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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1925]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL
POLICE
FOR  THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 3 1st, 1924
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles P.  Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1925.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British, Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Keport of the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for the year ended December 31st, 1924.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1925. Office of Superintendent of Provincial Police,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1925.
Honourable A. M. Manson, E.G., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Eeport for the year which ended
December 31st, 1924.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Superintendent of Provincial Police. REPORT OF
SUPERINTENDENT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1924.
Hon. A. M. Manson, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to forward herewith my Annual Report for the year ended December
31st, 1924.
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
At midnight of December 31st, 1924, the strength of the Force stood as follows: 8 officers;
178 non-commissioned officers and men; 45 automobiles; 3 motor-cycles; 7 launches; 6 powerboats.
Pursuant to the " Police and Prisons Regulation Act" of 1923, the reorganization of the
Force originally proposed is practically complete. The Force is now divided into four Divisions
designated by the letters " A," " B," " C," and " D," and for further convenience " A " Division
is again divided inot two Subdivisions—Victoria and Vancouver. Headquarters remains at
Victoria.
The following table shows the distribution of the Force as at December 31st:—
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33
22
22
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Totals	
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4
2
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13
146
5
45
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7
6
* In addition to the permanent staff, Special Constables were employed as occasion arose.
In the Province there are six divisional headquarters offices, sixteen district headquarters
offices, and eighty-three detachments. A list of detachments with their officers is shown as
Appendix V. on page 24 of this report.
On October 1st last year I considered it advisable for better policing to take the Clinton and
Lillooet Detachments out of the Lillooet District and place them under the direction of the N.C.O.
in charge of the Yale District. On October 16th the headquarters of the Boundary Police District
were moved to Penticton, this being done owing to the increasing importance of the Penticton
area. On November 1st the Cranbrook Police District was merged into the Fernie District.
During the year the Campbell River Detachment was reopened, the officer at Clayoquot was
moved to Ucluelet, and a new detachment opened at that point. New detachments were also
opened in " D " Division at Finlay Forks and Telegraph Creek. The detachments at Alice Arm,
Boundary, Clayoquot, Huntingdon, Hutton, Quathiaski Cove, Rolla, and Swanson Bay were
closed during the year. With the inception of a regular launch patrol certain coastal offices might
be safely discontinued.
ENLISTMENTS, DISCHARGES, ETC.
The following are the particulars regarding enlistments, discharges, etc., during the year
1924:  Enlistments, 8;  resignations, 6;  dismissals, 4;  discharges, nil;  deaths, 2.
On April 1st, 1924, all officers were required to complete three-year engagement sheets, and
the six resignations referred to took place prior to the completion of the forms. X 6
British Columbia.
1925
The death of Constable H. Avison, Prince George District Headquarters, is deeply regretted.
Avison was a loyal, efficient, and trusted police officer and his loss will be felt.
I also regret to report the death of a newly joined Constable, C. C. Canning, Smithers District
Headquarters Office.
APPOINTMENTS.
On January 31st, 1924, Inspector Walter Owen was appointed a Justice of the Peace for the
Province of British Columbia.
On February 1st, 1924, Inspector Owen was appointed Assistant Superintendent, and Deputy
Inspectors W. R. Dunwoody, W. L. Fernie, and T. W. S. Parsons were appointed Inspectors, and
Chief Contable Forbes Cruickshank was appointed to the rank of Sub-Inspector.      ;
On April 1st, 1924, Chief Clerk Geo. A. Hood (Headquarters) was appointed to the rank of
Sub-Inspector.
BUILDINGS.
The present policy permits the construction annually of some three new lock-up buildings.
These buildings being of a type standardized by the Public Works Department have been found
most suitable for the purpose. However, there is still a large number of officers of this Force
throughout the Province who have to provide their own accommodation, an unfairness which
I have found impossible to overcome up to the present. As an example, certain N.C.O.'s who
must purchase their own fuel, water, and light, and also rent suitable accommodation themselves,
are far worse off than their subordinates stationed at detachments where these privileges are
provided. To meet the situation I am hoping to be able to introduce a system of allowances
equitable to all ranks.
UNIFORMS.
The material and badges having been delivered, I hope to have the entire Force uniformed
within a few months. As the design selected appears to be both comfortable and workmanlike
the officers are expected to present a very smart appearance.
DRILLS AND LECTURE'S.
Although the value of drills and lectures is recognized as tending towards increased efficiency,
it has been found difficult to take men away from their stations for this purpose. However, it is
hoped that a course of training will be instituted at Headquarters upon subjects covered by the
individual officer in his work on detachment.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION.
The Force is badly handicapped for the want of a department dealing exclusively with
criminal investigation. A nucleus exists—the finger-print branch—but infinitely more is needed.
The prevailing custom of detailing an officer to superintend a particular case has been successful
up to a point, but the fact of removing an executive officer from his regular w,ork invariably
creates local disorganization. This was particularly noticeable during the closing days of 1924,
when Sub-Inspector Cruickshank, then engaged on cases of extreme importance, was continually
absent from the Vancouver Subdivision.
In order to better protect the public interests a separate department should be formed
immediately, and to this end I am preparing the necessary dispositions.
IDENTIFICATION BUREAU.
The work in connection with the Identification Bureau, commenced at the beginning of the
year, is rapidly increasing. This branch was efficiently organized by Corporal W. J. Voisey, who
reports as follows :—
British Columbia Provincial Police,
Identification Bureau, Headquarters,
Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1924.
Col. J. H. McMullin,
Superintendent, British Columbia Police, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit a report on the operation of the British Columbia Criminal
Identification Bureau for the year ended December 31st, 1924.
The Bureau commenced operations on January 1st, 1924. Previous to this time no system of
classifying and filing finger-prints, nor of maintaining records of criminals passing through the Provincial Prisons and our own Police Force, had been adopted. nales.
Total
83
1,198
3
88
1,733
15 Geo. 5 Report of Superintendent of Provincial Police. X 7
The finger-prints of all prisoners confined at the Oakalla Prison Farm and the Nelson Provincial
Gaol had been taken since 1917 and allowed to accumulate there. Upon the inauguration of the
Headquarters Bureau this accumulation, to the number of 7,180, was transferred to me. I immediately
commenced classifying and filing, and at the end of the year 1,733 had been completed. Record-cards
have also been made in each instance and indexed alphabetically. These show the criminal record
of each prisoner whose prints have ;been filed. I am endeavouring to complete the prints at an early
date;   however, I consider it more important to first deal with new prints coming in.
The total number of prints on file, with a corresponding number of record-cards containing the
full criminal history of the individual, now amounts to 3,200, and the following table sets out in
detail how they were obtained. Finger-print records received from all sources during the year ended
December 31st, 1924.
Provincial Prisons— Males.
Oakalla Prison Farm   1,115
Nelson Provincial Gaol         85
From accumulation at Gaols 	
British Columbia  Police—
" A " Division 	
" B " Division      ,  14
"C" Division         25
"D" Division  *  7
Other sources—
Calgary City Police         91'
New Westminster City Police         1.5 j- 135
Wyoming State Penitentiary         29
Total  3,200
Identifications.
Recognition identifications      72
Finger-print identifications      55
—    127
Recapitulation.
Provincial Gaols  1,286
Provincial Gaols prior to inauguration of Bureau   1,733
British Columbia Police   46
City and Municipal Police  .C... 106
Foreign Penitentiary   29
Total  -j   3,200
Respectfully submitted.
46
W. J. Voisey, Corporal,
Officer i/c Bureau.
GENERAL.
During the year I visited every divisional and many district headquarters offices and
detachments. Efficient police-work is being performed and a satisfactory relationship exists
between the Force and the public it serves. I also noticed a spirit of loyalty and comradeship
among the men which cannot but favourably react upon the quality of their work.
A Provincial Police organization is usually presumed to be occupied with purely rural
problems, but the physical characteristics of British Columbia require its Force to be conversant
with everything lying within the range of practical police-work. On the Pacific our men must
be sailors, navigators, and engineers. In the Kootenays and on Vancouver Island they must
understand mines and mining; in Central British Columbia the cattle industry; and in the newly
opened North every angle of frontier life. In addition to all this, our officers perform an immense
amount of urban duty, particularly in Victoria, Vancouver, and the outlying municipalities.
Once a city prisoner is committed for trial the subsequent proceedings are in Provincial hands,
a fact necessitating complete understanding of all the varying conditions identified with modern
society.
At present it, is exceedingly difficult to cope with certain prevailing coastal conditions, and
I strongly urge that our existing water-craft be augmented by the addition of two fast motor-
launches, capable of operating over a wide area and carrying machine-guns in addition to their
usual equipment. These launches—one based at Victoria and the other at Prince Rupert—are
an immediate necessity. The first cost of. such vessels, probably between $10,000 and $12,000
each, is not provided for in our estimates. However, in the light of recent events, their innovation is fully justified. X 8 British Columbia. 1925
Pleasant relations exist between other Provincial Forces and ourselves, and I again take the
opportunity of expressing my warm admiration and thanks to Colonel Bryan, the officers,
N.C.O.'s, and men of the Alberta Provincial Police. Illustrative of our co-operative efforts is
the fact that many Alberta Provincial Policemen have been sworn in as British Columbia
Policemen, and vice versa, an excellent arrangement which permits freedom of action to either
Force along the Interprovincial Boundary.
Whenever opportunity offered, many municipal forces have rendered valuable assistance,
and we have reciprocated.
During the last Legislature amendments to the " Police and Prisons Regulation Act"
contained a section enabling any municipality so desiring to take advantage of our wider
organization and be Provincially policed.    This section reads as follows:—
"34. (1.) Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or special Act, the Municipal
Council of any municipality may, on terms and conditions approved by the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council, enter into an agreement with the Superintendent, under which the Superintendent
shall take charge of the .policing of that municipality; and thereupon the Provincial Police Force
shall act in policing that municipality and in maintaining law and order therein.
"(2.) All moneys due from a municipality under any agreement entered into pursuant to
subsection (1) shall be paid into the Consolidated Revenue Fund; and in the absence of any
special appropriation of the Legislature available for the purpose all expenses incurred by the
Superintendent in policing the municipality, including the salaries, pay, and allowance of the
members of the Provincial Police Force assigned for duty therein, shall be payable from the
Consolidated Revenue Fund."
Upon that officer taking over the British Columbia Division, I interviewed Superintendent
Knight, and as a result a working arrangement satisfactory to both Forces now exists between
the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and ourselves.
Our dealings with the various United States 'authorities cover a period of many years.
Federal, State, and County Forces seem only too willing to co-operate, and during 1924 we
received generous and valuable assistance from New York, California, Montana, Washington,
and other States.
The Canadian Pacific and Canadian National Railway Police organizations are in continual
touch with our own. This liaison is particularly noticeable in " C " and " D " Divisions, where
a mutual and beneficial understanding between the Canadian National Railway and British
Columbia Police has been successfully built up. In many essentials railway practice differs
from Provincial, and I am extremely satisfied with the existing relationship. Mr. Page, Chief
of the Canadian National Railway Investigation Department, and his Winnipeg assistant,
Superintendent Hesketh, have been most kind and sympathetic in their dealings with our
executives;  in fact, a desirable unification of effort has been the direct result.
CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.
With few exceptions, the conduct of the Force during 1924 was excellent. Only four
members were dismissed for cause.
By reason of its physical formation British Columbia offers great difficulties to close
supervisory control. Mountain ranges separate each Division and often the individual detachment. This throws many of our N.C.O.'s and men entirely upon, their own resources, and that
men so placed have not failed to arrive at decisions warranted by the facts is borne out by
testimony received from the most unexpected quarters. Many of these commendatory letters
indicate a spirit of service upon which both the Province and its police may be congratulated.
From time to time I have had great pleasure in commending in our monthly General Orders
certain members of the Force for outstanding and notable work in the course of their duties.
The following names have been mentioned during the year:—
January Sth, 1924. Constable Sperry Cline, Hazelton Detachment, for resource and initiative
displayed in the capture of Charles Kilby, who 'was wanted for the theft of a sum of money.
February 5th, 1924. Corporal Kier, Duncan Detachment, and Corporal Voisey, i/c Fingerprint Bureau, for their skill in establishing the identity from latent finger-prints of George
Hannay, who is alleged to have entered and robbed a store at Duncan, B.C.
March 5th, 1924. Inspector W. R. Dunwoody, Officer Commanding " B " Division, and Staff-
Sergeant Fraser, for smart work in gathering evidence and tracking down Dan and Robert Cress,
who while masked had violently robbed two men near Spencer, on the International Boundary-line. 15 Geo. 5 Report of Superintendent of Provincial Police. X 9
April 8th, 1924. 'Sergeant W. Spiller, Corporal A. Saint, and Constable R. P. Ponder, all of
Prince Rupert District Headquarters, for courageously attempting to save the captain of the
fishing-launch " Narbathong," who had been overcome by the fumes from the engine in his
launch. While his cabin was still full of the deadly fumes these three officers worked with
splendid disregard for their own safety.
July 3rd, 1924. Constable F. G. Brown, i/c Waldo Detachment, for particularly smart work
in effecting the arrest of George Thomas on a charge of horse-stealing. In order to make this
capture Constable Brown followed the horse-tracks from Waldo, B.C., to a .point near Rexford,
Montana.
August 4th, 1924. Constable S. S. Saunders, i/c Cranbrook Detachment, for his demonstration of courage and ingenuity in disarming an individual who was apparently of unsound mind.
September Sth, 1924. Sergeant Carter and Constables McConnell and Robertson, for their
excellent work in effecting the arrest of Gus Marchand, alias Mike Hearns, who had committed
numerous depredations in the Vernon area.
September Sth, 1924. Constable H. C. Clarke, Williams Lake, and Constable Ian McRae,
Hanceville, for their determination and untiring efforts to bring about the arrest of John
Solomon (Indian), wanted at Williams Lake on serious charges. Solomon was taking every
precaution to evade arrest and had an excellent knowledge of the area in which he sought refuge.
September Sth, 1924. Constable A. W. Collins, while temporarily stationed at Ocean Falls
Detachment, was the victim of a brutal assault, serious injuries to the head and face resulting.
His assailants managed to get his revolver and would undoubtedly have shot the officer had not
the safety-catch been on the gun at the time. They broke away, but Constable Collins later
sought them out, and in again endeavouring to effect their arrest received further serious injuries.
These men then managed to get clear away but were later arrested at different points in the
Province. Constable Collins's action, in repeatedly attempting to arrest these men and his
forbearance in not using his revolver are worthy of high praise. Although badly injured the
Constable remained on duty.
December 7th, 1924. Corporal Service and Probationer Thiis„ Smithers District Headquarters, for great coolness and courage in effecting the arrest of an armed man at Smithers.
The fugitive had held up a citizen of Smithers and made his escape to the bush, where Probationer Thiis shortly succeeded in locating him. Despite the fact that he was armed and under
cover the Constable unhesitatingly advanced into the bush and effected his capture.
I have also been pleased to receive from outside sources commendatory letters on behalf of
the following officers for valuable and timely assistance rendered by them: Constable W. A. Walker,
i/c Yahk Detachment; Constable Geo. Williams, i/c Port Alice Detachment; Constable S. W.
Dawson, i/c Campbell River Detachment;   Constable W. H. Hadley, i/c Alert Bay Detachment.
ASSISTANCE TO OTHER DEPARTMENTS.
There appears to be no general appreciation of the varied duties police are called upon to
carry out. Apart from their natural function—the prevention and suppression of crime—
members of the British Columbia Police are both requested and expected to perform a multiplicity
of labours only partially identified with the preservation of law and order. In addition, then, to
a function which includes the pursuit of crime from inception to judicial completion, we are
particularly charged with the enforcement of some fifty quasi-criminal Provincial Statutes and
certain other statutory legislation of a special order. A reference to Appendix II. on page 21
of this report will give an idea of the volume of the work, whilst the following summarizes its
nature:—
Department op the Attorney-General.
Assize Courts.—Police were on special duty at Courts of Assize held in the Province during
the year.
" Deserted Wives' Maintenance Act."—In common with other social legislation, this Statute
has been successfully invoked in a number of instances.
"Fire Marshal Act."—For the purposes of the Act all unorganized areas are divided into
districts, the detachment officer in charge being ipso facto a deputy fire marshal. Every fire
occurring in these districts is duly investigated and reported upon by the Provincial Police.
" Game Act."—The entire responsibility of enforcing this Act lies with the Force, and its
present satisfactory observation may be credited to the extreme keenness of many individual X 10 British Columbia. 1925
officers. In addition to submitting special reports upon administrative matters, investigating
applications for permission to operate fur-farms, issuing export fur permits and game licences,
collecting the sum of $128,573.80 in revenue, some ninety-eight detachments report monthly.on
local game conditions.
" Government Liquor Act,"—Besides performing our own specific duties connected with
arrests and prosecutions in unorganized territory, we fully co-operate with and render a great
deal of assistance to the Enforcement Branch of the Liquor Control Board.
" Motor-vehicle Act."—As a result of its ever-increasing volume, the Department shoulders
an immense amount of work in connection with mechanical transportation. All licences are
issued by the police and our total collections amounted to no less a sum than $888,924.85.
Whilst enforcement in unorganized districts is not called upon to encounter the many
obstacles confronting municipal authorities, the latter could afford us much more support. I
refer to the necessity of a greater insistence upon the Act's basic requirements—a proper display
of licence-plates and an observation of lighting, rules of the road, and speeding regulations.
After all, this should not be considered as expecting too much from the smaller municipalities,
particularly as they receive a proportion of. revenue derived under the Act.
It might be added that in view of the very large revenue obtained from this source I feel a
proportion should be deducted and applied to traffic-control purposes. The Force could well use
half a dozen specialists for this work.
" Moving Pictures Act."—Reports upon all premises licensed under, the Act are regularly
submitted.
". Pool-rooms Act."—The Force supervises all pool-rooms operating in unorganized districts
and in 1924 reported upon 103 premises. As the average proprietor realizes that his licence is
too valuable an asset to jeopardize by non-compliance with the regulations, we experience but
very little trouble from this source.
Village Municipalities.—While the Act permits them internal administrative freedom, the
policing of village municipalities is a distinct Provincial charge. This throws a great deal of
additional work upon our N.C.O.'s, who appear to have acquitted themselves most satisfactorily.
However, the growth of these municipalities, especially in the North, warrants a slight increase
in our strength.
" Women's and Girls' Protection Act."—The control provisions provided for have been availed
of in towns adjoining Indian reserves. In many instances the issuance of certificates has prevented the necessity of further police action—an excellent state of affairs and some proof of
this Statute's preventive value.
Department of Agriculture.
Among the services performed by the Force for this Department is that of enforcing the
" Brand Act," " Animals Act," " Pound. District Act," " Line Fences Act," and regulations pertaining to noxious weeds, dairies, egg-marking, and apiaries. In country districts we are
particularly interested in. all matters relating to cattle-marking, hide inspections, and contagious
diseases of animals;  in fact, the men patrol hundreds of miles in this connection.
Officers in touch with conditions regarding line fences suggest that the Act might be amended.
As they are prohibitive in cost to men of limited means, the present arbitrary constituents of a
legal fence seem scarcely necessary in unsettled districts.
" Sheep Protection Act."—This law has been properly enforced in all proclaimed districts.
Department of Education.
From time to time assistance has been rendered to the various School Inspectors. Our men
are constantly in touch with rural conditions and are often in a position to supply valuable
information to these officials. ■ •
Department of Fisheries.
During the fishing season special patrols supervise licence collection along the entire Coast.
Technical reports on the salmon run and various hatcheries are also submitted by officers who,
from long practice, may be fairly classed as experts.
Department of Labour.
The Force is in close touch both with labour and labour conditions and in many instances
they have been able to secure overdue wages for men which they might otherwise have lost. 15 Geo. 5 Report of Superintendent of Provincial Police. X 11
A strict attention to camp sanitary regulations has also gone far towards bettering living
conditions in remote portions of the Province. They have prevented much unnecessary hardship
to injured men by insisting upon employers keeping their first-aid kits up-to date.
Department of Lands.
At the Minister's request many investigations have been carried out. During the fire season
we closely co-operate with the Forest Branch. The Force not only undertakes preventive duty,
but it procures fire-fighters and institutes proceedings against those violating the regulations.
Department of Mines.
For public convenience, Constables in certain districts act as Deputy Mining Recorders.
Department of the Provincial Secretary.
" Dentistry Act."—Numerous inquiries touching unauthorized practitioners were made on
behalf of the College of Dental Surgeons of British Columbia.
" Health Act."—The sanitary inspection of camps is one of our most important duties, and
during the year 1924 492 inspections were undertaken on behalf of the Provincial Board of
Health. The necessity of painstaking and thorough work has been impressed upon all ranks,
and the generally healthy condition prevailing in mining, mill, and logging camps indicates a
close attention to these instructions.
Indigent, Aged, and Sick Persom.—Reports of destitution, etc., receive immediate attention,
suitable relief being provided wherever necessary. The most deserving cases not infrequently
attempt to shield their distress, and as work of this nature requires both kindness and tact the
manner of its performance reflects great credit on our N.C.O.'s and men.
Industrial and Subnormal Boys' School.—The Force is in constant touch with and carries out
investigations for the Superintendent of this institution and for the Superintendent of Neglected
Children.
"Mental Hospitals Act"—In unorganized territory the necessary preliminaries in lunacy
cases are invariably undertaken by the Force. Suspects are interviewed, taken under control,
brought up for medical examination, committed, and escorted to the Mental Hospital. This is
often arduous and tiring work, and that the Force displays a kindly attitude in dealing with
these unfortunates is amply evidenced by the appreeiatory comment brought to my attention.
" Mothers' Pensions Act."—The Provincial Police reported upon and submitted recommendations in 153 cases.
Public Works Department.
All detachment officers make a point of reporting road conditions to District Engineers.
This advantageous arrangement appears to be fully appreciated by the officials concerned, who
on their part unfailingly reciprocate by assisting the police. ^Successful prosecutions have also
been launched by request of the Provincial Inspector of Boilers and the Road Department.
.   . Treasury. Department.
The Force collected* many thousands of dollars by way of licence and other taxation for the
Treasury Department, some of which—but for its local knowledge—would' be lost to the
Province. In Appendix III. will be found particulars of revenue collected by the British
Columbia Police during the year 1924.
DOMINION STATUTES.
The enforcement of Dominion Statutes mainly devolves upon the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police and investigators attached to the Department concerned1. However, my own point of view
is that, whatever its nature, a dereliction coming within a policeman's purview also comes within
his sphere of activity, and that preliminary action should be taken immediately. This attitude
is equally that of the entire Force and many convictions have been obtained as a result. Generally speaking, our field has been opium and narcotic drugs, both European and Chinese immigration, criminal contagious diseases, shipping, contagious diseases of animals, customs and excise,
explosives, Indians, migratory birds protection, naturalization, the postal service, paroled
prisoners, ticket-of-leave, quarantine, railways, and the telegraph service.   -It has been a great X 12 British Columbia. 1925
pleasure to co-operate with the various Dominion officials concerned. They have been sympathetic towards us, only too ready to assist, and unfailingly appreciative of any effort put forth
on their behalf.
"CORONERS ACT."
The Force was associated with 250 Coroners' inquests and inquiries. We invariably undertake the bulk of the work in this connection, and are called upon to arrange and present the
witnesses and generally to superintend the proceedings.
Deaths by drowning, 89; deaths by accident, 124.
I attach hereto a statement of Criminal Statistics for the past year.
In conclusion, I wish to express the appreciation of myself and all ranks of this Force to
you for the warm personal interest you have always taken in matters pertaining to the welfare
of the Provincial Police.
I also wish to take this opportunity of expressing my appreciation of the work of Assistant
Superintendent Walter Owen and all members of the Force for their very hearty and loyal
co-operation.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Superintendent.
CRIMINAL STATISTICS.
Appendix I. on page IS of this report gives details of criminal offences dealt with by the
British Columbia Provincial Police during the year 1924. Only those cases which have been
brought to a conclusion are shown. The total number of cases entered was 2,724, with 2,331
convictions, a percentage of 85.57, which is very high and indicates a careful preparation of the
cases on the part of the officers.
The following is a summary of the more outstanding and interesting cases which have
occurred during the year:—
Royal Bank Robbery at Ladner, B.C.
Forming one of a number of daring robberies involving a loss of approximately $750,000
which occurred in the North-western United States and 'Canada during 1922 and 1923, a branch
of the Royal Bank of Canada in the Municipality of Ladner, B.C., was entered on March 28th,
1922, and bonds to the extent of $130,000 stolen therefrom. The various Western Canadian
Provincial Police Forces were immediately interested, and, acting in conjunction with United
States officers, finally traced these crimes to an organized gang of criminals, all of whom were
ex-convicts.
Our associations with the Alberta Provincial Police were particularly close, and an arrangement was entered into with Colonel Bryan to share any expenses which might be incurred in
prosecuting this matter to a finish. As a result Assistant Superintendent Owen, of this Force,
proceeded to Edmonton and Lethbridge, Alberta, and to Minneapolis, where he joined Assistant
Superintendent Nicholson, of the Alberta Provincial Police. The offices of the Finger-print
Bureau of the Minneapolis Police Department and the local Burns Detective Agency were visited
by these officers, who then left for Minot, North Dakota, from whence, after obtaining information touching one Whitey Kline, a suspect, they returned to Lethbridge for consultation with
Inspector Bavin, of the Alberta Provincial Police.
Subsequent instructions were received by Assistant Superintendent Nicholson from his
Commissioner to accompany Assistant Superintendent Owen to Great Falls, Montana, where
another suspect, Johnny Reed, was in gaol. His connection with other bank robberies having
been established, the fact of awaiting extradition to Canada appears to have induced Reed to
assist the authorities in clearing up certain outstanding features of the case.
On March 21st Sheriff Gordon and Assistant Superintendents Nicholson and Owen accompanied Reed some 125 miles in a blinding snow-storm to a cache north-east of Great Falls,
Montana, where, after working for several hours in the frozen ground, a bundle of registered 15 Geo. 5 Report of Superintendent of Provincial Police. X 13
bonds were recovered. These were stolen from an Alberta branch of the Union Bank at Foremost
and approximated $100,000 in value.
The party then returned to Canada, subsequently arriving in Vancouver, where Reed led
them to another cache. This proved to be situated in Stanley Park and a grip containing
$83,850 of registered bonds stolen from the Ladner Bank was located.
On May 19th, 1924, Johnny Reed appeared before His Honour Judge Cayley, County Criminal
Court, Vancouver, and pleaded guilty to participating in the Ladner Bank robbery. Although
declining to implicate any of his associates, he had assisted in the recovery of over $900,000—the
proceeds of robberies extending from the Pacific Coast to Eastern Ontario—and on these grounds
sentence was suspended.
Soon after this Assistant 'Superintendent Owen was able to conclusively connect Whitey
Kline with the Ladner robbery. He proceeded to Minot with a view to extradition, but was
forestalled by his quarry, who, rather than, face a Canadian jury, preferred pleading guilty
to a North Dakota charge, for which he was sentenced to five years in the State Penitentiary.
Escaping from custody, Kline fled to South Dakota, where he was immediately rearrested and
sentenced to fifteen years' imprisonment with hard labour for another bank robbery.
These investigations involved an immense amount of hard and painstaking work—apart from
our Alberta eo>nfreres, Assistant Superintendent Owen travelled some 29,000 miles—and reflects
the greatest credit upon all concerned.
The Gillis Murders.
The Force was confronted with the elucidation of a major criminal problem when a derelict
Canadian launch was driven ashore on the United States Coast in September, 1924. This vessel,
the " Beryl G.," owned 'by William J. Gillis, was recovered by the U.S. lighthouse-keeper at
Turn Point, Washington, on September 17th, 1924. There was no one on board; everything was
in disorder; blood-stains showed on the forward hatch and starboard bulwark; there were
bullet-holes through the cabin door and starboard side, while more blood was on the cook-stove,
the settee, and cabin floor. In fact, everything pointed to an unusual occurrence of extreme
violence.
Local inquiry being made, Sub-Inspector Cruickshank was placed in charge of the case and
left for Seattle and Tacoma on September 29th. After three months' continuous investigation in
the United States this officer was finally able to reconstruct the entire story. It seems that
William J. Gillis, with his son William, had undertaken to deliver 350 cases of liquor from a
vessel lying off Cape Beale to Sidney Island, near Victoria, where transfer was to be made to
a United States " rum-runner." His plans evidently leaked out and arrangements were made
by a gang consisting of three Americans and one Canadian of Polish extraction to raid and steal
his cargo. On the night of September 15th, 1924, it is alleged the Canadian, Paul Stromkins
(who owned a motor-boat), took Owen B. Baker, Charles Morris, and Harry F. Sowash to a
cove on Sidney Island, where Baker, Sowash, and Morris boarded the " Beryl G." Stromkins,
who was subsequently arrested on November 25th, 1924, confessed that he heard two shots
and that Baker came back for him in the dinghy. He brought his launch alongside the
" Beryl G." and soon after saw the dead bodies of William J. Gillis and his son. The liquor
was then transhipped, after which the bodies were tied together and thrown overboard, the
" Beryl G." itself being cast adrift.
Charles Morris was arrested on November 25th, 1924, by the Seattle Police Department and
three other men, C. Chetwood, Ray J. Kraemer, and Harry Morris were held for complicity.
Owen Baker and Harry F. Sowash escaped for the time being, but were afterwards captured in
New York and New Orleans respectively.—Unconcluded.
Royal Bank Robbery at Nanaimo, B.C.
On December 12th, 1924, a gang of seven men held up the Royal Bank branch at Nanaimo,
B.C., and effected a spectacular escape with $42,000 of the bank's funds. On a general alarm
being given City and Provincial officers immediately instituted a pursuit, while an aeroplane
from the Canadian Air Force, Vancouver, H.M.C.S. "Patrician," and several privately owned speed-
launches also attempted to locate and prevent the bandits from leaving Canadian jurisdiction.
Briefly, the surrounding circumstances were as follows: At 2.30 p.m., as two strangers
entered the bank by its main and west entrance, the accountant's attention was attracted by an X 14 British Columbia. • 1925
unusual noise. Immediately " covered " by these men, he was marched to the vault and ordered
to open the safe. However, its combination being known only to the manager, their request
lacked compliance. Still " covered," Mr. R. Husband was then directed to and compelled to remain
in another position. Entering the teller's cage, the robbers then rifled the tills of $42,000. For
twenty-five minutes the bandits with their associates completely controlled the bank and made
such disposition of its clients as their scheme required. Their final escape was in a high-powered
car.
Through assistance rendered by private individuals, U.S. Sheriffs and Police, it was ascertained that a number of strange men had arrived at Bellingham, Washington, on the 10th,
left the day following, and returned late on December 12th, their subsequent movements being
traced to the outskirts of Seattle. Sub-Inspector F. Cruickshanks (who was in Seattle) proceeded to Anacortes on the morning of the 13th and by Monday, the 15th, had definitely succeeded
in establishing the suspects' identity. On December 24th, 1,921, by request of the Honourable
the Attorney-General, A. M. Manson, the following arrests were effected by American officials
in the State of Washington: Ross C. Watson at Seattle; T. H. Johnson, William Bagley, and
George Rossi at Tacoma; and C. H. Schively at Montesano, all of whom, with the exception of
Schively, being held for extradition. In his case proceedings were left in abeyance pending the
completion of a sentence imposed for a Federal offence.
As this matter is still sub judice further particulars cannot be given at this time. However,
I cannot omit an expression of my appreciation of the work performed in its connection by
Sub-Inspector Cruickshank, those N.C.O.'s and men who assisted him, together with the Police
and Sheriffs of the State of Washington, without whose cordial and willing co-operation these
men would still be at large.
The Liard River Murder.
Last spring the Department of Indian Affairs received word that a young northern Indian
had been callously murdered by his fellow-tribesmen. To avoid unnecessary duplication of work
and expense, Colonel R. S. Knight, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Commanding the British
Columbia District, kindly arranged to have this and other matters investigated by a patrol he
was sending in to the British Columbia-Yukon boundary.
In May, 1924, Inspector Sandys-Wunsch, with two Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constables, reached Fort Liard via Wrangell, Alaska, and within a few days not only found the
remains of Atol, or Moccasin, a young Indian boy who had been brutally tied up and left on the
ice to die, but succeeded in arresting Dan Loot, Jimmy Loot, Clem Loot, Big Alec, and a woman
named Edie for their share in the offence. These nomadic Indians—Nahanees of Den6 stock—
firmly believe in magic and witchcraft, and it is because he was suspected of their practice that
Atol was cruelly done to death. The whole conduct of this investigation reflects great credit
upon the officers concerned, particularly so when it is remembered that natives are singularly
uncommunicative when questioned on the subject of their tribal belief.
Inspector Sandys-Wunsch, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, brought his prisoners out and
they are now awaiting trial.
The " Lillums " and " Hadsell " Liquor Thefts.
The violent seizure of cargoes of liquor from rum-running vessels has been defined in underworld argot as "hi-jacking," and during 1923 and 1924 we received several complaints of such
robberies, the " Lillums " and " Hadsell " cases being among the most outstanding.
The first named was held up at Hope Bay, B.C. Some months later—March, 1924—another
boat, the " Kayak," while awaiting a load of liquor to be delivered by the " Hadsell," was fired
at, boarded, and the crew imprisoned. Using the " Kayak " as a decoy, the " Hadsell " on arrival
was subjected to a heavy rifle fire, and then captured with her crew and cargo, Davidson, a
member of the " Hadsell's " crew, being shot and wounded. The " hi-jackers " after transferring
the cargo turned the " Hadsell " adrift, leaving the " Kayak " with both captured crews aboard.
After an immense amount of work by Sub-Inspector Cruickshank, Sergeant Robert Owens,
and the men of the Victoria Police District, the following men: Milo, Theo., and Ariel Eggers,
P. K. Kelly and Ohas. Pfluger, were positively identified with one or both of these offences.
Kelly and Pfluger were arrested in the United States, brought to Canada, tried, and each
sentenced to two years' imprisonment in the British Columbia Penitentiary. Theodore Eggers
was arrested in Atlanta, Georgia, and subsequently escaped, while Milo and Ariel were captured 15 Geo. 5 Report of Superintendent of Provincial Police. X 15
in San Francisco. The brothers, aided by confederates, broke custody and in the melee Ariel
was killed and a United States Sheriff wounded. Milo Eggers escaped and is now being sought
for by the United States Federal authorities.
The Janet Smith Case.
On July 26th, 1924, a young Scotswoman, Janet Smith, employed at 3851 Osier Avenue, in
the Municipality of Point Grey, was discovered dead in the basement by Sing Wong Fung, the
Chinese cook. He immediately advised his employer, Mr. F. L. Baker, who in turn notified the
Municipal Police. The municipal officers duly investigated and on July 28th, 1924, an inquest
was held by the Coroner, Dr. Brydone-Jack.   The story offered to the jury ran as follows:—
Miss Smith was found lying dead on the laundry floor. There was a bullet wound in her
temple and by her side an automatic revolver. Dr. A. H. Hunter, subsequently corroborated by
Dr. R. H. Mallin, deposed making an autopsy that morning—the day of the inquest—and finding
evidence of embalming, a fact which added considerable difficulty to his examination. However,
in his opinion, death ensued upon a gunshot wound in the head. Jas. Edwards, undertaker, then
swore to receiving police instruction on the 2Gth and embalming the body that day. After hearing
additional evidence from the Municipal Police, Mr. F. L. Baker, the house-boy, and others, the
jury returned a verdict of self-inflicted but accidental death. This conclusion was generally
regarded as unsatisfactory, and the Provincial Police were subsequently instructed to undertake
further investigation.
By August 30th, 1924, after an immense amount of work, the Provincial Police gathered a
large number of witnesses. Six medical experts re-examined the remains, and on September 4th,
1924, Dr. Brydone-Jack held a second inquest, Mr. Craig, K.C., representing the Honourable the
Attorney-General.    After hearing forty-eight witnesses the second jury found:—
" Janet Smith was wilfully murdered in the course of her employment in the laundry basement of 3851 Osier Avenue by being shot through the head with a revolver, but by whom fired
we have no evidence to show. To this verdict we wish to add that the want of any proper
investigation when the tragedy was discovered was responsible for this prolonged inquiry and
caused great suffering to innocent persons and probably shielded guilt. We exonerate Chief
Simpson and Constable Fish (Point Grey Municipal Police) entirely. It is regretted that the
reading of picked extracts from the deceased's diary tended to defame her pure and unsullied
memory."
Since September, 1924, to date, the Force has been unremitting in its attempts to solve the
mystery surrounding Miss Smith's death. These efforts have been further fortified by the able
assistance of Mr. M. B. Jackson, K.C., who received special instruction to that end from the
Honourable the Attorney-General.. As set forth in the second finding, our work is severely
handicapped by the hurried and incomplete Initial investigation ; however, the Force continues
to devote its energies toward solving this mystery.
The 'Corbett Murder,
At 2 p.m. on April 14th, 1924, District Engineer O. W. Smith informed our Cumberland
Police Detachment that Arthur Corbett, restaurant proprietor of Courtenay, had shot and
seriously wounded two persons. Constable R. Matthews reached Courtenay, some 12 miles away,
ascertained that Mrs. Mary Corbett and a man named Luther Spencer Teed were dangerously
wounded, and arrested Corbett, all within twenty minutes of receiving the call. Teed died at
2.35 p.m. and his assailant was thereupon charged with murder. As Mrs. Corbett died also,
a second charge was preferred, that of killing Teed being traversed. Arraigned at the Nanaimo
Spring Assize on May 14th, 1924, Arthur Corbett was found guilty of murder and sentenced to
be hanged in August.   This sentence was later commuted to life imprisonment.
The Jones Murder.
On July 18th, 1923, as Constable W. V. Fenton, i/c Ladner Detachment/drove past the Bank
of Commerce Building, Main Street, Vancouver, B.C., he saw Chung Sam Bow, a Chinese, shoot
and kill John C. Jones, a B.C. Telephone lineman. Stopping his car, our officer pursued, arrested,
and disarmed the then escaping Chinaman. Between July, 1923, and October, 1924, the accused,
who faced five—and was convicted at three—Assize trials, now awaits execution. .
X 16 British Columbia. 1925
The Witcherley Murder.
On March 22nd, 1924, in their home at Port Coquitlam Municipality, two people, Albert and
Edith Witcherley, were found to have been murdered under particularly brutal circumstances.
Immediate investigation was commenced by Chief of Municipal Police McKinley and by two
members of the Provincial Police Force who shortly followed him to the Witcherley residence.
It would seem the woman had been attacked and killed, and that her husband, who returned
later, was first shot and then savagely beaten with a sledge-hammer. This dastardly affair
appears to have been actuated by revenge, and in an attempt to locate its source we have communicated with not only Canadian but English police officials. To further stimulate public
interest a reward of $1,000 has been also offered.
The George Clark Murder.
Following a dispute over some liquor, William Athoe shot and killed George Clark at Beaton,
B.C., on May 23rd, 1924. Athoe was arrested by Constable F. F. O'Halloran, of Arrowhead
Detachment, the same day and charged with murder. Subsequently tried before Mr. Justice
McDonald, the accused was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced1 to eight years' imprisonment with hard labour.
The Calder Murder.
On July 20th, 1924, David R. Calder, Thomas O. Allen, and others were drinking in the
former's house, some 5 miles west of Revelstoke, B.C. Becoming quarrelsome, Calder assaulted
his wife, whereupon Allen interfered. Both men then obtained rifles and, firing his, Allen
wounded Calder in the groin. Seventeen days later Calder died and Allen was arrested by
Constable Markland, of the Revelstoke Detachment. Arraigned on a charge of murder at the
Revelstoke Assize, November 13th, 1924, Allen was found not guilty and discharged.
Rex vs. Mantoku Sakata—Attempted Murder.
On April 27th, 1924, Mantoku Sakata committed a brutal assault with a 7-lb. hammer on
two fellow-countrymen, Mr. and Mrs. Fuyomoto, near Cumberland, Vancouver Island. Sakata
was subsequently arrested by Nanaimo City Police Constable D. Tweedhope and Provincial
Constable Bradner at Ladysmith. Subsequently arraigned on two counts—one of which was
traversed—Sakata was found guilty of .assaulting Fuyomoto and sentenced to six months'
imprisonment, retroactive from the date of his arrest. In connection with this case the Imperial
Japanese Consul rendered us great assistance.
Murder of an Unknown Man.
On October 28th, 1924, two Coast Indians discovered human remains near Klewnuggit Light,
Grenville Channel. Corporal Saint, B.C. Police, investigated and returned with an adult male
skeleton to District Headquarters, Prince Rupert. There was a bullet-hole in the skull obviously
not self-inflicted. The condition of the teeth in the skull appears to be our only clue. In the
upper jaw there are three artificial teeth backed with gold held by gold crowns on the canines.
The right second molar is missing. This information has been made the subject of innumerable
inquiries among dental surgeons, however, without success.
Rex vs. McFadden.
Corporal Kier arrested W. E. McFadden for attempting to murder Alice McFadden at
Sahtlam, Vancouver Island, on August 14th, 1924. There seems to have been domestic trouble
which finally culminated in the husband firing a rifle at his wife. Arraigned at the Fall Assize,
McFadden was discharged and returned to Oakalla Prison Farm, there to complete a two-year
sentence previously imposed by Judge Mcintosh for attempted suicide.
The Payette Murder.
On October 11th, 1924, William Payette murdered his wife at Notch Hill, B.C. There had
been domestic trouble between the husband and wife for years and they were separated. Mrs.
Payette operated the Notch Hill Hotel. Payette, who was drinking and quarrelsome, stayed at
the house as an ordinary guest for three weeks, and it was there he pursued and struck his wife 15 Geo. 5     Report of Superintendent of Provincial Police.        X 17
with a poker. Accused made no attempt to escape and on arrest fully confessed to Sergeant
Adam and Constable Chadwick, of the British Columbia Police. Found guilty and sentenced to
death at Kamloops Fall Assize, Payette appealed and has been granted a new trial.
Mtjrdeb of Leslie Dickie at Nanaimo, B.C.
Although not strictly our concern, mention should be made of an investigation undertaken
by the Nanaimo Chief of Police, John Shirass, and Staff-Sergeant Stephenson, British Columbia
Police. Influenced by a " healer," Leslie Dickie, a hard-working and respected citizen of
Nanaimo, appears to have developed extreme religio-mania, a mental attitude reacting upon
and finally dominating his entire household.
On November Sth, 1924, when Dickie was in a peculiar frame of mind, some chance remarks
of his bothered Mrs. Dickie to the extent that her youngest son interfered and was promptly
knocked down. On Sunday, November 9th, 1924, the Nanaimo City Police were advised of an
unusual condition prevailing at the Dickie residence and promptly investigated. Disturbing
a quasi-religious service as they entered, the police officers discovered the whole family, with
two leaders of a sect styling themselves Pentecostal Brethren, kneeling and praying, whilst
on a table, surrounded by partially consumed food, lay a dead child dressed in ordinary clothing.
As the father manifested an abnormal condition and the others were chary of giving any information, the Coroner and medical officers were called in, Dickie meanwhile being removed in
custody. 'Subsequently a post-mortem examination established the child's unnatural death,
and1 Dickie was charged with murdering his 2-year-old son.
An extraordinary state of affairs was revealed at the preliminary inquiry. It seems that
after abstaining from food for several hours Dickie called every one to the kitchen early on
Sunday morning. Bidding them fix their eyes on the rising sun and " behold the Glory of God,"
Dickie placed his hand on the mouth and nose of the child, then in Mrs. Dickie's arms. A few
minutes later he announced its death.
This case is still sub judice.
Stabbing Affray on S.S. " Santa Maria."
On Sunday, April 21st, 1924, Michael McMahon was stabbed by three Chileans—Santibanes,
Maturana, and Nave—on board an oil-tanker then lying in Esquimalt Harbour. Sergeant Robert
Owens, of Victoria District Headquarters Office, investigated, and, seeing the " Santa Maria "
putting to sea, hired a gasolene-launch, pursued and boarded1 her. The crew being mustered,
McMahon then identified the accused, who were arrested and brought ashore.
On April 22nd, 1924, Santibanes and Nave received three and one months' imprisonment
respectively, and Maturana was handed over to the immigration authorities for deportation. X 18
British Columbia.
1925
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APPENDIX V.
LIST OF OFFICERS OF THE  B.C. POLICE,  WITH DETACHMENTS.
Headquartebs.
Superintendent Colonel J. H. McMuliin Victoria.
Assistant Superintendent W. Owen ,	
Sub-Inspector G. A. Hood	
Constable O. Clark	
 H. H. Clarke.	
 T. F. C. Salt	
 T. Oonly (Game)	
Criminal Identification Department.
Corporal W. J. Voisey Victoria.
Constable It. Peacliey        „
Motor TAcence Branch. .
Sergeant 0. A. Booth Victoria.
Constable W. H. Handley	
" A " Division.
Victoria Subdivision.
Victoria District—
Sergeant R. Owens Victoria Dist. Hqrs
Constable M. C. McPhail	
 E. B. Irving	
 ffl. J. Hatcher	
 R. Gidley	
Probationer R. Harvey	
Corporal W. Kier Duncan.
Constable J. N. Rogers Ganges.
 F. E. L Philp Sidney.
 E. G. Stedham Duncan.
„         G. B. Simpson Lake Cowichan.
Nanaimo District—
Staff-Sergeant A. T. Stephenson Nanaimo Dist. Hqrs.
Corporal A. D. I. Mustart        „ „
Constable F. E. Bradner         „ „
 R. Marshall	
 W. Shepherd	
 H. N. Wood Alberni.
 S. W. Dawson Campbell River.
 J. Russell Courtenay.
 R. M. Stewart	
 R. L. Matthews .....Cumberland.
 Geo. Williams Port Alice.
 J. A. Anderson Ucluelet.
Vancouver Subdivision.
Divisional Headquarters—-
Officer Commanding Sub-Inspector F. Cruickshank Vancouver.
Divisional Clerk Constable J. C. Lowe. , 15 Geo. 5
Report of Superintendent of Provincial Police.
X 25
" A " Division—Continued.
Vancouver Sul) div ision—Continued.
Vancouver District-
Sergeant	
 S. North Vancouver Dist. Hqrs.
„      O. Wilkie	
Constable S. Marshall	
 J. W. Cruickshank	
 J. P. M. Hannah	
 R. A. Sims	
 R. C. B. Foote	
 J. G.'Cunningham (Launch "Watla").
 T. R. Baker	
 D. C. Campbell	
Probationer Wm. Clark :	
Constable W. H. Hadley Alert Bay.
 W. H. Cameron .Ladner.
 A. C. Sutton Powell River.
 J. Renner Squamish.
 A. W. Stone Rivers Inlet.
 C. F. Kearns ..Vananda.
Motor Licence Branch—
Sergeant G. H. Jennings Vancouver Dist. Hqrs.
Constable E. McArthur         „ „
„         J. R. Shannon         „ „
 H. E. Baker	
New Westminster District—
Sergeant.—.' .T. Macdonald	
Corporal J. Kelly         „
Constable C. H. Dawson         „
 P. Corrigan ......        „
 J. Murray Port Moody.
 W. V. Fenton Fort Langley.
 F. Broughton Abbotsford.
 M. J. Condon        „
 H. C. Pyke..... Chilliwack.
Corporal G. J. Duncan Mission.
Constable A. H. Silk         „
Probationer W. J. Mcintosh Langley.
New Westminster Dist. Hqrs.
" B " Division.
Divisional Headquarters—
Officer Commanding Inspector W. R. Dunwoody Nelson.
Divisional Clerk Constable C. K. McKenzie         „
Boundary District—
Staff-Sergeant J. A. Fraser Penticton Dist. Hqrs.
Constable J. J. McConnell :.        „ „
 R. M. Robertson....        „ „
 O. H. Martin Coalmont.
 D. A. MacDonald Fairview.
 G. F. Killam Grand Forks.
 J. M. Bella Greenwood.
 A. E. Spall ;.......Keremeos.
 W. B. Stewart Midway.
 W. A. Walker ...Princeton. X 26 British Columbia. 1925
" B " Division—Continued.
Fernie District—
Sergeant G. H. Greenwood Fernie Dist. Hqrs.
Constable G. D. Mead         „
„         F. Yearby Corhin..
„         S. S. Saunders .Cranbrook.
„         G. Thomas        „
„        H. McLaren Creston.
„         I. J. Brown Elk Prairie.
 A. J. Smith Elko.
„         F. Fryer Kimberley.
„         F.  Brindley Natal.
 F. G. Brown Waldo.
„        G. W. Donohoe Wardner.
 G. C. Sharpe Yahk.
North-east Kootenay District—
Staff-Sergeant R. J. Sutherland Golden Dist. Hqrs.
Constable J. P. Green         „ „
 F. H. Butwell	
,,         F. F. O'Halloran Arrowhead.
„         E. A. Vaehon Athalmer.
 G. H. Soles	
„         H.  Grainger Canal Flats.
„         F. D. Markland '. Revelstoke.
West Kootenay District—
Staff-Sergeant E. Gammon Nelson Dist. Hqrs.
Constable H. W. King        „
„         ..C. F. Oland Kaslo.
,,         , P. W. Jupp  Nakusp.
„         W. H. Laird .New Denver.
 W. R. Henley : Salmo.
Corporal J. F. Johnston Trail.
" C " Division.
Divisional Headquarters—
Officer Commanding Inspector W. L. Fernie Kamloops.
Divisional Clerk Constable E. Patterson        „
Kamloops District—
Sergeant G. H. Adam Kamloops Dist. Hqrs.
Constable W. E. Giles        „ „
 G. F. Bradley	
„        J. W. Chadwick Chase.
„         J. Urquhart Ducks.
 F. N. Emmott Mount Olie.
„        , R. Pritchard Sicamous.
Lillooet District—
Corporal F. W. Gallagher Williams Lake Dist. Hqrs.
Constable R. H. Tebb	
„         G. F. Turner Barkerville.
„ Ian McRae :...Hanceville.
„ H. C. Clarke Quesnel.
Vernon District—
Sergeant G. C. Mortimer Vernon Dist. Hqrs.
Constable -G. A. Johnson ,         „ „
„         , -J. M. Smith Enderby.
„         :.....P. Pentecost Kelowna. 15 Geo. 5
Report of Superintendent of Provincial Police.
X 27
" C " Division—Continued.
Yale District—
Sergeant R. W. Bowen Ashcroft Dist. Hqrs.
Constable G. E. Ashton         „ „
 M. Gorman Clinton.
 D. A. Hazelton Hope.
 T. Higginbottom Lillooet.
 G. D. McKenzie        „
 W. Greenwood ...Lytton.
Corporal P. Badman Merritt.
Constable A. T.  Regan North Bend.
" D " Division.
Divisional Headquarters—
Officer Commanding Inspector T. W. S. Parsons Prince Rupert.
Divisional Clerk Constable A. Volume         „
Fort George District—
Sergeant A. McNeill Prince George Dist. Hqrs.
Corporal T. Van Dyk         ,, „
Constable J. A. Smith        „ „
 G. H. Clark	
 C. D. Muirhead Finlay Forks.
 .'. H. L. McKenney Giscome.
 A. F. Sinclair Lucerne.
 S. Service McBride.
 H. H. Mansell Vanderhoof.
Hazelton District—
Corporal W. J. Service Smithers Dist. Hqrs.
Probationer T. R. Thiis         „ „
Constable P. Carr Burns Lake.
„         S. Cline Hazelton.
„         A. Fair.bairn Telkwa.
Peace River District—
Corpora] W. A. 'S. Duncan Pouce Coupe Dist. Hqrs.
Constable C. G. Barber Fort St. John.
„         E. Forfar > Hudson Hope.
Prince Rupert District—
Sergeant W. Spiller , Prince Rupert Dist. Hqrs.
Corporal A.  Saint	
Constable R. P. Ponder •         „ „
 -  A. W. Collins	
 R. A. Beavan Anyox.
 R. Webster Atlin.
 F. Islip Bella Coola.
 C. Kench Masset.
 A. Dryden Ocean Falls.
 : R. Gibson Port Essington.
 J. A. Williams Stewart.
 J. G. Blaney Telegraph Creek.
 J. P. Eggleshaw Terrace.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Chables F.  Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1925.

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