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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA TWENTY-NINTH REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING FOURTEENTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1925]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-NINTH REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
FOURTEENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED
JUNE 30TH, 1925, AND THE FIFTY-THIRD REPORT OF VITAL
STATISTICS DEPARTMENT, BEING A SUMMARY
REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1924
PRINTED   BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSE.MBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles  F.   Banfield,  Printer  to  ths King's  Most Excellent  Majesty.
1925.
  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1925.
To His Honour Walter Cameron j^iciiol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ended June 30th, 1925.
WILLIAM SLOAN,
Provincial Secretary.
  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July Slst, 1925.
The Honourable William, Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Twenty-uinth Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health.
The progress that is being made in the work of the Provincial Board of Health permits me
to say that satisfactory advance in the different departments is very noticeable, and our principal
desire is to so direct the work of the Department that the educational side is emphasized, and,
together with this, preventive medicine is given a prominent place.
We must acknowledge there is much to be attained and there still remains, as we all realize,
a tremendous task to be performed. The progress that is marked from year to year is not
spectacular. We appreciate the fact that progress in getting across to the people a knowledge of
the fundamental principles of hygiene is slow, yet by comparison with previous stages we are able
to demonstrate that progress is being made. And while it is difficult to describe this progress in
a material way by fixing a financial value, which is the usual way of marking progress in human
events, yet we know from continued contact with different organizations, with representatives
of the profession, and with results obtained through Government agencies that the public mind
is being slowly and surely influenced to the value of the work of the Provincial and Municipal
Boards of Health.
There is an awakening of a very satisfactory proportion of the people to the importance of
health-work and to its possibilities. Not in a theoretical direction, but as demonstrated by actual
accomplishment.
Formerly it was the highest ambition of public-health workers to show each year a diminished
morbidity and mortality rate from certain named diseases. If the Public Health Officer could
show that in a brief period of his incumbency he had cut the typhoid death-rate down to one-fifth
of its former proportions and had a steadily diminishing rate for scarlet fever or diphtheria,
he felt that he had done a great deal. But within the past few years we have had a higher
ambition. We have felt that we must deal with more than the negative side of health, and that
it was most distinctly within the province of a Health Officer to put forth every effort to raise
the vitality of every human unit in his community to the highest point of efficiency. He must
no longer be satisfied with the knowledge that from the result of his efforts a number of individuals have survived who might have died from some preventable disease, but he must also feel
that he must lay a foundation for the robust citizens of to-morrow, and so our ideals have
advanced, taking in not only the previous field of sanitation, but also that of personal hygiene.
How to reach the individual, however, has been the problem. Health Officers could not personally supervise the daily life of each individual in the community, and he recognizes, therefore,
the necessity for educational measures, directed both to the end of securing better understanding,
and hence better support to the Health Department, and also to so educate the individual as to
furnish him with the knowledge of how to promote his individual health and with the incentive
to put that knowledge into effect. To accomplish this we must secure co-operation as between
the Boards of Health, the medical profession, and the public.
As regards the medical profession, we hope that we will in time be able to say for the profession in British Columbia what was said in regard to the profession in Denmark, in a report made
to the Rockefeller Foundation, that " In Denmark every doctor is a public health officer, and every
public health officer is a doctor."
And we find further in this report the following: " In Denmark most of what we are continually insisting on for the protection of the public health is a part of the accepted tradition
and routine of daily life. Thus, all engineering that involves public water-supplies is, as a matter
of course, sanitary engineering.    Cleanliness is a national habit.    The reporting of communicable
 N 6 British Columbia. 1925
disease is a matter of course. The appropriate measures of control are applied by recognized
authority, to which an intelligent population readily submits."
This is a remarkable showing, especially when we consider that Denmark is one of the
smallest countries of the world and shows what intelligence, co-operation, and sound social organization can accomplish. They accept the basic principles of public health without comment and
it is not necessary to carry on an extensive educational campaign. There is only one full-time
public health officer in the country of Denmark, but every doctor considers himself a public health
officer.
It may be some time before we are able to write of British Columbia as I have written above
in regard to Denmark, but I feel very much encouraged with the progress that we are making
with the public. It is to be hoped that we will be able to say that " our methods of control are
applied by recognized authorities, to which an intelligent population readily submits."
The different branches of our work have been carried out with careful attention to the
enforcement of existing laws and regulations, and still further with au effort to secure co-operation, and we are pleased to be able to record that the efforts of the Provincial Board of Health
are recognized as being inspired by motives, the realization of which will produce accomplishment
by an enforcement of the law in a manner which receives the cordial co-operation of the public.
I will refer briefly to the different branches of the Department.
Sanitation.
The calls upon the Sanitary Department are a gauge of the economic conditions of the
Province. In times of depression, when industries are working half-time or are closed down, the
basic industries, such as mining and logging, are affected and there are fewer points which need
to receive our attention. During this year, however, I am pleased to note that we have been very
busy in our inspectorial work, indicating renewed activity in all branches; added to this economic
activity is the great expansion in the summer lives of our people.
The motor traffic as reported on is three times the volume of last year. The peak of the
season is over and I am pleased to say that no serious complaint in regard to any communicable
disease in connection with this traffic has been reported. We look for continued increase, and
when the road along the Fraser River is opened, admitting of easy access to the Interior of the
Province, we will be face to face with a problem that will require very serious attention, although
I must say the basic regulations we have laid down for the management of cur motor traffic are
such that an extension of our work is all that will be required.
The problem of handling the motor traffic is one which is engagiug the attention of the
authorities in the States to the south of us and in Canadian Provinces to the east. The matter
has been taken up by the Federal Council of Health at Ottawa and as a result regulations will
be drawn up that will be applicable to the whole of the Dominion, allowing for such amendments
and changes as may be necessary to meet any peculiar condition in any particular Province. This
will be a great boon to the travelling public and give measures of control which will enable us to
handle this traffic without any danger to the public.
During our holiday season our people are going farther afield and are utilizing the sea-shore
for camping-sites and are adopting plans which contain a potential danger unless properly regulated. I refer to the building of small huts or shacks on the foreshores in the many bays and
indentations of the Coast, particularly close to our cities.
This foreshore is " no man's land," although the title is in the Government. There has been
difficulty heretofore from the fact that the Federal Government had title to the shore between
high- and low-water mark, and we are now informed that this strip now comes under the jurisdiction of the Provincial Government.
Such being the case, I would certainly recommend to the Honourable the Provincial Secretary that the matter be immediately dealt with by the Government and a definite policy laid down
which will enable us to control the situation. Many of the beaches in the vicinity of our larger
cities are utilized by the citizens for bathing and are also used by squatters, with the result that
continued complaints are being made of the restrictions to bathing facilities, in addition to which
there is a serious sanitary menace even in their existence; and I would recommend that notice be
served on these people that they are there without any title or right, and would further recommend that in the immediate vicinity of the cities our beaches should be entirely cleared of
squatters.
 16 Geo. 5 Board of Health. N 7
Venere-..l Clinics.
I have to report that the work in the clinics is progressing in a very satisfactory manner.
We are at present engaged in enlarging our Vancouver Clinic to three times the present size in
order to keep pace with the increasing work. The question of the treatment of V.D. cases shows
that since the war there has been a great diminution in the number of cases. I find, in interviewing the drug trade, that they almost unanimously say that the sale of patent remedies for
these cases is practically nil, and also point out that there is a great increase in the purchase of
remedies as may be used for prophylaxis. They attribute this to what the men learned during
the war and to the fact that these men have been acting as educators of others.
We provide in the clinics for the treatment of cases free, including medicines, and we also
furnish laboratory service. In addition to this, we furnish all physicians who report a case,
whether the patient is indigent or not, with free medicine and laboratory service.
I feel that since beginning the treatment of these cases through the clinics we have made
very substantial progress in this work and the results are most encouraging.
Laboratories.
We have been continuing our work in the laboratories and since my last report have established a laboratory at Kamloops, in the middle interior of the Province, and another one has
been established at Kelowna, in the southern part of the Province. We find that the co-operation
of the municipalities is being secured and they are realizing the fact that the work is being
carried out in a more systematic and thorough manner than previously, with lower cost to
themselves.
In connection with laboratory-work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out on request. There
were sent out 54,215 points smallpox vaccine, 5,264,000 units diphtheria antitoxin, 100 doses diphtheria toxin antitoxin, 496 doses typhoid vaccine, 29,000 units tetanus antitoxin, 3 packages rabies
serum, and 2 cc. Koch tuberculin, all distributed free.
Tuberculosis.
During the past year we have extended our tuberculosis campaign and as a result we are able
to report a continued improvement in the mortality list.
The Sanitoriurn at Tranquille has been taken over entirely by the Government and an
endeavour made to limit as far as possible the patients entering to those iu which there is some
hope of at least an arrest of the disease. Provision is made for the care of tuberculosis patients
in local hospitals, which are obliged to provide 10 per cent, of their bed accommodation for such
cases. Our Public Health Nurses are trained in tuberculosis-work and are especially instructed
to report all suspected cases.
An appointment was made of a Travelling Diagnostician in Tuberculosis, who co-operates
with the members of the medical profession and addresses public bodies in all parts of the Province, and also co-operates with the nurses and receives information from them in reference to
suspected cases which they have found.
In connection with the Inspector, arrangements were made for X-ray service and a portable
machine under the charge of a technician from the Sanatorium was used. The results from this
have been very satisfactory. The Department has been commended both by the medical profession and by the public for the steps that have been taken, and we are publishing in this report a
report from Dr. Lamb, our Inspector, which deals more especially with his work.
Infectious Diseases.
I regret to have to report an unsatisfactory condition of affairs during this year, more
especially as regards smallpox. The tabulated report of infectious diseases during the year ending June 30th, 1925, shows an increase over last year, especially as regards whooping-cough,
scarlet fever, chicken-pox, and smallpox. In scarlet fever 1,500 of the 2,000-odd cases reported
occurred in Vancouver and suburbs. We trust that within the next year, and certainly within
two years, the application of the prophylactic treatment for scarlet fever will make a very substantial reduction in these cases. It is difficult to understand the endemic nature of the attacks
of scarlet fever, but we are carrying out treatment under the direction of the Connaught Laboratories of Toronto and we feel confident that we will be able to master this situation.
 rtN 8 British Columbia. 1925
In regard to whooping-cough, 55 per cent, of the cases reported occurred in Vancouver and
vicinity. This is to be expected, as 70 per cent, of our Provincial population are within the
immediate vicinity of Vancouver.
In regard to smallpox, we received a very severe criticism in the form of a ban being placed
upon the City of Vancouver and suburbs by the United States Government.
The authorities in Vancouver had been warned and rewarned si.x months previously that this
would occur unless some preventive measures were taken and support given to the City Health
Officer. The City Council and Board of Trade were interviewed on different occasions, and it
was pointed out clearly that monthly reports of cases were forwarded to the League of Nations
at Geneva and from there broadcasted around the world, and if there was no diminution in the
number of cases a ban was only to be expected. All these representations did not have any
effect and in March we received notice of the ban being placed. Even then the public, as represented by different organizations and the press, did not seem to realize the seriousness of the
United States action, and every effort was made to try and hide the fact that we had a very
large number of cases of smallpox in Vancouver and vicinity. We received absolutely no help
from the press. Regulations were adopted and published which allowed us to enforce vaccination to the extent permitted by our Provincial " Health -let" in the schools. The transportation
companies, representing the shipping interests and large railways, did endeavour to assist us,
as a continuance of the ban would have meant entire disruption of the summer traffic.
We have in our midst a number of people who are very strongly opposed to vaccination and
the campaign of vilification which was carried on by these people was such that it had to be
borne, as replies could not be made to them owing to the attitude of the public press. The ban
was continued for some three weeks, and in spite of our difficulties we did succeed in having a
large number of the population vaccinated and when the cases began to subside the ban was
raised.
There was sufficient interference with the traffic to convince the business interests of the
Province that a repetition of the ban during the summer season would cost hundreds of thousands
of dollars, and I feel that should there be another outbreak of smallpox we will receive more
cordial support.
I am publishing in this report a picture of a smallpox ease of a severe type, and I trust that
those who will have an opportunity of reading this report will understand the real concern of
the Provincial Board of Health, that such a type of the disease would not become rampant.
A table of infectious diseases reported during the year is incorporated in this report, and in
addition epidemics were reported as follows:—
Chicken-pox.—Burnaby, Creston, Hazelton and District, Invermere District, Kamloops, Mission and District, Point Grey, Prince George, Queen Charlotte City, Quesnel, Salmon Arm
District, South Vancouver, Vancouver, and Victoria.
Diphtheria.—Mission District and Vancouver.
Influenza.—.\shcroft, Corbin, Creston, Hazelton and District, Kimberley, Smithers and District, and Vernon.
Measles.—Port Coquitlam and Salmon Arm District.
Scarlet Fever.—Point Grey, South Vancouver, and Vancouver.
Smallpox.—Burnaby, South Vancouver, and Vancouver.
Whooping-cough.—Kamloops, Williams Lake and District.
Public Health Nursing.
It is a pleasure to be able to record from year to year satisfactory progress in this department. Last year we published a report of the work as carried out in our central Health Centre
at Saanich, and this year we are publishing an account of the work carried out by the Cowichan
Health Centre at Duncan, .Vancouver Island. The Saanich and Duncan Health Centres are used
as part of the Public Health Nursing University Course, and students are given an intensive
course at these points to demonstrate the health-work as carried on outside of the cities in
British Columbia.
" Cowichan Health Centre.
" When the history of the first quarter of the twentieth century comes to be written one of
the outstanding features noted will be the awaking of the public conscience regarding the value
to humanity and the state of the good health of the individual.
 16 Geo. 5 Board of Health. N 9
" The Great War opened the eyes of the world to the fact that a vast number of people were
suffering from defects that could have been remedied in childhood. The welfare of the mother
and child acquired a new significance, and not since the great artists of the fourteenth and
fifteenth centuries filled the galleries of Europe with pictures and sculpture of the ' Young Child
and His Mother' has so much that is beautiful in art, science, and literature centred around
motherhood and childhood.
" Cowichan District covers a large area of some 600 square miles, with the City of Duncan
as centre and a sparsely populated unorganized district. If it is true that the progress of a
country is marked by the status of its women, it is interesting to note that the movement to obtain
a nurse began almost simultaneously in the city and in the country, and in each case it was
the Women's Institute that took the lead. In September, 1919, the Cowichan Women's Institute,
working in conjunction with the Duncan Consolidated School Board, appointed a nurse whose
duties included school inspection and general nursing. In October the Cobble Hill Women's
Institute and the Shawnigan Lake Women's Institute appointed a nurse on probation with similar
duties. In both cases the result was satisfactory, but the continuance cf the service depended
on money being forthcoming and it was decided to form an organization that would command the
financial support of the whole district. The peace-time programme of the Red Cross to improve
health, prevent disease, and to mitigate suffering pointed the way to better things, and the North
Cowichan and Cowichan branches worked loyally together to form what is known now as the
Cowichan Health Centre. In this work they had the support and sympathy of all the women's
societies—i.e., the Women's Institutes, the King's Daughters, and both local Chapters of the
I.O.D.E. In addition, the City of Duncan and the North Cowichan Municipal Council have given
generous grants. Help was also given by the Department of Education in grants towards the
salaries of the nurses and from the local School Boards at the rate of a dollar per pupil per
annum in the schools inspected by the Health Centre nurses.
" In .August, 1920, the first Public Health Nurse was appointed to the Health Centre and
since then the work has increased beyond the brightest dreams of its promoters. On the disbanding of the Red Cross branches the activities of the Health Centre were directed by the local
committee, composed of representatives from all subscribing organizations, working under- the
Provincial Health Officer, with an office in Duncan, two very highly trained nurses, and two
motor-cars. This mobile service is carried on with greatest efficiency and the least possible
expense to the district.
"(Signed)       Margaret Moss,
President, Coicichan Health Centre Committee."
" The district covered by the Public Health Nurses of the Cowichan Health Centre is large,
covering some 600 square miles, including the City of Duncan. The population of the district is
approximately 6,0C0, not including the labour employed in the lumbering industry, with a school
population of 1,000 children scattered through sixteen different schools. In such a large, sparsely
populated district the great difficulties in attempting a generalized nursing service are that of
transportation and providing a central office. The first difficulty is surmounted by supplying the
nurses with two Ford cars and the second by obtaining an office in the Baron Block, Duncan.
" Nursing Service.—During the past year the nursing service of the Health Centre has
increased greatly, more than doubling that of the previous year. In all, over 3,300 visits were
made to homes in the district, and of these 1,075 were bedside nursing visits when actual nursing
was done. Four hundred and eighty-four tuberculosis and other welfare visits were made.
Phone consultations numbering 996 were held and 429 visitors were received in the Health Centre
Office.
" Two hundred and twelve transportations were made by the nurses with the Health Centre
cars, including many patients from all parts of the district, who, unable to afford ambulance
transportation, were brought into the Hospital by the nurses at the request of the doctor or the
patient's family.
" Child-welfare Worlc.—All babies known by the nurses to be living in the district are visited
as soon as possible after birth, and monthly from then on for as long as possible. Eight hundred
and sixty-four such visits were made in the past year.
" A well-baby clinic is held once a month in the Women's Institute Rooms, Duncan, the local
medical men being in charge, with the exception of during the months of July and August, when
a nurse is in attendance at the Health Centre Office every afternoon for the purpose of weighing
  N 10 British Columbia. 1925
and measuring the babies and to give any assistance she can to the mothers. This is proving a
popular branch of the work, and sometimes as many as six or seven young mothers will arrive
on the same afternoon to have their children weighed and to talk over the health and proper
summer feeding of the family.
" Social Service.—The Health Centre does not administer material relief to families in need,
but as always throughout the world, sickness and poverty are closely connected, the nurses have
an intimate knowledge of the home and economic conditions of the different families and are
asked from time to time to investigate needy cases. During the year ninety-one such visits were
made, and seven cases referred to the Great War Veterans and two to the Women's Institute for
assistance.
" School Service.—There are fifteen schools in the district covered by the Cowichan Health
Centre, with thirty-three class-rooms ; these include the Consolidated School at Duncan; the four-
roomed school at Chernainus; two-roomed schools at Cowichan Station, Sylvania, and Shawnigan
Lake; and the one-room schools at Genoa Bay, Westholme, Crofton, Glenora, Sahtlam, Mayo,
Cowichan Lake, Koksilah, Bench Road, and Cobble Hill. All the children attending these
schools are examined yearly by the different School Medical Officers, assisted by the nurses.
" There is an individual class-room inspection of each child once a month by the nurse, and
in case of an outbreak of communicable disease in a school the children attending that school
are inspected daily until all danger of communication is over. The signs and symptoms of the
communicable diseases most readily found in schools are explained to the teachers and they are
asked to notify the Health Centre at once of any suspicious case in their school. The child is then
visited and, if advisable, taken to the School Medical Officer for examination, who will, if necessary, exclude the child from school. The nurses have not the authority to exclude children from
school without the permission of the School Medical Officer. All the pupils are weighed and
measured twice during the school-year, and children underweight for their age and height are
weighed monthly ; a keen interest is then kept stimulated in the children to become normal weight.
After the monthly inspection a class-room talk is given on personal hygiene, proper food and
drink, etc., covering a routine yearly course of instruction.
" Toothbrush and handkerchief drills are held in the primary classes, and the teachers
co-operate with the nurses in having many entertaining and instructive ' Good Health ' projects
and playlets.
' Good Health ' Competition.—During the year such a competition was held throughout
the rural schools of the district. Prizes were awarded for the best poster, illustrating a health
talk given by the nurse during the year, the best health book telling and illustrating the story
of ' Good Health,' and the best essay on a health subject. The competition was most successful;
in all, there were over 150 entries and all the schools in the district, with the exception of one,
competed in all the different classes. The keen interest displayed by the children in the competition was sincerely appreciated by the Health Centre as demonstrating the fine spirit of
co-operation existing throughout the district.
" The Health Centre is indebted in this connection to the Provincial Board of Health, without
whose assistance it would not have been possible to have held the competition.
" Dental Clinics.—During the year the School Dental Officer examines the teeth of all the
children attending school in the district. Notification is sent the parents of any needed dental
work on their children's teeth, with the approximate cost to them of the work, which cost is
considerably less than if the work was done elsewhere than at the school clinic. TJpon receipt
of the parents' consent the work is proceeded with.
" Class Instruction.—Our First Aid and Home Nursing classes are very popular with the
Girl Guides and Canadian Girls in Training throughout the district. Last year more requests
were received for instruction than it was possible to arrange for. In all, four different groups
of girls were instructed, all satisfactorily completing the course and writing the examinations.
"Affiliation with University of British Columbia.—Last year lectures were given the Public
Health Nursing students at the University, the students afterwards coming to the Health Centre
for their Rural Public Health Nursing field-work.
" Each year the work of the Cowichan Health Centre increases; sometimes one phase perhaps
more than another is stressed, but always there is a steady growth, showing without a doubt
that the work undertaken is appreciated and of benefit to the public.
" Isabelle M. Jeffabes, R.N."
 16 Geo. 5 Board df Health. N'll
In carrying out the work I have again to record our indebtedness to the women of British
Columbia and particularly the Women's Institutes. Their quiet, thoughtful reception of suggestions which are intended to secure their co-operation in carrying on our work is stimulating.
They are understanding more and more the point of view of the Department, in that we are
endeavouring to educate the public to the seriousness of the situation as regards the health of
the community and also realizing that preventive measures must be taken if we are to succeed
in bringing up the rising generation as healthy citizens.
They have undertaken a further step in the health programme and are co-operating in the
establishment of a Solarium. We will make further reference to this in our School Report in
this volume.
The work of the Department is growing very rapidly and it is necessary to ask for an
increase in our staff. We have been forced to employ temporary assistance in the office during
the past year, but the increase in the work has become such that we must have permanent
service.
Cemetery-sites approved.—New Denver (extension), Errington, Cowichan Station, Quamichan,
Nanaimo (Chinese), and Squamish.
Sewage-disposal Systems approved.—Point Grey (extension), South Vancouver (extension),
Vancouver (extension), and Kelowna (extension).
Water-supply Systems approved.—Saanich (Lake District), Point Grey (extension), Coquitlam Municipality (extension), Coldstream Municipality (Antwerp Springs), Summerland (extension), Cranbrook (alterations and extension), Trail (alterations and extension), Vancouver
(extension), and North Vancouver City (extension).
We are appending reports from the Tuberculosis Inspector and the Vital Statistics Branch,
together with a report of the Medical Inspection of Schools. A careful perusal of these will
afford very interesting reading to the citizens of our Province, and our only regret is that the
public as a whole do not seem to understand that there is issued from the Government reports
dealing with all the affairs of the Province, which should at least interest the shareholders of
the company—that is, the taxpayers of British Columbia.
I must be allowed to express my great appreciation of the co-operation which I receive from
the members of my staff. Every request is immediately complied with, extra work is cheerfully
undertaken, and overtime used. All the staff take a great interest in their work and it has been
a pleasure to carry on with them.
I would like, sir, to express for myself and staff our appreciation of the co-operation which
we receive from yourself. Your interest in this Department is very stimulating and we are
confident that it augurs well for the future, in bringing our work to the knowledge of the public
in general.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG, M.D., CM.,
Provincial Health Officer.
 N 12
British Columbia.
1925
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1
1
7
10
2
4
39
54
7
45
3
1
3
51
12
6
1
3
48
4
5
12
1
3
3
1
6
3
55
1
....
1
33
117
2
15
5
32
1
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9
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' iis.'
1
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1
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6
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1
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8
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83
45
35
20
16
1
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13
9
3
812
42
5
2
5
Can-ied forward	
40
96
5
56
666
222
242
364
1
14
180
44
1
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 13
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE
PROVINCE— Continued.
'■*3
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Brought forward	
5
40
96
5
1
666
2
222
8
242
364
9
180
1
44
1
5
12
1
2
16
1
2
2
1
14
2
2
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1
4
2
2
1
28
4
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74
38
788
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16
375
178
1
I
232
1
2
21
5
1
2
73
5
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25
26
573
10
2
114
57
4
19
231
12
79
26
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7
1
7
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1
Woorlftbre	
1
7
356
15
109
257
2,104
1,014
601
1,726
609
6
215
44
 N 14= British Columbia. 1925
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1925.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Medical Officer of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Fifteenth .Annual Report on the work undertaken by
this branch of your Department during the past year.
As predicted in my last report, an era of prosperity has commenced in British Columbia, and
with it many new phases and problems requiring prophylactic measures are beiug met cheerfully
and in nearly every case with gratifying results.
This branch of your Department embraces the inspection of mining, logging, and numerous
other important industrial plants, together with the supervision of public watersheds and supply-
systems, fish- and food-canning plants, selection or approval of cemetery-sites, summer resorts,
also quarantine and foreshore supervision, covering an important sphere of usefulness.
Eliminating details, which our files would show, I will simply touch on the major points.
Infectious or contagious outbreaks in the unorganized districts have fortunately been few,
and at this writing every case has been closely followed up and its spread effectually stopped.
Industrial.
Logging, mining, and fishing are the principal industries of this Province and 75 per cent,
of these are located along our 6,000 miles of coastal line. The output from these industries runs
into scores of millions of dollars and the employment of many thousands of men, yet we have
industrial peace and splendid sanitary conditions throu.ghout these far-scattered and remotely
located camps. We can not claim all the credit for this condition, because without the cheerful
co-operation of the operators our work would be full of strife.
Salmon-canneries.
The salmon-canning industry this year bids fair to be a good average, with a waiting market
for the entire output. The canneries are all operating in a manner that brings much surprise
and unstinted praise from the many visitors and tourists who are permitted to inspect without
restraint the entire canning process from net to the labelled can.
So perfected and ingenious are the mechanical means of handling and cooking the fish
that from the time the salmon are caught in the sea to the time they are canned and ready for
the consumer's table the fish are scarcely touched by human hands. Yet, in spite of that, our
regulations and also the Federal regulations regarding the premises, fish, and health condition
of employees are most stringent.
Following the visits of tourists, we are frequently asked for copies of our regulations which
visitors have noticed posted around the different canneries. We are informed that they will be
used as a standard for food-product factories in many parts of the world.
Fruit-canneries.
What the salmon-canneries are on the Coast in point of cleanliness and quality of product,
the same can be said for the Okanagan and its wonderful fruit. Every year finds this health-
giving food better known and recognized by the outside world, and it is gratifying to be able to
say that not a single instance of faulty packing or canning of Okanagan fruit has been brought
to our notice in the fruit-canning industry of British Columbia.
W.\TERSIIEDS.
The Sanitary Regulations provided especially for watersheds are responsible in a great
measure for the freedom of British Columbia from water-borne diseases.    These regulations are
 16 Geo. 5 Board of Health. K 15
being observed and the drinking-water for more than one-half of our population is preserved in
all its unrivalled purity. The city medical and engineering departments of Vancouver and North
Vancouver are entitled to credit for the active and persistent co-operation in enforcing our regulations on the Capilano, Lynn Creek, and Seymour watersheds.
Auto Tourist Camps.
The number of visiting automobile tourists this year has surpassed all anticipations and,
whilst those in charge have had a strenuous time, the sanitary condition of these camps has been
quite up to the standard imposed by our regulations formulated in 1923.
Seaside Summer Resorts.
British Columbians in general seem to incline towards the open-air life and the seaside
resorts are never altogether deserted, but this year seems to surpass all previous years for crowds.
The majority of these resorts are located on the Coast in unorganized territory and consequently
directly under the supervision of this Department, entailing much travel and attention.
The greatest problem for these places is an adequate and modern domestic 'water-supply.
The camper does not usually feel inclined to expend money on a temporary need and consequently
" takes a chance " with water " not above suspicion." The open-air life may add to the powers
of resistance, but the carelessness of some campers gives much concern to the visiting Sanitary
Inspector. Poster propaganda, however, is having a beneficial effect, and already we are glad
to note that a well-known steamship company operating a large resort on Bowen Island has
installed a modern piped water system, septic tanks, and a first-aid officer with full kit of
supplies and a first-aid depot has been established at this popular summer resort. It is a most
commendable step and has already proved its worth to many visitors during the season just
passed.
Nuisances.
This has been our busiest year for nuisances located within the confines of self-governing
rural municipalities. In every instance the local officers have shown a willingness to accept
their responsibility, but in many cases the solution is a serious problem, involving the expenditure of considerable money, which the property-owners object to.
Villages and camps are emerging into the status of towns and the matter of proper drainage
or sewerage is overlooked until the danger-point is apparent. One of our most popular seaside
resorts located within a rural municipality is becoming so thickly populated as to be a serious
problem from a sanitary standpoint. At week-ends the place is so crowded that the usual
sanitary conveniences are inadequate and permanent residents are subject to nuisances which
baffle the local authorities. It is quite apparent that unless the municipalities affected formulate some drastic plan to cope with the increasing number of visitors to their shores a serious
health menace is very probable. Whilst upon this subject, I would beg to remind you of the
recent Court decision which places all foreshore (outside the confines of certain harbours) under
Provincial control. This will need your most careful consideration in order to meet the sanitary
problems presenting.
The number of inspection visits made to logging and mining camps during the past year
approximates 300; to canneries, 135; pulp plants and quarries, 35; summer resorts, 40; cemeteries, 6; investigating and abating nuisances, 50.
Owing to the far-sightedness of the Honourable Dr. J. D. MacLean, this branch of your
service is equipped with transportation facilities which have enabled me to conduct the work in
a thorough and intensive manner at a minimum of expense, but with the rapid expansion of our
industrial life in the outlying and coastal districts it is quite apparent that this department will
need increased assistance.
I cannot conclude this report without mentioning the unstinted and valuable co-operation of
the Provincial Police in looking after the sanitary welfare in their respective districts. Every
constable is a sanitary officer and he is often called upon to solve problems only met with in an
isolated and new country. Their tact and courteousness has prevented the necessity of resorting
to drastic measures in the enforcement of the law.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Chief Sanitary Inspector.
 N 16 British Columbia. 1925
TRrtAV'ELLING  MEDICAL HE.iLTH  OFFICER'S  REPORT.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1925.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my second annual report as Travelling Medical
Health Officer for the Province.
Our plan of the first year, of notification of members of the medical profession individually
as to the time of my visits, proving so satisfactory, it was deemed advisable to continue that
method for another year. With very few exceptions, I continued as last year to consult with
and examine only cases referred to me through the family physician and reported on the cases
to them.
In connection with this part of my work I visited sixty-five towns and villages and interviewed 132 different doctors. This does not include meetings with groups of doctors, such as
meeting with the Victoria Medical Association and also with the Okanagan Division of the
British Columbia Medical Association.
Many of these towns I visited a second and several a third time, and in these cases it is
illustrative of the possibilities of the work to see that the more frequent the visits the more
cases are referred for examination.
Nanaimo being the largest town in the territory actively served by me, and also due to the
fact that there seemed to be a goodly number of cases there, I decided to try out the holding of
clinics at regular intervals. So the first week of every third month I spent in Nanaimo. Before
beginning that I took up the question of X-ray with the Hospital Committee of the Western Fuel
Company, to whom the machine belongs, and also with Drs. Hall, who, operate the machine,
and both very willingly offered their services free of charge to those unable to pay. Judging
by the co-operation I have received from practically every doctor in the town, this service is
appreciated by them and it is my intention to continue the same in the future.
I have seen and examined 342 persons, making in all 382 examinations, forty of them being
re-examinations. Of these 342, I have classed 126 as positively tuberculous, 68 as suspects, 15
as contacts, and 133 as non-tubercular.
Of the positive cases, there was practically every variety of case, as last year, from the
incipient to the far advanced. Many cases were referred to me not so much for diagnosis as
for advice as to the best method of treatment to follow.
The increased number of suspects is largely made up of children of school age referred to
me mostly by the school doctor or nurse on account of debility of one form or another. These
often do not show anything very definite on physical examination as the lungs are usually clear,
but we know from experience that a tubercular infection is the underlying cause in many cases.
These are the cases for which preventive treatment is indicated. Then there is the border-line
case that has many of the symptoms of the disease without any of the physical signs, that class
of case which the X-ray is often very helpful in clearing up.
Contacts were cases in whose immediate family some member was or had been tubercular.
Of the 133 classed as non-tubercular, they represented a variety of conditions.    The increased
percentage of non-tubercular in the total number of cases examined is a good indication of the
. growing interest in the work, for it shows an effort to get cases in the earlier stages which
probably is the most important single factor in the whole tubercular problem.
Of the nationality of these 342 cases, my list is hardly complete, but as far as recorded is as
follows: Canadian-born, representing every Province in the Dominion, 195 ; born in British Isles,
103; rtlmerican-born, 15; Indian, 4; and other nationalities, 30.
I have been holding clinics at Saanich Health Centre one afternoon a week when in Victoria.
Here the cases are referred by the School Nurse and illustrate the case-finding possibilities of
a clinic.
The Educational Part of Work.
This work was carried on in a similar manner to last year, meetings being held in localities
in which we were unable to make such arrangements last year. In addition, I have paid more
attention to the nursing profession, having given talks to seven classes of nurses in training and
two to Graduate Nurses' Societies.
 16 Geo. 5 Board of Health. N 17
The Women's Institutes I again found willing messengers of health propaganda. Ten
meetings were arranged through them. Service clubs account for four meetings. The balance,
of a total of thirty-six, were arranged through a variety of organizations, as Parent-Teachers;
Victoria Medical Society ; Tuberculous Veterans' Association, Victoria; high-school classes; and
fraternal organizations.
One of the best meetings held was under the auspices of the 1.0.F. of Grand Forks. This
society donated their hall for the meeting, adjourned their regular meeting early for that purpose, and advertised the meeting well beforehand.    We had an attendance of about seventy-five.
While this method of education is important, another method more effective probably is
short personal talks in trains, hotel lobbies, etc., for the interest in this disease is almost
universal.
As your Department was taken up with the hospitals the advisability of revision of hospital
by-laws, or, in cases where no by-laws existed, the necessity for the passing of such by-laws in
order to comply with the " Hospital Act," I was asked to go over the existing by-laws and
suggest needed changes.
This work is still being continued, as many of the changes suggested were not of sufficient
importance to require the calling of a special meeting of hospital societies for the purpose of
amending by-laws. Others were in doubt as to what was actually required. In many of the
latter cases I have been able to meet with the Secretary of the Hospital Board and in some
cases the full Boards, and take up the matter personally with them. This is the most satisfactory way of dealing with it.    We hope to have this matter cleared up early in the New Year.
I have inspected thirteen hospitals officially at the instance of your Department, and many
others unofficially.
As was the case last year, there are complaints from the doctors of being unable to get
cases into the Sanatorium when diagnosed; particularly does this apply to female patients.
I feel that we do need increased Sanatorium accommodation either at Tranquille or elsewhere.
Personally, I believe if that accommodation was provided at the Coast, either in Vancouver or
Victoria, that it would serve the purpose equally as well as at Tranquille. Perhaps the building
in Vancouver formerly used by the University, originally intended, I believe, as a tubercular
hospital, can be made to supply that need.
That division of my work that has to do with the following-up of cases discharged from the
Sanatorium is much appreciated by the patients. In order to keep in touch with patients at the
Sanatorium, I spent two periods of a few days each per year at Tranquille.
I am still interested in a survey of school-children in some part of the Dry Belt of British
Columbia. I interviewed Colonel Nasmith, of the Canadian Red Cross Society, when in Vancouver as to the possibility of financial assistance for same.
In conclusion, I wish to express my hearty appreciation of the helpful suggestions of Dr.
H. E. Young, Provincial Health Officer, and of the co-operation of the doctors, nurses, and the
different organizations that have been of material assistance in disseminating knowledge of the
fact of the curability and preventability of tuberculosis, the disbelief in the former being largely
responsible for the fact that so many cases reach an advanced stage before coming under the care
of their physician.
I have, etc.,
A. S. Lamb, M.D.,
Travelling Medical Health Officer.
 N 18 British Columbia. 1925
REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Bojvrd of Health,
Victoria, B.C., June 30th, 1925.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I beg to hand you the Fourteenth Annual Report of the Medical Inspection
of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
During the past year our Nursing Service has been extended and we are pleased to be able
to report a very great improvement in the attitude of the people towards the medical inspection
of schools. Under the " Medical Inspection of Schools Act," the medical man appointed to do the
work diagnoses defects and notifies the parents. He is not allowed to practise on these cases
for obvious reasons, and the result has been that in very many cases nothing is done by the
parents to have the defects corrected.
With the extension of our Nursing Service we have the means of carrying on follow-up work,
and through our trained nurses, who are working in conjunction with the Medical Inspectors, the
real purport of the doctor's notice is explained and the parent is shown the folly of neglecting
the treatment that will remove defects that in after-life means impairment of health.
The fact that these truths are being brought home is shown by the great interest that is
being taken by the Women's Institutes in the crippled children of the Province. The interest
that has been taken during the pas't two years has led to a greater understanding on their part
of how the defects have arisen and they are determined that prevention shall be the key-note of
the management of the children's troubles.
Between fifty and sixty cases have been taken charge of by the Women's Institute Committee
for Crippled Children and cures of the majority of the cases have been effected and great improvement in others. This means that the children must be sent to the hospital, operated on, and then
the convalescent period, which sometimes is drawn out and necessitates the child remaining in
the wards of the hospital.
This is not good either from the doctor's standpoint or from that of the child. Their education is neglected and they are of necessity thrown into the company of sick people.
There are many cases of defects amongst children that can be cured without operation, and
in order to provide a place for such oases, and also to provide a suitable place for those
upon whom an operation has been necessary, it has been decided to establish a Solarium, to which
these cases can be taken where treatment will be carried on under the very best conditions.
This movement is being sponsored by the Women's Institutes, and under the active management of Dr. 0. Wace, of Victoria, is shaping up. A site has been obtained and building will be
proceeded with.    I am indebted to Dr. Wace for the following account of the Solarium:—
" I have already briefly referred to the activities of the Women's Institutes and to the interest
they are taking in the establishment on Vancouver Island of a Home, or Solarium, for the delicate
and crippled children of Western Canada.
" The great advances in our knowledge of heliotherapy and the value of artificial sunlight
treatment by means of special violet-ray lamps are leading to a very extensive use of natural and
artificial sun-baths in all parts of the world. This is more especially noticeable in many of the
larger cities of England.
" The south end of Vancouver Island, with its yearly record of bright sunshine and equable
temperature, presents an ideal climate for an institution on the lines advocated by the Women's
Institutes.
" It is important to realize that this movement aims not only at the cure and education of the
crippled Child, but also at the prevention of more serious illness in children who are already
debilitated from sickness or other causes. A study of the report of the Tuberculosis Survey
Committee of School Children in South Vancouver will give conclusive evidence of the need for
this preventive aspect of the work.
" The interest that is already being taken in the project to build the Solarium on a site at
Malahat Beach is very widespread and increasing. It is probable that before another year's
report is issued the Solarium will be an established institution."
 16 Geo. 5 Board of Health. N 19
In my last report I spoke of the dental work which is being carried on, and I am pleased to
say that this work appeals very strongly to the people, and in different points of the Province
we are establishing dental clinics. One drawback in the carrying-out of this work is the difficulty
of getting dentists to take it up, which is not to be wondered at, as dental work is all office-work
and a man in practice does not feel able to leave his office for any length of time, but in respect
to the co-operation from the dental profession we are receiving every help from them and we will
gradually be able to accomplish very striking results.
Our plan usually is to have a survey made of a school or a number of schools in a district by
a competent dentist, which gives the people an idea of the work which is to be done. Each case
is reported to the parents and an estimate of the cost is given. The parents may either take the
child to their own dentist or have the dentist, who is selected for the work, carry it out.
The cost under this plan has been reduced very much. Indigents are taken care of either by the
local committees or with some assistance from the Government.
The reports of the schools this year show that there were about 5,300 more pupils examined
than last year, and the percentage of defects shows a very substantial decrease, and we have
inspected thirty-three more schools than in the former year.
The work in regard to the schools is not spectacular, but I feel very much encouraged with
the substantial progress that we are making and the people are coming to realize more the
real purport of the work.
Details of the examination for each school follow.
I have, etc.,
H. E. Young, M.D., CM.,
Provincial Health Officer.
SCHOOLS   INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors: 155.
Reports from Medical Inspectors: 149.
High Schools.
High Schools. 1923-24, 59: Reported, 27 ; not reported, 32. 19243-25, 67: Reported, 41; not
reported, 26.
Pupils inspected: 1923-24, 5,551; 1924-25, 7,419, an increase of 186S.
Graded City Schools.
Cities.   1923-24, 33 : Reported, 26 ; not reported, 7.   1924-25, 33: Reported, 28; not reported, 5.
Pupils inspected: 1923-24, 32,475; 1924-25, 34,036, an increase of 1561.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities. 1923-24, 27: Reported, 24; not reported, 3. 1924-25, 27: Reported, 25 ; not
reported, 2.
Pupils inspected: 1923-24, 24,856; 1924-25, 26,103, an increase of 1207.
Rural .-.nd Assisted Schools.
.Schools inspected: 1923-24, 561, at a cost of $12,687.25; 1924-25, 577, at a cost of $13,109.45.
Schools not inspected: 1923-24, 150; 1924-25, 126.
Pupils inspected: 1923-24, 14,687; 1924-25, 15,331, an increase of 644.
Cost of inspection per pupil: 1923-24, 86 cents; 1924-25, 85 cents.
7*   Percentage of defects: 1923-24, 107.56; 1924-25, 100.81, a decrease of 6.65.
 N 20
British Columbia.
1925
NORMAL
d
XR
a
Oi
*&
P<
Z
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Oj ti
> ti
Oi
«   .
Qi    b£
ai
•d  .
*H   O
£ 3
t) 9
8
£.£
ai «
ra w
ni.2
A  Qi
««
^
G*
ct>
Qffl
hK
o
HH
Victoria.
Lachlan Macmillaii
A. E. McMicking.
349
349
24
23
5
4
26
245
244
47
1
1
HIGH
Abbotsford  	
Burnaby :
Burnaby North.
Burnaby South .
Chilliwack 	
Cranbrook 	
Delta :
Ladner	
Esquimalt	
Grand Forks .
Kamloops.
Kelowna .
Ladysmith .
Langley	
Maple Ridge :
MacLean .
Matsqui :
Dennison .
Mission  	
Nanaimo	
New Westminster :
Duke of Connaught.
Ocean Falls.
Peachland..
Point Grey :
King George V..
Lord Byng..
Prince of Wales.
Prince George	
Prince Rupert:
King Edward .
Revelstoke	
Robson 	
Rossland	
Surrey	
Trail.
T. A. Swift	
J. G. McCammon .
J. C. Henderson   ...
G. E. L. MacKinnon
A. A. King	
J. S. McCallum.
M. G. Archibald ,
W. J. Knox	
II. B. Maxwell
B. B. Marr	
G. Morse	
R. H. Port	
A. J. Stuart
W. F. Drysdale .
E. 0. Arthur ...
D. A. Clark
A. E. II. Bennett .
Wm. Buchannan..
W. Dykes .
C. Ewert.
H. E. Tremayne .
J. H. Hamilton..
J. E. H. Kelso ...
J. W. Coffin	
F. D. Sinclair.  .
J. B. Thorn	
Miss M. J. Woods.
Miss A. Stark.
Miss M. Ewart.
39
72
72
225
213
220
220
130
116
56
51
63
63
85
175
84
68
57
45
18
57
183
244
401
204
51
127
120
10
85
96
84
160
77
67
55
41
18
57
183
244
401
365
159
215
49
126
116
10
83
26
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 21
SCHOOLS.
up
Qi
rt a
O
HO
O
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
C
a
s
rO
QJ
K
^
U2
"
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Defective vision, 23 ; refers to
cases not already wearing
glasses. Malnutrition as indicated by being underweight. Glands include 2
recently operated Goitre,
simple 17, toxic 4 ; tonsils,
does not include 25 cases operated ; not vaccinated, 140;
chronic appendix, 6 ; heart-
disease, 1 ; acne, 3 ; rheumatism, 2.
Atrophy one leg following infantile paralysis.
Scarlet fever, 2;   small
pox, 1
SCHOOLS.
7
14
32
26
9
'is'
12
"i
6
i
43
3
10
2
15
1
4
18
97
2
2
116
58
17
1
30
46
9
19
9
15
11
1
10
2
22
8
2
1
24
77
Cardiac, 1 .
Blepharitis, 1; cardiac, 1.
Orthopaedic, 2   	
Cardiac, 2; toxic goitre, 2; curvature of spine, 1; albino, 1;
dysmenorrhea, 4; flat feet, 2
Cardiac, 1; flat chest, 1; hammer-toe, 1
Acne, 1; dull, 1; nervous, 1;
abdominal pain and frequent
vomiting, 2
Cardiac, 9 ; pulmonary, 3 ; an-
semia, 1; oithopsedic, 5 ; nervous, 1
Enlarged thy-roid, 66 ; nervous,
5 ;   cardiac, 2 ;   orthopsedic,
35
Enlarged thyroid, 33 ; nervous,
6 ; anaemia,  1 ; orthopaedic,
11
Enlarged thyroid, 52 ; nervous,
2 ; orthopaedic, 17
Cyst eyelid, 1 ; discharging, 1;
acne, 1 ; ulcer cornea, I
Heart case, 1	
Cryptic   tonsil,    1 ;   defective
palate, 1
Heart defects, 7	
Scarlet, 2.
Chicken-pox, 6. Majority
were vaccinated
Scarletfeverand varicella
Mumps, 1; scarlet fever,
1; chicken-pox, 1
Mumps, 4; small-pox, 1.
Scarlet fever, 1 .
Chicken-pox.
Chicken-pox.
Not crowded; ven-
tilation fair;
heating uneven,
but    adequate;
lighting good
Rooms well lighted, heated, and
ventilated
Excellent
Good....
Modern
Good	
Satisfactory	
Heated well; ventilation fair
O.K	
Good	
Satisfactory .
Good.
Fair	
Good.......
Satisfactory
Yes.
Good.
Clean.
Adequate; clean.
Clean; adequate.
Sanitary;    efficient ; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Clean.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate
Adequate; fair.
Clean ; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Ample.
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
 N 22
British Columbia.
1925
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
&
y
School Nurse.
A   .
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Vancouver1:
Britannia
Junior	
King Edward
King George
Kitsilano   ...
High School of Commerce
Technical
Vancouver North.
Vancouver South:
John Oliver ..
Vernon.
Victoria .
H. White.
A.  H.  Singleton and Thos.
Verner
G. A. Lamont
S. G. Baldwin
D. Donald	
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss M, Campbell.
Miss E. Edwards.
Mrs. S. Martin.,.
Miss I. E. Adams.
568
506
144
661
116
596
410
S87
248
387
267
232
352
54
317
339
636
720
132
130
914
563
20
1
5
5
1
7
1
7
1
2
5
9
52
1
7
1
2
3
35
10
60
60
67
42
3
1
7
5
8
1
1
3
GRADED CITY
Alberni ...
Chilliwack
Cranbrook:
Central	
Kootenay Orchards
South Ward  	
Duncan	
Enderby	
Grand Forks.
Kamloops .
Kaslo	
Kelowna .
Ladysmith .
Merritt.
Nanaimo:
Middle Ward .
North Ward.
A. D. Morgan
J. C. Elliot...
G. E. L. Maekinnon.
H. N. Watson	
H. W. Keith.
VV. Truax ...
A. Francis 	
M. G. Archibald .
D. J. Barclay.  ..
W. J. Knox	
H. B. Maxwell
G. H. Tutill .
W. F. Drysdale .
Miss Jeffares
Miss A. M. Fisher.
Miss Davie.
Miss M. J. Woods.
110
313
157
356
93
803
132
531
435
168
160
101
307
5(0
12
84
399
127
350
130
508
367
168
160
25
48
276
13
S4
 16 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
N 23
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Qi
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Qi   Qi
PH
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if.   'A
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QJ
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Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
u
Qi
>
Qi
2
m
u
w
6
Sd
oj
ft
a
to
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
144
"i
4
11
ii'
5
8
5
63
29
29
Scarlet fever, 1 ; diphtheria,   1;  mumps, 3;
chicken-pox, 2; smallpox, 6
41
111
Scarlet fever, 6; diphtheria,   2;   diphtheria
carriers, 2; mumps, 7;
chicken-pox, 3; smallpox, 5
54
84
Vaccinated, 202	
Scarlet fever, 3 ; mumps,
1; chicken-pox, 3
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria   carriers,   3;
chicken-pox, 1; smallpox, 3
Scarlet fever, 2; mumps,
1; chicken-pox, 1 ;
smallpox, 1
84
17
42
276
10
Vaccinations,  102;   heart,   2;
hernia, 1
Cardiac, 1; blepharitis, 1; vaccinated, 50
2
Mumps, 2; chicken-pox,
2 ; smallpox, 10 ; scarlet fever,  11 ;   diphtheria, 3
Scarlet fever, 2; smallpox, 1
Satisfactorv	
O. K	
Excellent	
Satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
SCHOOLS.
56
263
1
3
40
23
69
1
20
11
49
29'
1
6
34
64
1
24
19
2
24
30
51
640
158
174
55
130
31
153
17
18
13
130
53
50
IH
62
6
80
40
6
Cardiac, 4.
Kyphosis, 2; cardiac, 3 ; chorea,
2 ; orthopaedic, 2 ; pulmonary, 1
Cardiac, 1	
Heart-trouble, 1	
Cardiac, 2 ; nervous, 1; inflammatory rheumatism, 1; facial
paralysis, 1
Cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 4; bronchitis, 5; nervous, 5 ; orthopaedic, 5 ; asthma, 2 ; blepharitis, 5; pink-eye, 10
Nervous, 2 ; orthopaedic, 2 ; anaemia, 2 ; cardiac, 1
Chorea, 11; cardiac, 8; fiat
feet, 4 ; anaemia, 9 ; chronic
bronchitis, 14 ; curvature of
spine, all being treated and
improving, 8; deformed feet,
3; squamous eczema of face, 7
Cardiac, 5 ; fiat chest, 2 ; anaemia, 2; poor circulation, 1;
acne, 1; chronic eczema, 1
Cardiac, 4
Lame, 1 ; asthma, 1: nerves, 2;
lost sight one eye, 2 ; stutters, 1
Chorea, 2 ; T.B. scar face, 1 ...
Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, influenza,
German measles
Scarlet fever
Chicken-pox, 23; measles,
4 ; whooping cough, 42
Epidemic of chicken-pox
—about 60 cases during year; nearly all
were vaccinated this
spring
Chicken-pox, 20; scarlet
fever, 10; whooping-
cough, 7
Scarlet fever, 1; chicken-
pox, 1
Scarlet fever, 4 ; chicken-
pox, 2
Good.	
Very good 	
Good	
Rooms fairly  well
ventilated
O. K	
Good	
Excellent, but
awnings needed
on south side of
the buildings
Good.
Satisfactory
Heated well;   fair
ventilation
Heated well ;   fair
ventilation
Clean ; adequate.
Adequate.
Good.
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Indoor flush;
adequate, sanitary, efficient.
Clean ; adequate.
Adequate ; fair.
 N 24
British Columbia.
1925
GRADED CITY
Name of  School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
rt
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Nanaimo—Continued.
Quennell	
South Ward	
Nelson:
Central	
Hume	
New Westminster:
Central	
Lord Kelvin	
Lord Lister	
Richard McBride
Queensborough  .
Herbert Spencer.
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam:
Central	
James Park .  ...
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert:
Booth Memorial.
Borden Street...
Seal Cove	
Revelstoke:
Central	
Selkirk  	
Rossland	
Slocan	
Trail:
Central	
Tadanac	
Trail, East	
Vancouver:
Aberdeen 	
Alexandra	
Bayview	
Beaconsfield 	
W. F. Drysdale .
E. 0. Arthur .
D.  A. Clark.
C. T. Hilton	
G. A. Sutherland .
C. R. Symmes .
C. Ewert	
H. E. Tremayne
J. H. Hamilton.
J. W. Coffin ..
W. E. Gomm .
J. B7 Thorn...
H. White.
Miss M. J. Woods.
Miss A. Stark.
703
698
225
301
352
491
79
420
220 ,
210
200
325
408
300
47
290
316
597
53
698
Miss M, Campbell,
Miss V. B. Stevens.   640
Miss D. Shields ...
Miss I. Smith.
698
225
818
301
352
491
210
193
196
304
382
288
46
280
306
525
53
698
45
84
:42
200
23
31
147
5
10
63
9
194
194
4
100
100
1
61
61
6
115
115
1
24
24
2
105
105
10
10
54
30
46
40
36
41
29
7
148
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 21
SCHOOLS—Continued;
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
fl"
6
Qi
H
rti
Qi
b£
Qi
rt
fl
fl
>
W
n
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
469
178
436
228
147
301
22
129
16
14
2
24
26
131
127
123
390
174
150
272
68 j 57
224  '220
Cleft palate, 1 ; nerves, 8 ; cardiac, 2 ; eczema, 4 ; facial
paralysis, 1 ; T.B. hip, 1 ;
T.B. spine, 1 ; hand deformed, 1 ; asthma, 1 ; epistaxis,
2 ; double amputated legs, 1;
Asthma, 1 ; dull, 2 ; nerves, 2.
Cardiac, 3 .
Cardiac, 38 ; pulmonary, 11 ;
orthopaedic, 29; nervous, etc.,
11 ; anaemic, 6
Cardiac, 7 ; pulmonary, 4 ; orthopaedic, 9 ;nervous, etc., 2,
anaemic, 1
Cardiac, 15; pulmonary, 3 ; orthopaedic, 13 ; nervous, etc.,
1 ; anaemic, 1
Cardiac, 18 ; pulmonary, 5 ; orthopaedic, 17 ; nervous, etc.,
1 ; anaemic, 3
Cardiac, 1 ; pulmonary, 2 ; orthopaedic, 4
Cardiac, 20 ; pulmonary, 7 ; orthopaedic, 18 ; nervous, etc.,
9 ; anaemic, 2
Heart disease, 1; anaemia, 25..
Pulmonary T.B., 1; anaemia, 1
Cardiac, 3 ; eczema, 2 ; infam
tile paralysis, 2
Blepharitis,   15;   nervous,   2
cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 1
Right leg atrophy, 1.
Orthopaedic, 2	
Heart cases, 4 ; orthopaedic, 3 ;
bronchitis, 1
Cardiac, 2	
Heart,  6 ;  cervical  glands,  2 ;
anaemia, 7 ; underweight, 2 ;
flat foot, 1 ; cleft palate, 1
Heart, 1 ; chest, 1 ; anaemic, 1
Heart, 4 	
Vaccinated,   230 ; cardiac,
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 294 ;   cardiac,  2 ;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 229 ; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 172 ; pulmonary, 2
Scariet fever, 12 ; chicken-
pox, 2
Scarlet fever, 1 .
Scarlet fever, chicken-
pox
Scarlet fever, chicken-
pox
Scarlatina, 25; pertussis, 2; chicken-pox,
J-18 ; smallpox, 1; typhoid, 1; German
measles, 4; meningitis,
1
Several cases measles and
chicken - pox ; 1 case
scarlet fever
Few cases chicken-pox..
Chicken-pox.
Chicken-pox.
Chicken-pox.
Scarlet fever and chick
en-pox
Scarlet fever and chick
en-pox
Scarlet fever, 4   	
Scarlet fever, 2; diph
theria, 4; diphtheria
carriers, 1; mumps, 8;
chicken-pox, 2; smallpox, 1
Scarlet fever, 25;  diph
theria, 3;  mumps, 2
chicken- po x,   47 ;
whooping cough, 5 ;
smallpox, 2
Scarlet fever, 4; measles.
1; mumps, 2 ; chicken'
pox, 32 ; whooping-
cough, 5
Scarlet fever, 15; mumps.
2; chicken - pox, 14
whooping-cough, 1
Heated well;   fair
ventilation
Heated well ; fair
ventilation
Overcrowded
O.K	
Satisfactory	
Not crowded; well
ventilated    and
heated
Not crowded; well
ventilated    and
heated
Good	
Adequate ; fair.
O.K.
Satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
Flushing  system
poor.
Yes.
 N 26
British Columbia.
1925
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Iuspector.
Vancouver—Continued,
Block 70..    	
Central 	
Dawson	
Charles Dickens ...
Fairview	
Franklin	
Simon Fraser	
General  Gordon..
Grandview'	
Grenfell	
Hastings	
Henry Hudson ...
Kitsilano	
Livingstone	
Model	
Mount Pleasant...
Macdonald	
Lord Nelson	
School Nurse.
03
a
a,
o
ss
p
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p  .
<-*    QJ
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oi be
EO
03
ll
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a
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Qi  Qi
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<J
.3-  333
P  ©
SB
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss 0. Kilpatrick
Miss D. Bellamy..
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss O. Kilpatrick
Miss D. Shields ...
MissV. B. Stevens
.Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss D. Shields ..
Miss O. Kilpatrick
Miss D. Bellamy ..
Miss 0. Kilpatrick
Miss M. D. Schultz
Miss I. Smith	
116
678
511
506
356
105
830
496
459
614
875
116
19
1
636
133
15
2
9
1169
224
33
1
11
2
462
104
11
1
1
8
453
91
14
1
3
333
98
1
666
132
24
1
1
2
542
131
10
1
1
2
571
146
11
1
2
94
12
1
2
822
161
11
2
6
668
161
4
2
3
7
493
107
10
1
2
!>
459
111
4
2
3
4
469
96
4
1
3
778
169
28
4
558
98
8
4
1
4
875
226
9
4
1
2
53
26
 16 Geo. 5
Bo.iRD of Health.
N 27
SCHOOLS—Continued,
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
ti
■3
Qi
T3
te
B
u
h
\>
w
Pi
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
8
2
5
159
2
10
242
26
47
78
10
10
78
2
9
51
5
6
109
17
20
68
2
7
118
2
14
4
4
123
10
12
161
11
70
9
85
J 6
13
77
1
5
155
12
26
116
3
16
173
5
9
Vaccinated, 31.
Vaccinated,  281 ;   cardiac,   2
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   549;   cardiac,   1
pulmonary, 5
Vaccinated,   248 ;  cardiac, 1
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 219 ; cardiac, 1.
Vaccinated, 150	
Vaccinated, 287.
Vaccinated, 352
Vaccinated, 235.
Vaccinated, 61; cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 329; pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 408; pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   231;   cardiac, 1
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 217 ; cardiac, 2 ...
Vaccinated, 195 ; cardiac, 1 .
Vaccinated,   320;   cardiac,  4
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 285 ; pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,   359 ; cardiac,  2 ;
pulmonary, 1
Scarlet fever, 3; diph
theria carriers, 1;
mumps, 1 ; chicken
pox, 33 ; smallpox, 1
Scarlet fever, 6 ; diphtheria, 1 ; measles, 2 ;
mumps, 30; chicken-
pox, 31; whooping-
cough, 4
Scarlet fever, 8; diphtheria, 5 ; mumps, 3 ;
chicken-pox, 18; smallpox, 3; whooping-
cough, 14
Scarlet fever, 10 ; chicken-pox, 31; mumps, 11;
whooping - cough, 10 ;
smallpox, 19
Scarlet fever, 5; diphtheria, 1 ; mumps, 3 ;
smallpox, 2
Scarlet fever, 13 ; diphtheria, 1; mumps, 4 ;
chicken-pox, 20;
whooping-c o u g h , 1;
smallpox, 1
Scarlet fever, 20; diphtheria, 10; whooping-
cough, 3; chicken-pox,
11; mumps, 37'
Scarlet fever, 9 ; diphtheria, 1 ; diphtheria
carriers, 1; mumps, 60;
chicken-pox, 24; smallpox, 2 ; whooping-
cough, 7
Scarlet fever, 16 ; diphtheria, 2; diphtheria
carriers, 1; mumps, 8;
ch cken-pox, 13; smallpox, 4
Scarlet fever, 16: diphtheria, 1 ; diphtheria
carriers, 3
Scarlet fever, 11; diphtheria, 6; diphtheria
carriers, 3 ; mumps, 1;
chicken - pox, 29;
whooping-cough, 22 ;
smallpox, 13
Scarlet fever, 12; smallpox, 3 ; measles, 1;
mumps, 1; chicken-
pox, 28; whooping-
cough, 7
Scarlet fever, 10; chicken-pox, 4; mumps, 4;
whooping-cough, 1
Scarlet fever, 9; diphtheria, 2; mumps, 45;
smallpox, 8; whooping-
cough, 5; chicken-
pox, 14
Scarlet fever, 18; chicken-pox, 9; mumps,23;
smallpox, 4
Scarlet fever, 27 ; diphtheria, 13; diphtheria
carriers, 17; mumps, 22;
whooping - cough, 6 ;
chicken-pox, 20; smallpox, 10
Scarlet fever, 7; chicken-pox, 35; smallpox, 3
Scarlet fever 34 ; chicken-pox, 23 ; whooping-
cough, 1 ; smallpox, 3
 N 28
British Columbia.
1925
GRADED CITI'
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School  Nurse.
d
a
a
5
p
<H   QJ
p   .
^   Qi
t-t   P
°1
p
4) i>>
QJ
>
Qi
.£ fee
+3 a
O
P
°=3
rt
"aJ oj
~   -R
"3 3
V>^
tj
Q«
Gf>
QK
PK
<l
Vancouver—Continued.
Florence Nightingale	
Cecil Rhodes	
Lord Roberts	
Laura Secord	
Seymour	
Strathcona	
Tennyson	
Vancouver, North:
Lonsdale	
Queen Mary	
Hidgeway	
Vernon 	
Victoria:
Bank Street	
Beacon Hill	
Boys' Central	
Burnside ,	
Sir James Douglas	
Girls'  Central   	
George Jay	
Margaret Jenkins	
Kingston Street	
North Ward	
(includes Rock Bay and
King's Road)
Oaklands	
H. White.
A.  H.  Singleton and Thos,
Verner
Ditto ,	
S. G. Baldwin
D. Donald.
Miss V. B. Stevens
Miss D. Bellamy .
Miss H. Jukes .
Miss I. Smith.  ..
Miss A. McLellan
Miss D. Bellamy ..    7;
Mrs. S. Martin	
Mrs. J. A. Osborn.
Miss I. E. Adams..
Mrs. J, A. Osborn.
Miss E. J. Herbert
Mrs. J. A. Osborn.
Miss I. E. Adams..
Mrs. J. A. Osborn.
Miss I. E. Adams ,
Miss E. J. Herbert
674
659
101
7
1
1
4
584
581
88
8
o
3
1,035
1,035
271
25
5
3
3
601
601
175
5
2
4
911
850
151
7
1
2
10
1,282
1,225
282
13
12
780
667
131
5
1
4
432
346
8
2
49
13
80
SO
604
563
787
493
493
780
4
4
25
2
5
35
37
35
13
8
3
150
175
150
175
184
90
19
2
124
348
32
180
20
210
86
2
1
1
436
127
45
378
155
15
468
155
26
326
103
5
1
153
39
1
479
323
15
1
583
182
11
1
1
85
159
190
204
 16 Geo. 5
Board op He.ilth.
N 29
SCHOOLS—Continued.
-d
OJ
Si
WO
rH
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
Mi
y
QJ
G
fl
bh
QJ
rt
a
\>
02
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
156
6
21
59
1
6
139
24
23
143
4
4
165
11
28
233
14
28
100
9
65
67
102
1
41
108
60
223
1
167
2
3
1
1
Vaccinated,  314 ; cardiac,
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 259.
Vaccinated, 492 ; cardiac, 2.
Vaccinated, 186.
Vaccinated,   531 ;   cardiac,   2
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 1,060 ; cardiac, 5
pulmonary, 4
9   Vaccinated, 361.
Kyphosis, 1	
Hernia, 1 ; spinal curvature, 1
Scoliosis, 5 ; cardiac, 5	
Conjunctivitis, 3 ;   blepharitis,
6 ; pulmonary, 1 ; hernia, 1 ;
wry neck, 1 ; bronchitis, 1 ;
stammering, 1 ;  cardiac,   1 ;
seborrhoea, 3 ; catarrh, 3
Nervous,   2 ;    impediment   of
speech, 1
Nervous, 3; discharging ear, 1;
cyst under upper lip, 1 ; cardiac, 1
Infantile paralysis, 1; cripple-
foot (congenital), 1
Cardiac, 1 ; impediment of
speech,   2 ;   strabismus,   1 ;
shingles, 1 ; erythema, 1 ;
flat chest, 1
Cardiac, 3 ; deformed left foot,
1
Nervous, 2, pulmonary, 2 ; cardiac, 1
Nervous, 1; strabismus, 1 ; cardiac, 2 ; eczema, 1 ; asthma,
1 ; blepharitis, 1 ; psoriasis, 1
Cleft palate, 1	
Cardiac, 1.
Cardiac, 2 ; chest deformity, 1;
no thumbs (congenital), 1
Scarlet fever, 20; diphtheria, 2 ; mumps, 29 ;
chicken-pox, 21 ; smallpox, 4
Scarlet fever, 6 ; measles,
1; mumps, 3 ; chicken-
pox, 5 ; smallpox 5 ;
whooping-cough, 2
Scarlet fever, 16 ; diphtheria, 2 ; diphtheria
carriers, 1; chicken-
pox, 2 ; mumps, 41;
whooping-cough, 9
Scarlet fever, 23 ; smallpox, 3; chicken-pox,
24; whooping-cough. 1
Scarlet fever, 5; diphtheria, 9; diphtheria
carriers, 1; measles, 1;
mumps, 6; chicken-
pox, 47 ; smallpox, 22 ;
whooping-cough, 6
Scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria, 2; diphtheria
carriers, 2; mumps, 20;
chicken-pox, 44; smallpox, 1; whooping-
cough, 3
Scarlet fever, 7 ; diphtheria, 4; chicken-pox,
4; whooping-cough, 2;
smallpox, 23
Smallpox, 2; chicken-
pox, 2; scarlet fever, 3 ;
typhoid, 1; influenza, 4;
rheumatic fever, 1
Chicken-pox, 1; scarlet
fever, 6; whooping-
cough, 1
Chicken-pox, 4;    scarlet
fever, 3;     whooping-
cough, 9
Whooping-cough, 1; scar-
letfever, 2; smallpox, 5
Chicken-pox, 22; whoop-
cough, 1
Chicken-pox, 41; scarlet
fever, 5; whooping-
cough, 13
Diphtheria, 1; whooping-
cough, 4
Chicken-pox, 6; scarlet
fever, 3 ; mumps, 1
Chicken-pox, 10; scarlet
fever, 4; whooping-
cough, 4
Chicken-pox, 1 ; whooping-cough, 10 ; scarlet
fever, 2
Chicken-pox, 9; scarlet
fever, 2; whooping-
cough, 3
Chicken-pox, 19; scarlet
fever, 8
O.K.
Excellent ;     well
ventilated    and
heated
Excellent ;   well
ventilated    and
heated
An old building ;
clean; fairly well
entilated
heated
Excellent ;
ventilated
heated
Excellent ;
ventilated
heated
and
well
and
well
and
Excellent ; well
ventilated
Excellent ; well
ventilated and
heated
Excellent ; well
ventilated and
heated
An old building ;
fairlywellheated
and ventilated
An old building ;
ventilation and
heating, fair ;
Kings' Road
quite unsatisfactory
Excellent; heating
and ventilation
good
Clean.
Clean ; adequate.
 N 30
British Colujibla..
1925
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
SQ
ft
3
rH         .
«H   Qi
O oi
o
£a
/$  Qi
03
"a
p  .
Cl xt
1-1    Qi
<H    P
°1
i%
ft*   Qi
a
a
a
rt
Qi   >i
ti   *
4)
>
at*
*   .
> bk
QJ i
•H rt
rt
oj bo
t* a
a> rt
%t
OK
2
c
q
OJ
<
~ oa
r3 a
a o
Victoria—Continued.
Quadra Primary.	
South Park	
D. Donald	
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams..
223
140
302
148
350
116
35
102
52
128
5
8
9
1
1
2
1
6
1
2
Spring Ridge	
8
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Burnaby :
Armstrong Avenue
Barnet	
Capitol Hill	
Douglas Road	
Edmonds Street ...
Gilmore Avenue ...
Hamilton Road	
Inman Avenue	
Kingsway, East....
Kingsway, West...
Nelson Avenue
Riverway, East.   , .
Riverway, West .-..
Schou Street	
Seaforth	
Second Street	
Sperling Avenue...
Chilliwack:
Atchelitz  	
Camp Slough	
Cheam	
East Chilliwack
Fairfield Island
Lotbiniere	
Parson's Hill	
Promontory Flats..
Robertson	
Rosedale	
Sardis	
Strathcona	
Sumas	
Vedder Crossing...
Coquitlam:
Central	
Coquitlam, East...
Glen	
Hillside	
Silver Valley 	
Cowichan, North:
Chernainus	
Crofton    	
Genoa Bay	
Westholme	
Delta:
Annacis Island	
Annieville	
Boundary Bay	
Canoe Pass	
J. E.
E.J,
McCammon ,
Foster	
J. E. McCammon .
E.J.
J. E.
Foster	
McCammon .
E. J. Foster .
J. E.
E- J.
McCammon .
Foster	
L. A. Patten .
R. McCaffrey.
L. A. Patten
R. McCaffrey .
L. A. Patten .
R. McCaffrey.
L. A. Patten .
H. B. Rogers.
A. A. King .
Miss E. Naden .
27
27
o
2
1
12
12
3
1
3
118
108
....    14
<>
7
99
97
4
7
9
532
514
4
2      41
3
19
41
697
669
7
2      48
1
36
82
22
21
1
1
4
189
189
7
2     12
1
4
15
150
136
1
1        7
3
9
13
509
494
3
6     33
4
29
50
346
346
2
2     22
14
39
70
70
2
1
19
19
1
i
2
72
70
....    10
1
9
5
18
53
15
49
1
9
1
       2
6
15
13
1
....      2
1
2
80
80
3
....      3
7
:
34
34
2
8
62
60
1
....      3
3
8
76
70
....      3
10
52
48
3
8
49
49
2
2
5
5
24
24
5
5
13
83
13
83
3
6
3
6
2
....      3
125
117
1
       4
1
1
8
156
156
4
2       4
10
10
40
33
1
2
1
10
25
23
61
25
23
53
i
10
4
3
4
3
....      2
22
16
22
15
1    ...
....      1
1
1
59
55
1        1
1
1.
12
111
10
105
14
2     11
1
12
1
28
19
28
17
5
....      4
....      5
24
23
4
....      2
1
18
18
...      2
3
5
29
24
1        1
1
3
37
36
3       2
1
2
6
26
23
....      3
3
7
2
5
11
23
87
152
4
29
23
104
71
3
7
7
1
10
8
9
10
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 31
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Qi
>
■a
u xt
OJ
o
QiH
WO
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
6
OJ
fl
Qi
ft
V
H
\>
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Strabismus, 1 ; nervous, 4.
Cardiac, 4 ; club-foot, 1 ; enuresis, 1
Cardiac, 1; spinal   curvature,
1 ; right arm deformed, 1
5
1
1
10
1
2
4
3
1
3
6
11
1
Chicken-pox, 8; scarlet
fever, 7 ; whooping-
cough, 2
Chicken-pox, 4; scarlet
fever, 1
Whooping-cough, 1; scarlet-fever, 3
Chicken-pox, 11; scarlet
" ver,   1
Chicken.pox, 2; mumps,
2 ; scarlet fever, 1
Excellent; heating
and ventilation
good
Ditto	
An old building ;
lighting not very
good ; heating
and ventilation
fair
An old building ;
lighting good ;
heating and
ventilation fair
Good; heating and
lighting good
Clean ; adequate.
SCHOOLS.
9
2
20
43
185
SJ58
4
49
46
137
114
18
4
9
5
27
Cleft palate, 1; orthopaedic, 4,
Orthopedic, 3	
Pigeon-breast, 2 ; cleft palate, 1
Cleft palate, 1 	
Stye, 1 .
Granular eyelids,  1;   webbed
fingers, 1
Cardiac, 3 ; orthopaedic, 6.
Cardiac, 3 ; anaemia, 1 .
Cardiac, 1; flat feet, 1 .
T.B., 1 .
Chicken-pox.
Good.
Good; exceptslight
crowding
Good	
Good	
Excellent
Good	
Old building;  fair
Lighting poor	
Crowded ; poorly
ventilated; heated and lighted
Satisfactory	
Poor in all respects
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Good.
Good.
Yes.
Good.
Yes.
Good.
Clean ; adequate.
Inadequate ; new
ones are to be
constructed.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean ; barely
adequate.
Out of repair.
Clean ;  inadequate.
Out of repair.
Good.
Fair.
Good.
Clean.
 N 32
British Columbu.
1925
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School  Nurse.
rt
CD
ft
£
Hi ia
Fh
QJ   >j
OJ
<y .
ii a
EQ
o £3
0fl
a
y "rt
*§
£'£
53.fi
o
p
6 '£
£  QJ
rt
a 53
^ q
"S 93
*Z   Qi
S
Q^
R>
oa
cm
<l
a o
Delta— Continued.
Delta, East	
Inverholme	
Kennedy 	
Ladner   	
Mosher Siding..
Sunbury 	
Trenant	
Westham Island
Esquimalt:
Lampson Street
Glenmore :
Glenmore	
Kent:
Agassiz	
Harrison River	
Langley :
Aldergrove 	
Belmont	
County Line	
Glen Valley	
Glenwood	
Langle.v, East	
Langley Fort	
Langley Prairie	
Langley, West 	
Lochiel	
Milner	
Murrayville 	
Otter	
Otter, South	
Patricia      	
Sperling	
Springbrook  	
Maple Ridge :
Albion	
Hammond	
Haney	
Lillooet, South	
Maple Ridge	
Alex Robinson	
Ruskin   	
Webster's Corners ..
Whonnock	
Matsqui:
Aberdeen	
Bradner	
Clayburn 	
Dunach	
Glenmore	
Jubilee  	
Matsqui   	
Mount Lehman	
Peardonville	
Poplar	
Ridgedale	
Mission:
Cedar Valley	
Hatzic	
Mission City	
Silverdale	
Silverhill	
Stave Falls	
Stave River Gardens
Steelhead	
Oak Bay :
Monterey	
Willows	
A. A. King .
J. S. McCallum .
W. J. Knox...
P. McCaffrey .
B. B. Marr   ..
A. J. Stuart .
J. N. Taylor.
Miss Morrison .
Miss McClung .
Miss O'Brien.
31
30
5
3
2
3
20
18
1
3
2
4
5
28
27
3
5
4
7
187
174
9
10
18
7
21
16
16
1
6
5
50
50
2
2
4
3
17
40
38
3
2
7
22
22
2
1
1
12
12
507
507
20
5
7
2
20
20
28
26
4
1
4
3
2
143
134
2
3
14
14
47
47
17
14
1
1
2
1
8
8
49
46
1
1
1
21
20
1
55
52
1
1
i
21
20
28
27
18
81
17
77
1
2
1
l
126   .
109
13
2
2
58
57
3
19
13
92
82
6
2
2
122
118
4
1
55
54
2
14
14
21
21
32
28
1
19
17
27
23
7
2
87
78
21
185
168
39
10
22
21
8
3
99
88
29
69
65
22
3
42
35
12
3
57
53
17
67
65
24
3
56
54
1
2
53
49
2
73
68
1
1
2
1
21
19
28
27
1
1
23
21
1
4
126
123
2
2
43
43
3
2
2
20
19
2
62
55
1
3
50
40
2
38
38
2
2
3
1
2
55
51
4
3
3
1
326
281
23
11
19
2
3
24
35
30
1
1
3
2
17
15
3
1
1
47
41
1
1
2
20
37
20
33
1
2
3
279
269
1
3
23
27
22
281
272
1
2
20
2
25
25
5
6
7
36
4
17
10
12
56
14
29
10
8
7
2
12
7
6
12
64
6
3
3
3
 16
Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 33
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Oi
t-
n 22
03 +3
03   03
Qir
-a
Qi       .
rt a
il
03
o
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
u
01
03
et
rn
6
.T
03
a
a
a
o
fc
bn
a
u
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
4
1
6
27
2
10
5
6
71
7
20
2
5
2
3
2
1
2
5
4
3
6
4
3
2
....
7
30
42
7
20
31
15
24
40
6
3
6
2
2
2
2
3
31
1
3
7
10
7
18
3
2
1
2
Good	
Good.
Good.
Poor	
Good	
Bad.
Good.
Heart, 1...   .
13
12
Good	
2
2
2
Cardiac, 1 ; infantile paralysis,
1 ; Erb's palsy, 1 ; chorea, 1
Dwarf, 1 ; chorea, 1 ; anaemia,
3 ; eczema, 1
Scarlet fever, 7; ckicken-
pox, 5; pneumonia, 1 ;
acute rheumatism,  1;
Majority vaccinated ....
22 ; clean ; adequate.
Adequate ; sanitary.
Scarlet fever    	
Good	
2
2
' i'
3
3
2
3
2
2
■'      	
Scarlet fever; diphtheria
Scarlet fever	
Scarlet fever	
Measles	
Chicken-pox	
Poorly heated ....
Good	
Not properly
flushed.
i
1
1
2
In need of repair.
Not properly
flushed.
3
2
2
Chicken-pox  	
Cl
5
2
1
1
3
1
16
2
5
1
24
7
Good	
Chicken-pox	
Diphtheria, 3;   scarlet
4
6
"      	
1
Measles, 5	
"
Chicken-pox; measles, 1
4
5
5
14
67
5
3
5
3
6
22
48
4
....
7
5
3
9
4
2
20
2
1
3
1
4
24
32
1
5
2
2
Satisfactory	
"Flu," 4	
"Flu," 3   	
Measles, 3; "Flu," 3
"Flu," 5
Clean ; adequate.
2
1
"Flu," 1	
V e ry   unsatisfactory
Satisfactory	
Whooping-cough, 3; measles, 1
Chorea, 1; eczema, 1	
Clean ; adequate.
Anamiia,  7 ;   cardiac,  1;   pulmonary, 1 ;   skin, 2 ;   orthopedic, 2 ; defective speech, 1;
blepharitis, 1
Anieinia, 11; keloid, 1 ; blepharitis, 3 ; orthopaidic, 1; de-
fective speech, 1
1
Smallpox,  scarlet fever,
chicken-pox, whooping cough
Smallpox,  scarlet fever,
chicken-pox
Excellent; no overcrowding ; ventilation and heating satisfactory
Excellent; no overcrowding; ventilation and heating satisfactory
"
3
 N 34
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
rt
ft
$5
a
<H   QJ
a   .
Cn tS
^  Qi
a
qj >.
QJ
QJ
■oj 6c
'o
&
Z.      t.
a>.2
A Qi
(^ Qi
rt
'S 5
V>.S!3
aj qj
OJ   £
S
3S
fl>
QK
Ppq
•4
Peachland:
Peachland	
Trepanier	
Penticton :
Ellis	
Pitt Meadows :
Pitt Meadows	
Richardson	
Point Grey:
Edith Cavell	
Kerrisdale  	
Lord Kitchener...
Lloyd George	
Magee 	
Oak Street	
Prince of Wales...
Queen Mary	
Strath cona Height;
Richmond :
Bridgeport	
Lord Byng	
General Currie
English 	
Lulu	
Mitchell  	
Sea Island	
Trites	
Saanich :
Cedar Hill	
Cloverdale	
Craigflower	
Gordon Head	
Keating   	
Model	
MacKenzie Avenue
North Daily	
Wm. Buchanan.
H. McGregor.,.
L. Broe ..
W. Dyke .
W. K. Hall .
Miss M. Ewart	
Miss M. Griffin.
63
12
62
39
321
503
482
101
429
452
39
33
29
87
77
25
117
37
168
47
12
38
611
496
702
5S0
120
566
37
30
25
82
74
22
179
237
37
57
4 i 3
1 10
10
2
171
20
25
25
35
2
3
5
6
10
8
4
5
5
8
12
8
2
5
3
1
2
1
5
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 35
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Qi
a a
WO
o
Other Conditions,   specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a"
Qi
2
6
be
Qi
|
O
fc
b£
QJ
aJ
&
>
Ol
M
P4
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated,  etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
45
12
89
122
9-
16
5
7
94
1
106
1
64
103
6
98
3
12
68
1
126
1
Maxillary sinusitis, 1; displace
ment of viscera, 1; hay-fever,
3 ; stammering, 1 ; cardiac.
2 ; bronchitis, 1; asthma, 1
■ post diphtheria paralysis 1 ;
right arm deformity, 1 ; pigeon breast, 2 ; cleft palate, 1;
rheumatism, I ; anaemia, 3 ;
nephritis, 1 ; skin-diseases, 4;
granulated lids, 9 ; nystagmus, 1
Heart cases, 2
Heart cases, 2
Enlarged thyroid, 45 ; nervous,
6 ;   cardiac, 1 ;   orthopsedic,
24 ; anaemia, 2
Enlarged thyroid, 55 ; nervous,
9 ; pulmonary, 1 ; cardiac, 1;
orthopaedic, 30 ; anaemia, 4
Enlarged thyroid, 36 ; nervous,
2 ; orthopaedic, 21 ; anaemia,
3
Enlarged thyroid, 49 ; nervous,
4 ; cardiac,  3 ;   orthopaedic,
29 ; anamiia, 1
Enlarged thyroid, 42 ; nervous,
4 ; pulmonary, 1 ; cardiac, 1;
orthopsedic, 12 ; anaemia, 1
Enlarged thyroid, 6; nervous,
1; cardiac, 2 ; orthopedic, 5
Enlarged thyroid, 45 ; nervous,
2; cardiac, 1 ; orthopaidic,
17 ; anamiia, 6
Enlarged thyroid, 55 ; nervous,
5 ; pulmonary, 1; cardiac, 1;
orthopaidic, 33 ; anaemia, 3
Enlarged thyroid, 27 ; nervous,
7 ; cardiac, 1; orthopsedic, 5
Squint, 1; blepharitis, 1; vernal
catarrh, 1; vaccinated, 58
Squint, 3; chorea, 1 ; diseased
eye, 1; blepharitis, 3; acute
appendicitis, 1; vaccinated,
67
Herpes, 1; paralysis, 1 ; vaccinated, 35
Vaccinated, 12	
Squint, 1 ; knee-joint, 1; vaccinated, 22
quint, i ; anaemia, 1 ; blepharitis, 1 ; orthopaedic, 1 ; vaccinated, 46
Vaccinated, 25	
Scarlet fever, 17 ;    diph
theria, 2
Measles, 9;scarletfever, 3
Mumps, 28; scarlet fever
8; smallpox, 2 ; chicken-pox, 26
Mumps, 2 ;    measles, 1
whooping - cough,    1
scarlet fever, 8; chick
en-pox,    12;        smallpox, 1
Scarlet fever, 12; small
pox, 1
Mumps, 37; whooping-
cough, 6; chicken-pox,
14 ; scarlet fever, 17
Mumps, 3;    measles, 1;
whooping - cough,   1
scarlet fever, 8
Whooping-cough, 2;
chicken-pox, 1
Whooping- cough, 21 ;
scarlet fever, 7 ; chicken-pox, 44
Mumps, 33; whooping-
cough, 1 ; scarlet fever,
15 ;   chicken-pox,   47;
smallpox, 2
Scarlet fever, 3	
Chicken-pox, 20 ; scarlet
fever, 4;  mumps, 10;
whooping-cough, 10
Chicken-pox, 3;  scarlet
fever, 1
Smallpox, 2	
Scarlet fever, 2	
Whooping-cough, 6 ..
Whooping-cough, 4..
Chicken-pox, 2	
Satisfactory
Excellent .
Sanitary ; good.
Modern ; O. K....
Frame;  O.K..
Modern ; O. K.
Frame ;  O.K.
Satisfactory.
Excellent,
Ample.
Diphtheria,  1 ;   measles,
6; whooping-cough, 9;
pneumonia, 1
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
4 ; whooping-cough, 2;
diphtheria, 1 ; pneumonia, 1
Measles, 1; mumps, 1;
whooping-cough, 1
Measles, 1 ; whooping-
cough, 15
Scarlet fever, 1 ; diphtheria, 1; whooping-
cough, 3; chicken-pox,
1; pneumonia, 1
Measles, 1; chicken-
pox, 1
Clean ; adequate.
 N 36
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL MUNICIPAL
"3
m
,2
a
ft
O
£
Name of School.
Medical
Inspector.
School Nurse.
1-1 xt
«H   Qi
ir V
M  QJ
«h a
°1
a
QJ  ^
QJ
QJ
fc M
J3 a
u •■-*
> _a
2
o
a
xt
O a
i*5 Qi
«
o 3
V> m
o o
z. s
^
Q«
ck
QM
Qffl
<
KH
Saanich— Continued.
Prospect Lake	
Eoyal Oak	
Saanicbton	
Saanich, West	
Strawberry Vale....
Tillicum Road	
Tolmie	
Tolmie Primary	
Sumas :
Huntingdon  	
Kilgarde	
Straiton   	
Whatcom Road	
Summerland :
Central	
Surrey :
Anniedale	
Clayton	
Cloverdale	
Colebrook   	
Crescent Beach.	
Elgin 	
Grand View Heights
Hall's Prairie.   	
Johnston Road	
Kensington, East...
Kensington, Prairie
Newton   ....  	
Port  Mann	
Springdale	
Strawberry   Hill	
Surrey Centre	
Tynehead 	
Westminster South .
White Rock	
Woodward Hill	
Vancouver, North :
Capilano	
Keith  Lynn	
Lynn Valley	
North Star	
Roche Point 	
R. L. Miller	
Miss M. Griffin....
»    	
"         	
T. A. Swift	
»         	
	
	
R. V. McCarley  	
35
37
79
73
38
37
52
93
45
80
244
223
248
229
75
71
51
48
32
15
80
30
12
80
278
263
16
44
145
15
35
138
23
26
20
25
30
25
77
29
23
71
47
46
36
43
46
30
84
76
33
48
32
38
44
32
42
27
46
112
35
106
153
146
32
31
105
105
83
83
293
291
195
195
23
23
38
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 37
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
bn
Qi
3
Qi
ft
a
w
Qi
at
a
r>
m
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
4
2
6
1
8
1
7
14
2
1
2
27
4
27
13
5
1
10
3
7
4
3
13
2
4
1
10
110
35
115
4
4
2
5
2
1
16
"7
3
2
7
1
3
5
1
4
5
6
4
1
2
4
7
14
3
5
2
2
2
3
1
1
3
2
13
5
11
2
20
21
8
1
3
19
12
5
13
6
4
62
17
38
34
14
14
11
1
Vaccinated, 13	
Blepharitis, 1 ; vaccinated, 44
Squint, 1 ; vaccinated, 31
Vaccinated, 10.	
Blepharitis,  1 ; vaccinated, 43
Blepharitis, 2 ; squint, 1 ; diseased ears, 1 ; vaccinated, 71
Cardiac, 1 ; nervous, 1 ; stammers, 1 ; laryngeal, 1 ; blepharitis, 3 ; vaccinated, 123
Diseased eye, 1 ; vaccinated, 31
Pulmonary, 1,
Acne, 2 ; eczema, 3 ; nervous
stammering, 1 ; anaemia, 9 ;
cardiac, 4 ; pulmonary, 3 ;
lupus erythematus
Cleft palate, 1; bronchitis, 1..
Paralysis, 1	
Amputation, 1; pigeon-chest,
1; defective palate, 1 ; cryptic tonsil, 1; functional systolic, 3 ; bronchitis, 2; endocarditis, 1
Cellulitis, 1	
Defective palate due to operation
High-arch palate, 1; eczema, 1
Marginal blepharitis, 1	
Pigeon-chest, 1 ; anaemia, 2 ;
defective palate, 1
High-arch palates, 2	
Defective speech, 1	
Infantile paralysis, 1 ; facial
paralysis, 1
Cryptic tonsil, 1; chorea, 1;
paralysis, 1
Anaemia, 1; D.A.H., 1	
Endocarditis, 1 ; T.B. adenitis,
3 ; cryptic tonsil, 1 ; abnormal palate, 1
T.B. arthritis, 1	
Defective palate from operation, 1; synovitis, 1
Flat feet, 1 ; cryptic tonsil, 1..
Defective palate, 1; anaemia, 1 ;
cleft palate, 1 ; functional
systolic, 2
T.B. adenitis, 1; T.B. meningitis, 1 ; blepharitis, 1; fiat
chest, 2 ; appendix, 1 ; functional systolic, 2
Deformed hand, 1	
Epilepsy, 1 ; asthma, 1 ; valvular heart, 1
Nervous, 1 ; valvular heart-disease, 2
Nervous, 1 ; valvular heart-disease, 1
Chorea, 1 ; asthma, 1 ; valvular
heart, 1
Measles
pox, 1
Mumps, 1
pox, 1 ;
cough, 1
Measles, 3;
4 ; chicken-
;        chicken -
whooping-
scarlet fever,
1; whooping-cough, 20
Chicken-pox, 1   	
Measles, 14 ; mumps, 3 ;
whooping-cough, 1
Mumps, 4 ; chicken -
pox, 2
Measles, 4 ; scarlet fever,
3 ; smallpox, 1 ; chicken-pox, 2; whooping-
cough 1
Whooping-cough, 2 ...   .
Chicken-pox, 9; whooping-cough, 16 ; infantile paralysis, 2
Scarlet fever, 2 .
Chicken-pox, 4 .
Scarlet fever, 3
Scarlet fever, 3 .
Scarlet fever, 1 .
Chicken-pox, 3 .
Mumps, 3	
Scarlet fever, 3 .
Chicken-pox, 6 .
Chicken-pox, measles.
Scarlet fever	
Whooping-cough	
Scarlet fever, whooping-
cough 	
Whooping-cough	
Clean ; adequate.
Boys' should he
cleaned ; girls'
O.K.
Should be lined.
Modern; well ventilated and heated
Unsatisfactory.
Satisfactory ...
Inadequate.
Satisfactory .
No water	
Satisfactory .
Not satisfactory :
insufficient accommodation
Adequate ; all
flush type.
Poor.
Fair.
Satisfactory.
Good.
Poor.
Good.
Fair.
Poor.
Fair.
Smelly.
Poor.
Primitive.
Satisfactory.
Primitive,
Clean ; adequate.
Fairly clean and
adequate.
 N 38
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School
Vancouver, South :
Brock 	
Carleton	
Champlain	
Connaught	
Gordon	
Moberley	
R. McBride	
Sir A. Mackenzie ..
John Norquay	
Laura Secord	
Lord Selkirk	
Sexsmith 	
Teeumseh	
Van Home	
Wolfe	
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"ft
ft
21
3
Pi     ■
Xi
a   .
d xt
Qi
U
a
a
QJ  >i
QJ
« B
Qi
> be
4)   tC
05
O ^«
O
IS
rU     QJ
°i
QJ   ^
B
a
ti
Ort
z>
CK
QM
^
G. A. Lamont ,
Miss E. Edwards
Miss E. Bell .
Miss E. Edwards. .
Miss E. Bell
Miss E. Edwards..
474
473
13
1
14
1
15
33
1035
1031
13
26
1
5S
57
26
25
4
1
4
50
48
6
2
1
9
9
435
430
17
2
15
1
40
42
475
474
12
3
7
1
9
20
745
744
11
17
1
13
34
653
653
12
1
6
3
16
35
366
361
13
1
7
27
27
251
251
13
5
1
13
18
926
915
15
16
21
3
62
50
297
297
21
8
1
7
14
645
639
15
3
13
1
33
30
345
345
10
1
8
3
19
657
657
13
11
1
10
35
3
15
9
40
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 39
SCHOOLS—Continued.
0)
xi
QEH
HO
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc).
d
to
S
QJ
be
y
J2
a;
ft
a
Cfl
.s
>
m
M
tf
Acute Fevers  which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean  and
adequate.
145
9
392
34
13
47
5
187
20
229
6
223
17
276
11
136
4
90
9
338
49
92
3
313
33
142
6
218
16
Vaccinations,   51 ;    heart,   4
hernia, 1
Vaccinations, 293 ; pulmonary
bronchitis, 4 ; heart, 8 ; hernia, 4
Vaccinations, 13
Vaccinations, 5.
Vaccinations,   26 ;  pulmonary
bronchitis, 3 ; heart, 2 ; her-
Pulmonary bronchitis, 1; heart,
3
Vaccinations, 103 ; pulmonary
bronchitis, 2 ; heart, 3 ; hernia, 4
Vaccinations,  251 ;   heart,  1 ;
hernia, 2
Vaccinations,   96 ;  pulmonary
bronchitis, 1 ; heart, 2
Vaccinations, 27 ; pulmonary
bronchitis, 1 ; heart, 2 ; hernia, 1
Vaccinations, 120 ; pulmonary
bronchitis, 1 ; heart, 8 ; hernia, 4
Vaccinations, 96 ; heart, 2.
Vaccinations,  98 ;   pulmonary
bronchitis, 4 ; heart, 5
Vaccinations, 36 ; heart 10..
Vaccinations, 65 ; pulmonary
bronchitis, 2 ; heart, 4, hernia, 3
Diphtheria, 3; nasal and
throat swabs, 60 ; scarlet fever, 3; mumps, 6 ;
whooping - cough, 4 ;
chicken-pox, 11
Diphtheria, 4 ; carriers,
1; nasal and throat
swabs, 12 ; mumps, 3 ;
whooping - cough, 3 ;
chicken-pox, 16; smallpox, 3; scarlet fever,
30
Mumps, 1 ; wrhooping-
eough, 1; chicken-pox,
1
Nasal and throat ewabs,
1; whooping-cough, 1
Diphtheria, 2 ; carriers,
3; nasal and throat-
swabs, 43 ; mumps, 12 ;
whooping-cough, 1;
chicken-pox, 28; scarlet
fever, 12
Diphtheria, 1; nasal and
throat swabs, 74; scarlet fever, 10; whooping-cough, 1; chicken-
pox, 45
Diphtheria, 1; carriers, 1;
nasal and throat swabs,
1; mumps, 28; whooping-cough, 2; chicken-
pox, 1 ; smallpox, 1;
scarlet fever, 11
Nasal and throat swabs,
1; whooping-cough, 1;
chicken-pox, 36; small
pox, 16; scarlet
fever, 13
Nasal and throat swabs,
1; mumps, 2 ; whooping - cough, 3 ; chicken-pox, 21; smallpox,
1 ; scarlet fever, 21 ;
measles, 1
Whooping-cough, 4	
Diphtheria, 2; carriers, 3;
nasal ami throat swabs,
40 ; whooping-cough,
11; chicken-pox, 24 ;
smallpox, 1 ; scarlet
fever, 35 ; measles, ] ;
typhoid, 1
Diphtheria, 2; carriers,1;
nasal and throat swabs,
23 ; mumps, 1 ; whooping-cough, 9; chicken-
pox, 6 ; smallpox, 3 ;
scarlet fever, 12
Diphtheria, 2; mumps, 1;
nasal and throat swabs,
40; whooping-cough,
15 ; chicken-pox, 1 ;
scarlet fever, 10
Diphtheria, 1; carders, 1;
whooping-cough, 16;
chicken-pox, 54; smallpox, 2 ; scarlet fever,
10 ; nasal and throat
swabs, 27
Diphtheria, 5; carriers, 5;
mumps, 5 ; whooping-
cough, 9; chicken-pox,
7; scarlet fever, 9
Fair.
Main satisfactory
Annex fair
Satisfactory .
Satisfactory
Main satisfactory
Annex fair
Satisfactory .
Fair
Satisfactory
Satisfactory; adequate.
Fair; adequate.
Adequate ; fairly
satisfactory.
Satisfactory; adequate.
Satisfactory; ade-
q uate.
Satisfactory; adequate.
Satisfactory; adequate.
Inadequate ; unsatisfactory.
Satisfactory; adequate.
Satisfactory; adequate.
Main adequate ;
Annex fair.
Satisfactory; adequate.
Satisfactory; adequate.
Satisfactory; adequate.
Satisfactory; adequate.
 N 40
British Columbia.
1925
RTJKAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
oa
"ft
a
fc   .
'sS
'—■   Qi
© '-;
O
fc    03
'ft
a  .
Qj Xi
W  QJ
tn a
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tr, 02
a
o
V.
03 >.
> 222
-£t
03  q
s 33
PS
03
i§
Qi>
03
T     3rt0
rt.  333
03  H
C3   O
RK
d
330
033
fc
03 Oil
>to
01 T2
03   33I
03   u
3
0
to
03
<
Enlarged
Tonsils.                  1
T. A. Swift	
208
12
16
9
9
8
45
16
30
22
18
13
9
13
36
14
14
15
20
63
10
28
16
7
26
21
22
14
24
11
12
13
19
19
20
21
36
21
24
12
13
5
7
22
9
12
10
12
10
51
16
9
35
10
6
12
23
12
16
18
14
22
12
13
23
28
199
12
15
9
9
7
37
16
28
22
17
11
9
13
29
14
12
14
19
61
8
26
16
6
25
12
20
14
24
11
12
12
16
19
20
14
36
21
18
12
12
5
7
22
8
10
8
10
10
50
16
6
35
6
4
9
23
12
15
17
14
22
12
13
19
28
8
2
1
2
1
5
14
D. J. Barclay	
3
3
1
R. Fel ton   	
2
1
3'
3
1
1
3
3
4
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
2
0
1
3
4
2
1
1
1
14
5
4
7
6
7
1
9
6
4
1
3
5
14
4
3
3
8
3
4
1
2
1
i
0
2
W. Rose 	
Lee Smith	
A. Francis  	
M. G. Archibald	
Anglemont	
3
3
1
J. B. Thom     .
1
1
2
1
Arrow Park, West	
"7
3
1
1
1
12
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
2
Ashton Creek 	
H. W. Keith	
F. E. Cov ..
Atlin	
C. M. Eaten	
Balfour    	
D. J. Barclay	
W. Scatrhard	
Barriere River	
H. H. Murphy ...   .
II. A. Christie	
1
1
1
1
1
1
W R. Stone...
3
1
Beaton	
Beaver Creek 	
2
2
io
5
1
1
1
1
1
5
2
1
1
1
3
6
4
11
3
10
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
2
34
3
1
3
Bella Coola	
G. Bayfield	
3
•2'
3
1
1
1
11
6
1
1
12
5
1
1
5
1
Bench   ..   	
Beresf ord	
Big Eddy	
Big Sand	
H. A. Christie     	
3
1
1
3
2
12
3
Black Canyon	
R. W. Irving	
E Sheffield	
6
2
4
2
8
Blakeburn	
Blind Bay ..
W. Scatchard ..
W. W. Birdsall	
3
1
1
1
Blue Ridge	
Blue River	
Bonaparte Valley	
Bonnington Falls	
2
•1
1
2
1
8
2
3
2
6
4
T
i
3
1
2
G. R. Baker	
1
"2'
2
1
2
1
1
3
Boston Bar	
P M. Wilson .   ..
G. B. Henderson	
A. Francis	
Bowen Island	
Bowie 	
1
1
1
1
6
7
3
9
3
2
N. J- Paul	
1
3
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 41
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
03
t-
02 22
03 4^
•Al   O
03   03
OR
-3
Jrt      T
a 22
AA   02
h3
oj
o
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
u
Qi
>
Qi
2
efl
o
m
6
be
%
ft
a
a
u
o
a
tf
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
25
4
17
2
15
Epidemic of scabies, scarlet fever, 2
Good	
Girls' good ; boys'
fair.
2
Club-foot under treatment, 1;
anaemia, 1
Chicken-pox, 6 ; measles,
1
Good	
Fair	
Yes.
Fair
1
1
1
Satisfactory .
Clean ; well ventilated
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
2
24
5
5
6
1
2
i
2
3
7
Eczema, 1; infantile paralysis, 1
Clean ; adequate.
10
6
Clean ; adequate.
11
Good	
O.K	
4
O.K.
4
4
1
3'
14
1
1
7
14
2
2
2
25
6
2
2
No   thermometer;
no cloak-room
Satisfactory.
2
11
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
6
Fair	
Good	
2
6
4
16
..
Clean ; adequate.
8
Clean ; adequate.
Eight; clean ; adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
6
Club-foot, 1 ■.	
4
8
8
No  thermometer;
Modern	
Satisfactory.
3
4
Two ;  require
cleaning,
(/lean ; adequate.
Yes.
2
Scarlet fever, measles...
6
1
8
1
1
Clean ; adequate.
5
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory.
Good.
3
1
3
4
1
1
4
5
12
8
6
Excellent	
Crowded	
Pits nearly filled.
Good.
12
Smallpox, 2	
7
6
O.K	
Frame building in
good repair
6
9
8
Clean ; adequate.
..
4
Good.
7
Fairly suitable....
5
5
2
3
I
4
2
4
Main school good ;
small school unsuitable ;     poor
ventilation;
overcrowded
Good."
5
Clean ; adequate.
7
Good	
Good.
5
6
No thermometer..
Require repairs.
6
4
2
1
3
2
Clean ;   well  ventilated
Good	
Both.
1
Require new pits.
Clean ; adequate.
2
2
3
5
4
4
3
5
6
Pertussis, 1	
Dirty.
5
Good	
O.K	
Lighting defective
Good	
Not crowded; well
ventilated ; well
heated
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
O.K.
3
4
4
2
9
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
5
T
i
5
1
8
2
4
15
quate.
Good.
 N 42
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
_
cd
m
rji
'ft
ft
o
z
1-1 x\
tH  Qi
a;z!
a   .
a, <rs
w  QJ
tn a
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QJ *,
a?
aj.°
QJ
a t1
si
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£   Cl)
* £
OJ
-a
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G!>
AM
QP3
«.
= 19   I !» ,
P   21
ma
Brechin   ..
Bridesville
Brisco 	
Britannia Beach .
Britannia .Mine ..
Brookmere	
Brown Creek....
Buckley Bay
Bull River Bridge.
Burgoyne Bay.. ..
Burns Lake	
Burtondale   .....
Cache Creek	
Cahility   	
Campbell Creek .
Camp Lister....
Campbell River
Camp No. 2	
Camp No. 3	
Canford 	
Canyon City ....
Canyon Creek ...
Carlin Siding	
Carrol's Landing.
Carson	
Cartier     	
Cascade	
Cassidy	
Castledale  	
Castlegar 	
Castle Rock	
Cawston 	
Cedar, East	
Cedar. North	
Cedar, South	
Chase	
Chase Creek Lower
Chase River	
Chaumox  	
Cheakamus	
Cheamview	
Cherry Creek  Valley.
Chilco	
Chinook Cove	
Christina Lake.
Christian Valley.
Chu-Chua	
Clayoquot
Clearwater	
Clinton	
Coal Creek	
Coalmont	
Cobble Hill	
Cokato  	
Columbia Gardens.
Colwood	
Comox	
Concord	
Coombs	
Copper City	
Corbin	
Cowichan Lake...
Cowichan Station.
Craigellachie ....
Crawford Bay	
Crawford Creek ..
Crescent Valley...
Creston	
T. J. McPhee .
A. Francis . ..
T. E. Coy	
A. M. Menzies .
J. J. Gillis...
W. Truax ...
Guy Palmer .
H. A. Christie ...
E. M. Sutherland .
C. H. Hankinson .
P. J. Emerson   ...
R. Gibson	
R. W. Irving
C. J. Willoughby .
G. B. Henderson..
R. Ziegler	
T. A. Briggs	
J. J. Gillis	
G. B. Henderson.
C. Ewert  	
E. Buckell	
P. J. Emerson ...
W. Truax	
J. H. Hamilton ..
W. Truax	
T. J. McPhee	
Paul Ewert	
H. H. Mackenzie .
G. Baker 	
M. D. McEwen    ..
T. J. McPhee	
W. Scatchard.
T. J. McPhee.
P. M. Wilson ..
N. J. Paul ....
J. C. Elliot . . .
A.D. Morgan. .
W. R. Stone ..
H. H. Murphy.
W. Truax	
A. Francis
H. H. Murphy.
D. S. Dixson...
M. G. Archibald
R. Gibson   	
Wm. Workman.
E. Sheffield	
F. T. Stanier ....
D. Corsan	
J. B. Thorn	
R. Felton 	
T. A. Briggs	
J. C. Elliot	
L. T. Davis	
E. W. Ewart ....
R. Elliot	
E. L. Garner	
H. N. Watson ...
.1. H. Hamilton..
D. J. Barclay....
.1. II. Hamilton..
H. H. Mackenzie
G. B. Henderson
Miss Gawley.
Miss Kelly.
Miss Murraj-.
Miss .Naden..
Miss Jeffares.
147
12
14
53
66
11
19
20
43
24
50
32
9
6
14
25
55
18
14
16
70
8
23
15
22
37
24
74
42
15
55
8
63
22
117
13
92
8
11
10
15
11
11
24
48
98
30
23
12
15
41
71
54
31
49
17
31
10
25
220
139
12
12
63
65
11
18
20
40
24
44
27
7
6
14
25
55
17
12
13
65
8
21
14
22
37
23
70
4
37
15
52
8
57
20
110
13
90
10
11
15
11
9
9
11
24
46
98
29
20
11
15
32
69
10
38
24
43
14
30
10
21
204
11
4
5       2
30
21
17
....      3
4
4
11
"z
1
1    ....
10
18
4
2    ....
16
23
1    ....
1
1
2
1    ....
3
1
4
1
1
2    ....
3
3
3
8
8
10
2
3
2
4
1        1
13
8
8
14
1
1
1
1       1
1
1
1
1
1    ....
1
3
1    ....
3
3
6
1        1
4
4
4
2
2
2
1
4
2
2
2        I
2
6
5    .
3
4
3
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2    ....
2
2
2
3
3    ....
1
1
3
'
1
7       4
16
11
11
2
5
1
4
1
1
4
13
6
1    ....
8
1
1
1
4
1
8        3
16
10
10
2
2    ....
4
2
1
4
17
21
15
21
4
1
4       3
11
1       1
1
1
2
3    ....
3
1        1
6
2
2
2
4
1
1
2
1    ....
1
1
1
1
1
2      ..
1    ...
1     ....
2
1
8
1
8
3    ....
1
3
3
4
6       3
9
14
5
2
12       9
8
9
18
1    ....
5
14
1
1
4       2
1
1
5
1
1    ....
6
1
1
8
1
2       2
1
6       5
6
6
15
....      1
1
3
1
I
1
2
1     ...
1
1
3
3
3
7       6
13
13
13
4
1
1     ....
1
7
6
6
6
9
1    ....
1
1
1
10    ....
5
5
15
1
1    	
2    ....
7
9
2
17    ....
11
18
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 43
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Qi
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QJ    -
SoJS
aJ
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Qi *-
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Qi   OJ
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Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
a
a
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3
6
QJ
ft
a
a
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IS
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H
at
a
QJ
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m
S
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
77
47
11
"9
9
4
6
16
4
12
6
3
1
3
2
3
1
7
1
2
8
2
11
1
Scarlet   fever,   chicken-
pox
Good	
O.K.
4
O.K	
Good	
Satisfactory   ....
a
Clean ; adequate.
<M
Whooping-cough, 7	
<,
Good	
Air-space    adequate; wellventi-
lated and heated
8
1
•>,
Clean ; adequate.
99
10
Defective speech, 1; backward,
2
Satisfactory.
Yes.
9
Chicken-pox	
Good	
Clean	
Satisfactory	
Good	
9
1
1
Clean ; adequate.
9
1
2
10
1
5
3
Satisfactory.
Adequate.
O.K.
Clean ; adequate.
7
1
Scarlet fever.....°	
5
5
One right arm amputated..
Excellent	
Good	
4
3
2
3
2
13
2
9
2
1
6
2
4
1
8
1
9
	
Adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
4
Whooping-cough	
9
Good	
6
6
4
i
14
2
1
O.K.
1
In need of improvement
Excellent 	
Good	
Inadequate.
Clean ; adequate.
O.K.
13
2
Chicken-pox, 13	
10
2
22
8
19
1
6
2
Yes.
4
O.K.
23
4
2
68
7
14
2
2
8
1
11
55
No thermometer..
Good.
6
Scarlet fever, 1; measles,
4
Fair.
22
2
1
O.K.
3
Dirty.
7
Good.
7
Good	
Window    lighting
very bad
Good	
O.K	
Requires new floor
Not crowded;
well    ventilated
and heated
8
Clean ; adequate.
3
2
2
4
1
Two ; require
cleaning.
5
5
3
3
quate.
O.K.
7
Two ; require
cleaning.
Clean ; adequate.
7
6
6
1
4
ii
'2'
1
9
2
4
2
11
14
2
3
6
2
1
1
6
8
Good..
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
23
Cardiac, 7 ; chorea, 2	
3
No...
9
Poor	
O.K	
Good	
13
Whooping-cough, 6
9
in
Ptosis, 1 ; nervous stammer, 1
V.D.H.,  1	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
18
5
7
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
Good	
Fair	
Lighting not good
Fair	
Good	
1
Clean ; adequate.
19
9
Clean ; adequate.
3
1
1
30
1
3
9
Whooping-cough	
15
8
Vaccinated, 14	
Clean ; adequate.
Adequate.
28
 N 44
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
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a o
Crows Nest..
Croydon ....
Cultus Lake.
Dashvvood  ..
Dawson Creek	
Dawson Creek, North.
Dawson Creek, South.
Decker Lake 	
Deep Cove	
Deep Creek	
Deer Park	
Demars, West
Denman Island....
Departure Bay	
Dewdney  	
Diamond Crossing .
Divide 	
Doe Creek	
Dome Creek 	
Dorr	
Doriston	
Dorreen  	
Dove Creek	
Dragon Lake	
Driftwood   	
Ducks Range	
Dunster   	
Eagle Valley.......
Edgewater	
Edgewood  	
Elk Bay	
Elk Bridge	
Elko	
Elk Prairie.
Ellison .
Elphinstone Bay
Endako 	
Enderby, North .
Engen 	
Erickson ........
Erie	
Errington	
Essington	
Evelyn	
Ewing's Landing.
Extension	
Fairview ..
Falkland . .
Fanny Bay
Fauquier ..
Field  	
Fife	
Firvale  	
Fish Lake	
Flagstone	
Florence Mine	
Forestdale	
Forest Grove	
Forks   	
Fort Fraser	
Fort Fraser, North..
Fort George 	
Fort George, South.
Fort St. James	
Fort Steele	
Foster's Bar	
Fraser Lake	
Fruitlands	
Fruitvale	
Galena Bay	
R. Elliot....
J. P. Mackie.
J. C. Elliot..
L. T. Davis ..
W. A. Watson .
C. H. Hankinson
S. E. .\1. Hoops ..
H. VV. Keith	
,1. E. H. Kelso
P. J. Emerson   ...
H. .Meadows	
T. J. McPhee	
A. J. Stuart   ....
H. B. Maxwell...
E. M. Sutherland .
W. A. Watson .   ..
J. W. Lang	
H. A. Christie
F. Inglis	
V. E. R. Ardagh .
T. A. Briggs	
G. B. Baker   	
C. H. Hankinson .
0. J. Willoughby
J. P. Mackie	
E. Buckell	
F. E. Coy	
J. E. H. Kelso....
W. W. Birdsall....
R. C. Weldon	
II. A. Christie .
R. C. Weldon ..
W. J. Knox.
F. Inglis	
W. R. Stone	
H. W. Keith	
W. R. Stone	
G. B. Henderson.
.1. B. Thorn	
L. T. Davis   	
Wm. Sager	
C. H. Hankinson
W. J. Knox   	
H. B. Maxwell ...
G. H. Kearney...
P. D. van Kleeck.
H. Meadows	
J. E. II. Kelso ...
G. A. Cheeseman .
W. Truax 	
G. Bayfield   	
M. G. Archibald .
H. A. Christie ...
D. J. Barclay	
C. H. Hankinson .
F. V. Agnew ....
R. W. Irving ....
W. R. Stone	
C. Ewert.
W. R. Stone 	
F. W. Green	
P. M. Wilson	
W. R. Stone	
C. J. Willoughby .
.1. B. Thorn 	
J. H. Hamilton...
Miss Murray.
Miss Murray.
10
12
14
14
7
7
7
14
16
25
10
41
38
16
12
14
16
10
19
6
7
14
11
28
12
16
45
11
29
18
25
6
49
9
41
22
18
12
9
24
40
17
11
11
9
8
14
13
12
60
55
10
44
12
16
105
53
10
12
14
14
7
14
12
22
10
40
9
75
38
16
6
11
14
16
10
18
6
7
14
7
19
12
16
45
11
20
27
18
25
6
48
9
41
22
16
12
92
9
23
20
8
40
16
9
8
14
9
12
28
8
65
52
10
43
6
16
91
43
10
2
1
2
2
1
1
i
"i„
1
1
i
2
1
6
2
3
2
3
3
3
1
1
1
i
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
6
3
2
"2'
4
3
2
7
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
i
12
"5'
18
11
9
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
3
1
2
2
1
i
2
5
1
8
5
3
1
1
1
1
2
7
2 ■
5
1
3
7
5
3
1
2
3
....
7
6
4
8
4
2
3
1
3
4
2
4
6
6
3
1
1
9
"3
1
i
14
4
1
2
1
4
1
2
1
"l'
17
1
8
3
10
2
2
32
2
7
2
"2
9
2
2
4
3
1
1
3
2
3
1
2
5
2
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
•>
5
4
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
"3'
5
"2
i'
"7
3
7
7
4
V
3
7
7
4
2
7
3
4
8
5
4
3
1
3
4
15
4
9
4
5
4
14
•>f\
1
1
1
 16 Geo. 5
Bo.ard of Health.
N 45
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Qi
>
is
O 03
03     .
31   __-
3. .rt
rt 22
sr rt
S3
'3
0
Other Conditions,   specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Car-
diac Disease, etc.).
333
a
u
Qi
>
OJ
o
52
d
ft
a
o
tc
rt
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if cleau and
adequate.
3
2
"i
2
i
Good	
Fair	
Not crowded ; well
ventilated   and
heated
Poor lighting	
Very good	
Good	
Satisfactory.
8
4
1
4
3
4
2
Acute influenza	
3
6
Yes.
8
"2'
Satisfactory	
Crowded ;    poorly
ventilated   and
lighted
Good	
Fair	
5
3
■>
4
Inadequate.
3
3
4
2
2
i
1
1
9
2
4
5
2
Good	
O.K.
■>n
Orthopasdie defects, 4	
2
"Flu," 3	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Very good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
7
5
Satisfactory.
Clean.
Good.
2
2
9
Clean ; adequate.
5
?
4
Adequate.
6
1
Good	
Satisfactory   	
Yes.
1
Satisfactory.
3
1
Satisfactorv	
Good	
Yes
2
3
1
Scarlet fever, 1	
Clean.
Yes.
5
Adequate	
Well    ventilated
and heated
Satisfactory	
Well     ventilated
and heated
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
5
6
21
3
1
6
2
2
5
Chronic eczema, 1; ansemia, 1;
chorea, 1
Majority vaccinated ....
18
1
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
9
15
Good	
4
9
"i
1
Clean ; adequate.
2
11
1
Not crowded ; well
ventilated   and
heated
Excellent ...
Good	
Good	
Good	
Rather crowded ..
Crowded; not very
clean
17
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
2
3
2
1
2
3
1
1
3
3
1
2
1
4
3
Majority vaccinated   ...
36
Ventral hernia,  1;   cardiac,   1;
Stills' disease, 1
5
2
Clean ; adequate.
2
3
15
4
O.K.
3
3
3
Satisfactory	
Good	
('lean ; adequate.
9
"3'
8
2
7
1
?,
1
2
2
Clean   	
Good	
11
4
Yes.
17
19
4
9
14
12
"      	
Clean ; adequate.
6
"      	
Yes
8
1
33
7
2
1
47
Good.
5
Clean ; adequate.
Yes
7
Sa'isfactory	
24
7
2
3
Good	
Good
 N 46
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School  Nurse.
ii
IR
ft
o
Z
13
<W   QJ
0
d £
3     .
Qj  Xi
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a
a
QJ   J»s
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QJ
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k a
OJ   5J
DC
"o
OJ
Z   Qi
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fl^
Q i>
PK
Q«
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Galiano	
Galiano,  North	
Galley Bay	
Ganges  	
Gerrard	
Gill	
Giscome	
Glenbank	
Glenemma	
Glenora	
Glenrosa	
Golden   	
Goldstream	
Gowland Harbour ..
Grande Prairie	
Grandview Bench...
Granite Bay	
Grantham	
Grant Mine	
Gray Creek	
Grindrod   	
Hall's  Landing	
Happy Valley	
Harewood	
Harrogate 	
Harrop     	
Hatzic Prairie	
Hazelton	
Hazelton, New	
Headquarters   	
Hedley	
Heffley Creek.......
Heffley Creek, Upper
' Heriot Bay	
Hilborn	
Hillcrest	
Hilliers	
Hilltop   	
Hilton	
Hope ,
Hope Station	
Hornby Island	
Horse Creek	
Hosmer	
Houston 	
Howe Sound 	
Hulatt	
Hunter Island	
Hupel  	
Huscrof t     ...
Hutton 	
Ingram Mountain...
Invermere	
loco	
Irving's Landing	
Isabella .Point	
Jaffray	
James Island	
Joe Rich	
Johnson's Landing..
Jordan River	
Jura	
Kaleden	
Kaleva	
Kedlestone	
Keefers	
Kelowna, East	
Kelowna, South	
R. Ziegler '.	
E. M. Sutherland	
D. J. Barclay	
P. J. Emerson  	
H. N. Watson	
Miss Jeffares	
R. Felton	
Miss Kelly _
R. Ziegler	
H. W. Keith  	
\V. W. Birdsall	
T. A. Briggs	
T. J. McPhee	
H. W. Keith 	
R. Felton	
T. J. McPhee	
H. H. Mackenzie	
M. D. McEwen	
C. J. Willoughby	
G. R. Baker	
H. W. Keith	
W. Truax	
H. G. Williams	
J. C. Elliot.	
G. E. Darby	
H. W. Keith      	
J. W. Lang	
F. E. Coy	
E. M. Sutherland	
H. A. Christie	
F. R. Pollock	
\V. J. Knox 	
W. Rose	
H. G. Williams	
P. M. Wilson	
W. J. Knox 	
17
17
13
13
8
8
57
57
8
8
32
26
64
63
46
45
9
9
23
20
16
16
134
130
23
17
18
18
21
21
19
15
9
9
37
36
78
62
8
8
100
93
11-
11
23
22
377
345
15
13
24
24
14
14
30
25
29
27
36
36
65
64
22
20
6
6
15
14
11
11
16
12
23
23
12
12
12
9
63
65
6
6
18
17
16
9
28
26
12
12
98
93
10
10
7
7
10
10
24
23
22
22
14
13
27
24
106
99
16
14
14
14
35
32
44
44
10
10
8
8
7
7
9
8
11
11
14
14
15
15
7
6
59
56
16
15
•
1
1
2
1
4
9
1
2
1
2
2
4
9
3
3
9
i
1
i
2
2
2
1
6
1
ii
6
i
i
5
2
2
1
3
6
2
1
1
6
24
16
3
3
9
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
15
2
6
i
6
1
1
2
7
6
10'
"3'
1
1
24
4
3
5
18
2
5
5
13
2
10
5
12
2
44
17'
3
2
17
5
75
58
2
41
4
1
2
1
1
1
7
9
1
1
1
1
2
"3
1
1
4
5
2
1
4
5
3
11
5
4
8
6
8
4
1
1
3
2
7
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
2
6
2
7
22
2
3
i
1
1
2
13
i
1
3
3
1
3
2
3
5
26
1
2
1
2
1
3
6
14
2
14
4
i
2
4
i'
1
2
4
2
1
1
l6'
1
2
6
5
4
3
22
1
3
3
6
2
1
2
i
2
7
2
6
2
1
i
2
1
2
2
6
2
10
fi
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
11
1
3
4
1
1
6
2
1
6
9
1
7
4
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 47
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Qi   Qi
CB
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
o
bfl
Fh
Qi
H
OJ
ft
t>
ti
rt
Acute Fevers  which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.   ,
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
9
5
1
1
Satisfactory	
Fairly satisfactory
6
Adequate.
O.K.
18
4
i
5
3
8
8
1
12
4
Satisfactory.
9,
11
Clean ; adequate
37
Fairly good	
Very good	
10
1
Yes.
9,
Old ; good condition
O.K	
Good	
Clean ; adequate
Satisfactory.
3
12
7
4
2
3
36
Eczema, 1 ; hernia, 1 ; fits, 1 ;
stammering, 1
4
Clean ; adequate
8
Yes.
3
Clean ; adequate.
Adequate.
O K.
6
"»'
"z
1
94
1
1
1
5
6
i'
i
i
2
2
8
14
2
3
14
5
-
Yes.
34
3
Good.
4
Clean ; adequate.
O.K.
130
20
1
4
4
4
1
3
5
1
5
1
2
1
2
Cardiac, 2 ; nervous, 3	
2
5
7
2
Scarlet fever, 27;   measles, 11
Good	
Adequate	
Excellent	
Very old and unsatisfactory
Good	
Good	
8
Vaccinated, 19    	
Clean ; adequate.
3
14
Cardiac, 1 ; nervous, 1 	
Orthopajdic, 2 ; bronchitis, 1.
Clean ; adequate.
15
8
10
Scarlet fever, 2; measles,
1 ; pinkeye, 2
1
Good	
Satisfactory.
Adequate.
2
1
7
Good	
Yes.
9
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
Clean	
•>
1
3
4
24
9,
Fair	
1
2
3
4
1
4
1
5
1
6
Very good	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
1-/
51
"      	
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
5
Measles
6
O.K	
O.K.
6
5
4
5
4
Scarlet fever ;   measles ;
typhoid
Adequate.
Good.
8
3
O.K	
O.K.
4
Clean ; adequate.
12
3
20
Conjunctivitis, 3 ; infantile par-
alysis, 2 ; osteomyelitis, 1
4
1
2
9
Fair.
6
1
3'
1
Not crowded; heit-
ing and ventilation good
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
?.?,
8
Measles ;   chicken - pox ;
whooping-cough
One-half vaccinated	
2
1
8
Good.
5
Yes.
3
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
3
3
1
3
1
2
8
Clean ; adequate.
1
....
8
1
3
Practically all vaccinated
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
8
3
Spinal curvature, 1 ;  infantile
paralysis, 1; chronic bronchitis, 4;  diabetic, 1 ; chorea, 2
I
1
 N 48
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL AND
a
(R
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Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
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Keremeos	
Kerr Creek	
Kettle River, North.
Kettle Valley	
Kildonan   	
Killarney  	
Kimberley	
Kingsgate	
Kinnaird   	
Kispiox    	
Kitchener	
Kitsumgallum   	
Kitwanga	
Koksilah	
Lackenby	
Lac la Hache	
Lakelse Valley	
Lakes District	
Lang Bay 	
Langford  	
Larchwood ..
Lawn Hill ...
Lazo	
Lee	
Lee Creek ..
Lillooet	
Lindell   	
Little Fort..
Long Beach .
Long Lake ..
Longworth ..
Loos	
Loos, West..
Louis Creek .
Lumby	
Lumberton   .
Lund	
Lytton	
Mabel Lake..
Magna Bay..
Malakwa
Malcolm Island	
Hanson's Landing .
Mapes  	
Mara     	
Marguerite	
Martin's Prairie. ...
Marysville   	
Mayne Island	
Mayo	
Mayook 	
Meadowdale ...
Meadow Spur..
Meadow Valley
Medora Creek
Menzies Bay..,
Merville   	
Metchosin  ...
Michel	
Michel, New.
Midway	
Mill Bay 	
Mission Creek .
Mitchell Bay	
Moha	
Monte Creek	
Morrissey Mines .
Mount Ingersoll
Moyase    	
Moyie	
Mud River    .
Myucaster	
M. D. McEwen ..
A. Francis	
W. Truax    	
A. Francis	
A. D. Morgan ...
Lee Smith 	
D. P. Hanington
G. B. Henderson.
J. B. Thorn	
R. G. Large ....
G. B. Henderson.
E. W. Ewert ....
V. E. R. Ardagh .
H. N. Watson ...
R. W. Irving ....
T. V. Agnew ....
E. W. Ewart	
W. R. Stone 	
A. Henderson ..
R. Felton 	
VV. Green  	
H. Bleecker ...
A. Briggs	
P. Mackie	
S^atchard	
C. Nash	
C. Elliot	
J. Willoughby .
H. Mackenzie..
J. Willoughby .
W. Lang	
P. Mackie  	
W. Irving ...
G. Williams .
W. Green.. ..
Ziegler	
M. Wilson . ,
G. Williams .
Scatchard...
II. Hamilton.
W. Rose	
R. Ziegler	
W. R. Stone	
H. W. Keith   	
G. Baker 	
0. J. Willoughby .
D. P. Hanington..
C. H. West	
H. N Watson ..
H. A. Christie ..
W. R. Stone  ...
J. B. Thorn	
F. W. Andrew ..
H. G. Williams .
R. Ziegler   	
T. A. Briggs	
R. Felton	
R. C. Weldon...
A. Francis ..
F. T. Stanier
W. J. Knox .
W. Rose	
A. C. Nash	
C. J. Willoughby .
D. Corsan	
P. J. Emerson	
F. W. Green	
C. Ewert..
A. Francis
Miss Gawley.
Miss Kelly.
Miss Jeffares.
77
76
15
13
11
11
17
17
17
15
14
14
275
274
7
7
11
11
6
6
37
36
120
114
12
11
14
12
14
10
8
7
8
8
10
10
13
13
40
44
9
8
10
10
36
36
7
7
14
10
58
55
19
17
23
19
11
11
14
13
16
18
10
10
16
16
14
14
71
71
31
30
35
35
25
26
8
8
12
10
34
32
61
57
10
10
10
10
65
52
5
5
27
24
28
26
21
20
18
9
13
10
5
5
11
11
9
8
13
13
9
9
66
64
27
24
169
151
171
160
45
45
23
13
25
23
7
7
8
7
15
15
12
12
9
9
9
9
22
22
15
15
18
18
1
i
1
"t
2
1
2
1
"2'
T
13
i
1
12
2
1
20
4
2
6
3
3
i
1
2
i
31
2
1
6
23
1
1
2
7
"i
2
13
9
2
18
'&
1
2
24
3
1
"2'
1
3
2
2
3
1
2
1
2
i
1
5
3
2
5
1
1
4
i
1
4
1
6
1
1
1
1
"i'
2
2
1
1
1
5
1
"1
7
3
6
6
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
2
6-
1
2
2
2
2
"1"
6
2
4
2
5
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1
1
2
i
1
3
a
1
4
2
2
2
6
6
9
1
4
2
2
5
8
2
1
1
2
6
7
25
1
1
1
4
1
4
21
3
1
1
5
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
7
3
1
3
"3
i'
3
16
26
6
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"i'
iis
20
3
1
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1
1
3
1
3
18
9
3
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1
1
1
1
1
2
i
3
17
26
4
5
3
1
5
2
27
40
18
2
1
2
2
2
5
2
3
1
1
6
2
3
3
6
4
2
10
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 49
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
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Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
H
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QJ
Q
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Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
8
5
Yes.
O.K	
O.K.
o
1
4
1
8
6
3
2
O.K	
Good	
O.K.
Clean ; adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Small	
10
4
"a
"a"
5
1
18
2
6
Clean ; adequate.
8
26
2
1
Very satisfactory .
.
9
Efficient.
4
Clean	
1
Good	
Two ; yes.
3
•2
2
6
....
1
Good	
4
Yes.
1
Antemia and cardiac, 1; eczema,
1; impetigo, 2
4
1
1
Yes.
8
1
2
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Satisfactory.
2
6
"s'
7
3
No thermometer..
37
Both.
10
Good    	
Good.
6
....
2
1
1
1
i
5
7
2
2
2
i
8
5
5
9
Satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
Satisfactory.
Good.
2
Excellent 	
Satisfactory	
Unfinished	
5
4
1
4
Clean ; adequate..
Good	
3
1
9
Verv good	
4
O.K.
15
Fairly clean.
Good	
6
6
3
No cloak-room....
Good	
1
Whooping--cough, chick-
Good.
34
Clean ; adequate.
0 K.
2
Impetigo	
Adequate	
Good	
6
Yes.
■'0
3
0 K.
4
2
12
1
1
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Adequate ; but
require cleaning.
(/lean ; adequate.
3
2
Good	
1
2
Yes.
2
3
2
2
1
Frame;  fair natural ventilation
Good
Satisfactory.
1
1
io'
13
22
1
1
1
40
33
26
3
O.K	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Crowded ;   poorly
heated; unclean
Crowded ;    dirty ;
very unsafe;
poorly heated
O.K	
Good	
Fair	
Good
9
V.D.H., 1   	
Scarlet fever, 1	
Clean ; adequate.
2
Ptosis, 1	
71
Cardiac, 1; blepharitis, 4; acne,
1 ; eczema, 1
Cardiac, 2 ; blepharitis, 7 ; anaemia, 1
8
3
75
Measles, pertussis, chicken-pox
equate.
Fairly clean ; adequate .
0 K
14
12
Whooping-cough, 8	
Majority vaccinated; few
cases chicken-pox
4
4
Eczema, 1 ; chorea. 1 ; anaemia,
1
Adequate ;   sanitary.
Clean ; adequate.
3
1
....
11
i
n
n
9
2
3
7
Clean   	
Satisfactory.
Two ; clean.
7
3
Heart, 2 ; aneemia, 1	
2
Good	
fi
fi
fi
OK                                  ft  K
 N 50
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
rt
17)
£
£ .
Xt
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Myrtle Point	
Macalister	
McBride	
McConnell Creek .
McGuire 	
MacKenzie	
McLure	
McMurdo	
Nakusp	
Nauru   	
Nanaimo Bay	
Nanoose Bay	
Naramata	
Needles	
New Denver	
Newgate	
Newlands	
Nickle Plate Mine
Nicola	
Nicola, Lower ....
Nicomen	
Nicomen, North ..
Nimpkish River .,
Nob Hill	
Noosaisum	
North Bend	
Northfleld	
Norwegian Creek.
Notch Hill	
Ocean Falls	
Okanagan 	
Okanagan Centre.
Okanagan Falls...
Okanagan, South .
Okeover Ann	
Olalla	
Oliver  	
150-Mile House...
One-Mile Creek...
Orange Valley....
Osland	
Osoyoos 	
Otter Point	
Outlook	
Oyama	
Oyster Bay	
Oyster, North
Oyster Riyer	
Oyster, South
Pachelqua  	
Pacific	
Palling	
Park Siding	
Parksville	
Parson	
Passmore	
Pemberton Meado
Pemberton Range
Pender Harbour ,.
Pender Island
A. Henderson
F. V. Agnew .
J. P. Mackie..
A. J. Stuart..
H. A. Christie ...
G. E. Bayfield ...
M. G. Archibald .
Paul Ewert....
P. J. Emerson.
G. A. Roberts .
T. .1. McPhee .
L. T. Davis	
F. W. Andrew
J. E. H. Kelso .
W. E. Gomm ,
H. A. Christie .
VV. Laishlev ...
i\I. D. McEwen.
J. J. Gillis	
A. J. Stuart .
W. Rose......
T. A. Briggs...
G. E. Bayfield .
P. M. Wilson ..
T. J. McPhee	
A. Francis	
W. Scatchard	
A. E. H. Bennett.
VV. J. Knox
H. McGregor .
W. J. Knox.
R. Ziegler	
M. D. McEwen
G. H. Kearney.
F. V. Agnew ..
Lee Smith	
VV. R. Stone  ..
Wm. Sager	
G. H. Kearney.
R. Felton 	
W. Truax	
H. G. Williams .
T. A. Briggs
H. B. Maxwell .
R. Ziegler	
A. C. Nash	
V. E. R. Ardagh ..
C. H. Hankinson .
J.B. Thorn	
L. T. Davis	
P. Ewert	
H. IT. Mackenzie .
N. J. Paul	
R. W. Irving	
A. Henderson
E. M. Sutherland .
Miss Murray .
Miss Murray.
45
13
10
23
8
17
120
9
93
14
10
13
14
15
26
33
27
12
18
12
73
12
26
187
14
23
10
18
65
10
13
24
5
8
19
18
72
8
43
7
22
10
12
12
10
9
24
17
4
28
39
23
9
46
12
10
23
13
117
87
14
14
330
10
13
13
14
22
33
25
12
16
12
69
12
22
186
14
23
10
18
65
10
12
24
18
16
70
8
43
7
22
10
12
12
10
79
8
24
17
4
27
3
1
i
13
4
2
3
i
9
8
3
3
3
i
1
1
1
"i'
1
2
1
2
2
5
1
2
1
2
3
2
6
6
1
2
5
4
1
11
3
2
6
1
1
8
1
7
1
9
2
8
i
2
2
2
4
1
1
1
3
3
1
24
7
3
1
6
14
14
32
1
4
1
"i
1
i
2
2
i
1
1
18
7
4
1
1
3
6
1
2
2
15
15
3
6
3
1
7
16
10
2
2
4
2
1
2
4
9
3
1
2
2
11
15
4
6
6
5
2
3
7
12
1
12
3
21
4
2
1
3
6
5
5
3
2
4
17
11
8
6
30
7
3
3
6
3
2
i
7
1
ii
2
1
14
1
1
4
2
1
4
2
7
2
"2
14
2
3
1
2
4
"i"
1
1
6
5
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
4
2
5
1
9
1
4
i
6
2
8
"2
3
5
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
2
1
3
1
2
1
6
5
 16 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
N 51
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Qi
I-
QJ   QJ
Xi
Qi       .
i-i Xt
rt a
72 d
£5
QJ
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Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac Disease, etc.)-
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*
S
o"
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Pi
3
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be
m
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated,  poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
2
Good	
Clean.
9
2
1
1
Scarlet fever ; mumps..
Satisfactory.
Verj'  unsatis-
factory
Satisfactory	
Good	
3
Good.
2
31
4
T
5
4
34
2
8
1
16
1
9
3
Two ; in good repair.
Clean ; adequate.
Fair.
Good	
-Satisfactory	
Good	
3<*
2
6
1
1
O.K.
Not crowded ; well
ventilated   and
heated
Ventilation     and
heating good
Good	
17
Ansemia,  4 ;   cardiac,  1 ;   eczema, 1; orthopcedic, 1
Tabes mesenterica, 1; aortic regurgitation, 1
Orthopaedic, 1 ; cardiac, 3; nervous, 1
2
Vaccinated,    29;    influenza
Four for boys ;
four for girls ;
flush.
Satisfactory	
Good 	
Clean ; adequate.
1
3
Good	
Satisfactory   ....
Yes.
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
Good.
8
Clean.
4
2
Contracted nasal passages, 1..
Influenza, 2	
Clean ; adequate.
,,
21
26
13
is"
3
2
2
2
'is
1
2
4
19
6
13
8
11
7
3
2
10
1
3
21
1
2
.,
,,
Good.
Bronchitis, 1 ;   mitral  insufficient, 1
..
1
1
3
O.K	
Good	
O.K.
Infantile paralysis, 1 ; cardiac,
4 ; asthma, 1 ; orthopsedic, 1 ;
healed T.B. glands, 1
Ankylosed   elbow, 1 ;    myxedema, 1;   diabetic, 1 ;   atrophied arm, 1
Bronchitis, 1 ;  neurasthenia, 1
Chorea, 1 ; anaemia, 2 ; eczema,
1 ; overweight, 2 ;  orthopaedic, 2
Chorea, 2 ; cardiac, 2 ; diabetes,
1 ; anaemia, 1 ; curvature, 1
Clean ; adequate.
Majority    vaccinated.
Few cases chicken-pox
Practical^' all vaccinated
Improved	
Good	
4
Good.
6
Majority vaccinated ;
chicken-pox, 15
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
O.K.
2
Yes.
Poor	
Excellent	
Good	
Whooping-cough	
Two ; yes.
Outside.
Yes.
"i
1
3
Arrested T.B., 1   	
Clean ; adequate.
One in good condition.
3
Satisfactory	
Crowded	
Good	
3
2
Scarlet fever, 4	
2
9
1
Good.
2
Clean ; adequate.
2
5
6
1
3
M
5
l
,.
8
.
Both.
11
2
Efficient	
Good	
3
chemical.
Yes.
5
18
4
1
6
2
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
Excellent	
Good	
1
A
8
Earth ; poor.
8-
"i
1
1
8
Satisfactory	
 N 52
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL AND
ra
,3
£
Hi
o
a
<W  Qi
o
<=fl
a
O
Z
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
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£  Qi
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Penny	
Perow    	
Perry Siding .
Pine	
Popcum  	
Port Alice	
Port Clements.
Pouce Coupe	
Pouce Coupe, Central.
Pouce Coupe, East ...
Powell River .  ..
Prairiedale	
Pratts	
Princeton	
Princeton, East..
Procter 	
Qualicum Beach.
Quatsino	
Queen Charlotte City .
Queen's Bay	
Quesnel	
Quick	
Raft River	
Read Island	
Red Gap	
Refuge Cove	
Reiswig	
Reuata  	
Rendezvous Island ...
Rhone 	
Riondel	
Roberts Creek, East
Robins Range	
Robson	
Rock Bay     	
Rock Creek	
Rock Mountain	
Rocky Point	
Rolla  	
Roosville	
Rosebery	
Rose Hill	
Rose Lake.. .
Round Lake.
Round Top.
Roy   	
Rutland	
Saanich, North	
Sahtlam  	
Saint Elmo	
St. Eugene Mission .
Salmo	
Salmon Bench	
Salmon Valley	
Sand Creek,
Sandon	
Sandspit ...
Sandwiek	
Saskatoon Creek.
Satuma Island ..
Savona	
Savona Road .
Seatord 	
Sechelt	
Seton Lake Creek.
J. \V. Lang	
C. H. Hankinson
H. H. Mackenzie
J. J. Gillis	
,1. C. Elliot	
J. A. Street 	
Guy Palmer ....
W. A. Watson .
A. Henderson
W. R. Stone ..
R. G. Large ..
Lee Smith....
D. J. Barclay .
L. T. Davis ...
J. A. Street	
G. H. Bleecker ..
D.J. Barclay
G. R. Baker	
G. C. Paine	
M. G. Archibald .
R. Ziegler	
L. T. Davis	
R. Ziegler   	
II. G. Williams ..
J. E. H. Kelso ...
R. Ziegler	
A. Francis	
D. J. Barclay ....
F. Inglis	
M. G. Archibald .
J. E. II. Kelso . . .
W. W. Birdsall ..
A. Francis	
R. Felton	
W. A. Watson ...
H. A. Christie ...
W. E. Gomm	
M. G. Archibald .
C. H. Hankinson
G. C. Paine	
C. J. Willoughby
W. W. Birdsall ..
W. J. Knox	
S. E. M. Hoops ..
H. N. Watson ...
.1. C. Elliot	
F. W. Green ....
J. B. Thorn	
P. L). van Kleeck
W. Truax 	
W. E. Gomm ..
J. H. Bleecker.
T. A. Briggs	
W. A. Watson
E. M. Sutherland .
M. G. Archibald ..
R. E. Ziegler .
F. Inglis	
A. C. Nash ..
Miss Murray.
Miss McClung..
Miss .leffares.
6
13
24
8
20
32
19
11
14
822
13
8
153
14
60
65
20
21
8
100
17
13
10
25
6
11
36
10
18
10
20
12
22
12
30
8
10
53
8
10
13
7
13
6
7
129
23
27
17
48
26
13
12
57
21
40
10
10
18
16
23
11
13
21
8
20
31
19
11
14
316
13
8
149
14
50
65
13
21
8
100
17
11
10
25
5
10
36
10
18
10
20
12
22
12
35
8
10
53
8
10
18
7
13
6
82
23
24
16
48
26
13
12
57
21
38
10
10
15
17
11
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
i
l
l
2
1
1
7
2
7
4
3
l
l
2
3
5
3
1
15
1
1
14
2
10
3
3
5
3
1
12
1
1
17
3
10
15
3
8
4
,
21
1
1
2
2
10
3
6
6
2
"i
43
22
2
48
6
12
1
1
1
2
...
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
5
1
1
15
i
1
1
"i
"i
'*2
1
1
5
1
2-
1
2
2
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
l
"i
1
3
1
2
1
3
3
2
2
7
"i
1
3
6
2
6
3
1
2
1
10
12
4
12
2
1
13
3
2
1
1
2
3
i
1
2
3
4
1
9
3
l
2
9
5
1
i
l
l
4
10
2
3
i
8
2
5
I
1
"(5
1
1
1
1
9
1
1
2
3
9
9
10
7
2
3'?
1
l
6
i
2
1
2
9
1
1
2
16
2
1
13
1
1
3
9
4
1
4
1
4
3
 16 Geo. 5
BOARD   OF   HBrtVLTH.
N 53
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
ts
St
Qi
rt fl
HO
©
Other Conditions,   specify
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
R
Qi
IS
p
Qi
ir
ti
>
W
'2a
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
s
1
3
i
l
Good	
Good.
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
Yes.
4
Vaccinated, 21	
tl
2
11
Clean ; adequate.
3
Well    ventilated
and heated; adequate
Crowded;    poor
lighting
Temporary accommodation
13
9
"2'
1
12
5
8
10
2
39'
4
50
7
1
Clean.
4
2
19
Adequate.
Yes.
8
Good	
Crowded	
6
Unsatisfactory.
45
Scarlet fever, 3   	
6
2
"\
Cardiac, 1; anaemia, 4	
Good	
Not crowded; well
ventilated   and
heated
Fair	
Yes.
16
7
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
2
Good	
3
8
4
3
3
Satisfactory	
5
3
Yes.
7
1
Inadequate	
Not crowded ; well
ventilated   and
heated
Fair	
O.K.
7
1
1
O.K.
1
Good	
Good.
6
O.K	
Good	
Yes
R
O.K.
6
7
8
10
•>
Yes.
8
Clean ; adequate.
5
2
5
Very good	
Adequate	
O.K	
Yes.
4
Clean ; adequate.
O.K.
11
20
4
8
2
19
9,
9
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
14
R
fi
5
3
2
3
2
6
i
16
1
1
2
Frame building in
good repair
Good	
Yes.
3
pair.
Yes.
5
2
1
11
Satisfactory.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
1
Adequate	
Excellent	
13
57
Chorea, 1 ; cardiac, 2 ; bronchitis,   2 ; eczema, 3 ; anaemia,
3 ; curvature of spine, 2
3
Practically all vaccinated ; few cases chicken-
pox
12
"j'
2
ii'
2
2
2
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
19
1
Good	
Good
22
Heart defects, 7	
•>
Good	
Yes.
1
Eczema,   1;    1    cannot   talk
plainly due to deafness
3
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
1
Improvements  required
Good	
Very poor.
Clean ; adequate.
W,
2
10
1
1
6
8
1
3
1
1
V.G.H., 1 	
5
6
Satisfactory	
Wooden    building
in fair repair
Small frame build-
ing in fair repair
Good	
Lighting defective
Satisfactory.
13
4
adequate.
In poor repair
and i n a d e-
quate.
O K
9
Clean ; adequate.
7
1
 N 54
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL AND
~
co
XR
a
z
Name of
School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
"■6
CH   QJ
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Shalalth	
A. C. Nash   	
9
43
5
22
8
26
15
9
11
11
14
113
21
84
19
27
11
11
29
18
200
15
18
71
13
11
20
29
24
16
7
86
9
14
29   ■
24
11
12
14
17
7
12
10
9
13
8
22
9
8
13
40
19
9
40
18
9
42
11
18
6
18
16
7
23
35
17
37
85
10
9
36
4
22
7
13
12
8
8
11
14
105
19
84
- 19
24
11
11
28
15
165
14
16
60
13
11
14
28
12
13
6
85
8
13
29
23
10
10
14
15
6
11
9
9
13
8
19
9
8
12
20
19
8
40
18
6
37
11
16
6
17
15
14
34
17
37
85
9
Shawnigan Lake	
Shelley  	
Shirley   	
F. T. Stanier	
7
1
3
12
1
3
8
10
3
3
1
1
1
4
W. W. Birdsall	
5
1
i'
1
i
H. G. Williams	
3
3
3
E. Buckell	
S. E. M. Hoops	
"i
....
1
Sidney	
1
14
1
10
1
5
2
2
3
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
7
E. Buckell	
2
16
G. Baker      	
3
1
i
I
1
1
8
1
2
1
16
7
a
"»
3
20
2
Solsqua	
2
2
"i"
1
i
2
5
1
4
1
1
5
1
2
1
2
1
Springbend    	
J. J. Gillis    	
3
H. \V. Keith	
9
N J   Paul
2
2
1
3
2
2
1?
1
3
2
2
3
i
i
1
3
2
2
8
1
W. R. Stone	
3
1
1
1
"i
5
1
5
1
q
1
Sullivan Hill	
3
1
2
2
3
3
2
H. G. Williams	
1
"s
9.
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
2
3
2
2
W A. Watson	
3
4
1
2
2
3
2
4
R
1
1
"i
3
4
1
10
7
Three Valley	
1
1
2
T
4
1
1
1
2
1
4
in
M G. Archibald	
4
1
1
4
4
2
6
1
'if
l
9,
9,
H. W. Keith	
11
E Sheffield	
6
9,
Usk   	
E. W. Ewart	
6
3
1
1
17
10
1
2
4
2
2
2
W. R. Stone	
26
1
 16 Geo. 5                                       Board of Health.                                                N 55
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
ot
is
•rtrt   02
03 313
Gtr
30
03     -
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Other Conditions,   specify
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a*
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Qi
m
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fcJD
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a
a
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Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if   crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
5
20
2
2
3
2
6
1
2
4
i
Good	
Both.
One O.K ; one bad
Satisfactory	
Adequate	
Clean ; adequate.
Debility after rheumatism, 1 ;
anaemic, 1 ; lisp, 1 ; nervous,
1 ; nocturnal enuresis, 1
1
9
Vaccinated, 13	
Steps require repairs ;    no thermometer
Good	
Not fly-proof;
dirty.
Good.
8
8
1
55
1
5
2
2
5
11
No thermometer..
Good	
Excellent	
Excellent	
Good	
No lids and dirty.
Yes.
5
•
2
8
1
Measles	
Bronchitis, 1 ; cardiac, 2  	
Clean ; adequate.
3
Ventilation poor..
Good	
Yes.
7
2
36
3
6
8
5
6
8
4
2
5
....
18
1
"i
....
"i
5
4
3
1
1
6
1
3
1
Clean ; adequate.
..
Yes.
Whooping-cough	
Whooping-cough	
..
.,
General debility, 1 ; anaemia, 1,
6
Satisfactory	
Clean ; adequate.
Moderately good
condition; small
No cloak-room....
Good	
quate.
Clean ; adequate.
Fairly clean,
Yes
50
2
3
1
6
4
6
8
1
2
3
3
3
"i"
i
4
3
1
5
1
2
No thermometer..
Well    ventilated
and heated
Good	
Well    ventilated
and heated
Good	
O.K.
Clean ; adequate.
3
Clean ; adequate.
1,
Yes.
1
Satisfactory   ....
Good	
Excellent	
Fair	
Very good	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
Two ; require
cleaning.
Yes.
1
2
2
3
1
4
11
4
4
9
Clean ; adequate.
Adequate.
2
2
6
3
11
Clean ; well ventilated
O.K	
Satisfactory	
Clean ;   in   good
condition.
"i'
1
1
1
2
2
+
Dirty.
Yes.
Good.
10
i
12
Excellent	
Good	
Clean ; adequate.
3
6
10
11
3
5
2
2
4
32
1
i
i
7
2
1
2
5
One ; fair repair.
Good	
Fair 	
No thermometer..
Excellent	
Good	
1
5
6
quire repairs.
Clean ; adequate.
3
"f
5
2
Good	
Fairly comfortable
Yes
poor repair.
,
 K 56
British Columbia.
1925
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
in
a
<n 03
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E. M. Sutherland	
27
23
10
39
18
44
15
64
11
11
69
62
132
22
52
15
9
10
16
26
53
22
34
14
16
18
12
12
56
30
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50
13
0
69
45
79
31
21
27
23
10
39
14
44
14
61
11
11
60
49
118
22
41
14
9
10
16
26
50
21
30
14
16
15
10
10
53
26
7
43
13
6
65
44
74
27
21
1
Waldo	
M. G. Archibald	
3
3
4
15
2
5
2
15
3
10
5
6
1
8
3
19
3
2
i
i
2
1
1
1
2
5
"3
5
2
9
3
7
2
2
H. A. Christie .
18
F. W. Green	
T. J. McPhee	
3
4
1
6
1
i
13
3
16
12
26
3
' i
1
11
3
13
9
26
2
3
2
10
W. R. Stone ...
3
G. Baker	
1
Wellington, East	
T. J. McPhee	
9
8
20
VV. J. Knox	
3
5
6
2
White Lake	
E. Buckell	
2
i
1
i
1
4
4
2
i
1
1
2
1
1
1
"i'
2
1
1
5
15
Willow Point           	
H. H. Mackenzie	
6
7
3
W. R. Stone	
F. E. Coy	
1
2
Winfield	
W. J. Knox	
4
l
9
1
1
7
6
7
7
V. E. R. Ardagh	
9
C  G. G. Maclean	
1
"i'
i
2
5
l
11
4
1
1
3
1
1
4
11
16
G. C. Paine	
6
3
Wycliffe   	
Yahk	
2
i
4
6
4
4
1
1
1
ii
11
3
4
P. S. McCaffrey.
11
J. B  Thom	
15
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 57
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac Disease, etc.).
o
n
XR
Qi
o
fl
QJ
&c
ti
!>
w
P3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
8
3
4
4
3
4
'ir
i
13
18
29
1
"8'
1
1
"2
i
1
1
5
4
1
2
4
5
1
"3'
3
11
2
40
6
In good repair....
Good	
Satisfactory.
Not good.
9
3
13
Scarlet fever ; measles ..
Clean ; adequate.
9
?9
o
Good.
21
1
O.K.
8
Yes.
9
Good	
O.K.
19
1
2
2
"2
2
Scarlet fever, 2	
09
51
2
	
6
Myxedema, 1; anaemia, 1; cardiac, 1
Few cases chicken-pox..
4
O.K	
Good 	
Satisfactory.
O.K.
5
1
4
2
2
O.K.
7
Satisfactory	
Yes.
2
1
17
Whooping-cough and
chicken-pox
Vaccinated, 20 	
Vaccinated, 12	
Good	
Two ; yes.
Clean ; adequate.
fi
6
3
Good	
5
Yes
3
3
io
1
2
2
2
3
4
4
3
1
5
Clean ; adequate.
3
Excellent; still
have    to    carry
water to drink
Good	
Efficient	
Crowded;    poor
ventilation   and
light
9
9
Crippled leg,  1;   anaemia,  2 ;
cardiac, 2 ; chorea, 1 ; bronchitis, 2
Over one-half vaccinated;
few cases chicken-pox
10
6
14
6
school-room.
4
Clean ; adequate.
Good.
9
Cretin,  2;   asthma,  1;   stammers, 2
Lighting  system
extremely bad
fi
Adequate.
9
i
14
1
3
Eczema, 1	
5
12
 N 58
British Columbia.
1925
REGISTRAR'S REPORT UNDER THE VITAL STATISTICS ACT.
Victoria, B.C., June 30th,  1925.
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Fifty-third. Eeport of Vital Statistics for the year
ended December 31st, 1924
; Population.
Revised estimates by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics give the population of the Province,
including native Indians, as follows :—
1921 (census)   524,582
1922  535,000
1923   544,000
1924   553,000
Should comparison be made between the rates for the year 1924 and those published in the
reports of the immediate preceding years, allowance must be made for this revision in the
estimates of population. The Annual Report of the Department of Indian Affairs for the year
ended March 31st, 1924, gives the Indian population of the Province as 24,316, as against 25,694
for the year ended March 31st, 1922.
Registrations, 1922, 1923, and 1924 (exclusive of Indians).
The following table shows the total number of registrations of births, deaths, and marriages
in the different divisions of the Province for the years 1922, 1923, and 1924:—
Births.
Deaths.
Marriages.
Divisions.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1,360
671
4 2S2
L307
296
1,299
583
1,036
1,298
832
4,287
1,253
262
1,245
682
1,018
1,366
869
4,507
1,376
285
1,144
659
1,046
684
309
1,998
641
100
425
235
358
4,748
696
322
2,011
696
85
466
235
395
4,906
662
300
2,035
617
107
427
220
455
522
159
1,865
373
70
321
134
265
3,709
463
212
2,012
410
56
290
130
283
3,856
473
185
1,988
434
80
296
Alberni 	
Beaton	
164
335
Totals	
10,834
10,777
11,252
4,823
3,945
Births.
The total number of registrations of births, including 2S4 still-births, recorded during the
year ended December 31st, 1924, was 11,252, as against 10,777 in the year 1923. Of this total,
5,820 were registrations of male children and 5,432 of female children. The births of 8.895
children born alive during the year were registered in 1924. During the six months ending
June 30th, 1925, the births of 822 children born alive during 1924 were registered, thus making
a total of 9,717 living births for the year 1924, as against 9,585 living births for the year 1923.
The population of the Province (excluding native Indians) as estimated by the Dominion Bureau ,
of Statistics was 528,684, and the rate per 1,000 of population for living births for the year
1924 was 18.3, as against 1S.1 for the year 1923 and 19.3 for the year 1922.
Of a total of 11,252 registrations of births recorded during the year 1924, 7,949, or 70.6,
showed that the fathers were of British origin.
In the following table all registrations of births received between January 1st, 1920, and
December 31st 1924, have been segregated and assigned to the actual year in which the births
occurred irrespective of the date of registration. It should be noted that births which occurred
during the year 1924 but which were not registered until the year 1925 are not included in the
total number of births for the year 1924.   The number of these births was 822.
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 59
Registrations assigned to Year of Birth  (Still-births included).
1924.
1923.
1922.
1921.
1920.
Prior to
1920.
1920	
9,321
1,238
107
107
59
1,837
1921    	
8,959
1,081
85
9,654
1,236
■      157
75
11,122
767
1922.
532
1923	
8,898
1,036
9,934
534
1924	
9,152
845
91,52
^     10,125
10,832
4,515
Natural Increase.
The following table is taken from the Preliminary Report, A'ital Statistics, Canada, 1924.
The report remarks that the betterment shown by the year 1924 over the year 1923 was not due
to an increase in the birth-rate, which showed a falling-off, but to a decrease in the death-rate
from 10.5 to 9.8 per 1,000 estimated population.
1924.
1923.
1922.
•
Births.
Deaths.
Births.
Deaths.
Births.
Deaths.
1,763
11,703
10,654
71,126
15,445
21,085
14,265
9,700
954
6,523
4,902
33,034
5,020
5,735
4,756
4,758
1,977
11,680
10,704
70,056
16,472
20,947
15,060
10,001
1,142
6,858
5,006
35,637
5,330
6,151
4,984
4,955
2,160
12,693
11,564
71,430
17,679
22,339
16,163
10,166
1,113
6,679
5,168
34,034
5,754
Saskatchewan	
6,119
5,264
4,907
155,741
65,682
156,897
70,063
164,194
69,028
90 059
86 S34
95.166
Deaths.
The rate per 1,000 of population for registrations of deaths (exclusive of still-born) for the
year 1924 was 8.45, as against 8.71 for the year 1923 and 8.75 for the year 1922.
Deaths attributed to respiratory diseases show a considerable decrease on the figures for
the two preceding years—namely, 371 in 1924, as against 477 in 1923 and 625 in 1922.
Deaths due to external causes numbered 576, or 12.7 per cent, of all deaths registered. .
Of the total number of decedents, 1,225 males and 795 females were given as married, 1,210
males and 535 females as single, 267 males and 303 females as widowed, 14 males and 11 females
as divorced, and the balance, 110 males'and 2 females, as not given; 1,937 males and 1,352
females (72.4 of all deaths) were given as being of British origin; 291 children were registered
as still-births—152 males, 138 females, and 1 sex not given.
Infant Mortality.
Exclusive of still-births, the deaths of 484 children under 1 year of age were registered
during the year ended December 31st, 1924, and of these 276 were deaths of male and 208 of
female children. As compared with the year 1923, there was a decrease in the year 1924 of 98
in the number of deaths, while the rate per 1,000 of living births has dropped from 67.4 to 54.4.
The high mortality of infants can in a great measure be attributed to deaths of children from
immaturity or congenital debility. Of the total number of deaths of children under 1 year of
age, 205 occurred within the first week of birth, 264 failed to reach the age of 1 month, and 367
died under 4 months old.
 N 60
British Columbia.
1925
The following table gives the rates of infant mortality in various parts of the world:-
Countries.
Year.
Rate.
Chili	
1922
1922
1922
1922
1921
1922
1921
1922
1923
1923
1922
1923
1923
1923
1923
1923
187
177
166
134
124
115
101
South Africa   	
82
70
Netherlands	
67
66
60
54
53
43
Tuberculosis.
"The number of deaths from tuberculosis registered during the year 1924 was 401, or 8.84
per cent, of all deaths (exclusive of still-born), as against 379, or 8.23 per cent., for the year 1923.
The foregoing figures do not include deaths from tuberculosis received under Indian returns,
which numbered 125 during the year 1924 and 133 during the year 1923.
The deaths from tuberculosis among the specified races were as follows:—
1924. 1923.
Chinese       38 44
Japanese      24 23
Indians (native)   125 133
Other races  339 312
Cancer.
The number of deaths from cancer registered during the year 1924 was 435, or 9.70 per cent,
of all deaths (exclusive of still-born), as against 436, or 9.47 per cent., for the year 1923. There
were 6 deaths from cancer under the Indian returns which are not included above. Deaths from
cancer among the Japanese and Chinese numbered 11 and 9 respectively.
Ages of Decedents.
The following is a comparative statement re the ages of decedents for the years 1921, 1922,
1923, and 1924 :—
Age.
Under 1 Year (still-born excluded) .
1 to 2 years	
2 to 5 years	
5 to 10 years	
10 to 20 years	
20 to 30 years	
30 to 40 years .  	
40 to 50 years	
50 to 60 years	
60 to 70 years	
70 to 80 years	
80 to 90 years	
90 years and up	
Age not given	
Still-born	
Totals .
617
63
91
93
159
280
469
563
582
593
417
215
42
30
275
627
83
96
86
186
297
479
565
622
663
530
205
42
23
244
4,748
582
87
103
99
186
284
471
576
633
706
563
258
32
22
301
4,906
484
71
112
99
189
283
451
648
633
682
634
282
38
26
291
 16 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
N 61
Classified Deaths  (Indian Returns excluded).
The following is a list of classified deaths which have occurred in British Columbia for the
years 1920 to 1924 :—
Diseases.
1920. 1921. 1922. 1923. 1924.
1. General diseases	
2. Diseases of nervous system and organs of special sense	
3. Diseases of the circulatory system	
4. Diseases of the respiratory system	
5. Diseases of the digestive system	
6. Non-venereal diseases of the genito-urinary system and annexa
7. The puerperal state	
8. Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue	
9. Diseases of the bones and organs of locomotion	
10. Malformations	
11. Diseases of earlv infancy	
12. Old age    ."	
13. Affections produced by external causes	
14. Ill-defined, including executions    	
Still-born	
Totals	
.,193
422
646
840
285
278
47
10
8
37
343
88
544
38
284
5,003
1,107
447
666
487
269
223
61
17
14
25
311
84
476
37
276
1,222
424
667
625
306
249
57
20
7
29
302
74
4%
26
244
4,748
1,221
512
710
477
286
254
61
17
12
55
298
96
580
23
304
1,347
483
713
371
317
255
60
21
5
45
231
69
576
39
291
For purposes of comparison the classified deaths for the year 1924 have been segregated
and assigned to the several mining divisions. " Tuberculosis," " cancer," and " influenza " are
included under " General Diseases." These three items number 921, or 20.3 per cent, of all
deaths.
Allotment of all Causes of Death to each Mining Division for the Year 1924.
Mining Division.
"3 1
ti   01
3.2
147
20
5
f J
S3   [£,
£«]
81
4
3
1
4
2
5
100
9
t-i
o
Ss
a v
°*^
5J?
81
14
3
4
5
8
116
22
4
9
5
6
46
47
14
13
44
118
188
29
27
10
5
2
3
e
270
1
4
26
3
8
2
17
2
63
r.
o
-rt-
c.   r
a. 22
"ti.%
.2   r\
SaLO
45
3
i
03
» i
03-S
tf. Ji
25
2
. 2-1
CU   133
11 .
> ° ti
• 22, 01
sst
i20ttl
&0>
?!
Ph tn
5
2
03
si
.si
200
3
a
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R   O +33
33  to  °
30   C   ti
01  3.  C
rt   ^ X
O   3-  O
G
O
+3
t.
a
5
1
0
c
°c
c.
H
15
2
1
1
2
1
22
9
1
1
14
6
1
3
7
17
74
9
2
3
1
"i
1
91
1
1
5
1
2
io'
20
Oi
im
<
0
5
"3
i
9
2
2
4
1
1
1
4
7
18
5
9
2
1
1
36
"2
3
5
E   333
-3.   03
y, 5
H   r
31
8
2
6
7
54
23
8
24
2
14
71
17
7
1
40
65
143
5
8
7
8
1
5
5
182
12
1
23
2
2
6
7
1
54
•6
V
c
<B
03
V
5
i
6
1
1
3
1
1
7
'i
4
2
2
1
1
1
4
7
a
c
.32
rtO
26
1
1
1
1
30
6
3
2
5
16
11
4 .
5
10
30
124
12
2
6
1'
1
146
3
ii'
3
2
2
8
29
Is
0
H
30
1
500
Oak-Bay	
6
6
14
16
6
55
3
1
5
5
14
21
6
6
11
43
127
15
12
7
1
3
"i'
166
2
9
2
1
is"
2
29
1
28
8
"7
2
3
20
21
5
9
10
45
128
8
5
3
2
33
1
8
3
1
4
2
198
662
34
5
'"7
4
1
1
2
1
4
4
1
1
6
21
1
126
14
92
31
37
19
6
5
6
1
16
33
9
6
48
96
136
13
18
4
2
1
2
1
177
4
2
13
2
2
S
1
32
1
1
1
2
4
9
6
3
3
12
2
1
Totals	
64
17
1
300
60
13
15
59
9
7
4
11
232
66
65
264
Totals	
147
31
1
617
608
52
50
14
10
3
6
1
96
8
13
4
1
4
1590
158
1
61
West Vancouver	
11
21
17
1
145
2
1
9
2
1
9
1
3
1
22
1
1
2
1
1
6
9
15
644
9
3
63
5
16
1
27
3
126
4
2035
1
1
1
3
2
6
1
37
15
173
22
39
15
115
11
2
1
1
2
1
3
8
Totals	
127
25
21
427
 IS.  62
British Columbia.
1925
Allotment of all Causes of Death to each Mining Division for the Tear 1924—Continued.
Mining Division.
g 1
2
co    .
Am
o
_rf   r,
tA   01
a ig
Oik
2
>i
0
tO   r2
'r. OJ
333   £
#53.
2
1
2
03
is
03.2
3.33 1
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rth
£ S    .
S <i S
'30-03
5 Cm
O   03   irt.
1.
03
at.
— *a
3 rt
2a tJ2
03
to
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tO  ™  3D
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0
1
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a
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OS
H
1
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bo
<;
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0
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5
1
3
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1
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1
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10
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12
2
-6
c
3d
03
V
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1
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or
1
6
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1
1
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—
—
9
1
6
5
1
Y
1
4
3
4
i
23
5
7
7
1
2
2
13
1
3
1
2
2
8
12
7
1
1
4
24
1
4
4
1
4
18
7
6
2
2
1
10
3'
1
4
10
9
6
3
5
2
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
3
T
23
20
2
S
30
1
4
5
2
6
2
2
2
3
87
8
Nelson	
4
1
119
5
1
5
19
5
1
1
11
1
5
1
2
74
9
6
1
1
4
41
1
63
7
1
1
1
36
1
31
3
7
3
3
39
2
2
2
105
19
-in:,
9
1
5
1
1
Atlin	
9
1
i
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
5
1
3
17
2
2
4
1
3
5
1
2
4
6
8
1
"5
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
7
1
10
3
3
10
5
2
1
1
1
3
7
"2'
23
1
.     7
3
1
2
2
6
1
1
9
1
5
9
16
483
30
713
10
371
13
317
7
60
21
3
45
IS
231
2
69
56
576
4
39
16
291
39
6
255
220
Grand totals	
1,347
5
4,823
Specified Diseases.
The following table of specified diseases   (exclusive of Indian returns)  has been compiled
from returns for the whole Province for the years 1915 to 1924:—
Diseases.
1915.
1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.
1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
Total.
32
14
9
11
18
425
221
47
62
157
72
23
12
1
37
18
36
367
259
49
140
228
35
24
3
6
7
21
19
17
413
248
36
92
224
53
15
20
2
26
16
138
1839
444
279
37
81
265
58
8
2
2
2
8
34
163
615
411
309
39
91
226
51
8
13
9
26
32
64
300
444
320
41
220
147
58
1,682
20
4
8
6
27
34
17
414
373
50
222
132
42
11
1
2
11
12
23
85
109
401
424
49
146
249
57
12
2
21
21
27
23
54
69
379
436
31
121
187
62
15
4
40
22
19
54
25
60
401
435
44
91
173
47
12
171
257
3,009
4,099
3,304
423
Bronchopneumonia	
1,166
1,988
Totals	
1,068
1,205
1,163
3,220
1,961
1,349
1,580
1,442
1,430
16,100
 16 Geo. 5                                         Board of Health.
N 63
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining DrvisiON foe
the Tear 1924.
Mining Division.
JH    Qj
>> Qj
H5h
o
ft
a
w
te
1
+31
03  u
.3.   03
2
be
'3- ,3,
°   ,7
o be
J=  2
> o
^  01
■s
a
2
133
1333
333
03
333
c
2
1
■« to
.—   03
St ts
30  to
3   03
St
6
o
fi
42
3
03
O
a
00
0
69
5
1
J333
03
a
0
S
ll
0 22
a 22
O   03
A,   C
m Ca
6
c.
"S
0
a
24
1
T33
a
II
as
1
.3
0
H
163
14
4
1
1
2
2
57
12
3
3
8
89
5
1
6
6
18
211
32
1
21
9
3
66
71
14
16
57
158
525
17
9
1
48
6
59
5
670
1
1
2
2
2
1
4
1
6
7
2
10
"x
1
2
i
3
7
1
8
1
3
4
3
2
12
35
1
1
3
28
2
2
4
8
13
3
4
3
23
62
4
1
1
i
2
3
1
1
2
7
18
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
i
10
7
2
9
18
5
1
18
20
3
1
20
44
142
4
2
1
19
10
1
179
3
1
44
1
7
6
1
63
2
6
3
2
16
14
3
4
14
35
185
3
3
1
5
2
2
1
10
10
2
1
1
1
1
13
1
2
4
4
1
2
1
2
1
3
7
28
1
1
1
i
2
0
1
1
Totals	
1
2
_
1
2
2
1
2
i
3
2
1
3
5
15
2
20
1
229
2
1
9
5
1
5
1
24
4
3
2
4
15
3
3
1
44
1
6
2
76
4
1
2
'20
Totals	
2
18
15
3
33
13
23
1
2
2
6
a
6*
7
14
1
37
4
136
3
1
i
1
"i'
1
1
4
1
2
1
4
1
5
8
3
2
6
1
5
10
1
6
Totals	
3
2
2
i
5
1
5
1
1
3
5
2
1
1
1
2
8
i
1
3
19
33
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
Totals	
1
2
2
3
7
3
2
1
11
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
6
3
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
9
3
2
1
1
10
"i"
1
5
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
5
1
3
"i
24
26
6
3
3
32
2
5
4
1
9
1
4
1
4
3
2
2
"2
1
1
1
1
1
3
...
Trail   	
1
1
2
1
22
2
2
32
2
3
12
14
1
7
1
4
119
5
1
Totals	
8
2
5
1
4
2
2
5
1
Atiin     	
1
2
2
1
6
 N 64
British Columbi.a.
1925
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining Division for the Year 1924—Continued.
Mining- Division.
"2
O
_ft
S
QQ
oi
s
03   ^
t S
rf 5:
O   03
mrnA
be
s •?
o be
fl   3
£8
"C
03
.a
s
=3
N
1333
03
22
<B
S
rf to
30  «3
CC
2   3-
22  03
<Cfl
1333 ^
.-<  O
1
03
o
fl
H
2
tA
03
a
0J
0
2
fl
0
0
•S
■Ss
333  23
O  03
C   333
a S
2
0
s
03
B
Ph
1
A21
033
rt
rf <»*
8-J
fl'E
£ 03
.31
as
1
i
-c2
O
H
6
1
1
2
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
3
"2
1
3
15
1
1
1
2
1
1
"i„
2
1
8
1
Totals	
1
15
4
1
40
22
1
19
54
2
25
2
60
11
401
7
435
2
44
4
91
3
173
3
47
37
1,430
Marriages.
The number of marriages registered during the year 1924 was 3,945, as against 3,856 in
1923 and 3,709 in 1922,
Oriental Races.
Chinese.—The total number of Chinese registrations of birth during the year ended December
31st, 1924, was 493, as against 337 registrations for the year 1923. There were 197 children born
and registered during the year 1924, the balance being registrations of children born prior to
1924. The large increase in the number of Chinese registrations of births is due to the fact
that under the " Chinese Immigration Act " all Chinese were compelled to register.
The number of Chinese deaths registered during the year 1924 including 3 still-births, was
207, as against 259 during the previous year. The deaths of children under 1 year of age,
exclusive of 3 still-births, was 16, as against 21 in the year 1923. There were 38 deaths from
tuberculosis and 12 deaths from cancer among the Chinese in the year 1924.
Japanese.—There were 949 registrations of Japanese births during the year 1924, as against
889 registrations in the previous year; 617 Japanese children were born and registered during
the year ended December 31st, 1924, as against 595 during the same period in the previous year.
Death registrations of Japanese during the year 1924 were 155, excluding 15 still-births.
The number of deaths of children under 1 year of age, excluding still-births, was 40, as against
81 during the year 1923. The number of deaths from tuberculosis and cancer was 24 and 11
respectively, as against 23 and 5 during the year 1923.
Indian Returns.
The total number of registrations of births of Indians for the year ended December 31st,
1924, was 408, and of these 206 were males and 202 females. Children born and registered in
the year numbered 390, as compared with 299 in the previous year. The birth-rate per l,00t of
population was 16.7.
Registrations of deaths among Indians numbered 457 in the year 1924, as against 432 in
the year 1923, 252 being deaths of males and 205 of females. The death-rate per 1,000 of
population was 18.7. Deaths from tuberculosis and cancer showed a slight decrease as compared
with the preceding year, being 125 and 6 respectively, as against 133 from tuberculosis and 9
from cancer in the year 1923. The number of deaths of children under 1 year of age was 95,
as compared with 70 in the year 1923; 56.4 per cent, of the total number of decedents were under
the age of 20 years.    It will be noted that the number of deaths exceeded the number of births
'by 49.
Registrations of marriages numbered 120, as against 104 in the year 1923.
 16 Geo. 5 Bo.\rd of Health. N 6c
" Adoption Act."
Particulars of births relating to 111 children adopted under the "Adoption Act" have been
received and filed in this office during the year 1924.
General.
Cash receipts—
1923   $2,179 82
1924     3,133 81
1925 (6 months only)     2,039 39
Marriage-licence fees—
1923       295 00
1924        315 OO
1925 (6 months only)  ,.        195 00
Letters inward—
1923  4,973
1924  ,  6,475
1925 (6 months only)  3,952
Letters outward—
1923 No record.
1924  5,198
1925 (6 months only)   3,193
Searches made—
1923  2,594
1924  3,945
1925 (6 months only)   2,616
Certificates issued—
1923     2,470
1924  3,783
1925 (6 months only)   2,612
With regard to the figures quoted above, I would remark that the large increase of work has
been met with comparatively little temporary assistance. The credit for dealing with this
increase is in a very great measure due to the efficiency and loyalty of my staff, and to the
willing and prompt assistance invariably received from all officials connected with this
Department.
I have, etc.,
Herbert B. French,
Deputy Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.
victoria, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield. Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1925.
 

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