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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1925]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL EEPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR THE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1924
PRINTED   BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C.:
Printed hy Charles  F.   Banfield,  Printer  to  the  King's  Most   Excellent  Majesty.
1925.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the yea*
1924 is herewith respectfully submitted.'
A. M. MANSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
June, 1925.     . The Honourable A. M. Manson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my seventh Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1924.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. D. McNIVEN.
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., June 1925. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister   7
Unemployment Conference    7
The " Hours of Work Act "   8
The " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act"   8
New Legislation   9
Statistics of Trade and Industries   10
Increase in Annual Pay-roll   10
Proportionate Figures for each Area   11
Comparative Group Pay-rolls  13
Larger Percentage of White Workers   14
Lower Proportion of Orientals   14
Increase in Average Wage   15
Chart showing Fluctuation in Wages, 1918-24     16
Average Week's Wage In each Industry   17
Average Hours worked in Industry   18
Conciliation     33
Crisis in Kootenay Camps   33
Question of Carpenters' Wages  35
Labour Disputes   36
Coal-miners, Crow's Nest Area  36
Dumber-workers,  Cranbrook and District  38
Summary of Labour Disputes   40
Employment Service    41
Chart showing Fluctuations during 1924   42
Business transacted during 1924  43
Harvest-labour for Prairie Provinces   43
The Service and the Fruit Industry  44
Employment of Disabled ex-Service Men   45
Co-operation with Immigration Department   46
Inspection of Factories   47
Accident  Prevention  47
Elevators  47
Child-labour   48
Complaints   ■-  4S
Report of Minimum, Wage Board  49
Latitude allowed under the Law   49
Additional Pay secured   49
Cases taken into Court   50
The " Schools " Problem   51
Statistical  Report    51
Summary of all Occupations  57
Labour Turnover in each Group   58
Summary of Orders  -  60
Associations of Employers   64
Union Directory   66  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR
FOR 1924.
The year 1924, which is covered by the seventh annual report of the Department of Labour,
was, comparatively speaking, an uneventful period. There were only two disputes in the Province
which affected a large body of workers. One was the strike of coal miners in the Crow's Nest
country, lasting for sis months fromi May to the end of October, and being followed by a period
of readjustment which kept matters unsettled until the end of the year. The other was the
strike of lumber workers in the Southern Interior earlier in the year. This dispute was noteworthy because of the unusual issues which it raised, and which are dealt with in the Labour
Disputes section of the report.
Progress of Industries.
Generally speaking, the industries of the Province witnessed satisfactory progress during
the year. The chief exceptions were lumbering and coal-mining, which from different causes
Were less active than in the previous year. Most of our other industries enjoyed the experience
of adding substantially to their annual pay-roll. Special influences were, however, at work to
keep back our most important industry, that of lumbering, during the summer months, and this
had the effect of bringing about a considerable amount of unemployment at a period of the
year when work is usually fairly plentiful.
Provisions of Relief Work.
As the winter drew near the question of dealing with unemployment became more urgent
in certain parts of the Province, and the Legislature, during the Session in November, voted
a sum of $150,000 for the purpose of carrying out relief works. Up to the end of the year about
$20,000 of this amount had been expended.
Unemployment Conference.
In September a conference was called by the Dominion Government at Ottawa, to discuss
ways and means of dealing with the question of unemployment. The Province was represented
by the Deputy Minister of Labour, who, before attending the Conference, had a careful survey
made by the Employment Service officials in various centres. The information they supplied
showed that we had a larger number of unemployed in the Province than was usual at that
period of the year, though there was some improvement later. The Conference declared strongly
against the giving of assistance in the form of money or doles, and expressed the opinion that
" certain classes of work, which in the past had been discouraged during the winter season, can
with perfect safety and economy be undertaken throughout the country." They therefore recommended that public work should be undertaken during the winter as far as possible, and. that,
in regulating such work, a short working-day with a large number of workers would be preferable to a long working-day with a small number employed. A system of emergency relief was
also favoured by the Conference, and it was suggested that the matter of meeting the expenditure
should be dealt with in the same manner as in previous schemes, 50 per cent, of the cost to be
borne by the municipal authorities, 25 per cent, by the Dominion, and 25 per cent, by the Provincial Governments.
There were, at different times during the Conference, reminder echoes of the old controversy
as to who is responsible for relieving the unemployed. For the Dominion. Mr. Murdock, Minister of Labour, disclaimed responsibility, but this opinion did not find an echo in some of the
subsequent remarks of other speakers, and it seemed as if a fairly reasonable compromise was
effected in the terms of the resolutions passed.
The Question of Immigration.
Some of the Eastern representatives at the Conference were in. favour of making the check
upon immigration more strigent than at present. The question presents a difficult problem.
Every one agrees that we want the Dominion to become more of a settled country than it is,
especially our great areas in the West, and that we can do with a large number of suitable
people who will go on the land and develop the country. The trouble has been, however, that
many immigrants who have come here to take up land or work on farms have found conditions
a little different from what they had imagined, have become discouraged, and have left the land to go into the big towns, where there are already, at certain seasons of the year, too many
applicants for the work available. It is this state of things which many in the Conference
wished to prevent, though there were others who, recognizing how largely the country has been
built up by immigration, were very unwilling to do anything to interfere with its further development in the same way.
The " Hours of Work Act."
One of the most far-reaching enactments on the Statute Book of the Province, so far as
labour interests are concerned, is the " Hours of Work Act," which, having received the approval
of the Legislature in December, 1923, comes into force on January 1st, 1925. The operation of
the Act does not therefore belong to the period covered by this report, but some amount of
preparatory work was done during 1924, with a view to establishing the administration of the
Act upon a sound footing. An important part in the work of administration devolves upon the
Board of Adjustment, consisting of three members, with the Deputy Minister of Labour as
Chairman. The other members, -who were appointed early in November, are Mr. T. F. Paterson,
of Vancouver, and Mr. F. V. Foster, of Smithers. Mr. Paterson being especially acquainted with
the employers' side and Mr. Foster with the workers' side of the question.
The members of the Board, after surveying the question in its general aspect, undertook,
in the latter part of November, a tour in the outlying portions of the Province, with the object
of studying the application of the Act to local industries. Public meetings were held at Nelson,
Cranbrook, Golden, Kamloops, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Vancouver, and Victoria, and at
each of these places representations were made by persons interested in the operation of the
|Act from various angles. A lengthy hearing was given to the views of both employers and
employed, and a large amount of useful information was collected regarding the conditions under
which the industries of the Province are carried on in the various localities. This proved of
great assistance to the Board when they came later to the duty imposed upon them by the Act,
of making regulations as to the manner in which regular hours may be varied, and overtime
permitted or limited. The task of enforcing such regulations, however, did not come within
the period covered by the present report.
The " Industrial Disputes Investigation Act."
A decision which may have an important bearing upon the method of settling industrial
disputes in this Province, as in other parts of Canada, has been given by the Privy Council, the
unanimous ruling of five judges being stated, in a judgment of some length, by Lord Haldane,
formerly Lord Chancellor in the Labour Government of Great Britain. The judgment was
given in a case which raised directly the question of the validity of the " Industrial Disputes
Investigation Act " of 1907. The terms of this measure, which had been on the Statute Books
of the Dominion for nearly eighteen years, are too well known to require recapitulation. They
have been the means of settling a large number of industrial disputes, and decisions of Boards
appointed under the Act were always regarded as legally binding until the authority of the
Act was questioned in a dispute which occurred in Ontario last year.
The effect of the Privy Council's decision is that the Act deals with matters which were
reserved by the British North America Act as being within the competence of the Provincial
Legislatures, as distinct from the' Dominion Parliament, and that the latter exceeded its powers
in passing such a measure. There is a consensus of opinion that the Act should not be allowed
to fall into abeyance, and that its main provisions should, in some form or other, be re-enacted.
At the time of writing an amending Bill is before the House at Ottawa, to provide legislation
along the old lines within the limits of what may be enacted by the Dominion Parliament. If
this is passed into law, however, there will still be left a gap, which it will be within the discretion of Provincial Legislatures to fill. The position at present is a very interesting one,
which will no doubt be considered in all its bearings by all the parties affected.
Employment of Disabled War Veterans.
From time to time since the conclusion of the war, the question has presented itself for
consideration as to whether the matter of finding employment for disabled ex-service men should
be the care of the Government Employment Service or of the Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment
Board. Until recently this duty was discharged by special officials of the S.C.R., with whom
the staff of the Employment Service had frequently co-operated.   During the past year, however, 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 9
the Ministers of Labour of the Dominion and the Province arrived at an agreement, under
which the work is now being performed by the Employment Service under the control of Provincial officials, the Dominion Government providing additions to the staff in Vancouver and
Victoria, so that the new arrangement does not entail any additional expense upon the Province.
The agreement came into effect on December 1st, and the results of the first month's working
of it are considered encouraging.
New Legislation.
In the last session of the Provincial Legislature several new laws were passed touching
upon subjects of special interest to working men and women.
The "Barbers Act" will apply to cities, towns, and villages with a population of 750 or
more persons. It requires that all barbers shall be registered members of the Barbers' Association of British Columbia. There will be a Board elected by the members of the Association,
which will hold examinations of persons desiring to be registered, with special reference to the
applicant's ability as a barber and his knowledge of sanitary regulations in the conduct of barbershops, the antiseptic preparation and sterilization of tools and appliances, and the protection of
the public from disease. Penalties are provided for against any person not holding a certificate
of registration who engages in the business of barbering.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act Amendment Act."—This Act of 1924 amends the
older Act by increasing the stringency of the provisions as to penalties against persons convicted
of violation of the Act. The limits of the fine to be imposed are increased from " not less than
twenty-five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars " to " not less than one hundred nor more
than five hundred dollars."
" Mothers' Pensions Act Amendment Act."—This Act amended the Act originally passed in
1920, in various particulars. Among those who had been entitled to the benefits of the Act was
" a widow whose husband at the time of his death was domiciled in the Province." This was
changed so as to specify " a widow whose husband was domiciled in this Province at the time
of the appearance of the disability which caused his death." Another change was that, where
a woman claims a pension on the ground of her husband's disability, the qualifying words are
added: " and whose disability may reasonably be expected to continue for at least one year."
A wife claiming a pension as one who has been deserted by her husband must now, in order to
have her application granted, have been " deserted for at least two years by a husband domiciled
in the Province at the time of the desertion, but who does not reside nor own property therein
at the date of her application for an allowance." Under further provisions, a mother drawing
a pension may be one possessing personal property not exceeding $500 in value, or real property
which she uses as a home not exceeding $1,500 in assessed value over and above the encumbrances thereon. Where a mother pensioner has died leaving children under the age of 16, the
proper allowance may be paid to a grandmother, aunt, or elder sister who assumes care and
responsibility for them. The Board administering the Act, which has hitherto consisted of the
members of the Workmen's Compensation Board, lis in future to include " one other member,
who shall be a woman."
" Electrical Energy Inspection Act Amendment Act."—This Act, passed in the 1924 Session,
added three clauses to the previous Act, the effect being to place its administration under the
Workmen's Compensation Board, instead of the Minister of Public Works as heretofore. It
was also provided that all inspectors, clerks, and employees engaged in the administration of
the Act shall be deemed to be members, of the Civil Service.
" Boiler Inspection Act Amendment Act."—The work of Boiler Inspection is also placed
under the supervision of the Workmen's Compensation Board, instead of the Minister of Public
Works, by this Act of 1924. There is also a new provision, to the effect that no person shall
paint or operate any steam-engine or fly-wheel which has been subjected to or damaged by fire,
unless the same has been first inspected by an Inspector and approved by him for operation, as
the case may be. G 10 Department op Labour. 1925
STATISTICS OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIES.
The returns received by the Department of Labour from industrial employers throughout
the Province have been summarized in the tables which complete this section of the report, and,
as has been the practice in former years, it is thought that a few observations may usefully be
offered here in relation to them. Each employer is asked to make in his return a statement as
to his total pay-roll for the year, the rates of wages paid, the nationality, hours of labour, and
fluctuations of employment of those in his employ during the previous year. The publication of
the information thus secured has been appreciated both by employers and employed, and has
been of service to the public, forming, as it does, a record of progress of industrial development
in the Province from one year to another.
A Record Number of.Returns.
In the matter of promptitude in responding to the Department's request for these returns
there is still much to be desired. The forms are sent out to employers at the beginning of the
year, and the period of one month is given for them to be filled in and returned; but many
employers do not meet the requirements of the " Department of Labour Act " in this respect until
a second, or even in some cases a third, application has been forwarded to them. The Department has been reluctant to take extreme measures in such cases, but we feel that reasonable
latitude has been exceeded by some, and the inevitable result has been delay in the preparation
and publication of these statistics, for which there have been many requests from persons
interested in the industries of the Province. With this reservation, it is a pleasure to state
that employers generally have made a more complete return than in any previous year since
these statistics were first collected. The number of returns received for 1924 is 3,566, which
compares favourably with the total of 3,375 received for 1923. In former years the totals were:
1918,1,047; 1919,1,207; 1920,1,869; 1921,2,275; 1922,2,809. This increase from year to year
indicates, partly, the greater success of the Department in securing a more complete return,
and partly, no doubt, the larger number of industrial establishments in the Province. Every
effort is made by the Department to keep our industrial list up to date by the prompt removal of
the names of defunct firms and the addition of new ones, and the fact that the list shows, on the
balance, an increase each year gives a favourable reading of the industrial barometer.
Increase in the Annual Pay-roll.
No change has been made in the form of the questionnaire sent out this year. Suggestions
are made from time to time for enlarging its scope, and attention has been called to the fact that
certain inquiries made by other Governments are more exhaustive in character than our own.
It has been thought, however, that the inquiry made by this Department deals with the main
essentials, and that the demands which it makes upon the clerical staff of employing firms, coming
as they do only once a year, are not too heavy. The returns are again arranged under twenty-
five heads, and no change in their grouping has been made from last year. It is possible, therefore, to make a very just comparison between the figures for 1924 and those for 1923.
The total amount paid out by the 3,566 firms last year in salaries and wages was
$107,798,771.36. In the previous year the sum of $106,796,958.96 was paid out by 3,375 firms,
and in 1922 there were 2,809 firms making returns, whose salary and wage payments amounted
to $86,192,190.73. The amount paid to officers, superintendents, and managers last year was
$9,749,110.17, which represents an increase, as compared with the corresponding total for 1923,
of more than 10 per cent. For clerks, stenographers, and salesmen the amount paid was
$8,934,730.81, which, compared with $8,329,069.21 in 1923, is an increase of over 7 per cent.
However, the amount paid to wage-earners, $89,114,930.38, is $515,1S5.73 less than the previous
year's, the decrease being equal to about y2 per cent. This is only partially explained by the
fact that the two principal industries which give a lower aggregate payment for the year,
lumbering and coal-mining, are those which normally make the largest proportionate payment
to wage-earners. In nearly all the other classes of industry the percentage of payment for
managerial and clerical help is higher than last year's.
How the Wage-list is divided.
Of the total salary and wage payments for 1924, officers, superintendents, and managers
received 9.04 per cent., clerks, stenographers, and salesmen 8.29 per cent., and wage-earners 15 Geo. 5 Report op the Deputy Minister. G 11
received 82.67 per cent. Going back for the previous years, we find that the percentage for
wage-earners in 1921 was 80 per cent, in 1922 82.75 per cent., and in 1923 it was 83.93 per cent.
In considering these proportions, allowance should perhaps be made for the fact that returns
are received relating to a large number of small businesses, where the payments made to the
proprietors or partners are entered as being made for managerial or clerical help, although the
work performed is largely that of the skilled mechanic or tradesman.
Estimating the Aggregate Figures.
In the " Summary of all Tables " given on the concluding page of this section of the report
a change in the arrangement will be noted by any one making a comparison with the summaries
for previous years. It will have been clear to those making an examination of our previous
reports that the tables printed did not purport to give an exhaustive statement of the industrial
pay-roll of the Province, but simply the pay-roll of those employers making returns to this
Department. In the last year or two, however, there has become evident a desire for more complete
information along this line. So far as we are aware, no authority is in a position to give exact
figures as to the total of our industrial salaries and wages. Our own position is that, outside
the returns which come in to this Department, any further totals must be, with ourselves as
with others, largely a matter of conjecture, and that it is better to accompany our estimates by a
statement of the process by which they are arrived at.
After our final tabulation of the 3,566 returns giving a total pay-roll of $107,798,771.36, a
number of late returns were received before this report went to press, with an additional pay-roll
of $638,544.84. In the industries coming within the scope of our inquiry there still are a number
of firms who have not sent in any returns, but who are known to have been in business during
the past year. In going through the list of these we have endeavoured to make a reasonable
estimate of their probable pay-roll, and the figure at which we arrive by this process is, approximately, $8,000,000. This gives a total of $116,437,316.20 for salaries and wages in the purely
industrial operations embraced by our inquiry.
A Grand Total of over $151,000,000.
Turning to industries outside our inquiry, we may consider, first a group of semi-industrial
occupations for which the general terms of our questionnaire have not been considered suitable.
These include industrial workers employed by wholesale and retail firms, and whose wages are
estimated to amount to $3,000,000; delivery, cartage, teaming, and warehousing, $1,730,000;
butchers, $950,000 ; moving-picture operators, $147,000; coal and wood yards, $604,000; and auto
transportation, $169,000. The transcontinental railway systems and their industrial adjuncts,
for which also our questionnaire is not suitable, have a pay-roll estimated at $20,000,000. A large
amount of industrial and semi-industrial work is also done by employees of the Dominion and
Provincial Governments, and for this we have allowed .a sum of $5,000,000; and miscellaneous
payments for industrial work, which cannot he included under any particular head, may be set
down at $3,000,000. These figures bring our estimate for the total industrial pay-roll of the
Province up to $151,037,316.20.
Proportionate Figures for each Area.
As the returns were received from employers this year, they were carefully segregated
according to. the area in which the respective firms were carrying on their operations, and we
have also endeavoured to make an equitable division of the figures given in the preceding
paragraphs. The result of these calculations shows that 36.05 per cent, of our industrial
pay-roll is located in Greater Vancouver, which for this purpose has been taken to include the
City of Vancouver, North Vancouver, South Vancouver, West Vancouver, Point Grey, and
Burnaby. The rest of the Mainland, with which also we have grouped the Queen Charlottes
and the Northern Islands, claims 45.02 per cent., and Vancouver Island, taking in also the Gulf
Islands, has 18.93 per cent. In accordance with these divisions, the estimated industrial pay-roll
of the Province is made up as follows:—
Greater Vancouver   $ 54,449,747 95
Rest of Mainland       67,992,347 26
Vancouver Island       28,595,220 99
..,,..,   - To^al  .-- - • , $151,037,316 20 G 12 Department op Labour. 1925
A Decline in the Lumbering Group.
Of the twenty-five groups in which the industries of the Province are divided, sixteen show
an increased pay-roll as compared with 1923, and nine a decrease. Chief among the latter is the
important industry of lumbering. This industry enjoyed a spell of marked prosperity in 1923
and the early part of 1924, but in the month of May it was struck by a sudden wave of
depression, the results of which are only now gradually disappearing. This depression was
mainly attributable to the falling-off in the demand from the Orient after the exceptional requirements caused by rebuilding in the area devastated by the earthquake in Japan had been satisfied.
When this demand was in full tide, production in this Province and in the Pacific Coast States
had been greatly stimulated, and had been continued at the enhanced rate for some time longer
than was necessary, thus causing an accumulation of unsold lumber and a glutted market. A
number of camps and mills were closed, or were operated for a time with less than a normal
crew, and during the summer months the unusual condition was presented of some thousands
of lumber-workers in the Province being thrown out of employment, though some who were
prepared to accept other occupations did not long remain unemployed. Usually the months of
June, July, and August form the busiest period in the lumber industry, but last year there was
a sharp decline in employment during June and July, and though an improvement was witnessed
later no complete recovery was made in the remainder of the year. According to figures presented
by the 904 lumber firms sending in returns, the number of lumber-workers ranged from 19,946
in December to a maximum of 25,925 in May, whereas in 1923 there were 20,382 employed by
922 firms in January, the smallest month for employment, gradually increasing to the peak of
27,567 in June. These figures will explain why the pay-roll for the lumbering industry showed a
decline of nearly $4,000,000 in 1924 as compared with 1923. In the former year over 33 per
cent, of industrial wages in the Province were paid to lumber-workers, but in 1924 the proportion
fell to 29 per cent.
Economic Result of the Coal Strike.
The reduction by nearly $2,000,000 of the pay-roll in the coal-mining industry was caused
chiefly by the strike in the Crow's Nest area, the mines, being virtually closed down for more than
half the year. It is encouraging to hear, however, that since the final settlement of the dispute,
in December last, production at the mines has been on a bigger scale than before. Coal-mining
on Vancouver Island experienced rather a slackened demand for its product, and in the month
of September industrial trouble was also threatened here, but the crisis was safely passed.
A number of other industries show a slightly decreased return as compared with 1923, but there
does not appear to be any particular reason for these decreases, except that, in the case of pulp
and paper manufacturing, some financial reconstruction was understood to be going on in relation
to one of the principal companies. The other industries in question were garment-making,
manufacturing of jewellery, manufacturing leather and fur goods, oil-refining, paint-manufacture,
and printing and publishing.
Industries which show an Advance.
As previously stated, sixteen of the twenty-five industrial groups increased their pay-roll
during 1924, and these increases were more than sufficient to offset the reductions recorded by
the basic industries of lumbering and coal-mining. An advance of more than a million and a
half was made in the metal trades, various branches of this industrial group, such as machine-
shops, blacksmithing, boiler-making, and garages, all taking a step forward. Metal-mining
followed up the notable gain of over two millions in 1923 by adding another million to its
pay-roil in 1924, and present indications are very favourable for a further gain in the coming
year. The progress made in 1924 was mainly in the Southern Interior, but more recently certain
prospects in the northern part of the Province have been receiving a larger amount of attention.
Increase in Coast Shipping.
The industry of Coast shipping moves forward from year to year with rapid strides. Last
year the gain in its pay-roll was nearly a million and a half, notwithstanding the fact that
longshoring and stevedoring activities fell off somewhat owing to smaller shipments of wheat
and lumber. It would appear that a larger number of small craft are entering the coastal
carrying trades and are finding business to be done, while important additions are shortly being
made to the Coast fleets of some of the larger companies.    There was also an increased amount 15 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
G 13
of building and contracting going on in the Province, as is shown by the addition of a million
and a quarter to the pay-roll of the contracting group. Another good feature is that, although
lumbering, as a whole, had a quieter year, the manufacture of lumber products, such as boxes,
sashes and doors, and ply-wood, showed a better record than in 1923.
The smelters of the Province also paid out nearly half a million more in wages, and the
public utilities group were nearly $400,000 ahead, while in the building and repairing of ships
and boats our employers picked up enough additional business to call for the payment to their
wage-earners of an extra quarter of a million.
Comparative Group Pay-rolls.
For the purpose of comparing the pay-roll in the various industries for the past two years
the following table has been prepared:—
Industry.
1922.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1923.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1924.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining ,	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals..	
Food products	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Manufacturing jewellers'...	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and far goods
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining 	
Miscellaneous	
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways, etc	
Manufacturing wood (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
23
53
9
18
80
716
20
255
55
30
15
51
44
667
33o
126
55
5
9
S9
9
31
3
62
51
446.
1,274
94
9,470
4,068
9,783.
484
6,584
765
397,
246,
1,022,
412,
23,827,
3,634
3,700
1,262,
542
184
2,375
3,639
946
2,932
7,048
1,045
424 81
969 24
319 78
551 72
735 63
516 69
335 84
844 60
,692 63
,416-30
179 10
161 39
798 23
204 89
,162 75
,007 59
,027 58
,267 58
969 28
803 98
680 95
,530 73
,768 19
906 65
914 69
26
55
7
20
102
797
22
309
70
38
14
61
46
922
378
161
54
7
13
99
11
30
4
73
I      564
1,192
61
9,460
5,079
11,000
481
7,141
753
470,
263,
1,117,
430,
35,268,
3,970,
6,173,
1,217
558,
226
2,690,
4,819
1,176
3,782
7,406
1,478
388 96
471 64
459 91
416 63
,427 44
574 14
796 19
380 55
,114 63
463 89
878 84
436 19
515 84
880 16
987 58
,426 26
,799 49
,634 77
589 17
755 12
,791 77
806 25
253 88
,183 20
,536 43
7
22
131
855
24
331
62
40
13
64
46
904
405
162
72
5
11
96
10
30
3
69
59
f      574
1,251
65
7,599
6,480
12,270
790
7,760
692
503
254,
1,154,
420,
31,339,
5,646,
7,102
1,463
492
226
2,636
3,981
1,436
4,213
7,794
1,645
,933 86
,102 23
,159 24
,643 78
,990 92
,425 17
,926 46
,664 62
,802 47
,972 11
729 38
546 69
517 74
445 11
,298 18
374 33
,132 65
,761 90
,368 42
,049 66
,623 11
,102 46
,469 30
,865 55
,866 82
2,809
$86,192,190  73
3,375   $106,796,958 96    3,566   $107,798,771  36
Less Fluctuation of Employment.
The tables which give the average number of wage-earners for each month afford a good
indication of the amount of fluctuation in employment during the year. With many of the most
important industrial undertakings in the Province it is impossible, or very difficult, to continue
their operations steadily all the year round, and every year our figures show a larger volume of
employment in the summer than in the winter months. From the worker's point of view this
is an undesirable feature of our industrial organization, and it is one also which in some years
has caused much anxiety from a general social and economic view-point. Last year, however,
the degree of fluctuation was less than usual. In the month of January the 3,566 firms sending
in returns had 58,677 men in their employ, and four months later, in May, the number had
increased to 68,443. For the next five months there was little change, and then came a sharp
decline from 67,967 in October to 60,232 in December. These figures present a contrast with
those for 1923, when the numbers varied from 55,335 in January to 71,274 in August, the variation
between high and low being reduced from 16,000 in 1923 to 10,000 in 1924. This result, however,
was due not so much to any constructive change in the organization of industry as to the
abnormal conditions already noted, which prevailed in the lumbering and coal-mining industries
during the summer of 1924. G 14 Department of Labour. 1925
Larger Percentage of White Workers.
The countries of origin of our industrial workers are shown in the tables headed " Nationality
of Employees." From the figures here given the relative percentages of the different races have
been carefully worked out. The results show that the slight changes from year to year, which
have been commented upon in our annual reports for several years past, were continued and
even accentuated during 1924. In other words, the proportion of natives of Canada and Great
Britain engaged in our various industries was higher in 1924 than in any previous year since
we first began the compilation of these figures, and the proportions, not only of natives of Asiatic
countries but also of Continental Europe, were correspondingly reduced. Last year 36.42 per
cent, of our industrial workers were native Canadians, and 31.42 per cent, were of British birth,
which figures compare with 34.55 per cent, of Canadians and 30.29 per cent, of British in 1923.
If we add to these the relatively small number of natives of the United States and Australia, we
find that 72.33 per cent, of our workers were natives of English-speaking countries, compared
with 69.61 per cent, in 1923. Grouping together the Chinese, Hindus, and Japanese, we arrive at
a proportion of 11.97 per cent, of the total who are natives of Asiatic countries, as against 13.85
per cent, in the previous year.
Lower Proportion of Orientals.
This percentage of 11.97 of Oriental workers is decidedly the smallest for any recent year.
In 1918 20.37 per cent, of our industrial workers were of Asiatic origin. In the following year
they fell to 18.35 per cent., and in later years the percentage was 16.64 in 1920, 14.45 in 1921,
14.61 in 1922, 13.85 in 1923, and now 11.97. In regard to the fall between the last two years,
it is again to be observed that lumbering, which employs a larger number of Orientals than any
other industry, had fewer employees in 1924 than in 1923.
The balance of our workers are mostly from Continental Europe, their percentage being
14.56, compared with 15.45 in 1923. This percentage may also have been affected by the condition
of the lumbering industry, which draws largely upon the Scandinavian immigrant for its labour.
However, the fact that immigratiou generally has been at a very much reduced rate in recent
years as compared with the years before the war will no doubt make it increasingly necessary
for employers to utilize the services of native Canadians as they arrive at the industrial age,
and of natives of Great Britain who came out with their parents and have grown up in this
country. So far as these comparisons throw a light upon the probable course of racial development in this Province, they do not afford much scope for the arguments of the pessimist.
Dividing our industrial workers into groups as above referred to, the proportions for the
last two years are as follows:—
1923. 1924.
Per Cent. Per Cent.
Natives of English-speaking countries :     69.61 72.33
Natives of Continental Europe     15.45 14.56
Natives of Asiatic countries     13.85 11.97
From other countries, or nationality not stated •.       1.09 1.14
Totals  100.00 100.00
Taking each of the industrial groups, our returns show more workers of Canadian than of
British birth in lumbering, breweries, explosives and chemicals, manufacture of food products,
manufacturing jewellery, metal trades, metal-mining, paint-manufacturing, printing and publishing, pulp and paper mills, and manufacture of wood (N.E.S.). The industries in which natives
of Great Britain outnumber the native Canadians are builders' materials, etc., coal-mining, Coast
shipping, contracting, garment-making, house-furnishing, laundries, cleaning and dyeing, manufacturing leather and fur goods, oil-refining, ship-building, smelting, the public utilities, and the
miscellaneous group.
Where Asiatics are employed.
More than half of our industrial workers of the Oriental races are engaged in the lumbering
industry, but, as compared with 1923, there was a lower percentage of Asiatics employed in this
group. Thus in the logging camps 6.70 per cent, of the workers employed were Orientals, compared with 7.96 per cent, in the previous year. On logging-railways the percentage fell from
14.95 in 1923 to 14.12 in 1924; in planing-mills from 38.04 to 37.89; in sawmills from 33.95 to
33.53;   and in shingle-mills from 56.13 to 51.66.    Taking the general totals for the whole of the 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 15
lumbering industry, the percentage for the two years showed a fall from 22.34 to 21.78. In other
industries which employ an appreciable number of Orientals the proportion showed a decline, as
in coal-mining from 11.79 to 10.75 per cent., in fish-canneries from 43.83 to 31,38 per cent., and in
pulp and paper mills from 30.14 to 22.32 per cent.
Increase in the Average Wage.
The tables relating to the classified weekly wage-rates of our industrial workers do not call
for lengthy comment. On the whole, the wages paid during 1924 were slightly higher than those
in 1923, an average increase being shown in fourteen groups and an average decrease in eleven.
In this calculation only male workers over 18 years of age are considered, as the wages of female
workers are dealt, with in another section of this report. This is the second successive year in
which the average wages paid have shown an increase. From the high-water mark of 1920 there
was a steep fall in 1921, a further slight decline in 1922, but the next year witnessed a rise, and
now we have another increase, the average industrial wage in the Province having been $1.10 a
week higher in 1924 than in 1922.
The weekly increases and decreases are shown in the following table:—
Increase. Decrease.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing  $0.75 Breweries  $0.04
Coast shipping  :  1.23 Builders' materials  73
Explosives, chemicals, etc 23 Coal-mining    1.23
Food products, manufacture of  33 Contracting    33
House-furnishing    79 Garment-making     1.47
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing  63 Manufacturing jewellery   1.39
Lumber industries  23 Manufacturing leather and fur goods..    .29
Miscellaneous trades and industries 02 Metal trades  1.67
Oil-refining 35 Metal-mining 37
Paint-manufacturing  1.56 Pulp and paper manufacturing 21
Printing and publishing   1.43 Manufacturing of wood (N.E.S.) 78
Ship-building  91
Smelting  98
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc.    .42
Better Demand for the Highly* Skilled.
The year 1924 did not witness any prominent changes in wage-rates, and the difference
between the average pay in particular industries in the last two years is comparatively small,
with a bias in the direction of higher remuneration. There is, however, one interesting feature
brought out by a comparison between the tables of classified weekly wage-rates for the two
years. In the low-paid classes of adult male labour, the men receiving less than $18 a week, the
total is 1,073 more than in 1923. In the classes receiving what might be called medium rates of
pay, between $18 and $30 a week, the total is 3,654 lower, but there was again an increase of
2,954 in the classes of highly-paid labour with weekly wages of $30 and upwards. The lessened
activity in the lumbering industries would partly account for the decreases in the middle class,
while the increased pay-roll in such industries as Coast shipping, smelting, and the building trades
would bring in more employees of the highly-paid class. The general conclusion to be drawn
from these figures is that there was less demand last year for the common labourer or semi-skilled
worker receiving from $3 to $5 a day and a better field for the highly-qualified skilled worker
receiving upwards of $5 a day. At the opposite end of the scale, however, we have a movement,
quite perceptible though not so marked as the other two, to increase the proportion of unskilled
workers receiving less than $3 a day.
The changes in the prevailing industrial wages in the Province during the past seven years
are shown in the diagram on the following page.
Wage-bates Comparison with Previous Years.
For the purpose of comparison with the wages in previous years, the average wage of adult
males in each industry has been worked out on the basis of the classified weekly wage-rate. The
plan adopted has been the same as in previous years. Employers were asked in our questionnaire
to give the number of wage-earners within specified limits, but were not asked to give exact
figures; thus the H$\2 wage-earners receiving "$24 to $24.99 weekly" would no doubt include
some receiving $24, some $24.25, some $24.50, some $24.75, etc.;  while the 12,988 workers receiving G 16
Department of Labour.
1925
Weekly Percentage
Wages. Employees.
Under   $15 00  2.64%
$15 to    19 99.. 14.10%
20 to    24 99 25.78%
25 to    29 99 19.19%
30 to    34 99. 15.94%
35 to    39 99 13.71%
40 to    44 99  4.84%
45 to    49 99  1.97%
50 and over     1.83%
Under   $15 00  2.49%
$15 to    19 99 10.19%
20 to    24 99 23.69%
25 to    29 99.. 21.64%
30 to    34 99 16.74%
35 to    39 99 15.13%
40 to    44 99  5.23%
45 to    49 99  2.60%
50 and over    2.29<«,
Under   $15 00  0.79%
$15 to    19 99  4.85%
20 to    24 99 14.29%
25 to    29 99... 23.80%
30 to    34 99 19.98%
35 to    39 99 17.89%
40 to    44 99  9.24',
45 to    49 99  4.5°
50 and over   4.58%
Under   $15 00    4.35%
$15 to    19 99 13.14%
20 to    24 99 24.62%
25 to    29  99... 22.52%
30 to    34 99... 15.06%
35 to    39 99 11.52%
40 to    44 99  4.87%
45 to    49 99...  2.06%
50 and over   1.86%
Under  $15 00  4.64%
$15  to     19   99 16.94%
20 to    24 99 25.48%
25 to    29 99 20.15%
30 to    34 99 13.20%
35 to    39 99  9.69%
40 to    44 99   4.37%
45 to    49 99   2.24%
50 and over   3.29%
Under   $15 00   2.91%
$15 to    19  99 13.66%
20 to    24 99  28.01%
25 to    29 99  19.90%
30 to    34 99 14.38%
35 to    39 99 10.23%
40 to    44 99  4.79%
45 to    49 99  2.40%
50 and over   3.72%
Under   $15 00...  3.65%
$15 to    19 99 13.38%
20 to    24 99 25.64%
25 to    29 99 18.63%
30 to    34 99 14.67%
35 to    39 99 12.02%
40 to    44 99  5.33%
45 to    49 99  2.72%
50 and over   3.96%
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o 15 Geo. 5
Eeport op the Deputy Minister.
G 17
$30 to $34.99 weekly would be made up, in proportions which cannot be determined, of those
receiving $30, $31, $32, $33, $34, etc. For the purpose of making an average it has been assumed,
where steps of $1 are given in our table, that " $24 to $24.99," for example, meant 24.50; and,
where steps of $5 are given, that " $30 to $34.99," for example, meant $32. Lest these assumptions should be thought to err on the side of generosity, " $50 and over " was taken in all cases
to mean $50 only.
As the same method of computation has been adopted for each of the past four years, the
comparisons in the following table may be taken as entirely fair:—
Average Full Week's Wage in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1EU9-20.
I
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
$28 27
31 65
32 48
37 64
26 81
31 61
31 53
29 72
36 14
28 79
34 20
28 42
28 81
32 47
31 14
35 96
28 24
28 52
27 23
35 97
35 18
28 11
36 44
32 81
27 46
$28 67
28 82
23 97
32 83
28 45
28 82
26 34
25 67
29 38
26 00
33 54
27 32
29 85
24 70
30 33
32 00
28 40
35 73
24 14
36 30
25 41
29 87
31 98
29 55
23 48
$26 62
25 61
25 30
35 96
25 43
28 06
26 13
27 39
27 28
24 23
30 90
26 11
26 67
25 29
27 73
30 97
25 91
32 63
21 79
36 23
25 88
25 55
29 91
30 41
23 12
$26 55
26 83
23 32
36 96
28 36
28 31
26 63
25 61
29 85
24 74
32 65
25 07
26 73
25 92
28 04
32 21
25 83
32 71
23 13
38 09
27 90
25 88
34 16
29 42
23 33
$26 51
26 10
24 07
35 73
29 59
27 98
26 86
25 94
28 38
25 53
31 26
25 70
26 44
26 15
26 37
31 84
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
25 85
33 06
24 69
39 52
27 69
26 79
Smelting ___  —	
35 14
29 S4
Manufacture of wood (N.E.S.) — -.- -	
22 55
The averages are calculated from figures supplied by each firm for the " week of employment
of the greatest number," and represent the pay for a full week's work. Actual weekly earnings
in many cases at certain periods of the year would be lower owing to stoppages or broken
time. On the other hand, many employees would receive larger amounts in periods when overtime was being worked.
By pooling the figures for all the above industries, and taking into account the respective
numbers employed in them, we arrive at the following:—
Average Industrial Weekly Wage of all Adult Male Wage-earners,
as computed from Returns.
1918        $27 97
1919     - - - -     29  11
1920    31 51
1921  27 62
1922      27  29
1923  28 05
1924  28 39
A Reduction in Wobking-houks.
An average of 50.59 working-hours a week is shown by our statistics relating to hours of
work, the hours in various industries ranging from 43.65 in the manufacture of jewellery to
56.76 in Coast shipping. As to the latter, it should be said that it is not always easy to apply a
standard for estimating the hours of work, as there are often times when a man is not actually
engaged in the duties of his occupation, though liable to be called upon for service. As compared
2 G 18 Department op Labour. 1925
with the previous year's general average, the working-week for 1924 shows a reduction of some
52 minutes. This, it may be mentioned, was before the coming into operation of the " Hours of
Work Act," but very probably there was a desire on the part of many employers to bring their
working-hours into harmony with the spirit of the Act before it came into force.
The following table shows the hours of work prevailing in the various industries:—
Average Weekly Working-hours in each Industry.
Industry. 1923. 1924.
Breweries  49.16 49.04
Builders' materials   53.22 51.51
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing  44.32 44.26
Coal-mining  47.84 47.95
Coast shipping   57.35 56.76
Contracting  48.98 47.72
Explosives,  chemicals,  etc  49.88 52.44
Pood products, manufacture of  53.90 53.67
Garment-making  45.34 45.12
House-furnishings, manufacture of   45.52 46.01
Jewellery, manufacture of   44.51 43.65
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing   48.29 46.66
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of  48.19 47.88
Lumbering—
Logging   50-86 50.79
Logging-railways  53.77 52.01
Mixed plants ,  55.07 64.01
Lumber-dealers     53.76 52.29
Planing-mills    55.10 55.5S
Saw-mills     55.46 54.05
Shingle-mills     55.49 55.44
Metal  trades   -  46.23 44.36
Metal-mining    .53.92 53.12
Miscellaneous trades and industries   49.38 48.79
Oil-refining   48.69 47.97
Paint-manufacturing   44.43 44.63
Printing and publishing  45.30 45.90
Pulp and paper manufacturing   54.72 53.24
Ship-building '.  44.07 44.73
Smelting - - - --•— - -  55.86 55.95
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc  47.31 46.12
Wood,  manufacture  of   (N.E.S.)  50.46 48.90
Firms with over $100,000 Pay-roll.
For the first time in 1921 we counted the number of industrial firms in the Province whose
returns to this Department showed a pay-roll of more than $100,000. In that year.there were
118 such firms. In the following year the number had increased to 164, and for 1923 there were
exactly 200. For the year 1924, now under review, there is a slight drop to 196, the lumbering
industry, which in 1923 had 100 such firms and in 1924 only 92, accounting for this set-back.
Twelve of these large firms had a pay-roll of over $1,000,000, two of them being over $2,000,000
and one over $3,000,000. No account has been taken in this list of any public authorities,
Dominion, Provincial, or municipal, or of the transcontinental railways, wholesale and retail
merchants, and deep-sea shipping. The list of 196 includes, in addition to the 92 lumbering firms,
14 engaged in manufacture of food products; 13 in Coast shipping; 11 in coal-mining; 9 in
metal-mining; 8 each in the metal trades and public utilities groups; 5 in ship-building; 4 each
in the production of builders' materials, printing and publishing, and pulp and paper manufacturing; 2 each in explosives and chemicals, laundries, cleaning and dyeing, miscellaneous trades
and industries, smelting, and the manufacture of wood (N.E.S.) ; and 1 each in breweries,
house-furnishing, manufacture of jewellery, oil-refining, and paint-manufacture. This list
indicates that the Province is firmly establishing its position in the industrial world. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 19
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following-, the general
heading's of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc.—Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, line, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing,— Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5, Coast Shipping.— Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. -Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy,'macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.— Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a-factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.—Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers ; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-rejining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 10. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.— Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.— This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene aud oxygen ; also
includes gasolene lighting and heating devices, (*,nd supply
of water to municipalities
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified,).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No.  1.
BREWERIES.
Returns covering 26 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $127,9i3 7«
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     87,200 IS
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    359,819 94
Total §574,933 86
Average
Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
April	
May	
276
249
261
400
326
344
5
6
6
6
5
4
July	
August
September .
November ..
December...
364
354
318
282
255
266
4
4
4
4
5
June	
5
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&, over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
2
2
1
1
7.00 to     7.99...
8 00 to     8.99...
1
9.00to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
1
4
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13 00 to   13.99...
6
5
1
8
1
14 00 to   14 99...
15.00 to .15.99...
3
4
1
1
1
18 00 to   18.99.
14
1
12
3
10
27
39
87
7
51
6
2
19 00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
1
21.00 to   21.99...
22 00 to   22.99.
23 00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99.
25.00 to   25.99...
1
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99.
28.00 to   28.99.
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99..
45
14
8
1
6
35.00 to   39.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over ...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
■Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.	
Germany...'	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
199
119
17
1
1
1
11
4
1
8
1
1
Females.
Weekly Hours ol Labour.
1 at 40 hours. 99 at 50 hours.
10 at 44     i. 9 at 51      M
11 at 45  i. 3 at 52  „
178 at 48  ii 3 at 54  n
14 at 49  m 22 at 56  .. G 20
Department of Labour.
192E
Table No.  2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 56 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Manag-ers $   168,313 97
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         59,023 60
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,023,764 66
Total 81,251,102 23
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 7 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 21,131 12
Cierks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       9,655 17
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     34,372 95
Total   ¥ 65,159 24
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
727
792
806
874
941
Month.
July	
August.   ..
September .
October.
November.
December..
Males.    Females.
867
876
850
779
Month.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
Males.   Females.
15
14
12
13
13
13
17
27
41
41
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August	
September .
October
November..
December .
14
14
14
16
15
17
32
38
41
42
44
41
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
S6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15 00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
2S.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to $ 6.!
7.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
18 Yrs.
& over.
3
1
1
17
128
55
6
33
8
25
131
91
27
90
70
30
97
25
45
115
75
77
22
16
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
S 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14 00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to* 6.!
to 7.:
to 8.!
to 9.!
to 10.!
to 11.1
to 12.!
to 13.!
to 14.1
to 15.1
to   16.!
to 18
to 19
to 20
to 21
to 22
to 23
to 24
to 25
to 26
to 27.
to 28.
to 29
to   34
to   39
ana over.
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
4
7
11
4
5
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country-...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated 	
277
378
25
1
1
84
8
1
47
40
1
324
1
2
1
1
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country.	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Females.
16
18
2
Weekly Hours of Labour.
1 at 30 hours.    271 at 48 hours.  97 at 60 hours.
1 at 38  n      104 at 50  „
46 at 40  ,.      395 at 54  n
107 at 44  ii       14 at 56  .,
2 at 46  ,,      38 at 59  m
29 at 63
1 at 65
4 at 84
Weekly Hours of Labour.
4 at 40 hours. 4 at 45 hours.
45 at 44     ,, 7 at 48     h 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 21
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 22 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers §   206,963 96
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       188,376 16
Wages-earners (including piece-workers)    7,204,303 66
Total -55 7,599,643 78
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Table No.  5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 131 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $    519,591 31
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        420,902 78
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,540,496 83
Total , 8 6,480,990 92
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January
February...
March	
April 	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
5,843
5,831
5,539
4,255
4,188
4,219
Month.
July	
August	
September
October....
November..
December..
Males.    Females.
4,281
4,313
4,262
5,002
4,931
5,287
Month.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
Males.   Females.
5,785
5,349
6,620
5,428
5,641
5,040
20
20
21
23
25
Mouth.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December
Males.
Females.
5,267
26
5,285
26
5,275
27
5,302
24
5,081
23
4,907
21
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
9 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
23.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
86.00 ....
to.$ 6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12 99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
to   16.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27 99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
18 Yrs.
& over.
191
17
62
38
57
41
98
117
26
32
34
58
106
91
151
269
306
205
873
829
762
340
1,273
Under
18 Yrs.
18
1
8
13
35
25
3
14
11
1
12
4
18 Yrs.     Under
&over.    18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
86.00..
to 8 6.!
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
.99.
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99 .
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99 .
and over..'
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
29
6
5
115
47
28
50
247
40
23
103
289
286
216
118
67
S8
96
59
•   356
152
63
101
407
28
768
1,760
579
126
2
4
1
2
1
3
9
3
2
3
5
1
2
230
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan   	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated.	
76
4
47
27
531
19
176
121
304
53
574
Females.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium ._	
France '    	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
H industan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
,643
1,831
153
21
4
24
39
12
2
238
15
45
336
58
6
106
13
14
1
Weekly Hours of Labour.
141 at 40 hours. 41 at 54 hours.
5,725 at 48     „ 43 at 56     ,.
69 at 53     „
Weekly Hours of Labour.
2 at 38 hours. 1 at 46 hours.       197 at 60 hours.
6 at 39      ii 1,585 at 48 " 6 at 65 n
1 at 40     ,i 26 at 50 .. 3 at 70 „
108 at 42      „ 1 at 52 .. 1,006 at 72 ,.
177 at 44      ,, 35 at 54 ., 210 at 84 .,
272 at 45      „ 519 at 56 ii G 22
Department of Labour.
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 855 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 1,256,639 48
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,250,182 63
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    9,763,603 06
Total .' $12,270,425 17
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 24 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $102,490 03
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    .... 175,072 30
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) ,  513,364 13
Total $790,926 46
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June ....
Males.   Females.
5,232
5,246
6,160
7,014
8,069
8,661
52
61
82
85
Month.
July	
August....
September
October .. .
November.
December..
Males.   Females
9,159
9,670
9,009
9,028
8,102
7,144
Month.
84
88
91
80
69
65
January  ,
February ,
March	
April. ..,
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
222
210
275
299
526
561
Month.       Males.    Females
July	
August	
September..
October....
November ..
December ..
555
592
557
449
353
268
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Appren-
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Vrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
4
16
8
4
4
16
9
31
55
47
52
104
176
125
558
342
1,176
1,398
481
1,569
332
406
657
187
116
1,489
1,991
684
320
393
5
14
5
11
17
38
8
88
24
18
6
9
14
4
1
1
1
1
11
12
10
7
4
14
4
10
2
6
3
2
7
$ 6.00 to? 6.99...
$ 6.00 to $ 6.99
7.00 to     7.99 .
1
1
7.00 to    7.99...
9 00 to    9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
2
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to  11.99...
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99 .
1
12.00 to   12.99...
3
13.00 to   13.99...
13.00 to   13.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99 .
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
46.00 to   49.99..
4
7
8
17
12
3
175
30
46
14
12
47
16
37
69
11
53
51
33
10
22
1
1
1
2
14.00 to   14.99...
1
5
12
7
2
1
2
1
17.00 to   17.99...
1
20.00 to   20.99.
1
1
1
21.00 to   21.99...
1
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99..
24 00 to   24.99...
1
25.00 to   25.99,..
1
1
1
28.00 to   28 99...
35.00 to   39.99  ..
Nationality of En
ployees.  .
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
6,634
5,824
379
19
23
60
304
19
75
776
176
41
39
10
30
34
97
50
40
185
162
10
1
5
Great Britain and I
United States of Ai
Great Britain and
United States of A
Australasia	
Belgium	
1
Italy	
2
Italy	
5
1
71
7
.?
117
Norway, Sweden, and Denm
2
Norway, Sweden, and Denu
Other European coi
5
1
Other European country	
China	
99
All other countrie
Nationality not st
Nationality not sta
ted .
w
17 at 30 hours
8 at 36     n
140 at 40     ii
27 at 41     „
4 at 42     n
5,906 at 44     ,,
33 at, 45     ii
37 at 46      ii
'eekly Li
10 a
4,292 s
16 l
206 <
13 .
74 !
1,757 <
1 <
ours of
t 47 hou
t 48     ii
t 49     ii
It 50     ..
it 51      n
it 52     ii
it 54     ii
t 55      ii
Lab
"S.
our
13
1
19
2
1
3 at 56 1
! at 59
1 at SO
1 at 63
I at 66
i at 70
! at 76
ours.
2 at 36 hours
51 at 44     n
31 at 48     m
53 at 50     .1
'eekly Ii
74 al
16 at
18 at
ours of
54 hour
56      ii
60      „
Lab
s.
our
l
18
3
it 63 ho
at 70     ,
it 84     ,
urs. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 23
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 331 Firms.
Table No. 9.
QARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 62 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  .8 1,065,015 65
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       890,868 42
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,804,780 55
Total 8 7,760,664 62
Average Number of Wage-earners,
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers 8102,624 80
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     91,998 10
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    498,179 57
Total $692,802 47
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January..
February.
March	
April	
May	
June   	
Males.   Females.
3,024
3,045
2,788
3,224
3,509
4,695
620
637
642
617
673
1,131
Month.
July	
August	
September .
October
November..
December ..
Males.   Females.
5,080
5,208
4,959
4,765
3,846
3,349
Month.
1,648
1,739
1,899
943
914
723
January..
February.
March....
April.
May	
June	
Males.    Females.
180
181
187
190
1S7
188
333
369
364
378
363
338
Month.
July	
August....
September
October ...
November.
December .
Males.   Females.
193
190
188
191
183
187
347
337
344
353
347
284
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00 ....
to* 6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
to 20.99.
to   21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over .
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
14
11
3
6
9
11
9
87
71
84
213
196
139
416
162
392
315
424
261
269
424
250
323
177
157
640
356
246
102
397
4
4
6
16
12
14
9
S2
11
16
25
3
2
5
1
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
5
1
3
9
22
60
28
193
131
316
466
137
129
214
57
71
46
43
24
25
82
12
19
21
25
31
6
3
20
5
30
12
46
19
21
23
9
6
11
4
1
2
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10,00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50 00
$6.00 ....
to 8 6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
1
2
10
6
2
2
7
4
1
5
12
4
6
4
3
5
2
10
2
1
16
43
12
2
16
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Y7rs.
1
11
3
16
40
69
45
29
24
37
12
15
6
7
4
4
33
1
10
8
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   ....
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
J apan	
All other countries    	
Nationality not stated	
1,548
i,143
170
17
11
23
40
14
21
312
30
30
816
61
490
129
11
Country of Origin.
1,530
692
82
1
3
32
12
8
32
7
63
66
4
Canada and Newfoundland   ....
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China    	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
59
99
5
1
1
2
8
14
5
28
1
10
186
195
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
30 at 30 hrs.
6 at 35 .,
7 at 36 „
49 at 37 „
5 at 38 ,.
5 at 39 „
61 at 40 ,i
3at42 i,
883 at 44 hrs.
35 at 45
27 at 46
61 at 47
2,441 at 48
246 at 49
680 at 50
105 at 51
40 at 52 hrs.
Ill at 53 „
1,070 at 54 n
45 at 55 ,,
84 at 56 ,i
7 at 58 ,i
1,345 at 60 „
5 at 63 ii
19 at 65 1
25 at 66
31 at 70
20 at 72
704 at 80
4 at 84
1 at 36 hours.
14 at 40
1 at 43
346 at 44
3 at 45
93 at 46
52 at 47 1
68 at 48
2 at 49
10 at 51
2 at 60 G 24
Department of Labour.
1925
Table No.  10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering J/O Firms.
Table No.  11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 13 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 88,041 51
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     46,721 75
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   369,208 85
Total $503,972 11
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 32,484 83
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc 110,707 20
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 111,537 35
Total 8254,729 38
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January .
February
March...
April
May	
June
Males.   Females.
298
304
300
309
313
31S
23
26
27
28
29
26
Month.       Males.   Females.
July 	
August...
September.
October   ..
November.
December..
307
318
317
314
314
308
Month.
29
26
29
28
28
29
January..
February.
March....
April.   . ..
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
81
81
83
81
Month.
July ..
August.
September
October...
November
December.
Males.   Females.
84
85
85
86
86
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
$6.00.
to
99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99,
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
1
1
3
8
4
12
14
16
13
17
5
3
23
3
IS
24
26
7
18
10
54
24
6
3
1
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
&over.    18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
IS Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under$6.00	
1
$ 6.00 to S 6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
2
4
8.00 to     8.99.
1
9 00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99.
11.00 to   11.99..
1
1
4
1
13 00 to   13.99..
1
1
2
1
4
3
2
1
2
4
4
2
1
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99
1
18 00 to   18 99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99
21.00 to   21.99..
1
22.00 to   22.99  .
23.00 to   23.99
25.00 to   25.99
27.00 to   27.99
1
1
3
14
12
4
1
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99..
40 00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
50.00 and over ..
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia ,	
Belgium	
France	
ILaly	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark .
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China.....  	
Hindustan   	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
117
208
3
1
Females.
Country of Origin.
16
15
1
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
50
46
Weekly Hours of Labour.
4 at 30 hours.
1 at 40     n
186 at 44     «
12 at 45     ,,
1 at 47     i.
23 at 48 hours,
10 at 49     H
116 at 50     i,
2 at 55      ii
Weekly Hours of Labour.
11 at 38 hours. 7 at 45 hours.
2 at 42      ii 5 at 50      ,,
71 at 44     „ 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 25
Table No. 12.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 61/ Firms.
rABi.E No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 46 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $100,263 81
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   153,756 19
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  900,526 69
Total $1,154,546 69
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 47,522 48
Cierks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     55,736 22
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  317,259 04
Total $420,517 74
Average Number oi Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
-Month.
January..
February.
March. . .
April..  ..
May	
June
Males.   Females.
383
387
389
394
414
409
724
711
713
714
714
770
Month.
July	
August ...
September
October ...
November.
December .
Males.    Females.
422
407
415
414
406
401
780
783
768
723
714
720
January..
February.
March	
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
247
245
242
242
240
238
70
62
66
67
66
66
July	
August...
September
October ..
November
December
Males.   Females.
231
219
200
228
251
247
66
69
73
74
72
72
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $ 6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
18
7
44
14
9
9
38
67
23
36
20
4
50
27
10
2
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
21
149
117
116
48
22
41
5
11
2
1
1
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
3
7
6
3
15
2
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to$ 6.!
.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99
23.99.
24.99
25.99.
26.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34 99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
1
2
2
2
4
2
5
6
3
1
4
6
15
4
15
10
20
23
2
51
17
2
1
4
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs-
& over.
2
3
13
3
3
6
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia      .
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Males.
147
236
Germany   	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
2
3
1
39
1
7
Country of Origin.
302
404
22
2
1
13
12
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America ..
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
23
8
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
104
148
12
1
10
10
1
1
35
39
2
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
3 at SO hours.
161 at 44 hoars.
1 at 51 hours.
51 at 44 hours.
101 at 48 hours.
4 at 54 hours.
2 at, 32     ,,
12 at 45     ,,
1 at 52     1,
3 at 45      1,
9 at 49      11
3 at 55     11
4 at 35      ,1
407 at 46     „
2 at 54     ,,
3 at 46     11
68 at 50      "
6 at 36      „
12 at 47     1,
2 at 55     ..
6 at 47      11
1 at 52      11
14 at 40      „
569 at 48     „
1 at 60     1,
9 at 43     „
3 at 50     „ G 26
Department op Labour.
1925
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 90-4 Firms.
Table No. 15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 465 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 2,019,432 01
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,096,323 50
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 28,223,689 60
Total $31,339,445 11
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,437,123 79
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       962,249 37
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,246,925 02
Total  $ 5,646,298 18
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June
Males.    Females.
19,978
22,440
24,713
25,574
25,925
23,843
67
70
83
100
98
93
Month.
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December..
Males.    Females.
21,755
22,034
22,414
22,504
22,092
19,946
Month.       Males.   Females.
86
90
88
89
102
January
February
Mareh.
April..
May ..
June .
2,418
2,549
2,648
4,607
2,760
2,;60
31
33
S3
35
35
Month.
•July	
August	
September .
October
November ..
December...
Males.   Females.
2,707
2,732
2,704
2,985
2,596
2,698
36
35
36
36
37
25
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
■ 11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
80.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $ 6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to   22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Males.
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
11
54
124
279
422
451
919
1,067
1,033
1,890
1,437
1,595
2,641
1,909
632
2,819
1,434
1,012
2,075
1,022
979
3,580
2,509
922
695
Under
18 Yrs.
1
9
7
2
2
8
2
14
4
4
10
1
3
IS Yrs.
& over.
1
4
4
7
11
5
5
17
3
11
3
12
11
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
S' 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
2S.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00....
to$ 6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17 99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
to   25.99.
20.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
3
10
4
9
31
15
25
10
19
66
31
65
59
68
127
81
280
86
157
144
76
113
105
100
806
302
131
36
46
8
9
11
14
11
26
9
16
9
1
8
1
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
4
10
3
Apprentices.
18
28
10
24
12
16
14
13
10
6
15
7
4
3
1
2
1
3
1
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sw-eden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
12,717
4,617
1,891
338
518
139
332
3,654
742
364
3,778
900
2,290
141
462
Females.
Country of Origin.
62
38
10
1
1
1
1
11
1
1
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy .	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
1,664
1,549
157
8
3
6
16
4
4
53
37
11
4
Females
37
12
Weekly Hours of Labour.
18 at 30 hours. 2,403 at 50 hours. 3 at 63 hours.
3 at 32     ,i 481 at 52     u 8 at 65 .,
21 at 36  ii 17 at 53  „ 4] at 66 u
145 at 40  i, 7,605 at 54  u 4 at 67 u
9 at 42  ,, 659 at 55  n 6 at 68 ii
124 at 44  i, 468 at 56  ii 69 at 70 .,
28 at 45  ,i 469 at 58  i. 41 at 72 ..
209 at 46  „ 175 at 59  u 5 at 77 m
13,243 at 48  ,, 6,318 at 60  n 20 at 84 n
198 at 49  ., 1 at 62  .. 3 at 91 ..
Weekly Hours of Labour.
2 at 30 hours.
1 at 35
I at 36
72 at 40
1 at 41
10 at 42
2,440 at 44
28 at 45
14 at 16
14 at 47 hours.
746 at 48 „
62 at 49 „
83 at 50 .,
3 at 51 .,
116 at 52 ,i
6 at 53 „
182 at 54 „
3 at 55 n
27 at 56 hours.
24 at 60 „
5 at 63 i,
4 at 66 ii
1 at 72 ..
1 at 77 ..
1 at 84 ., 15 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
G 27
Table No.  16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 165 Firms.
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  354,476 40
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      231,061 56
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 6,516,836 37
Total $7,102,374 33
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   246,105 85
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      253,644 07
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      963,382 73
Total   $1,463,132 65
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January..
February .
March . ..
April ..
May	
June	
3,470
3,446
3,626
3,732
4,056
4,136
29
35
36
37
Month.       Males.   Females.
July 	
August	
September..
October ...
November...
December...
4,052
4,139
4,195
4,267
4,017
3,484
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females.
38
39
40
January...
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
632
717
661
650
693
715
150
160
165
163
166
164
July	
August	
September..
October   ..
November..
December ..
701
677
676
659
641
610
159
156
169
168
165
162
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
.00..
6.99.
7.99.
9.99...
10.99...
11.99...
12.99...
13.99...
14.99...
15.99...
16.99...
17.99..
to 18.99...
to 19.99...
to 20.99...
to 21.99...
to 22.99...
to 23.99...
to 24.99..
to 25.99...
to 26.99...
to 27.99...
to 28.99...
to 29.99...
to 34.99...
to 39.99...
to 44.99...
to 49.99...
and over . .
18 Yrs.
& over.
4
11
3
54
7
39
17
15
22
140
417
241
255
78
626
305
1,236
935
347
157
88
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.     18 Yrs.
12
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ..
to$ 6.9
.99.
.99.
9.99.
10.99
11.99
12.99.
13.99.
14.99
15.99.
16.99.
17.99
18.99
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99
23.99
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and over .
IS Yrs.
& over.
10
9
9
9
6
12
9
7
5
13
75
11
24
139
48
32
28
36
31
18
121
62
11
3
4
Under
18 Yrs.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
6
3
6
4
100
8
Apprentices.
Nationality of E/npIoyees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
(jnited States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females
,784
.,341
283
15
8
11
296
20
118
777
299
63
1
7
Country of Origin.
14
17
5
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
353
481
23
2
1
4
7
25
1
Females.
74
89
Weekly Hours of Labour.
4 at 36 hours. 39 at 60 hours.
1 at 44
1,480 at 48
6 at 50
390 at 52
163 at 54
7 at 66
2,498 at 56
2 at 63
8 at 64
1 at 65
21 at 70
1 at 72
1 at 76
Weekly Hours of Labour.
1 at 30 hours. 316 at 48 hours. 3 at 58 houre.
1 at 41     ,i                     2 at 49     „ 5 at 60 „
4 at 42      „ 506 at 50     „ 1 at 61 „
255 at 44      „                       2 at 52     „ 24 at 63 i.
9 at 45      „                       9 at 53      n 6 at 78 u
6 at 46     ,, 42 at 54     i, 2 at 84 ,,
31 at 47     ,, 10 at 56     n G 28
Department op Labour.
1925
Table No.  18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 5 Firms.
Table No. 19.
PAINT-A1ANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 21.960 00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    117,916 68
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    352,885 22
Total $492,761 90
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $ 65,759 85
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     61,039 09
Wage-earneis (including piece-workers)     99,569 48
Total  $226,368 42
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January . .
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
234
199
201
205
210
214
Month.
July	
August. .
September
October...
November
December.
Males.   Females.
221
215
207
206
201
204
Month.
Males.
January	
77
February...
91
March	
105
April	
114
May	
113
112
9
10
14
14
12
12
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August....
September.
October	
November .
December..
86
86
80
11
10
10
10
10
10
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to* 6.'
to 7.
to 8
to 9.'
to 10.'
to 11.!
to 12.
to 13.1
to 14.!
to 15.
to 16.
to 17.
to   18.
to 21
to 22
to 23
to 24
to 25
to 26.
to 27.
to 28.
to 29.
to 34.
to 39.
to 44.
to 49.
and Ov
18 Yrs.
& over.
47
85
4
6
Under
18 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to$ 6.
to 7.
to 8.
to 9.
to 10.
to 11.
to 12
to 13
to 14.'
to 15.!
to 16
to 17
to 18
to 19
to 20
to 21
to 22
to 23
to 24
to 25
to 26
to 27.
to 28.
to 29
to 34.
to 39.
to 44.
to 49.
and ov
99..
99.
99..
99..
99.
.99.
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
.99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
99 .
99..
99..
99..
99..
99..
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
11
10
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated     ...
Males.
123
12
3
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France    	
Italy	
Germany    	
Austria  	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country ..
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
61
59
12
2
Weekly Hours of Labour.
4 at 44 hours. 223 at 48 hours.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
7 at 41 hours.
101 at 44     ii
1 at 46     .,
2 at 47 hours.
25 at 48     ,, 15 Geo. 5
Eeport op the Deputy Minister.
G 29
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 96 Firms.
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns  covering 10 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  375,S34 89
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      794,634 92
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      1,465,579 85
Total $2,636,049 66
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  402,838 63
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      199,003 92
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  3,379,780 56
Total   $3,981,623 11
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.. .
February..
March.
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
767
765
789
816
842
900
106
112
113
110
134
111
Month.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.   Females.
866
8S7
871
868
864
895
Month.
115
121
117
118
119
117
January.,
February
March ...
April
May	
June
Males.   Females.
2.013
2,127
2,140
1,950
1,993
2,042
56
53
55
54
54
56
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October
November .
December..
Males.   Females.
2,136
1,973
2,112
2,109
2,050
1,972
56
56
58
57
55
56
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
. 13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45 00
50.00
$6.00	
to$ 6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99
d over.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
1
7
7
6
13
6
1
5
5
11
7
17
10
23
7
6
5
35
2S
127
Under
18 Yrs.
13
4
11
5
7
1
15
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
4
1
3
4
25
13
14
7
8
1
9
14
5
1
12
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
12
11
3
14
7
1
8
4
1
3
1
3
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to$ 6.99.
to 7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
26.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Males. ^
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
23
11
165
14
69
77
228
313
121
87
187
53
169
211
133
172
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
15
2
2
2
1
3
1
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
540
356
41
5
13
30
1
Females.
Country of Origin.
105
93
9
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia .   ..   	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
811
560
2
12
269
4
13
66
34
1
70
29
17
4
Weekly Hours of Labour.
Weekly Hours of Labour.
1 at 33 hours.
1 at 36  „
5 at 38  ,i
1 at 39  „
4 at 40  „
6 at 42 hours.
7 at 43 „
308 at 44 ,i
312 at 45        ..
13 at 46
3 at 47 hours.
478 at 48
5 at 50       „
1 at 60       „
62 at 44 hours.
1,117 at 48     i,
11 at 49      ,i
543 at 54     n
12 at 66     i,
404 at 60 hours.
7 at 64     „
169 at 72     „
3 at 84     ,, G 30
Department op Labour.
1925
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 30 Firms.
Table No.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 3 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $    103,882 20
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         99,954 96
Wrage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,232,265 30
Total $ 1,436,102 46
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $   227,636 60
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       284,673 16
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    3,701,159 54
Total $4,213,469 30
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January .
February
March...
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
998
800
805
943
813
678
Month.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Males.   Females.
763
752
854
762
1,034
Month.
January.
p-ebruary
March..
April
May	
June
Males.   Females.
1,697
1,740
1,777
1,807
1,859
2,008
20
20
19
20
19
19
Month.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
Males.   Females.
2,115
2,155
2,111
2,158
2,243
2,092
20
20
20
20
20
20
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Emplo3'inent of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to)
7.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
to 19.99.
to   20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
89.99.
44.99.
49.9
and over. .
Males.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over     18 Yrs.
1
7
8
2
81
241
86
232
178
40
43
28
87
38
93
427
136
26
19
2
5
16
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
1
10
1
and over
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
12
19
9
2
1
4
91
90
1,049
692
383
108
45
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark .
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
770
851
77
6
1
10
19
3
2
70
5
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China   .
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
578
995
94
6
1
9
300
5
64
117
69
70
50
Females.
13
5
2
Weekly Hours of Labour.
668 at 44 hours.
49 at 48      .,
6 at 50     ii
4 at 56 hours.
1 at 60     ii
40 at 69     ii
3 at 44 hours.
20 at 48     ii
Weekly Hours of Labour.
2,354 at 56 hours. 15 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
G 31
Table No.  24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, POWER, TELEPHONE, ETC.
Returns covering 69 Firms.
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 59 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $  460,227 13
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,161,278 76
Wage-earners (including piece-w-orkers)  6,173,359 86
Total $7,794,865 75
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1924.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $   194,837 13
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      132,750 12
Wrage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,318,279 57
Total " ,      $1,645,866 82
Average Number of Wage-earners.	
Month.
January..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
3,056
3,033
3,197
3,343
3,427
3,473
1,117
1,126
1,141
1,161
1,182
1,222
Month.
July	
August	
September.
October ...
November .
December..
Males.    Females.
3,465
3,364
3,369
3,370
3,476
3,215
Month.
1,242
1,264
1,225
1,227
1,131
1,232
January..
February .
March. ...
April	
May	
June	
Males.   Females.
1,053
1,058
1,163
1,267
1,369
1,334
40
42
49
55
54
51
Month.
Males.
July	
1,296
1,311
September..
1,211
October ....
1,041
November...
956
December ..
912
25
21
21
23
23
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17 00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to$ 6.99...
to 7.99...
8.99. .
9.99...
10.99...
11.99.   .
12.99...
13.99...
14.99...
15.99...
16.99...
17.99...
to 18.99...
to 19.99...
to   20.99...
21.99...
22.99...
23.99...
24.99...
26.99...
27.99...
28.99...
29.99...
34.99..
39.99...
44.99...
49.99...
and over .
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
26
4
2
101
44
109
9
224
227
49
503
61
50
133
171
146
1,227
608
207
67
26
18 Yrs.
& over.
33
142
73
1
349
99
21
127
99
176
57
41
1
1
2
Under
18 Yrs.
1
6
7
is'
Appren
tices.
For Week of
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
33
147
79
12
10
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29 00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00 ....
i 6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to   23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
3
1
1
9
8
10
18
15
69
11
61
63
79
84
90
61
57
35
42
69
40
60
64
51
46
67
52
20
32
21
15
29
26
12
8
2
18 Yrs.  Under
over. 18 Yrs.
1
1
3
17
11
5
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France 	
Italy	
Germany ;...
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia or other Slav country ...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated.........
Males.       Females.
1,623
2,243
159
18
5
6
169
18
108
33
11
14
3
4
Country of Origin.
731
574
47
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
Russia or other Slav country....
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated.	
62
3
7
9
3
1
53
6
7
112
2
75
4
35
13
3
3 at 39
1,014 at 42
1,333 at 44
51 at 45
539 at 48
2 at 50
Weekly Hours of Labour.
hours. 1.023 at 52 hours.
826 at 54 „
96 at 56 „
77 at 60 n
3 at 63 i,
I at SO .,
Weekly Hours of Labour.
430 at 44 hours.
52 at 45  it
10 at 46  „
131 at 48  ,i
10 at 49  „
440 at 50 hours.
2 at 52  .,
4 at 53  i,
226 at 54  ,,
100 at 55  „
3 at 56 hours.
9 at 60  i,
1 at 78
1 at 96   „ G 32
Department op Labour.
1925
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 3,566 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended December 31st, 1924:—
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers   $ 9,749,110 17
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen        8,934,730 81
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     89,114,930 38
  $107,798,771 36
Supplementary Pat-roll.
In estimating the total industrial pay-roll of the Province, account might be taken of
the following items not included in the above totals :—
35 returns received too late to be included in above Summary   $     638,544 84
Estimated  pay-roll  of  employers  in  occupations  covered  by  Department's
inquiry, and from whom returns were not received        8,000,000 00
Transcontinental Railways     20,000,000 00
Workers employed by Dominion and Provincial Governments   5,000,000 00
Workers employed by Wholesale and Retail Firms   3,000,000 00
Delivery,   Cartage   and   Teaming,   Warehousing,   Butchers,   Moving-picture
Operators, Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation   3,600,000 00
Miscellaneous   3,000,000  00
43,238,544 84
$151,037,316 20
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only.)
During the Month of
January...
February .
March..   ..
April	
May	
June	
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria	
Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
Russia'or other Slav country...
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
752
204
193
555
033
265
834
421
826
741
371
979
724
58,677
3,4S6
60,843
3,574
64,476
3,650
65,663
3,707
68,443
3,781
67,927
4,274
67,053
4,813
67,854
5,125
67,266
5,053
67,967
4,058
65,023
3,914
60,232
3,725
Females.
3,245
2,258
197
4
27
53
16
9
91
28
10
20
1
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$ 6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18 00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
00	
$ 6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.89.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99
39 99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
Totals.
Males.
18 Yrs.
& over.
31
44
147
96
196
262
872
735
786
1,678
1,941
2,212
3,082
2,931
3,340
4,996
4,982
2,463
6,912
3,475
2,594
4,368
3,449
2,601
12,988
10,638
4,720
2,408
3,505
8,512
Under
18 Yrs.
27
66
61
102
89
161
105
216
83
87
100
27
47
23
10
1,245
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
4
6
14
26
88
95
410
420
697
1,047
357
243
496
227
317
155
117
38
54
92
19
27
34
29
48
19
5,097
Under
18 Yrs.
7
4
4
33
16
56
22
72
33
32
38
12
9
12
14
13
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
Apprentices.
55
48
72
46
65
60
207
107
26
36
15
14
6
13
6
10
20
2
9
7
2
3
7
w
10
Weekly Hours of Labour.
76 at 30 hours.
5 at 32 ,,
1 at 33 i,
11 at 35 ii
43 at 36 ii
49 at 37 n
34 at 38 „
15 at 39 „
644 at 40 ..
36 at 41 ,i
1,160 at 42 „
17 at 43 „
14,416 at 44 ,,
872 at 45 hours.
882 at 46 ii
191 at 47 i.
33,585 at 48 .,
580 at 49 ,■
4,811 at 50 ..
223 at 51 m
2,134 at 52 „
216 at 53 ii
12,868 at 54 .,
842 at 55 ..
6,281 at 56 ..
479 at 58 n
225 at 59 hours.
8,758 at 60 „
1 at 61 „
1 at 62 ,,
96 at 63 ii
15 at 64 „
39 at 65 ,i
68 at 66 „
4 at 67 ,i
7 at 68 ,,
40 at 69 ii
168 at 70 „
1,240 at 72 „
2 at
1 at
6 at
3 at
705 at
247 at
2 at
1 at
75 ho
re 15 Geo. 5 Report op the Deputy Minister. G 33
CONCILIATION.
Important work of conciliation was carried, on by the Department of Labour during the
past year, in cases where events appeared to be tending towards a rupture of peaceful relations
between employers and employed. In this way some useful results were brought about in the
preservation of industrial peace. No particular purpose would be served by referring in detail,
in a record of this kind, to a large number of slight differences which have been brought to the
notice of the Department and satisfactorily adjusted, but reference may be made to a few cases
in which larger issues were involved.
A Crisis in Kootenay Camps.
Early in the year a serious situation developed in the lumber camps of the South-Bast
Kootenay District, and alarming representations were received by the Department with regard
to a strike which had been called by the Industrial Workers of the World. On January 23rd
the Deputy Minister of Labour, Mr. J. D. McNiven, left for Cranbrook to endeavour to bring
about a cessation of extreme propaganda and a settlement of the dispute. On arriving in Cranbrook Mr. McNiven immediately got in touch with the strike leaders, and also with as many
of the lumbermen as were in the neighbourhood; but, as the latter were emphatic in stating
that they would have no dealings with the I.W.W., and the strikers had the camps pretty well
tied, up, there was little chance at the moment of any conciliatory measures being successful.
The strike had been in progress since January 2nd, having originated in a demand by the
I.W.W., for the reinstatement of one of their number who had been discharged. Other demands
were very soon added, these comprising an eight-hour day, a minimum wage of $4 a day, the
release of all class war prisoners, no discrimination against members of the I.W.W., and that
their literature be allowed in the camps. The demands were refused, and. within a few days
the camps at Liimberton, where the trouble began, were almost deserted. The strike soon spread
to nearly all the other camps in the neighbourhood, the principal exceptions being those of the
Canadian Pacific Railway at Yahk and Bull River.
Reason for " War Prisoners " Demand.
On questioning the members of the strike committee as to the reason for placing before
Canadian employers such a demand as the release of class war prisoners, Mr. McNiven was
informed that it was because of the large percentage of American-owned camps in that distract,
and with a view of influencing the American Government in favour of a release of their fellow-
workers.
The strike committee were feeding and housing about 200 men in Cranbrook. Vacant houses
were rented and used as cook-house, dining-room, and sleeping-quarters, and there appeared to
be no lack of funds, which were coming mainly from across the Border. For a strike of this
kind the proceedings were very peaceful; the strikers were informed by their leaders that drunkenness and unlawfulness would not be tolerated, and that any of them found under the influence
of liquor would be expelled from the organization and ejected from the camp. The employers
were having men recruited in the Prairie cities, and a large number arrived in Cranbrook, but
most of them joined the strikers, declaring that the situation had been misrepresentated to them.
The circumstances in which the strike terminated are dealt with in the section on " Labour
Disputes."
A Wage Reduction partly Restored.
The white workers at a sawmill in Victoria appealed to Mr. McNiven to intervene in a
dispute which occurred early in July, the proprietors of the mill having announced a reduction
in wages of 2y2 cents, an hour. The Deputy Minister had several interviews with the management of the mill and the strikers, the result of which was a settlement restoring part of the
reduction in wages.
COAL-MINERS'   LAPSED  AGREEMENT.
An agreement under which the coal-miners of Nanaimo were working was due to expire
on September .30th, 1924, and the operators and men were unable to decide upon the basis of
an agreement as to the conditions under which work should be continued after that date.    Mes-
3 G 34 Department of Labour. 1925
sages were received in Victoria urgently requesting the Deputy Minister of Labour to visit
Nanaimo, and in response Mr. McNiven went to that city and saw the Pit Committee, from
whom he was able to get a clear understanding of the difficulty.
The agreement under which the men had been working provided for a conference thirty
days before its termination if either party to the agreement should request a change. A portion
of the men's remuneration was in the form of a bonus of $1 a day, subject to fluctuation according to competitive conditions, and some months earlier the Company had requested that the
bonus be reduced by 14 cents a day, but the men refused to agree. Early in September the men
wrote to the Company requesting an advance of 25 cents per day on the bonus. The Company
made a counter-proposal for a reduction by a similar amount and a modification of certain
contract conditions.
Application for a Board.
Mr. McNiven was in Nanaimo from Friday, the 26th, to Sunday, the 28th of September;
but beyond getting -a clear insight in the difficulty7 little -progress was made at the moment towards a settlement. The officials of the operating company were inclined to stand pat on the
offer they had made, and were not inclined to arbitrate the difference. Mr. McNiven advised
the men to make application for a Board under the " Industrial Disputes Act," and assisted
them in the preparation of the necessary forms. The application was wired to the Hon. James
Murdock, Dominion Minister of Labour at Ottawa, and a reply was received from him granting
a Board forthwith. A pit-head vote was ordered to be taken on the question: " Shall we accept
the terms proposed by the Company?" which resulted as follows: For 1ST; against 630; spoilt
ballots 10; total 827 votes.
A mass meeting of the men was called for Wednesday morning, October 1st, to hear the
result of the ballot and to consider what further action should be taken. Mr. McNiven, who
had returned to Nanaimo the previous day, was invited to be present, and during the course
of the proceedings took occasion to point out that, while a Board of Investigation and Conciliation had been granted, yet the findings of such a Board might not necessarily be accepted by
either party. He advised that the Pit Committee should proceed to the office of the Company
and endeavour to arrive at an amicable settlement, and offered to accompany them there. This
was agreed to, and an interview took place with the Company's Superintendent.
Terms of Agreement Accepted.
The position at first was that the men were not insisting on their demand for a 25-cent
increase in the bonus, but that the Company stood firm for a decrease of 25 cents. After dis*
cussion the Company agreed to accept a reduction of 12y2 cents a day in the bonus, making it
87% cents instead of $1, and some of the differences as to mining conditions were satisfactorily
adjusted and others partially so.
A mass meeting of the men was held in the afternoon, at which the Pit Committee gave
their report. The bonus of 87% cents a day was not considered satisfactory, and some of the
adjustments on " dead work " were accepted and others rejected. The committee was again
instructed to return and endeavour to make more satisfactory arrangements and report to the
same meeting at eight o'clock in the evening. This was done. After much discussion the Company agreed to a 10-cent cut in the bonus instead of 12% cents, but stood firm in regard to the
other adjustments. When these terms were reported back to the men's meeting later in the
evening they were unanimously accepted.
Over 1,300 Men Affected.
Mr. McNiven, who had been present -and had taken part in the whole proceedings of the
day, was accorded a hearty vote of thanks by the men at the conclusion of the evening meeting.
At each of the mass meetings there were about SOO miners present. The reduction of 10 cents
a day in the bonus affected between 1,300 and 1,400 men, and the differences made in working
conditions, which were slight, would affect probably about 300 men. The agreement w-as drawn
up and signed by the committee and the Company late the same evening. While the men left
their work on October 1st, it was understood both by the Company and themselves that this
one-day stoppage should not be considered as a strike. 15 Geo. 5 Report op the Deputy Minister. G 35
A Question of Carpenters' Wages.
A dispute arose in September between the carpenters and contractors of Vancouver as to
wages, a portion of the work being on contracts for the Provincial and Dominion Governments,
and therefore affected by the fair-wage clause. Mr. McNiven, who at the time was returning
from an official visit to Ottawa, received a telegram while en route, from the acting-secretary
of the Contractors' Association, asking him to meet the contractors. He at once wired his
acceptance of the invitation, and met a number of the leading contractors of Vancouver shortly
after arriving in that city.
The point of view put forth by the contractors was that the current wage of carpenters was
$6.50 a day, instead of $7 as provided for in an agreement entered into by the Association and
the joint carpenters' organizations, which stipulated that " the minimum rate of wage from
June 1st, 1924, shall not be less than 87% cents per hour and shall hold good without change
until May 31st, 1925." Mr. McNiven inquired why this agreement was not being observed, and
was told that, as the carpenters had violated the agreement, it was null and void. He reminded
the contractors that on August 15th the Dominion Government Fair Wage Officer had made
an Investigation and found that $7 per day prevailed at that time, and should apply to all work
carried on by the Dominion Government in Vancouver and the surrounding district. This was
approved by the Federal Minister of Labour, and contractors were ordered to observe the ruling
and pay carpenters $7 per day. However, if the contractors desired another investigation Mr.
McNiven offered to have one made, the result of such inquiry to determine the wages to be paid
on Provincial Government work.
The Men and their Agreement.
Representatives of the Carpenters' Union, who were also interviewed, declared that they
had carried out the agreement to the letter, and that to the best of their knowledge and belief
no members of their organization were working for less than $7 per day. An official of the
Department was directed to make a survey of all firms in Vancouver, and to ascertain the nuin-
ber of carpenters employed by each and the rate of wages paid.
Action by Department of Public Works.
In the meantime a notice was posted by a firm of contractors engaged on Government work,
to the effect that, on and after September 27th, the carpenters' rate would be $6.50 instead of
$7 per day. Mr. McNiven took up the question with the Hon. Dr. Sutherland, Minister of Public
Works, and Mr. Philip, Chief Engineer of the Department of Public Works. After an explanation of the action of the Company in question, Mr. Philip forwarded to them the following
telegram:—
" Understand you intend to reduce wages for carpenters on Government buildings. Take no
action in this connection, but continue to pay the rate you have heretofore paid, namely $7, until
such time as it has been conclusively proved that a lower rate prevails, and in this event not
until you receive the sanction of the Department."
Seventy-two firms or persons employing carpenters were interviewed by the Department's
representative. Four of them were engaged in Provincial Government work, under contract,
and two were performing work for the Dominion Government. The former had 79 carpenters
in their employ, whose rate of pay had been reduced from $7 to $6.50. The two Federal Government contractors employed 275 carpenters. There were 68 independent contractors, who where
not bound by the terms of a contract to pay any stipulated wage, and employing 407 carpenters.
Of the latter, 120 were paid $6.50 per day or less, and 287 received $7 or more per day.
Result of Inquiry.
The investigations led to the conclusion that the prevailing rate of wages for carpenters
was $7 per day. A report to this effect was made to the Department of Public Works, and contractors doing work for the Government were directed to govern themselves accordingly and to
pay their carpenters $7 per day. LABOUR DISPUTES IN 1924.
The labour disputes which occurred in this Province during the past year were again comparatively few in number, and most of them were only of minor importance. The principal
area of disturbance was the South-eastern Interior, where the two most serious disputes were
witnessed, both of them presenting certain unusual features. One was caused by the calling
out of the men of the logging camps by the I.W.W. early in the year, and the other was the
dispute which led to the coal-miners, in common with those of Alberta, giving up their employment for several months in defence of a wage-list which was, in a sense, a survival of conditions
brought about by the settlement of war-time disputes.
Coal-miners, Crow's Nest Area.
The strike referred to, which brought a whole district industrially to a standstill for several
months in the middle of the year, was that of the coal-miners in what is known as District 18,
of the United Mine Workers of America. The main portion of this district was in the Province
of Alberta, but it also took in the important coal-bearing area of Fernie, Michel, and Corbin in
the Crow's Nest country of British Columbia.
The " Cost-of-living " Bonus.
For an understanding of the causes of the strike it is necessary to refer to the cost-of-living
bonus, which during the war became a factor in the calculation of miners' wages. Bonuses were
first given in July and November, 1916. In April of the following year a new wage scale was
adopted which absorbed these bonuses, establishing a wage scale approximately 25 per cent,
higher than one which had been set up in 1911. The 1917 agreement also provided that every
four months the increases in the cost of living should be ascertained and a bonus given. Shortly
after the Armistice the bonuses amounted to 92 cents a day, and from the end of 1918 no further
bonus inquiries were made. However, bituminous coal-miners in the United States received a
wage increase in 1919 and another in 1920, and in District 18 the operators and miners agreed
to adopt this as the basis of increase in Canada. To carry out this agreement the bonus of
92 cents a day was increased to $1.17 a day, and added to the schedule for the men on day
wages. For contract miners the, cost-of-living bonus was not absorbed into the wage rates, but
it was provided that the piece-work rates should be increased by 27 per cent., and that the
cost-of-living bonus of $1.17 a day should be paid in addition. In October, 1920, men on day
wages were given another increase, amounting to $1.15 per day and upwards.
In 1922 this agreement expired, and as the operators wrere insisting on a reduction in wages
a strike occurred, lasting from April to August. Work was resumed at a reduction of 15 per cent,
in wages, this to continue until a settlement should have been made in the United States affecting
not less than 75 per cent, of the Union miners in the central competitive field. The 15-per-cent.
reduction was operative only for a very short period, however. By September 1st a settlement
had been made in the United States providing for the same wages as from 1920 to 1922, and the
1920 scale for Alberta and Eastern British Columbia was therefore restored.
A Comparison with the U.S.A.
This was the scale which, by means of renewals, continued to be operative until March, 1924.
At this time another revision or renew-al was due in District 18, although the agreements in the
United States had been renewed until 1927. In District 18 the operators proposed a reduction
of $1.17 per day, the amount of the cost-of-living bonus. They submitted that the cost of living
had fallen, and that the wages in District 18 were as high as in the United States, though the
hours per day were eight " at the face " in the United States, and only eight hours " bank to
bank " in District 18. This, they argued, meant that the miners in District 18 had a working-day
one hour less on the average than those in the United States. They also stated that United
States coal was competing against the product of District 18 in markets which ought to be
supplied by the latter, and that the higher rate they were paying for labour told against them
in the competition. This, they said, had made it necessary to close mines extensively in 1923
and 1924. 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 37
In reply the miners pointed out that the demand for coal was intermittent, that work was
irregular, and that their average earnings, spread over the year, were too small to admit of a
reduction in wages.
, Strike Negotiations.
The old agreement expired on March 31st, and as no basis for a new agreement could be
arrived at, a strike was begun on April 1st. It was provided, however, that the maintenance-men
should continue at work at the rate of pay prior to the strike, and that the operators should
continue to carry on development-work as long as no coal was produced for sale.
Negotiations were carried on during the early summer without changing the aspect of affairs.
In August the Minister of Labour for the Dominion visited Calgary and interviewed parties in
the dispute. He proposed that the two parties should consider a settlement on the basis of a
reduction in wages of one-eighth, to meet the difference in hours in District 18 and in the United
States. As this meant an amount very similar to the $1.17 which had been proposed by the
operators, it proved acceptable to them; but the miners contended that there was no actual
difference of one hour as beween the working-time in District 18 and in the United States. They
therefore declined to agree to the proposal, or to submit it to their membership by referendum, on
the ground that their instructions did not allow of their submitting any proposal for a decrease.
A number of the miners' locals called for a special District Convention, which was held early
in September. The Convention approved the action of the committee, but gave it a free hand
in further negotiations. Thereupon the resident officer of the Dominion Department of Labour
arranged for another joint conference of operators and miners, and this was held on September
25th, Mr. J. D. McNiven, the Provincial Deputy Minister of Labour, being present in addition to
representatives of the Dominion Government.
Several meetings were held, and then a proposal was made from the miners' side for a
settlement under which a decrease would be accepted of $1 a day for contract miners and one-
eighth for men on day wages. Later they agreed to a reduction of $1.17 for the contract miners
and one-eighth for men on day wages. For the moment a final agreement was not reached, as
the operators objected to the length of contract desired by the miners. The Conference accordingly adjourned until the second week in October. On the 10th of that month it was announced
that a settlement had been affected.
Terms of Settlement.
The terms of settlement were a reduction in wages of $1.17 a day in the case of contract
miners and of 12% per cent, for those on day wages. Contract miners' wages had averaged
$9.50 per day, so that the $1.17 was approximately one-eighth in their case also. Day wages had
ranged from $6.58 a day for surface labourers to $7.50 a day for hand-pick miners and other
similar classes, so that the average decrease for these was estimated to be about 90 cents per day.
The agreement was voted on by members of the Union on October 16th and approved by a small
majority, the miners in British Columbia, however, giving it more decided support than those
in Alberta. One explanation suggested for this was that during the period of a prolonged
stoppage of work in the mines, especially in summer, the workers in Alberta are better able
to find alternative employment on farms and elsewhere than are those of British Columbia, and
that the privations caused by the dispute were more pronounced here than in the neighbouring
Province. The demand for Alberta coal is also more of a seasonal affair, as the Crow's Nest
mines have a fairly steady market for their high-grade bituminous coal with the railroads and
for coke-making for the smelters.
It was provided that the settlement made should run until March, 1927, subject to six
months' notice after March 31st, 1925. Work was resumed on October 20th. The number
of miners affected by the dispute in British Columbia was about 1,200.
Closing-down of the Mines.
At the time the agreement was arrived at, the representative of the principal company
affected in the Province expressed a doubt as to whether his company would be able to operate
their mines and pay even the reduced scale of wages which had been accepted, and which, he
pointed out, would still leave the rate of pay very much higher than was in vogue before the
war. For a few weeks work was done with a partial crew. Then, on November 13th the
following notice was issued:— G 38 Department of Labour. 1925
" The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, through its failure to retrieve sufficient business
to operate Coal Creek Mines, regret the necessity for their having to inform employees of
said mines that Coal Creek Mines will be closed down indefinitely.
" Under the circumstances we would advise the employees of the company to try and
secure employment elsewhere.
" Company officials will bring all the miners' tools out of the mines to a surface building
at Coal Creek where the men owning the tools will be able to get them."
" The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Ltd."
The closing-down of the mines brought about a new crisis of a disturbing character, and
arrangements were made by the Provincial Government to put relief-work in hand in order to
cope with the unemployment situation.
The Wage-list again Revised.
In the meantime negotiations were opened up unofficially to ascertain the conditions as to
wages under which the company would feel warranted in resuming operation of the mines.
A scale of wages was drawn up which it was understood the company would be prepared to
accept, and which was lower than the scale agreed upon in October. On December 6th a meeting
of miners was held, and was addressed by Mr. W. R. Wilson, President of the Crow's Nest Pass
Coal Company.   The following resolution was then put:—
"That we, the miners of Fernie and Coal Creek, break away our association with the
United Mine Workers of America and form a Canadian organization of our own, and that
we appoint a committee to negotiate an agreement with the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company."
This resolution was voted on by printed ballot, with the result:   "Yes," 290;   "No," 15;
spoiled, 12.
A committee of five was appointed to act in accordance with the terms of the resolution.
Subsequently the terms which the company were willing to agree to were submitted to another
vote of the miners, and were accepted by 385 to 21. Under these conditions a partial resumption
of work was made on December 22nd, and additional men were taken on later as circumstances
required. It was agreed that the new scale of wages should be operative for a period of three
years and three months.
Lumber-workees, Cranbrook and District.  "
A serious dispute' was reported from Cranbrook and district at the beginning of the year.
On January 2nd the men employed at a large number of logging camps left work at the call of
the I.W.W. The latter demanded official recognition of their organization by the employers, a
minimum wage of $4 for an eight-hour day, and the release of all " class war prisoners"
in the United States. The putting forward of this latter demand was a remarkable feature of
the dispute, and the I.W.W., in support of their action, contended that the majority of the
lumber concerns in the Interior were owned by Americans, whose Government they held responsible for what they regarded as a grievance. The large camps operated by the Canadian Pacific
Railway at Yahk and Bull River were the only important lumber concerns ill the district not
affected by the strike.
In the Interior country it is important that logging should be done in the winter, when the
snow facilitates the movement of the logs. The sawmills, which cannot be operated while the
country is in the grasp of frost, are dependent for their summer working upon a sufficient
accumulation of logs at the end of the winter season. With the object of averting serious loss
to the industry, and bringing about a settlement of the dispute, Mr. J. D. McNiven, Deputy
Minister of Labour, visited the district during the last week of January and interviewed the
various parties affected. His efforts at conciliation did not bring immediate results, but on
March 3rd the strike was called off by the I.W.W. In all there had been something like 1,000
men affected. Before the end of the strike the employers in a number of camps had been able
to replace the strikers with other workers. In calling off the strike the I.W.W. notified employers
that they had " transferred the strike to the job," and employers announced that no man would
be employed if he were known to belong to their Union. One result of the strike was the
extension of the " gyppo " system, under which a small group of men contract to carry out
certain work ou a plan which provides for payment by results. 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 39
Shipwrights and Carpenters, Vancouver.
About 200 shipwrights and carpenters, working for several firms on the water-front in Vancouver, left work on June 2nd, claiming an advance in pay from $6 to $7 a day for carpenters
and joiners and from $6.75 to $8 for caulkers, and also a stricter adherence by- employers to
rules requiring overtime to be paid after a certain number of hours had been worked. Some of
the men were taken back to work at a higher rate of pay but the balance, when the dispute was
finally settled on July 14th, were taken on again at the original rate.
Japanese Fishermen, Skeena River.
A number of cannery operators and packers on the Skeena River reduced the price for
sockeye salmon from 30 cents to 22% cents, fishing with cannery gear, and from 45 cents to 37%
cents for men fishing with own gear. This occupation was largely in the hands of Japanese
fishermen who had an organization controlling the workers from Port Essington. To the number
of 573 they left work on June 15th, but went back on the 25th agreeing to accept the operators'
prices.
Sawmill-workers, New Westminster.
A cut in wages, which the management stated to be necessary owing to the state of trade,
was made at a sawmill in New Westminster on July 5th and about fifty of the employees left
work. However, a number of them returned the following day and the movement to cause a
general strike collapsed.
Sawmill-workers, Victoria.
The employees at a large sawmill in Victoria, numbering about 350, left work on July 5th
on receiving an intimation from their employers that wages were to be reduced by 2% cents an
hour. About half of the strikers were Orientals. The smallest wage paid at the mill to white
workers was 35 cents an hour, which it was proposed by the management should be cut to 32%
cents, though an offer was afterwards made to compromise on a reduction of 1% cents an hour.
It was proposed to cut the wages of Orientals from 25 cents to 22% cents an hour. The white
workers sought the intervention of Mr. J. D. McNiven, Deputy Minister of Labour, who had a
series of interviews with the manager of the mill. These resulted in a settlement under which
the lowest rates of pay were to be 34 cents an hour for white labour and 23% cents an hour for
Orientals. Those receiving over 40 cents an hour were to have their pay reduced on a sliding
scale.
Musicians  (Moving-picture Theatres), Vancouver.
An agreement which the Musicians' Union had with the proprietors of two Vancouver picture
theatres expired on August 31st, and the. musicians sought to have a new* agreement drawn up.
They asked for a day of five and a half working hours instead of six, but the employers wished
to retain the six-hour day. Thirty-five men left work on Saturday night, August 30th. Negotiations followed, and a compromise was reached by which, while the six-hour day was nominally
retained, rest periods were agreed to, thus bringing down the actual working-time. After a
stoppage of four working days the men returned to their places on the afternoon of Friday,
September 5th.
Packing-house Workers, Kelowna.
The men and boys engaged by the Growers' Exchange at Kelowna were working under an
agreement, but the question was raised of increased pay and fourteen of their number left work
on September 15th. Their places were filled the same day and later those who had gone o.t
returned to work.
Fish Packers, Prince Rupert.
The workers employed in a cold-storage plant at Prince Rupert were organized as a Union,
but three of the packers refused to contribute any Union dues. The other packers, to the number
of forty-eight, left work on September 27th. Mediation was resorted to in which two members
of the Steam and Operating Engineers' local Union and representatives of the Fish Packers' local
(O.B.U.) took part. The employees concerned agreed to pay Union dues, and a new clause was
inserted in the agreement with the employers whereby thirty days' notice must be given to
employers before the calling of a strike. The Fish Packers decided to apply to the Dominion
Trades and Labour Congress for a new charter, which virtually meant a change in their Union
affiliations.    AVork was resumed on October 3rd. G 40
Department of Labour.
192C
Summary of Labour Disputes for 1924.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
pad
Lumber-workers—
Cranbrook   and   District
Shipwrights and Carpenters—
Vancouver	
Coal-miners—
Fernie    and    Crow's
Nest
Japanese Fishermen—
Skeena River	
Sawmill-workers—
New Westminster.
Sawmill-workers—
Victoria	
Musicians—
Vancouver..
Packing-house Workers-
Kelowna	
Fish-packers—
Prince Kupert-
Commenced January 2nd. Workers in logging-camps were
called out by the I.W.W., who demanded official recognition, a minimum wage of $4 daily, and release of " war
prisoners " in the United States. The Deputy Minister of
Labour visited district and interviewed parties in the dispute. On March 5th the I.W.W. called off the strike,
announcing that they had " transferred the strike to the
job "
Commenced June 2nd. The men claimed an advance from
$6 to $7 a day for carpenters and joiners and from $6.75
to $8 for caulkers. Advance conceded to a number of
men ; remainder resumed work on July 14th at original
rate
Commenced April 1st. On expiry of previous agreement,
employers sought to have wages reduced by approximately
12% per cent., the equivalent of an advance which had
originally been granted during the war as a cost-of-living
bonus. They complained that competing mine-owners in
the United States were paying lower wages than they, but
this was disputed. For some months mediation was not
effective, but in October, after a series of conferences, the
miners by referendum vote agreed to accept a reduction of
$1.17 a day in the case of contract miners and 12% per
cent, for those on day wages. Work was resumed on
October 20th
Price for sockeye salmon having been reduced the men left
work June 15th, but resumed at operators' prices on the
25th
Commenced July 5th, owing to a cut in wages. Only one mill
affected. Men returned to work next day on employers-
terms
Commenced July 5th, at one mill. Men left work to resist
a reduction of 2% cents an hour in wages. Deputy Minister of Labour was invited by white workers to mediate
and after several conferences arrangement was arrived at
which was in the nature of a compromise
Commenced August 31st, employees requesting a new agreement under which hours of duty would be reduced from six
to five and a half hours a day. Management agreed to
recognize certain rest periods, while retaining six-hour day.
Work resumed September 5th
Commenced September 15th. For increased pay. Places of
strikers were filled and work resumed at old rate the
following day
Commenced September 27th. Strikers refused to work with
three men who would not contribute to their Union
Strike settled by mediation, the men agreeing .to pay
Union dues and the Union to make a change in its affilia
tions.    Work resumed October 3rd
1,000
200
1,200
50
350
35
14
48
30,000
7,000
180,000
2,100
140
288
3,470     |  223,S76
I 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 41
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent Jas. H. McVety, 714 Richards Street, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, 714 Richards Street  "|
Vancouver, 53 Powell Street   j. W. S. Dickson, Superintendent.
Vancouver (Women's Branch), 714 Richards Street J
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets  1
Victoria (Women's Branch), Langley and Broughton Streets] H- Crisford, Superintendent.
New Westminster   M.   Standbridge, Superintendent.
Nanaimo   J. T. Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops  J. H. How, Superintendent.
Vernon     G. E.  Street, Superintendent.
Penticton   A.  Gilley, Superintendent.
Nelson :  G. Anderson, Superintendent.
Cranbrook  J. E. Kennedy, Superintendent.
Revelstoke  H. N. Coursier, Superintendent.
Prince Rupert  J. M. Campbell, Superintendent.
Prince George   G. C. Sinclair, Superintendent.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This statement covering the work of the British Columbia branch of the Employment Service
of Canada for the year 1924 is the sixth annual report of this section of the Department of
Labour.
There are sixteen offices in operation in the Province, the number remaining the same as
during the preceding year. The offices are located as follows: Vancouver (3), Victoria (2),
Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Prince George, Fernie, Cranbrook, Nelson, Revelstoke, Kamloops,
Vernon, Penticton, and New Westminster. Owing to a reduction in the volume of business,
the office at Fernie was discontinued at the end of March, and an arrangement made to handle
the work at that point on a part-time basis. In Vancouver and Victoria separate offices are
provided for securing the employment of women.
Unemployment.
Unemployment was not so prevalent during the early part of the period under review as
during the corresponding months in preceding years. A large number of unemployed men
congregated in the cities of Vancouver, Victoria, and New Westminster and the surrounding
municipalities, owing to the attraction of the milder climate of the Coast area and the closing of
seasonal industries. The condition wras further accentuated by a continued depression in the
lumber industry, resulting in many of the companies reducing their staff, and by a large flow
to the Pacific Coast of new arrivals. While there was some distress as a result of unemployment,
conditions were not such as to necessitate any extensive relief measures. In March and April
approximately 500 men were sent to the Prairie Provinces for spring ploughing and seeding, and
the reopening of seasonal industries absorbed many of the unemployed.
During the summer months, however, as a result of the accumulation of a surplus of logs,
a great many of the logging camps in the Coast area were not reopened, or were operating with
reduced crews, and many of the men who followed this line of employment accepted work in
other industries. In August and September 5,380 persons were sent to Alberta and Saskatchewan
for harvest labour, but owing to unfavourable weather conditions, and also to a shorter crop,
harvesters did not do so well financially as in previous years.
Business transacted during Year.
The volume of business transacted is shown in the tables and chart appearing on other pages,
the details being shown by offices and months. The aggregate number of placements for the
year under review shows a contraction as compared with the previous year, all but one office
showing a reduction in the number of placements. This was due to the slackening in the lumber
industry, which affected all parts of the Province and resulted in a surplus of men who moved
from place to place and applied in person to employers, with the result that the requirements of
industry were met in many instances without placing orders with the Employment Service. The
supply of men was also greatly increased by an influx of newly-arrived immigrants. The number
of .persons placed during the year was 45,061, and of this number 26,498 were sent to " regular "
positions where the duration of employment ranges from a minimum of two weeks to permanence. G 42
Department of Labour.
1925
The balance, 18,560, filled " casual " vacancies where the period of employment did not exceed
two weeks. The number of women placed was 7,805, of which number approximately 4,000 were
for casual employment.
Chart showing Applications, Vacancies, and Placements Week by Week during 1024.
1
^
^
r>'S'N'N<NrN<NtsCM^t-<c^rsiCNCS<N^'N,>l^irN\x\\WW\W>sXNS\\N\\
§
I
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^
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I
III
r:
:-i
V¥
^
^
^
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tt
v5
Sf
m
§
:3: 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 43
The chart shows the rise and fall of applications for employment, employers' orders, and
placement of applicants, by weeks. The sharp rise in the line showing employers' orders in
February was caused by a strike in the lumber industry in the Crow's Nest Pass by the I.W.W.
The fall in this line at the end of March was due to a transfer of longshore orders which had
been given to our offices as one of the conditions of settlement of a longshoremen's strike on the
Vancouver water-front. The sharp rise in June marks the demand for pickers of small fruits,
which the Service finds greater difficulty each year in supplying. In August the annual movement of harvest labourers to the Prairie Provinces occurred, which accounts for the rapid rise
in the number of applicants and placements during that month, the employers' orders not being
affected, however, as the orders are shown on the reports of the Provinces to which the men were
sent.
Business transacted Monthly', 1924.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
to other
Provinces.
January...	
February	
March 	
April	
May	
June	
July 	
August 	
September	
October	
November..	
December	
Totals
11,612
9,856
9,436
9,637
7,280
6,925
8,317
10,915
7,213
8,836
8,588
9,238
107,S53
6,149
4,318
4,316
4,120
3,202
3,994
4,245
2,759
2,854
3,207
1,977
2,063
43,204
4,840
4,521
4,137
3,769
3,024
3,201
3,585
2,62S
2,596
3,039
1,926
2,023
39,2S9
131
50
93
139
104
159
99
98
144
125
47
38
1,227
1
3
69
225
126
15
27
4,128
1,176
1
1
5,772
Business transacted by Offices, 1924.
Office.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
to other
Provinces.
Cranbrook	
Ferine	
Kamloops   	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster 	
Penticton.... 	
Prince Georg   ,	
Prince Rupert 	
Revelstoke	
Vancouver (Richards Street
Vancouver (Powell Street) ~
Vancouver (Women)	
Vernon	
Victoria , 	
Victoria (Women)	
Totals	
2,635
190
3;2G4
1,724
3,746
4,557
2,874
1,312
10,472
713
21,466
27,282
11,804
3,600
8,314
3,900
107,853
2,940
425
1,368
438
1,742
1,331
920
1,423
1,521
606
3,655
15,354
6,343
689
2,397
2,052
43,204
2,317
282
1,099
.412
1,481
1,281
S42
1,317
1,511
514
3,180
14,928
5,444
553
2,390
1,738
39,2S9
113
26
2
12
11
4
3
22
5
424
473
92
3
8
29
1,227
40
121
53
427
8S
176
231
16
2,869
808
224
180
492
47
5,772
Harvest-labour for Praikie Provinces.
The arrangement made with the Employment Service officials of the Provinces of Alberta
and Saskatchewan in 1921 to take available experienced farm labourers for spring seeding and
ploughing in the spring of the year and harvest-labourers in the month of August is still in
effect, and has worked out to the advantage of the unemployed in this Province and the employers
who required labour on Prairie farms.    The railways grant reduced rates for the return journey, G 44 Department of Labour. 1925
and the men are guaranteed employment and a minimum wage by the Employment Service officials
of the Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.
The arrangement for the transfer of harvesters in previous years applied only to Vancouver,
Victoria, and New Westminster and the territory adjacent to these cities. In 1924 the rates were
made applicable to Prince Rupert, Prince George, and intermediate points, and Kamloops, Vernon,
and Penticton. This change was made as a result of the large number of settlers on the land
who took advantage of the opportunity to engage in harvest labour during the previous year, the
view being that a similar opportunity should be given to settlers in the more remote parts of the
Province. The result was an unqualified success, 1,063 settlers from 193 different rural communities taking advantage of the reduced rates and the opportunity to secure funds to permit
them to devote the time when work could be carried on to the best advantage to improving their
own places instead of being forced to seek employment in the over-supplied market of the cities
and towns.
Five thousand and sixty-seven men and 313 women were sent to the Prairies for farm-work,
3,913 of this number being in possession of letters from farmers by whom they were previously
employed offering an engagement for the current season. This number increased from 2,358
sent under the same circumstances in 1923, and 1,004 in 1922. The number of employers who
are satisfied to re-engage workers from this Province year after year is a tribute to the ability
of the help sent through the Employment Service during the initial period. That the workers
are willing to return to the same employers year after year is a fair indication that they were
well treated and satisfied with the conditions of employment. No more satisfactory results
could be desired than the bringing together of so many employers and workmen to their mutual
satisfaction and advantage. Measured by this standard alone, the harvest-labour movement
under the auspices of the Employment Service can be said to have been successful.
Inclement and uncertain weather conditions resulted in the harvesters losing considerable
time with a consequent reduction of earnings and increase of expenses, but this is one of the
hazards of outdoor employment which cannot be left out of account. There has been the same
absence of complaints noted in previous reports, the Employment Service officials in the Prairie
Provinces having carried out the conditions of employment offered to the men when they were
recruited.
In addition to giving settlers an opportunity in other Provinces, local superintendents in
the districts where settlers are taking up land have standing instructions to give preference of
employment in industries in their districts to this class of resident, which would in the ordinary
course of events go to migratory workers, many of whom are not citizens either b(y birth or
naturalization.
The Service and the Fruit Industry.
Many parts of this Province are particularly suitable for the growth of such fruits as berries,
plums, cherries, peaches, and apples, and where the acreage under cultivation increases faster
than the population in the several districts the task of securing the necessary labour to handle
the crops becomes a serious problem. The demand comes, of course, at the busiest season of
the year, and the period of employment is short, with the result that the field from which this
labour must be recruited is limited to the older boys and girls attending schools and higher
branches of learning. The low prices obtained by the growers for their products has compelled
a corresponding low rate for fruiit-pickers, and this has discouraged those who require to earn
money rather than embark on a holiday venture. Where the work is located close to centres
of population and the pickers can return to their homes at night the problem has not been so
great, but pickers who must camp or board expect a much greater return than the industry has
been able to pay.
The Employment Service is confronted annually with the labour problems of this very
important industry, and does its best to recruit the necessary labour. Dependent on weather
conditions, the growers invariably place their orders early and for a date usually in advance
of when the help is required, with the result that the labour recruited frequently vanishes by the
time it is actually needed, the youthful recruits having been hired by some other employer
who, because of location, has his crop ready for picking, or else having accepted an invitation
to go camping.
In the district adjacent to Victoria the Service has been very successful in meeting the needs
of the growers, but in this area the pickers, if they desire to do so, can return to their city homes 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 45
each night for a nominal transportation charge. In the Fraser Valley the situation is entirely
different. There the fields are situated 30 to 50 miles from Vancouver and New Westminster,
and in addition to the initial fare the pickers must pay varying amounts for board and lodging,
some of which is well worth the amount charged. The number of girls who are prepared to
accept this work is diminishing yearly, owing to their inability to earn what they consider an
adequate return for the work required, though no difficulty is experienced in securing women for
cannery work, where the remuneration is fixed under orders passed by the Minimum Wage
Board. Newspaper advertisements by individual growers and by the Service failed during the
past season to attract the help necessary, and had it not been for men and boys who were sent
out by the Employment offices, many of the growers would have suffered heavy loss through
their crops rotting on the bushes. Efforts to secure pickers from the adjoining State of Washington proved unsuccessful, and the Employment Service cannot lend itself to the efforts made
by growers to induce pickers to come from the Prairie Provinces, as the railway fare is greatly
out of proportion to any possible return the pickers can expect from their labour.
In this industry labour must be available when the fruit is ready to be picked, or the crop,
a perishable one, becomes a total loss. Conditions must therefore be made sufficiently attractive
to induce workers to accept employment, and if this is not done an impasse is reached that is
disastrous to the industry, the workers, and the country generally. The workers expect to sell
their commodity in the best possible market, and in this policy they are following the example
of the growers in disposing of their crops to the highest bidder. The Service can bring the
employers and the workers together, but has no control over either. The employer, in this case
the grower, must therefore adjust conditions in such a way that the workers will be justified in
accepting employment in the industry.
The labour requirements for the tree-fruit crop in the Okanagan Valley are much more
easily met. A large percentage of the help required is resident in the Valley, and unless the
crop is above the average in quantity very little outside assistance is necessary. This is easily
obtained in other parts of the Interior and in the Coast area, as many young women spend their
holidays in this outdoor employment.
Employment for Disabled ex-Service Men.
Although the official responsibility for providing facilities for the placing in employment of
handicapped ex-service men has rested with the Dominion Government Department of Soldiers'
Civil Re-establishment, the Employment Service has always played a strong part in this work.
As four-fifths of the male members of the staff were overseas and three-fifths of this number are
handicapped as a result of war service, the unemployed ex-service men, and particularly those
suffering from infirmities, are assured of most sympathetic consideration and assistance. In
addition to this favourable background, the Hon. Minister of Labour has always taken a keen
interest in this branch of the work and has repeatedly required surveys to be made showing the
degree of unemployment existing among this section of the population and the steps taken by
Departmental officers to effect an improved condition of affairs.
The problem has become localized in the Coast cities of Vancouver and Victoria, where, in
addition to the men who went overseas from these cities and the surrounding districts, all the
unplaced handicapped ex-service men from other parts of the Province have congregated. This
number has been heavily increased by men from other parts of Canada who, because of climatic
advantages, have taken up residence in the Coast cities.
A better appreciation of the difficulties of finding employment for these men is secured when
the nature of our industries is considered, lumbering, mining, and fishing are our principal sources
of employment, and the first two are highly hazardous, resulting in the disablement of many
men who cannot, in the case of major injuries, be again employed in the industry in which they
were injured. A comparatively small amount of light manufacturing, where men of impaired
efficiency can be employed, is carried on in the Province, and the result is that the field available
for handicapped workers is extremely limited.
For some time past it has been the view of the Dominion Government officials that better
results could be obtained if the employment of handicapped men was placed exclusively in the
control of the Employment Service. Following negotiations between the Dominion and Provincial
Ministers of Labour, an agreement was finally signed whereby the employment-work would be
handled by the Employment Service under the control of Provincial officials,  the Dominion G 48 Department of Labour. 1925
Government providing some additional staff in Vancouver and Victoria to permit of an extension
without additional expense to the Province of the work already being carried on by the Employment Service officials under the direction of the Minister of Labour. This agreement came into
effect on December 1st, 1924, and although industrial conditions were naturally at their worst
during the winter months, the members of the staff assigned to the work of canvassing employers
carried on an active campaign. As a result of this work, in the month of December 115 handicapped men were placed in employment, some of it being of a casual nature,.but all of assistance
to the handicapped ex-service men. Everything considered, the initial efforts along the new
lines have been very encouraging, and an improvement in industrial conditions and the
reopening of seasonal industries will undoubtedly result in a material reduction in the number
of these men. Although started to assist ex-service men, industrial handicaps are also being
taken care of in the new branch and many men who heretofore have not utilized the services
of the staff are now registering and securing employment as handicap cases. Many of these men
are veterans of earlier wars, or were injured in industry prior to the enactment of the present
" Workmen's Compensation Act." In consequence, they are dependent on their earnings, and
their cases will receive the sympathetic assistance of those entrusted with this work.
CO-OPERATION   WITH   IMMIGRATION  DEPARTMENT.
In addition to actual employment-work, the Service is in close touch with and co-operating
with the Department of Immigration, and as a result the Immigration officials have constantly
at their disposal first-hand and reliable information regarding industrial conditions, which is of
considerable assistance in dealing with applications for the admission of aliens, and directing
the flow of immigration to parts of Canada where the immigrants can be absorbed into the life
of the community. This policy also has the effect of discouraging newcomers from going to
districts where there is already a surplus of workers.
The same facilities are also at the disposal of and widely used by the Women's Division
of the Department of Immigration in assisting women who have come to this country under the
auspices of that Department. This arrangement has the effect of encouraging women who are
experienced in lines in which employment is available, and discouraging those who would find
on arrival that there is no work available for them. Investigations are also made of living and
working conditions in the more isolated parts of the Province from which applications have been
received for women workers.
The weekly reports of labour conditions throughout the country which are available in all
of our offices are widely used by workmen in search of employment, and as a result there is a
reduction in the number of men aimlessly wandering from place to place in search of work.
The majority of the employees of the Employment Service, a branch of the Department of
Labour, have been with the organization since its beginning in 1919, and have acquired a wealth
of knowledge of our industries that is extremely valuable to employers and workmen. The
Service is now accepted as, and recognized, as an integral part of the industrial life of the
Province. 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 47
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Chief Inspector *- R. J.  Stewart.
Assistant Inspector H. Douglas.
Assistant Inspector Miss A.  C.  McMullln.
Assistant Inspector Miss   Violet   Smart.
(Office  Court-house, Vancouver.)
The following report is submitted by the Chief Inspector of Factories:—
I have the honour of submitting herewith the annual report of the work of Factory Inspection in the Province for the fiscal year ending December 31st, 1925.
Personal observation and reports reaching this office indicate that some of the manufacturing
plants of the Province have not been working to capacity throughout the past year. Various
reasons are given for this condition, and various proposals are made by those affected with a
view of preventing these periodical times of depression.
As our duties require us to make inspections during good times and bad, our insistence
upon improvements in the working conditions, where necessary, are not always welcomed by
the employer, whose plant we may be visiting during one of these periods. Generally speaking,
the circumstances existing throughout the year were such as to discourage any large outlays for
plant extensions or improvements.
Accident Prevention.
Accident prevention has become a definitely organized objective in practically all large
industrial plants throughout the Province, with the result that records concerning preventable
accidents show a gratifying reduction.
A different procedure is now being followed when new machinery is being installed or plants
rebuilt. In the past the dominating objective appeared to be to get the machinery in operation
and then w7ait until the Inspector made an inspection of the plant before any serious attempt
was made to provide safe working conditions for the employees. The general practice at the
present time, however, is to have all safe-guards installed before the machinery or plant is
placed in operation, and then to notify us that the plant is ready for inspection. Although
standards governing the operation of power-driven machinery have been issued by the Workmen's Compensation Board, there are certain existing conditions in some plants which make
strict adherence to these standards a difficult matter at times. In cases of this nature the
Inspector is very often called upon to devise other ways and means of removing the hazard,
which is not always easy of accomplishment. As in previous years much time is necessarily
devoted to this portion of our duties, which, while they are to a certain extent of a routine nature,
require in some instances a good deal of time and study before a solution satisfactory to all
concerned is decided upon.
Elevators.
During the past year we have devoted a large portion of our time to the inspection of
passenger elevators. The great majority of the elevators installed throughout the Province are
what is known as the " drum type," which is being rapidly superseded by the later and more
modern type known as the "traction machine." While the hazards in connection with their
operation do not differ to a very great extent, the traction type has certain safety features not
possessed by the drum machine.
We find in subjecting the safety devices on some of the older machines to a test that they
do not meet requirements, and in view of these defects have found it necessary to have equipment of a more efficient type installed. .Such installation takes considerable time, and entails,
in some instances, quite an expenditure. We have in mind one installation, the car-holding safety
devices of which had been rendered absolutely useless through the ignorance of either the
engineer or some other person who was not conversant with the operation of this device. At
the time these conditions were noted, it was also found that one of the hoisting cables had
broken just outside the socket. What would have happened to the occupants of this elevator if
the remaining cable had broken can only be surmised.
While no fatalities occurred on passenger elevators throughout the Province during the
past year, I have to report injuries being received by several occupants of an elevator in one G 48 Department of Labour. 1925
of the large office buildings in Vancouver, owing to the breaking of the hoisting-cables inside
the socket. Inspection of this elevator just prior to the failure of the cables would not have
disclosed the defects in the cable fastening, as they are applied to the car in such a manner
as to be inaccessible for inspection. This accident occurred when the car was being stopped at
the ground floor. Owing to the short distance from the ground floor to the pit, the governor
and safety devices could not function, although the car was equipped with modern safety devices,
which upon examination afterwards were found to be acting properly. If the distance of fall
had been four feet farther, the car would have stopped as easily as it does at any floor during
regular operation.
Since the occurrence of this accident we are ordering all elevators that are equipped with
this type of fastening to have at least ten (10) inches cut off the cables at the sockets and these
cables refastened every two years.
Child-labour.
The law prohibiting employment of boys and .girls under the age of 15 has in most cases
been complied with, although in several instances, during school holidays, we found that children
were holding positions through false representation regarding their age being made by themselves and their parents.
Prosecutions.
The observance of the hours governing the operations of laundries has shown a marked
improvement over previous years. One prosecution for an infraction of this portion of the Act
resulted in a fine of $100 being imposed on a proprietor of one of the Oriental laundries in
Vancouver.
With regard to sanitation, ventilation, and lighting, these important matters have been
given our constant surveillance, and, where alterations and improvements were found necessary,
instructions regarding same had been issued.
Complaints.
Most complaints are received at this office by telephone, some through the mail, while many
are made in person. In the majority of eases the informant does not care to reveal his or her
name, fearing possible exposure and dismissal. It has been the policy of the inspectorate
immediately to follow up all complaints, and encouragement has been given to employees to
report any violation of the Act. At the same time the assurance is given that any information
received will be treated strictly confidential.
In conclusion, I wish to remark that the work of enforcing the laws relating to factory
inspection has been carried on wTith only one motive in mind—that of carrying out the intentions
of each law impartially. In many cases where some of the orders issued may have appeared
stringent, and exception was taken by the recipients of such orders, they have been invited to
meet in conference to discuss all alleged grievances. In every case the matter in question was
the subject of argument, which invariably resulted in a better understanding between the Department and the owner of the business, and in more cordial co-operation towards securing the
desired results. 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 49
REPORT OF THE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
Officials of the Board :
Miss Mabel A. Cameron, Secretary Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Miss Violet Smart, Inspector Court-house, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit the seventh annual report of the Minimum AVage Board
of British Columbia, covering the work of the Board for the year ended December 31st, 1924.
The late Mrs. Winifred Mahon.
It is with very deep regret that the Board records the death of the Minimum Wage Inspector,
Mrs. Winifred Mahon, which occurred in July, 1924. The late Mrs. Mahon was appointed in
February, 1923, and had proved herself a most capable official, at all times assiduous in carrying
out the duties of her position. The public service of the Province is the poorer by her untimely
death, and the women and girl workers of British Columbia have lost a true friend.
Work of Minimum Wage Inspection.
Her successor in the inspectorate is Miss Violet Smart, who had been engaged in other
branches of the Provincial Civil Service for several years. Since taking over her present duties
Miss Smart has made tours of inspection in various parts of the Province, visiting working
establishments where women and girls are employed. These visits have led in a number of
instances to changes for the better in the conditions under which employees were working, and
to the making-up of the amounts due where they had been underpaid. Some of the offending
firms have been prosecuted, and in cases where minor irregularities were found to exist a warning was given and a further call paid at a later date to ascertain that the cause of complaint had
been removed.
Latitude allowed under the Law.
It has happened frequently that the attention of the Board and its officials has been directed
to cases w-here an infraction of the law was supposed to have occurred, but after investigation
it has been found that everything was in order. Such misunderstandings may be avoided if
those making complaint bear in miiid that a girl under eighteen years of age is permitted to be
employed at a salary less than the full legal minimum for older experienced girls, and also that
persons over the age of eighteen may be employed for a certain stated period, which varies in
different industries, on a reduced scale of pay while learning the trade.
Other cases producing a crop of unfounded complaints are those in which women and girls
at work for less than the full legal number of hours weekly are paid on a pro rata basis, their
weekly pay being thus less than would be required if the full number of working-hours were
put in. The number of communications received by the Board relating to cases coming under
these heads leads us to believe that the degree of flexibility authorized by the law as to these
matters is not fully understood.
Additional Pay' secured.
In checking up the returns received by the Board from employers, a number of cases came
to light ill which girls were being paid less than the minimum wage required by the Board's
orders. Steps have at once been taken to recover for the girls affected the full legal minimum
wage, and representations made to employers have in all cases been effective. In this way female
employees in the Province have received additions to their pay amounting in the aggregate to
$S9.75 a week, as the direct result of the intervention of the Board. In some of these cases the
circumstances were not such as seemed to justify prosecution, or the offence has been within
only a short period and without deliberate intention to violate the law. Some of the most
flagrant cases have been taken into Court.
Compensation for Underpayment.
Experience has again proved the value of the provision of the Act which entitles a woman
or girl to receive compensation from her employer for past underpayment for her services.
Cases coining under this head have been brought to the notice of the Board, and where the
4 G 50
Department of Labour.
1925
facts were clearly established we have insisted that employers should make up the amounts by
which their employees have been underpaid during varying periods. The total arrears received
by employees thereby amounted to $2,107.44, the individual payments ranging from as low as
7 cents to as much as $250. The girl in the latter case had worked a considerable amount of
overtime, and payment at a higher rate was demanded and secured. Towards the end of the
year a case was dealt with in which eight girls working for the same employer had been underpaid, and the total amount received from the employer in arrears was over $700.
The girls benefiting by the action of the Board in collecting arrears during the year included
workers in restaurants, hotels, millinery, tailoring and dressmaking establishments, dentists'
offices, glove factories, laundries, fruit canneries, garment factories, retail stores, commercial
offices, and paper-box factories. The principal delinquents were found in Vancouver, Victoria,
New Westminster, Chilliwack, and Penticton, although readjustments were necessary in other
centres.
Cases taken into Court.
Where it appeared that an offence could be clearly established by evidence and there were
no mitigating circumstances, the Board proceeded against the offenders in Court. Twelve such
cases were taken during the year, of which the following is a brief resume:—
1. Information was laid against the proprietor of a restaurant for not paying the legal
minimum wage. The case was called and adjourned for a week. Defendant did not appear.
The Magistrate issued a warrant and defendant was arrested. He was allowed out on bail after
promising to pay $22.50 arrears next day to the employee. He paid $12.50 only and was given
one more day's grace. The following day he paid $5 and was remanded for a week when he
paid the balance. The Magistrate dismissed the case, as he was reluctant to imprison the man
and the employee had received all arrears due.
2. Two charges were laid against the proprietress of a restaurant, one for allowing an
employee to work excessive hours and the second for failing to post the Board's Order. Defendant was convicted on the first charge and fined $25. The second case was dismissed as it was
proved that the Order had been posted and subsequently taken down. The Magistrate declared
that there was nothing in the Act to stipulate that the Order should be kept posted.
3. An employer was fined $25 under the Mercantile Order for paying wages below the
prescribed minimum.
4. An employee worked excessive hours as waitress in an ice-cream parlour. Two charges
were laid against the proprietor, for allowing her to work longer than the Order permitted and
for making a false return to the Board. It was calculated the sum of $250 was due to the
employee.    This w-as paid in cash and the cases were withdrawn.
5. A restaurant proprietor was fined $25 for permitting his employee to work longer hours
than the law allowed.
6. In a case in which the telephone operator at a hotel worked excessive hours the employer
was fined $25 for violation of the Order governing the Telephone Occupation.
7. Information was laid against the proprietor of an ice-cream parlour and confectionery-
business for failing to pay the minimum wage. The place was suddenly closed and the employer
could not be located, presumably having left town.
8. A $25 fine was imposed for allowing a hotel employee to work excessive hours. The
Magistrate of his own accord and without an additional information being laid imposed a further
fine of $10 because the defendant dismissed the employee after she gave information to the
Board's officials.
9. A fine of $25 was imposed for causing an employee in a cafe to work longer hours than
was permitted by the Public Housekeeping Order.
IX) and 11. Two restaurant proprietors were fined $25 for causing their employees to work
long hours.
12. The proprietor of a hotel was fined $25 for paying less than the minimum wage to a
chambermaid.
The defendants in most of the above-mentioned cases were either foreigners or persons who
had recently gone into business.  It is noticed that, as experience of the Act becomes more general, 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 51
there is less reticence on the part of girls who have been unfairly treated in making complaint
or in coming forward to testify against the offenders. Their unwillingness to do so in former
years was one of the chief difficulties confronting the Board, and the changed attitude of female
employees will tend toward more effective administration of the provisions of the Act.
The " Schools " Problem.
One of the most embarrassing problems which the Board encounters are the pseudo " schools "
which profess to teach some industry or occupation- and pay no wages but frequently charge
for what they designate as a " course " of instruction.
If wage-earners are paid lower sums than the legal minimum to which they are entitled
the Board may proceed against the offending employers in the Police Courts, and the employees
themselves may recover in the Civil Courts the difference between what they were paid and
what they should have received. But when girls are induced to pay fees, in some cases amounting to $75 or $100 for the privilege of learning some occupation, even though the instruction is
indifferent or worthless, and the employers are being paid by their customers for the services
of the " pupils," the Board is helpless. The Courts having decided that such girls are not
employees in the legal sense, since they are not in receipt of wages and are therefore not
technically employed, the Board has no power to obtain redress for them.
Statistical Report.
The figures compiled from the annual returns furnished by employers of female help in the
Province for week ending November 29th, 1924 (or for the week of greatest employment in the
seasonal occupations), are arranged in tables covering nine occupations or industries for which
Orders are in effect. These are listed in such a way that comparison may be made with those of
former years.
In addition to presenting statistics relating to women and girl employees for the whole
Province the forms were divided into four geographical groups, according to the location of the
business. Returns from employers in the Cities of Vancouver and Victoria have been classified
in two separate divisions, while the figures relating to the firms on the Mainland (exclusive of
Vancouver), and those on Vancouver Island (other than Victoria), make up the remaining two
classes. For convenience these groups are referred to in the text as Vancouver, Victoria, Mainland, and Island.
Returns for 1924 were received from 2,287 firms, being 92 in advance of the 1923 total.
A gain is also recorded in the number of employees reported. Last year's figures accounted for
1.0,863, while this year the total stands at 11,597, an increase of 734. It must be remembered that
the " Minimum Wage Act" does not apply to domestic servants, fruit-pickers, and farm-labourers.
If these classes came under the jurisdiction of the Minimum Wage Board our total of women
gainfully employed would be considerably higher.
The following tables, with accompanying comment, are presented by the Board with the
sincere hope that the data contained therein will be of interest and value to the readers of
the Report.
Mercantile Industry".
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years -	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
Average hours worked per week	
335
2,124
341
$32,203.49
$3,028.00
$15.16
$8.88
13.83%
42.95
$30
325
2,000
364
.520.25
!,321.00
$15.26
$9.12
15.4%
42.95
320
1,828
283
$27,577.19
$2,682.00
$15.09
$9.48
13.4%
43.7
278
256.
$28,601.35
$2,389.50
$15.99
$9.33
12.52%
44.17
317
1,685
369
$26,852.90
$3,528.00
$15.94
$9.56
17.96%
43.7 G 52
Department of Labour.
1925
Returns were received from 335 firms employing 2,4G5 female employees, of which number
132 establishments were located in Vancouver, with 1,613 employees on the pay-roll; 58 in
Victoria accounting for 511 women and girls, 109 on the Mainland with 250 employees, and
36 on the Island with the balance of 91 workers.
The total pay-roll for the women and girls for the one week reported amounted to $35,231.49,
which was apportioned as follows : Vancouver, $23,251.53; Victoria, $7,022 ; Mainland, $3,775.96;
Island, $1,182.
In computing the average weekly wage for employees over 18 years of age the Provincial
figure proved to be $15.16, which is $2.41 in excess of the prescribed minimum of $12.75. Following are the averages for the four localities: $15.40 in Vancouver, $14.32 in Victoria, the Mainland
standing high at $15.88, the Island recording $14.57.
For the girls under 18 the average weekly wage for the whole of British Columbia was $S.S8.
Vancouver's and Victoria's figures are almost identical in this grading, the former standing at
$8.75 and the latter at $8.76.    The Mainland average is $10.84, and that of the Island $8.33.
The percentage of employees under 18 years of age for the entire Province has dropped since
1923 from 15.4 per cent, to 13.83 per cent. In Vancouver this percentage is 14.88, in Victoria
10.37, on the Mainland 10, and the Islands run up to 25.28 per cent.
The average weekly working-hours for British Columbia are 42.95, no change having occurred
since 1923. In calculating the average working-week for Vancouver it is found to be 42.59 hours,
in Victoria it is 42.77 hours, on the Mainland the workers are employed on an average of 46.13
hours, while the Island average is 42.52.
Out of the 2,465 employees in this occupation there are 930 wTorking a 44-hour week, or
slightly over 37 per cent.    This is the most general weekly working-period.
More employees are in receipt of wages ranging between $12 and $13 than any other amount,
there being 568 in this division, 25 of whom are under 18 years of age. Another large group,
comprising 346 employees (341 adults and 5 girls), is recorded as receiving between $15 and $16.
Laundry Industry-.
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years -
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years-
Average hours w-orke.d per week	
53
625
S4
$8,859.00
$889.00
$14.17
$10.58
11.85%
43.69
53
60
$8,026.50
$667.00
$14.38
$11.12
9.71%
44.33
46
474
101
$6,880.00
$1,215.50
$14.51
$12.03
17.57%
44.73
33
449
70
$6,478.50
$837.00
$14.43
$11.06
13.48%
44.74
35
486
84
•,332.00
.,004.00
$15.08
$11.95
14.74%
45.72
Although the number of firms sending in returns for 1924 is exactly the same as the preceding
year—namely, 53, the staffs employed show an upward tendency in numbers. In 1923 the payrolls contained 618 names, but the - following year there were 709 listed. Vancouver's 25 firms
contributed 475 employees; Victoria's 112 workers were found in 9 establishments; the Mainland quota of 103 was gathered from 17 plants; while the Island made up the balance of 19 in
2 different firms.
The week's pay-roll in Vancouver reached the sum of $6,678.50; Victoria's share was $1,488;
the Mainland and Island wages for the week were $1,365.50 and $216, respectively, making up
the total for the Province of $9,748.
Coming to the average weekly wages we find that for the whole of British Columbia the
adult women workers averaged $14.17 weekly, and the girls $10.58. The minimum wage for
experienced workers over 18 years of age in this line of work is $13.50 per week.    In Vancouver 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 53
the average for employees over IS is $14.50;   for the younger workers it is $10.86 weekly.    The
averages in the other sections of the Province adhere more closely to the legal minimum.
The Province's percentage of employees under 18 years of age is 11.85. The Mainland firms
employ the most limited number of girl workers, or 5.83 per cent. The Island ranks next with
10.52 per cent.    Vancouver has 12.21 per cent, while Victoria's percentage is 16.07.
Whereas it is permissible to work a 48-hour week, yet the average hours for British Columbia
are 43.69. The average week in Vancouver consists of 44.06 hours; in Victoria it is 46. Shorter
working periods prevail on the Mainland and Island, where 40.51 and 38.11 hours are the respective averages.
A 46-hour week is actually worked by 20S employees. This is the most usual working-period.
The peak in numbers receiving the same wage occurs between $13 and $14, there being 196
workers at this rating, of whom 14 are under 18 years of age. There are 112 adults and 3 girls
listed at $14-$15.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
314
1,316
49
$21,493.42
$730.00
$16.33
$14.90
3.59%
45.97
287
1,174
47
$19,164.50
50
$16.32
$14.61
3.85%
45.42
287
1,171
44
718.25
00
$15.98
$14.95
3.62%
46.23
242
994
26
$15,774.06
$373,00
$15.87
$14.35
2.55%
45.26
244
1,184
58
$19,625.44
$913.50
$16.58
$15.75
4.67%
46.51
An appreciable gain over 1923 is recorded in the number of employees in this calling. For
1924 it is pleasing to report that 27 extra firms added 144 names to the pay-rolls, thus bringing
the total employed to 1,365, spread over 314 establishments.
These places of business are situated as follows: Vancouver has 137 with 789 workers;
Victoria, 36 with 182 employees; Mainland, 341 women and girls with 117 different business
addresses;   Island, 53 employees in 24 work-places.
The Provincial pay-roll for the week is quoted at $22,223.42, distributed in the following
manner:  Vancouver, $12,764.60;   Victoria, $2,629.50;  Mainland, $5,949.82;   Island, $879.50.
The legal minimum in this line of work is $14 weekly for workers over 18, and $12 for the
younger girls. The averages for British Columbia in the two classes are $16.33 and $14.90,
respectively. In the four localities of the Province there is considerable variation in the
averages. For the adult employees an ascending scale of averages is: Victoria, $14.45; Vancouver, $16.21; Island, $16.96; and Mainland, $17.51. The order for girls' averages is : Island,
$13.10;  Victoria, $14.42;  Vancouver, $14.63;  and Mainland again in top place with $16.09.
This is one of the occupations in which the percentage of employees under 18 is always very
low. The Provincial figure is but 3.59 per cent. The following are the percentages for the four
parts of the Province:  Vancouver, 1.9;  Mainland, 4.69 ;  Victoria, 7.14;  and Island, 9.43.
Turning to the working-week it is perceived that the average for 1924 stands at 45.97 hours
weekly. The lawful working-week may run up to 48 hours with an extra four hours in emergency
cases. These additional hours carry with them the right of the employee to be paid at the rate
of time and one-half. In the cities of Victoria and Vancouver the average hours worked per
week are somewhat lower than on the Mainland and Island.
Barring highly seasonal occupations this is the one in which the temptation to require
employees to work long hours seems to be strongest. The Board has had to institute Police
Court proceedings in some instances to check this tendency. G 54
Department of Labour.
1925
Office Occupation.
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
Average hours worked per week	
1,171
2,799
92
$54,758.49
$1,113.50
$19.56
$12.10
3.18%
41.9
1,133
2,595
93
$50,285.00
$1,155.50
$19.38
$12.42
3.5%
41.90
1,097
2,502
91
$48,341.00
$1,110.50
$19.32
$12.20
3.5 %
41.93
1,043
2,434
50
$47,155.97
$577.00
$10.37
$11.54
2.01%
40.89
1,019
2,467
155
$47,941.00
$2,110.00
$19.43
$13.61
5.9%
41.5
From the returns received for 1924 it is worthy of observation that there are more employees
engaged in clerical work than in any other calling over which the Minimum Wage Board has
jurisdiction.
The 1,171 firms reporting supplied information concerning 2,891 office employees, 2,123 of
whom were in Vancouver, 361 in Victoria, 349 on the Mainland, and 58 on the Island. The
week's pay-roll reached a total of $55,871.99. Employees of Vancouver firms draw $41,586.50 of
this amount; Victoria is credited with $6,522.06. The Mainland figure is $6,723.40, and $1,040.03
are earned on the Island.
The weekly average for workers over IS years of age is much higher than in any of the
other all-the-year-round occupations, and, standing as it does at $19.56, has even surpassed the
1923 figure. The minimum prescribed by the Board's Order is $15. Dealing with the Vancouver
firms alone the average for employees over IS is $19.82 weekly. For the younger girls it is
$12.15. The Victoria calculations resulted in $18.10 and $14.56 for these respective averages.
From the Mainland forms the weekly averages were reckoned at $19.57 for the over-18 workers;
the Island average proved to be $18.76.
While this occupation has the high record for averages it also has a lower percentage of
young workers than any of the other groups. The Provincial figure is 3.18 per cent. In
Victoria this percentage is very low—namely, 2.49. Vancouver offices absorb 3.06 per cent, of
girls under 18, and the other divisions of the Province have a slightly higher percentage.
There is very little variation in the average weekly hours for the four parts of the Province.
The Mainland ranks low with 40.52 hours; the Island shows 41.76; the average for the entire
Province is 41.9. Next in order is Vancouver with 42.09 hours. Victoria's office-workers average
42.13 hours weekly.
Three hundred and forty-five, or 11.93 per cent, of the employees in this classification draw
wages in the sum of $25 a week or more, the highest actual weekly earnings being $62.50.
Personal Service Occupation.
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years -■	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
34
126
22
$2,009.79
$239.50
$15.95
$10.89
14.86%
38.14
34
91
18
$1,534.68
$208.00
$16.87
$11.56
16.51%
40.07
32
78
19
$1,
$
196.00
214.00
$15.33
$11.26
19.59%
3S.03
22
69
18
$1,077.50
$203.00
$15.62
$11.28
20.06%
38.52
37
144
17
$2,403.25
$246.00
$16.69
$14.47
10.56%
35.7 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 55
Out of the 34 firms employing 148 women and girls 22 are located in Vancouver, with 113
names on the pay-rolls. The 28 employees in Victoria are found in 7 establishments. The Mainland and Island figures are low, there being but 3 employers with 4 workers on the Mainland,
and 2 firms on the Island with 3 employees.
The weekly pay-roll for the entire Province was $2,249.29, of which amount $1,819.29 was
allotted to the Vancouver wage-earners and $389.50 to those in Victoria. On the Mainland and
Island the working-week was very short, and in consequence the earnings of the employees were
low.
British Columbia women workers over 18 years of age averaged $15.95 weekly, while the
figure for the girls worked out at $10.89. The result of computing the weekly averages for the
older workers in Vancouver and Victoria revealed $16.73 for the former and $14.76 for the latter.
The legal minimum for adult workers is $14.25 weekly.
The percentage of girls under 18 years of age in this occupation is 14.86 for the whole
Province. Victoria firms employ 17.86 per cent, of girls under 18. In Vancouver the figure is
lower, there being but 13.27 per cent, of the younger workers.
Ushers are included in this category, and as their hours are very broken the average working-
week in this occupation is shorter than in any other group. For the Province it is 38.14 hours,
in Vancouver it is 38.71 hours, and in Victoria 42.5 hours constitute the average working-week.
Fishing Industry.
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting ...
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
34
5
$601.44
$55.00
$17.69
$11.00
12.82%
50.59
31
1
$489.50
$13.50
$15.79
$13.50
3.12 9c
49.12
50
15
$778.00
$181.50
$15.56
$12.10
23.08%
46.08
36
12
.$534.00
$143.50
$14.81
$11.96
25.00%
41.5
24
1
$433.19
$9.50
$18.05
$9.50
4.00%
49.36
The minimum wage in this industry is $15.50 for experienced workers—the highest rate in
effect in British Columbia at the present time. As the Order does not apply to canning its scope
is limited to other branches of the industry, such as salting, smoking, etc.
Only 4 returns, covering 39 employees, Were received for 1924. Three of these, with 11
workers, were located in Vancouver. The other firm with the balance of employees on its
pay-roll was found on the Island.
The total wages for the week reported amounted to $656.44. The weekly average for
experienced workers, $17.69, exceeded last year's figure by $1.90.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
Average hours worked per week	
97
1,192
218
$21,256.75
$2,555.50
$17.83
$11.72
15.46%
42.29
94
1,089
204
$19,426.18
$2,289.50
$17.84
$11.22
15.78%
41.34
83
1,084
142
,18,698.50
$1,550.00
$17.25
$10.92
11.58%
41.53
69
988
158
$15,986.37
$2,113.50
$16.18
$13.38
13.8%
41.7
71
848
379
$14,528.00
$4,778.50
$17.13
$13.90
30.88%
42 G 56
Department of Labour.
1925
Ninety-seven firms in British Columbia wrere responsible for the wages of 1,410 telephone or
telegraph operators during 1924. These businesses were found to be situated as follows: 57 in
Vancouver with 929 operators; 5 in Victoria with 134 employees; 32 on the Mainland with
257 operators, and 3 on the Island with 90 employees.
The Provincial pay-roll for the week amounted to $23,812.25, made up in the following
manner:   Vancouver, $16,190.95;   Victoria, $2,369.58;   Mainland, $4,005.22;   Island, $1,246.50.
The minimum wage for experienced workers in this occupation is $15 for a 48-hour week,
with a lower scale for the inexperienced operators. The Provincial average is $17.83 for
experienced employees, and $11.72 for those who have not had sufficient training to entitle
them to the higher rate. In Vancouver the two averages are $18.46 and $12.34, respectively.
The average in Victoria for the experienced workers in still higher, being $18.70, while the
unskilled workers average $12.19. On the Mainland and Island the averages are somewhat
lower.
The percentage of inexperienced employees for British Columbia is 15.46, which is just a
trifle below the 1923 figure. The lowest percentage, 10.89, occurs on the Mainland. There are
14.44 per cent, of inexperienced workers on the Island, 15.67 in Victoria, and 16.79 in Vancouver.
The average weekly hours for British Columbia are 42.29, and range from 40.81 on the
Island, 41.94 in Victoria, 42.32 in Vancouver, to 42.86 on the Mainland.
A 44-hour week is actually worked by 447 operators, while 345 are busy 42 hours weekly.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1924.
1923.
Number of firms reporting..
39
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees..
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees..
Time.
625
14S
$9,849.70
$1,225.50
$15.76
$8.28
Piece.
252
65
$4,975.19
$573.50
$19.74
$8.82
Percentage of inexperienced employees..
Average hours worked per week   (time-
workers)	
19.54%
43.29
28
30
Time.
669
93
$11,302.50
$931.50
$16.89
$10.02
Piece.
298
122
$5,256.00
$744.50
$17.64
$6.10
Time.
574
242
$10,598.00
$1,967.50
$18.46
$8.13
Piece.
135
102
$2,619.00
$817.00
$19.40
$8.01
18.19%
47.77
32.67%
43.07
The fruit and vegetable industry is largely centred around the Okanagan Valley. The actual
pickers of fruit are not included in the figures herewith presented, as they and their employers
are specifically exempted from the provisions of the " Minimum Wage Act." Most of the girls
are engaged in work in and around the packing-houses and canneries.
In many branches of this industry piece-work is customary, and in some establishments no
record is kept of actual hours worked by each piece-worker. However, when hours were
reported for employees they were included amongst the time-workers, so that calculations to
obtain the average working-week would cover the greatest number.
Thirty-nine firms sent in returns covering 1,090 employees. The 29 Mainland establishments
contributed the major portion of the workers, accounting for 792. Vancouver, with 7 plants and
263 workers, ranked next. Victoria's 3 firms employed 35 women and girls. There were no
returns from the Island in this industry.
The total weekly wages for the Province reached the sum of $16,623.89, of which the
Mainland's share was $12,205.66. Vancouver employees earned $3,989.73, and the Victoria
workers were paid $42S.50.
For a 48-hour week the minimum wage is $14 for experienced workers, with slightly advanced
rates when additional hours must be put in to take care of the fruit which cannot be handled
in a normal working-day. Experienced time-workers and piece-workers for the entire Province
averaged $15.76 and $19.74 a week respectively. On the Mainland the piece-workers' average
was $21.50 and the time-workers' $15.72. In Vancouver $16.39 was the average for the time-
workers and $17.12 for those on a piece-rate basis. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 57
The percentage of inexperienced workers was found to be 19.54 for British Columbia. The
Vancouver firms employed 18.25 per cent, of this class of help, Mainland 19.44 per cent., and
Victoria 31.43 per cent.
The average working-week consisted of 43.29 hours for employees in the Province.
Manufacturing Industry".
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Number of firms reporting	
Number of employees—
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
240
1,262
218
20,510.60
$2,235.00
$16.25
$10.25
14.73?
43.65
1,107
249
$18,707.46
$2,494.50
$16.90
$10.02
18.36%
43.82
231
1,093
203
$17,485.00
$2,150.50
$16.00
$10.59
15.66%
43.92
199
1,145
298
$18,323.42
$2,939.00
$16.00
$9.86
20.65%
42.63
181
989
201
$16,454.96
$2,087.00
$16.64
$10.38
16.89%
43.8
Returns were received from 240 firms employing 1,480 employees. The Vancouver concerns
number 184, with staffs totalling 1,280. In Victoria 30 firms employed 136 workers, whose duties
were classified in the manufacturing industry. The Mainland recorded 22 establishments with
59 employees, the other 4 firms being located on the Island and employing 5.
The Provincial pay-roll for the week was $22,745.60, towards which Vancouver contributed
$19,624.10.    Victoria's share was $2,139, the Mainland's $913, and the Island's $69.50.
Piece-work prevails in some branches of this industry, but the minimum wage for experienced
employees, whether on a time-rate or piece-rate basis, is $14 for a week of 48 hours. The average
for skilled workers for the Province is $16.25 weekly. A rising scale of averages for the four
divisions would read as follows : Island, $15.50; Vancouver, $16.18 ; Victoria, $16.72; Mainland,
$16.88.
The percentage of inexperienced employees in British Columbia has dropped from 18.36 in
1923 to 14.73 in 1924. In the two cities of Vancouver and Victoria these percentages are 14.37
and 14.71 respectively. On the Mainland and Island there is a higher percentage of inexperienced
help employed, the figure for the former being 22.03 per cent, and for the latter 20 per cent.
The working-week averaged 43.65 hours for the Province. On the Island the employees
average the shortest week, or 41.6 hours. Vancouver's average is 43.51 hours; Victoria's, 44.45.
The employees on the Mainland work an average of 44.86 hours. Out of 1,480 employees 462
are actually on duty for 44 hours.
Summary of all Occupations.
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
2,287
2,195
2,135
1,923
1,939
Number of employees—
Over 18 years, or experienced	
10,355
9,612
8,989
8,592
8,481
Under 18 years, or inexperienced..
1,242
1,251
1,242
1,130
1,328
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or ex
perienced	
$176,517.87
$164,712.57
$152,890.94
$147,084.68
$147,247.01
Employees  under  18  years,  or
inexperienced	
$12,644.50
$12,511.50
$12,546.50
$11,671.10
$15,439.50
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or ex-
$17.05
$17.14
$17.00
$17.12
$17.36
Employees  under  18  years,  or
inexperienced	
$10.18
$10.00
$10.10
$10.33
$11.62
Percentage of employees under 18
10.71%
11.52%
12.14%
11.63%
42.96
13.54%
43.62
Average hours worked per week
43.09
43.31
43.28 G 58
Department of Labour.
1925
For the past four years co-operation of employers in furnishing reports has been more
pronounced each year. While it is frankly admitted that our figures for 1924 are not absolutely
complete, effort was made to secure as many returns as possible, with the result that the statistics
cover 92 more firms than in 1923. There is an increase, too, in the number of experienced
employees or those over 18 years of age. In 1923 records concerning 9,612 such workers were
received, but the 1924 total stood at 10,355. Since last year a slight decrease of 0.51 per cent.
is noticeable in the employment of young girls or unskilled workers.
The total weekly pay-roll amounted to $189,162.37, as against $177,224.07 the previous year.
The weekly average of $17.05 for the adult w-orkers registered a decrease of 9 cents from the
1923 figure, but the average for young girls rose from $10 to $10.18.
The average hours worked per week for the total number of women and girl workers are
43.09.
Length of Service.
The following table shows the length of time the employees served with the firms for whom
they were working at the time the returns were sent in to the Board. A study of the table
discloses that office-workers remain with their respective employers longer than those in other
callings. In marked contrast those engaged in public housekeeping occupations are apt to change
positions most frequently. Practically one-half the women in this group had been with their
employers less than -a year.
The fact that the fruit and vegetable season lasts but a few months each year accounts for
employers reporting 706 out of 1,090 workers having served them for less than twelve months.
As a general rule it is noticed that the length of training required for a particular line of
work has a distinct bearing on the time the employee will hold her position. An occupation
that requires little or no time in w-hich to acquire proficiency usually carries with it a frequent
labour turnover. Where long intensive preparation is necessary to qualify for a position the
changes do not occur nearly so often.
Table showing Labour Turnover in each Group—Number of Employees in Continuous Service
of Employer reporting.
DQ
C3
ui
60
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a
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X
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109
10
987
220
497
172
241
101
211
68
141
53
103
32
56
20
44
7
24
4
5
2
47
14
2,465
709
335
Laundry	
53
Public   house-
28
655
252
135
96
70
43
32
12
8
8
26
1,365
314
Office	
31
683
515
354
259
317
192
177
84
72
83
174
2,891
1,171
Manufacturing	
28
493
299
210
145
98
73
53
28
10
9
34
1,480
240
Personal service..
5
70
21
19
4
10
6
6
4
2
1
148
34
Telephone    a n d
1
399
279
147
103
195
94
47
50
24
10
61
1 410
97
1
27
3
1
1
1
39
4
Fruit   and   vege
table	
237
706
37
65
20
13
6
6
~397~
~23CT
1,090
39
Totals	
456
4,240
2,077
1,275
907
898
549
144
67
357
11,597
2,287
Peak Wage anr Record Service.
As the returns for each industry were dealt with note was made of the highest wage and
longest term of service with the same employer in each group. In the mercantile industry
$67.27 was the highest weekly wage. Two employees in one Vancouver store are receiving this
amount for their services. A Victoria worker with 20 years' continuous service to her credit
holds the record for the Province. 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Deputy Minister. G 59
In the laundry and dry-cleaning industry honours for the peak wage must be divided. Four
employees were in receipt of $25 a week; this being the top wage in this line of work. Two of
these young ladies were employed in dry-cleaning industries in Vancouver and a third in Victoria.
The fourth person in receipt of this amount was working in a laundry in Victoria. The City of
New Westminster is the home of the employee who has been longest in this line of work, her
record being 16 years with the same laundry.
The highest wage in the public housekeeping occupation is $43.04, which is paid weekly to
an employee of one of the company towns on the Coast. The honours for the longest service go
to an employee in a Vancouver hotel who has been working there for 21 years.
A weekly wage of $62.50, paid by a Vancouver firm is the highest in the Province for the
office occupation. With 31 years' service to her credit an employee of another terminal city
firm takes the premier place for continuous employment.
In the personal service occupation a $30 weekly wage and a service of 11 years and 10 months
outclass all others.    Two Vancouver firms share honours for these records.
Turning to the fishing industry we find that $28.15 a week is the highest wage. This is paid
by a firm on Vancouver Island. Four years constitutes the longest service reported in this line
of work.    This occurred in Vancouver.
The employee in Vancouver who earns $38.08 weekly should have the satisfaction of knowing
she is the highest paid worker in the telephone and telegraph occupation of which the Board
has record. A Victoria employee gets credit for having served the longest term with one
employer—namely, 21 years.
The highest wage paid in the fruit and vegetable industry was $44.38 for a week reported
by a Kelowna firm. A 6-year term with a Vancouver establishment is the longest continuous
period of employment in this calling.
An analysis of the forms received in the manufacturing industry reveals the fact that a
$40 weekly wage was the highest paid. Three employees in different Vancouver firms received
this amount.    Thirty-seven years in one Victoria firm easily outclasses all other records.
Conclusion.
Before concluding we desire to thank employers and employees who have co-operated with
the Board and its officials in the administration of the Act. May we specialy urge on the
women and girl workers of the Province the desirability of reporting any fancied or real violation
of any of the Minimum Wage Orders. Information thus given is held in strict confidence by the
Board, and the employee is always protected as fully as possible. It is inadvisable for a girl
to wait until after she has left her position or been discharged before registering a complaint
or reporting an infraction of the law.
For convenient reference a summary of the nine Orders of the Board is contained in the
Appendix to this Report. They were framed for the benefit of the working women of the
Province and have been in force for several years. The Order dealing with the mercantile
industry was the first to be promulgated, and is probably in need of revision. A reopening of
■an Order is made possible only by petition to the Board of employers or employees in the
industry.
During the past year the Board has felt that the regulations are becoming better known to
the general public, and the workers themselves are more familiar with the legislation that has
already proved its practical worth. For the future it is hoped that the girls will derive even
greater benefit than they have so far experienced.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Tour obedient servants,
J. D. McNiven, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
Thomas Mathews. G 60
Department of Labour.
1925
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS.
For convenient reference a summary of the Orders now in force is herewith appended:—
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
This includes all establishments operated for the purpose of trade in the purchase or sale of any
goods or merchandise; and includes the work of all female employees engaged therein on the sales
force; the wrapping force; the auditing or check-inspection force; the shoppers' force in the mailorder department; the receiving, marking, and stock-room employees; sheet-music saleswomen; and
those otherwise engaged in the sale, purchase, or distribution of any goods or merchandise.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
INEXPERIENCED
Workers.
Under
18
Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$12.75.    Hourly  rate,   26B/i6  cents.
$ 7 50 for
8 00   „
1st
2nd
3
3
months.
$  9 00 for 1st    3 months.
10 00   „   2nd   3
8 50
ff
3rd
3
,
11  00   „   3rd   3
9 00
ft
4 th
3
,
12 00   „   4th   3         „
9 50
„
5th
3
,
10 00
10 50
"
6th
7th
3
3
'
Licences   required   in   this
class.
11 50
"
8th
3
'
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    Time worked in excess of 48 hours must be paid for at
the hourly rate.
Order has been in force since February 24th, 1919.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING, AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$13.50.     Hourly   rate,   28%   cents.
8 00 for 1st
4 months
8 50   „   2nd
4
9 00   „   3rd
4
0 00   ,,   4th
4
1 00   „   5th
4
2 00   „   6th
4
$ 9 00 for 1st   4 months.
10 50   ,,    2nd   4
12 00   „   3rd   4
Licences   required   in   this
class.
Above rates are based on a 48-hour week. Maximum working-period 48 hours, governed by
" Factories Act."
Order has been in force since March 31st, 1919.
PUBLIC HOUSEKEEPING OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of waitresses, attendants, housekeepers, janitresses, cooks, and kitchen
help in restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, ice-cream parlours, light-lunch stands, and other places where
food is cooked, prepared, and served for which a charge is made; and the work of chambermaids in
hotels, lodging-houses, and apartments where lodging is furnished, whether or not such establishments
are operated independently or in connection with any other business; and the work of all female
elevator operators.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Ago.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29%  cents.
$12 00                                                      $12 00
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    In emergency cases 52 hours may be worked.    Time and
one-half shall be paid for work in excess of 4S hours and up to 52 hours. 15 Geo.
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 61
When lodging is furnished, not more than $3 a week may be deducted for such lodging.
When board or meals are furnished, not more than $5.25 may be deducted for a full week's
board of 21 meals.    A fraction of a week's board shall be computed upon a proportional basis.
As elevator operators are required by law to pass an examination before running elevators, no
apprenticeship is permitted under the Minimum Wage Order.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks,
filing clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other Orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer
operators, auditors, attendants in physicians' and dentists' offices, and all kinds of clerical help.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$15.     Monthly  rate,   $65.
Hourly rate, 31 Vi  cents.
$11 00 for 1st
12 00   „   2nd
13 00   „   3rd
14 00   „   4th
6 months.
6
6
6
$11 00 for 1st   3
12 00   „   2nd   3
13 00   „   3rd   3
14 00   „   4th   3
Licences   required
class.
months,
in   this
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum weekly working-period prescribed by Order, 4S
hours.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring, hairdressing, barbering, and other
work of like nature, or employed as ushers in theatres, attendants at shooting-galleries and other
public places of amusement, garages, and gasolene service stations, or as drivers of motor-cars and
other vehicles.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
1S Years of Age or over.
$14.25.    Hourly rate,   29"/i0 cents.
$10 00 for 1st    6 months.
11 00   „   2nd   6
12 00   „   3rd   6
13 00   „   4th   6
»$10  00 for 1st    3  months.
11 00   „   2nd   3
12 00   „   3rd   3
13 00   „   4th   3
Licences   required   in   this
class.
* These rates for learners do not apply to attendants at shooting-galleries and other public places of
amusement, garages, and gasolene service stations, or to drivers of motor-cars or other vehicles, for whom
no apprenticeship is deemed necessary.
Above rates are for 48-hour week, which is maximum permitted.
Wages for Ushers.
Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, or the like, engaged after 6 p.m., on legal holidays,
and for special matinees, are entitled to a wage of not less than 30 cents an hour, with a minimum
payment of 75 cents.
Ushers working more than 18 hours a week, but not in excess of 36 hours, are entitled to not
less than S10.80 a week. (Ushers in this category may be employed only between 1.30 p.m. and
11 p.m.)
Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours are entitled to not less than $14.25.
No distinction is made for ushers under 18 and over 18 years of age. No apprenticeship considered
necessary for ushers.
Order has been in force since September 15th, 1919. G 62                                             Department op Labour.                                               1925
FISHING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except
in the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50.    Hourly rate, 327/2i cents.
$12 75 for 1st    4 months.
13 75   „   2nd   4
14 75   „   3rd   4
Licences  required for inexperienced  employees 18 years of age or over.
Order has been in force since February 28th, 1920.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy, and shall also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of
the operation of telephone or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the
Board.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.    Hourly rate, 31%  cents.
$11 00 for 1st   3 months.
12 00   „   2nd   3
13 00   „   3rd   3
Licences  required  for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    Maximum hours permitted are 8 per day and 48 per week,
except in cases of emergency, when 56 hours may be worked.    Time and one-half is payable for hours
in excess of 48.    Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m.
and 8 a.m., 10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing
the number of hours of employment a week.
In cases where employees reside on the employer's premises, the employer shall not be prevented
from making an arrangement with such employees to answer emergency calls between the hours of
10 p.m. and 8 a.m.
Order has been in force since April 5th, 1920.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adopting for sale or use, any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29%  cents.
$10 00 for 1st   month.
11 00   „   2nd
12 00   „   3rd
Licences  required for inexperienced employees 18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 4S-hour wTeek.    For work over 48 hours, but not in excess of 60 hours,
wages shall be not less than 30 cents an hour for experienced workers, and for work in excess of
60 hours the rate shall be not less than 45 cents an hour. 15 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
G 63
Overtime work for inexperienced workers must be paid in the same proportion to their wages as
overtime for experienced employees.
Work in excess of 48 hours a week is permitted only during an emergency period of 90 days in
any 12 months, unless the Board finds unusual conditions necessitate a longer period, and it may then,
in its discretion, extend such emergency period.
Order has been in force Since September 3rd, 1922.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, and adapting for use or sale any article
or commodity, but excepting fish, fruit, and vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Schedule 1.
Schedule 2.
Schedule 3.
$14.   Hourly  rate,  29%
cents.
$ 8 00 for 1st   2 mos.
10 00   „   2nd 2     „
12 00   „   3rd  2     „
$ 8 00 for 1st   4 mos.
10 00   „   2nd 4     „
12 00   „   3rd  4     „
$  7 00 for 1st   6 mos.
10 00   „   2nd 6     „
13 00   „   3rd   6     „
Licences required for inexperienced workers 18 years of age or over.
Schedule 1 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-powders, molasses,
sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, biscuits,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, soft drinks, yeast, cans, buttons soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, whisks, pails, wash-boards, wooden boxes, clothes-pins,
matches, explosives, munitions, gas-mantles, and window-shades.
Schedule 2 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured
or adapted for use or sale: Cotton bags, envelopes, overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, gloves,
hats, caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, tents, awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding,
pillow-covers, loose covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made millinery,
knitted goods, blankets, brushes, machine-made cigars, and dipped chocolates.
Schedule 3 applies to the following occupations, or to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or adapted for use or sale: Bookbinding, embossing, engraving, printing,
dressmaking, men's and women's tailoring, ready-to-wear suits, paper boxes, jewellery, furs, leather
goods, hand-made cigars, boots, shoes, and hand-made millinery.
Schedule 3 does not apply to regularly indentured apprentices whose indentures have been approved
by the Minimum Wage Board.
The above rates are for a 48-hour week. No employee shall be employed more than 8 hours a
day, nor more than 48 hours a week, except when permission has been granted under the provisions
of the " Factories Act."
Order has been in force since November 20th, 1923. ASSOCIATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
In the preparation of the following list the intention has been to confine it to organizations
which have direct connection with the employment of labour, and not to include any which are
established purely for other business or social purposes. The list, which is numerically about
equal to that of last year, has been carefully corrected at the last possible moment before going
to press.
Box Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman,
A. M. Sharpe, B.C. Box Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Canadian Jewellers' Association (B.C. Section)
—Hon. Presidents, O. B. Allan and G. E.
Trorey; President, T. A. Lyttleton; Vice-
President, W. M. Gow; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Executive (District); J. Little, Victoria;
R, Kaplansky, Nanaimo; C. J. Whiten, Vernon ; W. J. Kerr, Kamloops; J. W. Duncan,
Victoria; A. Clausen, New Westminster;
J. Bulger, Prince Rupert.
B.C. Loggers' Association—President, P. A. Wilson, McCoy-Wilson, Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, L. R. Andrews, Metropolitan Building,
Vancouver. Officers elected annually on January 15th.
B.C. Lumber & Shingle Manufacturers' Association—President, J. D. McCormack, Canadian
Western Lumber Company, Fraser Mills; Secretary, R. H. H. Alexander, 917 Metropolitan
Building, Vancouver. Officers elected annually
on third Thursday in January.
B.C. Tow Boat Owners' Association—President,
C. S. Thicke, B.W.B. Navigation Co., foot of
Burrard Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Capt.
J. R. Stewart, 837 Hastings Street West, Vancouver ; Vice-President, Capt. Geo. McGregor,
Victoria Tug Company, Victoria. Election of
officers in September each year.
B.C. Wood-Workers' Section (affiliated with
CM.A.)—President, V. Winkle, Eburne Sash
and Door Co., Marpole; Secretary, J. W.
Curran, 796 Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C.
Division) ; Provincial Headquarters, 701-7
Board of Trade Building, Vancouver—Chairman, F. E. Burke, Wallace Fisheries, Ltd.;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (Victoria
Branch), 1008 Broad Street, Victoria—Chairman, J. L. Beckwith, 110 Belmont House, Victoria; Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 1008 Broad
Street, Victoria.
Canadian Storage & Transferrin's Association—
President, F. D. Gross, 94 Pender Street West,
Vancouver; Secretary, E. A. Quigley, Suite 10,
423 Hamilton Street, Vancouver. This Association has Board of Directors of each Province.
Canned Salmon Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, H. O.
Bell-Irving, Anglo-B.C. Packing Co., Ltd., Vancouver ;    Vice-Chairman,   R.   C.   Gosse,   Gosse-
Millerd, Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh
Dalton, 402 Pender Street West, Vancouver;
Assistant Secretary of Section, R. E. Banning,
705 Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Clay Products Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, James
Parfitt, Victoria Brick Company, Victoria;
Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 1008 Broad Street,
Victoria.
Drug Extract & Vinegar Manufacturers' Section,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, D. Hockin, National Drug and Chemical
Company, Ltd.; Vice-Chairman, W. A. Hunter ;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 Board of Trade
Building, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association, Inc.—President, L. A. Sandstrom, Pier 8, Seattle, Wash.;
Secretary, Capt. Martin Johnson, Pier 8,
Seattle, Wash.
General Cartage & Storage Association of B.C.—
President, Frank D. Gross, Mainland Transfer
Co., Ltd., 94 West Pender Street;   Secretary,
E. A. Quigley, Suite 10, Canadian Bank of
Commerce Chambers, 423 Hamilton Street,
Vancouver.
General   Contractors'   Association—President,   J.
F. Keen, 1st Vice-President, J. Tucker;
Secretary, W. G. Welsford, 300 Pender Street
West, Vancouver.
Jam Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman,
C. D. Hunter, Empress Manufacturing Co.,
Ltd., Vancouver; Vice-Chairman, H. C. Wade,
Dominion Canners, B.C. Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West,  Vancouver.
Metal Trades Employers' Section, CM.A. (B.C.
Division)—Chairman, A. McKelvie, Canadian
Sumner Iron Works, Vancouver; 1st Vice-
Chairman, W. J. Reid, Westminster Iron
Works, New Westminster ; 2nd Vice-Chairman,
T. M. Martin, Hall Machine Works, Vancouver;
Treasurer, J. Latta, Murray-Latta Machine
Works, Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton,
701 Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, E. W.
Izard, Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt; Secretary,
T. J. Goodlake, 1008 Broad Street, Victoria.
Mining Association of Interior British Columbia
—President, R. R. Bruce, Invermere; Secretary, W. H. Burgess, Kaslo.
Mining Association of British Columbia—President, C. P. Browning, Britannia Beach; Secretary, H. Mortimer Lamb, 902 Tower Building,
Arancouver. 15 Geo. 5
Report op the Deputy Minister.
G 65
Mountain Lumber Manufacturers' Association—
President, C. M. Pennock, Wardner; Secretary,
I. R. Poole, Nelson. Officers" elected at annual
meeting held in January.
Northern B.C. Lumbermen's Association—President, O. Hanson, Prince Rupert; Secretary,
W. E. Williams, Prince Rupert.
Printers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association — Chairman, II. L.
Graves, G. A. Roedde Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
West, Vancouver; Manager, R. L. Norman,
701 Board of Trade Building, Vancouver.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Board—President, Daryl H. Kent, Vancouver ; Vice-President, H. S. Stevenson, Victoria ; 2nd Vice-President, T. J. Wilcox, Kamloops ; 3rd Vice-President, E. R. McTaggart,
Vancouver; Treasurer, J. M. Hyslop, New
Westminster ; Dominion Representative, Joseph
T. Crowden, Vancouver; Secretary, Walter F.
Ing, Vancouver, Head Provincial Office at 420
Pacific Building, Vancouver. Branches are
established at Armstrong, Chilliwack, Cranbrook, Duncan, Kamloops, Kelowna, Lytton,
Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson, Prince Rupert,
Revelstoke, Vancouver. At New Westminster
there is a District Branch serving the principal
towns of the Lower Fraser Valley.
Shingle Manufacturers' Association of B.C.—
President, Robert McNair, Robert McNair
Shingle Co.; Vice-President, C. J. Culter,
Westminster Mills, Ltd.; Secretary-Manager,
E. Bevan, 102 Yorkshire Building, Vancouver.
Meets for election of officers in January each
year.
Shipping Federation of B.C.—Manager and Secretary, Major W. C. D. Crombie, Orange Hall,
341 Gore Avenue, Vancouver. Meets for election of officers in January each year.
Vancouver Association of Electragists—President,
P. F. Letts, 3044 Granville Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, J. Hart, Room 323 B.C. Electric
Building, Vancouver; Office, 425 Pacific Building.    Officers elected annually in September.
Vancouver Association of Sanitary & Heating
Engineers—President, W. Moscrop, 861 Seymour Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Robert G.
Hargreaves, 425 Pacific Building, Vancouver.
Officers elected annually in June.
B.C. Hotels' Association—President, W. K.
Clark; 1st Vice-President, D. A. Ford; 2nd
Vice-President, D. Bowes; Secretary, B. G.
Frazer-Crierie, 514 Richards Street, Vancouver ;   Treasurer, A. Austin.
Timber Industries Council of B.C.—President,
J. D. McCormack, Canadian Western Lumber
Co., Ltd.; Managing Director, W. MacNeill,
911 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Victoria Bread & Cake Manufacturers' Association—President, D. W. Hanbury, Golden West
Bakery; Secretary, H. Amphlett, 212 Union
Bank Building. Election of officers annually
in January.
Victoria Builders' Exchange—President, William
Luney, 508 Sayward Building; Secretary, J.
W. Bolden, 2509 Prior Street. Officers elected
annually in January.
Western Canada Coal Operators' Association—
President, John Shanks, Nordegg, Alta.; Secretary, R. M. Young, Calgary, Alta. Officers
elected on second Friday in January each year. G 66
Department of Labour.
1925
UNION DIRECTORY.
In our endeavour to present an up-to-date directory of trade-union organizations and their
officials we have been greatly assisted by union secretaries and others, to whom our grateful
acknowledgments are tendered. The number of such organizations in the Province does not
show any material difference as compared with last year's, a few local organizations having gone
out of existence and others having been initiated. The Department will appreciate any intimation of changes in the list which may be made from time to time.
TRADES AND LABOUR CONGRESS OF
CANADA.
President, Thomas Moore, Ottawa. Vice-Presidents, J. T. Foster, Montreal; Jas. Simpson,
Toronto; Bert. Nelson, Toronto; Secretary-
Treasurer, P. M. Draper, Hope Building,
Ottawa.
B.C. EXECUTIVE OF TRADES & LABOUR
CONGRESS.
Chairman, Percy R. Bengough, Room 803, 16
Hastings Street East, Vancouver. Members,
W. H. Cottrell, 166 Seventeenth Avenue East,
Vancouver; E. S. Woodward, Labour Temple,
Victoria; S. D. McDonald, P.O. Box 268,
Prince Rupert.
NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.
Canadian Merchant Service Guild.
Vancouver—President, Capt. W. S. Morehouse,
c/o Independent Pilots, Ltd., 510 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver; Secretary, A. Good-
lad, 505 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Meets at 505 Hastings Street West twice a
month.
Victoria—Secretary, Capt. T. H. Brown, 408
Union Bank Building.
National Association of Marine Engineers.
Vancouver Council No. 7—President, H. J.
Hutchinson, 1936 First Avenue West, Vancouver ; Secretary, E. Read, 232 Thirteenth
Street West, North Vancouver. Meets at 319
Pender Street on Fridays in winter months
and on second and fourth Fridays in summer
months at 8 p.m.
Victoria Council No. 6—President, W. C. Jordan,
2929 Queen's Avenue; Secretary, G. Brown,
Box 299, Victoria. Meets at 401 Union Bank
Building at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays
of month.
TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCILS.
Prince Rupert—President, S. D. McDonald, Empire Office, Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. Derry,
Box 498, Prince Rupert. Meets at Carpenter's
Hall on second and fourth Tuesdays of each
month.
Vancouver, New Westminster and District—
President, R. H. Neelands, M.P.P., 804 Holden
Building, Vancouver; Secretary, P. R. Bengough, 803 Holden- Building, Vancouver. Meets
first and third Tuesdays of each month on
second floor, Holden Building, at 8 p.m.
Vancouver Trades Council, Metal Trades Department—See P. R. Bengough, 803 Holden Building, Vancouver.
Victoria—Corresponding Secretary, E. S. Woodward, 1325 Carlin Street. Meets at 8 p.m. on
first and third Wednesdays in month at Trades
Hall,  Broad  Street.
Federated Trades  Councils   (Railroads).
Victoria (Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Employees' Federation)—President, Geo. Phil-
brook, 637 King's Road, Victoria; Secretary,
J. Booth, Victoria. Meets in Room 4, Green
Block, Victoria, at 7.30 p.m. on first Monday
in month.
DISTRICT LODGES AND COUNCILS.
International Association of Machinists.
Vancouver District Lodge No. 78—President,
Bert. Oliver, 807 Holden Building, Vancouver;
Secretary, A. W. Tait, 1865 Tenth Avenue
West. Meets on first Wednesday of each month
at S07 Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
District No. 2 (all Railroads in Canada)—President, D. S. Lyons, 331 Edmonton Street, Winnipeg; Secretary, H. Kemster, 14 Labour Temple,
Winnipeg. Time and place of meeting decided
by referendum of members.
Allied Printing Trades Council.
Vancouver—President, Frank Milne, Box 66,
Vancouver; Secretary, R. H. Neelands, Box
66, Vancouver. Meets at 804 Holden Building,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second Monday in
month.
Victoria—Secretary, T. A. Burgess, 2094 Byron
Street, Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad
Street, at 8 p.m. on second Friday in month.
Theatrical Federation  of Vancouver.
President—E. A. Jamieson, 991 Nelson Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, G. W. Allin, 2835
Stephens Street. Meets at 991 Nelson Street
at 10 a.m. on Tuesday before first Sunday in
month.
Civil Servants' Council.
Vancouver—President, R. D. E. McMahon, North
Lonsdale P.O.; Secretary, J. Linsen, 2334
Second Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets in
Eagles' Hall on third Tuesday of each month
at 8 p.m.
TRADE UNIONS.
Ashcroft.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 210—President, J. D. Nicol,
Savona; Secretary, R. Halliday, Box 8, Spences
Bridge. Meets at Ashcroft at 7.30 p.m. on third
Saturday of March, June, September, and
December. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 67
Boulder.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 15—President, J. H. Davies,
Blackpool, B.C.; Secretary, M. Roirdan,
Vavenby, B.C.
Burnaby.
Civic Employees' Union, No. 23—Secretary, Chas.
B. Brown, 2195 Linden Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Central Park.
Carpenters & Joiners (Amalgamated), No. 2605
President, F. Williams, 2469 Twenty-ninth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Muir-
head, 2572 Monmouth Avenue, South Vancouver.
Copper Mountain.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, International, No.
160—Secretary, J. Cuthbertson, Copper Mountain.
Chilliwack.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
31—President, K. Hall, Rosedale; Secretary,
T. J. Blackadder, Box 134, Matsqui. Meets at
1.30 p.m. on first Sunday in March, June,
September, and December at C.N.R. Freight
Office Building, Vancouver.
Cranbrook. <
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 632—Secretary, T. E. Smith, Cranbrook,
B.C. Meets at 8.30 p.m. on last Monday in
month at A. H. Bullock's Barber Shop, Cranbrook.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers,
No. 308—Secretary, A. Mueller, c/o Cranbrook
Brewing Company, Cranbrook.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 559—President, R. Bartholomew,
Cranbrook; Secretary, M. H. Johns, Box 214,
Cranbrook. Meets at 2.30 p.m. on first and
third Sundays in month at Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
563—President, Hugh J. Brook, Box 551, Cranbrook ; Secretary, A. H. Johnson, Cranbrook.
Meets at 8 p.m. on alternate Mondays in Maple
Hall.
Machinists, International, No. 588—President, W.
Henderson, P.O. Box 827, Cranbrook; Secretary, R. J. Lawrie, Box 291, Cranbrook.
Meets at residence of Secretary on first Sunday
each month at 4.30 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
229—President, Geo. C. Brown, Box 939, Cranbrook ; Secretary, Frank Romano, Kitchener.
Meets at Cranbrook at call of Secretary.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 407—President, R. T. Tiffin, Cranbrook;
Secretary, W. A. Wilson, Box 843, Cranbrook.
Meets at K. of P. Hall, Cranbrook, on second
Sunday in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 173—President, W. Hewson, French
Avenue,   Cranbrook;    Secretary,   J.   F.   Lunn,
200 Durick Avenue, Cranbrook. Meets at 8
p.m. at I.O.O.F. Hall, Norbury Avenue, on first
Wednesday in month.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
585—President, F. Doodson, Cranbrook; Secretary, P. C. Hartnell, Box 865, Cranbrook.
Meets at Maple Hall every Sunday at 7.30 p.m.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1292—
President, L. E. W. Cox, General Delivery,
Cranbrook; Secretary, E. G. Dingley, Box 728,
Cranbrook. Meets in Auditorium, Cranbrook,
on second and fourth Sundays in month at
3 p.m.
Corbin.
United Mine Workers of America, Local No. 2877
—President, J. Williams, Corbin; Secretary,
J. R. MacDonald, Box 273, Corbin. Meets at
Union Hall, Corbin, every second1 Sunday at
2 p.m.
Duncan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
533—Secretary, H. W. McKenzie, Box 356,
Duncan.
Essondale.
Mental Hospital Attendants' Union, No. 35 (T.
& L.C.)—President, Kenneth C. Story; Secretary, J. MeD. Nicholson.
Fernie.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers
of America, International Union of, Local No.
308—President, P. Robinson, 206 Howland
Avenue; Secretary, J. E. Robson, Box 1071,
Fernie. Meets at 96 Howland Avenue, Fernie,
on first Monday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
United Mine Workers of America, Local No. 2314
—Secretary, R. Derbyshire, Fernie. Meets at
Grand Theatre on Fridays at 7.30 p.m.
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, No. 1454—Secretary, G. A. Wood, Field, B.C.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
165—Secretary, C. Godfreyson. Meets at
Golden on the last Sunday of each quarter at
10 a.m.
Kamloops.
Brewery,  Flour,  Cereal &  Soft Drink Workers,
No. 276—Secretary, De Lance Green, 307 Main
Street,   Kamloops.     Meets   first   Tuesday   in
• month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 821—President, C. G. Sutherland, Kamloops ; Secretary, T. J. O'Neill, Box 753, Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall on first and third
Thursdays in month at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 855—Secretary, J. Patterson, Kamloops.
Meets first and third Sundays at Orange Hall,
Kamloops, at 2.30 p.m. G 68
Department of Labour.
1925
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 258—President, H. C. Embree,
Kamloops; Secretary, R. Eccles, Box 380,
Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops,
at 2.30 p.m. on first and third Tuesdays in
month.
Railroad Employees, No. 161—President, J. E.
Fitzwater, Kamloops; Secretary, N. Papworth,
Kamloops.
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 148
—President, O. E. Klemmer, North Kamloops;
Secretary, J. Clarke, 903 Battle Street, Box
776, Kamloops. Meets on first Thursday and
fourth Friday in month at 8 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 611—President, A. G. Corry, Kamloops ; Secretary, W. Bailey, Box 798, Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops, on.
second and fourth Sundays in month at 2 p.m.
Railway Enginemen, Canadian Association of—
Secretary, W. Dohm, Kamloops.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
519—Secretary, V. A. Mott, Kamloops. Meets
at Orange Hall, Kamloops, on second Sundays
and fourth Tuesdays in month at 7 p.m.
Kitchener.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 229—Secretary, Frank Romano,
Wycliffe, B.C.
Lucerne.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1874—Secretary, A. Grieve, Lucerne Station.
Locomotive Engineers, No. 898—Secretary, S. F.
Hickingbottom.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, No. 904—■
President, P. Sorenson, Lucerne; Secretary,
O. E. Jacobson, Lucerne. Meets at School-
house, Lucerne, on first and third Sundays in
month at 3 p.m.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 727—
President, C. Cameron, Lucerne; Secretary, A.
McEachren, Lucerne.
Railway Conductors, No. 674—Chief Conductor,
M. J. Williams, Lucerne; Secretary, H. Square-
briggs. Meets at Lucerne every Sunday at
3 p.m.
Matsqui.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 31—President, P. E. Crick,
Kamloops Junction; Secretary, F. Kent, Box
A., Lytton. Meets at C.N.R. Freight Office
Building, Vancouver, at 11 a.m. on first Sunday
in March, June, September, and December.
Mission City.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
168—President, F. W. Brunton, Hatzic Post-
office ; Secretary, H. Anderson, Box 10, Harrison Mills. Meets at North Bend on third
Sunday in January, April, July, and October.
Michel.
United Mine Workers of America, Local No. 2334
—Secretary, S. Weavers. Meets in Natal Club
Hall, Natal, at 2.30 p.m. on Sundays.
Nanaimo.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 54
—President, W. J. Ince, 321 Prideaux Street,
Nanaimo; Secretary, W. H. McMillan, 410
Bruce Avenue, Nanaimo. Meets at 7.30 p.m.
on first Tuesday of month.
Postal Clerks Association, Dominion—Secretary,
Copley Bennett, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
337—President, James J. Begg, c/o Free Press
Block, Nanaimo; Secretary, L. C. Gilbert, Box
476, Nanaimo.   Meets at call of President.
Nelson.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 196—President, Eli Sutcliffe, Nelson; Secretary, H. Hughes, P.O. Box 465, Nelson.
Meets at 417% Hall Street, Nelson, at 8 p.m.
on last Thursday in month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 579—President, J. Simons, 203 Silica
Street, Nelson; Secretary, E. Jeffcott, 610
Mill Street, Nelson. Meets at Recreation
Club, Nelson, on first and third Sundays in
the month at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Division No. 631—President, G. Turner,
Box, 1084, Nelson; Secretary, Geo. Allan, Box
1084, Nelson. Meets second and fourth Sundays at 1.30 p.m. in I.O.O.F. Hall.
g Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 663—President-Secretary, Fred. Chapman,
Box 253, Nelson.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
181—President, H. Erickson, Midway; Secretary, F. Gustafson, Box 265, Nelson. Meets last
Sunday in January, April, July, and October
at 2 p.m. at Nelson.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, Local No. 95—■
Secretary, Marcus Martin, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 98—President, R. Cook, Box 705,
Nelson; Secretary, J. Shardelow, Box 765,
Nelson. Meets in McGregor Hall, Nelson, at
7.30 p.m. on second Thursday in month.
Railwav Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 460—Chief Conductor, A. B. Hall, 915
Stanley Street, Nelson; Secretary, H. L.
Genest, Box 216, Nelson. Meets in K. of P.
Hall at 1.30 p.m. on second Sunday in month.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
558—President, P. Jeffrey, 120 Mines Road,
Nelson; Secretary, A. Kirby, 820 Carbonate
Street, Nelson, Meets at Community Building,
cor. Stanley and Victoria Streets, at 2 p.m. on
second Sunday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1291—
President, James Kay, Box 924, Nelson; Secretary, A. T. Richards, Box 701, Nelson. Meets
in Nelson on first Monday of each month at
8.30 p.m.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 340
—President, D. C. McMorris, " Daily News,"
Nelson; Secretary, L. E. Pascoe, " News,"
Nelson. Meets in Daily News Office, Nelson,
at 5.10 p.m. on last Wednesday in month. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 69
New Denver.
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, No. 98—Secretary, A. Shilland, New Denver.
New Westminster.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 573—President, C. Moir, New Westminster ; Secretary, Geo. Yorkstown, 35 Eighth
Street, New Westminster. Meets at 35 Eighth
Street on fourth Thursday in month at 7 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1251—President, W. Moody,
Twentieth Street, Edmonds; Financial Secretary, T. Blackledge, 824 Fifth Avenue, New
Westminster; Recording Secretary, A. E. Cor-
bett, Labour Temple, New Westminster. Meets
at Labour Temple on first Thursday in month
at 7.30 p.m.
Civic Employees of New Westminster, Union of
—President, Richard' Reid, 525 Ninth Street,
New Westminster; Secretary, Rees Morgan,
313 Regina Street, New Westminster. Meets
in Labour Temple at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday
in month.
Civil Servants of Canada (Amalgamated)—President, F. McGrath, New Westminster; Secretary, II. G. Cox, Box 40, New Westminster.
Meets at Dominion Building on second Tuesday
in month at 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
256—President, W. Mathew, 910 London
Street; Secretary, T. A. Briggs, 1123 Eighth
Avenue, New Westminster. Meets at No. 1
Fire Hall (no set day) during first week of
month at 8 p.m.
Fishermen's Protective Association of B.C.—■
President, L. Patterson, Annieville; Secretary,
W. E. Maiden, Suites 2 and 3 Cliff Block, New
Westminster. Meets at Room 24, Hart Block,
New Westminster, at 3.30 p.m. on first Saturday of each month.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 151—President, F. Sinnett, Kingsway;
Secretary, D. MacDonald, 360 Sherbrooke
Street, New Westminster. Meets in Labour
Temple on first Friday in each month at 8 p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 654
—President, F. Staton, 926 Tenth Street, New
Westminster; Secretary, F. C. Bass, 61 Sixth
Street, New Westminster. Meets in Labour
Temple at 2.30 p.m. on fourth Sunday in month.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 280—President, F. Woods, Alta
Vista; Secretary, W. Duark, 214 St. Patrick
Street, New Westminster. Meets at Labour
Temple on third Friday in month at 8 p.m.
Retail Clerks' International Protective Association, No. 1306—President, W. W. Callander,
321 Pine Street; Secretary, J. Ellis, 719 Thirteenth Street, New Westminster. Meets last
Thursday in month in Hart Block at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 134
—President, R. C. Higgins, 709 Fifth Avenue,
New Westminster; Secretary, J. B. Mouat,
525 Tenth Street, New Westminster.   Meets in
Labour Temple at 7 p.m. on first and third
Tuesdays in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
632—President, A. R. MacDonald, Box 1024,
New Westminster; Secretary, R. A. Stoney,
Box 1024, New Westminster. Meets in Labour
Temple at 8 p.m. on last Friday in month.
Notch Hill.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 193—President, M. Kubin,
Sicamous;   Secretary, W.  Loftus, Notch Hill.
Penticton.
Locomotive Engineers, No. 866—President, F.
McA. Stocker, Penticton; Secretary, C. Cor-
nock, Box 64, Penticton. Meets at Burtch's
Hall, Penticton, on second and fourth Sundays
of each month at 3 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1023—President, James Slatter, General Delivery, Penticton; Secretary, R. F. Olsen, Box
294, Penticton. Meets in Penticton at 1 p.m.
on second Sunday of every second month.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 884—President, C. A. Tupper,
Penticton; Secretary, R. O. Blackstock, Box
385, Penticton. Meets at Penticton on second
and fourth Thursdays of month about 12.30 p.m.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
914—President, R. S. Fraser, Box 43, Penticton ; Secretary, Angus Campbell, P.O. Box
389, Penticton. Meets at Burtch's Hall, Penticton, on first and third Sundays of each
month at 9.30 a.m. and 2.30 p.m.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
541—President, H. de Pencier, Penticton;
Secretary, W. B. Hilliard, Enderby. General
meetings, Kelowna; monthly meetings, Penticton, at 8.30 p.m. on fourth Saturday of
month. Area comprises, Vernon, Armstrong,
Kelowna, Penticton, and Princeton.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1426—President, H. Suckling, Box 322, Penticton ; Secretary, W. G. Archard, General
Delivery, Penticton. Meets on first Monday in
month at 8 p.m.
Point Grey.
Fire Fighters' International Association, No. 260
—President, E. S. Vaughan, No. 1 Fire Hall,
Kerrisdale; Secretary, H. Foulkes, No. 1 Fire
Hall, Kerrisdale. Meets at 319 Pender Street
West, Vancouver, on first Thursday of each
month at 10.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m.
Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's Club (unchartered)—Secretary,
W. G. Bigmore, Port Alberni.
Powell River.
Pulp, Sulphite & Paper Mill Workers of United
States and Canada, International Brotherhood
of, Local No. 76—President, George P.
O'Malley, Powell River; Secretary, J. A
Goddard, Powell River. Meets first and thi-d
Sundays of each month at Central Hall. G 70
Department op Labour.
1925
Prince George.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 843—President, George Abbott, Prince
George; Secretary, R. McChesney, Box 265,
Prince George. Meets in Odd Fellows' Hall on
second and fourth Mondays of each month at
2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Mount Robson Lodge, No. 827—President,
E. J. Rice, Prince George; Secretary, F. Hornby, Prince George. Meets in I.O.O.F. Hall at
7.30 p.m. on first and third Sundays in the
month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Nechako
Lodge No. 1870—President, W. Cullen, Box
289, Prince George; Secretary, T. Nielsen,
Box 162, Prince George. Meets alternately at
Endako and Prince George about every six
weeks, date set at each meeting.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
202—President, A. Peterson, Newlands; Secretary, W. Sims, McBride. Meets at McBride
and Prince George about end of each quarter.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 620—President, Bert Gogna, Prince George ;
Secretary, J. E. Paschall, Box 305, Prince
George. Meets in" Prince George on second and
fourth Sundays in month at 8 p.m.
Railroad   Employees,   Local   No.   28—President,
F. C. Saunders, Prince George; Secretary, H.
A. MacLeod, Prince George. Meets in Odd
Fellows' Hall at call of President.
Prince Rupert.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1735—President, Chas. Taylor, Box 225 ; Secretary, Marcus Andrews, Box
225, Prince Rupert; Financial Secretary, T.
Ross Mackay, Box 1573, Prince Rupert. Meets
in Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on first and third
Wednesdays of each month.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
Canadian Radio Division No. 65—-.General
Chairman, F. J. Hollis, Radio Station, Alert
Bay, B.C.; Secretary, W. T. Burford, 4144
Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Time
and place of meetings variable.
Deep Sea Fishermen's Union of the Pacific—
Secretary-Treasurer, P. B. Gill, 84 Seneca
Street, Seattle. Meets at 84 Seneca Street,
Seattle, also at Prince Bnpert and Ketchican
on Tuesdays at 7.30 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 344—President, A. McRae, Box 457,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, S. Massey, Box 457,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at
8 p.m. on first Monday of each month.
Longshoremen's Association, International, Local
No. 38-41—President, G. Mathers, Box 531,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. W. Reich, Box
531, Prince Rupert. Meets at Prince Rupert
on Monday of each week at 8 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 207—President, W. Horrobin, General De
livery, Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. Campbell,
Box 469, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall at 8 p.m. on second Wednesday in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
335—President, J. E. McDonald, Caspaco;
Secretary, T. G. McManaman, c/o C.N. Railway, Kwinitsa. Meets alternately at Usk and
Prince Rupert at call of President and Secretary.
Plumbers & Steamfitters of the United States and
Canada, United Association of, Local No. 495
—President, R. Wilson, P.O. Box 209, Prince
Rupert; Secretary, W. M. Brown, Box 209,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at
8 p.m. on first Monday in the month.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 426—President, H. Leaper, Box 465,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, Frank Derry, Box
498, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall,
Eighth Street, Prince Rupert, at 8 p.m. on
second and third Mondays of each month.
Railway Employees, Brotherhood of, Division No.
154—President, H. R. Hill, General Delivery,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. G. Atherley,
General Delivery, Prince Rupert. Meets on
Thursdays at 8.30 p.m.
Sheet Metal Workers, International Alliance,
Local No. 672—President, G. H. Dobb; Secretary, A. Hudema, Box 826, Prince Rupert.
Meets in Trades and Labour Council Hall at
8 p.m. on fourth Friday in the month.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Local No. 510—
President, J. E. Boddie, Box 398, Prince
Rupert; Secretary, J. R. Brown, Box 62,
Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at
8 p.m. on first Friday of each month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
413—President, S. D. MacDonald, Box 689,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. M. Campbell,
Box 689, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall at 3 p.m. on last Sunday of each month.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 407—
President, Jas. Mathie, Revelstoke; Secretary,
Jas. M. Goble, Box 283, Revelstoke. Meets in
Selkirk Hall on the fourth Saturday of each
month at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
657—President, H. Carpenter, Box 5, Revelstoke ; Secretary, J. P. Purvis, Box 27, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on first and third
Tuesdays of each month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 341—President, W. L. Lea,
Revelstoke; Secretary, W. Pavey, Box 438,
Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall, Revelstoke,
on first and third Wednesdays of each month
at 2.30 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 258—President, A. W. Bell, Box 234, Revelstoke ; Secretary, Dugald Bell, Box 234, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8 p.m. on
second Monday of month. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 71
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
208—President, A. L. Anderson, Revelstoke;
Secretary, A. Blackberg, Revelstoke. Meets in
Revelstoke at 2 p.m. on last Sunday in January,
April, June, and October.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 481—President, A. Shepherd, Revelstoke ; Secretary, H. Parsons, Box 42, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 7.30 p.m. on
third Tuesday of each month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of,
Mount Stephen Division, Local No. 487—President, W. H. Perry, Revelstoke; Secretary, C.
R. Clay, Box 444, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk
Hall on second Monday at 7.30 p.m. and fourth
Thursday of each month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
51—President, D. A. McDonald, Revelstoke;
Secretary, W. Maxwell, Revelstoke. Meets at
Revelstoke at 2 p.m. on first Sunday and at 8
p.m. on third Monday of each month.
Salmon Arm.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
193—President, M. Kubin, Sicamous; Secretary, W. Loftus, Notch Hill. Meets at Salmon
Arm at 1 p.m. on third Sunday in March, June,
September, and December.
Salvas.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 335—President, J. E. McDonald, Sockeye; Secretary, G. McManaman,
Telegraph Point.
Smithers.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America, No.
53—Chairman and Secretary, W. Mitchell,
Smithers.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local
No. Ill—Chief Engineer, J. E. Carpenter,
Smithers; Secretary, S. J. Mayer, Smithers.
Meets at Smithers on first and third Tuesdays
in month at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, No. 902—President, B. Ross, Smithers;
Secretary, T. L. Stafford, Smithers.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
340—President, J. McKenzie, Moricetown;
Secretary, E. Gunderson, Smithers. Meets at
Smithers every three months.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
No. 157—Secretary, Hugh Forrest, Smithers.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Farthest
North Lodge, No. 869—President, A. Green-
halgh, Box 180, Smithers; Secretary, H. H.
Oleson, Box 180, Smithers. Meets at Railway-
men's Hall, Smithers, on first and third Thursdays of each month at 8.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415—Secretary, G. W. Smith, Box 92, Smithers. Meets at Social Hall, Smithers, on first
Thursday in month at 7.30 p.m.
South Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union—President, A. W.
Richardson, Municipal Hall, South Vancouver;
Secretary, W. S. Welton, Municipal Hall,
South Vancouver. Meets at Municipal Hall,
South Vancouver, on second Tuesday in month
at 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
259—President, G. Hearnden, 2625 Forty-ninth
Avenue East, Collingwood; Secretary, L. B.
Taylor, 5614 Culloden Street, South Vancouver.
Meets at No. 3 Fire Hall, South Vancouver, at
5.30 p.m. on first Monday of month.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1419—Secretary, W. F. Ogilvie, Squamish;
President, T. Smith.
Steveston.
Fishermen's Benevolent Society (Japanese Independent)—Secretary, G. Takahashi, Steveston.
Stewart.
Mine, Mill & Smelters Workers' Union, International, Local No. 181—Secretary, W. Fraser,
Stewart.
Trail.
Machinists,   International  Association  of,   Local
No. 763—President, A. Balfour, Box 114, Trail;
Secretary, T. Meachem, Box 74, Trail.    Meets
in Miners' Hall at call of Chair.
Musicians,   American  Federation  of,   No.  685—
President, J. Pasta; Secretary, W. L. Dunning,
Box 627, Trail.
Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen's International Union of America, Local No. 371—President, A. Wylie, 4336
Elgin Street, Vancouver; Secretary, H. A.
Bowron, 929 Eleventh Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at Holden Building on second
Thursday of each month at 8 p.m.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 120—Secretary, A. R. Jennie, 728 Hastings
Street West. Meets at 810 Holden Building at
7.15 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays in
month.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 151—President, W. J. Bartlett, 1154 Howe Street; Secretary, A. Annan, 2048 Second Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings Street East
at 8 p.m. on fourth Friday of each month.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 194—President, C. McMillan, 1020 Hornby Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. Fraser, 5079 Ross
Street, South Vancouver. Meets at Holden
Building at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays
of each month.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 105—President, F. J. Milne, 536 Drake
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Arthur Hobden,
Box 411, Vancouver. Meets at Holden Building, Hastings Street, Vancouver, on second
Tuesday of each month at 8 p.m. G 72
Department of Labour.
1925
Boot & Shoe Workers' Union, Local No. 505—■
Secretary, T. G. Griffiths, 3622 McGill Street,
Vancouver. Meets at 804 Holden Building at
8 p.m. on first Wednesday in month.
Bricklayers, Masons & Plasterers' International
Union of America, Local Union No. 1, B.C.—
Secretary, W. J. Pipes, Box 53, Vancouver.
Meets at 808 Holden Building, Vancouver, on
second and fourth Wednesdays in month at 8
p.m.
Bridge & Structural Iron Workers, International
Association of, Local No. 97—President, W.
Dickeson, Box 1196, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. Dunn, Box 1196, Vancouver. Meets at 611
Holden Building, 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. each Monday.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated, Branch No.
1—President, W. Taylor, 3330 Miller Avenue,
Burnaby; Secretary, F. Prosser, 2083 Forty-
third Avenue West, Kerrisdale. Meets at 163
Hastings Street West"at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Tuesdays of each month.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated, Branch No.
2—President, G. Finlay, 4424 Walden Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, W. Bray, 72 Sixteenth
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at Flack
Building, 163 Hastings Street West, on first
and third Tuesdays of month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 452—President, G. L. Thorn, 809
Holden Building, Vancouver; Secretary, W.
Page, 809 Holden Building, Vancouver. Meets
at 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8
p.m. on second and fourth Mondays in month.
Cigarmakers, International Union of America,
Local No. 357—President, J. Halawell, 3939
Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, R. A. Shaw, 1022 Seymour Street, Vancouver. Meets at 804 Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday in month.
City Hall Employees' Association—President, W.
H. Lewthwaite, 2586 Eton Street; Secretary,
H. A. Black, 2870 Yale Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 445 Richards Street, Vancouver, at 8
p.m. on first Wednesday of each month.
Civic Employees' Federal, Local No. 28 (Chartered by Trades & Labour Congress of Canada)
—Secretary, G. Harrison, 1182 Parker Street,
Vancouver. Meets at 445 Richards Street,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first and third Fridays
in month.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated—President, J. Cass, Post Office Staff, Vancouver;
Secretary, D. J. McCarthy, Post Office Staff,
Vancouver.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
C.P.R. System, Division No. 1—Chairman,
W. D. Brine, Box 432, Vancouver; Secretary,
H. S. Cunningham, Box 432, Vancouver. Meets
at Holden Building, no regular time set.
Commercial Telegraphers' Union of America,
Local 52—Chairman, J. Clark, 738 Sherburn
Street, Winnipeg; Secretary, J. A. McDougall,
1633 Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Dominion Express Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 15—President, E. Ensor, 315 Eighth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, H. C.
Haines, 1919 Kingsway, Vancouver.    Meets at
810 Holden Building first Friday of each month
at 8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 213—Secretary and Business Agent,
E. H. Morrison, Room 5, 319 Pender Street
West, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender Street
West on Monday at 8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of.
Local No. 310—President, F. Buckle, 2525
Wellington Street, South Vancouver; Recording Secretary, Lloyd Purdy, 3754 Inverness
Street, Vancouver; Financial Secretary, W. E.
Buntin, 2200 Cambie Street, Vancouver. Meets
at 310 Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
every Monday.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local
No. 18—President, Neil McDonald, No. 3 Fire
Hall, Vancouver; Secretary, C. A. Watson, No.
3 Fire Hall, Vancouver.
Granite Cutters, International Association of—
President, G. Fordyce, 533 Fifty-third Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, John Philip, 2537
Trinity Street. Meets on third Friday of month
at Holden Building, 16 Hastings Street East,
at 7.30 p.m.
Hotel & Restaurant Employees, International
Alliance, Local No. 28—President, W. Colmar,
441 Seymour Street, Vancouver; Secretary, A.
Graham, 441 Seymour Street, Vancouver. Meets
at 441 Seymour Street first and third Wednesdays.
Jewellery Workers, International Union of, Local
No. 42—President, A. Bergman, 2030 Venables
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, T. Howell,
Birks' Factory, Vancouver. Meets on second
and fourth Tuesdays in month.
Lathers, Wood, Wire & Metal, International
Union, Local No. 207—President, V. R. Midg-
ley, 375 Keefer Street, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. G. Finlayson, 2635 Twelfth Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets at Room 209, Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first and third
Fridays in month.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, Local
No. 44—President, C. Addie, 217 Twenty-third
Avenue, Vancouver; Secretary, G. D. Graham,
823 Richards Street, Vancouver. Meets at
Room 804, Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8
p.m. on third Wednesday in month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 320—President, G. P. Boxton, 1763 Third
Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, H. O. .B.
McDonald, 1222 Pendrell Street, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on second Tuesday in
month at 8 p.m. and on fourth Tuesday in
month at 2.30 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Local No. 656
—President, T. Phillips, 1230 Eighth Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, S. II. Waterhouse,
1043 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Thursday of
each month at 8 p.m. and third Thursday at
2 p.m.
Lumber Workers' Industrial Union of Canada,
Coast Branch—Secretary, J. M. Clarke, 814-5
Holden Building, Vancouver. Meets at Holden
Building on second and fourth Sundays of each
month at 2 p.m. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 73
Lumber Workers' Industrial Union, No. 120
(I.W.W.)—Secretary-Treasurer, J. J. Dunning,
1001 West Madison Street, Chicago, U.S.A.;
Secretary, G. F. Murray, 27 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver. Meets at 27 Hastings Street
West at 2 p.m. on Sundays.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 182—President, B. S. Oliver, 1980 First
Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, D. Roger-
son, 200 Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meets at 313 Holden Building, Vancouver, at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Fridays.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 692—Secretary, John Robb, 215 Thirty-
first Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 807
Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
second and fourth Tuesdays.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
167—President, C. J. Beck, 1612 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, A. D. McDonald, Box 115, Vancouver. Meets at 804
Holden Building, Vancouver, at 11 a.m. on
third Sunday in month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1734—President, A. Shann, 5827 Lancaster
Street, South Vancouver. Meets at Eagle Hall
at 3 p.m. last Sunday in month.
Marine Transport Workers' Union, No. 510
(I.W.W.)—Secretary-Treasurer, T. P. Sullivan, 3 Coentiss Slip, New York City; Secretary, John Cuming, 27 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver. Meets at 27 Hastings Street West
at 7.30 p.m. on Wednesdays.
Milk Wagon Drivers & Dairy Employees, Local
No. 464—Secretary, B. Showier, 1115 Robson
Street, Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Fridays in month.
Moulders of North America, International Union
of, Local No. 281—Secretary, J. Pinkerton,
2159 Victoria Drive, Vancouver. Meets at 16
Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
first and third Fridays in month.
Moving Picture Machine Operators, Local No.
348—President, J. R. Foster, 1161 Granville
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, G. Gerrard,
P.O. Box 345, Vancouver. Meets on first Sunday in month at 991 Nelson Street at 7.30 p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 145
—President, E. C. Miller, 991 Nelson Street;
Secretary, Edward A. Jamieson, 991 Nelson
Street, Vancouver. Meets at G.W.V.A. Auditorium, 901 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, at
10 a.m. on second Sunday in month.
Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers of America,
Local No. 138—President, H. Grand, 5737 Carlton Street, Vancouver; Secretary, R. S. Stevenson, 5033 Christie Street, South Vancouver.
Meets at 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Thursdays of
month.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf & Dock Builders,
Local No. 2404—President, Gordon Campbell,
4308 Elgin Street, South Vancouver; Financial
Secretary, J. Thompson, Box 320, Vancouver;
Recording   Secretary,   H.   Graham,   Box   320,
Vancouver. Meets at 112 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. each Friday.
Photo Engravers' International Union of North
America, Local No. 54—President, G. L.
Edwards, 2723 Fifth Avenue West, Vancouver;
Secretary, W. Swearinger, 1425 Tenth Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Wednesday
in month.
Plasterers & Cement Finishers, International
Association of the United States and Canada,
Local No. 89—President, W. R. Strickland, 289
Forty-sixth Avenue East, South Vancouver;
Secretary, Mark Galway, 1151 Fifty-ninth
Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at Holden
Building, 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m. on first Wednesday in month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
170—President, B. Stinchcombe, 1899 Ogden
Avenue, Vancouver; Secretary and Business
Agent, Wm. Watt, 984 Seventh Avenue West,
Vancouver. Meets at Holden Building, 16
Hastings Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
second and fourth Fridays.
Policemen's Federation (Chartered by Trades &
Labour Congress of Canada), Local No. 12—
President, W. J. Fisk, 3127 St. Catherine's
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, W. M. Thompson, 1362 Seventeenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meets at 16 Hastings Street East, Vancouver,
at 7.30 p.m. on fourth Tuesday in month.
Postal Workers, Amalgamated—President, D. J.
McCarthy, 2325 Maple Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, J. Linsen, 1728 Yew Street, Vancouver. Meets at 535 Homer Street at 8 p.m.
on second Thursday of month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 69—President, II. F. Longley, 449 East Eighth Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, F. H. Humphrey, 4036
Victoria Drive, Vancouver. Meets at 213
Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
second Tuesday in month.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of.
Division No. 59—President, C. Bird, 2030
Union Street, Vancouver; Secretary, H. Winter, Connaught Apartments, Guelph and Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall,
515 Hamilton Street, at 8 p.m. on first Friday
in month.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144—
President, G. H. Patterson, 1776 Thirty-ninth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, D. A.
Munro, 70 Seventh Avenue West, A^ancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall, Hamilton Street, on
first Tuesday at 8 p.m. and third Sunday at
2 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of.
Local No. 58—Secretary, J. D. Vulliamy, 2215
Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at
Cotillion Hall, Davie and Granville Streets, on
first and third Fridays in month at 8 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 267—President, J. R. Burton, 1324
First Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. B. Physick, 1156 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday and
third Thursday at 8 p.m. G 74
Department op Labour.
1925
Railway Mail Clerks' Association—President,
H. F. Hatt, c/o Railway Mail Service, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. A. Overend, c/o Railway
Mail Service, Vancouver. Meets in Room 18,
Post Office Building, Vancouver, at 2.30 p.m.
on last Tuesday of month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 630—President, J. Brodie; Secretary, J.
W. Hope, 300 Empire Building, Vancouver.
Meets at Belvedere Hall, corner of Tenth and
Main Streets, at 8 p.m. on first Monday in
month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Lodge 626—President, H. P. Wilson, 1758 Thirty-third Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, E. Baldock, 6433
Argyle Street, Vancouver. Meets at C.P.R.
Storeroom, foot of Drake Street, Vancouver, on
last Friday of month at 5 p.m.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 46—Secretary, F. H. Fallows, 1504
St. Andrews Street, North Vancouver.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
144—President, G. H. Patterson, c/o Moose
Club, 535 Homer Street, Vancouver; Secretary,
D. A. Munro, 70 Seventh Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall, Hamilton
Street, Vancouver, at 7.30 p.m. on first Tuesday
and 2.30 p.m. on third Sunday.
Sawmill Filers & Sawyers' Association—President, J. O. Brown, 1848 Fifty-second Avenue
East, South Vancouver; Secretary, H. Isher-
wood, 858 Sixty-sixth Street East, South
Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Mondays in month.
Seafarers' Union of B.C., The Federated—President, R. Thom, 565 Howe Street; Vice-President, D. Gillespie, Vancouver; Secretary, W.
Donaldson, Vancouver.
Sheet Metal Workers, Local No. 280—President,
N. C. Smith, 4425 Inman Avenue, Vancouver;
Secretary, A. P. Ashton, 4503 Spruce Street,
Burnaby. Meets at Holden Building, 16
Hastings Street East at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Thursdays.
Soft Drink Dispensers' Union, No. 676—President, Frank McCann, 1423 Eleventh Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, T. J. Hanafin,
2376 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets
at 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver, at 2.30
p.m. on first Sunday in month.
Steam Engineers, Sawyers, Filers & Mill Mechanics, Canadian Society of Certified, Headquarters No. 1—President, J. O. Brown, 1848
Fifty-second Avenue East, South Vancouver;
Secretary, H. Isherwood, 858 Sixty-sixth Avenue East, South Vancouver. Meets on second
and fourth Mondays in month at 163 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union of, Local No. 844—President, R. Finley,
1171 Forty-first Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, H. McSweeney, 806 Holden Building,
Vancouver. Meets at 806 Holden Building,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. every Thursday.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Industrial Union
of, No. 882—Vice-President, W. G. Hulbert,
806 Holden Building; Secretary, W. Ainger,
806 Holden Building;   Recording Secretary, J.
T. Venn. Meets every Wednesday at 8 p.m.,
Room 806 Holden Building.
Steam Shovel & Dredgermen, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 62—President, D.
Clark, Aldergrove; Secretary, G. D. Lamont,
223 Carrall Street, Vancouver.
Stenographers, Association of—President, Miss C.
Bevley, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Stereotypers & Electrotypers, International Union
of, Local No. 88—President, H. G. Woodbury,
180 Gothard Street, Vancouver; Secretary, J.
McKinnon, 1614 Reefer Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 310 Holden Building at 4 p.m. on
second Monday in month.
Stone-cutters' Association of North America—
President, J. Pennock, 2227 Eighth Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, F. Lowe, 3225
Twenty-sixth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at 810 Holden Building on second Tuesday in
month at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 101
—President, F. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive;
Secretary, H. C. Griffin, 447 Sixth Avenue East,
Vancouver. Meets at K. of P. Hall, Eighth
Avenue and Scotia Street, Vancouver, at 10.15
a.m. on first Monday and 7 p.m. on third
Monday.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No.
Ill—President, J. D. Murray, 1161 Comox
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, A. S. Crosson,
1228 Howe Street. Meets at 209 Holden Building on first Sunday in month.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, Local
No. 178—President, A. R. Gatenby, 1721 Cotton
Drive, Vancouver; Secretary, C. McDonald,
P.O. Box 503, Vancouver. Meets at 16 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Monday in month.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers,
No. 464 (Milk Wagon Drivers and Dairy
Employees)—President, E. Wood, 714 Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, B. Showier, 1115 Robson Street, Vancouver. Meets at
213 Holden Building on second and fourth
Fridays in month at 8 p.m.
Telegraphers' Union of America, No. 52, Commercial (Canadian Press Division)—Secretary, J.
A. McDougall, 1633 Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees Federation & Moving
Picture Machine Operators of the United States
and Canada, International Alliance of, Local
No. 118—President, G. A. Jamieson, 991 Nelson Street, Vancouver; Secretary, G. Allen,
991 Nelson Street, Vancouver. Meets at 991
Nelson Street, Vancouver, at 9.30 a.m. on
second Friday in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
226—President, R. P. Pettipiece, P.O. Box 66,
Vancouver; Secretary, R. H. Neelands, P.O.
Box 66, Vancouver. Meets at Room 213,
Holden Building, Vancouver, at 2 p.m. on last
Sunday in month.
Upholsterers' International Union No. 26—
President, P. Clift, 1727 Powell Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, J. Chappie, 1072 Barclay
Street, Vancouver. Meets at 342 Pender Street
West, Vancouver, on fourth Monday of month
at 8 p.m. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Deputy Minister.
G 75
Waterfront Freight Handlers' Association—President, H. P. Hazen, rear 233 Main Street, Vancouver; Secretary, A. McAdam, 4363 Hastings
Street East, Vancouver. Meets in rear of 233
Main Street on first and third Wednesdays in
month at 8 p.m.
Wood-workers, Amalgamated Society of, No. 1
Branch—President, G. Richardson, 2856 Oxford Street, Vancouver; Secretary, C. E. Ellis,
1657 Thirty-sixth Avenue East, South Vancouver. Meets at Flack Building, 163 Hastings
Street West, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. second and
fourth Tuesdays of each month.
Wood-workers, Amalgamated Society of, No. 2
Branch—Business Agent, J. McKinley, 607
Fifty-second Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at Flack Building, 163 Hastings Street West,
Vancouver, first and third Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
Vernon.
Typographical Union, No. 541—President, H. G.
Bartholomew, Box 643, Kelowna; Secretary,
W. B. Hilliard, R.R. No. 1, Enderby. Meetings held at Vernon on last Sunday in month.
Victoria.
Barbers, Journeymen, International Union of,
Local No. 372—President, J. A. Green, 1319
Government Street, Victoria; Secretary, J.
Langlois, Sayward Block, Douglas Street.
Meets at Veterans of France Club, Douglas
Street, on fourth Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Bridge, Dock & Wharf Builders, No. 2415—President, J. McLeod, 7 Boyd Street, Victoria; Secretary, E. E. Goldsmith, 2565 Grahame Street,
Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad Street,
Victoria, at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays
of each month.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 191—Secretary, P. W. Wilson, 1323 Pandora Street, Victoria. Meets at Foresters' Hall
at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 147—President, W. W. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria ; Secretary, E. Sturgeon, 141
Eberts Street, Victoria. Meets at Surrey Block,
Yates Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on fourth
Friday in month.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers of
America, International Union of United, Local
No. 280—President, G. M. Brewer, Crease
Avenue, Saanich; Secretary, Ernest Orr, 58
Sims Avenue, Saanich. Meets at Trades Hall,
Broad Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second
Tuesday in month.
Bricklayers, Masons & Plasterers of America,
International Union of, Local No. 2—President,
E. W. Mertton, 1039 Hillside Avenue, Victoria ;
Secretary, J. H. Owen, 541 Toronto Street, Victoria. Meets at K. of P. Hall, Victoria, at 8
p.m. on first Monday in month.
Carpenters & Joiners (Shipwrights), United
Brotherhood of, Local No. 1598—President, W.
Farquhar, 543 Manchester Road; Recording
Secretary, T. S. S. Stott, 1191 St. Patrick
Street. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad Street,
at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays in month.
Civic Employees, Local No. 50—President, A. E.
Fraser, 824 Pembroke Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. E. Farmer, 2948 Scott Street, Victoria. Meets at 842 North Park Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second Wednesday.
Cooks, Waiters & Waitresses, Local No. 459—
President, A. Hoskyn, 406 John Street; Secretary, F. Dovey, 948 Inverness Street, Saanich.
Meets at Room 7, Surrey Building, Yates
Street, on first and third Tuesdays in month
at 8.30 p.m.
Dominion Express Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 20—President, T. C. John; Secretary, F.
E. Dutot, c/o Dominion Express, Victoria.
Meets at Canadian Pacific Railway Building
on first Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 230—President, T. R. Lundy, 953
Wilmer Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, W. Reid,
2736 Asquith Street, Victoria. Meets at Harmony Hall, Fort Street, at 8 p.m. on first and
third Tuesdays of month.
Federated Seafarers' Union of B.C.—Branch
Agent, W. Morgan, Green Block, Broad Street.
Meets at Green Block on first Tuesday and
third Friday in month at 8.30 p.m.
Firefighters, City Union No. 258—President, R.
Taylor, Headquarters Fire Hall, Victoria; Secretary, T. A. Heaslip, Headquarters Fire Hall,
Victoria. Meets at Headquarters Fire Hall,
Cormorant Street, at 8 p.m. on or about first
of each month.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America—President, J. Eva, Orillia Street,
Saanich; Secretary, J. Barlow, P.O. Box 392.
Meets at K. of P. Hall at 8 p.m. on third
Friday of each month.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11
—Secretary, W. Cragmyle, 2872 Inez Drive,
Victoria. Meets in Surrey Block, Yates Street,
at 7.30 p.m. on third Thursday in month.
Locomotive Firemen & Engineers, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 690—President, E. S. Cottle, Mary
Street, Victoria; Secretary, H. Richmond, 615
Wilson Street, Victoria. Meets at A.O.F. Hall,
Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on first Wednesday and
third Thursday in month.
Machinists, Local No. 456—Secretary, L. Smeltz,
Gordon Street. Meets at K. of P. Hall, North
Park Street, fourth Thursday in month at 8
p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
2824—President, F. Loeffler, Taunton Street,
Victoria ; Secretary, G. E. Wilkinson, 50 Sims
Avenue, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall, Broad
Street, on third Sundays of March, June, September, and December at 2 p.m.
Moulders, International Union -of North America,
Local No. 144—President, G. Stancombe; Secretary, G. Smethurst, 549 Niagara Street, Victoria. Meets at K. of P. Hall at 8 p.m. on
second Wednesday in month.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 247
—President, Stanley Peele, 1210 MaeKenzie
Street, Victoria; Secretary, W. H. Press, 1060
Burdette Avenue, Victoria. Meets at K. of P.
Hall at 2 p.m. on second Sunday in month. G 76
Department of Labour.
1925
Painters, Decorators & Paper-hangers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1119—President, W. R.
Moulton, 717 Discovery Street, Victoria; Secretary, J. Aspenwall, 2650 Douglas Street, Victoria ; Recording Secretary, F. Harman, 568
Vincent Street. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad
Street, on first and third Thursdays in month
at 8 p.m.
Pattern Makers' League of North America—President, J. LeSueur, 1272 Walnut Street, Victoria ; Secretary, J. A. McCahill, P.O. Box
851, Victoria. Meets on second Monday each
month at 326 John Street, at 8 p.m.
Photo Engravers, International Union of North
America (Auxiliary of Vancouver), Local No.
54—Secretary, Frank M. Day, c/o Engraving
Department, " The Times," Victoria.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf & Dock Builders,
No. 2415—President, J. Crane, 318 Irvine
Road, Victoria; Secretary, E. E. Goldsmith,
2565 Grahame Street, Victoria. Meets at 16
Green Block, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Tuesdays of month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
17—President, J. Fox, 2858 Austin Avenue;
Secretary, H. Johnson, 3261 Harriet Road.
Meets at K. of P. Hall at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Tuesdays.
Policemen's Federal Union, Local No. 24—President, H. Raines, Police Headquarters; Secretary, A. H. Bishop, 316 Skinner Street, Victoria. Meets at Police Headquarters at 3.15
p.m. on first Tuesday in month.
Postal Clerks Association (Dominion)—President, L. F. Hawkes, Cowper Apartments,
Menzies Street; Secretary, J. White, 2237
Bowker Avenue.     Meets  at P.O.  Building.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 79—President, Thomas Nute, 534 Michigan Street, Victoria ; Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236 Mac-
Kenzie Street, Victoria. Meets at Campbell
Building (sixth floor) at 8 p.m. on second
Monday in month.
Railway & Steamships Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, No. 1137—President, E. Leonard, 1221 Whittaker Street, Victoria ; Secretary, V. I. Duncan, 832 Tolmie
Avenue, Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall at 8
p.m. on first Thursday in month.
Railway Conductors, No. 289—Chief Conductor,
J. W. Thompson, 556 McPherson Avenue;
Secretary,  J.  Martin, 2109 Vancouver Street.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
613—President, J. S. Menzies, Blanshard
Street; Secretary, W. M. Parlby, 780 Dominion Road, Esquimalt. Meets at A.O.F. Hall,
Broad Street, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on second
Tuesday and last Friday in month.
Retail Clerks, International Association of, Local
No. 604—President, J. Talbot, 1737 Bank
Street, Victoria; Secretary, H. H. Hollins,
Trades Hall, Broad Street. Meets at Trades
Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday
in month.
Sheet Metal Workers, Amalgamated, International Alliance of, Local No. 134—President,
J. McMinn, Box 5, Victoria; Secretary, P.
Pitt, P.O. Box 5, Victoria. Meets at K. of P.
Hall, 842 North Park Street, at 8 p.m. on first
Thursday.
Steam Engineers, Sawyers, Filers & Mill Mechanics, No. 3—President, J. McKenzie; Secretary, B. Burton, Sidney. Meets at Trades
Hall at 8 p.m. on first Monday in month.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union, Local No. 446—President, C. MacLean,
2640 Avesbury Street, Victoria; Secretary, H.
Geake, 1242 Faithful Street, Victoria (P.O.
Box 502). Meets at K. of P. Hall at 8 p.m.
on second and fourth Tuesdays.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America.
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 109
—President, E. F. Fox, 1219 Basil Avenue,
Victoria; Secretary, R. A. C. Dewar, 1218
Johnson Street, Victoria. Meets corner Broad
and Yates Street, Victoria, at 10 a.m. and 7
p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Stonecutters' Association of North America
(Journeymen)—President, W. Mackay, P.O.
Box 853, Victoria; Secretary, J. Barlow, P.O.
Box S53, Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on second
Thursday in Labour Hall, Broad Street.
Tailors' Journeymen Union of America, Local
No. 142—President, M. Mobray; Vice-President, C. Tripp; Financial Secretary, H. I).
Reid, P.O. Box 1031, Victoria. Meets at 8
p.m. on first Monday in month.
Teamsters & Chauffeurs, General, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 365—Secretary, Sid.
Haldridge, 632 Cornwall Street, Victoria. Meets
at Trades Hall, Broad Street, at 8 p.m. on first
Tuesday.
Theatrical Stage Employees & Moving Picture
Machine Operators of the United States and
Canada, International Alliance of, Local No.
16S—Secretary, C. More, 949 Balmoral Road,
Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad Street,
Victoria, at 11.15 p.m. on first Thursday in
month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
201—President, R. G. Marshall, 1041 Pender-
gast Street, Victoria ; Secretary, T. A. Burgess,
P.O. Box 1183, Victoria. Meets at Campbell
Building (sixth floor), Victoria, at 2 p.m. on
last Sunday in month
Upholsterers & Trimmers, No. 5—Secretary, J. F.
Sharp, 570 Yates Street, Victoria. Meets in
Campbell Building at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Mondays in month.
Wellington.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 50—President, Thomas M. Biggs,
Wellington P.O.; Secretary, T. Richards, Wellington. Meets at Wellington on third Thursday in month at 8 p.m.
Willow River.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Railway & Shop
Labourers, No. 202—President, A. Petersen,
Newlands;   Secretary, W. Sims, McBride.

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