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NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1923

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 NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOE BOTS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1922, TO MAECH 31ST, 1923
PRINTED   by
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William II. Cdllin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1924.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Youk Honour :
I beg herewith respectfully to present the Report of the Provincial Industrial
School for Boys for the year ended March 31st, 1923.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C., October 29th, 1923.
j. i). Maclean,
Provincial Secretary. DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. J. D. MacLean, Provincial Secretary. J. L. AVhite, Deputy Provincial Secretary.
NOMINAL ROLL OF ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF.
Brankin, Davhi B., Superintendent. Brankin, Mrs. M., Matron.
Pettitt, A. O., Boole-keeper, Stenographer, and Commercial Teacher.
Holland, Miss A., Nurse and Assistant Supervisor. Henderson, J., Tailw Instructor.
Ayling, N. C, Carpenter Instructor and Musical Director.
Jenner, G., Shoemaking Instructor. Shaw, E. J. C, Agricultural Instructor.
Graham, Miss Mary, Junior School-teacher. Carr, Aliss Elsie, Senior School-teacher.
Hughes, R., Chief Attendant and Storekeeper.
Allen, R. G., Attendant. Scott, W. J., Attendant, Poultryman, and Blacksmith.
Marshal, W., Nightxeatchman. Templeton, Aliss E., Assistant Supervisor.
Moore, Aliss D., Assistant Supervisor. Walker, Miss C, Assistant Supervisor. View of Administration Building, containing- Superintendent and Matron's quarters and male
administrative staff living in.
View of one of the cottages showing well-lighted and ventilated dormitorie  «iqul#
View of new barn buildings erected
November, 1922.
The B.I.S. herd of pure-bred
pure-bred Jersey cattle.
swin^T °i',',aiSk?W.fU fleI(I' "andstand,
swings, giant-stride, etc., where the
hoys spend their hours of recreation'  PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
FOR BOYS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
The Honourable J. D. MacLean, M.V., CM.,.
Provincial  Secretary,   Victoria,  B.C.
Sir,—In opening my annual report for the period April 1st, 1922, to March 31st, 1923, I
will give first of all an outline of the reasons why a boy comes to us and our methods of
handling him after he has arrived.
It has been our experience that where a boy's home is not merely a place to eat and sleep,
and he thinks that his home is the best place on earth, such a boy scarcely ever comes to the
Industrial School, but where the sweetness has departed from a home through the sins of
omission or commission on the part of the parents, and it fails to attract, there is no surprise
at the boy eventually coming to us. .Again, quite a number began their delinquencies by first
playing truant from school and getting associated with gangs of boys who taught them how to
pilfer fruit, and food when hungry, going on from this to more serious offences. We seldom
ever get a boy who was a regular attendant at a Sunday-school, which would indicate that for
some reason or other there are a number of boys who do not come within the zone of the
churches' influence, which is unfortunate. I rejoice to see that a number of churches are
beginning to realize that the providing of suitable entertainment during the week makes it
easier to get the boys on Sunday.
However, whatever may have been the contributing factors, the result is we get the boy,
and it is our business to find out why he went wrong, more so that he did go wrong; in other
words, we must deal with causes instead of effects; that is why we say it takes not less than
two years to do an effective permanent work on the boy. This, I know, is somewhat contrary
to the general belief that all a boy requires is a change of environment, and presto! a miracle
is performed. Our experience has been that a change of environment is the first essential step
towards the cure, but there are others equally important, and unless a school has a jwell-
organized system that will cover the whole twenty-four hours of the day success will not follow.
AVhat I mean by this is, an industrial school shoald be a combination of home, public school,
a place of industry, and have hospital facilities for the treatment of physical ailments that are
contributory factors to boys' delinquencies. Of these may be named diseased tonsils, adenoids,
decayed teeth, defective eyes and ears. At present this is well taken care of by our Medical
Officer, Dr. Stanley Paulin, and has proved successful in over 80 per cent, of the cases dealt
with. It should be a school where not only the three R's are taught, but where misshapen
views of life are torn down and their place taken by clean and wholesome thought and ideas
of what constitutes a good citizen; a home where a boy can still retain his name and individuality, with the opportunity to develop along natural lines. A boy likes being called by his
Christian name and resents being called Johnnie if his name is Robert. Any one guilty of so
doing makes the boy think that the person doesn't know much about him when he doesn't even
know his name; a place of industry where boys can be taught all labour is honourable, and that
no man has a right to be a non-producer or sponger on others.
Of the school, it has been said by visitors and those who are intimate with the home conditions of many boys who are with us that this is the only place that a good many of them
could call home. It is the only place in a good many cases where they ever got three square
meals a day, 'where they are well clothed, and where they could get regular sleeping-hours, and
an opportunity to indulge in good clean sport, such as football, baseball, lacrosse, etc.; in short,
a place where they can get the right ideas of life. J 6 Industrial School for Boys. 1923
Since the school was transferred from Point Grey a great many changes have taken place,
not the least important of which was the passing of an Order in Council proclaiming British
Columbia within the scope of the 1921 amendment to the " Juvenile Delinquents Act, 1908,"
raising the age-limit for commitment to the Industrial School from 16 to 18 years. This has
been the means of raising the number of boys from eighty-nine at the end of the fiscal year
1921-22 to the extent of twelve, in addition, of course, to many boys under 16.
As can be expected with the admission of more mature boys and a larger store of worldly
kndwledge, our difficulties have increased, and there were thirty escapes during the year, of
which number twenty-one boys were of the 16- to 18-year-old class.
AVith the wide open spaces, the close proximity of brush and undergrowth, and the lack
of specified boundaries of our present location as compared with the old Point Grey location,
the task of watching boys during the long summer days and evenings was no small one, and
it is to the credit of the boys that they did not take advantage of the opportunity to get away
to a larger extent. AVith the exception of two, all were caught and returned to the school.
It might also be explained that any boy! leaving the school property without permission is considered as having escaped, although he may be away only a few hours.
How Boys are admitted and released.
In districts where Juvenile Courts are functioning properly boys are committed under
section 16 of the " Juvenile Delinquents Act, 1908," as wards of the Court for an undefined
period. AVhen the time comes for their release they are returned to the Court for further
disposition, which usually means their release from the school and supervision by Court Probation Officers.
In the other parts of the Province, where no Juvenile Courts exist, boys are committed by
Magistrates or Justices of the Peace for a fixed period (not very satisfactory). In these cases
we endeavour, before allowing a boy to go home, to get some responsible person to assist us in
preparing the way for his home-coming and his supervision afterwards, besides making the boy
write to us at least once a month. In this connection I wish to pay special tribute to the members of the Provincial Police, who have been most painstaking and sympathetic with every boy
placed in their care.
Population.
At the end of March, 1922, there were eighty-nine boys on the nominal roll, and since that
time and up to the end of AIarch, 1923, there have been sixty-eight admissions; while the number
of releases amounts to thirty-three, one died, one was transferred to England, and four to
Oakalla, making the present number of boys in the institution 118. Two are absent. Number
of boys passed through the school up to the present, 667.
Ages of boys in the institution at present are: 9 years, 1; 10 years, 1; 11 years, 5; 12
years, 8; 13 years, 11; 14 years, 19; 15 years, 25; 16 years, 34; 17 years, 9; 18 years, 5.
Sentences: 23 months, 1 ; 2 years, 41; 2% years, 1; 3 years, 8; 4 years, 3; 5 years, 1;
indefinite, 62.
Charges committed on: Theft, 55; incorrigible, 29; B.E. and stealing, 24; arson, 2; returned
wards, 2; neglected child, 1; horse-stealing, 2; indecency, 2; receiving, 1.
Nationalities of the boys are as follows: Canadian, 58; English, 16; American, 14; Scotch,
5; Irish, 2; Welsh, 1; Serbian (U.S.A.), 1; German, 1; South African, 1; Ukrainian, 1; Chinese,
2; Swedish, 2; Norwegian, 1; Mulatto, 1; Indian, full, 7; breed, half, 1; breed, quarter, 1;
Italian, 1; French-Canadian, 1; Japanese, 1.
There are sixty-eight boys in the school, including Indians, half-breeds, and quarter-breeds,
born in Canada, and it might be interesting to know the nationalities of their parents. They
are: Scotch (both), 1; English (both), 13; Irish (both). 3; Canadian-American, 3; Italian
(both), 3; American (both), 2; French-Canadian, 1; Canadians (both), 15; English-American,
1; Scotch and half-breed, 1; Welsh-French, 1; English-Canadian, 3; "Ukrainian, 1; Scotch and
Irish-Canadian, 1; Irish-Canadian, 1; Swede-French, 1; Irish-Scotch, 3; Welsh-American, 1;
Polish, 1; Scotch-American, 1; Irish-English, 1; Chinese, 1; Japanese, 1; Indian, 7; Indian,
(half-breed), 1. 14 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
J 7
The following is a list of all the boys in the school, showing the number, place of birth,
parentage, and residence in Canada and British Columbia where it has been possible to obtain
it:—
List of all Boys in the School.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
in Canada.
Residence
in British
Columbia.
465
503
506
521
528
534
535
536
538
541
542
543
547
552
553
556
558
559
560
561
563
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
593
595
596
597
598
599
600
601
603
604
U.S.A	
Texas, U.S.A.   . . .
Vancouver  	
Glasgow	
Nanaimo   	
England	
Revelstoke	
China	
England	
Calgary   	
Calgary   	
North  Dakota   . .
Nanaimo   	
Victoria   	
Ontario   	
England	
Vancouver  	
Vancouver  	
Coal  Creek   	
Sechelt   	
Rossland   	
Vananda   	
Ireland   	
England   	
England   	
Clinton  	
Fernie   	
Saskatchewan   .. .
England   	
Mission   	
Lancashire, Eng.
Germany   	
South Dakota   . . .
Alberta   	
Canada 	
Vancouver Island
Vancouver Island
Vancouver Island
South   Africa   . . .
Moose Jaw   	
England    	
America   	
Calgary   	
Alontreal   	
England  	
American   	
Grand Forks . . .
Grand Forks . . .
Bowen Island   . . .
Norway   	
Squamish  	
Cloverdale   	
U.S.A	
Canada    	
Ontario   	
Victoria  	
Vancouver   	
Spokane    	
Serbian  	
Coloured   	
English   	
Scotch   	
English   	
English   	
Canadian	
Chinese   	
English   	
English   	
English   	
French-American  .
English   	
Canadian 	
English   	
English   	
Canadian 	
Canadian 	
Canadian	
Indian	
Italian  	
Canadian	
Irish   	
English   	
Australian    	
Half-breed  	
Canadian	
English   	
English   	
Scotch-Irish   	
English   	
German   	
American    	
Canadian	
Indian   	
Indian   	
Indian   	
Indian   	
English   	
Canadian  	
English   	
French-Canadian   .
Canadian-American
English   	
English   	
Scandinavian   ....
Scotch-Irish   	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Norwegian	
Indian   	
English   	
American    	
Scotch-Irish   	
Canadian	
Canadian	
Canadian	
American   	
Years.
11
9
15
16
12
12
12
3
14
5
5
12
14
14
14
2%
15
12
14
13
14
15
12
13
16
16
16
10
0
13
16
15
15
15
12
14
2
15
17
9%
11
16
14
15
16
16
16
17
16
17%
3%
Years.
11
0
15
16
12
12
12
3
13
12
11
14
9
2%
13
12
14
13
14
15
5
7
2%
12
13
10
16
13
10
9
16
15
15
15
0
3
12
2%
4%
11
16
14
15
16
16
16
3
16
17%
3% J 8
Industrial School for Boys.
1923
List of all Boys in the School—Continued.
No.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence
in Canada.
Residence
in British
Columbia.
603
607
608
609
610
611
612
013
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
628
629
630
631
632
633
634
635
636
638
639
640
641
642
643
644
645
646
647
650
651
652
653
654
655
656
657
658
659
660
661
662
663
664
665
666
067
Vancouver	
Sweden    	
Creston   	
Liverpool   	
Ontario   	
Nelson,  B.C	
Toronto   	
Glasgow    	
Portage La Prairie
Calgary   	
Creston   	
Maillardville   	
Winnipeg    	
Cleethorpes, Eng	
Bolton, Eng »
Winnipeg, Alan	
Sweden	
Saskatchewan   	
Liverpool,  Eng	
Whitehouse,  Eng	
Pittsburgh,   US.A	
Lacombe,  Alta	
New Hampshire, U.S.A.
North Vancouver  	
Vancouver   	
Minnesota,  U.S.A	
Vegreville,   Alta	
Nanaimo   	
Bristol,   Eng	
Winnipeg, Alan	
Spokane, Wash	
Canada    	
Lanark, Scotland	
Vancouver   	
Stoughton,  Sask	
Marsville, U.S.A	
Maresville, U.S.A	
Ireland    	
Maiden,  Eng	
America    p
Nanaimo   	
Seattle, U.S.A	
Vancouver   	
Manitoba   	
Nanaimo   	
Frank. Alta	
Cardiff,  Wales   	
North Dakota 	
Manitoba   	
Wisconsin, U.S.A	
Arancouver  	
Bo'ness,  Scot	
Inverness, Scot	
Rossland   	
Cloverdale	
East Kootenay  	
Vancouver  	
Vancouver  	
Maine,  U.S.A	
English   	
Swedish  	
Welsh-American   .. .
English   	
Canadian  	
Polish   	
Canadian 	
Scotch  	
Canadian  	
Canadian  	
English   	
French-Canadian   . .
Ukrainian   	
English   	
English   	
Austrian   	
Swedish   	
Scotch-American   ..
Irish   	
English   	
Hungarian   	
English   	
American    	
Canadian-American
English   :	
Canadian-American
Swedish-French   . . .
Coloured   	
English   	
American    	
American-Canadian
Canadian-American
Scotch   	
Italian   	
Canadian-English    .
Canadian  	
Canadian 	
Irish    	
English   	
Irish-American   ....
Welsh-French   	
English   	
Canadian  	
Canadian  	
English-American    .
Irish-Canadian   ....
Welsh	
American    	
Irish-English   	
American-Norwegian
Italian	
Scotch  	
Scotch  	
Canadian  	
Japanese  	
Scotch  	
Canadian  	
Chinese  	
Canadian-American
Years.
16
14 y2
5
15
9
15
14
11
12
16
11
16
16
4
11
15
13
16
14%
15
16%
12
13
2 mos.
Years.
16
14%
5
15
9
15
12
16
4
4
6
15
13
5
14%
1
15
12
2 mos.
14
14
14%
14%
14
5
14
14*
13
13
1.0
10
1
1
13
10
10
14%
14%
1
1
5
5
17
17
15
15
14
14
15
15
13
13
13
13 14 Geo. 5 British Columbia. J 9
Religious.
Every facility is given a boy to practise his own form of religion. Services are held for
Protestants every Sunday afternoon in the assembly-room, the local ministers and Salvation
Army officers conducting on alternate Sundays. Roman Catholic service is held at the same
hour by a priest from New Westminster assisted by a member of our staff.
Religious denominations: Church of England, 29; Presbyterian, 29; Roman Catholic, 23;
Alethodists, 20; Latter Day Saints, 1; Greek Catholic, 1; Lutheran, 3; Chinese, 2; Seventh Day
Adventists, 4; Baptists, 4; Scandinavian Methodist, 1; Congregational, 1.
Health of Inmates.
The following is the report of our Medical Officer, Dr. Stanley Paulin, covering the work
for the year :—
" During the year ended March 31st, 1923, the general health of the boys at the school has
been good. This has been contributed to in the largest measure by regular provision for all
of warm, suitable clothing, good food, regular work and recreation, as well as comfortable
cottages in which they are domiciled. These buildings, containing warm, well-ventilated dormitories, recreation-rooms, work-rooms, together with sufficient provision of shower-baths and toilet
requirements, have been uniformly kept in a clean, sanitary condition. Any boys with the above
facilities, with no serious handicap, are bound to be improved physically and so prepared for
any tuition provided for them, and to be ultimately safer citizens to discharge from the
institution.
" In order to exclude any such serious handicap, all new boys have been given a thorough
physical examination shortly after arrival at the school. Of the sixty-five boys arrived during
the year, I have found eighteen for whom I recommended removal of adenoids and tonsils, and
seven needing circumcision (three needing both operations—twenty-two in all). Excluding four,
who were either transferred or ran away, these have been dealt with as soon as it was considered safe for them to be allowed to go to hospital. Accordingly, during the year, including
some held from the previous year, there have been fourteen cases of removal of adenoids and
tonsils and six of circumcision (two having both operations). Three boys were found needing
glasses. One boy, an old admission, developed a condition requiring a resection of the nasal
septum. These were referred for treatment to an eye-and-nose specialist. One boy on admission
had inequality in the length of the legs, with slight lateral curvature of the spine, from an old
infantile paralysis. One had flat feet. For both of these boys suitable boots were made in the
shoe-shop of the school.
"A good many of the hoys on admission have tooth conditions which should be referred to
a dentist, and I strongly recommend that, if possible, some provision for dental care, over and
above extractions, be made.
" In the latter part of December, 1922, two mild eases of scarlet fever developed, necessitating quarantine of the school and isolation of all contacts. The isolation in the school itself
was facilitated by there being part of one cottage still unfilled. No new cases developed. The
source of the infection was not discovered. -
" One Indian boy, with marks of previous tuberculous glands, had more glands involved
shortly after admission, necessitating hospital treatment. His condition is now good. One case,
an Indian boy from the previous year, was discharged on account of tuberculosis. He subsequently died in hospital, where he had been for a considerable time before his official discharge from the school.
"Also during the year, as a couple of cases of goitre had developed, all the1 boys were
given small doses of iodide of soda during the period of two weeks, as a preventive, in view
of the present opinion that it had some power in this respect. Two cases of endocarditis
developed during the year subsequent to sore throats and colds. This necessitated prolonged
rest in each case.
"Apart from a frequent occurrence of small boils which broke out in several boys, there
is nothing else to report.
" There were twenty-six boys admitted to Vancouver General Hospital for operations, as
follows :  T.B. glands, 2 ; tonsils, 11; circumcision, 7; adenoids, C.
" Three were admitted for minor operations, such as ear-trouble, wounds, etc." J 10 Industrial School for Boys. 1923
School Dep.4.rtment.
All the boys in entering the school are tested to determine their public-school standing, a
record being kept, be he school age or otherwise. Few of the boys over 14 are likely to continue
school when they leave here. Most of them will have to go to work to support themselves. In
order-to do this they are given the opportunity of learning trades. If they are very far behind
in their school-work, and some boys on entering have not been able to read or write, they are
sent to school for a half-day.
A survey of the boys over 14 at present in the school shows the standing as follows: High
School, 5; Entrance, 11; Senior, 15; Second-year Intermediate, IS; First-year Intermediate, 11;
Junior, 8.
The hoys under 14 are given the regular school course, so that they may, when they leave
again, take their places in the public schools without loss of time. Alost of these boys are about
two years behind the grade they should have been in for their ages. In some cases this is
accounted for by the fact that they have not been attending school regularly, while others are
subnormal, several having come from " special classes." This means that instruction is practically individual, as most of them need constant encouragement and assistance.
Many of the boys show quite an aptness for drawing, of which they are very fond. Of
course, every effort is made to inculcate that most valuable of all lessons, self-control and respect
for the rights of others.
In Division 1 there have been fifty pupils who have attended since September. Of these,
nineteen attended for half-day during all or part of the time. At the present time there are
twenty-six on the roll, five of whom are attending half-day. Of the remaining twenty-four,
three have been sent back to Division 2, six have gone home, and fifteen have been put at trades
for the whole day.
Those attending at present are classified as follows: Senior Fifth, 5; Junior Fifth, 9;
Fourth Reader, 12.
Since September four have been promoted to a higher standing and four have been placed
in lower grades.
In division 2, consisting of the primary grades, twenty-nine boys have been enrolled since
the school opened in September, 1922. of which number two have gone home and eight passed
on to Division 1, but three were sent back as not being sufficiently advanced.
This division is really doing " special class " work asi conducted in the public schools, every
pupil requiring individual attention. There were three boys who entered this class during the
period from September who could neither read nor write, but who are now showing marked
improvement. As ean be readily seen, the arrival of new boys who have to be broken into
class-work makes things very difficult for the teacher, as some of them have certainly had their
education sadly neglected. The task confronting the teacher is no easy one, as, being boys of
tender years, it is exceedingly difficult to hold their attention very long at a time, and they
need great variety.
Boys in this division have attained grades as follows: Fourth Reader, 9; Third Reader, 4;
Second Reader, 4; First Reader, —.
Fourteen boys were let out of school at the end of June, they having reached the required
age, and over in some cases, all having attained to Junior and Intermediate Third. Being big
boys, and in the opinion of the teacher not liable to go a great deal higher, it was considered
as in their best interests to pass them out. Four of them were put in the shoe-shop, five on
the farm, one to the Poultry Department, one to the blacksmith-shop, one in the office, one to
the Carpentry Department, and two to the general work-gang, as being of a type that would
not settle to a trade. Of the four who were put in the shoe-shop, two have since gone home,
having done very well, the others being still there and proving very proficient. Of the five
put on the farm, one has since left the school, the remaining four still being there and are
interested and good workers. The one placed in the office has done exceedingly well, as also
have those placed in the Poultry, Blacksmith, and Carpentry Departments.
Business Course.—AVhen the school closed down in June one boy was anxious to take
office-work, and in order to give him an opportunity to see what he could do the institution of
a Commercial Course was decided on. The results proved very satisfactory; the work being
taught is Pitman's  shorthand,  touch  typewriting,  spelling,  elementary  book-keeping,   copying 14 Geo. 5 British Columbia. J 11
business letters, and general office practice. It can be understood that there are not many
boys in the school who can take this work, but a second boy who also showed a desire for this
kind of work was taken into the office and is also proving to be an apt pupil. The amount of
instruction that can be given during the course of a day is necessarily limited, it having to
be more or less spasmodic, but for all that the progress is excellent.
In addition these two boys assist in the library and keep the books in good condition and
in their proper order on the shelves. A filing system was installed and all the books, numbering 800 and more, were placed and indexed. We are additionally thankful for the loan of a
travelling library from Victoria.
The Band.
A band in a school of this description is a great asset and has been the means of helping
a great number of boys along the right road, several of whom it might have been very difficult
to handle otherwise. Alusic is inspiring, comforting, and uplifting, and when once a boy gets
so that he can play a few scales on any instrument he soon becomes enthusiastic, and in very
few cases has it been necessary to put a boy out of the band, nor has any boy wished to withdraw from it after once playing. The opportunities these boys get of playing at concerts, parades, etc., is an additional incentive for them to learn, and learn quickly.
I sometimes feel that the power of music has never been fully realized by child-welfare
workers, and personally I place great value upon music as being one of the main essentials in
the reclamation of child delinquents. One of the drawbacks we have to contend with in regard
to our band here is that no sooner than we get a boy up to top-notch than he is ready to leave
the school, and while at different times we have splendid concerts and other performances to,
our credit, yet there are times when we are seriously handicapped by the inclusion of so many
new boys. Naturally, of course, we want to see all the boys we can possibly handle in the
band, as it is considered a good omen for his future conduct and progress; quite a number of
our boys having, when they left the school, joined military, municipal, and religious bands.
Eleven of our band-boys left during the year, their places being eagerly filled, and the present
strength of the band is twenty-two boys, who are all working under a capable instructor to
become good musicians, which undoubtedly a good many of them will.
The expenditure on the band during the year was negligible, the amount being $268.50, of
which $180 was Bandmaster's salary, the average expenditure per boy being $2.95 per year.
Band practices are held every Monday and Thursday evening. Every morning the band
plays the " National Anthem" and other patriotic airs, and in the evening plays " retreat,"
followed by a hymn.
During the year the; band attended various fairs, sports, and children's days in different
localities, and gave concerts at the Agricultural Hall, Port Coquitlam, Kitsilano Beach, and
Vancouver.
Work Accomplished in Departments.
Tailoring Department.—The ever-growing needs of this institution on account of new
arrivals, the constant call for repairs to overalls, pants, sweaters, and the hundred-and-one
sundry repairs necessary to clothing create a heavy demand on this department, in addition
to which instruction is given to three boys employed there all day and to two boys employed
there for half a day. As can be imagined, in sedentary work of this kind a great deal of patience
is required teaching stitching, cutting-out, button-holing, etc., and it often happens that just
about the time when a boy is getting useful it is time for him to leave. While very few boys
take to this class of work, preferring the outdoor life, it is to be hoped that the knowledge they do
gain compensates to a large extent for the amount of time expended in teaching them. The
work turned out is of a very substantial nature, being neat and most suitable in every way
to our needs, and without a doubt does much to enhance the appearance of the boys at this
institution and instil into them a certain measure of self-respect which they had not possessed
before.
To help out in the work it was found necessary to install machinery driven by electricity,
as it was thought that, if any teaching was going to be done at all, it might just as well be
along modern lines, and with this end in view three electrically driven Singer sewing-machines
were put in, one button-holing machine, a Scovil button-machine, and two electric irons. From
the figures given it will be seen that the amount of work turned out during the year has been J 12 Industrial School for Boys. 1923
very satisfactory, and at the same time a considerable saving has heen effected: First, the
original cost of the overalls, uniforms, etc.; and, secondly, in the amount of repairs done; in
addition to which we must not overlook the real value of instruction given.
The material used is of the best and more than repays for the little extra expended in the
wear and tear we get out of it and its ability to withstand rough usage and constant repairing.
Five hundred and seventy-six pairs of overalls, 111 pairs of pants, and 37 uniforms, coats,
etc., were made, totalling in all £2,426.40; in addition to which, sundries, pressing, and repairs
amounting to S797.70 were done, totalling $3,224.10.
Expenditure for this department during the year, including the salary of the Tailor Instructor, amounted to $4,261.19 and the present inventory value is $3,109.05.
Shoemaking Department.—As with the foregoing, this department is thoroughly up-to-date,
its equipment consisting of two1 electrically-driven Singer sewing-machines, one foot-machine,
one " Ideal " Champion stitehing-machine, finishing-machine, and the necessary lasts, hammers,
nail-holders, and other tools. The work turned out by the boys under the instruction of a
capable man is of the very best and very suitable to the needs of the boys here, who are for
the most -part employed on the farm, grading, teaming, etc., work that requires a good strong
boot and the purchase of the best leather. Four boys are working here all day and two for
half a day, attending school the other half. Four boys have left the school since April, who
were previously engaged in learning this work, and became very proficient, and one in particular could make a boot from start to finish. It has been said by one who knows of such
things, on being shown some work that was done by this particular boy, that it was equal to
any that could be done by a tradesman. Of the remaining six boys, they are progressing very
favourably, being keen and interested in their work, and even in their present state of learning
could make a fair living.
The expenditure on this department for the year 1922-23 has been very moderate, as will
be seen, the purchase of tools and repairs to machinery being negligible.
The interest taken in the boys by their Instructor is very keen, which is reciprocated by
their doing their best at all times, and the work turned out by them undoubtedly shows that
they appreciate what is being done to help them become useful citizens. These boys are content
to stay in this department, despite the fact that they are not tied to any one branch of learning,
but are allowed to choose their own vocations, every endeavour being made to eliminate the
danger of a boy becoming a " square peg in a round hole."
A new departure was instituted this summer in the making of indoor slippers for use of
the boys in the rest-rooms in the cottages at night, a very creditable article being turned out,
and good time made of the summer season, when the boys for the most part were running
around in their bare feet and work in the way of repairs being somewhat slack. As in the
Tailoring Department, prices of the work turned out here are based on those obtaining outside;
but, for all that, it is highly improbable whether we could purchase a shoe which would be of
the same service to us, as the leather we put in our article is of the best and stands a lot
of repairing and patching, thus lengthening the life of the shoe.
Taken all in all, this is a department which undoubtedly justifies its existence, and which
will always be a source of interest to a number of boys, and, it is hoped, be a means of some
of them getting on their feet and justifying the time they have spent in the institution.
Two hundred and ninety-eight pairs of shoes were turned out, 110 pairs of slippers, and 7
pairs of football boots, at a value of S2,GS0.50, and repairs to the value of Sl,525 were made.
Carpentry Department.—A department which is constantly kept busy is our Carpentry
Department. There are about six boys employed here. The work done is of a practical nature
and suited to the needs of the school. The instruction obtainable does not run beyond the use
of the hammer, saw, plane, tri-square, etc.; but when the time does come for a boy to leave
the institution he is more or less familiar with these tools, and would be enabled to get work
as a helper and so pick up the more advanced side of carpentry.
Some of the work done in this department consists of the construction of a bandstand,
incubator and brooder houses, chicken-coops, garbage-house, and fire-hall; alterations to tailor
and shoe shops; putting new floors in shoe-shop and band-room; construction of root-bins and
potato-bins; alterations to practically all the doors in all the buildings through their either
having swollen or shrunk; building new library in No. 3 Cottage; construction of screens; and
other jobs of a like nature too numerous to mention. 14 Geo. 5 British Columbia. J 13
Estimated expenditure for the year was $204.07, but lumber and salary of official amounted
to another $2,906.08, making a total of $3,110.15. Work to the value of $2,438.35 was done during
the period, the present inventory value being $857.56.
Poultry Department.—The Poultry Department was for some considerable part of the year
under the direction of the Farm Department, but in view of the intention to extend this department considerably it has been made a separate thing, embracing, in addition to poultry, geese,
ducks, turkeys, and rabbits. AVe have at the present time one pen of Rhode Island Reds, one
pen of White Wyandotte pullets, one pen of Barred Plymouth Rock pullets, one pen of White
Leghorns, one pen of Barred Plymouth Rocks, three roosters, two cockerels, and bantam rooster
and hens, all pure-bred strains.
There are six boys steadily employed in this department, one being solely in charge of the
incubation, the others having various pens of birds, rabbits, or geese, as. the case may be. All
are very enthusiastic, and, as ean be imagined, the work they are doing and the knowledge
they are gaining will fit them for this kind of vocation should they desire to take it up when
they leave the institution. For a long time pens of rabbits were given to the school-boys to look
after, but this was not found very satisfactory, as they soon got tired and wanted to be switching all the time; consequently the better plan of putting some of the older boys who had left
the school in charge of different pens was tried and has proved very successful. From the first
batch of eggs put in the incubators this spring chicks to the number of 209 were hatched,
although on account of the late and cold season the percentage of non-fertile eggs was very high.
About 60,000 square feet of ground has been set aside on the hill for runs and scratching-
ground, making an ideal location for the raising of poultry.
Grading.—The man running the Poultry Department also looks after the grading. Boys
coming to the school first are usually put on this kind of work—that is, providing they are
above school age—in order to enable them to get the benefit of fresh air and to be built up.
After a month on the pick and shovel, if they are desirous of taking up a trade they are allowed
to do so, it being the rule that a boy be permitted to choose his own vocation. It often happens
that a boy will go from department to department until he finally decides on that which will
suit his ideas.
The work done under this heading during the year consists of levelling the parade and football grounds, erection of playground equipment, consisting of parallel bars, giant-stride, swings,
building a retaining-wall, layout of the grounds, gardens, etc., shrubberies around the bandstand,
and slashing and clearing acreage on the hillside preparatory to ploughing.
Blacksmith Department.—In the Blacksmith Department most of the work in the way of
repairs to farm machinery, implements, etc., is done by the same man who runs the two departments, Poultry and Grading. All the bolts for the erection of the playground equipment were
forged here; ploughshares are sharpened, also picks and other tools used constantly. Two boys
are employed here and are learning what! they can in the way of blacksmithing, although on
account of so much of this work being done by machinery these days, and this school not having
the necessary machinery to teach them, we have to do what we can without it.
The value of the work done by these two departments can hardly be estimated in actual
figures, as it is of such a nature that taken singly they would not amount to much, hut combined they cover a large field, a large amount of work, and no little patience in Instructing boys
and at the same time keeping a watchful eye that they all keep busy and make most of their
time.
Expenditure incurred in the Poultry Department, including men's salary, purchase of incubators, brooding-machines, etc., is $1,489.29, and returns from eggs, poultry for table use, rabbits,
etc., amount to $272.14, and present inventory value is $573.50.
Farm Department.—Iu getting a department of this kind started it can be easily understood that the initial outlay would be somewhat heavy, machinery aud stock having to be
bought.
We got away to a late start last spring, and being new ground which had to be cleared
of logs, stumps, rocks, etc., and then broken, harrowed, and disked, it is considered that good
work was done in getting ground under cultivation to the extent of 7% acres, of which 3%
acres were put down to garden-truck and 4 acres to potatoes, roots, etc., which kept the school
supplied through the winter months, and in the summer months gave us daily fresh supplies J 14 Industrial School for Boys. 1923
of vegetables in season. This, as may be seen, helped considerably with our grocery bills, and
with pork being supplied to the extent of 2,085 lb., our meat bills were also reduced in proportion.
The following produce resulted from the work put in in the Farm, Dairy, Piggery, and
Poultry Departments, which were at that time incorporated under the one department: Pork,
2,085 lb.; eggs, 333% dozen; potatoes, 20% tons; carrots, HVi tons; beets, 672 lb.; turnips, 5%
tons; cucumbers, 1,645; cabbage, 917 lb.; hay, 10 tons; vegetable marrow, 282 lb.; tomatoes,
876 lb.; peas, 205 lb.; lettuce, 140 head; cauliflowers, 14 lb.; squash, 60 lb.; brussels sprouts,
30 lb.; parsnips, 1,050 lb.; corn, 117 dozen; beans, 240 lb.; milk, 15,835 lb.
Estimated total value of this production based on the then day's prices is $2,901.17, and
expenditure incurred, including Farm Instructor's salai'5', purchase of machinery,' cattle, feed,
etc., amounted to $8,146.01; present inventory value being $6,155.55.
Dairy.—It was with a great deal of satisfaction that every one viewed the commencement
of construction of the new barns in September, 1922, and with their completion in November
steps were immediately taken to put in motion the machinery authorizing us to purchase the
necessary stock to fill same, resulting in the purchase of a Jersey cow and calf and a young
hull from the Fraser Valley District, to be followed in January by the purchase of six more
Jersey cows from Victoria, all pedigreed stock and with high production records. From the
start a record of milk production was kept, and as will be seen by the fact that since their
purchase to the end of March 15th 819.2 lb. of milk has been yielded, this has done away with
the necessity of purchasing from the Colony Farm at Essondale.
The institution of the dairy branch of farming has given us an outlet for the employment
of our surplus boys, many of whom, since the extension of the age-limit to 18, are very big
boys and have been accustomed to working on farms. Those who have been allotted to this
department are proving very enthusiastic, both in the care and cleanliness! of the cows they are
tending, and are also proving good milkers. This is work that will be of inestimable value to
the Province, as it is intended to make it one of the most outstanding departments at the school,
and when it has had time to get down to a thorough working basis it is to be hoped that a
large number of the boys will make it their vocation and a means of earning a livelihood when
the time comes to leave the school.
Paint Department.—Every opportunity was taken of the fine, long summer days to do a
great amount of painting to outbuildings, etc., kalsomining basement walls, whitewashing
furnace-rooms, etc.
In the painting of the buildings which were put up during the year the colour scheme
throughout was kept in harmony as far as possible with that of the main buildings—namely,
buff, brown facings, and green shingle-stain for the roofs. This work was a source of profit
to the boys engaged in doing it, although not a great many take to it. One boy, however, in
particular showed great aptitude and has been kept in this department right along, and is
to-day a very fair painter and keenly interested in his work.
Work done during the year consisted of painting floors of assembly-rooms in cottages, garage,
fire-hall, chicken-houses, piggeries, rabbit-pens, bandstand, swings, and playground equipment,
garbage-house, brooder and incubator house, band-room, chicken-coops, blacksmith-shop, and
some painting in the new barn buildings.
It is the intention in the coming year to use any boys showing proficiency in this line of
work for interior decoration.
The material used is of the best, consisting of finest white lead, pure American turpentine,
and linseed-oil, the mixing and colouring being done right at the school. This affords additional
scope for learning for the boys. In addition to painting, glazing of lights is also done and other
work of a like nature.
Expenditure under this heading for the fiscal year amounted to $547.77, work to the value
of about $734 being done.   Inventory value of this department at the end of March was $351.39.
Engineering Department.—This is another department which has been the means of finding
work for idle hands to do, and quite a number of boys have passed through the hands of the
Engineering Department since its inception. A few of them have stuck and are making good,
but quite a number have not found it so interesting and have passed on. A considerable amount
of work is doue in this department, as is easily imagined in an institution of this kind. Plugged
drains, frozen pipes, bursts, etc., keep the man in charge and his boys very busy. A 100-foot
pipe-line was also run to the shacks occupied by the men working on the roads and grading last 14 Geo. 5 British Columbia. J 15
summer, and another was run to the barns. The boys get instruction in drilling, tapping,
threading, cutting, soldering, brazing, and other work. The uncovered nature of the pipes
and fittings keeps this department on the jump, and then again the covered nature of some of
them, being buried under the cement floor, gives considerable trouble in locating stoppages. The
oare and attention to the Cottage and Administration Block furnaces are also the work of this
department, as is the care of the fire apparatus.
It is impossible, as in the case of some other departments, to estimate the value of this
work, it not really being on a large scale, but consists for the most part of minor repairs and
general maintenance-work, such as attention to toilets, plumbing, repairs to furnaces, attention
to fires, removing stoppages from drains, etc.
From this sort of work the boys get a good insight into both plumbing and engineering
work, which it is to be hoped will serve its purpose at some future date.
Purchases for this department outside of pipes and fittings, etc., that were installed,
amounted to only $107.28 for the year, which includes1 tool, drain-cleaning machinery, etc., and
the present inventory value is $201.70.
Garage.—This affords an outlet for two or three boys, who do minor repairs, drive the oars,
keep them clean, and make themselves generally useful.
Cooking.—Two boys have proved themselves very adept at cooking. One has since left
the school, the other still being here. The tuition obtained is practical and all along the lines
of plain cooking, but there is reason to hope that the experience they gain here will enable
them to get a position when they go out, and thus help them farther along the road should
they desire to take it up as a profession.
A^ISITORS DURING THE  YEAR.
We had a large number of visitors out to see us during the year, and all expressed themselves as delighted with what they saw, the general appearance of the boys being highly commented on, and the work done improving the grounds and buildings drew forth exclamations
of real surprise that so much could be accomplished in such a short period. Among the visitors
were: The Hon. John Oliver, Premier of British Columbia, and the Hon. Dr. MacLean, Provincial Secretary; J. L. AVhite, Deputy Provincial Secretary; W. IL Maclnnes, Civil Service
Commissioner; a delegation of child-welfare workers from Kamloops; members of the Children's
Aid Society of A'ancouver; a delegation from Edmonton, Alberta; a delegation from the Local
Council of Women, New AVestminster; Magistrate Edmonds, of New AVestminster; a delegation
from the Convention of Women's Institutes; Mrs. Ralph Smith, Mr. Blair, Mr. Carter, Rev.
A. H. Sovereign, Airs. Mayley, and Mrs. McNair, representing the Children's Aid Society of Aran-
couver; the Hon. Dr. Sutherland and Mrs. Sutherland, of the Public Works Department, accompanied by Mr. Philip, Public AVorks Engineer; Air. Weston, Superintendent of Boys' Industrial
School, Hawaii; Chief Anderson, of Vancouver, and H. AV. Collier, Chief Probation Officer for
the City of Vancouver; Mrs. MacMurray and Miss Scott, of South Africa; the Hon. J. D. McPher-
son, K.C., of Toronto; Captain C. AV. Whittaker; Miss Chandler, of New York, and R. D. Dinning,
of Arancouver; a delegation from the Ancient Order of Foresters attending the convention of
that order in Vancouver; Captain Rayner, Ottawa, and Mrs. Gibson from Victoria; delegations
from the Gyro and Canadian Clubs of A'ancouver; Commissioner Wells-Gray, South A'ancouver;
James Falconer and party; J. W. de B. Farris, late Attorney-General for the Province of
British Columbia, and Garfield King; Rev. R. Henderson, of New Westminster; Captain A.
Holland and Mr. Holland, of Burnaby; not forgetting our old friends " The Elks " and Shelly's
Minstrels, who came out and entertained us as they can only do.
We are greatly indebted to those of our friends who during the year contributed in various
ways to the happiness of the boys by the donation of gifts of sporting goods, equipment, etc.,
some of whom are: The Canadian Club, headed by Bishop de Pencier, J. R. V. Dunlop, Esq.,
made a presentation of lacrosse sticks, baseball bats, mitts, etc.; in addition they paid transportation one way on the occasion of our trip to Bowen Island, and in this connection our
thanks are extended to the Union Steamship Company for that delightful day; a cheque for
$25 was received from the Canadian Association of Commercial Travellers for use for the hoys
at Christmas, and the Salvation Army came out in person and distributed candies, fruits, etc.,
on this occasion. The Canadian Club were to the fore again also when they presented us with
a chest-developing outfit, punch-bag, etc. J 16 Industrial School for Boys. 1923
Outings.
On May 5th (Alay Day) the whole school took part in the celebrations held at New Westminster, transportation facilities being supplied by the Kiwanis Club, and a most enjoyable
day was had. On May 6th the " Elks " at Port Coquitlam gave us an enjoyable day and a
football match thrown in. On May 10th the Gyros and Elks Clubs came out and took the boys
in to New AVestminster on the occasion of the Amateur Sports Day. On July 3rd the band took
part in the contest at Stanley Park arranged by the Tyee Potlatch Committee; at the Invitation
of the Point Grey Municipality the band were allowed to go to Seaside Park. On August 22nd,
the whole school were permitted to attend the celebration of Children's Day at Hastings Park,
preceded by the parade through A'ancouver, our good friends the " Elks " making the necessary
transportation arrangements. On August the " Elks " of Coquitlam entertained us again. On
August 18th, thanks to the courtesy of the Union Steamship Company, we were enabled to go
to Bowen Island and spent a very happy day. On September Sth the band visited Burquitlam on
the occasion of the fall fair, and on September 21st visited Maple Ridge for the purpose of
entertaining the people attending the fair. On February 27th, at the invitation of the Rotary
Club, the band played at the opening of the Community Hall, A'ancouver, and were entertained
to luncheon by the ladies of the Canadian War Memorial Church; in the afternoon attending
a show at the instigation of the management of the Capitol Theatre.
For the opportunities afforded by these outings to help brighten the lives of the boys, our
heartiest thanks are extended to those whose kind forethought and interest made such times
possible.
Summer Schedule, effective from April 1st,  1923, until Further Notice.
Daily Routine.—Morning: Reveille, 6 a.m.; breakfast, 7 a.m.; prayers, 7.25 a.m.; flag-raising,
7.30 a.m.; sick parade, 8 a.m.; trades (men), 7.30 a.m.; trades (boys), 8 a.m.; schools, 8.30 to
10.45 a.m.; dinner, 12 noon.
Afternoon: Trades (men and boys), 1 p.m.; schools, 1.30 to 3.30 p.m.; play, 4 to 5 p.m.;
supper, 5 p.m.; sick parade, 5.30 p.m.; retreat, 7 p.m. (time to be extended a quarter of an hour
each month) ; evening prayers, according to retreat; bed, 9 p.m.; lights out, 9.30 p.m.
Sundays.—All meals will be served at the same hours, but reveille will be at 6.30 a.m.
instead of 6. Church services, parades, and lectures will be arranged according to weather and
other conditions.
Bugle-calls.—The authorized bugle-calls will be sounded at least fifteen minutes before each
parade.
Farm-boys.—Boys working in dairy and having care of horses must be ready to leave their
cottage by 5 a.m.
Winter Schedule, effective from October 1st, 1922, until Further Notice.
Daily Routine.—Alorning: Reveille, 6.30 a.m.; breakfast, 7.30 a.m.; prayers, 8 a.m.; sick
parade, 8.10 a.m.; flag-raising, 8.15 a.m.; trades (men), 8 a.m.; trades (hoys), 8.30 a.m.; schools,
8.45 a.m.; dinner, 12 noon.
Afternoon: Trades (men and boys), 1 p.m.; schools, 1.15 p.m.; play, 4 to 5.15 p.m.; supper,
5.30 p.m,; sick parade, 6 p.m.; retreat, 7.30 p.m.; evening prayers, 8 p.m.; bed, 8.15 p.m.;
lights out, 9.15 p.m.
Sundays—All meals will be served at the same hours, but reveille will be at 7 a.m. instead
of 6.30 a.m. Church services, parades, and lectures will be arranged according to weather and
other conditions.
Bugle-calls.—The authorized bugle-calls will be sounded at least fifteen minutes before each
parade.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
DAVID B. BRANKIN,
Superintendent.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William H.  Citllin,  Printer to tlie King's Most Excellent  Majesty.
1924.

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