co	
Renfrew Lumber Co.,  Ltd	
The White Rock Tie tic Lumber Co.
Lumber   Specialty,  Ltd	
W.  T.  Stevens   	
D.  Rogers   	
T.  R.  Davis   	
The Union Cedar Mills, Ltd	
H.  L.  Latremouilio   	
Nicol  Lumber Co	
Thorpe  tic  Lancaster   	
John  Renwisk & Son   	
The E.  & M.  Lumber  Co.   . .	
H.  J.   Parker   	
R. T. Burnett tic A. Stewart   	
A.  S. Rutherford & Louis Hanson   . .
The Bailey Hobbs Lumber Co., Ltd.
John   Freeman   	
Newton   Sawmill   	
Joyce & Johnston	
Lome E.  Butt Lumber & Shingle Mills,
Ltd.
McArthur  &  Co	
Percy  Cotton   	
Comaplix  Mills,   Ltd	
The Chase Creek Lumber Co., Ltd	
Baskin   Gevurtz   Lumber  Co.,   Ltd	
John C. Dill   	
H. M. Hornbv   	
W. J. McIntyre	
Neilson Shingle Co.
Powell River	
Webster's Corner   	
Cumberland	
Prince George	
Cowichan Bay	
405 Bank of Nova Scotia Bldg.,
Vancouver.
Port Hammond	
8617 Columbia Ave., South Vancouver.
Port Hammond	
Rethel  	
Penticton	
North Vancouver  	
Fraser Ave. and River Road, South
Vancouver.
Duncan    	
Qualicum	
Floods P.O.
Silverton   . .
West Summerland
Fort Steele  	
Duncan  	
Stewart   	
Westholme    	
21 Pender St. W„ Vancouver  . . .
1129  Standard Bldg.,  Vancouver.
Waleacb   	
Erie   	
Mission  	
Wire Cache  	
Graham's Ranch,  Sidney
Stave Falls	
Dewar's Wharf, Vancouver   .
620 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver
Duncan  	
Satuma   	
Victoria  	
Lumby   	
Cloverdale   	
R.R. No.  3, Victoria   	
654 Yates St., Victoria	
White Rock	
466 Winch Bldg., Vancouver  ...
Westbank   	
Cloverdale   	
Terrace   	
414 Yorkshire Bldg., Vancouver.
Louis Creek	
Vedder Crossing	
Nelson   	
Crescent Valley	
Merville  	
Merritt    	
Capilano   	
Prince George	
114 Crown Bldg., Vancouver  ...
Kamloops    	
Newton P.O	
Quesnel ....
Mission City
Midway
Adelpbi P.O.
Comaplix   . . .
Shuswap   ...
Nelson   	
325  Howe St.,
Cloverdale .. .
Sicamous
Silverdale .. .
Vancouver
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Lath-mill.
Shingle-mill  (suspended operations).
Lath-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Manufacturing  Lath.
Manufacturing Shingles.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill (suspended operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill (suspended operations).
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended   operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill   (suspended   open
tions).
Sawmill.
Sawmill,  etc.
Shingle-mill.
Manufacturing shingles.
Shingles.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended   operations).
Ditto.
Sawmill.
Lath-mill   (assigned).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Sawmill, etc.
Sawmill.
Shiugle-mill.
Gasolene sawmill.
Sawmill   (suspended   operations).
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill  (suspended operations).
Shingle-mill.
Sawmill.
Shingle-mill  (suspended operations). P CO
British Columbia.
1921
Sheet-metal Works.
Firm.
Industry.
Eburne Sheet Metal Works  	
F. W. Hamilton  	
Ansell Sheet Metal Works	
E. L. Armstrong	
A. J. Barker  	
Grandview Sheet Metal Works	
Johnson Lee  	
James  H.  Hatch   	
H. tic H. Sheet Metal Works  	
Frank Little Sheet Metal Works   	
John   K.  Miller   Co.,   Ltd.   .	
J. R. Tacey & Son   	
Pacific Sheet Metal Works,  Ltd	
B.C. Sheet Metal Works	
I'acific Sheet  Metal  Works.  Ltd	
Victoria Sheet Metal Works   	
Sixth  Avenue  Sheet  Metal  Works
Terminal  Sheet Metal Works. Ltd	
Steen  & 'LongwiU   	
Campbell tic Grill   	
New Idea Sheet Metal Works  	
Central   Sheet Metal  Works   	
Nelson Hardware Co	
Rowe's Sheet Metal Works   	
Columbia Copper tic Sheet Steel Manufacturing Co.
Latimer tic Sons. Ltd	
D'Arcy B. Plunkett	
A. W.  Schwan  	
McLeod  Sheet Metal Works   	
Smith tic Kirkland   	
Vancouver  Sheet  Metal   	
The Metallic Heating & Ventilating Co..
Ltd.
British Columbia Ceiling & Roofing Co.,
Ltd.
C. W. Grafton  	
Marpole  	
1618 Commercial St., Vancouver. .
2215 Thirteenth Ave. W., Vancouver.
1329 Granville St., Vancouver...
516' Pender St. W„ Vancouver ..
1685 Venables St., Vancouver . . .
826 Dunsmuir St., Vancouver . .
69 Cordova St. W., Vancouver . .
735 Richards St., Vancouver . ..
1168 Seymour St., Vancouver . .-.
337 Dufferin St.. Vancouver ....
1160 Seymour St., Vancouver . . .
523 Seventh Ave., W., Vancouver
Victoria  	
434' Kingston St., Victoria	
Prince Rupert	
1043 Pender St., Vancouver   ....
Prince  Rupert   	
1238 Seymour St., Vancouver  . . .
757   Beatty  St.,  Vancouver   	
560 Cambie St., Vancouver   	
Nelson   	
Prince George	
2421   Scotia  St.,  Vancouver   ....
550 Main St., Vancouver   	
2510 Rock Bay Ave., Victoria . .
S Cordova St. E., Vancouver ....
1042  Richards  St.,  Vancouver   . .
1537 Kingsway,  Vancouver   	
1096 Hamilton St.. Vancouver . .
2301 Cambie St., Vancouver   ....
823  Seventh Ave.  W.,  Vancouver
153 Keefer St., Vancouver	
Sheet-metal works.
Manufacturing   sheet   copper
and steel.
Sheet-metal works.
Tanneries, Manufacture of Leather Goods, Gloves, and Shoes.
Sandell  Manufacturing Co.,  Ltd.   ,
W . T. Glenn & Sons  	
Okanagan Saddlery  	
A.   J.   Beer   	
B.C.  Saddlery Co., Ltd	
William   Duncan    	
F. Norris & Sons	
Wilcox-Hall   Co.,   Ltd	
Sterling  Glove   Co	
Searson   tic  Russell    	
Vancouver   Glove  Co	
Lawrence & Bishop  	
S. Nelson & Co	
John  Watson	
Standard   Shoe  Manufacturing  Co.
J.  Leckie Co., Ltd	
Leckie  Tannery   	
P.O.   Box  316,  Vancouver
Kelowna    	
Vernon   	
West    Summerland    	
Victoria   	
1322  Douglas   St.,   Victoria   . . .
1320 Government St., Victoria
Kamloops    	
Vancouver   	
232   Cambie   St.,   Vancouver   . .
223 Carrall St., Vancouver   ...
Mission City  	
304   London  Bldg..   Vancouver
127 Dufferin  St. E.,  Vancouver
Vancouver   	
Manufacturing leather gloves.
Manufacturing leather goods.
Manufacturing   leather   gloves
(suspended  operations).
Making canvas gloves.
Manufacturing gloves.
Manufacturing leather goods.
Tannery.
Manufacturing   leather   gloves.
Manufacturing shoes.
Tannery.
Manufacture of Wooden Toys.
Western Toy and Furniture Manufacturing Co.
Quinton A. Gosling	
Hiker Manufacturing Co., Ltd	
H. C. Derrick  	
Mrs. Emma G. Barnard  	
Dominion  Composition  Furniture & Toy
Manufacturing Co., Ltd.
Vancouver
Murrayville
Victoria   . ..
Vancouver   ,
Victoria   . . .
Wooden  toys.
Wooden toys (suspended opers
tions).
Wooden  toys.
Wooden toys (suspended opera
tions).
Wooden toys.
Manufacturing toys. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Industries.
P 61
Miscellaneous Wood-working Plants.
Firm.
Location.
Kootenay Wire Works Co.
A. Lundberg
Black Bros., Ltd.
E. C. Chrystall  	
Dominion Manufacturing,  Ltd.   (Vancouver Casket Co.)
Shaw Manufacturing Co., Ltd	
William J. Mable 	
Marston Show Case Co.
Imperial  Casket Co.   ...
Twentieth Century House Co., Ltd	
J. S. Goddard 	
Auto Body Builders	
Canada Dolls, Ltd	
Mill Cut Homes & Lumber, Ltd	
The  Simmons,  Ltd	
Vancouver Creosoting Co., Ltd	
Cut-to-fit Buildings Co., Ltd	
S.  M.  Simpson   	
John  Brown   	
Pacific Coast Pipe Co.,  Ltd	
Columbia Pulleys, Ltd	
Coast Box  Co	
Hardwood Lumber Co., Ltd	
Terminal  Construction &  Manufacturing
Co.,. Ltd.
Okanagan Building & Trading Co., Ltd.. .
Dominion  Woodwork  Manufacturing Co.
Chalmers  Cabinet  Works,   Ltd.
Great West Manufacturing Co., Ltd.   . . .
C.  A.  C. Allen   	
Canadian Pipe Co., Ltd	
W. F. Drysdale	
Williams, Trerise & Williams   	
Dalziel Box Co	
Standard Box Co  	
Johnson & Allan   	
Canadian Box Co., Ltd	
J.  F.  Stainton   	
Canadian  Western  Woodworkers   	
Northwestern Box Co., Ltd	
San Juan Box Co., Ltd	
Sunset Woodworkers  	
Nelson   . . .
Vancouver
Central   Park
Victoria   	
Cedar Cottage
Vancouver  ..,
South Vancouver
Vancouver   	
Kelowna . .
Vancouver
Vancouver
Kelowna
Vancouver
Vernon  	
550 Pacific   St.,  Vancouver
1033 North  Park  St., Victoria   .
853 Cormorant St.,  Victoria   . ..
Victoria   	
Langley  Prairie   	
148 Lome St. E., Vancouver . . .
161 Dufferin St., Vancouver  . . .
Vernon  	
Victoria   	
607 Northwest Bldg., Vancouver.
Port Renfrew   	
Vancouver   	
Industry.
Manufacturing wire mattresses
and  box-making.
Manufacturing artificial limbs.
Manufacturing auto tops and
bodies.
Building  construction.
Caskets and undertaking supplies.
Children's vehicles.
Manufacturing vehicles and repairs.
Show-cases.
Caskets and undertaking supplies.
Ready-cut houses (suspended
operations).
Auto tops and bodies.
Manufacturing  vehicles.
Dolls and novelties.
Cut-to-fit houses.
Iron beds, etc.
Creosoting timber.
Cut-to-fit   houses.
Wood-working plant.
Carpenter-shop.
Manufacturing wood pipe.
Manufacturing wood pulleys.
Wooden   boxes.
Wood-working.
Wood-working   (suspended   operations).
Ditto.
Wood-working.
Manufacturing wood pipes.
Wood-working.
Manufacturing wooden   boxes.
Box-factory.
Wood-working.
Manufacturing wooden boxes.
Wood-working.
Box-factory.
Manufacturing boxes.
Wood-working.
Miscellaneous.
B.C. Anchor Fence Co., Ltd	
Canadian Northwest Steel-Co., Ltd.   ...
Great  Western  Smelting tic Refining Co.
Morrison   Steel   &  Wire  Co	
Opsal Steel Co., Ltd	
Sea  Island  Can  Co.,  Ltd	
Aetna Saw Works, Ltd	
The  Brittannia   Wire  Rope  Co.,  Ltd.   . .
Raemaekers &  Stephen  Bros	
The Lowox  Steel Co., Ltd	
Vancouver  Rolling  Mills  Co.,   Ltd	
Atlas Steel Products, Ltd	
Pacific  Copper  &  Brazing  Co	
B.C.  Silver & Nickel Plating Works   . . .
Cascade Plating Works   	
Roote's Auto Top Co	
H.  M.  Nugent & Co	
Peerless Products, Ltd	
Victoria Tent Factory   	
Dominion Carton & Printing Works  ...
Wm. N. O'Neil Co.. Ltd	
W. J. Pendray & Sons, Ltd	
Sidney Roofing & Paper Co., Ltd	
Victoria Mattress Works  	
Gabriola  Shale Products, Ltd	
Pacific Coast Fluff Rug Co	
Canadian Bag Co., Ltd	
Modern   Macaroni   Factory   	
1031 Pender St. W., Vancouver.
Front    and    Prince    Edward    St.
Vancouver.
146.' Dufferin  St.  E..  Vancouver.
Granville  Island, Vancouver   . . .
Vancouver 	
597 Hastings St. W.. Vancouver
Industrial Island, Vancouver . . .
Granville Island, Vancouver
Vancouver  	
Foot of Smythe  St., Vancouver.
Eburne 	
Industrial Island. Vancouver . .
130 Dufferin St. W.. Vancouver.
534' Howe  St., Vancouver   	
740 Pacific St., Vancouver	
48 Water St., Vancouver  	
1156 Hamilton  St.. Vancouver. .
618 Pandora St., Victoria	
Victoria   	
Victoria and  Sidney   	
Victoria  	
Moody Block, Victoria	
1069 Richards St., Vancouver . . ,
1152: Mainland St., Vancouver.,
638 Cormorant St., Victoria
Manufacturing wire fences.
Fabrication and assembly steel.
Manufacturing babbitt.
Manufacturing wire nails.
Making steel and manufacturing tools.
Manufacturing cans.
Manufacturing  saws.
Manufacturing wire rope.
Manufacturing agents.
Steel.
Rolling-mills.
Manufacturing steel products.
Ooppersmithing.
Silverplating.
Electroplating.
Manufacturing auto-tops.
Manufacturing tents and awnings.
Manufacturing ink.
Manufacturing tents and sails.
Manufacturing paper boxes.
Manufacturing art glass.
Manufacturing soap.
Manufacturing rubber roofing.
Manufacturing mattresses.
Manufacturing brick, with clay
digging.
Manufacturing fluff rugs.
Manufacturing jute bags.
Manufacturing macaroni. P 62
British Columbia.
1921
Miscellaneous—Continued.
Firm.
Location.
Industry.
Pacific Roofing Co., Ltd	
A. J. Cassels & Co	
Nakamura   Bros	
Western  Tire & Rubber  Co	
B.C.  Laboratories,  Ltd	
The Canadian Refiners, Ltd	
The  Vancouver   Island   Riggers'   &   Sail-
makers'  Association.  Ltd.
Canada Western  Woollen  Mills,  Ltd.   . .
North America Noodle Factory	
B.C.  Vinegar Works,  Ltd	
B.C. Sugar Refinery Co., Ltd	
B.C.   Pharmical   Co.,   Ltd	
Davis Paper Box Co., Ltd	
National  Paper  Box & Carton Co.,  Ltd.
Edward Lipsett   	
The Barrett Co.", Ltd	
Royal Crown Soaps Co., Ltd	
C.  H.  Jones &  Son,  Ltd	
Industrial Island, Vancouver ....
5U'8> Richards St., Vancouver ....
174 Dufferin St. W., Vancouver. .
c/o Carter & Bird  (assignee), 626
Pender St.  W.. Vancouver.
Pender St.  W., Vancouver   	
415  Bank  of  Nova  Scotia  Bldg.,
Vancouver.
1364  Wharf  St.,  Victoria   	
Vancouver  	
433 Georgia  St.   E.,
Vancouver  	
Vancouver.
1668 Pandora St.. Vancouver . .
160 Lome St. W., Vancouver . .
68   Water  St.,   Vancouver   	
Tenth and Arbutus St., Vancouver
Vancouver   	
28—36 Water St., Vancouver  ....
Manufacturing roofing-paper.
Manufacturing window-shades.
Noodle-factory.
Manufacturing rubber goods.
Manufacturing soap products.
Refining of Epsom salts.
Sail-makers.
Woollen-mill.
Noodle-factory.
Manufacturing of vinegar.
Manufacturing of sugar.
Manufacturing of drugs.
Manufacturing paper boxes.
Manufacturing tents and awnings.
Manufacturing roofing.
Manufacturing soap and paper
boxes.
Manufacturing tents and awnings.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1921.

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