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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1923

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SEOEETAET
SECOND ANNUAL REPORT
OP
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR   THE
FISCAL YEAE ENDED  MARCH  31ST, 1923
PRINTED   BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by William H. Culltn, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1923.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the
Medical Superintendent of the Tranquille Sanatorium for the fiscal year ending
March 31st, 1923.
j. d. Maclean,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. J. D. MacLean, Provincial Secretary. j. L. White, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM STAFF.
Medical Staff:
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent.
H. G. Chisholm, M.D., Medical Assistant. F. J. Kenny, M.D., Medical Assistant.
A. S. Lamu, M.LL, Medical Assistant.
W. G. Lothian, X-ray Technician. H. C. Cowan, Dentist.
Miss .AI. Hodgetts, Matron.
Consulting Surgeons:
Dr. J. S. Bcrris. Dr. R. W. Irving.
Office Staff:
A. Whitecross, Bursar. Miss G. Forbes, Clerk and Stenographer.
A. N. Low, Storekeeper. Miss L. C. Buckley, Dietitian.
J. P. Bolton, Chief Engineer. j. Trevors, Laundry Manager.
Rev. E. D. McLaren, Chaplain.
Farm Staff:
D. W. Strachan, Farm Superintendent.
Miss D. Kelly, Book-keeper.   TRANQUILLE   SANATORIUM.
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
The Honourable J. D. MacLean, M.D.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your consideration the Second Annual Report of
Tranquille Sanatorium, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1922, to March 31st, 1923.
During the past year we had beds for 243 cases, the highest population being 237. A total
of 179 admitted and 149 discharged showed an increase in population of thirty at the end of
the year. Three hundred and seventy-two patients, ten less than the previous year, received
treatment. The average length of the period of treatment was greater, making an increase in
the number of patient-days over the previous year.
The statistical table on discharges shows fairly satisfactory results. There is a sharp decline
in the number of apparently arrested cases; this is due to the difficulty in persuading patients
to remain for any length of time after the disease becomes quiescent. Many of them, being
breadwinners, leave, as soon as they can tolerate three or four hours' daily exercise, to look
for work.
There was a marked decrease in the number of incipient cases seeking admission and a
corresponding increase in the numbers of far-advanced cases. Some special effort should be
made to have the disease diagnosed earlier. The cry should not be, as at present, "More beds
at Tranquille for early cases," but " More early cases for the beds at Tranquille."
Laboratory.
Although we have not yet been able to employ a laboratory technician, a good deal of work
has been done during the year. However, we will not be able to do any special work in the
laboratory until we have a technician who can devote his whole time to it. It is very desirable
that each sanatorium be doing some research-work, as it is in this way only that any progress
in the treatment of the disease can be accomplished.
X-ray Department.
This department continues to be of great assistance to ns in the medical work, both as an
aid in diagnosis and in checking up onr physical findings. The Alpine Sun lamp treatments are
controlled by the X-ray technician, and our one lamp has been kept in operation all day, every
day. We have found this treatment particularly valuable in abdominal and surgical lesions.
There is a beneficial psychological effect in many cases.
Dental Service.
Much work has been done in this department. A thorough examination of the mouth is
made in each new case soon after admission. Many sources of infection are found and their
treatment hastens the recovery of the xiatient.
Financial.
The most striking thing about the financial report is an increase in the gross per capita
cost of 9 cents per diem. The explanation of this is the difficulty experienced for four mouths
last summer in keeping the patient-population up; this resulted in several thousand patient-days
less than we should have had. The overhead expenses were not affected materially. This condition is not likely to exist in the future. The net cost increased considerably, clue to a falling-off
in revenue, which was brought about chiefly by the decline in the number of D.S.C.R. patients.
The bill for repairs and renewals was high again, but as the buildings are now in good condition
this item should be much less in future.
Laundry.
This is a very necessary but fairly expensive department, which handles a large volume
of work. During the past year a monthly average of nearly 27,500 pieces was reported. A
large percentage of it was heavy work—blankets, sheets, table-cloths, etc. D 6 Tranquille Sanatorium. 1923
Sanatorium Farm.
The farm showed an operating deficit for the first time. This was caused by a very dry
season, with crop-shortage, aud the resulting high price of feed, which it was necessary to
purchase in order to carry the range stock through the winter. Owing to poor market conditions
many beef cattle were not disposed of. The Cooney Ranch which was purchased was in very
poor condition, entailing a great deal of labour in getting it ready for seeding this spring. This
also added to the operating expense.   Conditions should be much better during the coming year.
Builuing Operations.
The Nurses' Home was completed and ox>ened in July and has proven a very valuable
addition to the.Sanatorium.
Four staff cottages were erected, adding considerably to the comfort of the members of the
staff who are married. A workshop for patients taking occupational therapy, and large enough
to provide room for our own carpenter and paint shops, is nearing completion.
An addition was built on the end of the garage, providing ample room for the storage of
all Sanatorium cars. The root-house was completed early in the year and has been in use all
winter.
A trestle for unloading coal at the power-house was built on the railway siiur and is proving
a great convenience; a considerable saving of labour has also been effected.
The farm buildings which were under construction at the beginning of the year have been
completed and have xiroven a great asset to the farm.
Recommendations.
Another Alpine Sun lamp should be added to the present equipment and a high-frequency
apparatus added to the X-ray outfit.
The institution is large enough now to emiiloy a laboratory technician. I have pointed out
earlier in the report that this is desirable, and would like to recommend that this addition be
made to the present staff.
The sewerage system should be changed throughout, and I would suggest that a trunk sewer
be put in with a single large septic tank at some distance from the institution. This work
would not necessarily be done at once, but could cover a period of years, the trunk being built
first and the sewer laid to one or two buildings at a time.
The policy of doing some work towards improving the grouuds each year should be continued.
Beautiful grounds raise the morale of any institution and have a decided beneficial effect on
the residents.
The quarters for male help are quite cramped and some are living in outlying shacks and
tents. I would recommend the erection of a building to house the maids, and the use of their
present quarters for the male help who are at iiresent living in temporary buildings.
Acknowledgments.
Our thanks are due to Dr. J. S. Burris and to. Dr. R. W. Irving, of Kamloops, consulting
surgeons.
We appreciate the kindness of our many friends in Kamloops who have provided considerable
entertainment for both patients and staff during the winter months; our thanks are due, also,
to those comprising the visiting committee of the Red Cross.
I would like to acknowledge with thanks the contributions towards amusements made by
the Military Branch of the Y.M.C.A.
In conclusion, I would express my gratitude to my assistant physicians, Drs. Chisholm,
Kenny, and Lamb, and to all the various members of the staff who have all contributed to the
successful operation of the Sanatorium during (the year. I thank you, sir, for the support and
assistance which I have always had from your Deiiartinent.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP,
Medical Superintendent. 14 Geo. 5
Second Report.
D 7
STATISTICAL TABLES.
Statistics for Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Civil.
Military.
Total.
Number of patients in Sanatorium, Marcli 31st, 1922
Number of patients admitted during year  	
Number of patients treated during year	
Number of patients discharged during year	
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1923
101
126
227
74
153
92
53
145
75
70
193
179
372
149
223
Cases admitted dueing Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Males  118
Females  61
Total  179
Civil state—
Married  76
Single  100
Widowed  3
Total    179
Classification—
Incipient    29=16.20%
Moderately advanced  74=41.34%
Far advanced  74=41.34%
Suspects  2= 1.12%
Age Classification of Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1923.
1-10 years ..
11-15     „      ..
16-20     „
21-25     „      ..
26-30      „
31-35     „
36-40      „
41-45      „
46-50     „
51-55      „
Over 55 years
Males.
Females
1
2
4
9
10
18
16
23
11
27
6
12
7
12
3
9
2
3
1
2
1
Totals
118
61
Number of Patient-days during Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Total  70,978
Religion of Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Church of England  57
Methodist  13
Protestant   26
Greek Church     2
Hebrew  1
Bible Student   1
Roman Catholic   17
Lutheran       7
Presbyterian  46
Baptist      5
Polish       1
Unknown       3 D 8
Tranquille Sanatorium.
1923
Addresses of Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Vancouver   80
Victoria     15
Kelowna   4
Courtenay     2
Heffley Creek  1
Tranquille    9
New Westminster   2
Nakusp   1
Pouce Coupe  1
Yennadon     1
Rutland    1
Pritchard   1
Nanaimo  4
Golden     1
Kamloops  13
Prospect Lake    1
Squilex  ....
Bickle	
Matsqui ....
Port Moody
Naramata   .
Fernie   2
Nelson  1
Pender Harbour   1
Burton    2
Osoyoos  1
Salmon Arm   2
Pitt Lake  1
Canim Lake  1
Hope   1
Forestdale   1
Chilliwack   2
Midway     1
Penticton   6
Port Haney  1
Duncan   2
Abbotsford  1
Chase    2
Revelstoke  1
Burns Lake  1
Miscellaneous, D.S.C.R. patients coming in
from other Provinces  7
Occupations of Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1923.
School-children   9
Housewife   25
Fruit-packer    2
Miner    5
Nurse     4
Garage-worker    2
Farmer   13
Clerk   21
Butcher  1
Boot-repair     1
Blacksmith     2
Fisherman   1
Insurance   1
Dentist  1
Carpenter     3
Teacher     3
Fireman    2
Architect draughtsman    1
Photographer    1
Tinsmith     1
Kitchen-work    1
Painter  1
Machine operator    1
Warehouseman  1
Labourer    2
Gardener   1
Cook    2
Waiter    5
Cleaner   1
At home  14
Elevator operator    1
Dietitian  1
Vulcanizer  2
Cashier   1
Broker     2
Stewardess     1
Telephone operator  1
Surgeon     1
Tailoress     1
Baker    1
Agricultural  student     1
Mounted Police    1
Foreman  1
Physician   1
Bookbinder    1
Electrician  1
Stenographer  2
Orderly  1
Motorman  1
Chauffeur   2
Merchant   1
Theatrical manager   1
Salesman    1
Engineer     4
Plumber   1
Moulder    1
Superintendent stevedore    1
Mechanic    1
Sailor    2
Book-keeper     1
Accountant     5
Shipwright  1
Barber     1
Fire ranger   1
Student   2
Laundry-worker   1
Priest     1
Stoker   1 14 Geo. 5
Second Report.
D 9
Nationalities of Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1923.
English   52
Canadian   6G
Dutch    1
Swedish    1
Greek    1
Russian  1
Finnish   2
Irish    10
Australian  2
Indian   1
Scottish   	
Italian	
Polish 	
French-Canadian
American	
Welsh 	
Norwegian  	
Russian Jew
Danish  	
Cases discharged during Year ended March 31st, 1923.
18
1
2
3
9
2
5
1
1
Results.
Classification on Admission.
Apparently
arrested.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Dead.
Incipient, 27—18.12%   	
10
5
1
15
37
21
1
4
2
7
15
1
6
Par advanced, 58—38.9%  	
19
Classification of Cases discharged as Non-tuberculous.
Asthma  1
Chronic bronchitis  2
For observation   2
Laundry Report for Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Total number pieces put through during year      321,846
Average monthly amount       20,820%
Report of Pneumo-thorax Treatment for Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Number of new cases in which pneumo-thorax was attempted  12
Number of new cases in which pneumo-thorax was successful  4
Reasons for which it was attempted—
Haemorrhage   4
Toxaemia  8
Total number of refills given  263
In  addition, two  cases were  successfully  operated  upon by thoracoplasty  method,  with
beneficial results.
X-ray Report for Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Stereoscopic films, pairs     261
Miscellaneous          56
Dental sets, complete      185
Alpine Sun Lamp.
Number of treatments given   1,460 D 10
Tranquille Sanatorium.
1923
METEOROLOGICAL   REPORT.
Month.
Maximum
Temp.
Minimum
Temp.
Averagi
Temp.
Hours of
Sunshine.
Rain.
Average
Humidity.
Snowfall.
April.   . ..
May
June
July   	
August . .
September
3ctober ..
November
December
January .
February
March . . .
Deg. F.
71
85
89
95
90
S2
68
50
45
50
69
Deg. F.
27
35
45
50
53
38
30
25
18
Deg. F.
48.2
69.0
5S.2
49.6
33.8
26.0
22.7
37.7
258.2
239.0
235.0
223.0
109.6
110.9
123.1
53.6
77.6
125.7
143.5
Inches
0.65
0.60
0.11
0.72
0.24
0.83
0.58
43.3
71.0
46.2
81.7
79.5
23.8
Inches
1.5
4.0
t
* Slight. t Trace.
DENTAL   REPORT.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ended March 31st, 1923, and in
so doing I wish to express my sincere thanks for the assistance I received from the rest of
the professional staff.
At the first of the year, as you know, my time was reduced, as far as the S.C.R. was
concerned, to half-time, but no change was made in regard to the civilian patients. I believe,
after a year's experience, that this is the most satisfactory way in which this department can
be handled; although we have had additional accommodation for the patients which was entirely
taken up by civilians, I have found it more or less possible to handle the work in the alloted
time.
All returned soldiers have had for some years now considerable dental treatment, either in
the Army or by the S.C.R., but in the case of civilian patients their dental condition is far
from perfect in a great many cases, the reason no doubt being that for some months before
coming here they have been indisposed and the teeth have been neglected, and quite often
from mercenary reasons; the result is that we have had to practically reconstruct the entire
mouth.
We have carried on the previous policy of a full-mouth X-ray of all patients, and I feel
justified in saying that the expense is warranted; it is of great assistance to me in all my work,
and also enables me to locate many troubles that would otherwise have been overlooked.
Following you will find a statement of the actual work done for the patients:—
Fillings, inclusive of root-fillings    522
Miscellaneous treatments, inclusive of root-canal treatments  559
Extractions    121
Anaesthetics    113
Dentures     37
Resets        3
Inlays       7
Repairs, denture ,     24
Removal of necrotic bone       7
Removal of bridges       2
Bridges     18
Crowns       8
Relines         3
X-ray, sets of  231
Root-amputation       1
I have, etc.,
Harold Cowan, Dentist. 14 Geo. 5 Second Report. D 11
BURSAR'S  REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1923.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour.to submit herewith the Balance-sheets and Profit and Loss Accounts
covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1923.
Throughout the year repair-work has been carried on in all buildings and they are now in
very good condition. All furnishings and equipment have been kept up to the desired standard
with instant repairs, or renewals where repair-work was impossible.
It will be noted that there is an increase in our per capita cost; this is largely attributable
to the fact that the i)opulation was low for four months of the year.
Our revenue has fallen off owing to a natural decrease in the number of military patients
from the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, the number of municipal cases received
has been less than last year, and there has been a great increase in the number of free cases
treated.
The gross cost of maintenance for the year amounted to $284,019.31, with a revenue of
$149,901.68, making the net per capita cost to the Province $689.69 per year, or $1.89 per day.
A total of 70,978 days' treatment has been given, which means an average of 194.46 patients
treated daily.
During the year ten munichpalities have paid for the maintenance of sixty-one patients at
the rate of $2.50 per day; while the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment has paid
for 145 military patients at the monthly per capita rate, and thirty-two patients have paid for
their own maintenance at varying rates, according to what they were able to afford. We bave
carried on the free list 134 cases unable to contribute any amount.
The Laundry Department has been taxed to its utmost capacity, and to meet the increased
demand we are planning to install some new machinery during the coming year. This department has put through a total of 321,846 pieces for the year, a monthly average of 26,820 pieces.
A trestle for the completion of the railway spur is under construction, which we hope will
greatly facilitate the handling of all the coal for the xiower-house.
In conclusion, I desire to express to my assistants my sincere thanks and appreciation of
their faithful service, and to yourself for the valuable aid you have extended to me during
the year.
I have, etc.,
A.   WlIITECROSS,
Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1923.
Assets.
Land  $ 39,437 14
Buildings  406,945 11
Plant and equipment  71,378 50
Furniture and fixtures  18,061 89
Inventories   7,988 17
Treasury advance (for petty expenses)    1,000 00
Accounts receivable  20,449 83
Railway spur  2,602 62
$567,863 26
Deficit (cost of operations, 1922-23)    134,117 63
$701,980 89 D 12 Tranquille Sanatorium. 1923
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia  $701,980 89
Profit and Loss Account, March 31 st, 1923.
Insurance ■ $    2,428 62
Salaries       93,772 68
Office supplies         1,572 35
Travelling expenses and transportation         2,202 06
Fuel, water, light, and power       45,272 71
Maintenance and repairs       25,868 26
Furniture and fixtures        13,008 74
Provisions       91,817 67
Medical and surgical supplies          2,541 89
Incidentals and unforeseen         5,534 33
By Donations   $    4,200 00
Receipts from maintenance of patients     145,701 68
Balance     134,117 63
$284,019 31 $284,019 31
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31st, 1923.
Operating Expense Accounts.
Operating expenditure by voucher—
.   Salaries—
Medical and clerical staff $ 13,196 77
Sundry employees        80,575 91
 $ 93,772 68
Office Supplies—
Books and journals   $       165 73
Postage and office supplies  681 73
Telephone and telegraph  196 12
 1,043 58
Travelling expenses and transportation           2,625 96
Fuel, water, light, and power—
Fuel $ 40,896 39
Power-house supplies           3,555 25
 44,451 64
Maintenance and repairs—
Repairs and renewals  $ 19,655 55
Janitors' supplies         5,635 91
 25,291 46
Furniture and fixtures—
Bedding $   3,356 04
Furniture and fixtures         3,867 90
Miscellaneous        2,947 30
 10,171 24
Provisions—
Groceries and sundries $ 41,016 57
Meat      29,538 48
Fish         7,445 80
Milk and eggs       18,356 95
 96,957 80
Carried forward   $274,314 36 14 Geo. 5 Second Report. D 13
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31st, 1923—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought forward    $274,314 36
Medical and surgical surjplies—
Medicines and drugs  $   2,019 41
X-ray and miscellaneous          1,513 37
 3,532 78
Incidentals and unforeseen—
Laundry $ 963 98
Freight and cartage  2,877 84
Sundries  2,649 65
Clothing  1,214 99
7,706 46
Total operating expense by voucher   $285,553 60
Inventories as at March 31st, 1922-
Fuel	
Provisions	
Office supplies 	
Medical and surgical supplies . .
Furniture and fixtures 	
Maintenance and repairs	
Transportation	
Insurance for year
Less inventories as at March 31st, 1923—
Fuel  $2,094 38
Provisions  2,329 42
Office supiilies  371 96
Medical and surgical suxiplies   815 94
Maintenance and repairs  1,593 36
Transportation  299 11
Incidentals  484 00
$ 2,989
80
3,861
54
900
73
S29
65
2,837
50
2,191
26
175
21
13,785
2,428
69
6''
$301,
767
91
By Post Office Department Account	
Fuel sold   	
Refund, Canadian General Electric Co.
Provisions sold  	
Refund, P. Burns & Co., Ltd	
Board Account   	
Refund on alcohol 	
Sale of thermometers	
Sundry collections 	
? 7,988 17
300 00
74 35
21 10
3,735 85
921 08
2,015 32
613 10
391 50
1,688 13
17,748 60
Gross cost of maintenance for year  $284,019 31
Revenue.
By Donations from Greaves Estate  $   4,200 00
Receipts from Department of S.C.R     107,506 79
Receipts from Municipalities       31,442 50
Receipts from private patients           6,752 39
 149,901 68
Net. cost of operation for year ended March 31st, 1923  $134,117 63 D 14 Tranquille Sanatorium. 1923
Summary of Profit and Loss Account.
Insurance  $   2,428 62
Salaries  93,772 68
Office supplies '  1,572 35
Travelling expenses and transportation    2,202 06
Fuel, water, light, and power  45,272 71
Maintenance and repairs  25,868 26
Furniture and fixtures  13,008 74
Provisions     91,817 07
Medical and surgical    2,541 89
Incidentals and unforeseen  5,534 33
$284,019 3J
Less donations      $   4,200 00
„    revenue, Maintenance Account     145,701 68
 149,901 68 770 86
Yearly
Per Capita.
$      12 49
482
22
8
09
11
32
232
81
133
03
66
89
472
17
13
07
28 46
$1,460 55
Net cost to Government for maintenance of patients.. $134,117 63 $   689 69
Remarks.
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1923  223
Daily average population for year ended March 31st, 1923  194.46
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  $1,460.55
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  4.00
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  680.69
Net maintenance pet capita cost, 1 day  1.89
Capital Expenditure.
Improvements to grounds    $ 1,951 97
Pole-line to station  1,375 00
Nurses' Home (balance)   15,508 90
Cottages  12,171 87
Workshop and garage .'  5,411 52
Pump-house  1,380 00
Motor for power-house   512 00
Furniture  2,756 67
FARM SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit my report of the operations of the Tranquille Sanatorium Farm for
the year ended March 31st, 1923.
This has been one of the most difficult years to operate that has ever been experienced
in the history of the farm. The summer of 1922 was the driest in many years; irrigation-
water was very short and the ranges of the Interior of British Columbia were depleted and bare
owing to the continued drought. As a result of this scarcity of pasture the cattle came into
winter quarters in poor condition and had to be fed heavier than in former years. The price
of feed, owing to the shortage, was higher than during the years of the war.
The farm crops were fair. The 300 tons of ensilage and 450 tons of hay produced on the
ranch were not sufficient to carry over the large amount of stock that the ranch was compelled
to keep in order to supply the needs of the Sanatorium. A large number of prime beef cattle had
to be kept over because there was no sale for them.*
* These cattle have since been sold at from $85 to $100 per head. *  14 Geo. 5 Second Report. D 15
The Cooney Ranch was purchased at a very reasonable figure—the run-down condition of
the land being taken into consideration—with 198 head of cattle and sixty-seven head of horses.
As there was no hay on ,the ranch to feed these cattle, hay had to be purchased at from $25
to $30 per ton; this feed item, together with the labour and expense of putting part of the
Cooney Ranch into producing condition, comprises the major portion of this year's deficit.
Another item that reduced our income was the fact that none of our beef could be sold'
owing to a glutted market, and this beef was inventoried at the price of stocker cattle, because
the unsettled condition of the market did not warrant putting a greater price upon them.
The dairy herd has done remarkably well; no losses were sustained during the year and
fifty-one cows produced 669,645 lb. of milk. Sufficient milk was available at all times for the
needs of the institution. The dairy herd was tested twice during the year for tuberculosis
but no reactors were found, lt is felt that the grades should be replaced by pure-breds as soon
as possible, as the cost and care is no greater with pure-breds and the sale price realized is
much higher, and our herd could then be i)laced on the accredited basis.
The construction of new buildings greatly hampered the operations of the ranch during the
year. These buildings, consisting of two cement silos 16 by 34 feet, one horse-barn 76 by 30 feet,
a commodious dairy, and a 100-foot addition to the cow-barn, making a total accommodation
for eighty-five head, have been completed and are up-to-date in every respect, providing for
the herd not only every comfort, but also the best sanitary conditions.
The range cattle, 425 in number, were all brought through the winter in good shape and
are now all out on the ranges.
The horses purchased with the new ranch are of the light-delivery and saddle-horse type,
and it is respectfully suggested that these be sold as opportunity occurs and be replaced by
horses of the draught type.
The hogs, notwithstanding the adverse conditions under which they were kept, proved
profitable, and it is confidently anticipated that proper housing accommodation will be erected
this year.    Most of these animals are pure-bred Berkshires of good quality.
The leased and purchased property of the farm consists of over 17,000 acres. Most of the
fences are in very poor condition and must be replaced; the dams, ditches, and water-gates
need a good deal of repairing and will be given attention as soon as time and oriportunity permit.
With the increased acreage there was necessarily an increase in the number of employees.
The housing accommodation, always insufficient, is now sadly inadequate, and it is hoped that
during this coming season comfortable quarters will be erected for the help of the farm.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
D. W. Strachan,
Farm Superintendent.
SANATORIUM  FARM   REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st,  1923.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Financial Statement for the Tranquille
Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1923.
Our expenditure for the year shows an increase in all departments, the Feed Department
showing the greatest. We had to winter 265 head of extra live stock (taken over with the
Cooney Estate) and high prices had to be paid for hay, as there was not enough grown on the
Cooney Ranch to feed these animals. The crops were not up to the usual standard owing to
a scarcity of moisture.
The dairy herd has done exceedingly well, producing an average of 13,132 lb. of milk per
animal for the year, the total production being 669,645 lb.
The revenue from the sale of farm produce has considerably increased. The farm has been
able to supply the Sanatorium with a greater amount of farm produce—namely, milk, vegetables,
fruit, and meats—than we have in former years.
All of which is respectfully submitted. A. Whitecross,
Bursar. D 16                                          Tranquille Sanatorium. 1923
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1923.
Assets.
Buildings and improvements    $ 27,495 33
Land (Cooney Ranch)     35,500 00
Live-stock inventory  35,895 00
Farm equipment   4,711 39
Automobile  150 00
Real estate   137 88
Accounts receivable  4,121 80
Tranquille Dam Account   421 72
Treasury advance (Petty Account)     1,000 00
Deficit for year 1922-23   13,785 -66
$123,218 78
Liabilities.
Provincial Treasury advance    $    1,000 00
Accounts  payable     241 85
Provincial Government      121,976 93
$123,218 78
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1923.
Salaries—
Farm Superintendent   $2,400 00
Book-keeper         540 00
Other employees     9,159 03
 $ 12,199 03
Provisions  3,571 93
Fuel, light, and water  123 66
Feed   15,898 17
Seed and fruit-boxes   266 28
Blacksmith and repairs  878 80
Drugs and veterinary supplies   69 00
Inurements, harness, and hardware   1,595 75
Travelling expenses   45 80
Depreciation on automobile  330 94
Incidentals and unforeseen   2,811 17
$ 37,790 53
Profit on live stock    $    1,435 66
Farm produce sold  22,370 69
Fruit-sales  64 25
Sale of hides  38 95
Sale of milk (private parties)     71 16
Sundry receipts    '  24 16
Balance, deficit for year    13,785 66
$ 37,790 53
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1923.

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