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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1925

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
.
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
'    REPORT
of the
PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN
for the year ended
-
DECEMBER 31ST, 1924
3ti
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY of the legislative assembly.
•
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F.   Banpield_,  Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1925.  .
To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of tJte Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned lias the honour to present the Keport of the Provincial Game
Warden for the year ended December 31st, 1924.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney- General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1925. Office of Superintendent of Provincial Police,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1925.
Honourable A. M. Manson, K.G., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game
Warden for the year which ended December 31st, 1924.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLTN,
Superintendent of Provincial Police. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1924
Familiarity with and a continual patrol of every portion of British Columbia undoubtedly
enables the Provincial Police Department to enforce the " Game Act" at a minimum of cost;
moreover, it is rare to find an up-country officer who is not personally interested in game
conservation, .and it is to this individual attitude that the excellent results obtained in 1924 may
be largely attributed.
The Force consisted of eight officers and 178 non-commissioned officers and men on December
31st, 1924. During the previous twelve months it laid 317 informations and secured 283 convictions under the " Game Act," besides collecting fines amounting to the sum of $4,768 and
further revenue arising from the sale of confiscated furs.    (See Appendix B on page 33.)
Comparative Table, Years 1917-24.
Calendar Year.
■ si
13
i, oa
pS °
a.2
p-p+j
oa
a
o
'?
a
©
a
1*
a
u
mr-3
03  r,
oats
6%
pa
03
oa
oa
03 a
oa 5
a.2
O'O
t, a
m 03
CJ
oo to
03  O
Revenue
derived
from the Sale
of Game
Licences
and Fees.
Revenue
derived
from the
Fur Trade.
1917
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
97
167
242
266
312
317
280 .
283
4
9
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
$1,763 50
3,341 00
6,024 50
6,073 00
6,455 00
7,275 00
5,676 50
4,768 00
$ 65,487 50
75,537 00
116,135 00
132,296 50
114,842 00
127,111 50
121,639 50
125,505 50
1918
1919
1920	
1921 	
$ 5,291 39
24,595 80
51,093 89
60,594 18
56,356 68
1922  	
1923  	
1924	
Submitted from the various Police Divisions the following reports accurately describe the
game conditions prevailing in British Columbia during the year 1924:—
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND).
VICTORIA DISTRICT. ,
By Sergeant R. Owens, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Bear.—From reports received it would appear that there are fewer bears in this district than
in 1923. Some were seen in the Duncan and Cowichan area, also along the west coast. However,
they are seldom hunted.
Deer.—That deer are increasing in numbers may be attributed partly to the " buck-only
law " and partly to the fact that a great deal of illegal shooting has been suppressed. Although
a certain type of hunter continues to shoot and leave does in the wood, the Game Wardens
displayed commendable activity in this connection and instances were few and far between.
Elk.—The elk on the Shaw Creek Reserve are reported as steadily increasing and they have
not been molested except by their natural enemies. Although the smaller bands on the Little
Nitinat River, headwaters of Nixon Creek, and the San Juan River have not been seen by the
Game Warden, their trails show that they are increasing.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Marten.—Very few marten have been seen in any part of the district.
Racoon,—These have  retapined  their  numbers;    in fact,  numerous complaints  have been
received that racoon are killing chickens in the Sooke District.
Otter.—Reported as scarce.
Beaver.—Very scarce throughout.
Mink.—Very few in any part of the district. Z 6
British Columbia.
1925
Wolverine.—Very scarce.
Fisher.—Very scarce.
Skunk.—No skunk in any part of this district.
Weasel.—These are fairly plentiful in parts.
Muskrat.—No muskrat to be found in any part of the district, except around Cowichan Lake,
where they are reported as being on the increase.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—Pheasants are fairly plentiful and more than holding their own. The winter
was mild and as a result no dead birds were reported. The amendment to the " Game Act"
giving farmers the right to shoot pheasants destroying their crops, appears to have had no ill
effect on their numbers. In regard to hen pheasants the law was rigidly enforced and a number
of convictions obtained.
Pheasants turned out at Shawnigan Lake and Jordan River are reported as on the increase.
These birds have an inclination to travel and several have been seen 4 and 5 miles from where
they were released. In parts the hen birds are reported outnumbering the cocks by as high as
20 to 1. For the 1925 season I would recommend that the open season on cocks be shortened
and there be an open season on hens for a week or ten days.
Grouse (Blue).—Noted as "plentiful"  in the Highland District,  Sooke Lake, Shawnigan'
Lake, Malahat, East and West Sooke, and Jordan River.    A scarcity is again reported at Sidney
and Duncam    To prevent extermination  I  would recommend that Duncan and  Sidney areas
be kept closed and in other parts of the district a short open season with a late opening date.
The opening date for both blue and willow grouse should be the same.
Grouse (Willow).—The above remarks also apply to willow-grouse, both as to districts and
recommendations. This would materially assist in checking up hunters and prevent the killing
and leaving of willow-grouse.
Quail.—These are reported in large numbers, and in some instances complaints were received
as to gardens being damaged.    A short open season is recommended.
Bob-white Quail.—Very few of these birds have been seen in the Victoria District.
Partridges.—Reported as very numerous in North and South Saanich, Oak Bay, and Sidney.
None reported from other areas.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—Although ducks throughout the district are reported as being less than last year,
a slight increase has been noted among the American scaup and ring-necked species.
Geese and Brant.—Very few of these have been seen in any part of the district.
Snipe.—Few seen.
Destruction of Vermin.
Cougars.—These are reported as being somewhat on the increase in some areas—Cowichan
Lake and Sooke. Every effort is being made to reduce their numbers by persistent hunting both
by the Game Wardens and the sheepmen.
Wolves.—No trouble has been caused by these for some time.
Cat (Domesticated).—These are the worst pest and are responsible for the destruction of
large numbers of young birds. Every effort is being made to reduce their numbers by trapping
and shooting.
Protection.
There is no outstanding feature during the year 1924 under this heading. The Game
Regulations, 1924, being considered by the best type of hunters as affording the best protection
for the game in this district. A few minor alterations have been suggested and are included
in this report.
The Shaw Creek Game Reserve affords ample protection not only for the elk, but also for a
large number of smaller game. This reserve is well patrolled by Constable G. B. Simpson both
summer and winter. A number of convictions under the '" Game Act " were obtained early in
The season. These were mostly in connection with doe deer and hen pheasants and the effect was
excellent.
A few complaints of pit-lamping were received. On investigation these turned out to be
Indians digging clams along the water-front. 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. Z 7
As a considerable number of both old and young birds are killed during the mating and
hatching season by dogs and cats, I would recommend that temporary Game Wardens be
employed during that season.
Propagation.
The muskrats sent by the Game Conservation Board to Cowichan Lake are steadily on the
increase.    Several local people have requested that others be liberated on their property.
Duncan area asks that new blood be introduced among the pheasants in that district.
Shawnigan Lake, Jordan River, and Cowichan Lake pheasants are increasing rapidly.
< Summary.
The game conditions on the whole throughout the district are very good indeed, and, with
the protection of the different species in the districts indicated in the foregoing, should improve
for the 1925 season.
The " Migratory Birds Act" and the " Game Act" are being strictly enforced by all officers
in this district, and by their co-operation and efficiency infractions are being reduced to a
minimum.
NANAIMO DISTRICT.
By Staff-Sergeant A. T. Stephenson, N.C.O. i/c.
The " Game Act" is well enforced throughout the Nanaimo Police District by my officers.
Pit-lamping for deer, common a few years ago, is now largely eradicated owing to the strict
enforcement of the Act.
A temporary Game Warden was appointed in the Nanaimo District, with headquarters at
Nanaimo, during the open season for game birds and deer, but owTing to his inexperience in game-
work his services during 1924 were not up to standard. I would recommend that the services
of an experienced man be procured, if possible, during the open season for 1925.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Bear are fairly numerous in the Nanaimo Police District, and I would suggest that
open season for 1925 be the same as for 1924 and also that the bag limit be cut down.
Deer.—These were more plentiful in 1924 than they have been for some time.
Elk.—There are a few elk 'located at Quatsino, Comox, and north of Home Lake, but they
do not seem to be increasing. Possibly due to the depredations of cougar, very few calves were
seen during 1924.
Game Birds.
Grouse (Willow).—Fairly plentiful in this district and appear to be on the increase.
Grouse (Blue).—Plentiful.
Pheasants.—Pheasants are increasing all through this district, and on the northern end of
the Island the hens outnumber the cocks by 10 to 1 or more. There should be a short season
on hen birds.
Ducks.—Very plentiful throughout the whole of this district and appear to be increasing in
numbers.
Geese.—Fairly plentiful in this district. Hunters complain that the season opens too late.
They state that before the opening date of the shooting season the geese have all migrated South.
Brant.—Very plentiful in this district.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Mink.—These are not very plentiful in the Nanaimo District, but at the northern end of the
Island they appear to be fairly numerous.
Marten.—Marten are getting scarce in the whole of the district.
Otter.—These are very scarce.
Beaver.—These appear to be on the increase again in this district, but would recommend
that the season be kept closed for some time. A few complaints were received at this office of
beaver doing damage to property.
Coon.—Seem to 'be fairly plentiful throughout the district. Z 8 British Columbia. 1925
!, Noxious Animals.
Panther.—These are fairly numerous in the district around Parksville, Campbell River, and
Cumberland.
Special Patrols.
One special patrol was made into the Nimkish District during the year 1924. These patrols
are only made when conditions warrant the same.
Game Reserves.
The only game reserve in the Nanaimo Police District is at Strathcona Park, near Campbell
River.
"A" DIVISION (MAINLAND).
VANCOUVER SUBDIVISION.
By Sub-Inspector F. Cruickshank, Officer Commanding.
Through various amendments to the " Game Act" at the close of the 1923 season Constables
in this Division have been able to carry on their work in a more efficient manner, and this year
we have not had any great number of complaints, and the complaints received have been in the
minority compared with previous years.
Temporary Game Wardens.
As it was found that temporary officers appointed during the open season in past years had
proven themselves unsatisfactory, I recommended this year that only one such officer be appointed.
It is felt that the policy of appointing these men should be carefully considered for the coming
year, as I am of the opinion that no great amount of benefit is derived by the Department from
their services.
Licence Fees and Roy'Alty.
The revenue derived from licences under the Act, as well as royalty collected on fur, compares favourably with the moneys received from this source in past years.
In connection with the issuance of firearms licences, considerable complaint has been raised
this year by the hunters, who are of the opinion that a metal tag of some description should
accompany each licence. They advance on behalf of their complaint the statement that through
continual use, and as the licence is subject to getting wet from time to time, it naturally is
spoilt within a short period after it is issued, and it might be mentioned that in a great number
of cases reports have been received that licences have been lost.
Fur Trade.
In regard to the present method of collecting royalty, I feel that the stamping of fur should
be done away with, as this procedure is and has been subject to numerous complaints from the
fur-traders. These gentlemen claim that through the stamping of their fur the same depreciates
in value on outside markets. There is no doubt in my mind that the stamping of muskrat and
weasel pelts affect their value.
Through various sources complaints of a flimsy nature have been received as to bootlegging
of fur in Vancouver, but it may be mentioned that not in one instance has there been any
complaint lodged upon which an investigation could be conducted. Personally, I am of the
opinion that there is, to a certain degree, some bootlegging of fur being carried on, but I do not
think the Department is dosing any great amount of revenue through this source. Evading the
payment of royalty can be done in a number of ways, and I may say it is a very difficult matter
to prevent this practice altogether, although steps have been and are being taken to keep this
■bootlegging down to the lowest possible minimum.
. Game Animals.
In dealing with the big game I have to mention the fact that along the Coast in my Division
the following big-game animals only are found, and I am dealing with these animals separately:—
Deer.—Through the protection afforded the doe deer during the last three years the deer
have increased in nearly every part of the Vancouver Subdivision.    On Bowen, Gambier, and the 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. Z 9
other smaller islands In the Howe Sound area many fine buck deer were taken during the open
season, and I do not think that the number killed will in any way affect the stand of these
animals. In the various inlets along the Coast deer are fairly plentiful, but would be more
so if the pit-lamping could be stopped, as I feel that the pit-lamp or jack-light is responsible.
In a number of instances our officers found left in the woods does which had been shot,
and it is regretted that this should be the case, as it is a shame to see this destructive work.
It is a very difficult matter to apprehend the hunter or hunters responsible for this, but I am
hoping that in this coming year we will be able to cope with this situation, and an example
should be made of any .person found shooting or in possession of a doe deer. There is very
little doubt in my mind that does far outnumber the 'bucks, and there is a possibility of the
farmers and ranchers along the Coast asking that the season be opened on does this coming
year. The shooting of doe deer, if allowed, should be confined to a limited period and with a
bag of only one doe allowed per hunter.
It is a very difficult matter to keep a check on the number of deer killed per hunter, and
in this connection I might mention that some sort of a tag system could no doubt be worked
satisfactorily.
Mountain-goat.—These animals, being quite able to take care of themselves, appear to be on
the increase, and as they are not hunted by the sportsmen in this district to any great extent,
there is no cause to shorten the open season in effect this year. Goat no doubt suffered considerably through numerous forest fires in the Powell River area, and this could also be said
in respect to the deer in this district.
Bear (Grizzly and Black).—Very few grizzly bear wrere taken during the past year, and
it might be mentioned that black bear do not appear to catch the eye of the average hunter, and
are naturally left unmolested and are increasing in every part of the district. In and around
the Burnaby Municipality black bear have done considerable damage to bee-hives and orchards,
and I feel that, as this district is so near Vancouver, steps should be taken by the Department
to thin these animals out, as if this is not done more complaints will be received each year.
It might be mentioned that these animals have been seen very close to Port Moody, as well as
near Lozells Station in Burnaby, and it is becoming a common occurrence to see these animals,
throughout these districts.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—During the past years these birds have increased, and the season of 1924 was
one of the best the sportsmen have had in this district for a number of years. Prior to the
opening of the season pheasants were noticed by our officers in, large numbers throughout the
district. The weather conditions throughout the season protected the birds, as well as the fact
of the duck season opening on the same day.
No doubt it will be a matter of interest to know that the Game Warden at Port Moody
noticed on one of his patrols a pure white hen pheasant. Although I ha"ve known of these
" freaks " being found from time to time, this is the first instance of the kind, to my knowledge,
in my district.
A very peculiar point in regard to pheasants is that, in respect to damage to crops of the
farmer, a few years ago numerous complaints were received, but during the past season only
two or three complaints or requests from farmers to shoot pheasants doing damage were received,
these requests coming from the Delta Municipality and another from the Coquitlam District.
European Partridge.—These birds are slightly increasing and I would not recommend' the
opening of the season, other than, in the Delta Municipality, on these birds during the coming
year.
It was noticed that partridges are getting hold in the Sumas Prairie country, and apparently
the birds there have migrated from the State to the south. A request was received by the Game
Conservation Board that the season be opened in this locality, and I feel that the Board quite
wisely refused this request, and I do not think that the season should be opened until the birds
have increased in such numbers as will warrant shooting, which I may say is not the case at the
present time.
Throughout the Surrey Municipality and the rest of the Delta Municipality and Electoral
District partridges can be seen here and there, but there are not enough birds in these localities
to warrant shooting, although the partridge is a bird that can very well take care of itself. Z 10 British Columbia. 1925
Quail.—In the Delta Municipality quail are about holding their own and, I feel, will never
increase to. such numbers as will warrant an open season unless a good amount of breeding
stock is liberated. In the North Vancouver District these birds are, to say the least, holding
their own, but it is felt that through the ravages by cats that are left to hunt for themselves
by campers and loggers these birds will not increase to any great number, and until steps
are taken to trap or get rid of domestic cats running wild in the bush in this and other districts
I do not think that these birds will increase in such numbers as will warrant shooting.
Grouse (Blue and Willow).—Excellent blue-grouse shooting was obtained during the past
season, whereas the willow is again decreasing in many parts of the district, and the season will
have to be closed on these birds shortly if we wish to assure the sportsmen that he will have
shooting of these birds in years to come.
The season, although the blue grouse were very plentiful, was closed on Bowen Island, due
to the fact that a petition was sent in to the Game Conservation Board for some pheasants, with
the understanding that if these birds wTere liberated the grouse season would be closed. A number
of pheasants as a result were turned loose on the island, and from reports received are doing
exceptionally well. B'lue grouse are reported plentiful in the North Vancouver District and
on Ganibier Island and the birds taken were in the best of condition.
Willow-grouse bags were very small and, as stated before, the season should be closed on
these birds this coming year.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks.—Prior to the opening of the season, mallards, pintail, widgeon, and teal could be
seen in large numbers off the foreshore of Lulu and Sea Islands and in the Delta District, and
a large number of birds were also noted in the Sumas District. After the opening day, however,
very poor bags were obtained, although in some parts of the district good shooting was had and
the birds killed were in good condition. Wood-ducks were seen near Chilliwack, but from
reports at hand they were not as plentiful as last year.
Taking into consideration the weather conditions, the season this year on wild fowl was
about the same as last year, and the birds appeared to be in about equal numbers, with no noted
increase or decrease.
Swans.—A very unusual thing occurred this year in respect to these birds. It was reported
that in the neighbourhood of 200 swans were seen off the foreshore of Sea Island, but I feel that
this report cannot be considered reliable, although I may say I do know that some twenty or
thirty swans were observed by our Game Wardens during the course of their patrols in the above-
mentioned area. Unfortunately, however, some hunters could not leave these birds alone, and as
a result two were prosecuted for killing a swan and one hunter for having a swan in his
possession. It is to be regretted that some hunters appear not to have any regard as to what
they are shooting at.
Geese and Brant.—These birds appeared in good numbers this year, and no doubt this
shooting season has been one of the best the sportsmen have had in this district on these birds
for some considerable time. Geese were reported as being very plentiful in the Knight Inlet
District, whereas excellent brant-shooting was obtained at Boundary and Mud Bays.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Very few of these animals are to be found in my Division and should be protected.
Marten.—Could not be considered plentiful, but from reports received trappers in the district
have caught a considerable number.
Mink.—These animals are about holding their own and are found in fairly large numbers
throughout the district.
Muskrats.—In many parts of the district muskrats are practically trapped out, whereas
in some portions they are still to be found in fair numbers, but nothing compared to the number
a few years ago.
Otter.—A few of these animals are to be found in the district.
Racoon.—I would consider that these animals are plentiful and in some instances' have been
killing domestic fowl.
Skunk.—Fairly plentiful throughout the district.
Weasel or Ermine.—Plentiful. 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. Z 11
In regard to fur-bearing animals, it is felt that if pit-lamping can be stopped, which is a
very difficult problem, the fur-hearers, especially along the Coast and the islands adjacent
thereto, would have a much better chance of increasing. Pit-lamping of these animals to my
mind is responsible for the noted decrease during the past few years.
Noxious Animals and Birds.
Cougars, coyotes, and wolves are found in the Vancouver District. Cougars can be considered as being fairly plentiful, and it might be mentioned that coyotes during the past two
years have migrated into the lower mainland regions of the district, and steps should be taken
to take care of the situation as there is very little doubt in my mind that these animals are
killing a good many pheasants and grouse.
Wolves are not found in this district, with the exception of the northern portion, where
they have been doing considerable damage not only to the game, but also to the stock of farmers.
It is considered that the present system of paying bounties on predatory animals has proven
a failure, and I would recommend that expert noxious-animal hunters be employed to carry on
the work of keeping cougars, wolves, and coyotes in check, as if this is not done I venture to
say that within a few years predatory animals in this district will have increased and thereby
cause a great depletion in the game found in the district.
In regard to noxious birds, a few years ago bounty was paid for the destruction of crows,
eagles, big-horned owls, and snowy owls, and although a large number of these birds were killed
they still appear to be as numerous as ever and are on the increase. The suggestion made above
in respect to predatory animals applies also in regard to noxious birds.
Special Patrols.
During the past year no special game patrols were made outside of the district, with the
exception of the trip made by the launch " Watla " to the Gulf Islands to investigate a complaint
of alleged pit-lamping going on in the vicinity of Tumbo Island. Owing to weather conditions,
however, no success was had on this trip, although reliable information was obtained that considerable pit-lamping had been carried on during the fall of the year, and that this practice has
been carried on for a number of years.
As usual, Constables in the district paid particular attention to game-work while out on
their police patrols throughout their respective districts. The following Constables were almost
continually engaged in making game patrols throughout the year being reported on, namely:
W. V. Fenton and W. J. Mcintosh, Langley Detachment; H. C. Pyke, Chilliwack Detachment;
W. H. Cameron, Ladner Detachment; J. G. Cunningham, W. Clark, and D. C. Campbell, Vancouver Detachment; A. H. Silk, Mission Detachment; J. Murray, Port Moody Detachment;
P. Corrigan, Pitt Meadow's Detachment.
Constables W. H. Hadley, A. C. Sutton, and C. F. Kearns, of Alert Bay, Powell River, and
Vananda Detachments, respectively, made a large number of patrols on game-protection work.
Game Reserves.
The follow.ing reserves are to be found in my Division : Nelson, Captain, and Hardy Islands;
Burnaby, Deer, and Trout Lakes.
The first-named reserve was made for the purpose of protecting the deer on Hardy Island,
of which there are a large number. The other reserves are natural resting-places for wild fowl,
and it might be mentioned that on Burnaby Lake at certain periods of the year thousands of
ducks of nearly every species can be seen, and this lake is certainly an ideal place for a resting
area for the birds. Special attention has been paid to these reserves, many patrols having been
made to see that no violation, of the Act and regulations occurred.
Enforcement.
Again I might mention that every possible step was taken to see that the game laws were
observed in my Division, although a few extra-qualified gamemen could be used to good advantage, and I may say that more of the permanent officers would have been sent out on game-work,
but this was impossible owing to the Assizes during the fall of the year and various other police
matters cropping up, and unfortunately I was unable to spare any extra men. Z 12
British Columbia.
1925
" B " DIVISION.
By Inspector W. R. Dunwoody, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " B " Division
for the year 1924, as requested in your Circular No. 974 of the 3rd February, 1925.
Owing to so many amendments to the " Game Act" being made at every session of the
Legislature, I would respectfully suggest that immediately after the House is prorogued the
" Game Act " be consolidated for the convenience of the Police, as it is very difficult for the
ordinary Constable to look up all the amendments, so that he can understand them properly.
In a great many instances it is many months after an amendment comes into force before the
Constables get copies of the same.
Temporary Game Wardens.
Two temporary Game Wardens were engaged in the Kootenay Valley from May 26th to
December 15th, 1924. This was considered necessary owing to the alleged destruction of game,
particularly elk, by Indians during the summer months in previous years. No Indians were
found hunting in this district during the summer of 1924. I have no record in this office of
either of these men obtaining evidence to warrant a prosecution, and I am doubtful whether
the expense incurred in having these men on patrol is warranted. Charles Shuttleworth, of
Penticton, was employed in the Boundary District for one month for the purpose of hunting
cougar. He obtained very good results, having bagged five cougar during that period. The above
were all the temporary Game Wardens employed in this Division during 1924.
Licence Fees and Roy'alty.
The Police and Game Wardens in this Division collected the sum of $8,456.70 in licence fees
and $820.31 in royalties during the year 1924. No doubt more royalties would have been
collected only that trapping in the greater portion of this Division is prohibited.
Fur Trade.
Owing to trapping being restricted south of the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway
during 1924, there was practically nothing doing in this trade during that time.
j Game Animals.
Moose, Elk, Mountain Sheep and Goat.—In the North-east Kootenay and Fernie Districts
moose and elk are increasing, as well as mountain sheep and goat. In the West Kootenay
District there are a few elk. These are in the Lardeau country and across the Slocan Lake
from New Denver.
Bear (Black and Grizzly).—These are also plentiful in the districts and are apparently
on  the  increase  throughout  the  Division.
Deer (Mule and White-tailed).—These are increasing. It seems to be the opinion of some
hunters that too many bucks are being killed, which causes a great many barren does, and
suggest that they should be allowed to kill one .buck and one doe in the open season. Other
hunters state that the " buck law " is the best there has ever been in this Province.
Caribou.—There are a few caribou in the North-east Kootenay District.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—In the Similkameen and South Okanagan Valleys pheasants are doing well
from a hunter's point of view, but the farmers are complaining that the pheasants are destructive to their crops. At Harrop and Creston, in the West Kootenay District, pheasants seem to
he doing fairly well.
Hungarian Partridge.—Reported in the Boundary, West Kootenay, and Fernie Districts and
are especially plentiful in the Boundary District. These are also destructive to crops and a
number of complaints have been received.
Grouse (Blue and Willow).—Plentiful throughout the Division, more having been killed
this year than during the past five seasons, and there were sufficient survivors to furnish good
foundation stock for breeding purposes for 1925. 15 Geo. 5 Report op the Provincial Game Warden. Z 13
Ducks and Geese.—Very plentiful in the North-east Kootenay District and also in the West
Kootenay District, around the Kootenay Flats. The Creston Rod and Gun Club planted considerable wild rice on Kootenay Flats during the year and seem to have been well repaid for
their trouble.
Fur-bearing Animals.
All fur-bearing animals are on the increase in this Division, but I would not suggest any
open season for another two years.
Beaver are doing exceptionally well. I have received a number of complaints of them
damming up small streams and flooding low-lying lands. Several permits have been issued to
farmers to trap beaver, but apparently they have not been very successful.
Mink and marten seem to be increasing and are getting a good foundation for further
increase.
Noxious Animals.
From reports, cougar are increasing in this Division, also coyotes, and are killing off great
numbers of deer, game birds, and small fur-bearing animals. A number of people are under the
impression that they have no right to trap these animals, thinking they are fur-bearing. These
noxious animals are bound to increase, especially coyotes, unless a larger bounty is placed on
them, as it does not pay a trapper to go out after them under present conditions. When there
was an open season on fur-bearing auimals more noxious animals were trapped, and something
must be done in the near future to check the increase of such animals.
Special Patrols.
The police have not made many special patrols during the year, excepting when they have
gone to investigate applications for permits to trap beaver doing damage to meadow lands, etc.
Game Reserves.
In this Division we have three game reserves—Elk River, Nelson, and Vaseaux Lake, in the
South Okanagan, where a bird sanctuary has been declared.
The Elk River Game Reserve has become a splendid sanctuary for wild life, they seeming
to know that here they are immune from molestation. All the high ranges are swarming with
goat and it is a question whether or not there are too many in this place, as they are crowding
the sheep from their old ranges.
The game reserve near Nelson should include the West Arm of the Kootenay Lake from
P. Burns's slaughter-house to Willow Point. This area was not included in the regulations
last year. This should be done, as it is very dangerous to human life for any person to be
shooting in this vicinity.
It is suggested by the N.C.O. in charge of the Fernie District that the district known locally
as the South Fork, where great numbers of deer crowd in from the surrounding country during
the winter, should be made a game reserve.
Enforcement.
The provisions of the " Game Act" have been rigidly enforced in this Division, and I am
of the opinion that the present system of having the police enforce the Act is more effective
than the old system of Game Wardens. Where Game Wardens are employed, in nearly every
instance it is the Provincial Police who obtain information to prosecute under the " Game Act."
During the year 1924 there were forty-two prosecutions in this Division under the " Game
Act," with thirty-five convictions and seven dismissals.
| Acknowledgments.
I would like to mention that Constables Ira J. Brown, of Fernie; F. H. Butwell, of Golden;
and R. M. Robertson, of Penticton, have proved efficient Game Wardens and seem to take a
great interest in their work. Z 14 British Columbia. 1925
"C" DIVISION.
By Inspector W. L. Fernie, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report of conditions, etc., in this Division
(Interior) under the " Game Act" for the year 1924.
The " Game Act" would appear to pbe satisfactory with the exception, of course, of trap-lines.
One request was received during the year from a Mr. J. W. Campbell, of Horsefly (Cariboo),
who was acting on behalf of several other trappers in that district, that trap-lines be registered.
This application was more or less in the way of affording trappers protection from others who
might wish to " jump " their trap-lines. Mr. Campbell pointed out that in the event of a trapper
wishing to rest his trap-line for a year or two, for the purpose of allowing the fur-bearing animals
an opportunity of increasing, there was nothing to stop another trapper claiming the trap-line
if no traps were set thereon. This of course would be unfair to the trapper who was conscientiously working towards conservation, and who should be encouraged in so doing.
The trading of trap-lines would also appear to be another matter which should have more
attention. I am of the opinion that a trapper no doubt can sell or dispose of his cabins and
equipment, but has He any right to sell or give the right to any other party to trap on that area
where his cabins and equipment are?
Temporary Game Wardens.
During this year six temporary Game Wardens were employed in this Division at the
beginning of the open season. Three of these Game Wardens were released during December,
the remainder still being employed. Splendid work was performed by these men, particularly
the men stationed at Kelowna, Vernon, and the 100-Mile House. I am of the opinion, however,
that Game Wardens appointed through the recommendation of Game Associations throughout
the Province should be given every opportunity to show that they are worthy of the position.
Should they not be found satisfactory or active enough in their work they should not be
re-employcd.
Licence Fees and Royalty.
The present licence fees and royalties appear to be satisfactory.
Fur Trade.
The fur-trade business would seem to be much the same as the last few years.    In this
Division the Cariboo country is about the only district where activity in this direction is noted.
Catches would seem to be on a par with last year, although it is early yet to get definite
information on this matter.
, Game Animals.     •
In spite of the many articles appearing in newspapers of this Province regarding the decrease
of game, there is no doubt that a great many of these articles would appear to be written by
people who seem to have no knowledge whatever of game conditions, From reports received
throughout the year from Game Wardens and Constables in this Division, and also from conversation with farmers and settlers in all parts of this Division, there is undoubtedly a marked
increase in big game in so far as the Interior is concerned. The following is compiled from
reports received from the different points of this Division:—
Moose.—In the Cariboo District these animals are very plentiful and have greatly increased
during the last two or three years. In the Kamloops District there is a band in the Criss Creek
District, near Savona, which is doing well and increasing. In the North Thompson District
moose have been noticed this last two years, evidently coming from the Upper and Lower
Clearwater Districts.  '
Caribou.—These are very plentiful in the Cariboo District and in good condition. In the
Kamloops District (North Thompson), near the Clearwater and Myrtle Lakes, they are plentiful
and increasing. Recently they have been observed in the Blue River and Avola sections. A large
band is also reported in that country to the north of the Adams Lake District.
Elk.—In the Yalakom Reserve, near Lillooet, these animals are increasing satisfactorily and
are now spreading out in small bands.   During October, 1924, 1,000 lb. of coarse salt for a 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. Z 15
salt-lick was spread out in Paradise Valley (part of the reserve) for these animals. This saltlick was provided by the Game Conservation Board in an attempt to divert the elk from destroying trees and pastures belonging to Indians in that district, and would appear to have achieved
its purpose.
Mount ain^sheep.—These appear to be holding their own in the Cariboo District. In the
North Thompson, particularly near Albreda, they are reported plentiful. In the Vernon District,
near Fintry, on the west side of the Okanagan Lake, favourable reports have been received
concerning a flock of sheep which has been there for some years.
Mountain-goat.—In the Cariboo District generally they are reported as holding their own,
the only noticeable increase being in the Clearwater District, near Mahood Lake. They are
reported as being plentiful in the regions of Shuswap and Adams Lake. At Sugar Lake, in the
Vernon District, they are also reported as being plentiful.
Bear.—These animals are reported very numerous throughout the whole Interior and no
doubt have incrreased very rapidly the last few years.
Deer.—Deer are undoubtedly on the increase throughout the whole Interior, reports in
abundance having been received to verify this information. Bucks are reported scarce in the
Okanagan. District (both North and South), and it would appear advisable to reduce the bag
limit this coming season or some other steps be taken to give them protection.
Game Birds.
Grouse.—Willow and blue grouse in the Cariboo District, on the average, are reported
plentiful. Franklin grouse in the Barkerville area are still reported plentiful, although they
would appear to be getting thinned out. In the Kamloops District both blue and willow grouse
are reported plentiful. In the Vernon District willow and blue grouse are reported plentiful,
although in some parts blue grouse are reported as not so numerous as in previous years. In
the Yale District reports are very satisfactory with regard to these birds. Ashcroft vicinity
is the only place where they are becoming scarce, which, of course, is not a suitable place for
these birds; no doubt they have migrated to other parts near by where they have better feeding
and protection.
Hungarian Partridge.—These are reported plentiful in the Okanagan and are on the increase.
They are a hardy bird and winter well. It would appear that they are spreading throughout
the Okanagan from the south to the north of this valley.
Pheasants.—These are undoubtedly on the increase throughout the whole Interior, at least
as far north as Clinton. There is a reported shortage of cocks in the Okanagan District, particularly at Kelowna, which no doubt is due to the season having been open for cocks in that
locality for the last few years. These birds appear to do splendidly in the Interior, the only
drawback being the wintering of these birds. The winter, the last two years, has been rather
severe, with a very heavy snowfall, and it would appear that the pheasants are unable to obtain
feed during that period. At all points where the pheasants are numerous instructions were
issued to purchase grain, if necessary, for these birds during the severe weather, and I am
satisfied that everything possible has been done for their protection during the winter, in spite
of the many criticisms that one reads, almost daily, during the cold weather in the Provincial
newspapers.
Ducks.—Reports on these migratory birds would appear to conflict. In the Cariboo country
they were reported this year as 'being plentiful, and in the Barkerville area they were reported
as being more numerous this year than in the last few years. In the Kamloops District they
were reported as being numerous, but not as plentiful as in previous years. In the Vernon
District they were reported as being plentiful, with no noticeable increase.
Geese.—Favourable reports have been received from all over the Interior concerning these
birds and there is no doubt that they are increasing. Concerning the above migratory birds, it
would appear probable that with the advent of the automobile, with which sportsmen can travel
rapidly from one lake to another, the large lakes near the public highways in this Interior are
being avoided by migratory birds, on their southern flights.
Swans.—It would appear necessary to add a little regarding these birds. It is of interest
to hear that they have been observed in different parts of the Province. Game Warden Hughes
reports that several flocks visited Exeter Lake in the spring and also again in the fall of this Z 16 British Columbia. 1925
year. Game Warden Turner reports that several flocks of swans were seen in Swan and
Spectacle Lakes in the Barkerville area. Swans were also reported at Salmon Arm and also
at Kelowna. Everything is being done to protect these birds, and it might not be out of place
to mention here that two prosecutions were lodged during the year concerning these birds, both
of which were successful.
Fur-bearing Animals.
There is a persistent demand for a close season in the Cariboo District. Trappers in this
district have been expecting that a close season would be proclaimed and appear disappointed
that something has not been done. Reports from Game Wardens and Constables in the Cariboo
country and also the North Thompson District are unanimous in their request for a close season
for a period of three or four years. In other parts of this Division where the trapping has been
closed there is no noticeable increase in fur-bearing animals, other than beaver. Beaver are
the only fur-bearing animals that appear to be increasing in the closed areas and the increase
is very noticeable.
Noxious Animals.
Coyotes and cougar are reported on the increase in the Vernon District by Game Warden
Quesnel. Cougar are also reported numerous near Sicamous, on the shores of the Shuswap Lake,
but action has been taken by the Game Conservation Board in this area and it is hoped will be
successful. Coyotes are reported as being more numerous in the Merritt District than in previous
years.    Coyotes are also reported as being numerous in the Quesnel District.
Special Patrols.
Numerous patrols have been made throughout the year in the interests of game, and all
temporary Game Wardens have more or less been making special patrols each month in their
respective districts. A special patrol was made by Game Warden Hughes during October to
Quesnel Dam. Infractions were supposed to have occurred in this vicinity, but no action could
be taken. It is expected that an officer will be stationed at Likely during this coming year and
no doubt will ibe able to give this district more attention. Several patrols to trap-lines were
undertaken during the trapping season, chiefly to settle disputes. A proposal has been received
from the Forest Branch for a joint patrol to be made by a Forest Branch officer and a Provincial
Constable in the spring or early summer of 1925 through the Chilootin country in the interests
of forest and game protection. This matter is now under consideration at present and it is
hoped that such a patrol will be undertaken. The district to be patrolled will be through regions
that have not been visited before and it is hoped to gather interesting data from this patrol.
Game Reserves.
I would again recommend that the Bowron Lake quadrangle be proclaimed a reserve for
moose. All opposition, as far as can be learned, has been withdrawn and the inhabitants are
anxious for it 'being proclaimed. The recommendation I made last year with regard to Paul
Lake and the Momitch Lake country, the first place being near Kamloops and the latter near
Adams Lake, I am still in favour of.
Enforcement.
The enforcement of the " Game Act" in this Division has been carried on with undiminished
vigour. The following summary of prosecutions is of interest: Prosecutions (all of which were
successful, netting fines amounting to $825), 54; withdrawal, 1; pleaded "Guilty" and given,
suspended sentence, 2; dismissals, 3 ; pleaded " Guilty " and which were dismissed, 3; total of
prosecutions for the year, 63.
The above record speaks well for the way in which the officers concerned prepared their
cases.
Acknowledgments.
In concluding my report, I would like to draw your attention to the interest taken by the
Constables and Game Wardens in the welfare of the game in this Province, and to whose untiring
efforts I am able to compile this report.   All of which I respectfully submit, 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Provincial Game Warden.
Z 17
"D" DIVISION.
By Inspector T. W. S. Parsons, Officer Commanding.
The " Game Act."
Based upon personal observation and from information supplied, many alterations designed
to assist the enforcement of the Act have been submitted at various times. In this connection
I feel officers stationed in the Fort George and Hazelton Police Districts, particularly Corporal
T. Van Dyk, deserve especial mention, for it is from these men most of the data presented was
obtained. Many of the suggestions put forward have since been incorporated in the Act, an
encouraging sign pointing both to an intelligent interest in and technical knowledge of their
work.
While the police liberally devote their time and energy towards making our game protection
a success, one weakness is exposed in the class'of service we are able to give; id est, our inability
to supply a reliable propagative survey.
Local plentitude is seldom an argument for general plentitude, and although by piecing
several reports together an approximate idea can be formed, actually the matter is one for the
expert, to which end the appointment of at least one trained conservator in every police division
is recommended.
The duties of such an official should comprise in lecturing school-children upon the British
Columbia " Game Act" and its intentions, the control of trap-line registration, the survey alluded
to above, and supervision of the fur trade. Obviously a high standard of intelligence with special
attributes would be expected from such an appointee.
During the year 1924 a very marked interest has been shown in this Act by members of the
Provincial Police and the Gun Clubs throughout the Division, between whom a close co-operation
is being established.
Licence Fees and Royalties.
The licence fees for the Division show an increase over 1923, and royalties a slight
falling-off. It is suggested that the present system of marking pelts be changed as the fur-
markers now in use can be too easily duplicated.
The Fur Trade.
The extremely speculative nature of this business during the past few years now appears
to have resolved itself into more prosaic channels.   Fur of a fixed grade calls for a fixed price,,
and with values set either in New York or London, dealers are compelled to trade on an ordinary
percentage basis.
Game Animals.
Interior.—Big game, especially moose and caribou, is unquestionably increasing and large
herds of these species have been seen at several points.
Coast.—The only big game in the Coast District are mountain-goat and deer. Both species
are numerous and easily obtained.
Game Birds.
Interior.—Grouse are very plentiful. Prairie-chicken show a steady increase, the latter
being due to the close season. At Prince George the Mongolian pheasants recently imported have
shown a satisfactory increase and will prove a valuable asset to the community. Mr. J. H.
Johnson still maintains a deep interest in their welfare.
Coos*.—Pheasants on the Queen Charlotte Islands increased during the year and a short
open season is recommended for 1925.
Geese and Ducks.—These have increased and a slight change in the open season has been
recommended.
Fur-bearing Animals.
During the year a better quality of fur has been marketed and one hears far less of
" unprime " fur than formerly.   The actual fur stand itself shows no serious diminution, and
with the inauguration of registered trap-lines I have every confidence that the Northern Interior
will never be deprived of one of its principal resources.
2 Z 18 British Columbia. 1925
Noxious Animals.
Wolves and coyotes are reported to be on the increase throughout the Division, especially
in the Fort George and Telegraph Creek area.
Game Reserves.
There are three game reserves in this Division—Fort George, Kaien Island, and Kunghit
Island.
Enforcement.
Interior.—During the year eighteen prosecutions were instituted and sixteen convictions
obtained by the Provincial Police in the Hazelton, Fort George, and Peace River Districts. This
unusual reduction in prosecutions may be fairly ascribed to the excellent work performed by our
officers.
Coast.—Twelve convictions were secured in the Prince Rupert District, and although this
shows an improvement over former years, I am still convinced that many violations of the
" Game Act" occur along the Coast. Until a proper system of boat patrols is maintained,
frequent complaints as to trappers and hunters operating during the close season may be
anticipated.
i Acknowledgments.
In closing this report, I wish to express appreciation of the vigilance of the N.C.O.'s and
men throughout this Division. Considering the vast area they are called upon to patrol—some
250,000 square miles—the work performed during the year has been very creditable indeed.
CEDAR HILL PHEASANT FARM.
By Constable J. W. Jones, in Charge.
Pheasants in .pens on January 1st, 1924       600
Breeding stock—
Hen pheasants        75
Cock pheasants        16
Number of eggs laid      2,000
Set under hens   1,850
Small late eggs used for feeding young pheasants       150
Young pheasants reared  1,200
Liberated in the fall, 1924      500
Now in pens       500
Strayed     150
Casualties        50
Old pheasants now in pens .-.        89
Escaped from breedingjpens         2
Total number of pheasants in pens, December 31st, 1924      589
The following is a list of vermin destroyed on the farm during the year 1924: Cats, 31;
crows, 3;  hawks, 60;  horned owls, 1;  owls, 20; blue jays, 25; total, 140.
During the months of November and December, 1924, 430 quail were trapped and liberated
in different parts of the Island, as follows: 'Shawnigan Lake, 30; Goldstream, 50; Mill Bay, 50;
North Saanich, West Road, 50; North Saanich, East Road, 50; East Sooke, Mr. Donaldson, 50;
East Sooke, Mr. Davidson, 50;  West Sooke, 50;  Metchosin, Mrs. McVickers, 50; total, 430.
The following prosecutions were instituted on and in the vicinity of the farm during the
year 1924 :—
October 21st. J. Stanley Cameron and E. H. Mitchell, possession of game birds during close
season.    Case dismissed.
October 22nd.    J. Cimonelly, hunting in a game reserve.    Fined $10.
October 31st.    John Porter, carrying loaded shotgun in motor-vehicle.    Fined $20.
October 31st.    J. Stanley Cameron, refusing to stop automobile when requested to do so by
Game Warden.    Case withdrawn. 15 Geo. 5 Report of the Provincial Game Warden. Z 19
December 29th. Lee John (Chinaman), carrying shotgun without a licence. Fined $10 and
shotgun confiscated;  $2.50 costs.
The following birds were shipped out from the Cedar Hill Pheasant Farm during the year
1924 :—
Pheasants.—Clinton, 25; Cranbrook, 15; Peachland, 15 ; Ashcroft, 15; Cariboo, 15; Quesnel,
15; Vancouver, for local distribution, 400; Hope, 15; Revelstoke, 15; Creston, 15; Vernon, 60;
Sooke Lake, 25; Sooke District, 50; Elk Lake, 25; Nanaimo, 25; Oregon, U.S.A., 12; Ballenas
Island, 10; Ladysmith, 3; East Sooke, 10; Bowen Island, 25; Riske Creek, 10; Otter Point, 15;
Alberni, 15; Kelowna, 60; North Bend, 15; Prince Rupert, 15; Metchosin, 25; Shawnigan
District, 25;  Parksville, 25;  Mr. Butler, Vancouver, 250.
Quail.—Forwarded to Shawnigan Lake and Cumberland, 100.
COLQUITZ PHEASANT FARM.
By Constable A. P. Cummins, in Charge.
Stock in hand in spring of 1924—
Mongolian hens        120
Mongolian cocks        30
Chinese hens  •.       20
Chinese cocks   6
Wild ducks         12
Wild drakes          5
Number of pheasant-eggs put under hens  2,000
Number of pheasant-eggs distributed      204
Number of pheasants hatched   1,500
Number lost by trampling of hens, vermin, etc     350
Number of birds strayed from field       100
Number of birds in pens at present time  1,030
The pheasant-eggs were distributed as follows: Percy Wood, South Port, P.E.I., 1 setting;
Colonel Victor Spencer, Lytton, 2 settings; B. H. McNeil, Canim Lake, 2 settings; Hon. E. A.
'Smith, Shediac, New Brunswick, 2 settings; W. K. Finlayson, Sicamous, 2 settings; W. Fooks,
Victoria, 1 setting.
After sufficient eggs had been collected a number of stock birds were turned out, some with
broods, others to raise a late brood.    Number of birds shipped up to December 1st, 1924, 19, as
follows :  One Mongolian cock to W. Fooks, Victoria;  five cocks and ten hens to Tranquille;  one
cook and two hens to Hon. E. A. Smith, Shediac, New Brunswick.
Over 100 wild duck reared and eighty at present on hand.
GAME CONSERVATION BOARD.
Report of F. Butler, Secretary, on Operations of Board, 1924.
Throughout the year 1924 the Game Conservation Board has continued its policy of trying
to better conditions for the protection and conservation of the wild life of British Columbia.
Many difficult problems have confronted the Board, and in order to show what has been done
or what the Board intends to do during the coming year these different problems are being dealt
with in this report.
Before dealing with these matters it is felt that mention should be made of the fact that
the Board's chief aim is to protect and conserve the wild animal and bird life of the Province
along sane and reasonable lines.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
Under the amendments to the " Game Act" passed in 1923, provision was made for the
making of regulations pertaining to the registration of trap-lines and guides, and during the
year under review the Board has given very careful attention to this matter in an endeavour
to have these regulations approved and promulgated.        * Z 20 British Columbia. 1925
In considering these regulations, the Board has tried, wherever possible, to work in the
best interests of the white and Indian trappers and the guides. The policy of registering trap-
lines, being a new one, has* naturally been a very difficult matter to deal with, but no doubt by
the 1925 trapping season these regulations will have been passed and put into force.
COLLECTION  OF  ROYALTY   ON   FUR.
The system now in vogue in respect to the collection of royalty on pelts of fur-bearing animals
trapped in the Province has proven a failure, and the Board, acting in conjunction with the
Provinces to the east, is endeavouring to devise some means whereby a better check may be kept
on the collection of this tax.
I Game Reserves.
As the Board has felt that in order to protect the game in a number of districts in the
Province reserves or sanctuaries are necessarily required, careful attention has been given to
a number of areas which have been brought to the notice of the Board, and recommendations
will be made shortly to the Department with a view of having different areas of land suitable
for the purpose set aside as game reserves.
p Returns of Licence-holders.
As in the past no reliable data or information has been obtained by the Game Department
in respect to the amount of game killed each year, regulations as provided for under the present
" Game Act" will be recommended, and under these regulations every licence-holder no doubt
will be required to surrender his licence upon expiry thereof to the Board, with a full statement
on the back of such licence showing the game that has been killed or taken by the licensee.
t Licence-tags.
The issuance of tags with all firearms licences has been considered and a recommendation
that these tags pbe again issued with licences has been made to the Department. The Board in
making this recommendation was of the opinion that not only would such a system enable our
game officers to better enforce the provisions of the " Game Act," but it would also be a means
of identification and in a way would enable the farmer to prevent trespassing on his property if
he should desire not to have hunters going over or hunting on his land.
Public Shooting-grounds,
During the past year throughout various States and in some of the Eastern Provinces public
shooting-grounds have been made, and the Board is of the opinion that such steps should be
taken in this Province, and with this object in view an investigation will be made of various
districts in the Province.
• Fur-farming.
Every assistance has been given to fur-farmers and prospective fur-farmers. All possible
literature has been obtained and furnished to applicants desiring information on this industry.
In a number of cases where the farmer has not had sufficient funds to obtain pbreeding stock
the Board has granted special permission to take a specified number of fur-bearing animals
during the close season on the understanding that the permittee returns to the Board, within a
limited period after such stock is taken, a number of live animals equal to the number captured
or trapped under such special permission.
During the year under review the Board has answered some 1,200 letters of inquiry in regard
to fur-farming. These inquiries have not only been received from people residing in the Province,
but from the other Provinces in Canada, the United States, ;South America, and England.
Banding of Migratory Birds.
Early in the year trapping operations were conducted on Lulu and Sea Islands, near Vancouver, for the purpose of banding migratory game birds, and it is pleasing to note that, although
a number of obstacles had to be overcome, some sixty-five ducks and one snow-goose were banded.
From returns so far received one duck banded was killed near Cordova, Alaska, another in the
State of Washington, and two in the neighbourhood where they were originally banded.   The «
15 Geo. 5
Report of the Provincial Game Warden.
Z 21
duck killed at Co
rdova, Alaska, was banded in March, 1924, and was report
3d as havii
ig been
killed in October of the same year. As far as the records show, the snow-goose was the first
ever banded and considerable difficulty was experienced by the banders in capturing this bird.
The Board has under consideration, at the present time the matter of establishing a
permanent banding-station, as it is felt that a large amount of reliable information can be
obtained by carrying on this work, which is being done in co-operation with the Dominion Parks
Branch, Ottawa, and the Biological Survey, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
Provincial Bird-house Competition.
In co-operation with the Dominion Parks Branch, the Board during the past two years has
held a bird-house competition amongst the school-children in the Province, and it is gratifying
to note that a good deal of interest has been taken by the competitors in providing houses for
insectivorous birds.
Propagation.
(a.) Pheasants.—Due to the operations of the Pheasant Farms near Victoria, some 2,000
pheasants were liberated in various parts of the Province, and from observations in the field
during the past open season the sportsmen have had one of the best seasons for hunting these
birds.
Considerable complaint was received from the farmers throughout the country as to damage
by pheasants, and in this connection the Board endeavoured to employ all possible means to
curtail this damage, as it is felt that the farmer should be given every assistance where these
birds are causing him harm.
(6.) Muskrats.—Other work carried on under the Board's direction was that in connection
with the trapping alive of muskrats within the boundaries of the Burnaby Lake Game Reserve.
A number of these animals were taken alive and shipped to points on Vancouver Island, where,
from reports received, they are increasing. It is to be noted that, so far as records show,
muskrats have never been found on Vancouver Island in the wild state until those shipped by
the Board were liberated. There are many suitable places on the Island for muskrats and the
Board intends to carry on this work each year.
(o.) Mountain-goat.-—Through the courtesy of the Dominion Parks Branch, the Board was
successful in obtaining four mountain-goat, these animals being liberated on the Shaw Creek
Game Reserve, Vancouver Island, and where it is hoped they will increase. It is the intention
of the Board to endeavour to obtain a further number of these animals for liberation on
Vancouver Island.
Control of Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds.
The control of predatory animals and noxious birds has also been given attention by the
Board, with the result that in a number of cases where complaints had been received special men
were employed to carry on the work of destroying vermin, and in one instance, which is worthy
of mention, a good deal of success was obtained by the hunter so employed. This hunter accounted
for five cougar within the short period of three weeks from the time he commenced his operations.
Recommendations have been received and considered in regard to again putting a bounty on
crows and other noxious birds, but from past experience the Board is of the opinion that the
system Of paying bounties was not a beneficial one, and steps will be taken shortly to have a
check kept on the noxious birds in the various districts in the Province where they are known
to be doing damage to game.
Meetings of Board.
During the year 1924 the Board has held a number of meetings which have been open to the
sportsmen and the general public, and it is felt, to a great extent, that these meetings have been
very beneficial, as they have taken place in various parts of the Province, and the Board has had
a very good opportunity to keep in close touch with the sportsmen, farmers, and the general
public in respect to conserving the wild life of British Columbia.
Through meetings held in Vernon, Kelowna, Penticton, and Vancouver, the Board received
a large amount of data and first-hand information in regard to the conditions in respect to game
in the districts surrounding these cities, which otherwise would not have been possible. Z 22 British Columbia. 1925
, Members of Board.
The members of the Board as at present constituted are as follows: M. B. Jackson, K.C.,
Chairman, Victoria; J. A. Buckham, M.L.A., Golden; T. B. Booth, Nanaimo; C. J. White,
Vancouver;  Dr. P. D. McSween, New Westminster.
It is to be regretted that Mr. J. F. Guimont, of Cranbrook, resigned as a member of the
Board, as this gentleman did an enormous amount of good while a member and the Board feels
the loss of his valuable advice and assistance.
i Game Regulations.
It is to be regretted that the Game Regulations for the season 1924-25 were not distributed
at an earlier date, but the Board intends in future to see that these regulations are fixed early
in the spring.
Acknowledgments.
On behalf of the Board, I wish to express appreciation to the Superintendent of Provincial
Police, his officers and Constables, and to the Game Associations and sportsmen throughout the
Province for the assistance rendered during the year under review. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Provincial Game Warden.
Z 23
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List op Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1924,
to December 31st, 1924.
Confiscated from.
Magistrate.
Date of
Confiscation.
Place of
Confiscation.
Kind
confiscated.
Siska, J.	
Welsh, F	
Roussel, F	
McCord, E. A	
McLane, N. V. H...
McLane, C. N	
White, B	
Liptak, M	
Kostyniuk, A	
Simon, H	
Abercrombie, R	
Willemar, D. R	
Wilson, S	
Bromberger, F	
Stender, W. H	
Bousquet, J	
Asada, Y	
Forsyth, L	
Lum Sing	
Austin, E	
Brackenridge, H. F.
F. W. Reger (J.P.)...
J. Cartmel	
W. Gebbie (J.P.)	
H. Bose (P.M.)	
A. H. Watson (J.P.)
A. H. Watson  (J.P.)
E. M. Sandilands..	
L. A. Dodd	
L. A. Dodd	
C. H. Beaver-Potts...
H. Carter (J.P.)	
C. W. Baker (J.P.)..
R. M. Banham (J.P.;
J. Smith	
J. Leask	
H. Bowden	
J. Maitland-Dougall.
J. A. Mclntyre..	
O. E. Darling	
O. E. Darling	
O. E. Darling	
1924.
April   25
May       5
19
June
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
2
25
25
21
4
4
8
10
6
10
30
11
28
19
11
13
13
13
Corbin	
Nelson....	
Powell River	
Cloverdale	
Fernie	
Fernie	
Wilmer	
Nanaimo	
Nanaimo	
Nanaimo	
Vananda 	
Masset	
Powell River	
Port Coquitlam
Cranbrook	
Salmon Arm	
Duncan	
Alberni	
Richmond	
Richmond..	
Richmond	
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
2 rifles,
1 shotgun,
1 revolver.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 shotgun.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle.
1 rifle. 15 Geo. 5
Report of the Provincial Game Warden.
Z 37
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<   fl      -
.I"-                      rfl         5£
9   si. u S S
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Z 38
British Columbia.
APPENDIX C.
REGULATIONS AND BOUNTIES.
Bounties paid during the Year, ended December 31st, 1024.
Government Agents.
to"
CD
r>
ba
3
M
a
to
CO*
is
o
to
%
cu
a
fl
to
cu
M
fl
O
o
S
m
Alberni	
Atlin	
Clinton	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan 	
Fernie 	
Fort Fraser	
Golden	
Kamloops 	
Kaslo --	
Merritt	
Nanaimo.-	
Nelson	
New Westminster.
Prince Rupert	
Pouce Coupe	
Penticton	
Prince George	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Smithers	
Telegraph Creek...
Victoria	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Williams Lake	
Totals	
7
30
12
1
36
2
195
1
7
12
1
5
3
33
13
20
2
1
8
2
7
4
8
4
1
4
86
15
2
1
1
4
20
7
1
173
20
440
114
21
254
102
462
3
428
39
4
13
627
384
492
234
49
5
100
8
4
17S
184
1,010
5,175
172
172
89
89
1925
$  495
00
145
00
920
00
428
00
1,365
00
520
00
842
00
578
00
524
00
1,234
00
6
00
1,016
00
320
00
238
00
183
00
1,316
00
1,359
00
1,818
00
1,244
00
523
00
138
00
90
00
260
00
31
00
291
40
1,776
00
648
00
2,090
00
$20,398
40 I
15 Geo. 5
Report of the Provincial Game Warden.
Z 39
APPENDIX D.
LIST OF GUIDES, SEASON 1924.
Williams, T Atlin.
Atlin District.
Noland, J. W.
.Atlin.
Cassiar District.
MeClusky, M Telegraph Creek.
Williams, G	
Decker, L	
Tait, N	
Fann, B	
Corlek, B	
Abesta, B	
Martin, L	
Frank, B *. Telegraph Creek.
Hyland, D .....
Dennis, B	
Dougan, —	
Colbert, J	
Escardi, —	
Fox, C	
Henyu, P	
Fort George District.
Knutson, L Albreda P.O.
Colebank, G. F Woodpecker.
Hooker, J. B Dome Creek.
Cochrane, W Croydon.
Johnson, O McBride.
Lamina, L. L        „
Goodell, T. R	
Renshaw, J. H McBride.
Ollgeier, L. Dunster.
Hargreaves, G Mount Robson.
Hargreaves, F. M  „
Brittain, H  „
Hargreaves, R. F  „
Sykes, B Penny.
Nelson, C Lucerne.
Cote, F	
Renshaw, E Loos.
Hoy, D. H..,. Fort St. James.
Barkerville District.
Cochrane, J. D Barkerville.
Pickard, M  „
Iverson, H  „
Rivers, H  „
Thompson, N. W Barkerville.
Thompson, R  „
Mason, H  „
Reef, F de W	
i Kamloops District.
Smith, G. M Seymour Arm.
Lillooet District.
Gaspard, E Horsefly.
Walters, G. H	
Walters, L. E	
Hooker, T. O	
Patenaude, G. B        „
Fletcher, J Keithley Creek.
Tighe, J Likely.
Larsen, L     „
Parminter, R      „
McChesney, D     „
McGregor, H      „
Dawes, R. W Likely.
Farler, G. C     „
Phillips, O. A :     „
Shaver, F. W      „
Veath, E     „
Lowden, D     „
McLure, P      „
Hamilton, R     „
Mansfield, B. A     „
Gaspard, F      „
Manson, W. M Lillooet.
Kootenay District.
Haner, J. M Revelstoke.
Coulliard, H Elk Prairie.
Sheek, W. P Field.
Thomas, G    „
Gilbert, F    „
Cameron, C Fort Steele.
Woodrow, F Rosebery.
Harrison, G Kermillin River.
Slaton, J Invermere.
Nixon, W. J	
Hurst, J Wilmer.
Stevens, P. V      „ Z 40
British Columbia.
1925
Nanaimo District.
Smith, J. C Comox.
Peace River District.
Peck, V. V Hudson Hope.
Vancouver District.
McPhee, J Orford Bay.
Forte, J. F Powell River.
Mansell, F Vancouver.
Forbes, J Forbes Landing.
Victoria District.
Girwood, J. B. Victoria.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed  by  Charles  F.   Banfield,  Printer  to  the  King's  Most  Excellent  Majesty.
1925.

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