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BC Sessional Papers

DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM OF THE PROVINCE… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1925]

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 DEFAETMENT OF PEOVINCIAL SECEETAEY
FOUETH ANNEAL EEPOET
OF
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
FOR   THE
FISCAL YEAE ENDED MAEOH 31ST, 1925
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY Off THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chables F.  Banfield,  Printer  to  the King's  Most Excellent Majesty.
1925.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The  undersigned  respectfully  submits  herewith  the  Annual  Report  of the
Medical Superintendent of the Tranquille Sanatorium for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1925.
WILLIAM SLOAN,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office. DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. William Sloan, Provincial Secretary. J. L. White, Deputy Provincial Secretary
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM STAFF.
Medical Staff:
A. D. Lapp, ALB., Medical Superintendent.
II. G. Chisholm, M.D., Assistant. W.m. Morris, M.D., Assistant.
R. S. Henderson, M.D., Assistant.
W. G. Lothian, Radiologist. Geo. Darling, Laboratory Technician.
Dr. W. 31. McLean, Dentist. Miss M. Hodgetts, Matron.
Consulting Surgeons:
Dr. J. S. Burris, Kamloops, B.C. Dr. R. W. Irving, Kamloops, B.C.
Administrative Staff:
A. Whitecross, Bursar. Miss G. Forbes, Clerk and Stenographer.
A. N. Low, Storekeeper. Miss L. C. Buckley, Dietitian.
J. P. Bolton, Chief Engineer. J. Trevors, Laundry Manager.
Rev. Dr. E. D. McLaren, Chaplain.
Sanatorium Farm Staff:
D. W. Strachan, Farm Superintendent.
Miss L. D. Kelly, Book-keeper. if $    ■
j>«>ffl|pBpttjfiPII ^j^p^gp^ptfpj^^^pStp^fpS^.
SH     »  TRANQUILLE   SANATORIUM.
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., April 1st, 1925.
The Honourable William Sloan,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your consideration the Fourth Annual Report of
Tranquille Sanatorium, covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1925.
A total of 407 patients received treatment during the year. There were 181 admissions and
172 discharges, making au increase of nine in the patient-population at the end of the year.
There were 245 available beds;  the largest number in residence was 237 and the average was 221.
In last year's report I commented on the large number of advanced cases applying for
admission. During the year under consideration there has been another marked decrease in
the percentage of incipient cases amongst our admissions. The explanation, so far as the
Sanatorium is concerned, is that very few applications for incipients were received. It is not
difficult to understand why there are more advanced cases applying for admission, as the total
number of applications is increasing, and many patients become advanced cases before they
have symptoms which they consider sufficiently grave to necessitate consulting a physician.
It is difficult to understand why there should be a decrease, not only in percentage, but in actual
numbers of the early cases seeking admission, as both physicians and the public are becoming,
year by year, better and better acquainted with the early symptoms 'and signs of the disease.
The explanation is partly due, perhaps, to the fact that more accurate methods of diagnosis
in the last few years have resulted in many cases, which would have been termed incipient before,
being classified as advanced. This is not, however, the full explanation, which should be sought,
and conditions remedied, if possible.
The statistical table on discharges would indicate that our results are satisfactory and
shows pan increase over last year in the percentage of cases becoming apparently arrested. Our
results cannot improve materially until the percentages of early cases amongst our admissions
increase.
Dental Service.
This is a service the good effects of which cannot be easily measured. It is generally
recognized now that many complaints which were formerly obscure and difficult to treat are
due to infection around the teeth.
Oral hygiene is playing such an important part in the health of every community that a
dental clinic is something which no institution of this size and nature can afford to be without.
.   Laboratory.
A laboratory technician was employed last fall, but his field of 'activities has been limited
owing to some unavoidable delay in securing full equipment. Many pieces have now been
installed and before another year has passed we expect to be able to report that some line of
research-work is being followed. We will probably delay any definite move until the National
Research Council has mapped out the work to be undertaken in the various centres.
Surgical.
Surgery has been playing a more prominent role in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis
each year.
During the year just ended collapse of one lung by artificial pneumothorax was considered
desirable in quite a large number of cases. At the beginning of the year there were twenty-three
cases receiving this treatment, with satisfactory results. During the year the treatment was
attempted in thirty-six cases.    In fourteen of the cases collapse of any therapeutic value was not S 6 British Columbia. 1925
obtainable; In the remaining twenty-two collapse was produced. Good results were obtained
in ten and fair in five cases. Seven cases were not benefited by the treatment and five of these
seven cases have died.    The total number of refills given during the year was 857.
Sauerbruck's thoracoplasty operation was performed on four cases, making a total of eleven
since the operation was first performed here. W.hen it is taken into consideration that some
of these operations were undertaken as a last resort, the results have been very satisfactory.
The services of the consulting surgeons have been necessary for many other cases.
X-ray' Department.
We continue to make good use of this department. Some of the equipment is becoming
rather antiquated and it should be brought up to date within the next year or two.
The two Sun-lamps are in constant use and a portable one should be added for the use of
patients who cannot be moved easily to the treatment-room.
Laundry.
This department handles a large volume of work, the monthly average being over 29,000
pieces. The old wooden machines have now been replaced by metal ones, with one exception.
An electrically operated press and a larger mangle would facilitate the work and make posssible
a reduction of staff.
Financial.
There has been a reduction of 40 cents per day in the gross per capita cost, as compared with
last year, which is very gratifying, in view of the fact that a heavy depreciation was charged
to our maintenance account.
Owing to a marked reduction in the number of Department of S.C.R. cases, and a corresponding falling-off in revenue, the net cost has necessarily been higher. As pointed out in last
year's report, there is still extensive repair-work necessary to put the buildings in good condition.
It is proposed to complete a certain amount of this work each year. As these repairs are paid
out of our maintenance account, it is hoped that we will be able to deduct the amount paid for
repairs of a permanent nature in any one year from our normal depreciation for that year.
The condition and appearance of both buildings and grounds are gradually being improved. This
work adds to our costs, as compared with present-day operating expenses of older institutions,
where these improvements are completed.
Sanatorium Farm.
The financial showing of the farm is much more satisfactory than for the previous year.
The farm has in the past year been reaping the benefits of moneys spent in improving the ranch,
and which in the previous report appeared as a loss. From now on there should be a profit
sufficient to pay interest on the capital investment. The farm justifies its existence, even if it
only manages to break even, financially. It would be practically impossible to secure our milk
satisfactorily from an outside source. Our meat-supply is also much more satisfactory than we
could procure on the market.
There are many reasons why it would not seem a profitable undertaking for the farm to
attempt to supply us with all our vegetables, although the general opinion might be that it should.
Sheep-raising appears to be a very profitable branch of the farm's activities. The present
flock is too small to require the full time of one man, and is rather >& nuisance, as it has to be
taken care of close to the buildings the year around. By increasing the flock to 1,000 head it
would be possible to summer them on the range profitably. The farm could supply all lamb and
mutton required by the Sanatorium and the returns would pay off the original investment in
the first year.
Building Operations.
No new buildings were erected at the Sanatorium during the year.
At the farm an impleinent-shed and blacksmith-shop were completed and put into use.
A feed-room and two large cement silos were built on to the dairy-barn. The piggery was
completed and the improvement in the results in this department more than justified the expense
of the building. In connection with the piggery, and under the same roof, was built a slaughterhouse, where the butchering can be done under sanitary conditions. f
Battle Bluff, near Tranquille Sanatorium.
Arriving at the Sanatorium. f 15 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. S 7
Recommendations.
Last year I drew the attention of the Department to the need for more accommodation for
advanced cases. The situation is becoming more acute and the handling of applications for
admission is a difficult problem. More accommodation is necessary at once, if the Government
is going to be able to cope with the tuberculosis situation as it exists in the Province to-day.
'The new quarters for female employees, which is now under consideration, should be
proceeded with as soon as possible.
The advantages of a gravity water-supply are many and the matter should not be allowed
to rest until the system is installed.
'The room at present used as an auditorium is quite inadequate for our needs, and, besides,
is very poorly ventilated.    The Government should consider the erection of a suitable building.
Acknowledgments.
Donations received at Christmas from various individuals and organizations are acknowledged with thanks. It is regretted that there has been a marked falling-off in the number of
these donations in the last two or three years.
The military branch of the Y.M.C.A. arranged for moving pictures once a week throughout
the winter months, and again provided an orchestra to play on Christmas Day, all of which was
appreciated.
The visiting committee of the Red Cross from Kamloops kept up their welcome visits.
A number of entertainments were put on by the various organizations in Kamloops; some of
whom also provided enjoyable motor-rides for patients. To all these we extend our sincere
thanks.
The visits of the various clergymen who conducted services and otherwise contributed to
the welfare of the patients were greatly appreciated.
For their valuable advice and assistance I tender to Dr. J. S. Burris and Dr. R. W. Irving,
consulting surgeons, my cordial thanks. I take this opportunity of thanking my assistant
physicians and expressing my appreciation of the co-operation of all the members of the staff of
the Sanatorium.
In conclusion, I thank you, sir, for the support and assistance I have had from your
Department.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP,
Medical Superintendent. S 8
British Columbia.
1925
STATISTICAL   TABLES.
Statistics for Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Civil.
Military.
Female.
Total.
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st,  1924 	
Number of patients admitted during year 1924—25	
Number of patients discharged during vear 1924—25	
Number of patients treated during year  1924-25 	
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1925...	
Ill
81
67
192
125
42
43
46
85
39
73
57
59
130
71
226
181
172
407
235
Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Males   124
Females     57
Total   181
Civil state of cases admitted—■
Married      77
Single  104
Widowed 	
Total   181
Classification of cases admitted—
Incipient or minimal      19, or 10.49%
Moderately advanced     46,   „   25.41%
Far advanced     99,   „   54.69%
Miscellaneous  :     17,   „    9.33%
Total   181
Age Classification of Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st,
Males.
1-10 years 	
11-15
16-20
21-25
26-30
31-35
36-40
41-45
46-50
51-55
Over 55 years
3
5
14
23
26
21
14
7
7
a
1925.
Females.
1
5
7
17
13
3
7
1
2
Totals   125
56
Number of Patient-days during Year ended March 31 st, 1925.
Total   80,753
Religion of 181 Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Church of England  57
Church of Rome   15
Presbyterian  47
Lutheran   13
Protestant  18
Methodist    15
Baptist     5
Greek Orthodox
Sikh	
Hebrew  	
Finnish   	
Salvation Army
Spiritualist 	
No religion 	 15 Geo. 5
Tranquille Sanatorium.
S 9
Addresses or 181 Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Victoria   6
Grindrod   1
Nova Scotia   1
Fernie  1
Keating   1
Kamloops  10
Balfour    1
Chilliwack  2
South Vancouver  2
Corbin    1
Sardis     1
LaChute  1
Blind Bay   1
Alberni   2
New Westminster   4
Burnaby     1
Smithers    3
North Lonsdale  :  1
Hosmer    1
Golden   3
White Rock '.  1
North Vancouver  2
Cape Scott  1
Natal    1
Nelson    4
Nakusp     1
Quesnel    1
Chase   2
Sandwick     1
Mount Lehman   1
England   2
Bella Coola   1
Parksville   1
Vancouver   72
Rossland  1
Bonnington  1
Chemainus    1
Merritt  1
Chinook Cove   1
Fort St. James  1
Hatzic     1
Heriot Bay   1
Kaslo   1
Barriere     1
Vernon   4
Anyox     1
Tranquille   4
Procter     1
Britannia Mines   1
Murrayville     1
Trail   1
Kelowna     1
Princeton     1
Kimberley   1
Malakwa  1
West Vancouver   3
Penticton   2
Nanaimo    6
Powell River   1
Agassiz  2
Field  1
Enderby   1
Saskatoon   1
Revelstoke     1
Somenos  1
Occupations op 181 Cases admittetd during Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Accountant  5
Surveyor's assistant   1
Trapper   1
Housewife  26
Teacher   3
Labourer   15
Salesman   2
School-child    12
Logger   7
Clerical work   3
Engineer, steam  3
Carpenter    4
Miner   9
Longshoreman   2
Chauffeur    1
Insurance agent   1
Engineer, marine   1
Shoemaker    1
Telephone operator  1
Machinist     1
Broker   2
Bank clerk  2
Engineer  4
Printer   1
Sailor   (i
Paper-maker  1
Clerk     7
At home  9
Telegraph operator  1
Merchant   1
Maid   1
Dentist  1
Milliner   1
Brakeman  1
Gardener   1
Book-keeper    3
Conductor   3
Steward   3
Forest ranger  1
Bank manager   1
Policeman   l
Warehouseman     l S 10
British Columbia.
1925
Motorman
Barber 	
Planter	
Physician ..
Occupations of 181 Cases admitted during Year—Continued.
  1
  1
  1
  1
Nurse  :.. 3
Electrician     1
Golf instructor  1
Architect   1
Journalist   1
Cook   l
Officer  l
Motor-body maker    1
Stoker     l
Waiter   l
Stenographer   4
Royal Navy   1
Rancher   S
Metallist    1
Nationalities of 181 Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Canadian   61
Scottish  18
Norwegian        0
Welsh      4
Serbian        1
Russian      1
American      5
Italian      1
East Indian        1
Jewish  !     1
Slavonian       1
Ukrainian      1
English     51
Swedish   8
Irish   9
Newfoundland   1
Japanese   1
Finland  :  2
French-Canadian   4
French   1
Danish   l
North American Indian   1
Greek   1
Classification of Patients discharged during Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Results.
Classification on Admission.
Apparently
Arrested.
Quiescent.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Died.
Moderately  advanced   	
  26
  51
  70
17
8
6
26
21
1
6
11
2
8
9
3
29
Non-tuberculous 	
   25
 172"
....
Totals  	
25
53
18
19
32
Classification
of Cases discharged as Non-tuberculous
5
1
2
3
3
6
1
2
2
2.-
Lung abscess 	
Bronchiectasis      	
Debilitv 	
Pleurisy 	
Asthma  	
Total 	 Tranquil Tranquille
View from main entrance, Tranquille Sanatorium.  15 Geo. 5
Tranquille Sanatorium.
S 11
Laboratory Report for Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Material examined.
Sputum	
T.B. positive	
T.B. negative ....
Pleural fluid	
T.B. positive	
T.B. negative	
Pus (urine)	
T.B. positive	
T.B. negative. 	
Urinalysis	
Renal tunc, test	
Blood-counts—
Erythrocytes	
Leukocytes	
Differential	
Haemoglobin	
Wassermann reaction	
Cerebro-spinal fluid	
Animal inoculation ....
Butter-fat determinations
Miscellaneous	
102
32
70
28
12
16
S2
1!)
24
10
14
1
20
31
18
13
29
15
14
120
61
59
1
1
1
1
118
108
38
70
3
1
2
124
4
5
6
4
4
45
60
24
36
7
2
5
40
4
4
4
4
4
36
92
50
33
1
1
6
106
8
10
9
8
9
94
36
58
1
12
11
11
12
12
9
117
76
30
46
4
1
3
46
1
8
8
7
7
3
1
1
8
4
117
64
53
4
126
1
14
13
13
14
11
881
399
482
6
3
3
30
6
24
879
12
57
57
56
55
116
5
2
34
132
Note.—76 per cent, of patients on admission show positive sputum, and" of this number 30 per cent,
have since become negative; 24 per cent, of patients show negative sputum ; total number of examinations, 2,322.
X-ray* Report for Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Chest films, pairs      472
Miscellaneous        49
Lamp treatments  2,190
Treatments with the new lamp        S4
Number of patients whose teeth have been X-rayed      175
METEOROLOGICAL  REPORT.
Summary of Meteorological Observations for Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Month.
Maximum
Temp.
Minimum
Temp.
Average
Temp.
Average
Humidity.
Snow.
Rain.
Sunshine.
1924
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1925
January	
February	
March..	
Deg. F.
77.0
87.0
96.0
95.0
90.0
88.0
71.0
54.0
54.0
49.0
52.0
62.0
Deg. F.
27.0
36.0
47.0
48.0
44.0
37.0
29.0
5.0
— 18.0
02.0
07.0
24.0
Deg. F.
48.40
61.70
64.50
70.20
67.30
60.96
50.20
34.08
17.50
24.80
33.00
41.77
54.8
48.1
59.6
54.5
60.0
60.4
67.9
Inches.
0.07
23.5
16.5
5.5
3.5
Inches.
0.04
0.50
1.56
1.03
0.71
0.30
0.32
0.78
0.17
0.12
0.04
Hours.
163.9
252.5
225.5
262.6
233.0
167.6
99.1
57.6
37.4
30.3
74.7
141.7
* Trace. S 12 British Columbia. 1925
DENTAL REPORT.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the year ended March 31st, 1925.
Throughout the year dental work has been carried on with particular aim to the health of
the patients here in this Hospital.
At this time I wish to extend my sincere thanks for the assistance I have received from the
staff during the past year.
Following you Will find a statement of actual work done for patients:—
Fillings, inclusive of root-fillings   614
Treatments   583
Extractions     301
Anaesthetics .*  286
Dentures   37
Inlays (gold)   29
Crowns (gold)   16
Bridges    23
Repairs to dentures  31
Reliners   5
X-ray sets	
Prophylaxis    176
I have, etc.,
W. M. McLean,
Dentist.
BURSAR'S   REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1925.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheets and the Profit and Loss
Accounts covering the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1925.
In examining the operating accounts you will note a considerable reduction in expenditure
in comparison with last year. The fuel account, provisions, and repairs to buildings have shown
the greatest decrease, and other departments are in the same category, although to a lesser
degree. In view of this reduction it is well to keep in mind that the efficiency of the institution
has not been impaired in any way. During the coming year our expenditure on repairs to
buildings will increase, in view of the relathing and replastering of the Main Building, which is
now under consideration.
The net per capita cost of maintenance has shown an increase over the previous year and is
attributable to a falling-off in our revenue, the donation account showing the greatest decrease.
The patients paid for by the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment are still reducing
in number and those paid for by the different municipalities are increasing, but not enough
to fully offset the reduction in military patients. Our collections from private patients remains
practically the same.
The gross cost of maintenance for the year amounted to $300,350.17 and our revenue from
maintenance of patients to $100,311.08, making the net per capita cost $2.47 per day.
The total days' treatment given was 80,753 and the average population 221.21, which is
higher than any previous year. : A  15 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. S 13
During the year six municipalities have paid for the maintenance of seventy-eight patients,
at the rate of $2.50 per day; while the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment has
maintained eighty-five military patients at the monthly per capita rate, and thirty-seven patients
have contributed towards their own maintenance, according to what they were able to afford.
We have carried on the free list 207 patients who were unable to contribute anything toward
their own maintenance, a total of 407 patients having received treatment.
To patients who were unable to procure .necessary clothing we distributed 164 suits of
pyjamas, 9 nightshirts, 65 shirts, 95 pairs of socks, 82 suits underwear, 27 bath-robes, 33 pairs
shoes, 26 pairs slippers, 14 pairs trousers, 17 suits, and various other articles of clothing and
toilet necessities.
The year has been quite a busy one in the Occupational Therapy workshops, 116 patients
(96 male and 20 female) having taken advantage of the classes, and great credit is due the
instructor for the quantity and the quality of the work turned out. The following is a list of
the work accomplished, a total of 783 pieces having been completed:—
Reed-work : 115 trays; 20 sewing-baskets ; 18 fruit-baskets; 20 table lamp-stands; 10 dresser
lamp-stands; 10 flower-baskets; 10 doll-cradles; 15 lamp-shades; 4 bed-trays; 10 pin-trays.
Pine-needle work: 2 table lamp-stands; 60 flower-baskets; 20 trays; 20 fruit-baskets; 15
flower-vases; 40 pin-trays; 10 doll-cradles; 10 glove-boxes.
Bead-work:  150 hand-bags ; 25 chains, neck and fob ; 100 butterflies.
Wood-work: 75 picture-frames; 15 trays, inlaid; 1 music-cabinet; 1 writing-desk; 6 tables;
1 boat.
At present there is very little market for this work, which is to be regretted, as better sales
would encourage the workers, giving them the ambition to continue and providing the funds to
purchase material.
I again take this opportunity of thanking you for the valuable support you have given me
in my work, also to my staff I wish to express my appreciation for the efficient and faithful
services given.
I have, etc.,
A. Whitecross,
Bursar.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1925.
Assets.
Land    $    4,943 14
Buildings   363,216 21
Plant and equipment  69,524 72
Furniture and fixtures   16,255 71
Inventories     9,906 58
Treasury advance (for petty expenses)   1,000 00
Accounts receivable  11,329 OO
$476,175 36
Deficit (cost of operations, 1924-25)     200,039 09
$676,214 45
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia   $676,214 45 S 14 British Columbia. 1925
Depreciation  Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Buildings     $ 21,128 47
Plant and equipment          3,801 09
Furniture and fixtures   903 09
Salaries      103,420 23
Office supplies          1,329 97
Travelling expenses and transportation         2,639 11
Fuel, water, light, and power       46,700 05
Maintenance and repairs       15,607 78
Furniture and fixtures          5,702 59
Provisions       86,016 60
Medical and surgical supplies          5,788 98
Incidentals and unforeseen          7,312 21
By Donations  ,  $    2,000 00
Receipts from maintenance of patients       98,311 OS
Balance        200,039 09
$300,350 17 $300,350 17
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended March 31st, 1925.
Operating Expense Accounts.
Expenditure by voucher (less amounts credited to vote for supplies sold) —
Salaries—
Medical and clerical staff   $ 13,740 03
Sundry employees       89,674 20
 $103,420 23
Office supplies—
Books and journals   $      345 81
Postage and office supplies         1,013 31
Telephone and telegraph   226 11
 1,585 23
Travelling and transportation   3,118 52
Fuel, water, light, and power—
Fuel     $ 42,011 45
Power-house supplies          6,785 16
       48,796 61
Maintenance and repairs.—
Repairs and renewals   $ 11,112 85
Janitors' supplies          4,520 81
       15,633 66
Furniture and fixtures—
Bedding   $    1,687 30
Furniture and fixtures         4,015 23
        5,702 59
Provisions—■
Groceries   $ 37,529 02
Meats       26,074 54
Fish          2,069 71
Milk and eggs        22,734 61
      88.408 4S .
Medical and surgical supplies—
Medicines and drugs   $    3,832 45
X-ray and miscellaneous         3,229 93
        7,062 38
Carried forward   $273,727 70 15 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. S 15
Expense and Revenue Statement—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Bright forward  $273,727 70
Expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Incidentals and unforeseen—
Laundry  $ 3,908 09
Freight and cartage  1,166 98
Sundries     732 23
Clothing  1,706 37
        7,514 27
Total operating expense by voucher  $281,241 97
Inventories as at March 31st, 1924—
Office supplies   $      421 17
Transportation     29 00
Fuel, water, light, and power          1,507 12
Maintenance and repairs         2,8S7 90
Provisions         1,888 70
Medical and surgical supplies   166 45
Incidentals   215 80
 7,116 14
Depreciation written off—
Buildings  $ 21,128 47
Plant and equipment         3,801 09
Furniture and fixtures   903 09
       25,832 65
$314,190 76
Less inventories as at March 31st, 1925—
Office supplies   $      676 43
Transportation    208 41
Fuel, light, water, and power         3,143 68
Maintenance and repairs         2,879 46
Provisions         2,300 57
Medical and surgical supplies   569 52
Incidentals  '.  128 51
 9,906 58
$304,284 18
Less equipment transferred to Asset Account       873 83
$303,410 35
Less sundry collections—
Provisions  .  $       822 79
Board           1,173 S3
Post-office    300 00
Thermometers   174 00
Laundry     37 66
Medical examinations  ,  282 50
Miscellaneous   269 40
 $    3,060 18
Gross cost of maintenance for year  $300,350 17
Carried forward  P00,350 17 S 16 British Columbia. • 1925
Expense and Revenue Statement—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought forward   $300,350 17
Revenue.
By Donations, Greaves Estate   $   2,000 00
Receipts from Department of" S.C.R      44,149 96
Receipts from municipalities       44,661 25
Receipts from private patients        9,499 87
    100,311 OS
Net cost of operation for year ended March 31st, 1925   $200,039 09
Summary of Profit and Loss Account. Yearly
Per Capita.
Depreciation   $ 25,832 65 $   116 77
Salaries      103,420 23 467 52
Office supplies         1,329 97 6 01
Transportation and travelling expenses         2,639 11 11 93
Fuel, water, light, and power       46,700 05 211 11
Maintenance and repairs       15,607 78 70 55
Furniture and fixtures         5,702 59 25 78
Provisions       86,016 60 288 86
Medical and surgical supplies          5,788 98 26 17
Incidentals and unforeseen         7,312 21 33 05
$300,350 17 $1,357 75
Less donations   $ 2,000 00
„     revenue (maintenance)       98,311 08
100,311 08 453 46
Net cost to the Government for maintenance of patients   $200,039 09 $   904 29
Remarks.
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1925   235
Daily average population for year ended March 31st, 1925  221.21
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  $1,357.75
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  3.71
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  904.29
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day   2.47
Capital Expenditures.
Fire-escapes     $   561 00
Cure cottages   750 00
Bakery    90 00
Stokers   1,470 23
Salaries, Clerk of Works, etc  360 00 ptJB
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■v ■  ;: .    . . ; ■....■■... ■■ ;' ■■„:..: '
Farm Buildings.  15 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. S 17
FARM   SUPERINTENDENT'S   REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1925.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the operations of the Tranquille
Sanatorium Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1925.
This has been a very favourable year for the farm in many respects. The run-down land
on the recently purchased ranch has been much improved and an excellent crop has been gathered
on the major part of it. A third of this land still requires considerable work done on it in the
way of building up the soil and the eradication of weeds before the soil is brought to its full
producing value. The amount of work required to restore worn-out soil to its original productiveness is always underestimated. Our silage-crops, hay, and roots were generally good, the
potatoes alone being the exception. The small potato-crop was due in a large degree to the fact
that the land, badly infested with weeds, was used with a .view of clearing up the land by
intensive cultivation. Another favourable factor in producing last year's crop was the unusual
amount of rainfall at regular intervals throughout the summer. This not only aided in a
natural way, but also helped to keep up the irrigation-water supply.
Four good crops of alfalfa-hay were taken off, which swelled the total of 787 tons of all
kinds of hay. There was also 650 tons of ensilage put up, mostly corn, although a considerable
amount of oats, peas, and vetch silage was also produced. So abundant was our crop that over
225 tons of ensilage and 120 tons of hay were left over at the end of the fiscal year. Judging by
the amount of work put on the new ranch, during the past year, it would be reasonable to
anticipate a greatly increased crop for the coming year.
The farm owns 120 horses. Some of these, sixty in number, were included in the Cooney
purchase, and were of very ordinary type and were not suited either for the needs of the ranch
or the market. It was felt that something should be done to improve the standard of these
animals, so the breeding stock was divided into two groups—one of the saddle-horse type and
one of agricultural type. With the first group was placed a thoroughbred stallion of splendid
breeding, and with the other group a Shire stallion of more than usual quality. That was two
years ago and the offspring are showing a marked improvement over the dams. Early in the
spring of 1924 ten pure-bred Clydesdales were purchased as the beginning of a pure-bred herd.
These are a very good type of animal and they are well suited to present-day demands. A further
effort has been made to improve the herd by culling out undesirables, with the result that nineteen
head have been successfully disposed of.
The Work-horse Department might be divided into two classes—harness-horses and saddle
and pack-horses. An exceptionally large number of harness work-horses have to be kept in order
to carry on the improvements mentioned in the foregoing paragraphs, as well as ordinary farm-
W'ork. It is also necessary to use a great number of saddle and pack horses to look after and
maintain the storage-water supply and also to care for and handle the range stock, both of cattle
and horses. It will be noticed that this farm is unique in its way, inasmuch as it is being run
as a mixed farm and a dairy-farm as well as a ranch. The ranch comprises over 18,000 acres,
with a front that extends for nearly 20 miles along the north shore of Kamloops Lake. The
range stock pasture over this area and back into the timber reserve for 15 miles.
Our watershed for irrigation purposes extends over a large area—at some points being
30 miles distant from the institution. Storage-dams and ditches have to be built and maintained to supplement the natural creek supply in the late summer months. This is a very wild,
rough, unsurveyed country, varying in altitude from 3,000 to 6,000 feet, and accessible only by
pack-train.    It is necessary to construct, maintain, and blaze many trails to carry on the work.
The beef herd has been greatly improved in quality: First, by pruning out inferior animals;
secondly, by the use of good bulls; thirdly, by the introduction of a few pure-bred dams; and,
fourthly, by more and better feed. At the close of this year we could boast of over sixty head
of pure-bred cattle, mostly Herefords. It has been found that the pure-bred stock stand range
conditions better than our grades and come in in a much better condition. The baby beef of a
year old will bring almost as much as the 2-year-old steers of a year ago. This improved result
is due entirely to two causes—breed and feed. In March, 1924, fifty head of ewes of ordinary farm breeding were purchased at Calgary for
$12 per head. While a few of these aborted, due to change of food and climate and shipping,
still a very fair crop of lambs was obtained, and the buck lambs sold averaged, together with
the wool-clip, the purchase price of the dam. This year the lambs commenced coming in
February and by the end of March the farm was assured of a 100-per-cent. crop.
Hogs are ever a profitable department and the good housing conditions under which fhey are
kept reflected very favourably on this year's results and proved conclusively the wisdom of
building the new hoggery. It was found that the litters born during the fall and winter months
did equally as well as those born in the spring and early summer.
The dairy herd has been able to produce sufficient milk to supply the needs of the Sanatorium.
The total production for the year was 554,221.8 lb., of which the Sanatorium used 466,130 lb.
It should be pointed out that the dairy equipment is now sufficient to produce a very much
larger quantity of milk at a very small additional cost as soon as the needs of the institution
demand it, which would greatly increase the profits of this department. The dairy herd, male
and female, old and young, all told, totals eighty-two head, all of which are pure-bred except
nine. The aim has been to produce a utility herd of high-producing cows at the lowest possible
cost. These animals are handled and fed as nearly as tiossible along commercial lines and not
as a record-producing or show herd. One cow of our own breeding, " Alexandra Korndyke
Aaggie," has produced a yearly record of 23,939 lb. milk and 906.2 lb. butter. " Mercena Molley
Hengerveld," two years ago produced a yearly record of 17,105 lb. milk; last year she produced
18,375 lb. and this year she will soon close her test with over 21,000 lb. milk. Another cow which
deserves special mention is " Alexandra Birdie May," with a record of 19,748 lb. milk and 870
lb. butter; while five cows—herself, her two daughters and two sisters—produced an average
of 19,675 lb. milk and 805.2 lb. butter per cow for the year. " Alexandra Ormsby Birdie," one
of the five, as a junior 2-year-old produced a yearly record of 18,312 lb. milk and 715 lb. butter.
The cows of this family are also persistent producers, giving good records every year. Twenty
of the herd averaged 17,875 lb. mi'.k and 769.9 lb. butter, while twenty-six cows on Record of
Performance averaged 16,754 lb. milk and 726 lb. butter.
The following is a list of Record of Performances produced by the herd:—
Milk Production. Butter.
Name. T. T,
Lb. Lb.
Alexandra Verona May  20,791 S43.7
Alexandra Ormsby Birdie  18,238 715.0
Alexandra Birdie May  19,748 870.0
Alexandra Birdie Rag Apple •.  19,853 79S.7
Alexandra Rag Apple Birdie  19,018 798.7
La Vata DeKol of Penticton  19,330 890.0
Alexandra Tranquille Korndyke  18,186 846.2
Alexandra Betty Waldorf  15,021 617.0
Alexandra Korndyke Aaggie   23,939 966.2
Alexandra Queen Hengerveld   14,692 655.0
Balcomo Ormsby Susie   18,085 745.0
Balcomo Burton Peggie  14,184 692.5
Balcomo Burton Daisy  11,226 503.7
Echo Sylvia Pearl   12,655 518.7
Easter Belle DeKol  10,560 771.2
Fairy Sylvia Echo   12,739 553.7
Hengerveld Pontiac Countess   13,184 640.0
Juliana Korndyke DeKol   16,088 758.7
Inka Darkness Hengerveld  17,184 757.5
Johnanna DeKol Princess   14,176 661.1
Lady DeKol Clinker  18,470 857.5
Mercena Molley Hengerveld  18,375 697.5
Mina Posch Pontiac  14,167 618.3
Uneeda Peach DeKol   16,029 658.7
Alexandra Orne Belle   16,697 726.1
Stella Korndyke Butter Girl   17,075 733.7 15 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. S 19
The following list of Record of Performance is now being applied for at Ottawa :—
Milk
Production.
Lb.
Balcomo Ormsby Rose .'.  13,140.8
Cinderella of Detchon Farm   14,172,2
Brema DeKol Hengerveld   13,753.3
Balcomo Dolly Canary  10,057.7
Brema DeKol Korndyke  17,146.1
Alexandra Queen Hengerveld   15,013.5
Alexandra Betty Waldorf  16,047.4
Alexandra Orne Belle   19,681.9
Lucy DeKol Pontiac  14,001.9
Inka Darkness Hengerveld  21,306.7
Alexandra Foxalina 2nd   10,010.9
Sarah Posch Korndyke   14,961.8
Mina Posch Pontiac  15,S83.4
Johanna Butter Girl Pontiac  14,049.3
Excellency Hengerveld Echo  17,523.7
Easter Belle DeKol   1S/719.5
Stella Korndyke Butter Girl   18,937.6
It is interesting to note that only two cows went below 11,000 lb. in the entire herd—
" Alexandra Foxalina 2nd," a junior 2-year-old, and " Balcomo Dolly Canary"—and they
produced over 10,000 lb. each.
The health of the herd has been good during the last year, although some little difficulty
was experienced during the later part of last year and the beginning of this year in getting the
cows to breed, but this condition has been corrected and the herd is now in excellent shape. Our
herd is tested twice a year for tuberculosis, but not a reactor has been found in the herd for
many years.
The dry climate of this locality is very suitable for the raising of turkeys, so last spring
a few turkey hens were purchased and sufficient turkeys were raised to supply the needs of the
Sanatorium for Tranksgiving and Christmas.    It is intended next year to raise from 400 to 500
turkeys, as they procure a large part of their living from weeds, grass, and insects.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
D. W. Strachan,
Farm Superintendent.
SANATORIUM   FARM   REPORT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1925.
The Medical Superintendent,
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Balance-sheet with Profit and Loss Accounts
for the year, ended March 31st, 1925.
It is very gratifying to be again in a position to show a profit on the farm operating accounts,
and it is quite safe to predict that this condition will continue. The heavy expenditures of the
past few years, building up the soil, ditch and "flume repairs, feucing, etc., on the recently
acquired portions, are now beginning to show results.
The Live-stock and Field-crop Departments have been very successful and profitable during
the past year and good profits are shown.
The farm buildings are now all in good shape, which adds greatly to the efficient handling
of the different varieties of stock. One building still necessary is a calf-barn, and this matter
is receiving consideration and will no doubt be erected during the coming year.
The Sanatorium has been able to absorb 466,130 lb. of our total milk production, 29,932 lb. of
beef, and 9,223 lb. of pork, besides 12 tons of vegetables.
I have, etc.,
A. Whitecross,
Bursar. S 20                                                   British Columbia.
»
1925
TRANQUILLE   SANATORIUM
Balance-sheet, March 31st,
Assets.
Buildings and improvements 	
Equipment Account 	
FARM.
1925.
? 96,713 08
5,580 01
70.26S 00
137 88
2,201 54
421 72
1,000 00
43,813 50
820 20
8,337 50
540 00
3,247 00
356 60
205 78
Land Account	
Real estate 	
Accounts receivable—
Tranquille Sanatorium Account 	
Notes receivable 	
Dam Account 	
$1,901 54
300 00
D. W. Strachan (petty cash advance) 	
Inventories (live stock) —
Dairy herd, as per inventory ....
$16 440 00
Bulls, as per inventory 	
Range stock, as per inventory 	
Sheep, as per inventory 	
Turkeys and hens, as per inventory 	
Horses, as per inventory	
'Swine, as per inventory 	
Motor-vehicles   	
550 00
15,950 00
937 00
166 50
7,440 .00
2,330 00
Unissued stores—
Feed 	
$7 540 00
Ice	
300 00
Fuel	
*>30 OO
Flour 	
27 50
Apples  	
30 00
210 OO
Harness     	
Machinery	
Tools   	
Canadian Bank of Commerce (Stock Trading Account)	
Liabilities.
D. W. Strachan (petty cash advance) 	
D. W. Strachan (Stock Trading Account)  	
Capital Surplus Account 	
Profit for year 1924-25 	
£233,643 41
?   1,000 oo
1,500 00
228,546 38
2,597 03
Profit and Loss Account, March
Receipts.
To profit on live stock 	
Hide-sales  .'	
■31st,
1925
$10,030 48
168 94
f233,643 41
Milk-sales—
Sanatorium   	
Sundry 	
Carried forward 	
 $1
7,210
48
30
20
$27,457 92 15 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. S 21
Profit and Loss Account—Continued.
Receipts—Continued.
Brought forward   $ 27,457 92
Teaming   251 75
Beef-sales—
'Sanatorium    $3,32S 00
Sundry     1,746 12
  5,074 12
Board Account ,  150 50
Pork-sales  1,129 30
Sundry farm produce  1,015 40
 $35,07S 99
„ ,    . Expenditure.
Salaries— '
Farm Superintendent  , $ 2,400 00
Book-keeper            GOO CO
Other employees     11,827 42
■ $14,8S7 42
Provisions     2,171 93
Fuel, light, and water  1,956 93
Feed Account    4,719 58
Seeds and fruit-boxes   154 13
Blacksmith supplies   168 29
Drugs and veterinary  247 65
Implements and harness   1,130 21
Incidentals and contingencies  3,380 05
 28,816 19
Profit on Operating Account   $   6,262 80
Less depreciation—
Depreciation on automobile  $   34S 30
Depreciation on equipment       457 05
Depreciation on farm buildings     2,800 42
       3,665 77
♦ Net profit for year 1924-25  $   2,597 03
Hay—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Receipts.
To   Inventory, 1924-25  $2,500 00
Hay, cattle, 000,000 lb    3,000 00
Hay, horses, 2SS,000 lb   2,880 OO
Hay, sheep, 20,000 lb      200 OO
Hay, dairy, 428,000 lb    4,280 OO
  $ 12,860 00
Expenditure.
Irrigation   $1,275 00
Cleaning ditches       600 00
Ploughing, cultivating, marking, etc    1,250 00
Cutting and stacking meadow-hay    1,284 00
Irrigator's board         562 50
Cost of harvesting four crops of irrigated hay     3,495 00
 8,466 50
Profit,   1924-25     $   4,393 50 S 22 British Columbia. 1925
Swine—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Receipts.
Pork sold to Sanatorium  $1,120 30
Sundry pork-sales   ;    1,052 52
Live stock sold  .'.      217 40
Pork sold to boarding-house       223 72
Inventory, 1924-25     2,330 00
 $  4,952 94
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1923-24  $1,689 00
Labour        540 00
Board of employees       300 00
Feed for stock ,      350 40
 2,879 40
Profit, 1924-25   $   2,073 54
Sheep—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Receipts.
Mutton sold $   222 09
Wool sold          79 99
Inventory, 1924-25       937 00
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1923-24 ..
Pasture  	
Feed 	
Salaries  	
Board of employees
$ 600
00
90 OO
200
00
54
00
45
00
1,239 08
989 CO
Profit, 1924-25   $     250 £8
Turkeys—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Receipts.
Turkeys sold  $   136 20
Inventory, 1924-25       106 50
  $    302 70
Expenditure.
Inventory, 1923-24  $    30 OO
Turkeys purchased  .
Feed purchased 	
Salaries 	
Board of employees
132 05
10
00
12
65
50 OO
30
00
Profit,  1924-25    $     170 05 15 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. S 23
Silage—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Receipts.
Inventory, 1924-25, 1,300,000 lb  $   3,250 00
Expenditure.
Seed ?   120 00
Ploughing, harrowing, disking, and seeding        550 00
Cultivating and weeding       110 00
Cutting, hauling, and siloing    1,885 OO
Irrigation      425 00
 3,090 00
Profit, 1824-25  $     160 00
Orchard—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Receipts.
Apples sold to Sanatorium  $    70 10
Sundry sales ...!        10 10
Supplied to boarding-house       300 00
Inventory, 1924-25          30 00
  $     410 20
Expenditure.
Labour, pruning, and cultivating  $   150 CO
Boxes, material         57 80
Making, labour for boxes          15 00
  222 80
Profit,  1924-25  $     191 40
Dairy Cattle—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Receipts.
Milk supplied to Sanatorium $17,210 30
Sundry milk-sales   48 20
Milk to boarding-house         876 00
Manure        1,230 00
Inventory, 1924-25  :    16,440 00
  $ 35,804 50
Expenditure.
Oats, 228,000 lb $ 4,678 00
Oilcake, 36,000 lb  1,170 00
Bran, 29,000 lb  391 50
Ensilage, 550,000 lb  1,375 00
Hay, 428,000 lb  4,280 00
Salt  66 87
Board of employees  2,737 50
Drugs and veterinary   247 65
Bedding  r  210 00
Teaming     1,050 00
Inventory, 1923-24   12,640 00
Green feed, 30,000 lb  1,350 00
Light    269 00
Water  80 00
       34,565 52
Profit, 1924-25   $    1,238 9S S 24 British Columbia. 1925
Range Stock—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
Receipts.
Beef supplied to Sanatorium  $ 3,328 00
Sundry beef sold     2,493 60
Beef supplied to boarding-house      1,149 00
Hides sold         16S 94
Manure            600 00
Inventory, 1924-25     15,950 00
  $ 23,689 54
Expenditure.
Hay, 600,000 lb $ 3,000 CO
Meal, 40,000 lb        880 00
Wages           540 00
Silage, 300,000 lb        750 CO
Horse-labour        600 CO
Salt     20 CO
Beef cattle purchased       1,922 50
Range leases         272 80
Inventory, 1923-24     13,215 OO
      21,200 30
Profit, 1924-25   $    2,489 24
Grounds—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
To Salaries  ;  $ 450 00
Sundry expenses   145 CO
Board of employees   375 00
Loss, 1924-25   $      970 00
Fencing—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
To Salaries   $ 350 CO
Team-labour     250 00
Material     75 00
Loss,  1924-25   $ 675 00
Maintenance of Ditches—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
To Salaries   $ 440 00
Board of employees  265 00
Horse-labour   .-.  415 00
Loss, 1924-25   $ 1,120 00
Machinery Upkeep—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
To Salaries   $ 300 00
Board of employees   145 CO
Material and repairs   286 63
Loss, 1924-25  $ 731 63 15 Geo. 5 Tranquille Sanatorium. S 25
Buildings and Upkeep—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1925.
To Material  $      252 00
Salaries  372 00
Board of employees      151 00
Loss,  1924-25   $       775 00
Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account, March 31st. 1925.
Expenditure.
Manuring $350 00
Ploughing, harrowing, etc    100 00
Weeding    100 00     '
Salaries    750 00
Hoeing and irrigating    450 00
 $   1,750 00
Receipts.
Inventory, 1924-25 $210 00
Potatoes supplied to boarding-house    200 00
Potatoes supplied to sundry  '.      33 23
Vegetables supplied to Sanatorium     659 41
Vegetables supplied to boarding-house    215 00
 1.317 64
Loss, 1924-25  '.  $      432 36
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed  by  Ciiari.es  F.   Banfield,   Printer  to   the King's   Most  Excellent   Majesty.
lt>25. 

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