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FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1924-25 BY THE SUPERINTENDENT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1925

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 PAET  III.
APPENDICES.  16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 115
APPENDIX A.
RESULTS OP THE HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY MATRICULATION
EXAMINATIONS, 1925.
The following are the names  of the winners  of His  Excellency the Governor-General's
silver medals :—■
Student.
High School.
Percentage.
88.6
86.5
85.9
85.2
Nelson	
84.3
Honourable mention is made of the following candidates: John Ross Tolmie, South Vancouver High School; Howard Graves Nicholson, King George High School, Vancouver; James
R. Daniels, Rocklands Academy, Victoria.
The gold medal awarded annually by the Hudson's Bay Company to the candidate obtaining
the highest standing in the Third-year Commercial Examination was won by Mary Elizabeth
Clark, Victoria High School, who obtained 76.7 per cent.
The winners of the Royal Institution Scholarships of $100 awarded by the University of
British Columbia on the results of the Matriculation Examinations follow :—
District.
Student.
High School.
Percentage.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
Margaret Theresa Gourlay
Irene May Smith	
Joshua James M. Jacob	
John Ross Tolmie	
Helen Jean Reed	
Olivia Dingwall Mouat	
Oak Bay	
Courtenay	
King George, Vancouver.
South Vancouver	
Penticton	
Nelson	
79.3
83.3
86.5
87.0
84.0
84.3
A Scholarship of $150 was awarded to Harriet Muriel Enabling Daniels, South Vancouver
High School, the student obtaining the highest standing in the Province in the Junior Matriculation Examination.
A Scholarship of $75 was awarded to Mary Hamilton Watts, Vernon High School, the student
obtaining the highest standing in the Province in the Senior Matriculation Examination. M 116
Public Schools Report.
1925
Number of Successful Candidates at each Centre.
Examination Centre.
J
u
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Abbotsford  (High)	
Agassiz   (High)   	
Alert Bay :
Mitchell Bay (Public) 	
Armstrong :
High 	
Private Study 	
Brentwood College 	
Bridgeport (High)	
Burnaby :
North (High)  	
South  (High)  	
Burns Lake :
Francois Lake  (Public)  ....
South Bank   (Public)   	
Cassidy   (Superior)   	
Chase (Superior) 	
Chilliwack (High)  	
Coalmont   (Public)   	
Courtenay :
Comox (Public)  	
Courtenay (High)  	
Private Study 	
Cranbrook:
Cranbrook (High)  	
Port Steele (Public)	
Creston :
Camp Lister (Public)  	
Creston   (High)   	
Cumberland    (High)   	
Dewdney  (Superior)   	
Duncan:
Duncan   (High)  	
Shawnigan Lake  (Private)
Private Study 	
Enderby :
Enderby (High)  	
Grindrod  (Public)  	
Esquimalt   	
Fernie   	
Ganges Harbour :
Public 	
Formby House  (Private)  ..
Golden  (Private Study) 	
Grand Forks:
High   	
Paulson (Public) 	
Private Study	
Greenwood   (Superior)   	
New Hazelton (Public)  	
Howe Sound :
High 	
Bowen Island (Public)  	
loco   (Superior)   	
Kamloops :
High 	
Heffley Creek (Public)  	
St. Ann's (Private)  	
Private Study 	
6
1
1
12
4
3
13
8
18
18
16
13
14
1
17
10
13
26
1
2
2
4
32
2
1
9
2
20
3
2
4
5
3
3
1
4
10
1
1
10
2
1
3
2
4
1
9
22
2
1
3 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 117
Number of Successful Candidates at each Centre—Continued.
Examination Centre.
d
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Kaslo  (High)	
Kelowna (High)	
Kitsumgallum :
Kitsumgallum (Superior) 	
Pacific (Public)  	
Ladner (High)  	
Ladysmith (High)  	
Langley :
High 	
Private Study 	
Maple Ridge :
MacLean  (High)  	
Ruskin  (Superior)  	
Private Study	
Matsqui  (High)  	
Merritt (High) 	
Mission   	
Nakusp :
High j.
Private Study 	
Nanaimo   	
Nelson :
High 	
St. Joseph's   (Private)	
Private Study	
New Denver:
High	
Three Forks  (Public)   	
New Westminster :
Duke of Connaught (High)  ..
T. J. Trapp (Technical) 	
Columbian College (Private)
St. Ann's (Private)  	
Private Study	
Oak Bay :
High 	
Cranleigh House  (Private)   ..
St. Michael's (Private) 	
Ocean Falls (High) 	
Oliver :
Superior   	
Osoyoos  (Public) 	
Oyama :
High 	
Private Study	
Parksville  (Superior)  	
Peachland  (High)  	
Penticton 	
Point Grey :
King George V. (High) 	
Lord Byng  (High)  	
Prince of Wales (High) 	
Sacred Heart (Private)  	
Private Study	
Port Alberni (High)  	
Port Coquitlam :
High 	
Pitt Meadows (Public) 	
10
1
2
2
4
4
1
4
2
1
4
6
1
6
1
1
1
17
10
27
2
1
47
2
2
1
30
1
3
2
1
6
1
12
34
1
14
42
2
1
1
2
1
"-'■
12
3
1
2
6
13
1
1
1
2
2
9
1
28
34
1
1
1
2
59
6
3
3
2
34
1
6
3
3
1
7
1
3
2
20
37
16
42
2
2
2
4
3 M 118
Public Schools Report.
1925
Number of Successful Candidates at each Centre—Continued.
Examination Centre.
£'8
th02
a-3
a "a
cj33
a cj
H33
a Sh
5 s
^3hj
Port Moody   (Superior)   	
Powell River :
High 	
Whaletown  (Public)  	
Prince George :
High	
Loos (Public)	
Prince Rupert (High)	
Princeton   (High)   	
Procter   (Superior)   	
Quesnel  (Superior)  	
Revelstoke :
High	
Private Study	
Robson :
High :	
Private Study 	
Rolla :
Rolla   (Public)   	
South Dawson Creek (Public)
Rossland :
High	
Private Study 	
Ruskin   (Superior)   	
Rutland (Superior)  	
Saanich,  North   (Superior)	
Salmon Arm :
High      	
Private Study 	
Silverton  (Superior)	
Slocan   (High)   	
Smithers :
High   	
Forestdale   (Public)   	
Sooke (Superior) ..	
Snuamish   (Public)   	
Stewart  (Superior)   	
Summerland   (High)	
Surrey :
High	
Private Study	
Trail:
High	
Private Study	
Union Bay  (Public)   	
Vananda (Public)  	
Vancouver:
Britannia  (High)	
High School of Commerce 	
King Edward  (High)  	
King George  (High)   	
Kitsilano  (High)  	
Technical (High) 	
Geo. V. (High), Point Grey ....
Britannia Mines   (Public)   	
School of Pharmacy  (Private)
Sacred Heart  (Private)	
Crofton House (Private)  	
15
3
16
13
10
1
14
2
46
63
53
11
13
1
14
10
2
3
1
3
1
21
1
3
4
17
3
1
1
6
1
9
4
4
14
1
12
2
1
1
3
5
9
1
10
1
4
3
63
16
83
65
59
17
1
2
22
1
29 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 119
Number of Successful Candidates at each Centre—Continued.
Examination Centre.
;
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Van couver—Continued!.
Sprott-Shaw  (Private)  	
Shaughnessy (Private)  	
St. Ann's (Private) 	
SI. Marina's (Private) 	
Vancouver College (Private)
Private Study 	
Vancouver, North :
High 	
Kingsley   (Private)   	
Private Study	
Vancouver, South :
High   	
Private Study	
Vancouver, West  (High)   	
Vanderhoof :
Superior	
Private   Study  	
Vernon :
High	
Lumby (Public)	
St. Michael's (Private)	
Preparatory (Private)  	
Private Study 	
Victoria :
High 	
Rocklands (Private)  	
St. Ann's (Private)  	
St. George's (Private) 	
St. Louis (Private)  	
St. Margaret's (Private)  ....
University (Private)  	
Private Study 	
Westbank Townsite (Superior)
Totals 	
140
71
10
33
10
10
278
1
2
1
7
8
12
5
26
1
1
18
58
4
1
1
8
3
1
6
15
3
1
1
22
68
2
3
3
1
1
5
924
71
48
3
2
7
22
31
4
2
80
5
9
4
1
29
2
8
6
3
100
2
6
1
1
22
1
16
1
1,585.
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1925.
The following are the results of the examination for entrance to high, school held in the
public schools of the Province at the end of June.
The names of the winners of His Excellency the Governor-General's bronze medals are:—
Name.
School.
District.
Alice Lee	
Florence L. Ferguson
Nobuichi Yamaoke	
Agnes P. Jamieson....
G. Sheldon Rothwell.
Leslie A. Cameron	
Dorothy K. Mason	
Robert F. Shaw	
Thomas H. Miard	
Roberta Bogle	
Girls' Central, Victoria	
Quennell School, Nanaimo 	
Model, Vancouver	
Richard McBride, South Vancouver	
Central, New Westminster	
Lady Byng, Ashcroft	
Armstrong and Spallumcheen Consolidated
Central, Iievelstoke.. 	
Central, Fernie	
Dome Creek  	
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.     8
No.    9
No.  10 M 120
Public Schools Report.
1925
Number of Successful Candidates at each School.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
Abbotsford..
Alberni..
Alert Bay..
Alice Arm..
Armstrong.
Arrowhead
Ashcroft	
Athalmer	
Barkerville	
Bella Coola	
Birken	
Black Creek	
Bradner  (Matsqui)	
Bridgeport (Richmond)
Britannia Beach	
South  Bulkley	
Burgoyne Bay	
Burnaby	
Burns Lake	
Burton	
Campbell River
Cassidy	
Castlegar	
Chase	
Poplar  (Matsqui)	
Abbotsford	
Agassiz	
Harrison River	
Alberni	
Port Alberni	
Bamfield	
Bainbridge	
Beaver Creek	
Cherry Creek Valley	
Kildonan	
Beaver Cove	
Boys' Industrial	
Girls' Home	
Alice Arm	
Armstrong and   Spallumcheen  Con
solidated	
Hendon  	
Salmon Valley........	
Beaton	
Crawford Creek	
Galena Bay..	
Hall's Landing	
Sproat	
Ashcroft	
Athalmer 	
Wilmer	
Windermere	
Barkerville	
Lower Bella Coola	
Mackenzie	
Birken	
Black Creek	
Aberdeen	
Jubilee	
Bridgeport	
Lord Byng ...
Mitchell	
Britannia Beach	
Britannia Mine 	
Private Study	
South Bulkley	
Beaver Point	
Burgoyne Bay	
Edmonds Street ,.	
Gilmore Avenue	
Inman Avenue	
Kingsway West	
Nelson Avenue	
Schou Street	
St. Helen's (Private)	
Burns Lake	
Tintagel	
Arrow Park, West.. ,	
Mount Ingersoll	
Campbell River	
Oyster Bay	
Cassidy	
Waterloo	
Castlegar	
Thrums	
Chase	
Shuswap	
15
17
58
33
31
17
3
6
19
2
10
5
5
1
1
1
3
4
2
1
1
8
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
4
3
2
6
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
23
20
8
24
12
3
1
2
1
3
2
4
1
4
2
10
1
6
19
2
10
11
5
1
1
1
3
4
2
1
1
23
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
'1
2
1
1
3
1
4
3
2
23
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
81
53
8
55
29
3
1
2
1
3
2
4
1
4
2
2
2
10
1 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 121
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
Chilliwack	
1
13
24
12
31
4
3
5
1
1
8
13
4
10
3
1
2
3
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
5
1
1
1
1
3
1
8
2
1
2
3
1
5
1
1
1
5
26
3
2
1
1
2
3
3
13
3
2
3
1
3
13
1
1
2
1
4
2
1
34
2
32
Atchelitz 	
4
3
5
Chilliwack, East	
Fairfield Island	
1
1
8
Robertson	
13
4
10
3
Vedder Creek	
1
2
3
2
Little Fort	
Raft River    .                           	
1
1
1
2
2
Coalmont ■.	
Green Lake,  South	
Coalmont  	
1
5
1
Colwood	
Albert Head	
1
1
1
3
1
Courtenay  	
Courtenay	
Grantham	
Lazo  	
21
2
1
2
3
Sand wick	
1
5
Crofton 	
1
1
Galiano, North    	
1
Cranbrook	
Central	
Bull River Bridge	
Fort Steele	
Jaffray	
50
3
2
1
1
1
2
Wycllffe	
3
Crawford Bay	
Creston	
Crawford Bay 	
3
13
3
2
Erickson	
3
1
Wyndell	
3
Cumberland	
Cumberland	
Bevan	
25
1
i
1
Denman Island	
2
1
Dewdney	
4
Nicomen Island	
2
1
Duncan	
34
2 M 122
Public Schools Report.
1925
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
Duncan..
Edgewood	
Elphinstone Bay.
Enderby	
Esquimalt	
Fernie	
Ganges Harbour.
Gillis Bay	
Giscome	
Golden	
Granby Bay..
Grand Forks
Greenwood....
Haney	
Hazelton	
Hedley	
Heriot Bay...
Hope	
Howe Sound
Huntingdon..
loco	
Kamloops	
Genoa Bay	
Mill Bay	
Sahtlam	
Shawnigan Lake	
Sylvania	
Needles	
Renata	
Elphinstone Bay	
Roberts Creek, East..
Wilson Creek	
Enderby	
Deek Creek	
Enderby, North	
Grindrod	
Springbend	
Esquimalt —
Goldstream	
Fernie	
Coal Creek	
Divide...	
Ganges Harbour	
Colston (Private)	
Girls'  (Private)...	
Private Study	
Gillis Bay	
Giscome...	
Castledale	
Golden 	
Granby Bay	
Central	
Brown Creek	
Cascade	
Greenwood	
Boundary Falls	
Brides ville	
Ingram Mountain	
Kerr Creek	
Kettle Valley	
Midway	
Myncaster...	
.Reck Creek.-..	
Haney....  	
Webster's Corner	
Hazelton	
New Hazelton	
Hedley 	
Heriot Bay	
Concord	
Hope	
St. Elmo	
Yale	
Bowen Island	
Howe Sound	
Huntingdon	
Sumas, Upper...	
loco	
Sunnyside No. 2
Kamloops	
Anderson Creek..
Beresford	
Cahilty......	
Campbell Creek..
Chu Chua	
1
41
24
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
17
1
4
1
2
37
2
35
6
3
5
1
1
1
6
1
1
7
11
13
2
1
10
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
17
3
3
1
1
2
1
3
2
2
2
8
4
8
6
1
7S
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
17
1
4
1
2
3S
2
76
6
3
5
1
1
1
6
1
1
7
11
37
2
1
10
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
17
3
3
1
1
2
1
3
2
2
2
1
78
1
1
1
1
1 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 123
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
Kamloops
Kaslo	
Kelowna	
Keremeos	
Kimberley	
Kingcome Inlet
Lac la Hache...
Ladner	
Ladysmith	
Langley..
Lasqueti	
Lillooet-	
Loos	
Lumby	
Lund	
Lytton	
Malcolm Island
Maple Ridge	
Mara	
Matsqui	
Merritt	
Michel	
Fish Lake Road	
Fruitlands	
Grande Frairie	
Monte Creek.	
North Thompson, West....
Pinantan..	
Rose Hill	
Savona	
Trapp Lake	
St. Ann's  (Private)	
Zetland (Private)	
Kaslo	
Johnson's Landing...	
Riondel	
Kelowna	
Glenmore	
Kelowna, East	
Okanagan, South	
Cawston..	
Keremeos	
Kimberley	
Kingcome Inlet...	
Lac la Hache 	
Ladner	
Mosher Siding..	
Trenant 	
Ladysmith	
Diamond  Crossing	
Oyster, North	
Extension  	
Galiano, North	
Perpetual Help  (Private)
Aldergrove	
Belmont	
Glenwood	
Langley Fort	
Langley Prairie	
Langley, West	
Lochiel	
Milner	
Murrayville	
Otter	
Sperling	
Maple Grove 	
Lillooet	
Loos	
Lumby 	
Reiswig	
Lund 	
Lytton	
Kaleva	
Malcolm Island	
Hammond	
Maple Ridge	
Mara	
Clayburn	
Matsqui..	
Ridgedale	
Vlerritt	
Brookmere	
Canford Mill	
Michel	
New Michel 	
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
6
5
8
1
1
31
1
1
3
1
7
6
3
2
34
2
2
40
3
1
8
1
5
6
2
2
12
10
1
2
7
6
1
1
1
2
2
4
1
1
1
2
4
3
11
3
3
11
2
25
1
1
4
4
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
6
5
8
1
1
31
1
1
3
1
7
6
3
2
34
2
2
40
3
1
8
1
5
6
2
2
12
10
1
2
7
6
1
1
1
2
2
4
1
1
1
2
4
3
11
3
3
11
2
26
1
1
4
4 M 124
Public Schools Report.
1925
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
15
60
9
21
7
1
1
14
1
3
12
4
5
4
2
1
3
7
4
54
6
4
1
6
1
3
5
3
1
2
5
7
5
1
2
4
37
11
2
1
3
1
2
1
5
1
1
5
1
85
68
30
29
1
2
7
1
2
11
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
2
4
23
26
3
Mission	
Dunach	
Mount Lehman	
Macalister —
Dome Creek 	
27
4
Macalister	
McBride	
5
4  '
2
1
Nakusp.....	
Educ. Dept. Correspondence Course
1
3
7
Nakusp	
4
114
6
4
1
Chase River	
6
1
3
14
3
1
Northfield  ...
2
5
7
St. Ann's (Private) 	
5
1
Private Study	
Naramata	
Central	
Hume..	
2
4
58
18
2
1
Passmore	
3
1
Slocan Junction	
2
1
5
1
Private Study	
1
5
1
Central	
86
68
31
29
Hamilton Road  (Burnaby)	
1
2
7
1
North Bend .
Providence Orphanage (Private)	
St. Ann's  (Private)	
Private Study	
2
11
3
1
1
North Bend	
3
Notch Hill
1
Blind Bay	
1
Meadow Creek	
Notch Hill	
1
2
2
Oak Bay	
White Lake	
4
37
27
1 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 125
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
Oak Bay	
Ocean Falls
Oliver	
Oyama	
Parksville....
Peachland	
Pemberton Meadows
Pender Island	
Penticton	
Point Grey	
Port Alice	
Port Clements..
Port Coquitlam
Port Essington
Port Moody	
Port Renfrew...
Port Simpson...
Powell River....
Prince George..
Prince Rupert
Princeton	
Procter	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rock Bay	
Roe Lake	
Rolla	
Uppingham (Private)...
Ocean Falls	
Oliver	
Osoyoos	
Oyama	
Winfield	
Errington	
French Creek	
Hilliers ."-	
Nanoose Bay	
Parksville	
Qualicum Beach	
Peachland	
Pemberton Meadows	
Pender Island	
Saturna Island	
Penticton	
David Lloyd George	
Edith Cavell	
Kerrisdale	
Lord Kitchener	
Magee	
Prince of Wales	
Queen Mary	
Port Alice	
Port Clements	
Central...	
James Park	
Glen	
Silver Valley	
Victoria Drive	
Pitt Meadows	
Essington	
Port Moody	
Port Renfrew	
Port Simpson	
Powell River	
Prince George	
Fort George	
Fort George, South	
Mud River	
Shelley	
Stone Creek	
Private Study	
Booth Memorial	
Borden Street	
Annunciation (Private)
Killarney	
Princeton	
Balfour	
Harrop	
Procter	
Dragon Lake	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Albert Canyon..	
Big Eddy	
Eagle Valley	
Menzies Bay :	
Thurlow	
Roe Lake	
Dawson Creek, South....
Pouce Coupe, Central....
37
15
22
29
16
26
30
33
9
13
12
12
22
4
2
5
3
5
4
1
1
6
2
6
2
1
1
22
11
10
27
5
10
13
17
4
3
7
7
5
1
3
5
2
12
2
5
8
5
1
- 1
1
1
17
7
8
1
15
1
2
6
2
2
53
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
22
4
2
5
3
5
4
1
1
6
2
6
2
1
1
59
26
32
56
21
36
43
50
4
3
7
7
5
1
3
5
2
12
2
2
15
18
8
5
1
1
1
1
29
19
8
1
15
1
2
6
2
2
53
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 M 126
Public Schools Report.
1925
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
Rolla	
Rossland
Ruskin....
Rutland..
Saanich..
Salmon Arm..
Sandon	
Sayward	
Sidney	
Silverton	
Skidegate	
Slocan	
Smithers	
Sooke	
Squamish	
Stewart	
Summerland
Surrey	
Rolla	
Swan Lake, North	
Taylor Flats	
Rossland	
Ruskin	
Whonnock 	
Joe Rich Valley	
Rutland	
Cedar Hill •	
Cloverdale	
Craigflower	
Keating	
Model	
Mackenzie Avenue	
Prospect Lake ......
Royal Oak	
Saanichton	
Saanich, West	
Strawberry Vale	
Tillicum	
Tolmie	
James Island	
Saanich, North ..'	
Salmon Arm	
Broadview 	
Canoe	
Gleneden	
Salmon Arm, West	
Sunnybrae 	
Tappen	
Tappen Valley	
Sandon	
Three Forks	
Sayward, Upper	
Hardwicke Island  (Private)
Sidney	
Silverton	
Lawn Hill  	
Sandspit	
Skidegate	
Slocan City	
Appledale	
Perry Siding	
Smithers	
Otter Point	
Sooke	
Sooke, North	
Squamish	
Premier	
Stewart	
Summerland	
Anniedale 	
Clayton	
Cloverdale	
Colebrook	
Elgin	
Hall's Prairie	
Johnston Road	
Kensington, East	
Kensington Prairie	
Newton	
Port Mann	
Springdale	
Ill
18
1
1
1
12
2
1
1
4
11
21
9
11
2
3
4
7
8
19
10
3
2
15
3
3
1
1
2
1
2
O
1
5
1
7
1
2
6
1
3
21
1
1
5
2
1
2
7
1
4
1
1
1
28
2
1
1
4
11
21
2
6
9
11
2
3
4
7
8
19
16
3
2
15
3
3
2
1
5
1
2
2
9
5
2
1
1
2
1
2
3
1
5
1
7
1
2
24
1
3
21
1
1
5
2
1
2
7
1
4 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 127
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
Surrey..
Terrace	
Tofino	
Trail	
Union Bay
Vananda...
Vancouver.
Vancouver, North-
Vancouver, North, Municipal-
Vancouver, South..
Tynehead	
Westminster, South	
White Rock	
Woodward's Hill	
Barnston Island	
Kitsumgallum	
Tofino ....
Ahousat  (Indian)	
Trail  	
Annable	
Fruitvale ....
Bowser 	
Fanny Bay. 	
Union Bay	
Vananda 	
Aberdeen  	
Alexandra	
Bayview	
Beaconsfield	
Central  	
Dawson ...
Charles Dickens 	
Fairview  	
Franklin	
Fraser 	
Gordon	
Grandview 	
Hastings	
Hudson	
Kitsilano	
Livingstone	
Model	
Mount  Pleasant	
Macdonald	
Nelson	
Nightingale  	
Rhodes  	
Roberts	
Secord	
Seymour —	
Strathcona  	
Tennyson	
Lake Buntzen	
Eudistine  (Private)...	
St. Ann's (Private)	
St. Augustine's  (Private)
St. Patrick's (Private)	
Private Study 	
Lonsdale 	
Queen Mary 	
Ridgeway	
Capilano	
Lynn Valley 	
North Star	
St. Edmund's (Private)...
Brock	
Carleton	
Gordon	
Moberly	
McBride 	
Mackenzie  	
Norquay 	
Secord 	
17
30
18
15
25
51
20
21
14
26
38
30
39
40
35
18
36
28
17
38
40
36
57
30
29
36
45
31
22
16
12
32
15
24
30
32
8
9
3
1
16
3
1
4
1
1
51
1
6
1
3
4
2
1
34
14
8
7
22
17
8
14
4
6
22
9
12
10
11
17
19
7
12
12
31
30
16
13
21
26
1
1
7
7
25
1
24
16
11
3
10
6
6
9
46
16
19
33
16
9
3
1
16
3
1
4
1
1
51
1
6
4
2
IS
64
32
23
32
73
37
29
28
30
44
52
48
52
45
29
53
47
24
50
52
67
87
46
42
57
71
1
1
7
7
25
1
24
47
33
3
26
6
6
21
78
31
43
63
48
17
18 M 128
Public Schools Report.
1925
Number of Successful Candidates at each School—Continued.
Centre.
School.
Promoted
on Recommendation.
Passed
Examination.
Total.
Vancouver, South	
Selkirk	
45
8
17
20
24
18
32
13
19
13
22
12
1
2
1
1
1
1
7
25
2
2
1
3
1
8
18
16
17
32
17
24
20
32
18
3
10
11
1
2
1
3
2
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
3
77
21
36
33
Wolfe	
46
30
Fort Fraser	
1
40
11
22
2
1
1
1
1
Vanderhoof	
Vernon	
Coldstream	
7
65
2
2
1
Falkland	
3
1
St. Michael's  (Private)	
Boys' Central	
8
29
38
Girls' Central 	
25
26
12
29
28
25
11
42
58
Margaret Jenkins	
North Ward	
29
53
48
South Park	
57
West	
29
Oriental (Private)	
3
St. Ann's (Private)	
10
11
Waldo      	
Elko	
2
Waldo	
3
Westbank	
2
3
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
Yahk	
Yahk            	
3
Totals, June, 1925	
2,130
I.RflS
3,568
2,887
5,698
4 782
Totals, June, 1924	 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. • M 129
APPENDIX B.
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1925.
Arithmetic.    (Time, 2% hours.)
Value.
12        1.  (tt.)  Write in words, 1S0.075;   in figures, five and seven ten-thousandths (fractional
part to be given in decimal form) ;  in Roman numerals, 1,867.
(6.)  How  much  greater  than  four  hundred  twenty-nine  thousand  seven hundred
fifty-six is one million twenty thousand and ten?
(c.) Divide the difference between 8f and 64- by the sum of T4j- and ^T.
12 2. (a.) A coal dealer bought a car-load of coal weighing 47,600 lb. Find what he paid
for it at $7.20 a ton.
(6.) Three men living together agree to share their expenses in proportion to what
they earn per month. The first man earns $150 per month, the second
$170, and the third $180. If their expenses for the month of May were
$225, how much should each man pay?
12       8.  («.) If there were 14 inches in a foot, (a) how many square inches would there be
in a square foot?   (&)  How many cubic inches would there be in a cubic
foot?
(&.) The circumference of the forewheel of a wagon is 10% feet.   How many revolutions will it make in going 7 miles?
18 4. A marble slab is 4 feet 9 inches long, 3 feet 6 inches wide, and 10 inches thick.
(a.) What is its value at $19.20 a cubic foot? (6.) What will it cost to polish
its six faces or sides at $4.80 a square foot?
18        5.  (a.) Express as decimals, \ and |; as common fractions, 37|% and 854%; in per
cent., .1 and 3^.
(6.) By selling a watch for $64 a jeweller gained $16.   Find his gain per cent.
(c.) The school population of the Province was 94,888 in June, 1923, and 96,204 in
June, 1924.    Find the gain per cent, during the year  (give answer to two
places of decimals).
16 6. (a.) A fruit dealer in Florida sent 3,560 boxes of grapefruit to a commission agent
in Vancouver who sold them at $4.75 a box. If the agent's commission
was 41/i2% and freight and other charges amounted to $125, find the amount
the agent must remit to the dealer in Florida.
(6.) A man whose income in 1923 was $2,375 had to pay an income-tax of 4% on
all over $2,000 to the Dominion Government and 1% on all over $1,500 to
the Provincial Government. Find the total amount he had to pay in income-
tax to the two Governments.
12       7. $730.
Vancouver, B.C., May 5th, 1924.
Five months after date, for value received, I promise to pay James Roberts, or
order, Seven hundred and thirty dollars, with interest at 6%.
Henry Price.
Find:    (a.) When the note became due.    (&.) The amount James Roberts should
receive from Henry Price when the note became due. M 130
Public Schools Report.
1925
Drawing.    (Time, 2% hours.)
Value.
16        («■)   Select two examples of work from your drawings, as follows :—
(1.)  The best example of colour drawing from nature.
(2.)  The best example of colour drawing in a design.
30 (6.) Construct a geometrical figure (8" by 5") similar to the one drawn below; and
within it arrange and print the following verse (be careful about the spacing
of letters and words) :—
" Our gracious Lord has promised
To be our Friend and Guide,
And we can want for nothing
While He is by our side."
30 (c.) In a rectangle 6 inches by 5 inches make a drawing of the given photograph. If
time permits finish in light and shade. (No ruling allowed except in drawing
rectangle.)
f         ■)**.-;
t^Z, -'   ■    ' —   :: ■;■■■■:■ "
;           ■   ■
■HHfBNte^.    .",'•;
■
: ■'.■■.-■    '.. '■
1MH1U ■
'.'»i. , '■■■■ ■ 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 131
Value.
24        (d.) Repeat the given unit three times in a border 3 inches wide.    Use any arrangement that you have used in borders during the year.
No ruling allowed except in drawing the border.
Geography.    (Time, 2% hours.)
In each blank, fill in the word or words needed to make the statement complete.   For
example, in the sentence, " The capital of Canada is ," you would
write the word " Ottawa " in the blank.
50   !• (<*.) On maps, lines which join places having the same latitude ar<3 called	
 ; those joining places having the same longitude are called
     The latitude of the southern boundary of British Columbia
is degrees north, that of the northern boundary of British Columbia is	
degrees north.   The earth's circumference is (approximately) miles
in length, and the length of a degree of latitude is (approximately) miles.
(6.)  The Canadian National Railway enters the Province of British Columbia by the
 Pass, and immediately divides
into two branches;   one branch runs north-west through the valley of the River
 to the City of ;
then up the Nechako Valley, crossing the divide and passing through a fine farming
country, it reaches the River and follows that river down
to the coast;   then turns in  a north-westerly  direction to the terminal  city of
     The other branch follows the course of the North
Thompson down to its junction with the South Thompson at	
and continues in a westerly direction following the Thompson and Fraser Rivers
After leaving the famous Fraser Canyon the railway passes through a rich dairying
district, and twelve miles before reaching Vancouver crosses the Fraser by a fine
bridge at ,	
(c.)  The chief industry at Anyox is ;   at Nanaimo ;
at Ocean Falls ; in the Okanagan Valley ;
in the district around Stewart	
(d.) Two of the six states that make up the Commonwealth of Australia are particularly
noted for sheep and cattle farming;  these two are and
     Sugar-cane and tropical fruits are grown in the
state of , and the island state is	
New Zealand is than a thousand miles distant from Australia, and it? M 132 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
principal seaport is     The native inhabitants of
New Zealand are known as	
(e.)  The federal capital of the United States is , and the two
largest cities are  and ;
the greatest iron-smelting city is ; the chief seaport
on the Gulf of Mexico is ; the American States (from
north to south) bordering on the Pacific Ocean are ,
 , and 	
(f.)  The capital of Argentina is , situated at the head of deep-water
navigation on the River     From the capital a railroad runs
inland, crossing the Mountains and reaching the Pacific Coast at
 , the leading seaport of the country of	
(p.) An interesting holiday might be spent in the Mediterranean. Entering from the
Atlantic we pass through the Strait of and coast northeast to the noted Spanish Port of with its manufactures of
cotton, linen, and silk fabrics;  we next visit , the greatest
French seaport, near the mouth of the River and from there
we go to , the chief port of north-west Italy, passing on
our way the famous health resorts of the Riviera.    Travelling down the Italian coast,
with a glimpse to our right of the Island of , Napoleon's
birthplace, we may pay brief visits to , the capital of Italy, and
to the largest city on the peninsula.    Still southward
through Messina Strait between Italy and the Island of ,
and then east, crossing the ^Egean Sea we pass through the	
into the Sea of Marmora, and then continue on to , until
recently the capital of the Turkish Empire.    Returning to the iEgean Sea we go
south and land at , the leading port of Asia Minor, long
noted for its figs, and from there sail to the Suez Canal. Our return to Canada
might be made by way of the Canal and the Red Sea, eastward past the Continent
of Asia, and across the Pacific Ocean to Vancouver.
11        2. Lightly sketch   (or draw with compasses)   a circle of about 5  inches diameter to
represent the Earth,
(a.)  On it show and name the Arctic and Antarctic Circles, the Tropics, and the
Equator.   Give degree of latitude of each circle.
(6.)  Show by means of arrows the directions of the trade winds and the westerly
winds,
(c.)  Explain why the trade winds blow in the direction Indicated in your diagram.
24       3. Draw in the space below a map of the three Prairie Provinces of Canada.    Show
on it:—
(a.)  The Saskatchewan River System, and such parts of the Athabaska, Peace,
Red, and Assiniboine Rivers as are included in the three Provinces.
(&.) Lakes Winnipeg, Athabaska, and Manitoba,
(o.) The following cities:   Calgary, Winnipeg,  Saskatoon, Brandon,  Edmonton,
Regina, Moose Jaw.
(d.) Below the map draw a straight line AB to represent a distance of 500 miles
on the map.
15       4. On the accompanying map of the British Isles :—
(a.)  Show and name the prime meridian, the 50th parallel of North Latitude,
Dover Strait, Bristol Channel, Orkney Islands, North Sea, Irish  Sea,
Firth of Forth, English Channel.
(&.)  Show and name the following:   Rivers—Thames, Clyde, Humber, Mersey,
Severn, and Shannon; Cities—London, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Birmingham,
Glasgow, Dublin, Newcastle, Southampton, Belfast, Leeds,
(c.)  Write under the name of each of the following cities the manufacture for
which it is noted:   Leeds,  Glasgow,  Birmingham,  Belfast,  Manchester. 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 133 M 134 Public Schools Report. 1925
Gbammab and Composition.    (Time, 2% hours.)
Value.
S3        1- He thought that if he could find a brownie that would do his work he would save
himself a great deal of trouble.
When father came in from the fields he said that big boys and little boys and everybody else must take care of the things they wanted to keep.
The system has been modified to meet industrial conditions, out it still retains a great
many of the features which characterize the older forms of apprenticeship.
In the above sentences:—
(a.) What are the principal and the subordinate clauses?   Give the kind of each
clause and state the relation of the subordinate clauses.
(&.) What part of speech is each of the italicized words?    Give reasons for your
answer.
(c.)  State the cases and the relations of brownie, his, things, system, it, and
which.
8       2. Give the voice, mood, tense, number, person, and class  (transitive or intransitive)
of the verbs in the following sentences:—
(a.) I have seen the house where Shakespeare was born.
(&.)  Come to the hotel at which we are staying,
(c.)  We had passed the castle and were leaving the valley.
(d.) If they return the books soon, they will not be fined.
8       3. Write, 'in two columns, the past tense and the past participle of the verbs rise, set,
choose, oegin, creep, olow, come, eat, drink, go, oecome, drive, tear, do, draw, run.
16 4. Correct the error in each of the following sentences and give a reason for the change
you make:—
(a.) The cat has laid down to sleep.
(6.)  He don't know anything about it.
(c.)  Either John or James are guilty.
(d.) Tom had came with John and me.
(e.) If a person lives in the city they must not expect a quiet life.
(/.) It was she who parted with him at the corner.
()?.) He could learn the dog only one trick.
(h.) One of them boys is here.
18        5.  (a.)  Rewrite and punctuate:   Who is making that noise I  hear it again  is it a
carpenter with his hammer now I see it is a woodpecker he is over there
on the trunk of the maple tree
(6.)  Write to J. M. Dent & Sons, 215-219 Victoria St., Toronto, Ontario, ordering a
copy of " The Far West Coast"  (Denton)  and a copy of " Mother Nature
Stories" (Sherman) and enclosing money order for $3.25.
(Use your examination number instead of your name.)
(c.)  Suppose that a merchant in your city or district advertised for a boy or girl to
assist in his store for July and August.   Write an application in answer to
the advertisement stating your age, qualifications, salary expected and whatever additional information you think might be of interest to your prospective employer.
(Use your examination number instead of your name.)
17 6.  (a.) Write a paragraph in which you give good advice to a " pupil who is usually late
in arriving at school."
(&.) Write a short story (about one-half a page) for a school magazine, using any one
of the following as a title:—
(a.) A Bird.
(&.) A School Picnic,
(o.)  A Launch Trip.
(d.) A Motor Trip. 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 135
Penmanship and Dictation and Spelling.    (Time, 1% hours.)
(25 marks for Penmanship and 75 marks for Dictation and Spelling.)
[Note.—The Supervisor shall read Section A to the candidates three times—the first time to
enable them to gather the meaning; the second time, slowly and clearly in subsections as
marked by the bars, alloioing all the candidates sufficient time to write the words; and the
third, time for review. He should repeat words or phrases, when necessary, in order that
every candidate may hear distinctly. Punctuation marks should not be dictated. Candidates
are not permitted to rewrite the passages.]
Value.
37
18
20
A. When water turns into ice / it expands. /    An iron pipe, / which is filled with water /
and sealed, / breaks when the water freezes. / This shows / the great force of
freezing water. / Similarly, / when the water freezes / in the pores / of a piece
of rock, / the expansion of the ice / tends to produce cracks / in the walls of the
pores. / This process, / often repeated, / will in time / cause the rock to crumble. /
Again, / when water freezes / in a crack in a rock, / the ice acts as a wedge / and
widens the crack. / In the spring of the year, / when there is much freezing /
and thawing, / this process often causes / pieces of rock / to split off from the
sides / of steep precipices / and rocky mountain slopes. / Usually at the base /
of such slopes / in cold humid climates / there is a pile of debris (de-bre')/that
has fallen from above. / Finally, / the surface of bare rock / that is alternately
heated / and cooled / tends to expand and then to contract, / but as there is no
change / in temperature / in the internal parts / of the rock, / a strain is set up /
at every expansion / and contraction. / These successive strains / cause cracks to
appear. /   This is one cause / of the cracking / of cement pavements and buildings.
B. (o.) The secretary /of the executive committee/ called an emergency meeting of the
organization / for the first Wednesday / in February. /
(6.)  A majority of the citizens / decided to proceed immediately / to the scene/of
the recent automobile accident. /
(c.) On any grave issue,/we especially recommend / the principle of  utilizing/
the judgment / of persons of character / and practical experience. /
(d.) The decision of the Committee/was unfortunate in the extreme./
(e.) The Senate deemed it advisable /to adjourn after the discussion / of its foreign
policy. /
(/.)  The dairy-maid kept a diary / of daily occurrences. /
vil'lage,
dis'ci pline,
sim'i lar,
pursuit'  (pursuf),
in i'tial,
tru'ly,
aux il'i ary,
debt'or (det'or),
crys'tal,
physi'cian,
par'lia ment,
mort'gage,
bus'iness,
ser'geant (sar'jent),
fifti'eth,
vil'lainy,
fea'tures,
trace'able,
siege,
crit'icism,
surgeon,
theme,
embalm'  (em bam'),
en'vious,
forbade' (forbad'),
Arc'tic  (Ark'tic),
embar'rass,
chasm (kasm),
plebiscite (pleb'isit),
ad dress',
cor'ridor,
ap plaud',
col'umn (col'um),
mas'sa ere,
ba zaar',
hy'phen,
leg'ible,
vac'cin ate (vak'sin at),
sa'lad,
neg'li gence. M 136 Public Schools Report. 1925
APPENDIX G.
HIGH SCHOOL EXAMINATION, JUNE, 1925.
Grade IX.
English Literature.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Value.
10       1. Quote from one of the following:—
On My Mother's Picture, 10 consecutive lines.
The Ode on the Death of Wellington, 10 consecutive lines.
To a Skylark, 2 consecutive stanzas.
Thanatopsis, last lines ("So live, etc.").
Ulysses, 10 consecutive lines.
4       2.  (<i.)  From what poem is each of the following quotations taken?—
(1.)  'Tis always morning somewhere, and above
The awakening continents from shore to shore
Somewhere the birds are singing evermore.
(2.) A deep distress hath humanized my soul.
(3.)  So much for idle wishing—how
It steals the time!  To business now.
(4.) For so the whole round earth is every way
Bound by gold chains about the feet of God.
4 (&.)  Give the name of the author of each of the four poems referred to in section (a)
of this question.
4 (c.) Name one other poem, included in your Fifth Reader, written by each of the
poets named in section (&) of this question.
15 3. Explain clearly any three of the following passages of poetry:—
(a.) Yet all experience is an arch wherethro'
Gleams that untravell'd world whose margin fades
For ever and for ever when I move.
(&.) Who gives himself with his alms feeds three—
Himself, his hungering neighbor, and me.
(c.) And, while the wings of fancy still are free,
And I can view this mimic form of thee,
Time has but half succeeded in his theft,—
Thyself removed, thy power to soothe me left.
(d.) One writes, that " Other friends remain,"
That " Loss is common to the race "—
And common is the commonplace,
And vacant chaff well meant for grain.
16 4. Discuss, in two or three clearly written paragraphs, your ideas as to the reasons why
Socrates was so fearless in the face of death.
15       5. Write a carefully written paragraph on one of the following topics :—
(a.) The Secret of Daniel O'Connell's Power to Sway Men.
(6.) The Peculiarities of Sir Roger de Coverley.
(c.) The Character of the Duke of Wellington. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 137
Value.
16        6. Discuss one of the following:—
(a.) The Vanity of Alan Breck Stewart.
(6.) Tie Treachery of David Balfour's Uncle Ebenezer.
16        7. Write a short account of one of the following:—
(a.) John Ridd's Ride on Tom Faggus's Mare, Winnie.
(&.) The Death of Carver Doone.
(c.) Lorna's Escape from Doone Valley.
Latin.    (Time, 2 hours.)
5       1. Make a list of case-endings of the third declension, adding rules for the formation
of the genitive plural in iim or ium.
5 2. Decline in  combination:   civis  Romanus,  flnitvma  civitas,  duae  legiones,  signum
militare, aliud tempns.
6 3. Compare:   liber, acer, humilis, utilis, bonus, magnus.
3        4. To  what positive  forms   (if  any)   do  the  following  belong:    pessknus,  plurimus,
ultimus, extimus, inflmus, summus.
10       5- Give the principal parts of:  absum, reperio, consido, solvo, incendo, dico, facio, cedo,
repello, do.
7 6. Express in Latin:   thirty ships, two hundred and seventy men,  fifty-five horses,
ninety-nine boys;   and the odd numbers from 27 to 37, inclusive.
12        7. Write the following verb forms, giving one English meaning for each :—
(a.)   Second singular perfect indicative active and passive of cognosco.
(6.)  Third plural future indicative active of committo.
(c.) First singular pluperfect indicative active of augeo.
(d.)  Third plural perfect indicative passive of dispono.
(e.)   Second singular imperfect indicative of absum.
20        8. Translate into English :—
(a.)  Alia consilia rei publicae sunt utilia, alia perieulosa.
(6.)   Omnes superiores dies summum montem tenebat.
(c.)  Maximas copias ex omnibus partibus Etruriae coegit et magnis itineribus ad
flumen Tiberim contendit.
(d.) Milia passuum octo a castris consederant.
(e.)  Agger erat latus pedes trecentos viginti, altus pedes septuaginta.
32       9. Translate into Latin:—
(a.) The previous winter he had collected very many war-ships and very large
forces.
(&.) We shall pitch our camp on the top of the hill,
(c.) He is the brother of the one, the friend of the other.
(d.) We are adjacent to two states.
(e.) When I discover the reason, I shall despatch messengers to the neighbouring states.
(/.) When Caesar is absent they will attack the winter camp.
(jr.) If the number of the enemy increases, we shall not join battle.
(Tt.) He is like no other leader. M 138 Public Schools Report. 1925
French.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Value.
21        1. Answer the following questions in French, using complete sentences :—
(a.) Quelle heure est-il?
(6.) Quel jour de la semaine est-ce aujourd'hui?
(c.) Quel jour du mois est-ce?
(d.)  Quel temps fait-il  aujourd'hui?
(e.)  En quelle saison sommes-nous?
(/.) Quel costume portez-vous?
(j?.) Qu' avez-vous aux pieds?
(h.) Dans quelle salle manget-on?
(!)  Quels fruits sont rouges?
(;.) Donnez les noms de deux animaux, de deux oiseaux et de deux sortes de
brosses.
28        2- Translate into French :—
(a.)  Good morning, children, how are you to-day?
(6.)  We are very well, thank you.
(c.)  What is your name, my boy?
(d.)  My name is John.
(e.)  Where do you live?
(f.)  I live in British Columbia.
(g.) Are you a Canadian?
(7i.)  Yes, sir, but my father is English.
(i.)  How old are you, my boy?
(.f.)  I am fourteen years old.
(/,'.)  Do you live in Chilliwack?
(I.) Yes, sir, I  live on Henderson  Street.
(m.)  Do you ride your bicycle to  school?
(«.)  No, sir, I walk, but when it rains I go on the street-car.
6        3.   (a.)  Put the nouns in column B in the place of the nouns in Column A and make
the necessary changes :—
A. B.
son grand fauteuil chaise
la main droite bras
mon chapeau bleu robe
nn petit panier boite
ce ruban brun ficelle
votre jolie maison yeux
5 (&.) Put these adjectives  in the correct place and make them  agree with  their
nouns:—■
La dictee est ici   (bon).
Le livre est. perdu (frangais).
J'ai achete une table (carre").
II y a plusieurs femmes la-bas (vieux).
Je n'ai pas de crayons  (vert).
4 (c.) Write in French the cardinal and ordinal forms of:   nine, eleven, twenty-one,
eighty. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 139
Value.
7       4. Supply suitable prepositions in these sentences :—
La clef est —• la serrure.
J'avance — la fenetre.
Je mets mon chapeau — la tete.
II donne sa plume — Jean.
Mes habits sont — laine.
On va — pied.
II est debout — la porte.
12       5. Change the italicized vous to je and make the other necessary changes :—
Vous vous asseyez sur votre chaise; vous regardez dans votre pupitre; vous
prenez votre cahier et votre plume; vous mettez le cahier sur le pupitre et
vous ecrivez des mots. Vous vous levez et vous commencez a chanter " A la
Claire Fontaine."
17        6. Translate into English:—
Au printemps il ne fait pas tres froid, nous allons a la campagne quand le soleil
brille et nous entendons les oiseaux chanter dans les bois. II y a aussi des
abeilles et des papillons dans les champs oil nous trouvons toutes sortes
de belles fleurs.
AprSs une bonne promenade nous so'inmes heureux de rentrer le soir a, la maison
pour manger un dtner de soupe, de poisson, de legumes. Enfin, c'est avec
plaisir que tous les enfants se couchent et ne levent pas la tete de 1'oreiller
de toute la nuit.
English Composition.    (Time, 2 hours.)
12        1. Use each of the words in the following pairs correctly in a sentence:—
(1.)  Stationary, stationery.
(2.) Accept, except.
(3.)  Last, latest.
(4.) Counsel, council.
(5.) Respectfully, respectively.
(6.)  Principal, principle.
8       2. Rewrite the following sentences, substituting for the italicized words, words which
have approximately the same meaning:—•
He rebuked me severely.
The magistrate cautioned the prisoner not to repeat the offence.
The spring sunshine is a source of delight to everybody.
We paddled vigorously for several hours.
3. Punctuate the following:—
3 (1.) A little thrush flew down from nowhere and rested herself on the green
studded branch of an old elm    Spring is coming she twittered.
4 (2.) A little wizened old man with a long white beard and dressed in a little
red coat red pointed hat with an unusually long green feather adorning
It red trousers red stockings and red shoes with very big bright buckles
skipped out of a little hole under the aged oak M 140 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
13       4. Write to the publishers of your favourite magazine  (or newspaper)  subscribing to
it for a year.   Write the envelope address.
60       5- Write a composition of not more than 200 words on one of the following:—
(1.) David Balfour Returns to the House of Shaws.    (Kidnapped.)
(2.)  John Ridd's First Visit to London.    (Lorna Doone.)
(3.) The Most Enjoyable Holiday I Ever Had.
(4.) My Favourite Study.
General Science.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer six only.]
1. (a.) Describe how the weight of air per cubic foot may be determined.
(6.) The weight of a flask of 864 cubic inches capacity filled with air is 467 grams. The
weight of the flask after the air has been exhausted is 450 grams. Determine the
weight of one cubic foot of air.
(c.) Give three uses of compressed air.
2. Write on bacteria under the following heads:   (1) Size and growth;   (2) relation to disease;
(3) useful bacteria;   (4) means of distribution;   (5) control.
3. (a.) Write briefly upon the relation of plants to our food supply.
(6.)  What food elements do plants derive from (1) the air, (2) the soil?
(c.)  State briefly how carbohydrates are formed in plants.
4. (a.) Describe with the aid of a diagram a distillation apparatus.
(6.)  What commercial use is made of this apparatus?
5. (a.) Name two common electrical devices which depend upon the effect produced by passing
a current through metal wires, and describe the construction and operation of one.
(6.) What is the use of a fuse in an electric circuit? Indicate the essential parts of a
fuse, and explain its operation.
6. (a.) What  is  the  difference  between   a   direct   and  an   alternating  current?     State  the
advantage of each.
(6.) What are the essential parts of a transformer?   State its purpose.
7   (a.) Describe with the aid of a diagram a lead storage cell and explain its operation.
(&.) Outline briefly the proper care of an automobile battery.
8. (a.) What two uses does the animal body make of food?
(6.) Briefly describe how the dissolved and digested food in the alimentary canal gets into
the blood,
(c.) What is meant by a proper balance of foods?
9. (a.)  Classify soils and state the distinguishing characteristics of each class.
(&.) What agencies convert rock into soil?   State how they operate.
10. (a.) Why is it important to have a supply of pure water for household and drinking
purposes?
(6.)  What means may be adopted to purify a large water supply?
(e.)  How may sewage be rendered harmless before discharging it into watercourses? 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 141
Geometry.    (Time, 2Y2 hours.)
Value.
5        1.  (a.) How many degrees are there between the hands of a clock at 2 o'clock?
5 (6.) Two roads meet at a point.   One runs north and the other south-east.   What
angle is between these roads?
15 2. In a triangle ABC, the angle at A is 30°. The side BA is equal to the side BC.
BD is drawn to cut AC at D so as to make BD equal to DA. Give in degrees
the size of the angle DBC and state how to find the size of this angle without
measuring it.
15 3. Using only a straight-edge and compasses, construct any acute-angled triangle having
its shortest side about 2.5 inches long. From each vertex draw a perpendicular
to the opposite'side.    (No written statement of any kind is required.)
15 4. If two triangles have two sides of the one equal to two sides of the other, each to
each, and also the angles contained by those sides equal, the triangles are
congruent.
15       5. If two angles of a triangle are equal the sides opposite to these angles are equal.
15 6. Draw a parallelogram ABCD. Join AC and produce it to E. Prove that the angle
DCE is equal to the sum of the angles ABC and ACB.
15       7. State, giving reasons in each case, whether each of the following is a true or a false
statement:—
(a.)  Straight lines which do not meet however far they are produced in either
direction are parallel straight lines.
(&.) Two triangles that have three angles of the one equal to three angles of the
other, each to each, are congruent,
(c.)  A triangle may have one of its angles a right angle and each of the other
two acute.
History.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Answer any five questions.]
20       1-  (a-) Describe briefly any relics of the Stone Age in England.
(6.) How did the people of this. Age produce fire?
(c.) What food did they live upon at first, and again later on as they developed?
(d.) What implements did they invent for the chase and for agriculture?
20       2-   (°-)  Describe in a few lines how the surface of Upper and Lower Egypt was built up.
(&.)  What branch of mathematics developed from the change of seasons in the valley
of the Nile?
(c.)  What are the chief features of Egyptian architecture?
(d.)  Compare the preservation of temples and other buildings in Egypt with that of
those in the valley of the Tigris and Euphrates.
20       3- (ffi-) Give the geographical position of Phcfinicia and tell why the Phoenicians were
sailors.
(6.)  Name the chief city of Phoenicia and connect it with Bible History and with
Greek History,
(c.)  Show what relations the Hebrews had with Egypt, Babylon, and Phoenicia.
(d.) Relate in a few words any voyages made by the Egyptians and Phoenicians.
20       4. Describe briefly the Olympic Games and tell what effect they had on the scattered
Greek states.
(&.) Enumerate in a few words the reforms of Solon. M 142 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
20        5.  (a.)  Describe briefly the training of a boy in Sparta.
(6.)  How did the Spartan women compare with Athenian women?
20        6.   (a.)   Summarize in not more than ten lines the two Persian invasions of Greece.
(6.)  State the effects of these invasions upon Greece.
20       7.  (a.) Describe either the Athenian Acropolis in the time of Pericles or an Athenian
home of that time.
(6.) Give a brief outline of Alexander the Great's expedition into Asia.
20       8.  (a.)  What were the effects of the defeat of Carthage upon Rome?
(&.) In a few lines give an account of the work of Julius Caesar when he was
proconsul in Gaul.
20       9-  («•)  State briefly the reforms of the Gracchi.
(&.)  "It is injurious for the small farmers  to  desert the country  for  the city."
Discuss the truth of this by reference to Rome, to England, and to Canada.
20 10' Give in a line or two the historical connection of each of the following: Sphinx, Pillars
of Hercules, Satrap, deme, cuneiform, barbarians, Mantinea, Zama, Actium, Con-
stantine.
Arithmetic.    (Time, 2 hours.)
8        1.  (a,)  Multiply 804607 by 804007.
(6.)  Divide 2701260 by 698.
8       2. Find the cost of each of the following:—
1,440 lb. of hay at $30 per ton.
5 gallons 3 quarts 1 pint of milk at 36 cents per gallon.
8 yards 1 foot 3 inches of ribbon at 18 cents per yard.
5 gross 5 dozen pens at 10 pens for 16 cents.
8 3. The  longitude  of  Charlottetown,  P.E.I.,   is  63°   10'  west.    When  it  Is  3.15  p.m.  in
Charlottetown, what is the time in Victoria, B.C., longitude 1.23° 19' west?
10       4.  (a.) Express 3 Km. 3 m. 3 cm. as cm.
(&.)  Express 3 dekametres 3 decimetres as kilometres.
(c.) Find the weight  (expressed in kilograms)  of the water in a rectangular box
1.4 metres long, .8 metre wide, and .75 metre deep.
10 5- A rug is 15 feet long and 12 feet wide. The invoice price is £5. The duty is 90
cents per square yard and 40% ad valorem. If a pound sterling can be bought
for $4.80, at what price must the rug be sold to gain 25%.
10 6. A merchant has 500 barrels of flour insured for 75% of its cost at 2Ys%, paying
$80.85 premium.   At what price per barrel did he purchase the flour?
10 7. The tax bill of a person who pays a tax of 19% mills on the dollar on all his income
except $1,200 is $35.10.   Find his gross income.
12 8. In selling a quantity of oranges and pineapples, a fruit-dealer gained $12.50, gaining
25% on the orange's but losing 10% on the pineapples. If the loss on the pineapples was 20% of the net gain, find the cost of each.
12 9. On June 1, 1923, Mr. Smith deposited $1,500 in the Savings Bank. The bank pays
3% interest, which is added semiannually on Nov. 30 and May 31. What sum
of money has Mr. Smith to his credit on June 1, 1925?
12 10. Find the alteration in income occasioned by changing $3,200 stock from the 3 per
cents at 86% to 4% stock at 114%, the brokerage being %%. 16 Geo. 5
Part III.—Appendices.
M 143
Drawing.    (Time, 2 hours.)
(a.)  Selections from Drawings.
[The time taken to collect these drawings is not to be deducted from the two hours allowed for
this paper.]
Value.
6
6
6
6
35
35
Select the following from the drawings you have made during the past year and write
your distinguishing number at the top right-hand corner of each. Before beginning
your drawing give these to the Examiner.
1. An  example  of  ornamental  design  coloured so  as to  illustrate  the principle of
analogous harmony.
2. An   example  of  ornamental   design   coloured  so  as   to  illustrate  the  principle  of
complementary harmony.
3. An example of colour-work from nature.
4. An example of shaded object-drawing.
5. An example of lettering.
(b.) Lettering.
With set-square and ruler draw a rectangle IVi inches wide by 5% inches high.    Place
this in the middle of your drawing-paper, so that there is room all around it for
a border.    Within this rectangle, leaving suitable margins, using plain unshaded
letters, letter the following:—
" Buy goods made in Canada;   it brings dollars back to your own pocket."
(e.) Design.
Decorate the panel of lettering, called for in the question above, with a border of suitable width around the outside, making use of the forms in the accompanying cut.
If you have not time to finish the whole border, be sure to finish at least a corner.
Write on your design the colours you would use in the various spaces. M 144 Public Schools Report. 1925
Grade IX., Preliminary Course.
Algebra.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Value.
16 1.  (a.) Multiply a4 - 7a&3 +1164 by a3 + 3a&2 - 563.
(6.) Divide x6 - x5 + 6al4 + 5xs - 57s;2 + 32a; + 3 by Xs - 5x 4- 2.
9        2. In the equation 15x - 8y = 6 :—
(a.) Determine the value of y if x be given the value 2.
(b.) Find the value of x if y be given the value 5|.
(c.) Find the value of x, when x and y have the same value.
12        3. (a.) What is the interest on $a for 6 years at c % per annum ?
(6.) An aviator can go x miles in y hours.    How long will it take him to go a
miles 1    How far can he go in u hours 1
(c.) What is the average price per lb.  when a merchant buys m lb. of tea at
p cents per lb. and n lb. at q cents per lb.
15        4. Give:—
(a.) The square of llaHb6.
(6.) The square root of 25y20.
( c.) The cube of - 2mTc2.
(d.) The H.C.F. of Up'^r' and la^V'-
(«.) The L.C.M. of 12ps?V and 15>5g4r3.
24        5. Solve the equations :—
(a.) (4-7*)- {3*-[4a;+2(7-4*)-3(3-5a)]} =2*.
/, , #-13    6x +1    2/„      3as\
(6.) a; = + -|6 - —)
v   ' 9 5        3\ 2/•
(c.) 5a;-7y = 0
7x + 5y = 7i.
15 6.  Resolve into factors :—
(a.) a?b2-3abc-\0c9-.
(b.) 2m2-Umn + 2\0n2.
(c.) a2x + abx + ac + aby + b2y + be.
9 7.  A certain business has two branches, one in Victoria, the other in Vancouver.
The sum of the profits of the two branches is $88,130, and three times the
profits of the Victoria branch is just $15 less than twice the profits of the
Vancouver branch.    Find the profits of each branch of this business. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 145
Grade X.
English Literature.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Candidates will answer Section A and any two of Sections B, C, D.]
Section A. Longer Narrative Poems.
Value.
10        I- Quote ten consecutive lines from one of the following:—
(a.)  Christabel.
(6.)  The Deserted Tillage.
(c.)  Snowbound.
3        2.   (a.)  Name three customs or beliefs in Sohrab and Rustum which contribute to the
Oriental setting of the poem.
3 (6.)  Explain clearly, but very briefly, how Rustum finally prevailed in his combat
with Sohrab.
3 (c.)  By what means was Rustum definitely persuaded that the dying Sohrab was his
son?
12       3. Discuss Snowbound as a picture of home-life in New England during the earlier
years of the 19th century.
8 4. Enumerate four incidents or circumstances employed by the author of Christabel in
his creation of the supernatural atmosphere of the poem.
12        5. Contrast the present desolation of The Deserted Village with its former prosperity.
9 6. Write full notes of explanation on any three of the following:—
(a.) To me more dear, congenial to my heart,
One native charm, than all the gloss of art.
(6.) Alas for him who never sees
The stars shine through his cypress-trees!
(c.) And fools, who came to scoff, remained to pray.
(d.) And thence I vowed this selfsame day,
With music strong and saintly song
To wander through the forest bare,
Lest aught unholy loiter there.
Section B. Julius Caesar.
Answer any two of these questions:—
10 (1.)  Discuss two occasions in the play, Julius Caesar, on which Brutus overrules
the decisions of Cassius on disputed points.
10 (2.)  Discuss the means whereby  Cassius induces Brutus to  join the conspiracy
against Julius Caesar.
10 (3.) Write a paragraph on one of the following subjects:—
The Fickleness of the Mob.
The Gentler Qualities in the Character of Brutus.
Section C. Quentin Dubwabd.
Answer any tico of these questions:—■
10 (1.)  Give a brief account of how Quentin Durward came to be enrolled as an
Archer of the Scottish Guard.
10 (2.)  Write briefly on Quentin Durward as a picture of conditions in France during
the reign of Louis XI.
10 M 146 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
10 (3.) Write on one of the following:—
The Vanity of Le Balafre.
The Superstition of Louis XI.
Section D. Specimens op the Short Story.
Answer any two of these questions:—
10 (1.)  "As  a  man  thinketh  in  his  heart,  so  is  he."    Discuss  this principle with
reference to the story, " The Great Stone Face."
10 (2.)  Write a very brief biography of Charles  Lamb,  drawing your information
chiefly from the sketch, " The Superannuated Man."
10 (3.)  Write briefly on  "Dr.  Manette's Manuscript" as a mirror of conditions in
France prior to the French Revolution.
Latin.    (Time, 2 hours.)
10 I- Decline in the singular only: uter homo, quae res, illud iter; in the plural only:
hie dies, tu, vis.
4       2. Compare:  magnus, pruden's, utilis, magnopcre.
3 3. Write the numerals:  seven, seventeen, sixth, ninety-three, eighteen, eleven.
4 4. Write the genitive plural of fructus, eivis, filius;   the ablative singular of mure,
cornu; the dative singular of unus, agcr, pedes.
6 5. Write the third singular present indicative active of capio, fcro; second singular
future indicative active of nolo, audio; second singular perfect indicative active
of mitto; second plural present imperative of hortor; first plural present subjunctive active of moneo, volo; third plural future perfect indicative active of
capio; perfect infinitive active of do; third singular imperfect subjunctive of
proflciseor, volo.
10 6. Write the Latin for: on the same day; let us return; with great danger to himself;
do not go away; I shall disembark; do you not think? both consuls; a man of
great valor;  a ditch ten feet wider;  of great use to us.
10 7. Principal parts of: desilio, vinco, proficiscor, maneo. resisto, sterno, quaero, audeo,
traho, infero.
32        S. Translate into Latin :—
(a.) He promised to help us.
(b.)  He urged me to remain in Rome ten days.
(c.) We wish to take thought for you.
(d.) Do not ask us to give hostages.
(e.) They sent envoys to ask for peace.
(f.) You are said to excel the others in valour.
(g.) We persuaded them not to leave the city.
(h.) They were so afraid of our troops that they were unwilling to cross the river.
14       9. Translate into English :—
Quod cum nollet Ariovistus facere, iterum ad eum Caesar legates mittit qui
postularent primum ne amplius Germanos trans Rhenum in Galliam
traduceret; deinde ut obsides Gallis redderet neve bellum its inferret. Ad
haec Ariovistus respondit se Gallos vicisse atque jure belli uti constituissc; 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 147
Value.
se obsides redditurum non esse,  neque  Gallis injuria bellum  illaturum si
imperio suo parerent;   atque si Caesar vellet secum congredi, intellecturum
quanta esset virtus invictorum Germanorum.
(a.) Account for the case of iis, imperio; the mood of postularent, eonstituisse, esset.
10. Translate into English :—
Cum jam multi hortarentur ut in Graeciam reverterentur, Ulixes Graecis persuasit
ut aliud consilium inirent.    Equus iigneus ingenti magnitudine est effectus
atque viris armatis completus est.    Turn reliqui Graeci in naves conscenderuut
et se in Graeciam navigare simulabant.
(a.)  Account for the case of magnitudine;  the mood of inirent.
French.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1. Write the opposites of:—
5 (a.) Mauvais, present, etroite, facile, propre, bon marche, tard, en bas, dessus,
noire.
6 (b.)  Give the French for:    (1.)  Mary is as beautiful as a flower.    (2.)  John is
taller than Henry.    (3.)  Marguerite is less interesting than Louise.
5        2. Write the following in the future tense, using " il " as subject:—
Quand vous avez mal aux dents vous allez chez un dentiste, car vous souffrez
beaucoup.   Vous vous asscyez dans un fauteuil puis vous vous tenez tranquille.
3. Replace the infinitives in brackets in the following:
5 (a.)  By the past indefinite tense:   Quand je (aller) a la campagne je  (se lever)
tous les matins de tres bonne heure. Je (s'habiller) vite, je (prendre)
mon dejeuner dans la salle a manger et je (ouvrir) la fenetre.
3 (6.)  By the imperfect tense:   Mon frere ne (etre) pas la je (remonter)  pour le
reveiller et je (crier) "Jean, Jean reveillez-vous."
8 (c.)  By the present tense:  Un jour je (dormir) tres tard, et ce (6tre), Jean qui
me (sortir) du lit. II (devoir) me donner un copieux dejeuner et
nous (remplir) nos tasses du bon caf6 que ma soeur (venir) de preparer.
Enfin nous (partir) pour l'ecole oft les eleves nous (recevoir) joyeuse-
ment.
10       4. Complete the following sentences by using il est or c'est:—
(1.)  — un medecin ;  — docteur.
(2.) — nous;  — eux.
(3.) —• un honune celebre.
(4.) — ici que nous demeurons.
(5.) — une heure et demie.
(6.) — demain le 4 Janvier.
(7.) A qui est ce crayon?  —■ & moi.
(8.) —■ malade.
10       5-  (<*•)  Replace the italicized words by pronouns:—
(1.)  Nous avons paye les bonbons an marchand.
(2.)  Jean n'a pas repondu a son pcre.
(3.)  Nous avons attendu ces enfants.
(4.)  On nous a moutre des mouchoirs.
(5.) II a count a la maison. M 148 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
5 (b.)  Fill these spaces with suitable relative pronouns:—
La fourrure — j'ai vue et sur — il y a un ruban rouge appartient fl, la
reine — voyage dans notre pays.
Le pardessus gris est celui — je prgfSre.
— dites-vous?    Je n'ai pas parle.
13        6. Put into English:—
Une dame, flgee, etait dans un omnibus ou se trouvait aussi un vieux monsieur,
" II fait trop chaud " s'ecrie celui-ci, " ouvrez la fenetre, j'etouffe." " Fermez-
la " dit la dame fl. son tour, " je vais mourir de froid." Le conducteur
hesitait. Un voyageur proposa alors, " Conducteur, ouvrez la fenetre et le
monsieur etouffera, puis vous la fermerez et la dame mourra, ainsi nous
aurons la paix."
etouffer— to stifle,
mourir—to die.
30        7. Translate into French:—
Jean: Good morning, Henri. AVhat are you doing in the country in June? Are
you ill?
Henri: I am not very well and I am resting (se reposer) here.
Jean:   How long have you been here?
Henri:  I have been here for two weeks.
Jean:  Do you sleep well?
Henri: Last night I did not sleep very well, but I shall go to bed early to-night
and I shall sleep all night.
Jean: Will you please waken me when you get up? I am going for a ride
to-morrow morning.
Henri: Why, yes. I went for a drive yesterday. The weather was beautiful.
We set out at half-past nine and arrived home at lunch time. Before going
into the dining-room I washed my hands and face. I was very hungry
and I ate heartily. When I was eating my dessert two gentlemen arrived
and I invited them to dine with me at seven in the evening. If it is fine
to-morrow we shall go for a row on the lake.
English Composition.    (Time, 2 hours.)
1. Punctuate the following, insert capitals where necessary, and arrange any verse into
its proper lines :—
3 (1.)  and what did your uncle say to that asked the judge he said you must never
breathe a word of this to a living soul was the reply
3 (2.) three courses lay open to the french general he could evacuate the city and
fall back upon his old base he could attempt to hold the city against the
allies or he could assume the aggressive and actually attack the weak
force guarding the meuse
3 (3.)  will he ever be weary of wandering the flaming sun ever weary of waning
in lovelight the white still moon will ever a shepherd come with a crook
of simple gold and lead all the little stars like lambs to the fold.
2. State what is wrong with the following sentences and write them correctly:—
2 (1.)  After enjoying the evening in dancing all thoughts turned to supper.
2 (2.)  Paris is larger than any city in France.
2 (3.)  I am one of those who cannot describe what I do not see.
2 (4.)   She has a bad habit of procrastinating everything until to-morrow. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 149
Value.
3 + 3     3. You have received an invitation to a party.    Write both a formal and an informal
2 acceptance of the invitation.    What circumstance would guide you in deciding
which of the two forms of acceptance to use?
75        4. Write a composition of about 200 words on one of the following:—
The Life of Sohrab.    (Sohrab and Rustum.)
A California Mining Camp.    (The Outcasts of Poker Flat.)
The Battle of Philippi.    (Julius Caesar.)
How I Spent My Last Summer's Vacation.
Algerra.    (Time, 2 hours.)
6 1.  In the equation x2 + 2xy = 7y + 37 find the value of y :—
(a.) When x is given the value 5.
(b.) When x is given the value 31,-.
(c.) When x is given the value - 8.
9 2.  Form perfect squares of the following by supplying the missing term in each :—
(a.) 9»'G + ([I) + iy2.
(b.)  121a°-66a3s + (?).
(c.) (1)-40M2 + 64&4.
20 3.  Solve the equations :—
25--
(a.) 3    16.x+ 44 = g+   23
x +1       8*+ 2 x+\
(b.) zUx-^\.-hx--^i
x — y_\
x-\ y    3j
20 4. Resolve into factors:—
(a.) «2c3 -cs + a2 - 1.
(b.) a4-11a;2+ 24.
(c.) a;4-13a;2+ 36.
(d.) a'4 -11a;2 +25.
(e.) a3 - 3a26 + 3a62 - 268.
10 5. The following expression is the product of two equal factors :—
1 - 22a:2 + 6a;3 + 121a;4 - 66.x5 + 9aA    ,
What are these factors 1
15        6. (a.) Find the H.C.F. of x3 - 19a; - 30 and x3 - 2a;2 - 29a; - 42.
(&.) What is theL.C.M. of these two expressions?
(The result may be left in the factor form.)
io    — m (■♦>> {> + i^} {i - ^2
10 8. A man agreed to sell 2,500 tons of cement at $16 a ton. What he had on hand
cost him $12 a ton. Not having enough he had to buy cement at $18 a ton
to fulfil his contract. On the transaction he made a profit of $5,800. How
many tons had he to buy 1 M 150 Public Schools Report. 1925
Botany.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[All questions are of equal value.    Answer five only.    Illustrate your answers
with carefully drawn diagrams.]
1. Distinguish between a fruit and a seed.    Describe the structure of the seed of a monocotyledon
and of a dicotyledon.   What is the use of each part?
2. Describe a bulb, a tuber, a corm, a rhizome, and a stolon.    Give one example of each and
bring out clearly the reasons why each is considered to be a modified stem.
3. Give diagrams to illustrate the flower structure of one member of each of the following
families, choosing specific examples (label fully) :   (a) Ranuneulacea?;   (6) LiliacesR.
4. Write a note on the importance of the plant kingdom to the animal kingdom.
5. Discuss the function of green leaves in regard to the manufacture of plant-food materials.
6. Describe and give examples of five different kinds of fruit.
Geometry.    (Time, 2y2 hours.)
Value.
15        1. If the sides of a convex polygon are produced in order, the sum of the angles so
formed is equal to four right angles.
10        2. A quadrilateral is a parallelogram if its diagonals bisect each other.
15       3. Parallelograms on the same base and between the same parallels are equivalent.
15 4. The area of a triangle ABC is 4.5 square inches. The base is equal to the altitude.
One of the interior angles at the base is 120°. Construct the triangle and give a
theoretical statement of your construction.
15 5. A and B are two points on opposite sides of a straight line CD. Show how to find
a point P in CD so that the angle APC is equal to the angle BPC.   Give a proof.
15 6. In an obtuse-angled triangle the square on the side opposite to the obtuse angle is
equal to the sum of the squares on the sides containing the obtuse angle plus twice
the rectangle contained by one of those sides and the projection on it of the
other.
15 7. ABC is an acute-angled triangle of which BC is the least side. With B as centre
and BC as radius, a circle is drawn cutting AB at D and AC at E. If AD is equal
to DE prove: (1) that the angle CED equals the sum of the angle BCA and
twice the angle CAB; (2) that the angle ABC equals twice the angle CAB.
Chemistry.    (Time, 2 hours.)
18       1-  (<*•) Name the allotropic forms of carbon and briefly describe their characteristic
properties.
(5.) What are the chief gaseous constituents of coal-gas?
(c.)  State two chemical properties of carbon dioxide and give its uses.
18        2.   (a.)  Detail  a convenient  laboratory  method for preparing a few jars of oxygen,
illustrating with a diagram.    Write the equation.
(6.)   State:  (1) the chief chemical property of oxygen;  (2)  two commercial uses.
15        3. Distinguish between the following and give examples:—
(a.) A symbol and a chemical formula.
(b.)  A solution and a chemical compound.
(c.)  Saturated and supersaturated solutions. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 151
Value.
18       4. Describe, with equations, what takes place in each of the following cases:—
(a.)  When charcoal is burned in oxygen and the residual gas shaken with a
solution of calcium hydroxide (lime-water).
(6.)  When white-hot iron wire is immersed in an atmosphere of chlorine.
(c.) When a lighted taper is brought to the mouth of a jar of acetylene.
15 5. Describe the precautions that should be taken in the following operations and give
reasons:—
(a.)  Lighting a jet attached to a hydrogen generating apparatus.
(&.)  Cutting a small piece from a stick of yellow phosphorus for experimental
purposes,
(c.) Testing the odour of a jar of gas suspected of being either chlorine or
hydrogen chloride.
16 6.  (a.)  Briefly describe what is meant by valency.
(b.)  What is the valency of copper, phosphorus, and sodium in the following:  copper
sulphate, phosphorus trichloride, sodium oxide?
(c.)  State the law of definite proportions'  (or constant composition)   and  explain
concisely what it means.
Physios.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer five only.]
1. Explain the following :—
(a.)  How to find the density of a liquid by using the specific gravity bottle.
(6.)  Magnetic declination, electrical repulsion.
2. (a.)  By means of sketches explain the different classes of levers.    Give a common example
of each class.
(&.)  Neglecting friction, what is the mechanical advantage of each of the following:  inclined
plane, screw, single movable pulley.
3. (a.)   State the law which is applied practically in the hydraulic press.
(&.) Make a sketch to show the position of the valves of the common suction-pump in the
upstroke of the piston. Account for the upward flow of water from the reservoir
to the spout.
4. (a.)  Why is mercury commonly used in thermometers?
(6.) Explain clearly heat transference in relation to the following: oven-roasting, snow, the
polished surface of a tea-kettle.
5. (a.)  State the First Law of Reflection and illustrate by drawing a figure representing an
experimental proof of it.
(6.)  How is light transmitted?
6. (a.) The similar poles of two bar-magnets are placed near together.    Make a sketch showing
the lines of force.
(&.)  Describe the construction of either a Voltaic Cell or a Leyden Jar.
7. Solve any two of the following:—
(a.) The crank of a windlass is 1 foot long and its drum 7 inches in diameter.   What
force applied to the handle will lift a weight of 156 lb.?
(6.)  On mixing 500 grams of iron at 200° C. with 3 kilograms of oil, the temperature of
the oil is raised from 15° C. to 20°,C.    Find the specific heat of the oil.   (Specific
heat of iron=0.113.)
(c.) A mass of air whose volume is 210 c.c. when the barometer stands at 760 m.m. has
a volume of 240 c.c. when carried up to a certain height.    What was the reading
of the barometer at the latter height, assuming that the temperature remained
constant? M 152 Public Schools Report. 1925
History'.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Answer any five questions.]
Value.
20        1.   ("••)  Give a brief account of Mohammed.
(6.)  Outline the extension of Mohammedan conquest up to the battle of Tours in 732.
20       2. Write a brief essay  on  Charlemagne,  touching especially upon the  extent  of his
conquests, law and government, education and the Church.
20       3. Explain the four chief results of the Crusades to England and to Europe generally.
20       4.  (a.) What effect on Middle and Western Europe had the advance of the Mohammedans on the Bosphorus?
(5.)   Show how the progress of the Saracens affected trade routes and navigation.
20        5.   (a.)  Describe briefly the condition of the French people prior to the Revolution.
(b.)  What act on the part of Napoleon brought him into prominence?
(c.)  Describe in a few words the conflict between Napoleon and England in the war
up to the Peace of Amiens.
(d.) Give a short outline of that work of Napoleon which was more important than his
military achievements.
20        6. Describe the great advance in agriculture, manufacture, and transportation during
the latter part of the eighteenth and the early part of the nineteenth centuries.
20        7. Write a brief explanatory note on each of the following men:   Roger Bacon, Martin
Luther, Sir Thomas More, Hampden, Cavour.
20        8. Outline the work of Bismarck in Germany.
1. Simplify;
Arithmetic.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[All work must be shoicn.]
2     3    o      3
(a.)  gxjf-ofj.
.125+  .25
v   ' .625 + .375
10 2. A pole of a circus tent is held in place by ropes 111 feet long running from the top
of the pole to stakes 105 feet from the base of the pole.   How high is the pole?
12 3. How many square yards of tin will be required to make S dozen pails, without covers,
9 inches in diameter and 7% inches deep, allowing 3 square feet for seams and
waste on each dozen pails?
12 4. A quart of milk supplies as much of both protein and energy as % lb. of beef or
S eggs. When milk is 12 cents per quart, beef 25 cents per pound, and eggs
30 cents per dozen, what per cent, is saved by buying milk instead of beef?
instead of eggs?
12 5. A man commenced business with $3,000 capital. The first year he gained 22%%,
which he added to his capital; the second year he gained 30% of the whole sum
and again added the gain to the capital; the third year he lost 16%% of his
entire capital.    How much did he make during the three years? 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 153
Value.
14 6. A baseball ground is 480 feet long and 360 feet wide. It is enclosed by a close board
fence 12 feet high, supported by posts placed 10 feet apart, to which are attached
three stringers 2 inches by 4 inches running the full length of the fence. The top
of the fence is covered by a round rail. The posts cost 45 cents each; the
stringers, $32 per M.; the boards, 1 inch thick, $32 per M.; and the rail 2% cents
a linear foot.    Find the total cost of the lumber.
16 7. Find the proceeds of a note for $900, dated Dec. 1, 1924, at 2 months with interest
at 7% per annum and discounted at a bank on Dec. 15th at 6% per annum.
16 8. Mr. Brown owned a farm which rented at $411.45 per annum. He sold the farm for
$8,229 and invested the proceeds in 6% stock at 105, paying %% brokerage. Was
his yearly income increased or decreased, and how much?
Agbicultuee.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Qttestions are of equal value.   Answer six only,.]
1. (a.) Write a concise account of how soils were made.
(6.) Explain the following terms as applied to soils: Loam, sedentary, transported, glacial,
alluvial, heavy, light, warm.
2. Scanty rainfall during the summer months is one difficulty with which the farmers and fruit
growers of B.C. have to contend. Mention two ways by which this difficulty may be
overcome and explain clearly how each method is carried out.
3. Give brief instructions under the following heads for the growing of an acre of potatoes:
(a) Choice and preparation of soil; (b) amount and choice of seed for either early or
late crop; (o) preparation of seed (cutting and treating) ; (d) planting; (e) subsequent
care;  (/) yield expected.
4. (a.)  Garden plants may be classified as annuals, biennials, and perennials.    Explain these
•   terms and say to which class the following belong:   Lettuce, carrot, asparagus, peas,
cabbage, celery, rhubarb, pumpkin, onion.
(6.) Make a second list of these vegetables and state after each which part of the plant is
used for human food.
5. (a.)  Name the two types of swine and name two breeds belonging to each type.
(b.) Sheep are sometimes classed as fine-wool, middle-wool, and long-wool breeds. Give an
example of each. Which of the three would also be classed as a mutton breed and
why?
6. (a.)  England and Scotland have each produced two fine breeds of beef cattle.    Name these
breeds in each case.
(b.)  Give some of the most important characteristics of a good beef animal.
7. (a.)  Trace briefly the life-history of any two of the following species of insects:   Locust
(grasshopper),   cabbage-butterfly,   any   species   of   cutworm,   codling-moth,   tent-
caterpillar.
(6.) Indicate the character of the injury done by each of the two species described and state
what remedial measures you would employ to destroy them.
8. (a.)  Give  directions  for  the planting and  subsequent  care  of  any  one of the following:
Loganberry, strawberry, raspberry.
(b.)  How are new plants obtained in the case of all three of the above varieties?
9. (a.)  Give what you consider to be the essential features of a good poultry-house.
(b.) Give concise directions for the care and feeding of laying hens during the three winter
months. M 154 Public  Schools Report. 1925
Grade XL, Junior Matriculation and Normal Entrance.
Greek.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Value.
10 1.  Decline in the singular tis, ti, acra-i's, Trar-qp, tx-qv.
12        2. Decline irds and dk-qOrfi in all genders and numbers.
6        3. Write the imperfect passive indicative, the present active subjunctive, the present
active optative of troieoj.
6        4. Write the second person singular of the imperative (a.) present active, (b.) aorist
middle, (c.) aorist passive of rip,d<a.
6        5. Decline fyw and crv.
5        6. State the constructions denoting means, time when, time within which; the form of
the past contrary to fact condition.
15 t.  Write the principal parts of ayw, j3ovkop.ai, ire/xiro), vo/xt£a>, KaAew, Yjoaoyucu, <j>evyo>,
(Xavvd), a.Kov(i>, kap.i3d.vto.
20        8. Translate into English :—
(a.)  eoeurav p.-q ol e^Opol TipinOeiev.
(b.)  iav Se tous (TTpariioTas dSiKy , oi'K edeky'irropev iirewOai avro).
(c.)  tfyjTovv rovq apyovra-i 'iva irepl rovrotv o-vp./3ovkevoivro avrols.
(d.) ira.vo-iop.e9a, & dvSpe<s o"T,oa.TtujTcu, ravr-qs rrj? pLa^ns.
(e.)  eiropevero vvv dv eirl rovs irokep,Lovs el (TTpdrevpa el-yev.
20 9.  Translate into Greek :—
(a.) For this army had been cut to pieces by the same viceroy.
(b.) They voted to send men with Clearchus also.
(c.) Why need these men proceed through the country itself?
(d.) If you should do this on account of friendship, we should justly feel
grateful,
(e.) During this night the barbarians withdrew along the river.
English Literature.    (Time, 2% hours.)
[Candidates are to write on Parts A. and D, and on either Part B or Part C]
Part A.
10       I-  («•) Explain, as fully as you can, what is meant by the term " romantic " in literary
history.
10 (b.)  Of the poets you have studied, state which one seems to you the most clearly
" romantic " and support your statement by references to that author's work.
24 2. Relate four of the following passages to their context. In each of the four cases
show that the passage displays at least one characteristic of its author. And
show also, as fully as you can, the beauty and fitness of the lines—with respect to
allusions, or diction, or sound, or figure', or in any way you like. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 155
Value.
(a.)  The lights began to twinkle from the rocks:
The long day wanes:   the slow moon climbs:   the deep
Moans round with many voices.    Come, my friends,
'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
(b.)  Shakespeare was of us, Milton was for us,
Burns, Shelley, were with us,—they watch from their graves!
He alone breaks from the van and the freemen,
—He alone sinks to the rear and the slaves!
We shall march prospering,—not through his presence;
Songs may inspirit us,—not from his lyre.
(c.) and when the deed was done
I heard among the solitary hills
Low breathings coming after me, and sounds
Of undistinguishab'le motion, steps
Almost as silent as the turf they trod.
(d.) Must we but weep o'er days more blest?
Must ice but blush?—Our fathers bled.
Earth !  render back from out thy breast
A remnant of our Spartan dead !
Of the three hundred grant but three,
To make a new Thermopylae!
(e.) The world's great age begins anew,
The golden years return,
The earth doth like a snake renew
Her winter weeds outworn :
Heaven smiles, and faiths and empires gleam
Like wrecks of a dissolving dream.
(/.)  Five miles meandering with a mazy motion
Through wood and dale the sacred river ran,
Then reached the caverns measureless to man,
And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean.
(g.)  Perhaps the self-same song that found a path
Through the sad heart of Ruth, when sick for home
She stood in tears among the alien corn;
The same that oft-times hath
Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam
Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn.
Part B.
20 1- By whom and under what circumstances was the following speech uttered? Show
how the passage is a fitting summary of, or comment on, the life of the speaker.
Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections,
passions? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to
the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the
same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not
bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die?
and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest,
we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his
humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance
be by Christian example? Why, revenge. The villainy you teach me, I will
execute, and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction.
24       2. There are three pairs of lovers in The Merchant of Venice.   What reasons have you
for thinking, in each case, that the match will be suitable? M 156 Public Schools Report. 1925
Part C.
Value.
20        I- By whom and under what circumstances was the following speech uttered?    Show
how the passage is a fitting summary of, or comment on, the life of the speaker.
She should have died hereafter;
There would have been a time for such a word.
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death.    Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more:  it is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.
24 2- To what extent do you think that Macbeth was "responsible" for his crime? In the
course of your answer show, as fully as possible, the influence exercised upon him
by the witches and by Lady Macbeth.
Part D.
12 The following poem is an exercise in "sight-reading"; probably no candidate has read
or studied it before. It is intended as a test of your ability to interpret a poem by
yourself. Read it carefully and then attempt the questions appended below. You
need not try more than three or four of them.
All That's Past.
Very old are the woods;
And the buds that break
Out of the briar's boughs,
When March winds wake,
So old with their beauty are—
Oh, no man knows
Through what wild centuries
Roves back the rose.
Very old are the brooks;
And the rills that rise
Where snow sleeps cold beneath
The azure skies
Sing such a history
Of come and gone.
Their every drop is as wise
As Solomon.
A'ery old are we men;
Our dreams are tales
Told in dim  Eden
By Eve's nightingales;
We wake and whisper awhile,
But, the day gone by,
Silence and sleep like fields
Of Amaranth lie.
(a.)  In what respect can the buds of the briar (wild-rose) and the mountain brooks be
called "old"?
(6.)  In what ways is man like these buds and brooks?    What is the significance of
choosing these three things to go together? 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 157
(c.) Try to explain what is meant by saying that our dreams were " told" long ago in
the Garden of Eden.
(d.)  Who was Solomon?    How can a drop of water be said to be as "wise" as he?
(e.)  Comment on the word wild in stanza 1, sleeps and azure in stanza 2, and whisper
in stanza 3.
(/.)  Comment on the sound and rhythm of the second and third lines of stanza 1 and
the last two lines of stanza 3.
History.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Answer any five questions.]
\ alue.
5 + 15   1. Why did the Protestant Reformation begin first in Germany?    Tell briefly the story
of Martin Luther's leadership.
5 + 15   -■ What led to the launching of the " Invincible Armada "?    Recall its fate and estimate
its effect upon England.
5X4     3. Write notes on :   (a) Sir John Eliot; (6) John Hampden ; (c) JohnPym; (d) "Cromwell's Ironsides."
20     4. Describe the condition of the peasantry in France before the Revolution.
20     5. Outline the reforms  effected by Bonaparte,  giving  special attention to the  Code
NapoUon.
7 + 13   6. What do you understand by the "Industrial Revolution" in England?    Contrast the
old " domestic system " with the new " factory system."
20      7. Trace the growth of the French colonial empire under the Third Republic.
20      8- After his dismissal of Bismarck, " Kaiser William II. himself directed the policy of the
Empire."    Sketch the main features of this policy.
20      9. Compare Sir John A. Macdonald and Sir Wilfred Laurier as " builders of Canada."
Latin Authors and Sight Translation.    (Time, 2% hours.)
A. Caesar, De Bello Gallico, Books IV. and V.
13        1. Translate:—
Interim, consilio ejus cognito, et per mercatores perlato ad Britannos, a compluri-
bus ejus insulae civitatibus ad eum legati veniunt, qui polliceantur obsides
dare atque imperio populi Romani obtemperare. Quibus auditis, liberaliter
pollicitus, hortatusque, ut in ea sententia permanerent, eos domum remittit;
et cum iis una Dominium, quern ipse Atrebatibus superatis regem ibi consti-
tuerat, cujus et virtutem et consilium probabat, et quern sibi fidelem arbi-
trabatur, cujusque auctoritas in iis regionibus magni habebatur, mittit.
(a.) Account for the case of perlato, domum, quern, magni; the mood of polliceantur,
permanerent; the tense of dare.
11        2. Translate:—
Caesar questus, quod, cum ultro in continentem legatis missis pacem ab se petis-
sent, bellum sine causa intulissent, ignoscere imprudentiae dixit obsidesque
imperavit; quorum illi partem statim dederunt, partem ex longinquioribus
locis arcessitam paucis diebus sese daturos dixerunt. Interea suos remigrare
in agros jusserunt, principesque undique convenire et se civitatesque suas
Caesari commendare coeperunt.
(a.) Account for the case of imprudentiae, arcessitam, diebus; the mood of intulissent. M 158 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
7 3. Translate:—
Caesar, etsi intellegebat qua de causa ea dicerentur, quaeque eum res ab instituto
consilio deterreret, tamen, ne aestatem in Treveris consumere cogeretur,
omnibus ad Britannicum bellum rebus comparatis, Indutiomarum ad se cum
ducentis O'bsidibus venire jussit.
(a.) Account for the niood of dicerentur, cogeretur; the tense of dicerentur.
9       4. Translate:—
His aliquantum itineris progressis, cum jam extremi essent in prospectu, equites
a Quinto Atrio ad Caesarem venerunt qui nuntiarent, superiore nocte
maxima coorta tempestate, prope omnes naves afllictas atque in litore ejectas
esse, quod neque ancorae funesque subsisterent, neque nautae gubernatores-
que vim pari tempestatis possent: itaque ex eo concursu navium magnum
esse incommodum aceeptum.
(a.) Account for the case of aliquantum, itineris.
(b.) Qui nuntiarent.    Give four other methods of expressing the same idea.
a        f.   m..„  „i„j,„ B. Vergil, Aeneid IL, Lines 1-505.
4 5. Translate :—
nee tacui demens;  et me, fors si qua tulisset,
si patrios unquam  remeassem victor ad Argos,
promts! ultorem, et verbis odia aspera movi.
(a.)  Account for the mood and the tense of remeassem.
8 6. Translate:—
" vos aeterni ignes, et non violabile vestrum
testor numen," ait, " vos arae ensesque nefandi,
quos fugi, vittaeque deum, quas hostia gessi:
fas mini Graiorum sacrata resolvere iura,
fas odisse viros, atque omnia ferre sub auras,
si qua tegunt:  teneor patriae nee legibus ullis.
tu modo promissis maneas, servataque serves
Troia fidem, si vera feram, si magna rependam."
(a.) Account for the mood of maneas;  the case of promissis.
(6.) Explain vittae.
7 7. Translate:—
' heu !  fuge, nate dea, teque his,' ait, ' eripe flammis.
hostis habet muros;   ruit alto a culmine Troia.
sat patriae Priamoque datum;   si Pergama dextra
defendi possent, etiam hac defensa fuissent.'
(a.)  Account for the case of dea; the tense of possent, fuissent.
(6.)  Scan the first line.
5 8. Translate:—
illis ad Troiam forte diebus
venerat, insano Cassandrae incensus amore,
et gener auxilium Priamo Phrygibusqne ferebat,
infelix, qui non sponsae praecepta furentis
audierit.
(a.)  Account for the mood of audierit.
8 9. Translate:—
' o soeii, qua prima,' inquit, ' fortuna salutis
monstrat iter, quaque ostendit se dextra, sequamur:
mutemus clipeos, Danaumque insignia nobis
aptemus.   dolus an virtus, quis in hoste requirat?
arma dabunt ipsi.'
(a.) Account for the case of dextra; the mood of sequamur, requirat.
(6.)  Scan the second line. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 159
Value.
8      10. Translate:—
hen nihil invitis fas quemquam fidere divis!
ecce trahebatur passis Priameia virgo
crinibus a templo Cassandra adytisque Minervae,
ad caelum tendens ardentia lumina frustra,
lumina, nam teneras arcebant vincula palmas.
non tulit hanc speciem furiata mente Coroebus,
et sese medium iniecit periturus in agmen.
(a.) Account for the case of nihil, quemquam, divis.
 „.,   „ C. Sight Translation.
20      11- Translate:—
Caesar postquam ex Menapiis in Treveros venit, duabus de causis Rhenum transire
constituit:   quaruin  una erat,  quod  German!  auxilia  contra  se  Treveris
miserant, altera ne ad eos Ambiorix receptum haberet.   His constitutis rebus,
paulo  supra  emn  locum quo  antea  exercitum  traduxerat  facere  pontem
instituit.     Magno militum studio paucis diebus opus efflcitur.     Firmo  ad
pontem praesidio relicto, reliquas copias equitatumque traducit.    IJbii qui
antea obsides dederant atque in deditionem venerant, purgandi sui causa ad
eum legates mittunt, qui dicant non ex sua civitate auxilia in Treveros
missa esse; petunt atque orant ut sibi parcat.
purgare = to excuse.
Latin Grammar and Composition.    (Time, 2 hours.)
8 1. Write the accusative plural of vis, iter, princeps; the ablative singular of flumen,
turris; the genitive plural of mille, miles, manus.
4       2. Decline together alia navis, rnelior pars.
2       3. Write the numerals three, thirteen, three hundred, eleven.
4       4. Compare celer, fidelis, audacter, bonus.
Q 5. Write the first person singular perfect indicative active and the present infinitive
passive of scribo, iuvo, veto, gero, do, fero.
Q C. Write the second singular present indicative active of nolo, fero; the third singular
imperfect subjunctive of proficiscor, malo; the second plural perfect indicative
active of capio; the second singular present imperative of hortor.
7        7. Write the principal parts of dedo, consuesco, audeo, tollo, iungo, frango, proficiscor.
7 S. Write the Latin for: (a) Did you see the king?; (b) ten miles; (c) in all directions;
(d) we are of good courage; (e) do not leave the town; (/) in a loud voice;
(g) I make war upon the enemy.
56        9. Translate into Latin:—
(a.) He asked me why I had not been faithful to him.
(b.) The enemy attacked so furiously that our men were driven out of the camp.
(c.) The scouts brought back word that the Germans were men of immense size
and incredible valour.
(d.) Ambassadors were sent to Caesar by the enemy to say that they were ready
to give hostages,
(e.) When the Gauls saw that our legions were being hard pressed they began
to cross the river.
(/.)  He asked where we preferred to dwell.
(g.)  Caesar   endeavoured   to   persuade   the   Helvetii   not   to   leave   their   own
territories. M 160 Public Schools Report. 1925
Agriculture.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer seven only.]
1. Discuss the interrelation between agriculture and the various sciences and show how the
farmer may benefit from scientific knowledge.
2. What constitutes soil-fertility?
3. How does water move in the soil, and in what way can the farmer or gardener control or
check the movement of water?
4. Why are legumes especially valuable as a farm crop?
5. What are the characteristics of a dairy cow?    Mention the most important breeds of dairy
cattle in this Province.
6. What are the main points to be considered in the feeding of animals?
7. How would you arrange a storage place for milk and cream so that these commodities may
keep sweet?
8. Give the life-history of, and prescribe treatment for, the insect which does the most damage
in your locality.
French Translation.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Value.
25        !■ Translate:—
HAY'MAKINO.
L'herbe coupee, on ne la rentre pas tout de suite, comme vous savez. II faut
d'abord la faire secher au soleil en la retournant avec des rateaux. Cela
s'appelle f'aner et la fenaison est 1'un des plus jolis travaux champetres et
des moins durs. Les femmes et les enfants s'en melent; tout le monde fane,
en batifolant. II y a une lettre ceiebre de Madame de Sevigne dans iaquelle
elle raconte la fenaison en Bretagne, de son temps. Excepts dans les provinces oil la machine a tout envahi, les choses n'ont guere changS depuis elle.
Ce sont les memes rateaux, les mSmes cris joyeux dans le foin parfume'. et
pour ramener le foin dans les granges, les memes chars antiques, empiles
jusqu'au faite.
rateau—rake.
batifoier—to play, to frolic.
faite—top.
20       2. Translate:—
(a.)  We have been sitting in the shade of the green foliage for half an hour.
(b.) When we arrive at the landing point next week, he and I will throw the
parcels on the wharf,
(c.) Everybody was delighted with the view when the steamboat passed opposite
the lighthouse.
(d.) I know her face very well but I do not know her name.
25        3. Answer the following questions in French (about twenty words each) :—
(a.)  Quelle est l'etude que vous avez preferee pendant vos annees d'ecole et
pourquoi?
(6.)  Quelle date tombe votre anniversaire et quels cadeaux aimez-vous recevoir
a cette occasion?
(c.)  Si un incendie Sclate dans votre ecole pendant les heures de classe, que
faut-il faire?
(a\)  Que peut-on voir d'interessant dans un port de mer? 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 161
Value.
30       4- Write in French (about a page) a conversation with a friend of which the following
is the material to be used :—
You have just returned from a journey—your friend meets you and asks you
how you are, whether you enjoyed your journey—you reply that you are
glad to see your friend again, that he (she) looks well. You tell him (her)
about your journey—he (she) puts in a question or a remark from time to
time—finally he (she) says you are very lucky to have had such a trip and
that he (she) is very glad to have you back again.
French Grammar.    (Time, 2 hours.)
5       1. In the following phrases replace the noun used by the noun given in parentheses, and
make any modifications rendered necessary by this change:—
Une femme tranquille  (homme).
En soldat joyeux (musique).
Un Chat roux (dame).
Un gent.il petit gargon   (fille).
20       2- But into French:—
(a.) Wbat would have become of us?
(6.) He has been a pupil there for a week.
(c.) You must have seen her.
(d.) That's not worth the trouble.
(e.)  We arrived there in less than three hours.
(/.)  How glad I am!
(g.) Come as soon as possible.
(ft.)  I will go there willingly.
(i.) You arrive before the time.
(j.) At the same time.
10       3. Put the italicized portion of the following passage into the plural:—
Le eheval est un animal que j'aime beaucoup. ll travaille bien dans mon pays ou
il traine un lourd bateau sur le canal. Parfois il souffre car le clou de son
sabot lui fait mal.
10        4. Explain in French the following words :—
Le Midi;  la vitre;  la mouette;  la loge;  la plage.
10        5. Make sentences showing the use of:—
PlustSt; plutdt; pour la plupart; toutefois; d'icila; oft (as a relative pronoun) ;
essayer (followed by infinitive) ; passer le temps (followed by infinitive) ;
desirer (followed by infinitive) ; assez and infinitive meaning enough:
e.g., There is enough poison to kill a man (du poison).
20       6- Put into French:—
(a.)  Give me some.
(6.)  Have you a book?    Give it to him.
(c.)  He is taller than Jean.
(a\)  It is half-past two.
(e.) He went to them.
(f.)  He introduced them to me.
(g.) Where is your book?   This is mine.
(ft.) No one loves me.
(i) Give me another pen.   This is no good.
(j.) What you say interests me.
ll M 162 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
25 7. I shall send you a post card (carte postale) as soon as I arrive and you ought to
receive it a week from to-day. We shall go to bathe in the sea every day and
perhaps we shall fall asleep on the beach. I -have taught my brother to swim.
I gave him ten lessons and after the tenth he swam fifty metres. Now he ought
not to fear the sea. We ride our bicycles, skip with a rope, run on the beach
and lie in the sun. Soon, alas, the holidays will be over and we must return to
school. We pack our trunks sadly and take the train to Paris. As we look out
of the window we say good-bye to the fields, the hay-stacks, the farmers and
peasants. If I had plenty of money I would live in the country all the year round,
(pack our trunks = faire nos malles.)
Geometry.    (Time, 2% hours.)
[N.B.—Draw neat diagrams;   use printed capitals.    Authorities may be cited  by number or
enunciation.]
17       I- Make an accurate construction of the following, omitting explanation or proof, but
showing the necessary construction lines:—
Describe a triangle having sides %, 1, and 1%. inches long. Then about a circle
2 inches in diameter circumscribe a second triangle which shall be equiangular to the one you have constructed.
17       2. Make an accurate construction of the following, and give proof:—
On a line 1% inches long describe a segment of a circle which shall contain an
angle of 45°.    (Protractor may be used.)
12       3.  (a.)  The opposite angles of any quadrilateral inscribed in a circle are supplementary.
3 (b.) What theorem may be deduced from the preceding by allowing two consecutive
vertices of the quadrilateral to become coincident?    Give reasons.
10       4. Construct a square equal in area to five times a given square.    Give proof.
16 5.  (a.)  If the vertical angle of a triangle is bisected externally, the bisector divides the
base into segments which have the same ratio as the other sides of the
triangle.
8 (6.)  In the triangle ABC, AB = 5, AC = 4, BC = 2.   The bisector of the exterior
angle at A meets BC produced at D.    Find the length of BD.
17 6. From any point P on the circumference of a circle PD, PE, and PF are respectively
perpendicular to the chord QR, to the tangent at Q, and to the tangent at R.
'   Show that PD is a mean proportional between PE and PF.
Chemistry.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer seven only.]
1. State the law of definite proportions and the law of multiple proportions, and show how each
is explained by the atomic theory.
2. Give an account of the preparation, physical and chemical properties, and uses of (a) hydrogen
sulphide,  (6)  ozone.
3. Describe, with equations, one method for the preparation of hydrogen chloride.   What are the
properties of this substance?   What is the solution of hydrogen chloride in water called?
4. Explain clearly what is meant by each of the following terms and give one example of each:
Acid radical, endothermic reaction, reversible reaction, bivalent element. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 163
5. Describe fully, with equations, one laboratory method for the preparation of carbon dioxide.
What are the physical and chemical properties of the substance?
6. After neutralizing a solution of sodium hydroxide with nitric acid and evaporating the solution
there remain 100 grains of sodium nitrate.   What weight of each substance is used?
7. How many grains of nitrous oxide can be prepared from 20 grams of ammonium nitrate?
What volume does the dry gas occupy at 17° C. and 1,520 mm. pressure?
8. Name and give the formula; of the first two members in each of the three series of the hydrides
of carbon you have studied. How is the formula of any one of these substances related
to that of the preceding member of the same series? Write the equation for the preparation of any one of them.
Atomic weights:  H = 1, 0 — 16, S = 32, C = 12, Na = 23, N = 14.
Algebra.    (Time, 2% hours.)
Value.
12 1.  Factor:—
(a.) U-lba+\6x-20ax.
(b.) 27^-512.
(c.)   9*5" -X3".
(d.) x2 - iy2 + 9 - 6x.
12        2. Simplify:—
2-9.
(a.)
(|)2 _(J)8_. 12(|),
a
2 + b
(b.)
2x
iab
12        3. Solve:—
v   '  2a-j3-2    3x24-3a; + 3    6a; + 6
(b.) .12(2*4- .05) - .15(1.5* - 2) = 0.246.
12 4.  (a.) One-sixth of a man's age 8 years ago equals |- of his age 12 years hence.
What is his age now 1
(b.) It costs as much to sod a square piece of ground at 20 cents per square yard
as to fence it at 80 cents a yard.    Find the side of the square.
14
.  Solve :—
(a.)
1+1-1=1
m    n    p
I+l + l-f
m    n    p
I-W-Ol
m    n    p
(b.)
0 ,    11a!    15
2ar - — — —.
2       2
12        6. One side of a right-angled triangle is 7 feet shorter than the other and the area is
30 square feet.    Find the two sides and the hypotenuse. M 164 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
14 •     7. (a.) Simplify :   JZJL* _ xi i ./_ +xy J2 + °L±V .
a a     V   x,y v xy
(b.) Find a quantity such that when it is added to each of the quantities 11, 17,
19, 23 the results are in proportion.
12        8. (a.) Is the point (3,4) on the line whose equation is  3x - iy = \21    Give the
reason for your answer.
(6.) Solve graphically:    2x + y=   1
y2 + 4x=\7.
Check the result.
English Composition.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Candidates are reminded that they are expected to spell and to punctuate correctly. They are
therefore urged to leave some few minutes free for a revision of their papers. They are
also reminded that they cannot expect marks for paragraphs and essays that are not well
organized and well worked out. They are therefore urged to plan their compositions before
they begin to write. The plan of the essay in question 2 should be written in the examination
book as part of the answer.]
25        1- Rewrite the following sentences in better form, giving reasons for the changes you
make:—■
(a.)  While admitting my opponent's ability, it is impossible to agree with him.
(b.) I met him on the street, when he told me that I had failed to pass my
examination, and yet I studied hard for it.
(e.) I  was wandering aimlessly down the street, when I saw a most pitiful
spectacle, the other day.
(d.)  I admire a good football player because it is such a manly sport.
(e.)  He would not reply until he had closed the door, and locking it.
75        2. Write an essay (of about 300 words) on one of the following topics :—
My Opinions on Jaques and Cynics in General.
Eppie's Influence on Silas Marner.
'   Camelot as a City of Magic.
The Chief Character in Kenilworth.
Nelson as Leader of Men.
British Columbia's Future.
Cross-word Puzzles.
Physics.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer six only.]
(a.) Make a drawing of a simple lift-pump. By reference to this explain how the pump works
and calculate the height to which a perfect lift-pump would lift water when the
mercury barometer stands at 29 inches. Indicate this height on your diagram.
Belative density of mercury is 13.6.
(&.) An open vessel contains 100 grams of air when the barometer stands at 740 mm. What
mass of air does it contain at the same temperature when the barometer stands at
760 mm.? 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 165
2. (a.) Describe by reference to a diagram a case of the refraction of water waves.   Define
refraction and show clearly how it is caused in this case.
(6.)  A certain tuning-fork sets up a wave-length of 100 cm. in air at a temperature of 20° C.
If the velocity of sound in air at 0° C. is 332 metres per second and it Increases
60 cm. per second for a rise of 1° C, calculate the frequency of the fork.
3. (a.)  Define the following terms:  Absolute zero, B.T.U., boiling-point, convection currents.
(6.) If 100 grams of copper, specific heat 0.094, are heated to 100° C. and are then placed in
200 grams of a liquid of specific heat 0.1, calculate the final temperature of the
mixture if the liquid at first is at 20° C.
4. (a.) Describe clearly a method of comparing the illuminating power of a lamp with that of
a candle.
(6.)  The index of refraction from air to water is */„ and from air to crown glass is */2.
If the velocity of light in water is 139,500 miles per second, calculate its velocity
in crown glass.
5. (a.) Prove that the focal length of a  convex spherical mirror is one-half its radius of
curvature.
(6.) Discuss the following terms:   (1) Induced magnetism (explain clearly how to test the
polarity of the temporary magnet) ;   (2) the magnetic field of the earth.
6. (a.) Explain the action of a simple electrical condenser.   Make a drawing to illustrate your
answer.
(b.) Plates of copper and platinum are dipped into a solution of copper sulphate and a
current is passed through the cell from the copper to the platinum.    Describe the
effects produced and also what happens when the current is reversed.
7. (a.)  Make a diagram of the essential parts and electrical connections of any instrument
depending on the electro-magnet.   How does it work?
(6.)  A current is flowing through a rigid copper rod.    How would you place a small piece
of iron wire with respect to it so that the iron may be magnetized in the direction
of its length?   Make a diagram, mark the direction of the current through the rod,
and indicate the north pole of the wire.
German Grammar.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Value.
8 1.  Rewrite the following sentence in all persons and genders, making the adjective
agree with the subject, and using all possible forms of the pronoun : ^d)
gebe bir lneiiteu SBietftift.
10 2.  Put into German :—
(1.) He comes into the room.
(2.) He goes up to the table.
(3.) He is sitting on a chair.
(4.) He came during the night.
(5.) He came without his book.
(6.) He plays with his dog.
(7.) He works for his father.
(8.) He stands behind the table.
(9.) He goes out of the house.
(10.) He goes through the park. M 166 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
10 3.  Insert appropriate adjectives or articles and fill in correct endings, then rewrite
both sentences in the plural:—
(1.)—fd)on—feauS mit—gro§—genfter fieljt in—long—©trafje an—onfaer—
gnbe—alt—©tabt.
(2.)—fldn—3Jcdbct)en fpielt mit—fdjroarg—-Ounb unb mit—grau—o^atje miter
—fdjattig—SBaiuit in—grojj—©ctrten.
10 4.  Change the verbs in the following to the imperfect and pluperfect tenses :—
(1.) <§X jteft_ba§ Slid).
(2.) @.r nerlagt bag fftmmer.
(3.) SDu nimmft bie geber.
(4.) %l)x geht Ijinaug.
(5.) @ie beantrootten ben Seljrer.
10        5. (a.)  Change the following infinitives to the correct form of the present tense :—
(1.) <S§ in ad) fen fd)nett.
(2.) (gr. anfoinmen Ijcute.
(3.) ®u fpredjen laut.
(4.) (Sr e|umfetn gruljftucf.
(5.) g't tteten herein.
(6.) Write the future of (1), the future-perfect of (2), and the imperative forms
of (3) and (5).
10 6.  Put into German :—
(1.) My brother is as tall as yours.
(2.) Your exercise is better than mine.
(3.) The best shops are in the largest cities.
(4.) The most careful students write best.
(5.) I like to study, I prefer to play, but I like to read best of all.
6 7.  (oj.) Combine the following sentences by means of a relative pronoun :—
(1.) SDein 93tief roar intereffant. £u ergdljlteft barin oon SDeiner 9r.eife.
(2.) Sie ©tabt Bat einen bebeutenben .SpanbeL $l)x JJafen ift fef;r gro§.
(3.) SDer 9Jcann ift metn greunb.    3d) befudjte tfjn geftern.
(6.) Combine the following sentences by means of the conjunction in brackets : —
(1.) @ie gingen fpajieren. @ie rootlten etroa§ frtfdje Suft atmen. (benn-)
(2.) 9Jcan fommt in einen freuibeu ©tabt an.    9}?an fciEjrt nad) einem
.£>ote(.    (roenn.)
(3.) ©ie Ijaben ntdjt oerfudjt ben S)om ju befdjretbcn-     @§ roar iljnen
nidjt mogltd).    (roetl.)
18 8.  Put into German :--.—
The diligent student gets up in the morning not later than half past seven.
After he has washed and dressed himself, he eats his breakfast quickly,
for he wishes to go to school at a quarter to nine. There he has
classes until noon, when he goes home for lunch. If he has no classes
in the afternoon, he can take a walk or play tennis after he has studied
for a couple of hours. In the evening he must study again until he
gets tired, then he goes to bed and falls asleep at once. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.-—-Appendices. M 167
Value.
18 9.  Put into German :—
(1.) You (sing.) can learn German if you want to.
(2.) That book is not yours, it is mine; please give it to me.
(3.) What one eats on the train often tastes better than what one eats at
home.
(4.) We left for Victoria on Wednesday, the twenty-fourth of May, 1925,
at 10.30 a.m. (numbers in full).
(5.) I know that he knows German and that he knows many Germans.
(6.) He thought that he had brought enough money with him.
Botany.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer five only.    Illustrate your answers by carefully drawn
diagrams.]
1. By  diagrams,  with  brief  descriptions,  show  the  distinctions  between  monocotyledons  and
dicotyledons in seeds, stems, leaves,  and flowers.
2. How do our plants prepare for winter conditions?
3. Arrange ferns, fungi, mosses, algse, and club-mosses in the order of their complexity, and give
reasons for your answer.
4. (a.)  What is meant by transpiration?
(6.)  In what ways is transpiration of importance in the life of a plant?
(c.)  Describe four modifications in plant structure which may influence the rate of transpiration.
5. Give diagrams to illustrate the flower structure of one member of each of the following
families.   Choose specific examples and use either diagrammatic longitudinal sections or
floral diagrams.   Label fully.
(a) Rosacea?; (6) Scrophulariacese; (c) Graminea?; (d) Labiate?.
6. What is the advantage of each of the following: The colours, the odours, the shapes, and the
duration of flowers?
German Translation.    (Time, 2 hours.)
Value.
60 1. Put into English :—
(a.) 9(6er bte j?finigtn roar erne fel)r Huge gran, bie meljr tun tonnte al§ in
einer fiaroffe fasten, ©ie natpn tljre grofje golbene ©d)ere, fdjnitt
em gro^e§ ©tiicf ©etbengeug unb mad)te einen Hetnen SSeutet, ben
fullte fie mit feiuer Suchtnetjengru^e, banb tJm auf ben 9-tMen ber
j^prtnjeffin unb fdjnitt bemn ein Heineg Sod) in ben 93eutel, fo baB bie
®rii|e ben ganjen Sffieg, ben bte SPrinjeffin paffierte, Beftreuen fonnte.
(b.) 35a roar er gang Befdjamt unb ftedte ben JJopf unter ben glftgel; er rouble
felBft nidjt, roa§ er tun follte; er roar fetjr glMlid), aber gar nidjt
ftoljj. (Sr badjte baron, roie man iljn geBiffen unb gefd)lagen Ijatte,
unb Ijorte nun alte fagen, bafj er ber fdjonfte alter fdjonen 33ogeI fei.
35a f)o6 er ben fdjbnen, langen .SpalS unb rief: ,,@o ntel ©li'tcf Babe
id) mir nidjt traumen laffen, al§ id) nod) ba§ B,afjlid)e (Sntletn roar! "
(c.) ^e^t mujjten bie jroei 6d)§lein fiir iB,rer bret arBeiten. SBa§ tljnen aBer,
neBft Stiffen, ©djtagen, Jpungerleiben, ba§ SeBen ooltenbS oerletbete, M 168 Public Schools Report.- 1925
Value.
baS roar ba§ Jpeimroelj uad) bent Braoen ,£>ang. ©ie trauerten unb
rourben nerftodt unb taten afleg nerfeljrt. 35e§6aIB fprad) ber $eter
leife ju feittem SBeiB : ,,35te Odjfen finb mir aud) nerljert." S3alb
rourben bte (Sfjeleute eing, bafi fie bag $aar fi'tr etn ©pottgelb bent
9Jcel$ger nerfauften ; ber fdjtadjtete fie in ber ©tabt.
(d.) 3d) fanb etn Sett ju fitDer Shit)'
3Iuf roetdjen, griinen fatten ;
35er 2Birt, er beetle felbft mid) ju
9Jiit feinem fulilen ©ctjatten.
9cun fragt' id) nad) ber ©d)ulbigfeit,
35a fcBi'tttett' er ben SBipfel.
©efegnet fei er atlejeit
Son ber SBur^el Big jum ©ipfel!
(«•) 35er Sonig ftieren Slicfg ba fag,
9Jtit fd)Iotternben finten unb totenBtag.
35ie Snedjtenfdjar faf-j fait burd)graut,
Unb fajj gar ftiff, gab feinen Saut.
35ie SJcagier tauten, bod) feiner nerftanb
3u beuten bie gtammenfd)rift an ber 3Sanb.
Selfagar roarb aber in feibtger 9cad)t
95on feinen J?ned)ten umgeBrad)t.
(/•) Unb al§ ber friifje 3ftorgen in Often Eaum gegraut,
35a Ijat ein feltneg @d)aufpiel int Sager man gefd)aut;
@§ offnet leife, leife fid) bag bebrctngte £or,
(S§ fdjroanft ein 3ug mm SSeiBern mit fdjroerem ©djritt Ijeruor.
35tef Beugt bte Saft fie nieber, bie auf bem Deaden ruBt,
©ie tragen ifyre ©fj&errn, ba§ ift ifyr ttebfteg @ut.
,,JpaIt an bte argen SBetber!" ruft broljenb mand)er 9Btd)t;
35er Tangier fprtdjt Bebeutfam: ,,35a§ roar ber SJceinung nidjt."
10 2. Translate at sight:—
(Sin 93tend)en tranf au§ etnent 33acl) unb fiet in bag SBaffer. 35a§ fal) eine
£au6e, bie auf einem Sautn fa§. ©djnett brad) fie ein S3tatt non bem
33aum unb roarf eg in ben Sad). 35ag 23iend)en fdjroamm nad) bem
S3iatte unb Ijalf fid) glitcflid) au§ bem SBaffer. 92ad) etniger 3^ii fajj bte
£aube roieber auf bemfelben 23aunt. 35a ram ein 3iager un^ raoflte bte
SauBe fdjieffen. 2113 bag SBtendjen ben ^ciger faf), flog e§ fdjneU herbei,
ftad) ben Sctger in bie $anb, unb—puff! ging ber ©djufj in bie Suft. ©o
oergait bag SSiendjen ber £aube i6)re SSoljltat.
12        3. Put into German :—
Once there was a lazy boy who did not like to go to school. But he had
to go because his father wished it. He could never do his lessons well
in class, for when the others were working, ho would never pay attention. So he often had to stay in after school and study while the
others played.
18 4.  Write in German a description of the city or district in which you live (about
half a page). 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 169
Grade XL, Normal Entrance.
Geogbaphy.    (Time, 2 hours.)
[Answer questions 1, 2, 3, 4, and any two of questions 5, 6, 7.   Illustrate answers,
whenever possible, by sketch-maps or diagrams.]
Value.
10       !•  (»•) The longitude of two locations is each 110° west.    The latitude of one is 30"
north and the other is on the Arctic circle.   How many miles   (approximately) are the locations apart?
(6.)  Explain the following:   isobars, igneous rock, doldrums,
(e.)  When do neap tides occur?
10       2. Describe clearly the production of either rice or raw cotton under the following
headings:
(a.)  Climatic conditions.
(b.)  Method of cultivation,
(c.) Economic value and principal producing countries.
20       3.  (a.)  Write comprehensively on one of the following topics:—
The Fisheries of the Atlantic Coast of Canada.
Canada's Export Trade.
Transportation Facilities of Canada.
(6.)  Name and locate the most productive Canadian mine for each of the following:
gold, nickel, lead-zine, asbestos,
(c.) " Canada is the land of the future."   Why?
20        4.   (a.)  Account for the greatness of Great Britain as an industrial and commercial
nation.
(6.)  Name and locate live of the great industries of England.    Associate at least one
city with each,
(c.) The greatness of London " is due to many causes."   Enumerate these.
20        5- Sketch a map of the Mississippi Itiver System and the Great Lakes.    On this mark
the location of:—
(a.) The corn, rice, and tobacco producing areas.
(&.) The twelve  largest cities.    Select any four of these and account for the
importance of each.
20       6. Describe Brazil or India under the following headings :—
(a.)  Surface and drainage.
(&.)  Climate.
(c.)  Principal products and important cities.
(d.) Trade.
20        7. Answer the following in regard to " Lumbering in British Columbia " :—
(a.) Where are the most valuable forests situated?   Why?
(&.) What are the principal trees cut by the lumbermen?   What qualities make
them marketable?
(c.)  Where are four of the largest sawmills?
(d.) Where do the lumbermen sell their finished product?
(e.)  What was the approximate timber cut for 1924 (in board-feet) ?
(f.)  What was the total estimated damage in 1924 through forest fires? M 170 Public Schools Report. 1925
Grade XII., Senior Matriculation.
Biology.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer five only.   Illustrate your answers
with diagrams.]
1. Write a brief account of the characteristics which are common to both plants and animals.
How would you differentiate between plants and animals?   Illustrate your answer by a
description of a unicellular plant and a unicellular animal.
2. What is meant by the "alternation of generations"?   Describe fully the life-history of a
plant and of an animal to illustrate your answer.
3. Give five examples of cells  (either plant or animal)  which have become specialized for the
performance of particular functions.    By what modifications is each cell dealt with above
specially adapted to the work which it performs?
4. (a.) What is meant by osmosis?
(6.)  Discuss the importance of osmosis in the life-processes of plants and animals.
5. Explain what is meant by the " Law of Recapitulation " and give three examples.
6. Describe either the pectoral girdle and forelimbs or the pelvic girdle and hind limbs of the
frog.
German Grammar and Composition.    (Time, 3 hours.)
Value.
1. Put into German :—
18 (a.) The most interesting thing that the American students did in Germany
was to take a trip up the Rhine. The boat left Cologne at half-
past nine in the morning and did not arrive in Rudesheim until
nine o'clock in the evening, so they spent the whole day on the
beautiful and romantic river. The sides of the mountains were
covered with vineyards and almost every peak was crowned with
an old castle. These splendid buildings, towering up so proudly
from out the green forests, were not only picturesque to look at,
but also called up many old legends and tales.
15 (b.) During their stay in Germany the two Americans learned many new
things about the country and the people, although they found that
in such a short time they could not see all that they would have
liked to see. If they had been able to stay longer, they would
have spent more time in South Germany, for they thought it was
most beautiful. But they also found many interesting things to
see in Berlin and wished that they could stay there for a whole
winter.
16 2. Put into German :—
(1.) Paul's   uncle,  whose   eldest  son  had been  in America,  could speak
English.
(2.) What they liked best in Germany was the arrangement of the trains.
(3.) They finally succeeded in finding their relatives.
(4.) I am sorry, but I don't care for that book at all.
(5.) One likes to do what is pleasant, one ought to do what is right.
(6.) They had to hurry, for their train was to leave in half an hour.
(7.) They had had their luggage sent to the hotel, because they were not
able to carry it.
(8.) We have not been permitted to speak English in our German class. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 171
Value.
9 3. Construct sentences  (third person  singular)  using the following verbs in the
present, perfect, and future tenses : Bereinfommen ; fid) erinnern ; iiberfeljen.
12        4. Put into German :—
(1.)  Karl told him that the castle was at the other end of the town.
(2.) Fritz said that he had never seen such a beautiful park.
(3.) His uncle said that he would go with them to Berlin.
(4.) If it rains to-morrow, I shall not go.
(5.) One could see more, if one could travel more slowly.
(6.) If they had gone to Heidelberg, they would have visited the old castle.
6 5. Rewrite in the passive :—
(!•) ©ein greunb fdjretBt iljm einen langeu Srief.
(2.) Man rotrb imtner bag @oetl)e=,£>aug Befudjen.
(3.) 9Jcan Iwt ben Corner im 15. ^afjrfunbert geBaut.
24 6.  Write in German (about 20 lines) a description of Germany, or the story of the
Mousetower.
English Literature.    (Time, 3 hours.)
14 1. With definite references to incidents in the story, discuss the skill shown in differentiating the characters in " The Sire de Maletroit's Door " or " On Greenhow Hill."
14 2. Within two pages, write a comparison of the two plays, " Electra " and "Julius
Caesar," showing the main differences between the drama of the Greeks and
that of Shakespeare.
10 3. What is meant by Foreshadowing and Dramatic Irony in the Drama? Illustrate your
answer with two examples of each from " The School for Scandal."
14 4. Set forth the principal incidents in " A Doll's House " that show the gradual development of Nora Helmer.
14 5- Within two pages, set forth the chief characteristics of the poetry of Rupert Brooke
or of Thomas Hardy.
12       6. On one of the following themes write an essay setting forth some of the ideas found
in " An Anthology of Modern Verse " :—
(a.) The Poet's Love for the Open Road.
(6.)  The Relationship between Man and his Creator.
10 7. Quote a passage of about fourteen lines and write notes pointing out its particular
virtues or beauties.
12       S. Write concisely on each of the following:—
(a.) The Setting in "Ethan Brand."
(6.)  The Importance of Jupiter in "The Gold-Bug."
(c.) Pathos in " Rab and his Friends." M 172 Public Schools Report. 1925
Physics.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer nine only.]
1. An accelerating force of 10 lb. acts on a mass of 120 lb. for 5 seconds starting from rest.
Find the acceleration, velocity at the end of the 5 seconds, the distance traversed, and
the work done (expressed in two different units).
2. (a.)  How long a plank will be needed to enable us to roll an iron safe weighing 1% tons
into a wagon 3 feet high with a pull of 600 lb. parallel to the incline?   What is the
mechanical advantage?
(&.) A block of stone weighs 1,656 lb.;  its volume is 10 cubic feet.   What is its density and
how much will it weigh when suspended in water?
3. (a.)  Define, briefly, the terms cohesion, viscosity, capillarity, surface tension, and osmosis.
(6.)  How does the molecular theory explain the expansion of a substance when heated and
the cooling effect of the evaporation of a liquid?
4. (a.)  Define the terms relative humidity, critical temperature, mechanical equivalent of heat
and efficiency of a steam-engine.
(&.)  A litre of hydrogen at standard temperature and pressure weighs .0S96 gram.    Find
the weight of a cubic metre of hydrogen at 15° C. and SO cm. pressure.
5. (a.)  Show how the pitch of both open and closed organ-pipes may be determined and why
the quality of the sounds given by them is different.
(&.)  A certain stretched wire has a frequency of 256 vibrations per second.    What would be
its frequency if it were (1) twice as long, (2) stretched with twice the force?
6. (a.) Define focus, index of refraction, bright line spectrum, and magnifying power of a
simple microscope.
(b.) An object is placed 15 cm. in front of a spherical mirror and its image is found to be
40 cm. behind the mirror.    Find, from the mirror formula, the focal length of the
mirror and whether it is concave or convex; then draw a diagram, roughly to scale,
showing why the image is so placed.
7. (a.)  Different wave lengths in ether radiations manifest themselves as entirely different
phenomena.    Name these different phenomena which have been investigated and
give some idea of the wave length in each case.
(b.)  When looking at a building through the ordinary glass of a window, why do straight
lines of the building appear so distorted?   What makes them appear to move as
you move your head slightly?
8. (a.)  Explain the construction and action of an electrical condenser.
(&.)  What is the fundamental difference in the construction of alternating and direct current
dynamos?
9. An electric iron takes 6 amperes at 110 volts.   Find its resistance, the cost of operating it
for one hour at 6 cents per kilowatt-hour, the number of calories of heat it generates
every second, and its power consumption expressed in horse-power.
10.  (a.)  Draw a diagram of an ordinary electromagnet, showing clearly the direction of the
current and the position of the poles.   How could you wind a wire around a piece
of iron in such a way that no magnetic poles would be formed when a current is
passed through the wire?
(6.)  State the laws of electrolysis.
(A maximum of 15 marks will be allowed for a properly certified laboratory note-book.) 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 173
Trigonometry.     (Time, 3 hours.)
Value.
12 I. (a.) Express 51° 17' 45" as a decimal of a right angle to 5 places of decimals.
(6.) Prove 3 tan2 30° +1- cos2 30° = 1 sec2 45° + i sin2 60° + f sin 90°.
(c.) Prove sin4 6 + sin2 6=2-3 cos2 d + cos4 6.
12 2. A man observes a spire in a direction E. 10° N, He walks 500 yards to the S.E.
and observes that the bearing of the spire is N.E. How far is he now from
the spire]    Given tan 55° = 1.4280.
12        3. (a.) Solve 2 sin A tan A+ 1 =tan A+ 2 sin A.
(b.) Prove cos (180° - A) = - cos A.    (Use a diagram.)
b c
16 4.  (a.) In any triangle prove
sin A    sin B    sin C
(b.) In any triangle prove tan = cot ._.
2 a + b 2
(c.) Prove cos (A + B) = cos A cos B - sin A sin B.
-I r-. co   t, sin x + sin 2x + sin 3x    ,       n
12        5. Prove = tan 2x.
cos x + cos 2x + cos 3x
18        6. Given A = 37° 27', B = 72° 11', a = 10, find c.
sin 37° 27'=   .6081 L sin 37° 27'= 9.7840 log 155 = 2.1900.
sin 70° 22'=   .9419 L sin 70° 22' = 9.9740
sin 72° 11'=   .9520 L sin 72° 11' = 9.9787
18        7. Given a = 681, c = 243, B = 50° 42', find the angles A and C.    (Use 4(b).)
log'438 = 2.64147 log cot 25° 21'= 0.32443
log 924 = 2.96567 log tan 45° 0' 57" = 0.00023
Latin Prose Composition, Sight Translation, and Roman History.
(Time, 3 hours.)
A. Latin Prose Composition.
50       Translate into Latin :—
(a.)  We would rather die free than live as slaves.
(b.)  You will scarcely venture to deny that duty was sometimes at variance with
interest.
(c.)  He promised to supply the army with food and clothing.
(d.)  The exiles believed that they had reached the locality from which their forefathers were sprung.
(e.)  He pretended that it was not for the sake of gain but of friendship that he had
given me all the books which his brother had left.
(/.)  All the world believes that the moon moves round the earth.
. (g.) The island'is surrounded by the sea which you call the ocean.
(h.)  You cannot, said he, injure your country without bringing loss and ruin to
yourself and your own affairs.
(i.)  So far am I from having said everything, that I could take up the whole of the
day in speaking; but I do not wish to be tedious.
(j.) And therefore, my country-men, do not believe that I, who have so often led
you to the field of battle, am afraid to-day of fortune leaving me. M 174 Public Schools Report. 1925
B. Sight Translation.
Value.
35 Appio Claudio consule coeptum est primum adversus Poenos bellum. Cum Messanam,
Slciliae urbem, Carthaginienses et Hiero, rex Syracusanus, obsiderent, Appius
Claudius ad Messanam liberandam missus est. Consul primo ad explorandos hostes
nave piscatoria traiecit freturn inter Italiam et Siciliam interiectum. Ad quern
venerunt nuntii ab Hannone, Poenorum duce, hortantes ad pacem conservandam.
Cum vero consul nullas coudiciones admitteret, nisi Poeni ab oppugnatione desis-
terent, iratus Hanno exclamavit, se non esse passurum Romanos vel manus in mari
Siculo abluere. Non tamen potuit prohibere, quin Claudius in Siciliam legionem
traduceret, et Poenos Messana expelleret. Deinde Hiero apud Syracusas victus est.
Qui eo periculo territus Romanorum amicitiam petiit, et in eorum societate postea
constanter permansit.
C. Roman History.
15 1. What were the causes of the Plebeian struggle for political equality? Write notes ou
the Tribunes of the People, and on the Assembly of the Tribes, showing the effects
of these institutions on popular liberty.
2. Write a short story of Hannibal's march into, and campaign in, Italy.
3. Give a short account of the trial of Gaius Verres.
Algebra.    (Time, 3 hours.)
12        1. Solve: a;3 + 2/3 = 351
x2 - xy + y2=  39.
14 2.  The distances which a man travels in successive days are in A. P.     At the end  of
the 5th day he has gone 100 miles and at the end of the 7th day  150 miles.
How long will he take to complete 300 miles in all ?
12        3. In a G.P. the first term is 7, the last is 448, and the sum is 889.    Find the series.
12 4.  (a.) If 15*2+ Ixy- 8y2 = 0, find x:y.
(b.) Solve: (^±3)3 + (,-l)a^65-
v   ' (2x + 3)s - (x - If    63
12 5. The weight of a sphere varies as its density and the cube of its radius. The
densities of two spheres are as 2:3 and their radii as 15:7. If the weight of
the first is 50 lb., find the weight of the second.
14 6.  (a.) Find the equation whose roots are m and n when ?n + n = 10 and ran — 16.
(b.) If (m - l)ic2 - (4m + 4)ic + 7m + 1 = 0 has equal roots, find m.
12        7. («.) In how many ways can 7 quarters and 5 ten-cent pieces be given to 12 boys,
one coin to each 1
(6.) In a town there are three different letter-boxes.    In how many ways can 5
letters be posted 1
12        8. (a.) Find the coefficient of x~15 in (x + ~
\     x
(b.) Expand (1 -\-2x)~'* to four terms. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 175
Latin Authors.    (Time, 3 hours.)
Value.
16        1- Translate:—
Difficile est dictu, Quirites, quanto in odio simus apud exteras nationes propter
eorum, quos "ad eas per hos annos cum imperio misimus, libidines et iniurias.
Quod enim fanum putatis in illis terris nostris magistratibus religiosum, quam
domum satis clausam ao munitam fuisse? FJrbes iam locupletes et copiosae
requiruntur, quibus causa belli propter diripiendi cupiditatem inferalur.
Libenter haec coram cum Q. Catulo et Q. Hortensio, summis et clarissimis
viris, disputarem. Noverunt enim sociorum volnera, vident eorum calami-
tates, querimonias audiunt. Pro sociis vos contra hostis exercitum mittere
putatis, an nostrum simulatione contra socios atque amicos? Quae civitas
est in Asia quae non modo imperatoris aut legati, sed unius tribuni militum
animos ac spiritus capere possitf
(1.)  Account for mood of simus, infcratur, disputarem, possit.
(2.)  What was, generally, the nature of Roman administration of conquered provinces
in Cicero's time?
20       2. Translate:—
Verum ubi ductores acie revocavcris ambo,
Deterior qui visus, eum, ne prodigus obsit,
Dede neci;  melior vacua sine regnet in aula.
Alter erit maculis auro squalentibus aniens;
Nam duo sunt genera :   hie melior, insignis et ore
Et rutilis clarus squamis;   Hie horridus alter
Desidia, latamque trahens inglorius alvom.
Ut binae regum facies, ita corpora plebis.
Namque aliae turpes horrent, ceu pulvere ab alto
Cum venit et sicco terrain spuit ore viator
Aridus ;  elucent aliae et fulgore coruscant,
Ardentes auro et paribus lita corpora guttis.
Haec potior suboles, bine caeli tempore certo
Dulcia mella premes, nee tantum dulcia, quantum
Et liquida et durum Bacchi domitura saporem.
(1.)  Parse and give principal parts of revocavcris, ardens, lita, domitura.
(2.)  Parse sine.    Account for mood of regnet.
12       3. Translate:—
His quidam signis atque haec exempla secuti
Esse apibus partem divinae mentis et haustus
Aetherios dixere;  deum namque ire per omnes
Terrasque tractusque maris caelumque profundum;
Hinc pecudes, armenta, viros, genus omne ferarum,
Quemque sibi tenues nascentem arcessere vitas;
Scilicet hue reddi deinde ac resoluta referri
Omnia, nee morti esse locum, sed viva volare
Sideris in numerum atque alto succedere caelo.
Scan:   Terrasque tractusque maris caelumque profundum..
Indicate the caesura by a double vertical line.
18        4. Translate:—
' Dis equidem auspicibus reor et Iunone secunda
' Hunc cursum Iliacas vento tenuisse carinas.
' Quam tu urbem, soror, hanc cernes, quae surgere regna
' Coniugio tali! Teucrum comitantibus armis,
' Punica se quantis attollet gloria rebus!
' Tu modo posce deos veniam, sacrisque litatis M 176 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
' Indulge hospitio, causasque innecte morandi,
' Dum pelago desaevit hiemps et aquosus Orion,
' Quassataeque rates, dum non tractabile caelum.'
His dictis incensum animum inflammavit amore,
Spemque dedit dubiae menti, solvitque pudorem.
(1.)  Coniugio tali—account for case.
(2.)  What is the usual meaning of litaref
14       5. Translate:—
Reginam thalamo cuuctantem ad limina primi
Poenorum exspectant, ostroque insignis et auro
Stat sonipes, ac frena ferox spumantia mandit.
Tandem progreditur magna stipante caterva
Sidoniam picto chlamydem circumdata limbo:
Qui pharetra ex auro, crines nodantur in aurum,
Aurea purpuream subnectit fibula vestem.
(1.)  Derivation of sonipes?
(2.)  Account for case of chlamydem.
20        6. Translate:—
' Quae quibus anteferam?    lam iam nee maxima Iuno,
' Nee Saturnius haec oculis pater aspicit aequis.
' Nusquam tuta fides.   Eiectum litore, egentem
' Excepi, et regni demens in parte loeavi ;
' Amissam classem, socios a morte reduxi.
' Heu furiis incensa feror!    Nunc augur Apollo,
' Nunc Lyciae sortes, nunc et love missus ab ipso
' Interpres divom fert horrida iussa per auras.
' Scilicet is snperis labor est, ea cura quietos
' Sollicitat.    Neque te teneo, neque dicta refello.
' I, sequere Italians ventis;  pete regna per undas. -
' Spero equidem mediis, si quid pia numina possunt,
' Supplicia hausurum scopulis, et nomine Dido
' Saepe vocaturum.    Sequar atris ignibus absens;
' Et cum frigida mors anima seduxerit artus
' Omnibus umbra locis adero.    Dabis, improbe, poenas;
' Audiam, et haec manes veniet mihi fama sub imos.'
(1.)  Scilicet—derivation?
(2.)  Case of Dido?
(3.)  Atris ignibus.    Explain.
(4.)  Write note on manes.
Geometry.    (Time, 3 hours.)
11       1. To describe an isosceles triangle having each of the angles at the base double the
third angle.
11       2. The rectangle contained by the diagonals of a quadrilateral inscribed in a circle is
equal to the sum of the rectangles contained by its opposite sides.
11        3. If any point is taken on the circumference of the circumscribed circle of a triangle,
the projections of this point on the three sides of the triangle are collinear. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 177
Value.
7       4. (a.) The points where the bisectors of the exterior angles at A, B, C of the triangle
ABC meet BC, CA, and AB, respectively, are collinear.
7 (b.)  In a semicircle of diameter 2 inches inscribe a square having two of its vertices
on the arc and the other two on the diameter.    (Give construction only.)
[N.B.—Graph paper is supplied.   An accurate diagram must be drawn for each of the
following questions.]
12        5-   (a.)  Find the length of the line joining (—3,-7) and (2,5).
(6.) A is the point (—4, 3), B the point (1, 4), and C| lies on AB produced.   Given
AC : CB=3: 2, find the co-ordinates of C.
(c.)  Find the area of the triangle (3, 0), (5, 4), (3, —2).
10 6.  (a.)  Find the equation of the line joining (—3, 7) and (2, —5).
(&.)  Find the equation of the line through  (—1, —4) having slope —•%.
12       7. (a.) Derive the condition that one line shall be perpendicular to another.
(&.) Find the equation of the line through the intersection of Sx+4y+12=0 and
2x—3y=Q, and perpendicular to the latter line.
8 8. Find the radius and the co-ordinates of the centre of the circle x2-\-y2—4x+6y—12=0.
Draw the circle.
11 9. Derive the equation for the tangent to a circle x2-\-y'233=r2 in the form x x^y y13=.f.
Draw the tangent when »i=5 and (xlt y1)=(—3, 4).
French Language.    (Time, 3 hours.)
30       I- Traduction:—
" Moliere belongs to no nation," said a great English actor (Kemble) ; " one day
the god of comedy, wishing to write, became a mail, and happened to fall in
France." I accept this; but in becoming man he found himself, at the same
time, a man of the seventeenth century and a Frenchman. Only the French
art of the seventeenth century could succeed in amusing honest folk, for it
consists in leading by an agreeable path to general notions.
10       2. (a.) Frangaisde:—
The man of whom I speak:
The table of which I think.
The boys whom I see.
Whom do you call?
I give you all I have.
(?).) Corrigez s'il est necessaire:—
On a joue du violin et on a dance au marriage du soldat.   Apres dinner,
plusiers persons ont visits l'apartment et la gallerie de tableaux oft il y a
beaucoup des vieiles peintures.
20       3- Frangais de:—
(a.) Before he has time to come back, will you speak to me about it?
(&.) She has just shut the window and is working near the fire,
(c.) You ought to go and see the wood in autumn.
(d.) The Italian captain was seen advancing towards the French lieutenant.
(e.) He has been speaking in prose for forty years without knowing it.
12 M 178 Public Schools Report. 1925
Value.
10       4. (a.) Placez les adverbes correctement:—
Je le vois (souvent).
Je l'ai vu (rarement).
II est parti (hier).
Dites lui de parler (ne pas).
II faut travailler (bien).
(6.) Traduisez pour la comparaison:—
His orchard is the best cultivated in the village and has the best fruit.
There are more than two feet of snow on the mountain.
That hoy is not so tall as the others but he is the worst of all.
15       5-  (a.) Traduisez avec le verbe faire:—
It is warm.   I shall give you pleasure.   He had the pupil sing.   While you
show the farm to the visitor, I shall have cakes made for tea.
(&.) Frangaisde:—
In springtime—in time—in Paris—in Canada—in France—in the country.
I have my hat in my hand—the nest is in the letter-box. Return within
twenty-four hours.   They are in the church.
15       6.  (a.) Mettez le verbe au temps convenable:—
—D6s que je revenir on joua bien.
—Approchez afin que je vous faire la legon.
—Si je alter a la foret, m'accompagnerez-vous?
—Ce jeune homme sortir chaque soir depuis quelques semaines.
—Je lui parlerais demain, s'il venir.
—Voulez-vous qu'il s'en alter.
—Cette jument s'est-elle blesser?
—Les cadeaux qu'il a offrir sont superbes.
—II regardait jouer les autres tout en manger.
—Nous repondrons quand il nous appelcr.
(b.) Donnez les cinq temps primitifs (principal parts) de:—
mourait, ecrirai, prendrions, sache, vaiflt.
French Literature.    (Time, 3 hours.)
20       i- Traduisez le passage suivant;  dites qui parle et a quel propos :—
Monsieur, la plupart des gens, sur cette question n'hesitent pas beaucoup. On
tranche le mot aisement. Ce nom ne fait aucun scrupule a prendre, et l'usage
aujourd'hui semble en autoriser le vol. Pour moi, je vous l'avoue, j'ai les
sentiments sur cette matiere un peu delicats. Je trouve que toute imposture
est indigne d'un honnete homme, et qu'il y a de la lftchete a deguiser ce que
le ciel nous a fait naitre, a se parer aux yeux du monde d'un titre derobe,
a se vouloir donner pour ce qu'on n'est pas. Je suis n& de parents, sans
doute, qui ont tenu des charges honorables. Je me suis acquis dans les annes
l'honneur de six ans de services, et je me trouve assez de bien pour tenir
dans le monde un rang assez passable; mais, avec tout cela, je ne veux
point me donner un nom oft d'autres, en ma place, croiraient pouvoir
pretendre.
25       2. Donnez les principaux traits de caractere de troia des personnages importants de la
comedie. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 179
Value.
20       3. (a.) Mettez en frangais moderne (surtout les phrases en italique) :—
(1.) L'affaire est dans le sac, done, nous n'avons que faire du truchement.
(2.) J'en demeure d'accord avec vous, ce coquin de valet donne furieusement
dans les vices du temps.
(3.) Par ma foi, e'est un grand dadais, et j'espSre qu'il ne s'avisera pas
de venir ceans.
(4.) Je ne saurais me tenir de rire de le voir fagote' de la sorte.
(5.) Comme je  le  fus  voir,  et  que j'entends  parfaitement la  langue,  il
s'entretint avec moi.
(6.) Formez cinq phrases avec les expressions suivantes: de gra.ee!—prefer l'oreille—
au premier jour—force gens—comme il faut—-(donnez l'anglais).
10       4. Traduisez:—
II ne put en dire plus long, il pleurait. L'empereur, a la lueur des feux allumes
de toutes parts, vit que la jument etait atteinte d'un eclat d'obus &. la cuisse
gauche. II croisa les mains derriere son dos, sous les basques de sa redingote,
et dit: " GuSrissez-vous tous deux, je le veux! Quand vous serez gueris,
allez-vous en au pays des Cotes, vous m'avez bien servi. Seulement je
retiens son premier poulain pour ma garde, et, dans vingt ans d'ici, tu
m'enverras ton ills k toi: j'en ferai un officier."
" Oui, mon empereur."
Cette journee rendit fier Jean-Marie pour toute sa vie, qui fut longue.
25       5. Description d'un pare que vous avez visitfi, ou d'un beau jardin (celui du cure de
St. Philemon par exemple).
History.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[Answer any five questions.]
12+8    1- Describe the work of Calvin in Geneva.   Estimate his influence upon religion and
politics.
15 + 5     2- What were the main issues involved in the struggle between Charles I. and Parliament?   What was the final outcome?
5X4    3. Write notes on:  (a) Rousseau;  (b) Turgot;  (c) Mirabeau;  (d)  The Declaration
of the Rights of Man.
20      4. Discuss the causes of Napoleon's downfall.
10+10 5. What were the early effects of the Industrial Revolution upon the working classes
in England?   Mention the remedies that have been attempted.
20      6. " The Paris Revolution of 1848 proclaimed, not the ' Rights of Man,' but the rights
of the working-man."   Explain and discuss.
20      7- Recount the chief steps by which German unification was achieved under the direction of Bismarck.
20      8. Compare briefly the home and foreign policies of Gladstone with those of Disraeli.
20      9- Sketch the maritime and naval background of the World War.
20    10. Give a succinct account of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and summarize its results.
20    11- What appear to you to be the most important results (political, social, economic,
etc.) of the World War? M 180 Public Schools Report. 1925
English Composition.    (Time, 3 hours.)
Value.
10       1. Point out definitely the particular principles violated in the following sentences, and
recast in more satisfactory form:—
(a.) I live two miles from college, which makes the trip to and from a short and
untedious one.
(«.) Miss Edwards lectured with stereopticon views, at Chickering Hall, with a
musical voice, her broken left arm in a sling, on Egypt, five or six
thousand miles away,
(o.) The ship then struck a rock, she began to slowly and steadily sink, and the
waves finally enveloped her.
(a\)  I doubt very much if anyone has a harder day than this one, especially as
it comes on Monday, and Sunday is not a good day for studying, even
if you have no religious scruples concerning it.
(e.) We went home, after all our misfortunes, glad to get one night's sleep,
anyhow.
20       2. Discuss the principles of good paragraph structure as exemplified in the following,
and indicate clearly the means of explicit reference:—
"Every educated person has at least two ways of speaking his mother tongue.
The first is that which he employs in his family, among his familiar friends,
and on ordinary occasions. The second is that which he uses in discoursing
on more complicated subjects, and in addressing persons with whom he is less
intimately acquainted. It is, in short, the language he employs when he is
' on his dignity' as he puts on evening dress when he is going to dine. The
difference between these two forms of language consists, in a great measure,
in a difference in vocabulary. The basis of familiar words must be the sain3
in both, but the vocabulary appropriate to the more formal occasion will
include many terms which would be stilted or affected in ordinary talk.
There is also considerable difference between familiar and dignified language
in the matter of utterance. Contrast the rapid utterance of our every-day
dialect, full of contractions and clipped forms, with the more distinct enunciation of the pulpit or the platform. Thus in conversation we habitually
employ such contractions as I'll, don't, he'd, and the like, which we should
never use in public speaking unless of set purpose, to give a markedly
colloquial tinge to what we have to say."
10 3. Discuss the chief points to be considered in the planning and construction of an
expository theme. Illustrate your answer by making an outline for your answer
to question 4.
60       4- Write an expository essay of at least two pages on one of the following:—
(a.) One Characteristic of Contemporary Poetry.
(6.) Presence of Mind,
(c.)  Cross-word Puzzles. 16 Geo. 5 Part III.—Appendices. M 181
Chemistry.    (Time, 3 hours.)
[Questions are of equal value.   Answer ten only.]
[Atomic weights and other data are given at end of paper.]
1. What do you understand by the following terms:    (a)   equivalent weight;   (b)   chemical
equilibrium;   (c) dissociation;   (d) valence;   (e) normal solution?
2. (a.)  Mention three different phenomena which indicate dissociation or ionization in solution.
(6.)' Compare the kinds of ions present when an acid, an alkali, and a salt respectively are
dissolved in water, and show by means of equations what happens to the ions when
an acid is neutralized by an alkali.
3. (a.)  Compare the action of hot concentrated sulphuric acid on a chloride, on a bromide,
and on an iodide.
(6.) Write equations for the action of chlorine on (i) water,  (ii) an aqueous solution of
potassium iodide, and (iii) methane.
4. (a.) Describe the theory and practice of the Haber process for the manufacture of ammonia
from nitrogen and hydrogen.
(6.) Write by means of partial equations the complete equations for the action of (i) concentrated nitric acid and (ii) dilute nitric acid, on metallic copper.
5. (a.)  If diamonds are a form of carbon, why are they not manufactured synthetically from
carbon on a commercial scale?
(6.) Write the equation illustrating the solution of limestone in water charged with carbon
dioxide.   What variety of hardness would this produce in water?   Describe with
equations two methods by which this hardness could be removed.
6. Describe briefly,  with equations,  the theory and practice  of  the manufacture of sodium
carbonate or bicarbonate by either the Solvay  (ammonia-soda)  process or the Leblanc
(salt-cake) process.   What is baking-powder and how does it act?
7. Write equations for reactions occurring when aluminium hydroxide is dissolved in sodium
hydroxide and hydrochloric acid respectively.   Would you consider aluminium to be a
metallic or non-metallic element?    Explain.
8. Indicate roughly the variation of the valence of elements, with respect to both hydrogen and
oxygen, as a function of their position in the periodic table.   Do the same for basic
and acidic properties.
9. (a.)  Write the formula for bleaehing-powder.    What acid radicals does it contain?    How is
it made?   What is the mechanism of its bleaching action?
(&.)  What is "superphosphate"?   Write its formula.    How is it made and what is it used
for?
10. 3 grams of metallic zinc are dropped into 100 c.c. of 1.85 normal hydrochloric acid.    What
would be the normality of the acid after the zinc had dissolved?
11. What  is  the  formula  of  a  compound  having  the  following  composition:    Fe.—=36.761%;
S—21.106%;  0=42.132%?
12. What volume would be occupied by the hydrogen obtained when 1 gram of metallic sodium
is dropped into an excess of water, if measured over water at 21° C. and at 740 mm.
pressure?
Atomic weights: H=l, 0=16, S=32, Zn=65.37, Fe=55.9; Na=23.
Vapour pressure of water at 21° C.=18.5 mm.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed  by  Charles  F.   Banfield,   Printer  to   the King's   Most  Excellent   Majesty.
1925.

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