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THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FIRE MARSHAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1925 STATISTICS, 1924 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1925

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 THIRD ANNUAL REPORT
OF
THE FIEE MAESHAL
FOR  THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1925
STATISTICS, 1924
PRINTED   by
AUTHORITY OF THE  LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Chaeles  F.   Bain-field,  Printer to  the King's  Most Excellent  Majesty.
1925.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
. May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned lias the honour to present the Third Annual Report of the
Fire Marshal for the year ended December 31st, 1924.
Victoria, B.C., March 31st, 1925.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Report of Fire Marshal  .*. Pages      5-7
Table I., Inspections made  Pages     8-9
Table II., Fires Reported Pages 10-11
Table III., Causes of Fires  , Pages 12-13
Table IV., Classification of Property  Pages 14-21
Table V., Summary  Page 22
Table VI., Loss of Life  Page 23 REPORT OF FIRE MARSHAL.
Office of Fire Marshal,
Vancouver, B.C., March 31st, 1925.
The Honourable A. M. Manson, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my third annual report as Fire Marshal, covering the
work of the year ended December 31st, 1924.
The work of this office in the field of advice, inspection, investigation, and inquiry has been
actively carried on with the co-operation and assistance of Mr. A. A. Mac-Donald, Deputy Fire
Marshal, and the 120 local assistants reporting.
The fire records which are a part of this report have been compiled and tabulated by Miss
Williamson, assisted by Miss McKeating, of the office staff.
One thousand six hundred and eighty-two fires occurred during the year, involving a property
loss of $4,050,448, a decrease of $179,4(19, as compared with 1923.
In comparing our losses for 1924 with those of other years, it is only fair to note that there
has been a large increase in values over previous years, both In stocks carried and in buildings.
So that a casual reading of these figures will not show the whole story of the benefit derived from
the organized fire-prevention work that has been carried on throughout the Province. In
addition to this fact, we should consider the improved system of collecting fire reports. In other
years many fires occurring in outlying districts were never reported, whereas to-day, with 120
local assistants in our cities, towns, and villages reporting every month, and the Provincial Police
Force covering the unorganized districts, we feel that our records are complete.
A study of Table IV. gives some idea of the effect of fire losses on the industrial and home
life of our people. In this Province we find that fires in industrial plants, which under ordinary
conditions employ a large number of wage-earners, caused a loss amounting to $2,031,365, or
about 50 per cent, of our entire loss for the year. This, of course, carries with it a serious
economic loss in wages, profits, and business that can only be estimated.
During the year 973 homes were destroyed, valued with their contents at $926,908, or nearly
25 per cent, of our entire loss. In the case of the homes our records show that not more than
60 per cent, of this loss is covered by insurance. Five of the six deaths reported, four children
and one adult, occurred in dwellings.
Eighteen schools were burned, with a total loss of $56,262. Five of these fires were found
to be of incendiary origin and occurred in the Doukhobor districts, with a loss of $11,350.
In view of these facts I think we must agre'e that the burden of our excessive fire loss
rests most heavily on those who can least afford it; i.e., the wage-earners and small-home
owners.
In attempting to cope with this situation, the work of inspection has been thoroughly
organized and a system of monthly inspections is enforced. Each month reports are required
showing the number of inspections made and orders issued. During 1924 49,677 inspections were
made and 5,804 hazards to life and property were found and orders issued to remove them.
From these orders seventy-seven appeals were made to the Fire Marshal under section 20 of the
Act. All were investigated and in all but one case satisfactory adjustments were made. The
exception was an appeal from the finding of the Fire Marshal to the County Court and was
decided in favour of the appellant.
The result of this work has been a marked improvement in conditions and a decreased
number of fires in the inspected districts. It has, however, been found to be both a physical and
financial impossibility to extend this work to the homes and, to a large extent, to the outlying
industrial districts.
In the industrial field trained men are not available for the work. Considerable advance
has been made, however, in this particular branch. Co-operating with the insurance engineers,
surveys have been made and advice given. In many cases the results have been excellent. As
noted in my report of last year, we feel that the serious problem of how to reduce the hazard of F 6 British Columbia. 1925
the refuse-burner has been solved by the installation of the " down-draught" type. Four of
these have been installed during the year and are giving excellent service, both from the standpoint of efficiency and cost of upkeep. ■   .'
In many cases old and disused buildings are being replaced by new and up-to-date plants
constructed on fire-resistive and fire-prevention lines. Better fire-protection is being provided by
the installation of sprinkler systems and other modern appliances. A notable case is the action
of the mill-owners located on False Creek, Vancouver, who have agreed to pay for a much-
needed fire-boat to be maintained by the city. As a result of this action a reduction of 10 per
cent, in insurance rates has been granted by the British Columbia Underwriters' Board. This
sort of co-operation will get results.
Realizing the great need of reaching the homes of our Province with a fire-prevention
message, a committee of insurance-men representing all the insurance interests of the Province,
including the agents, was formed. It was decided to conduct a campaign of education throughout the schools. With the co-operation and assistance of the Department of Education, fire-
prevention literature was placed in the hands of the teachers for the use of the children, who
were asked to write essays on the subject of fire-prevention or to submit drawings for fire-
prevention posters. The response was excellent. Thousands of children were reached and
hundreds of papers were handed in. Of these, the best were selected by the various principals
and submitted to the committee. From these, thirty-one were selected as being of outstanding
merit and gold and silver medals with diplomas were awarded to the successful contestants.
With your kind approval, I had the privilege and pleasure of contributing to the fund and
assisting in this work. Its value cannot be estimated in terms of money, but should it result
in the saving of one life and one home it is worth while.
• The work of providing fire-protection for cities and towns has not been neglected. There
has been a very considerable advance along this line. The capacity of storage-reservoirs has
been increased and larger mains installed. New fire-halls have been built and new and up-to-
date equipment purchased. The personnel and morale of the men of the departments has been
greatly improved in some cities. One result of this is seen in a reduction of from 10 to 20 per
cent, in insurance rates in the cities and towns making improvements. The requests for advice
and assistance along these lines have been many and such has been gladly given.
The relation of building construction to our fire losses is brought to our attention in Table
II. It will be noted that our loss in fire-resistive buildings was $557; in brick- and concrete-
joisted buildings, $438,602; and in frame buildings, $3,011,199. It must be conceded, of course,
that the percentage of frame buildings over the other types is very great, but the fact remains
that fires originating in a brick or concrete building are as a rule confined to the place of origin
without serious damage to the building, whereas in frame buildings they usually result in a
total loss of building and contents. On this point I have a report from Mr. A. J. Bird, Building
Inspector and Assistant Fire Marshal for Vancouver City, which is of interest. He states that
since 1922 there has not been a serious fire in a building constructed under the present building
by-law. In all cases where a fire occurred it was confined to the point of origin, with but little
damage to the building. These facts should receive serious consideration from some of our
City Councils who are prone to let down the restrictions and permit the repair or rebuilding of
wooden buildings within the first fire limits.
Requests for advice as to proper methods of handling and shipping explosives have been
received during the year, with particular reference to the Port of Vancouver. In this connection
I called to my assistance Lieutenant-Colonel F. E. Leach, of the Dominion Bureau of Explosives,
and Inspector D. W. McNabb, of the Bureau of Explosives for the United States and Canada.
Together we made a thorough survey of the methods used in handling, packing, and shipping
explosives in this Province. Every assistance was given by local officials of the Canadian Pacific
and Canadian National Railways and by the manufacturers. We found that great care is used
in the handling and shipping of dynamite and powder; only experienced men are employed in
the work. The most modern methods of packing and shipping are in use. All rules and regulations of the Railway Board governing the matter of loading, packing, and transportation are
fully carried ont. While the location of the transfer-wharf on the Vancouver water-front is
not ideal, yet, in view of the careful methods used, we feel that the situation is reasonably safe
and the cost of providing an explosives-wharf in another location would not at the present time
be justified. The local by-law in force in the City of Vancouver governing the handling and
transportation of explosives within the city is an excellent one and is being rigidly enforced. 15 Geo. 5 Report of Fire Marshal. F 7
The situation with reference to the handling and storage of fire-crackers and other explosives
of this nature was not found so satisfactory. No regulations other than those of the Dominion
Bureau of Explosives were in force and they did not quite cover the local situation. In view
of this fact I ventured to recommend that the " Fire Marshal Act" be amended, giving the
power to make regulations to control the situation. This was done at the last session and regulations will be submitted for. your approval in diie course.
The matter of the proper regulating of the storage of gasolene and other hazardous liquids
has received careful consideration during the year. A meeting of all interested parties was
called in my office and as a result regulations will be submitted for your consideration and
approval at a later date.
The danger to life and property in the home, due to the use of the dangerous nitro-cellulose
films by children, has received attention and regulations are being prepared under authority of
the amendment passed at the last session.
In concluding, I wish to express my warm appreciation of the work done by the Local
Assistant Fire Marshals during the year. Many of these men are volunteers and do not receive
any remuneration from their respective Councils. Others are municipal officers who have taken
on the work with no increase in salary. Yet in spite of this fact, with the possible exception
of two or three, they are doing faithful and efficient work in protecting the lives and property
of our citizens.
Thanks are also due to Colonel J. H. Mc-Mullin, Superintendent of Provincial Police, and
the officers and men of his force for valuable assistance rendered in investigating fires and
acting as Assistant Fire Marshals in unorganized districts.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. ALFRED THOMAS,
Fire Marstial. F 8
British Columbia.
1925
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS MADE AND ORDERS  ISSUED'BY ASSISTANT
FIRE  MARSHALS.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
City Municipalities (34).
58
24
2
344
60
1,110
47
29
6
S
561
30
57
735
908
554
175
11
62
306
328
307
425
130
28,301
113
8,382
4
17
4
109
35
5
18
3
11
8
78
15
135
58
55
1
16
109
129
29
290
Trail   	
5
3,243
36
384
Totals            	
43,073
148
77
5
35
43
90
2
16
4
18
47
155
155
1
97
26
170
19
41
2
4,602
22
4,797
District Municipalities  (29).
51
2
Delta.            	
6
31
Kent  	
6
62
6
22
1
83
15
95
11 15 Geo. 5
Report of Fire Marshal.
F 9
TABLE I.—INSPECTIONS MADE AND  ORDERS  ISSUED  BY ASSISTANT
FIRE MARSHALS—Continued.
Name.
Inspections.
Orders.
District Municipalities—Continued.
30
4
Totals	
5,805
1
30
218
8
395
Village Municipalities  (If).
1
12
24
Totals                                   	
257
7
25
1
16
2
365
1
8
21
39
33
15
9
37
Fire Districts  (19).
10
6
2
S
3
1
13
21
11
Totals	
542
75
49,677
5,304
Grand totals, 1923 :	
40,573
5,468 F 10
British Columbia.
1925
TABLE  II.—FIRES  REPORTED.
Districts   reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
City Municipalities (34).
Alberni..	
Armstrong	
Chilliwack	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan	
Bnderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Kelowna  	
Ladysmith ...
Merritt    —
Nanaimo	
Nelson.....	
New Westminster	
North Vancouver	
Phoenix ....
Port Alberni - - -	
Port Coquitlam..	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon..	
Victoria	
Totals	
District Municipalities  (29)
Burnaby -
Chilliwack	
Coldstream	
Coquitlam	
Delta	
Esquimalt -	
Fraser Mills...	
Kent	
Langley	
Maple  Ridge	
Matsqui	
Mission	
North Cowichan ,	
North Vancouver	
Oak Bay	
Peachland	
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows	
Point  Grey	
Richmond	
Saanich	
Salmon Arm	
South Vancouver	
Spallumcheen	
Suinas	
Summerland	
2
4
1
13
14
1
12
11
6
31
22
41
23
7
10
5
4
12
19
19
1
9
427
27
165
898
39
11
1
9
10
17
1
2
21
11
11
6
3
16
18
1
10
49
20
38
1
67
2
1
3
$    395
5,072
1,400
77,116
1,925
225
19,818
154
1,733
18,117
22,551
11,029
8,659
7,519
32,799
3,397
9,436
69,761
4,975
8,700
4,345
25,740
25,0S5
4,956
2,757
1,162,267
98,150
61,872
$1,689,953
65,042
35,468
500
56,837
23,337
69,123
794
4,300
47,186
20,208
36,906
32,861
4,824
30,132
587
325
10,808
37,796
118,310
59,764
7,500
37,420
3,283
35
576 15 Geo. 5
Report op Fire Marshal.
F 11
TABLE II.—FIRES REPORTED—Continued.
Districts   reporting.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
District Municipalities—Continued.
Surrey	
26
2
15
$
52 869
Tadanac	
13,200
11,799
West Vancouver	
Totals	
411
1
1
4
4
$
$
Village Municipalities (1,).
Abbotsford	
352
Burns Lake	
25
Mission	
20,020
9,523
Smithers	
Totals	
10
2
1
4
1
2
4
1
4
3
2
4
2
$
$
29,920
Fire Districts (19).
2,064
3,000
Hedley	
2,807
2,000
708
3,295
1,631
4,585
Stewart                                           	
14,710
1,850
Union Bay                                 	
14,473
Vanderhoof                   ..                                    ...               	
7,756
Totals	
30
13
11
5
9
22
17
38
25
9
68
8
40
20
35
13
$
$
58,879
23,055
Unorganized  Districts  (15).
90,988
Fort St. John	
8,100
6,349
97,413
27,957
269,618
176,431
25,054
Lillooet             	
209,991
22,804
315.854
62,388
36,055
Yale	
117,849
Totals	
333
$1
,489,906
1,682
$4
,050,448
Note.—Construction of buildings—
Fire-resisting  1,
Brick or concrete  144,
Frame  1,537,
1,682,
$ 557
438,692
3,611,199
$4,050,448 F 12
British Columbia.
1925
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Ashes against wood 	
Boiler or boiler-pipes insufficiently protected ..
Burning paint off wall 	
Candle  carelessness	
Canned heat exploded 	
Canned heat upset 	
Carburettor  back-firing  	
Clothes too near lamp 	
Clothes too near open fire 	
Clothes too near smoke-stack	
Clothes too near stove or stove-pipe 	
Coal-gas  explosion	
Coal-oil carelessness 	
Coal-oil explosion  	
Coat falling on exhaust-pipe of gasolene-engine
Curtains  from  candle	
Curtains from lamp	
Curtains  from  stove  	
Cushion falling against stove  	
Defective   boiler   	
Defective Buntzen burner 	
Defective burner on vulcanizing-mould  	
Defective   chimney   	
Defective exhaust-pipe 	
Defective   film  	
Defective   fireplace   	
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe 	
Defective  gas connection  	
Defective hot-air pipe  	
Defective  machine    —
Defective   oven   	
Defective   radiator   	
Defective   rubbish-burner   	
Defective stove  or stove-pipe 	
Defective "wiring 	
Dust  explosion   	
Electrical  appliances  	
Exposure    	
Fire-crackers	
Fumigation	
Furnace   insufficiently   protected   	
Gas-heater   upset   	
Gasolene   carelessness    	
Gasolene explosion  	
Gasolene leaking on exhaust-pipe 	
Grease on  stove  	
Hot-air register  igniting woodwork   	
Hot   box	
Hot poker on floor 	
Incendiary   	
Incubator-trays too  near furnace	
Lamp   explosion   	
Lamp  upset  	
Lantern upset  ...,—	
Lightning	
Live   coals    --
Lubricating-oil falling on exhaust-pipe 	
Match carelessness	
Matches,  children "with	
Matches,  mice with  	
Oil leaking over locomotive furnace	
Oil-stove  explosion	
Oil-stove  upset	
26
2
1
7
1
1
4
1
4
1
19
3
4
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
100
1
1
28
6
1
2
1
2
2
1
48
24
2
36
155
3
3
4
1
16
3
1
8
1
3
2
24
1
6
9
4
4
18
1
49
26
14
1
3
5
8,682
5,230
30
4,117
55
89
1,755
30
85
10
8,572
17,630
1,851
811
25
8
561
580
5
103
202
20
213,980
60
145
1,820
19,560
148
20
352
785
98
130
95,949
106,793
67
2,248
444.95S
•  34
871
22,253
72
39,422
5,890
300
480
35
30,237
12
41,804
514
2,926
13,762
10,978
10,678
1,088
14,000
45,759
13,280
11,375
200
11,433
2,954 15 Geo. 5
Report op Fire Marshal.
F 13
TABLE III.—CAUSES OF FIRES—Continued.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of
Loss.
Overheated   steam-pipe   	
Paper from electric globe 	
Paper from  fireplace  	
Paper from stove 	
Pressure-tank exploded	
Short circuit  	
Smokers'   carelessness   	
Sparks from boiler	
Sparks from burning rubbish 	
Sparks from bush fire 	
Sparks  from  chimney   	
Sparks from  Dutch  oven  	
Sparks from engine 	
Sparks from  fire-box  	
Sparks from fireplace  	
Sparks from  forge  	
Sparks from furnace 	
Sparks  from  generator  	
Sparks  from  locomotive  	
Sparks from  mill  burner  	
Sparks  from  motor  	
Sparks from oven 	
Sparks from smoke-stack 	
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe 	
Spontaneous comhustion	
Steam-pipes too  near ceiling 	
Stove   explosion	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Sun's rays on glass 	
Tar boiling over on stove 	
Thawing   pipes   	
Unknown   	
Varnish boiling over on stove 	
Wax melting on stove caught fire 	
Wood too near stove 	
Totals 	
1
1
1
2
1
43
137
2
12
30
261
4
13
O
53
3
8
1
7
34
1
1
1
38
46
1
1
83
1
5
9
160
1
1
11
1,682
227
12
47
33
270
105,536
553,325
28,000
16,359
93,063
223,027
16,469
42,152
5,958
31,560
1,714
61.2S9'
7,715
114,712
151,631
50
35
2,672
68,685
535,035
104
18
120,264
44,948
710
1,314
590,259
96
46
15,192
$4,050,448 F 14
British Columbia.
1925
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED  AND  CAUSES.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Apartments
Automobiles
Bakeries
Banks  and  offices
Barns    	
Barns and stables
Blacksmith-shops
Boarding-houses
34
87
Defective chimney   2
Defective   fireplace     3
Defective  stove    1
Electrical   appliances     1
Exposure  12
Furnace-pipe  insufficiently  protected    1
Incendiary      1
Match  carelessness      1
Matches,   children with     1
Paper from electric globe   1
Smokers'   carelessness  6
Sparks  from  chimney    2
Sparks   from   fireplace     1
Spontaneous   combustion     1
Carburettor  back-firing     4
Exposure     25
Gasolene carelessness   4
Gasolene   explosion  2
Gasolene leaking on  exhaust-pipe    1
Incendiary     2
Match   carelessness    4
Oil-stove  explosion  1
Short  circuit    21
Smokers'   carelessness     8
Sparks from bush  fire   3
Unknown     12
Defective   oven     1
Exposure     1
Stove insufficiently protected  1
Unknown      1
Wood too near stove   1
Defective   chimney  1
Ashes  against wood    1
Coal-oil  explosion    1
Exposure     4
Lantern   upset     4
Match  carelessness    2
Short   circuit  2
Smokers' carelessness  4
Sparks from burning rubbish   2
Sparks from bush lire  2
Sparks from chimney   2
Sparks from locomotive   1
Sparks from  stove    1
Spontaneous  combustion    10
Stove insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     15
Sparks from bush fire   1
Sparks  from  locomotive    1
Spontaneous  combustion    1
Exposure     1
Match  carelessness    1
Smokers'   carelessness     1
Sparks  from  forge    1
Unknown     1
Boiler-pipes  insufficiently  protected    1
Canned   heat  exploded    1
Defective  fireplace    1
300
354
5
10
8,116
22,000
18
1,593
225
12
1,855
982
2,192
973
1,755,
15,828
700
240
300
1,175
1,501
250
5,986
1,078
220
6,008
85
130
213
650
2,098
10
600
4,528
10,978
1,947
17,667
4,892
1,343
1,963
2,309
675
1,488
32,275
14
44,836
600
700
3,500
3,039
700
600
25
2,750
5,200
55
75
$     38,635
35,041
3,176
973
125,525
4,800
7,114 15 Geo. 5
Report of Fire Marshal.
F 15
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Boat-houses   ...
Boats  	
Bottling-works
Bowling-alleys
Bunkers  	
Bunk-houses   ...
Canneries
Chicken-houses
Churches  	
Cleaning establishments
Clubs   	
Causes.
14
Cold-storage plants    1
Convents     1
Cooperages     3
Coppersmith-shops      1
Dairies ..,   3
Dredges     1
Dry-cleaning   establisments.. 1
Dry-kilns       3
Dwellings     973
Amount of Loss.
Defective  furnace    1  1
Defective  wiring    1
Electrical   appliances  1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Unknown  2
Sparks from  stove    1
Tar boiled over on stove  1
Ashes against wood  1
Short  circuit    1
Exposure     1
Spontaneous   combustion     1
Match  carelessness    1
Smokers' carelessness   1
Sparks from bush  fire   1
Sparks from  stove    1
Stove insufficiently protected   1
Exposure  1
Sparks  from  chimney    1
Unknown     1
Ashes  against wood     3
Coal-oil  explosion  1
Incubator-trays too near furnace    1
Lamp explosion   1
Live   coals  1
Matches,   children  with   1
Smokers'   carelessness  2
Sparks from chimney  1
Spontaneous  combustion     1
Unknown  2
Defective chimney  1
Exposure     1
Match  carelessness  1
Spontaneous   combustion  2
Defective chimney       2
Exposure    :  1
Smokers'   carelessness  1
Sparks from chimney   1
Unknown   1
Steam-pipes too  near ceiling  1
Electrical   appliances     1
Defective  wiring    1
Incendiary  1
Sparks from Dutch oven  1
Live   coals     1
Sparks from chimney   2
Unknown     1
Exposure     1
Short   circuit  1
Overheated steam-pipe    1
Sparks  from   locomotive     1
Unknown     1
Ashes against wood   12
Burning paint off wall   1
9,000
34
10
2,227
300
165
10
353
75
2,150
1,283
1,500
4,059
$ 28,500
45,905
2,000
390
211
514
9
175
5
100
585
125
250
25
145
20
7,472
75
4
39
2,000
$  62,601
6,600
20
1,457
200
227
51,989
2,959
2,769
30
16,601
1,016
465
363
1,750
700
9,067
76,405
2,364
190
431
9,590
104
50
69,221
278
1,657
14,000
123
55,175 F 10
British Columbia.
1925
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Electrical  plants    1
Electrical  workshops            1
Engines     2
Candle   carelessness     5
Canned heat upset   1
Clothes too near lamp   1
Clothes too near open fire   4
Clothes too near stove   19
Coal-gas explosion   1
Coal-oil carelessness   3
Curtains from candle   1
Curtains from lamp    1
Curtains from stove   2
Cushion falling against stove   1
Defective   chimney     82
Defective   fireplace     25
Defective furnace or furnace-pipe   4
Defective  hot-air  pipe     1
Defective   radiator     1
Defective stove or stove-pipe   39
Defective  wiring    14
Electrical  appliances    29
Exposure  52
Fire-crackers      3
Fumigation     3
Furnace insufficiently protected   2
Gasolene   carelessness     2
Gasolene  explosion    1
Grease  on   stove     4
Hot-air register igniting w-oodwork   1
Hot poker on floor   2
Incendiary     11
Lamp explosion   3
Lamp   upset     9
Lightning     3
Live   coals    -  15
Match  carelessness    21
Matches,   children  with     21
Matches, mice with   13
Oil-stove   explosion     1
Oil-stove   upset  4
Paper from fireplace   1
Paper from stove   2
Short   circuit     5
Smokers'   carelessness     37
Sparks from burning rubbish   3
Sparks from bush fire   15
Sparks  from   chimney     227
Sparks  from   fireplace     48
Sparks from furnace   2
Sparks  from  locomotive    1
Sparks from mill burner   14
Sparks from stove or stove-pipe   32
Spontaneous   combustion  8
Stove explosion   1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected— 65
Tar boiling over on stove   1
Thawing pipes   7
Unknown     74
Varnish boiling over on stove   1
Wax melting on stove caught fire   1
Wood  too near stove   10
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Pressure-tank  exploded     1
Defective  exhaust-pipe    1
Unknown     1
$    1,602
89
30
85
8,572
180
1,836
8
561
174
5
121,678
9,906
3,760
15
58
81,195
23,120
2,041
40,877
34
871
50
422
2,000
136
35
12
15,906
1,875
13,762
9,700
615
25,515
12,770
10,293
4,500
2,951
47
33
4,923
12,985
22
12,631
143,671
12,353
210
190
3,451
61,792
3,031
18
70,632
175
428
187,042
96
46
13,094
60
875
926,908
1,205
270
935 15 Geo. 5
Report of Fire Marshal.
F 17
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES— Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Factory   (biscuit)     1
Factory   (clothing)      1
Factory   (match)  1
Factory   (overall)     1
Factory    (roofing   material) 1
Fences     1
Fire-halls  1
Fish-curing   plants  1
Fishing-boats  1
Foundries  2
Garages     29
Garages and dwellings
Gasolene   stations   	
Grandstands   	
Greenhouses   	
Halls   	
Hospitals
Hotels
Incinerators
Launches 	
40
Match  carelessness  1
Exposure    ,  1
Dust   explosion     1
Exposure     1
Sparks from  smoke-stack  1
Ashes against wood  I
Exposure   1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Exposure   i
Defective oven   1
Short  circuit      !
Ashes against wood    1
Defective burner  on  vulcanizing-mould     1
Exposure     3
Gasolene   carelessness — 2
Gasolene  explosion  1
Match carelessness  1
Matches,   children  with  1
Short   circuit       3
Smokers'   carelessness     2
Sparks from bush  fire     2
Sparks  from   chimney     2
Sparks from forge    1
Sparks  from  locomotive  1
Sparks  from  motor    1
Spontaneous   combustion  2
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected   1
Unknown     4
Unknown     1
Gasolene carelessness  1
Exposure     1
Boiler-pipes   insufficiently   protected     1
Clothes too near smoke-stack  1
Ashes against wood    1
Defective radiator   —. 1
Defective  stove    1
Defective  wiring     .  1
Exposure     1
Smokers'   carelessness     3
Defective chimney   1
Sparks from chimney   1
Defective   chimney     3
Exposure     2
Gasolene   carelessness     1
Grease  on  stove    1
Incendiary      1
Match carelessness    1
Smokers'   carelessness     18
Sparks from chimney   4
Sparks  from  locomotive    1
Sparks from stove   1
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected.... 4
Tar boiling over on stove   1
Thawing   pipes     1
Unknown     1
Sparks from furnace    1
Candle   carelessness  1
Coal-oil carelessness   1
700
15
10
20
360
208
3,800
10
250
2,264
1,276
247
1,526
575
600
50
825
13,000
690
30
10
150
40
1,500
60
266
2,661
2,500
15
3,375
18,925
10
29,045
2,672
10
72
1,708
240
ris
25,711
10,500
191
175
40
4,677
115
137,231
700 F 18
British Columbia.
1925
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Laundries   	
Logging   camps
Lumber-mills
Lumber-piles
Oil-houses   ....
Planing-mills
1
24
Meat-curing  plants  1
Mining   property     2
Offices            10
Pool-rooms - - 1
Post-offices  1
Power-houses     2
Printing-offices    3
Railway stations  2
Repair-shops  1
Restaurants  12
Gasolene   carelessness  1
Match  carelessness  1
Smokers'   carelessness     1
Unknown     1
Unknown    ,  1
Ashes against wood   1
Exposure  1
Gasolene   carelessness      1
Oil leaking over locomotive furnace   1
Smokers'   carelessness  1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from bush  fire   2
Sparks from  engine    12
Sparks  from  fire-box     l
Sparks  from  forge    i
Sparks from locomotive   1
Sun's rays on  glass   :  1
Exposure     i
Spontaneous   combustion     1
Exposure   l
Smokers' carelessness   1
Sparks from bush  fire   2
Sparks from mill burner   2
Unknown  2
Defective   boiler  1
Smokers'   carelessness      1
Sparks  from furnace     1
Exposure  2
Smokers'   carelessness  4
Sparks from chimney  1
Sparks from mill burner     1
Unknown     2
Sparks from mill burner  1
Hot   box         1
Match  carelessness  1
Sparks  from furnace   '.  1
Sparks from mill burner   2
Unknown  2
Defective   chimney  1
Exposure   1
Lightning      1
Lubricating-oil  falling on  exhaust-pipe     1
Curtains from stove  1
Gasolene carelessness   1
Short  circuit -  1
Defective  stove-pipe  1
Exposure    1
Coat   falling   on   exhaust-pipe   of   gasolene-
engine  1
Defective  stove    2
Exposure  3
Grease  on   stove     1
Live   coals     1
Smokers'   carelessness     2
3,100
1,200
10
800
(    3,600
52,903
12,972
200
10,679
4,579
70,962
33,530
2,458
1,114
17,558
44,948
P 35
320,000
f     3,033
60,000
4,007
7,037
13,086
147
794
40,000
32,000
26,093
978
14,000
406
812
114
4,756
1,000
$        683
7,697
111
20
53
7,625
1,500
255,503
326,035
87,163
103
16,860
7,524
286
99,034
6,864
11,000
14,978
1,332
5,756
25
I 15 Geo. 5
Report of Fire Marshal.
F 19
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Rooming-houses
Sawmills
Schools
Sheds
Shingle-mills
13
30
18
13
10
Ships      1
Shipyards      2
Slaughter-houses     1
Stables  13
Sparks from chimney    1
Sparks from stove   1
Stove insufficiently protected    1
Defective   chimney       1
Exposure  2
Smokers'   carelessness  9
Spontaneous   combustion  1
Dust   explosion     1
Exposure    1
Furnace   insufficiently   protected    .... 1
Hot   box       2
Short   circuit      1
Smokers'   carelessness      2
Sparks from boiler     2
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from Dutch oven    1
Sparks  from  furnace     1
Sparks from mill burner    10
Spontaneous   combustion      3
Unknown    10
Coal-gas   explosion         1
Defective  furnace      1
Defective   stove  1
Grease   on   stove      1
Incendiary      5
Match  carelessness      3
Sparks from chimney    3
Sparks  from  furnace    1
Sparks from   stove  1
Spontaneous   combustion      1
Ashes against wood      2
Match  carelessness     1
Matches,   children  with     1
Smokers'   carelessness      1
Sparks from burning rubbish   1
Sparks from chimney  1
Sparks  from  oven        1
Stove insufficiently  protected    3
Unknown  2
Exposure  —    1
Smokers'   carelessness     1
Sparks from bush  fire    1
Sparks from chimney  '  1
Sparks from  Dutch   oven     2
Sparks  from   generator     1
Sparks from mill burner   1
Unknown       2
Spontaneous   combustion      1
Smokers'   carelessness      2
Sparks   from   fire-box      1
Defective  wiring     1
Incendiary   1
Match  carelessness  1
Smokers'   carelessness   „  2
Sparks from burning rubbish    1
Sparks from bush  fire    1
Sparks from chimney    2
Sparks from engine  1
120
500
75
.904
533
,139
30;
10:
61.
28.
5
10
5
101
104
140
57
033
203
090
500
085
000
000
000
755
133
271
567
$ 17,
, 6,
300
800
12
39
350
884
106
403
600
768
■ 50
50
20
30
150
350
35
578
174
$ 15,
2,
303
799
650
50
449
715
700
427
435
300
000
510
125
500
746
622
,189
8,651
499,694
56,262
1,437
74,093
42
355,210
3,500 F 20
British Columbia.
1925
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Stores
Stores  and  apartments
Stores  and  dwellings
Stores and hotels
Stores  and  offices
81
20
Spontaneous   combustion
Unknown 	
Stores, offices and dwellings 1
Stores,  offices,  and  rooms—. 1
Stores    and    photographic
studios      1
Stores  and  restaurants    1
Stores  and  rooms    15
Defective gas connection 	
Defective  rubbish-burner 	
Defective  wiring	
Electrical   appliances   	
Exposure   	
Gas-heater upset 	
Incendiary	
Lamp explosion  —	
Match  carelessness  	
Matches,  mice with	
Oil-stove   upset	
Short   circuit   	
Smokers'   carelessness    .......
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks  from  fireplace   	
Spontaneous   combustion   	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected-
Tar boiling over on stove 	
Unknown   	
Ashes against wood ..
Defective   fireplace
Exposure   	
Smokers' carelessness
Candle   carelessness	
Defective   chimney   	
Defective stove or stove-pipe
Defective wiring	
Exposure  	
Grease  on  stove  	
Match  carelessness  	
Smokers'   carelessness   	
Sparks  from  chimney	
Sparks from  fireplace  	
Spontaneous   combustion   	
Tar boiling over on stove 	
Unknown   	
Defective   chimney   	
Smokers'   carelessness
Defective Buntzen  burner
Defective   stove   	
Electrical  appliances   	
Exposure 	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Defective   chimney
Coal-gas   explosion
Oil-stove  explosion  	
Defective hot-air pipe ....
Ashes against wood 	
Defective   chimney   	
Exposure  	
Incendiary   	
Match  carelessness 	
Matches,  children with
Short   circuit   	
Smokers'   carelessness   ..
1
2
1
1
4
3
12
1
1
2
3
1
1
3
16
5
1
8
5
1
12
2
1
1
2
1
4
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
406
1,700
148
130
12,502
105
46,008
72
4,705
1,042
886
1,082
3
4,397
15,674
2,834
8
44,285
6,999
115
17,486
1,583
25
402
185
15
13,125
5,969
5,423
15,470
99
1,825
00
1,122
7
13,200
60
55
; 14,800
565
I        202
1,829
32
2,856
528
100
275
2,200
1,400
60
10
82
42
24,344
159,381
2,195
56,420
5,447
50
150
6,683 15 Geo. 5
Report of Fire Marshal.
F 21
TABLE IV.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
1
Sparks   from   chimney   	
Sparks  from  fireplace  	
Spontaneous   combustion   	
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected 	
          2
          1
          1
          1
          1
1
$
3,300
8,500
64
28
3,378
$      19,439
25
Street-cars   	
Studios   (music)   	
          1
Exposure 	
Sparks from mill burner 	
Defective   film   	
Defective   machine   	
          1
          3
          1
          1
1
          3
?
$
$
14
50,000
Telephone   exchanges   ....
1
5
2
Theatres   	
145
352
240
489
125
1
Smokers' carelessness 	
Gasolene   carelessness   	
Spontaneous  combustion  	
Defective  wiring  	
Gasolene carelessness	
          1
1
          1
          1
          1
7
1
1,351
5,000
2,500
19
7,500
2,618
99,380
15,767
1,224
9,087
77
221
500
600
80,392
3
2
1
Smokers'   carelessness   	
Sparks from furnace  	
1
1
Spontaneous  combustion  	
Thawing pipes 	
          1
1
209,866
Wharves   	
$
2,170
100
Smokers'   carelessness   	
..   . .         1
2,270
Totals	
1,682
1,682
$4,050,448 F 22
British Columbia.
1925
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e 15 Geo. 5
Report of Fire Marshal.
F 23
TABLE VI.—LOSS OF LIFE, 1920-24.
Occupancy.
Cause of Fire.
Loss on- Life.
Adults.
Children.
1
1
2
2
Totals.	
1
5
8
10
12
5
Totals,  192.1	
9
Totals,  1922	
2
Totals,  1921	
1
Totals,  1920	
1
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed  by Charles  J\   Banb-ield,   Printer   to  the King's   Most  Excellent  Majesty.
1925.

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