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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1921-22 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1922

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 REPORT
OP  THE
MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS
OF  THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FISCAL YEAR 1921-22
PRINTED   BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majestj
1922.  To the Honourable James Alexander Macdonald,
Administrator of the Government of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
Herewith I 'beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of my Department
for the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1922, in compliance with the provisions of
the " Public Works Act."
W. H. SUTHERLAND,
Minister of Public Woi'ks.
Department of Public Works,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., September 30th, 1922.  PUBLIC WORKS REPORT.
REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS ENGINEER.
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., August 17th, 1922.
J. E. Griffith, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sik,—I have the honour to submit my report for the fiscal year 1921-22.
As the reports of the District Engineers and the Supervising Architect furnish detailed
information of the work done under their direct supervision, my remarks will be confined to
more general matters.
ORGANIZATION   AND  LABOUR.
The organization previously in force continued to work efficiently, only a few changes being
found necessary in the personnel of the different officials. As to labour-supply, there appeared
to be sufficient competent labour to meet demands generally.
During the winter relief-work was undertaken in different parts of the Province in order
to provide employment for the large number who were in immediate need. In the Interior rock-
work can be carried out fairly economically during the winter weather.
Roads and Trails.
The amount of construction-work accomplished this year was not quite so extensive as that
of the previous year, but a greater proportion of the work was undertaken by Provincial day-
labour.
"We are fortunate in having several conscientious and capable contracting firms in this
Province, and I wish to record my appreciation of the splendid work undertaken by them,
usually in an expeditious manner; but at the same time the Department is realizing that as
maintenance forms an increasingly large part of its work, the sooner the day-labour forces are
specially trained in road-work the better for the welfare of the Department.
With our mileage of roads increasing annually and with the rapid growth in the motor-
vehicle traffic (there are now 32,000 motors registered in this Province, as compared with 9,457
in 1916), the regular and systematic maintenance of our main highways demands' our very
best consideration and care. The appreciative remarks received from various sources as to
the splendid improvements in our highways is the best index of the popular recognition of the
Department's efforts to accomplish the greatest good for the greatest number, with the funds
available.
The Department is giving more and more attention to the development of the patrol system
of maintenance. With the aid of Ford runabouts for transportation of men, tools, and supplies,
this is rendered more feasible than formerly.
New roads require more maintenance the year following construction, and as our mileage
of construction in the previous year was the highest on record, correspondingly greater maintenance was necessary this year. Moreover, the abnormal wet weather and the resulting floods
greatly added to the highway-maintenance work, particularly on the Lower Mainland. As many
of our main roads must necessarily follow river-banks in narrow valleys, they are su'iject to the
ravages of such floods in addition to the damage caused by seasonal slides.
Construction-work was continued on the following trunk roads, details of which are given
elsewhere: On the Trans-Provincial Highway between Rossland and Christina Lake and a
much-needed diversion near Moyie Lake; on the Eagle Pass Highway (Revelstoke West) near
Taft; on the Okanagan Valley Highway (Fairview-Penticton) ; on the Cariboo Road between
Fort George and Quesnel; and on the Fort George-Hazelton Road north of Francois Lake.
These are all important links on our trunk highways, upon which the Department is concentrating its efforts to establish a connected system of highways serving the whole of the populated
portions of the Province. G 6
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
The more permanent hard-surfacing work included the following: Ladner-New Westminster
Road (6.338 miles), Warrenite-Bitulithie; Vancouver-Ladner Road (2.03 miles), asphaltic concrete; Trans-Provincial Highway, Lower Mainland (1.629 miles), concrete; Trans-Provincial
Highway (V.I.) north of Colwood (1.345 miles), concrete, and south of Nanaimo (2.401 miles),
asphaltic concrete; East Saanich Road (1.325 miles), concrete. The whole of the paving-work
was of a high type of construction and most of it was completed well within scheduled time.
Following are the mileages and types of paving undertaken since the year 1917, the year the
Department embarked on its paving programme :—
Year.
Miles
Bituminous
Paving.
Miles
Carpet
Coat.
Miles
Concrete.
Total
Mileage.
1017-18  	
1918-19   .'	
1919-20  	
1920-21   	
1921-22  	
2.14
8.29
4.21
3.78
10.760
1.93
3.15
9.52
6.299
3.29
6.14
16.45
17.068
Totals	
24.180
5.08
15.819
43.088
In carrying out the major construction programme the requirements of settlers were not
overlooked, several miles of settlers' roads having been constructed, particularly in the Fort
George, Omineca, and Similkameen Districts. Wherever, on investigation, circumstances justified
construction, settlers were provided with as serviceable road accommodation as the funds would
permit.
Fedeeal Aid.
The programme under the " Canada Highways Act, 1919," was continued this year with
satisfactory results; the Chief Commissioner (who inspected many of the projects), his
Assistant Chief Engineer, and the Inspecting Engineer all testifying at various times to the
general excellence of the construction-work. They were ail greatly impressed with not only
the nature and the variety of the work, but also with the difficult conditions and unusual
circumstances under which much of it was undertaken.
Details of the expenditures thereon, etc., and the Federal aid received will be found in
the body of the Minister's Annual Report. It will be noted that the Province has taken full
advantage of the provisions of this Act. With the completion of the work now under way the
Province will have reached its share originally allotted—namely, $1,251,955 of the total Federal
grant of $20,000,000 for the period ending March 31st, 1924.
Great credit is due the District Engineers and their assistants for the successful carrying-
out of such work under this Act, which has greatly added to their duties; and responsibilities.
Classification of Highways.
Although the " Highway Act Amendment Act, 1920," providing for the classification of
highways came into force on December 31st, 1920, considerable time was taken up consulting
municipal officials, so that it was only during the following year that any classifications were
made. The work of the Department has been greatly increased thereby, but at the close of the
fiscal year the majority of the municipalities entitled to assistance either actually entered into
agreements or had consented to do so, only two municipalities having refused to participate.
Up till March 31st, 1922, approximately 106 miles (of which 11 miles were in cities) had been
classified as primary highways and approximately 53 miles (of which 5 miles were in cities)
classified as secondary highways. Hereafter the Department will undertake work only on such
roads in organized districts for which agreements have been entered into as provided by this Act.
Bbidges.
The report of the Superintendent of Bridges thoroughly covers the bridge situation. An
outstanding feature was the increasing work satisfactorily undertaken by day-labour at generally
economical figures. Abnormal floods were responsible for the loss of several bridges, that over
the Coquitlam River at Port Coquitlam being the heaviest loss. It is now being replaced by a
steel structure of the most modern design.   03  13 Geo. 5 Report of the Public Works Engineer. G 7
With the thorough inspection of materials at the mill or iron-works by competent officials,
and by careful erection under experienced men, the Department is constructing substantial
structures at sites carefully located, or relocated in the event of renewal being necessary.
Ferries.
The principal work undertaken was the commencement of the construction of a new steel
motor-driven ferry-boat for the Francois Lake Ferry Service. This boat will be capable of
accommodating forty passengers (in addition to the crew) and considerable freight, and should
prove a great boon to the growing population in this neighbourhood.
The larger ferries on the Fraser River and on the Okanagan Lakes continue to give
satisfactory service. The small ferries are well maintained and as good service supplied as
the local conditions demand.
Protection-wobk.
The abnormal floods previously referred to were responsible for most of the work necessary.
The Vedder River protection-walls which suffered through erosion will be repaired next season
under the terms of the " River-bank Protection Act." In connection with our. roads and bridges
there must always be a certain amount of protection-work necessary to protect the Department's
interests, but the policy of the Department only to do such work as is essential for safeguarding
the public property is now being adhered to.
In order to arrive at some satisfactory solution of the problems of the Coquitlam River,
surveys have been made of the area affected with a view to undertaking some remedial work in
conjunction with the Federal Government and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, whose
interests are also involved.
Regulation ov Vehicular Traffic, .etc.
A far-reaching step was taken this year towards more directly and definitely limiting and
restricting traffic on our more important highways. Under the " Highways Act Amendment Act,
1921," the Minister is empowered to delegate local road officials to act in his capacity. Armed
with the powers vested in him, District Engineers and their assistants have been able to deal
promptly With such offending persons or firms who were either hauling too excessive loads or
were using the roads at times when weather or other conditions were liable to render same unfit
for general traffic through abuse. This is a highly important matter, in which the users of
vehicles require some education and, where necessary, salutary reproof, as it is only with the
interested co-operation of vehicle owners and users that our highways can be conserved, from
oft-times injudicious and improper usage, for the benefit of the general travelling public.
The change in the Rule of the Road in the remainder of the -Province occasioned considerable
work and expenditure for advertising, but it is pleasing to report that the change was made
promptly and harmoniously, with only a few minor accidents.
General.
To give a graphical idea of the correspondence passing through this Department a chart
prepared hy the Senior Clerk is elsewhere reproduced in the Annual Report of the Minister.
From this it will be seen that 32,555 communications, of which about 17,000 were outward letters,
were dealt with during this fiscal year. •
Over 250 subdivision plans were examined by the district officials and most of them approved
after some amendments considered necessary in the public interests.
Accompanying are the reports of the District Engineers, the Superintendent of Bridges, and
the Supervising Architect, all of which show that the work is progressing favourably.
I cannot conclude without again showing my hearty appreciation of the loyal and unstinted
help rendered me at all times both by officials at headquarters and in the engineering districts.
I particularly wish to emphasize the good work done by the District Engineers and their
assistants.
It is a pleasure and inspiration to work with capable men imbued with a spirit of devotion
to their superiors and aggressive enthusiasm for the general well-being of the Department.
I should like also to take this opportunity of recording the valuable assistance received from
yourself, as well as for the encouraging attitude of the late Minister  of Public Works, the G 8 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Honourable  Dr.   King.    In   the  Honourable   Dr.   Sutherland   the  Department  has   a   worthy
successor, who during the short time he has been Minister of Public Works has demonstrated
his great interest and enthusiasm for everything partaking to the public good.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
P. PHILIP,
Public Works Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 1.
District Engineer's Office,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., August 25th, 192ft
P. Philip, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer. Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report for Vancouver Island District.
There are in the neighbourhood of 2,224 miles of roads and trails to be maintained. The
population from the last census returns in the nine electoral districts on the Island is 118,730.
On account of increased heavy traffic during the wet season of the year, it is impossible to
keep gravel roads in the neighbourhood of towns from being badly cut during that period, and
where continuous log-hauling is carried on in timbered districts. From the results of trials with
screened or beach gravel and crushed rock, it has been observed that a foundation course of
entire gravel or crushed rock should be of uniform size as far as possible, and all voids systematically filled with a binder and rolled into a compact mass, followed with a course of chips
and fines from the crusher and again rolled, and then a top dressing of clayey soil from the
roadside.
Rock-crushers are now being installed at Alberni and Saltspring Island, in addition to the
one on the Malahat Drive. Crushed rock in California is sold iby car-load lots at 90 cents per
cubic yard. In this district, where crushing rock in small quantities for experimental purposes
is being carried on, the costs have been higher. It is hoped, with a well-designed layout and
with more mechanical elevators in a good quarry, the costs will be considerably reduced.
A road of this material does not come within the classification of pavements. It will,
however, partly prepare the road-bed for pavements and thus reduce the costs of paving contracts
when the time comes to pave.
Extraordinary Traffic.—Logging and heavy jitney traffic can be divided into two classes—
continuous and occasional. Continuous traffic includes logging-trucks, miners' jitneys, stages,
etc. Logging traffic on main roads and side-roads has been very heavy, resulting in serious
damage to the road-bed and very great inconvenience, and sometimes danger, to the general
public. The " Highway Act Amendment Act, 1921," enabled the Department to curtail and
limit heavy traffic. The burden of responsibility placed upon the Engineers and Road Foremen
to enforce the Act has led to many disagreeable disputes, and in! some cases into personal references to the individual and the Department they are employed by. After an order had been
given that no heavy traffic was to be put over the roads until further notice, there were always
some people who deliberately disobeyed the order by hauling heavy loads at night or early in
the morning.    A watchman was necessary to warn those who disobeyed the temporary regulation.
Road Machinery.—-The road machinery supplied has been of great value to the district,
especially as teams are getting difficult to hire and privately owned motor-trucks and tractors
have to be hired. Where foremen have been supplied with a Ford truck and a tractor, more
work was done per dollar spent on maintenance, and, in addition, provided means whereby work
can be done at the most advantageous time, which, as all roadmen know, is when the farmers'
teams are busy at farm-work.
Bridges.—The Sooke River Bridge was washed out and replaced by a new structure on the
old site. Several old bridges were reconstructed. The general condition of bridges in the
district, large and small, is fair. There are many old structures that have been strengthened
in various ways to save .cost of renewal, and appear to be fairly sound, excepting during the
very dry season, when spikes are continually loosening and require constant attention, especially
in the cases of new floors on very old stringers. ■    ■..
ss!silSlflR&:j  13 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer, District 2\o. 2. G 9
Mile-posts.—In the Alberni District mile-posts and signs bearing the names of all side-roads
have been put in at each mile on the Island Highway and Trans-Provincial Highway.
Rule of the Road.—This was effected in the district without delay to traffic or serious
accidents.
Roads.—In the Esquimalt District 1.35 miles of concrete pavement were laid between
Colwood Hotel and Langford Station. In North Saanich 1.33 miles of concrete pavement were
laid on the East Saanich Road from the end of the municipal pavement to Breed's Cross-road.
Wherever funds permitted, narrow portions of roads have been widened to a width of 20 feet.
During the year there has been a large demand for new roads from new settlers. In many cases
lack of sufficient funds made it impossible to grant their requests this year.
Farm Drainage into Road-ditches.—The object of the road-maker in digging ditches is to
keep water away from the road. Many land-owners consider that the road-ditches are the proper
discharge-channel for their tile drains, and run their tile pipes or drains into road-ditches without
having asked permission from the Department, as they would have done with any other adjoining
land-owner.
In the month of October a great deal of damage was done by a very heavy rainfall, and the
consequent overflow of rivers and streams resulted in damage to some bridges, culverts, and
road-beds.
During this year, as in the past, a considerable amount of maintenance-work consisted in
improving side-ditches and installing pipe culverts. The value of good road drainage was
conclusively proved, as well as the need for future extension of the same class of work next year.
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Hodgins,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 2.
District Engineer's Office,
Court-house, New Westminster, B.C., July 14th, 1922.
P. Philip, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit annual report for year 1921-22 for District No. 2, comprising
Chilliwack, Delta, Dewdney, North Vancouver, New Westminster, South Vancouver, Richmond,
and a portion of Yale Electoral Districts.
Chilliwack District.—During the past year no road-work of a permanent nature was carried
out by the Department in this district, most of the work consisting of ordinary maintenance and
repairs. About 12,000 cubic yards of grave] were hauled and spread on the Trans-Provincial
Highway through its entire length in this district. Particular attention was paid to ditching
throughout the district and the widening of narrow roadways.
The Ford trucks have been of great service in repair-work and patrolling during the winter
months. The foremen have been able to take gangs expeditiously to remove slides, fallen
timber, etc.
The usual amount of repair-work was carried out on the bridges, and in several cases bridges
were replaced by culverts and tills.
Owing to high water in the Fraser River it was necessary to discontinue the temporary ferry
service from Agassiz to Rosedale. However, this is the last year that it will be necessary to
use the old ferry.
On December 12th the district was visited by a severe storm, something in the nature of a
cloudburst; the Vedder River rising in twelve hours to approximately 11 feet above low water.
This river, being a mountain stream, travels at a great velocity and during flood-time brings
down a great deal of green timber and logs. This condition of affairs resulted in the carrying-
out of several hundred feet of the rock wall which was built in 1918. However, the main portion
of the wall remained intact and there was no loss of property owing to the breach in the wall.
During this storm our road-gangs were on duty night and day protecting bridges, clearing
slides, opening culverts, and generally patrolling the highways.
Delta District.—The most important works carried out in this district during the last fiscal
year were as follows:— Paving the Ladner-New Westminster Road, Project No. 5: This was divided in four
sections—A, B, C, and D—and by reason of similarity in subgrade conditions and type of
hard-surfacing A and C may be described under one heading.
A and C sections: A distance of 5.97 miles was paved 16 feet wide with a 2-inch bitulithic
surface on a dry macadam base. The existing macadam road was scarified and spread to the
required width, and then covered with clean crushed rock and the whole thoroughly rolled.
Great care was taken to ensure firm shoulders. Along numerous sections of road-bed extremely
unstable subsoil (peat) foundation conditions were encountered, which demanded a greater depth
of metal reinforcement than anticipated when contract plans and quantities were prepared.
The abnormal subsoil conditions were chiefly experienced along the easterly section of contract.
The major portion of this section of road was subjected to heavy rainfalls during the subgrading
operations preparatory to paving. In preparing the subgrade for paving the old macadam surface had to be scarified, and in this condition the road-crust afforded very easy access to water.
In addition to the subgrade on this section being subjected to heavy rains, numerous leaks in
municipal water-main (wooden stave) were encountered, the soft subsoil conditions created by
these leaks necessitating more metal being used to secure adequate stability along the affected
sections of subgrade. Irrespective of the type of road-construction which might have been
adopted for paving this road, the unstable foundation conditions encountered could only have
been overcome by strengthening the subsoil according to the particular local requirements.
Somewhat similar subsoil conditions, although not quite so bad, were experienced on the cement
concrete pavement, Section B of this road, where the sub-foundation had to be reinforced with
gravel before paving.
Perfect drainage was provided for the subgrade by means of French drains at intervals of
100 feet leading from subgrade to the toe of slope. To secure the required stability in the rock
base it was found necessary to use some fine granite-chips and some water, but not to the same
extent as required in water-bound macadam roads. ,
Section D: A distance of 0.49 mile consisted of a 1%-inch bitulithic wearing surface over
an existing lithta pavement 14 feet wide, which had begun to break up and required surfacing.
The above three sections have been subjected to fairly heavy traffic since completion and
are in excellent condition.
Section B : A distance of 2.026 miles was completed last year. A one-course cement concrete
paving 14 feet wide, 6% inches thick at the sides, and rising to 7% at the centre, with flat base,
was laid. Considerable difficulty was at first experienced in securing adequate drainage, but
this was finally effected, and it is gratifying to note that no heaving whatever took place during
the extreme cold of last winter.
The main highway from Ladner to New Westminster now comprises about 8^ miles nf
paved road, of the cost of which the Municipality of Delta has borne 50 per cent.
Trans-Provincial Highway, Project No. 9, Section D : This section of highway runs northerly
from the Village of Cloverdale, and consists of a one-course cement concrete pavement 18 feet
wide.
The old road-bed, chiefly macadam, provided a perfect subgrade for the concrete, and no
difficulty was encountered in providing drainage on this section. The concrete slab has a uniform
thickness of 7 inches and a camber of 3 inches. This has proven most satisfactory, and appears
to be a decided improvement on the cross-section followed hitherto—namely 1%-inch surface
camber with a level base.
The contractor on this section deserves great praise for the splendid finish obtained and the
evenness of the joints, a prominent highway official from Eastern Canada recently remarking
that he had never seen a more perfect concrete road. A straw cover thoroughly wet down was
used for curing the concrete. The sand, gravel, and cement were conveyed in batch boxes by
motor-trucks from Cloverdale bunkers to the mixer. This method proved expeditious, besides
keeping the aggregate clean.
Trans-Provincial Highway, Serpentine Flats, Project No. 9, Section C, 1.401 miles: The
work on this section consisted in raising by 5 feet the existing roadway, which was subjected
annually to flooding. The material for this embankment was obtained by excavating a drainage-
channel along the northerly and easterly side of the road. The natural formation on the flats
consisted of from 1 to 5 feet of peat overlying an alluvial sandy clay. Sufficient right-of-way
was acquired to provide for a 25-foot berm from the toe of embankment to top of channel;   a Laying bitulitliic surface on rock base, Ladner Trunk Road, 1921.
Nanaimo.  13 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer. District No. 2. G 11
drainage-channel 35 feet wide on top and a 30-foot strip for spoil-bank, where all the excavated
peat was " wasted."
The contractor used a hand-operated clam-shell for the excavation, and after disposing of
the peat the underlying clay was carried on a 60-foot boom to the embankment. The original
intention was to have 15 feet of berm, but owing to the numerous springs underlying the
embankment there was a tendency towards sliding and settlement. The width of berm was
then increased to 25 feet and no further trouble was encountered. When about one-half of
the length of the clay-fill was up to grade and had dried and hardened, it was covered with
a layer of hard-pan about 6 inches deep, which in turn was covered with 12 inches of run-of-bank
gravel.
Considerable anxiety was felt as to how the new clay-fill would act under heavy frost
conditions, but although the winter proved the worst on record for heaving gravel roads, no
trouble developed on the fill. It is therefore extremely gratifying to note the splendid results
obtained.
The balance of the work in the district consisted of the usual maintenance and repairs.
About 14,500 cubic yards of gravel were hauled and spread on the Trans-Provincial Highway
and the Pacific Highway. Owing to the prolonged heavy frost during the winter months, when
it was found that the frost had gone in some places as far as 2 feet into the road-bed, considerable trouble arose from the thaw, at which time our gravel roads were badly rutted. All truck
traffic was prohibited during this period, so that the roads did not become seriously damaged.
AVhen the thaw was'well advanced and the roads began to dry out they were thoroughly graded
and dragged.   A considerable amount of gravel was used in strengthening the weak places.
The new loader has proved a great success in this district, cost records showing that the
operating cost of loading gravel for one month was about 10 cents per cubic yard.
During paving operations a great deal of attention had to be paid to detours, which carried
an unusually heavy tourist traffic in addition to local traffic. The Department kept the road-
gang continually grading, dragging, and repairing in order to keep these roads in good condition.
No bridge-work other than maintenance and reflooring was undertaken.
The Barnston Island Ferry Service was greatly improved by the purchase of a new gasolene-
launch of sufficient carrying capacity to transport the freight and passengers.
Between the south approach of Westminster Bridge and the paved highway about 1,500
square yards of tarvia macadam roadway) were laid.
Dewdney District.—In Dewdney Electoral District, aside from the maintenance and
improvement of existing roads, a variety of undertakings were carried out. During the period
of high water on the Fraser in May and June the Department loaned equipment to the Land
Settlement Board and supervised the strengthening of the dykes on Nicomen Island. While the
danger of flood was present the Department gave advice and assistance in avoiding breaks
in the dykes and maintained the Dewdney Trunk Road on the north side of the island as a
protection against inundation.
Construction was commenced on the Farms Road in Hatzic Prairie and practically completed
before wet weather set in. A rock-crusher was put in operation near Dewdney and a large part
of the Salvaster Road rocked and greatly improved. The Ioeo-Suunyside Road was graded and
ditched and almost entirely gravelled by the end of March. Ontario Street and River Road
through Maple Ridge Municipality were taken in hand and reshaped, ditched, and drained,- with
excellent results.
The floods of October did small amount of damage to numerous bridges throughout the
district. The only serious damage was to the Coquitlam Bridge, of which one 120-foot span
was destroyed. A temporary trestle was erected and is still carrying traffic pending the
construction of a new span.
The Department also participated with the Dominion Government in clearing out jams
formed in the Coquitlam River above the bridge and in protecting the banks at three points
where erosion threatened the road.
Generally the roads in this district were in excellent condition at the end of the fiscal year.
North Vancouver District.—The work carried out in this district in the past year follows
very closely that of former years. Owing to its large area, of which probably less than 10 per
cent, is of agricultural value, the settlements are greatly scattered, and it is a very expensive
matter to provide even a tenth of the roads and trails requested.    In this district particularly G 12 Public Works Report (1921-22).
a great deal of time has to be devoted to the examination of requested roads, only to find that
the Department cannot authorize the expenditures asked for.
Considerable damage was done to roads and bridges in the Squamish District during the
storms of last winter. Repairs were carried out as far as possible at the earliest opportunity.
The agricultural development of the Pemberton Meadows has justified the expenditure of a
considerable sum on necessary road improvements.
Considerable damage is done annually by the Lillooet River to the main road, but up to
the present repairs have not presented any unsurmountable difficulty. At Owl Creek the bridge
was washed out and the road destroyed for some considerable distance. However, a detour
was built and a bridge to the hatchery used to take care of traffic.
The usual amount of work on trails has been carried out, Bargain Harbour Trail and
Skookumchuck Trail in particular having received attention.
In employment on road-work returned soldiers and married men have been given assistance
as far as possible.
New Westminster District.—Only the usual maintenance was undertaken in this district
for the year.
Richmond District.—During the past year the most important work undertaken in this
district consisted of paving on No. 3 and No. 9 Roads, Lulu Island, Project No. 4, Section C.
Early in the year the Department decided to pave this section, about 2.03 miles long, in order
to provide a paved road from Vancouver to Woodward's Landing. The type selected was a
2-inch asphaltic concrete surface 16 feet wide on a dry macadam base. The existing road was
for about half its length old macadam, very rough and badly pitted; the balance was a fair
gravel road. The entire surface of the old road was thoroughly scarified and spread to the
proper cross-section; then covered with about 6 inches of crushed rock and well rolled. No
difficulties were experienced in obtaining a firm foundation and adequate drainage. Since its
completion this road has carried very heavy truck traffic and shows no sign of giving trouble.
General repairs on the Marine Drive, in the matter of repairing the asphaltic surface,
clearing brush on dangerous corners, and placing fencing against high banks, which might be
dangerous to the travelling public, were carried out. There was also a fill placed at the
intersection of Sea Island Road and the Lulu Island Bridge.
Considerable repairing had to be carried out on the Sea and Lulu Island Bridges, as owing
to the immense traffic now passing over these structures the wood floor does not last any time.
The condition of the bridges is such that it is inadvisable to place a paved surface on the present
structure, with the result that heavy repairs have to be carried out from time to time.
The Ladner-Woodward Ferry has given splendid service during the past year. Owing to
the increased traffic between Ladner and Vancouver a great number of special trips had to be
made. During the prolonged frost last winter it was found necessary to discontinue the service
owing to ice in the river. No trips at all were lost owing to stormy weather, and great credit
must be given to the captain and crew for the splendid seamanship shown at all times during
the year.
South Vancouver District.—No work on roads was done by the Government this year. Under
" relief-work," the Municipality of Burnaby and South Vancouver carried out certain work to
which the Province and the Dominion contributed.
Yale District.—During the past year the western portion of Tale District was added to
District No. 2 for administrative purposes. The chief road-work carried out was the building
of about 3 miles of new road 12 feet wide from the west side of Harrison Bay! towards Chehalis
River. This road when completed will be about 6.6 miles long and will prove a great boon to
the settlers in that district. At Hope the north approach to the Hope Bridge was greatly
improved by removing a dangerous curve and reducing the grade. The balance 8f the work
consisted of usual maintenance. Several bridges were repaired, but no new construction was
undertaken, except a pile-trestle bridge at Cheam Slough.
On January 1st the change in the Rule of the Road took place, and this district organized
gangs for the erection of notices all over the highways, both in the country and in the cities.
During the night of December 31st gangs worked in erecting " Turn to the Right " signs. No
accidents took place in this district due to the change in the Rule of the Road.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
E. H. Verner,
District Engineer. . - .
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REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 3.
i District Engineer's Office,
Court-house, Kamloops, B.C., September 29th, 1922.
P. Philip, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit my annual report for the fiscal year 1921-22.
This year saw the start of the Kamloops-Yellowhead Pass Project. While no actual
construction was accomplished, surveys were made between Mount Olie and Blackpool, and this
section when completed will link Kamloops with Wire Cache, a distance of 130 miles. A bridge
was built across the Clearwater River in connection with the project.
The metalling of the southern end of the Kamloops—Falkland (Vernon) Road was completed
and the road is now in good shape, with the exception of Todd's Hill, which requires widening.
The extension of the Columbia Street section of the Kamloops-Savona Road was completed
and is proving of great advantage to the travelling public, as well as being of scenic interest to
the tourist.
A start was made during the winter on the Chase-Squilax-Sorrento Road, a mile of heavy
rock-work being completed. When completed this road will connect all of the Shuswap Lake
District with Kamloops. A ferry was installed at Squilax, and when the new road is completed
the settlers of Adams Lake and Adams River will by this means be joined to the main road
system.
Much work was done macadamizing in the Salmon Arm District, and a piece of construction
completed through the McGuire Orchard to reduce grades on the road to the fruit section of
the district.
During the year 1-Mile Creek Road, while not completed, was opened to traffic. This road
not only shortens the distance between Merritt and Princeton by 13 miles, but eliminates all the
heavy grades in the Otter Valley.
A number of small pieces of construction were carried on in extending existing roads to
incoming settlers—namely, the Blind Bay-Eagle Bay Road, Squilax-Anglemont, Mobley-Tappen,
and WTrite Lake. A connection was also built to give the White Lake settlers access to Carlin
Station.
The usual maintenance-work, consisting of grading, patching, gravelling, and renewing
culverts, etc., was carried on during the season.
In the summer months an up-to-date garage was erected on the Government Yards, Columbia
Street. The garage was fully equipped with machinery and tools and a mechanic put in charge.
Not only are the Public Works' cars repaired, but also those of other departments, and good
satisfaction has been given to all.
Respectfully submitted. G. B. Whitehead,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 4.
District Engineer's Office,
Penticton, B.C., August 15th, 1922.
P. Philip, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith my general report of the work done in the above district
during the fiscal year 1921-22.
Roads.—During the year 2,681 miles of roads were maintained at an approximate cost of
$54 per mile,, including supervision, materials, tools, etc. This also covered several diversions
and improvements to the main roads.
We have had considerable trouble with the owners of large motor-trucks. This type of
traffic has increased very considerably every year, and if it is allowed to continue in the future
it will be impossible to keep our gravel and earth roads in a passable condition for ordinary
traffic, unless at a prohibitive cost. I consider that a gross load of 5 tons is the maximum that
should be allowed on the above type of road, and I would submit that the manufacturers and G 14 Public Works Report (1921-22).
prospective customers should be warned that, under no consideration or at any time of the year,
will trucks of a larger carrying capacity than those suggested be allowed on any but hard-
surfaced highways.
We have again this year some nearly 6,000 car-loads of fruit and other products that will
be moved over our roads, some a distance from 2 to 20 miles, and we are now arriving at a
point in this district where, unless the appropriation can be at least doubled, it is almost useless
to think of keeping the roads, generally speaking, in a reasonably passable condition.
I again wish to take up with you the absolute necessity of making permanent appointments
of section crews, each to be supplied with a small Ford truck to be employed on the maintenance
of our main travelled highways.
Trails.—For the purpose of giving access to timber limits for the use of Game Wardens and
mining camps, about 800 miles of trails are maintained and made passable every year from the
district vote.
Bridges.—In addition to repairs, reinforcements, etc., twelve bridges of various types were
renewed, including two spans across the Kettle River at Midway, one span at Westbridge, and
one Howe-truss span across the Kettle River at Grand Forks. Two foot-bridges were also built,
one attached to the C.P.R. steel bridge at Sicamous and one across the North Fork of the Kettle
River at Grand Forks.
Ferries.—Three ferries, all subsidized, are operated in this district—namely, Shuswap Lake
Steamboat Service, running twice weekly to Seymour Arm; the Westbank-Kelowna Ferry, which
connects our main highway; and the Summerland-Naramata. Ferry.
Trunk Highway Construction.—The following new construction-work was very satisfactorily
undertaken by contract during the year: (1) Eagle Pass Road, Mara Lake-Sieamous, 4 miles;
(2) Fairview-Penticton Road, Demonstration Farm to Mclntyre Creek, 9 miles; (3) Trans-
Provincial Highway, Christina Creek East, 15 miles.
No.-1 will afford access to the Okanagan from Revelstoke. No. 2 accommodates the increasing population consequent upon the opening-up of the irrigated lands at the new settlement of
Oliver.   No. 3 is an important link in the Trans-Provincial Highway, the summit being 5,400 feet.
Respectfully submitted.
W. K. Gwter,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 5.
District Engineer's Office,
Court-house, Nelson, B.C., August 9th, 1922.
P. Philip, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit general report dealing with the work carried out in Engineering
District No. 5 during the fiscal year 1921-22.
Roads and Trails, Nelson Electoral District.—No new roads or streets were opened up, but
one-fifth of a mile of road in the Rosemont District leading to the Nelson golf-course was diverted
off private property and reconstructed on the street allowance.
In South Nelson three-quarters of a mile of streets were regraded with grader, and as far
as the appropriation would permit all travelled streets and roads were maintained in a good
state of repair.
Trail, Electoral District.—Continuing our policy of the past two years, the main highways
in the Trail Electoral District were at various points widened and prepared for gravel surfacing,
while a stretch of 5 miles which had been graded the previous year was gravelled by truck-haul.
Dry rock retaining-walls were built on the Trail-Smelter Hill and between Blueberry and
Castlegar to the extent of 1.250 lineal feet, while on the China Creek Hill there was put in place
6,823 lineal feet of cedar crib logs.
Ordinary maintenance-work was done on 236 miles of road and construction or reconstruction carried out on 3 miles of roads for settlers, while 26 miles of trails were cleaned out at the
request of parties interested in mining.
Rossland Electoral District.—General repair-work was carried out on 49 miles of roads;
535 tons of rock surfacing were distributed over the main road between Trail and Rossland. -■i^imz.......	
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■.■".'.■■■.■■  13 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer. District No. 5. G 15
On the Rossiand-Patterson Road considerable work was done on widening, grading, and
gravelling.
All the main trails were opened up and lateral roads, used principally by settlers, were kept
in a good state of repair.
Kaslo Electoral District.—As in former years, a large portion of our appropriation was
spent in the Creston Valley, between Duck Creek and Erickson, and the macadamizing of the
main road between Creston and Erickson, commenced the previous year, was extended for a
length of 5,800 feet, making a total of 1.9 miles. This portion of road is proving a boon to the
settlers, enabling them to haul to better advantage, besides eliminating much of the trouble with
dust in summer and mud in the fall and spring.
In the Kaslo District generally we repaired 203 miles of roads and cleaned put 193 miles of
trail, assistance having been obtained from the Department of Mines on 42 miles of trail-work.
In the Creston Settlement Area at Camp Lister only sufficient work was done on the road
allowances to enable the settlers to get through, and ten large timber culverts were put in place.
Revelstoke Electoral District.—Approximately 100 miles of road in the Revelstoke District
Were repaired and made fit for traffic, while about 7 miles were gravelled.
Out of the district appropriation we constructed 1.5 miles of new road and reconstructed
2 miles, while we also built 2.5 miles of new trail and repaired and cleaned out 92 miles of
existing trail.
The most important work undertaken, not only in the development of the district, but in
the interests of the Province generally, was the extension of the Revelstoke West Road, the
highway destined to link up Revelstoke with the Okanagan Valley and western points. This
road was extended from the Three Valley overhead railway crossing, a distance of approximately 8 miles, to within 2 miles of Taft. The work was heavy all through and the excavations
amounted to 86,000 cubic yards of material, a third of which was solid rock.
The policy inaugurated during the previous year of snow-ploughing the main roads during
the winter months was continued, with very gratifying results.
Slocan Electoral District.—In the Slocan Electoral District 210 miles of road and 77 miles
of trails received attention during the year, and of the above, assistance was given by the Mines
Department on 8 miles of road and 6.75 miles of trail.
Under a separate appropriation the Edgewood-Vernon Road was extended 1% miles to Sand
Creek, and the New Denver-Three Forks Road was opened up from New Denver to Alamo,
leaving a portion, about one-third of a mile in length, still to be constructed through some heavy
rock bluffs north of Alamo before- connection is made with Three Forks and Sandon.
In the Slocan District there were many demands for short stretches of settlers' roads, which
we were unable to undertake owing to the lack of funds.
Bridges.—The following new truss spans were built:—
Revelstoke District: One 100-foot Howe-truss span and approaches over the C.P.R. main
line at Clanwilliam; one 60-foot king-truss span and approaches over the Eagle River at Three
Valley; one €0-foot king-truss span and approaches over the C.P.R. main line at Three Valley;
one 40-foot steel span and approaches over the C.P.R. main line near 19-Mile board.
Slocan District: One 60-foot king truss with pile approaches over Inonoaklin Creek, 6 miles
from Edgewood.
In addition to the above, the following is a record of the general bridge-work undertaken
in this engineering district: Bridges replaced by culvert and fill, 6 (1,253 lineal feet) ; truss
spans examined, trussed, and overhauled, 16; stringer and trestle bridges repaired, 268; stringer
and trestle bridges constructed, 13;  stringer and trestle bridges reconstructed, 8.
Ferries.—New ferries were installed at Nelson and Creston during 1921-22.
The new Nelson ferry-barge measures 72 by 32 feet and is capable of carrying ten
automobiles at one trip. It is operated by a 20-horse-power gasolene-engine and is equipped
with an up-to-date lighting plant, the wiring having been put in to marine standards. The
underwater cable is of plough-steel 1 inch in diameter passing around sheaves 4 feet in diameter.
The new Kootenay River ferry-barge operating below Creston measures 48 by 16 feet and,
while being primarily a current-ferry, is equipped with a 3-horse-power gasolene-engine, which
enables the ferryman to give a much better service than formerly.
The ferries at Castlegar, Hall's Landing, and Goldstream all continue to give efficient
service. Relief-work.—In order to provide work for the unemployed relief-work was carried out in the
Revelstoke and Trail Districts. In Revelstoke the work consisted chiefly of clearing right-of-
way and quarrying rock for bridge-protection, while in the Trail District we widened out 2,000
lineal feet of the Trail-Castlegar Road and built 1.25 miles of a diversion on the Kootenay River
Road near Taghum. The latter stretch of road eliminated two switchbacks on the old road on
grades of 10% per cent, and reduced the summit by 200 feet, while the maximum grade on the
new road is 6.25 per cent.
Considering that this work was not started until the end of January, when the frost was
15 inches into the ground, good work was done throughout and very fair value received for
money spent.
In completing this general report, I wish to place on record the loyalty, enthusiasm, and
co-operation of the General Foremen, who have done their very best to give efficient service
to the general public, while the courtesy, attention, and encouragement received from the
Department combined to make 1921-22 a good year in every sense of the word.
Respectfully submitted.
Wm. Ramsa"y,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 6.
District Engineer's Office,
P. Philip, Esq., Cranbrook, B.C., July 20th, 1922.
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the following report for the year 1921-22 :—
Labour.—The labour situation was greatly improved as compared with that of the previous
year. The organization generally proved steady and reliable, with an ever-increasing tendency
to do better work. Returned men, who were given the preference and numbered about one-third
of the total labour employed, gave efficient service, especially those in the more important
positions of foremen, truck-drivers, and mechanics.
A matter of importance to the maintenance of roads was the amendment of the " Highway
Act," whereby more direct control of traffic was given to the officials of the Public Works
Department.
Roads and Trails.—Of the maintenance of roads and trails generally, such work was done
as the exigencies of the case required, but the marked increase in auto and truck traffic showed
that on the main highways at least the time had arrived for a system of more permanent patrol
maintenance.
Of the more important works of road-construction the following may be noted:—
Moyie Lake Diversion, 6.6 miles in length (not complete) : This is a section of the Trans-
Provincial Highway, taking the place of a very dangerous and poorly located piece of road, the
real be~te noir of all auto travellers coming into Cranbrook from the west. The diversion presents
easy grades, safe alignment, with a very beautiful scenic view of Moyie Lake for practically its
entire length.
Plank Hill Diversion, another section on the same Trans-Provincial Highway near Tochty
to circumvent a particularly bad hill, which became so rutted up by cars which failed to make
the grade that planks had to be used to give traction.
Grading and surfacing of a considerable portion of the highway between Yahk and Kingsgate
and also between Cranbrook and Wattsburg, the road at Wattsburg itself (now called Lumber-
ton) being constructed in conjunction with the British Columbia Spruce Mills, Limited.
East of Cranbrook, on the Trans-Provincial Highway, extensive improvements were accomplished in widening and surfacing, and north to Kimberley improved surfacing and a 2-mile
diversion near Marysville were undertaken.
Further surfacing was done between Eager Hill and Fort Steele, using for this purpose, on
account of scarcity of gravel in this vicinity, a sort of decomposed shale, highly coloured in red
and yellow shades, and standing up quite well as a surfacing, especially in dry weather.
Some work of improvement was commenced on the road from Marysville to St. Mary
Lake, with the intention of gradually completing this work as funds permit; and considerable
improvements were made to the roads around the Cranbrook Hospital. Relief-work, Kootenay River Road Diversion near Taghum.     (Before construct!
on.)
Relief-work, Kootenay River Road, during construction.    March, 1022.  13 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer, District No. 6. G 17
A noteworthy example of economy was presented in the action of this Department in taking
over some 11 miles of an old logging-railway bed between Waldo and Gold Creek and converting
this into a road to serve the settlers of this locality. A good foreman in charge of this work
converted the logging-road into a wagon and auto road for about $140 per mile.
At Crowsnest, on the International Highway, the widening of about 1,700 feet of narrow
road through rock was accomplished.
The coal-mining town of Coal Creek, near Fernie, was served by the commencement of a
diversion road (to be completed as funds permit) to take the place of a dangerous and expensive
road to maintain past the Crow's Nest Coal Company's dumps.
The road on the improved location up the south side of Bull River was continued to
facilitate settlers in that locality.
The construction of approximately half a mile of road was completed near the International
Boundary, in the Flathead country, to give access to a bridge over the Flathead River to serve
oil and coal interests.
In addition to partial reconstruction and general maintenance, 1 mile of the main trunk
road leading to Golden was opened up and gravelled.
Of other roads constructed or improved for the especial benefit of settlers, the following
might be mentioned: Wanklyn School Road; Peghin Road; Awniack Road; Miller Road;
Meadowbrook Road; McKenzie Mill Road; Mission-Fort Steele Upper Road; Betts Road;
Campbell Road; Canyon Creek Road; Forster's Landing Road; Findlay Creek Road; Golden-
Donald Upper and Lower Roads; West Side Road; Toby Creek Road; Windermere Loop;
Arnold, Brisco, Cameron, Dejordy, Graham, Madden, Ottason, Red Rock, and Wardner-Bull
River Roads.
The maintenance of streets and sidewalks was kept up in the following towns: Kimberley,
Slaterville, Moyie, Yahk, Wardner, Bull River, Fort Steele, Elko, West Fernie, Natal, Athalmer,
Wilmer, Invermere, and Golden.
All bridges were safely maintained throughout the year. In this connection a system of
obtaining daily gauge-readings of the height of water of the more important rivers was introduced, these readings being recorded in the District Engineer's office as a guide or warning of
the state of water or approaching flood. Credit is due to the Dominion Hydrographic officials
for information and assistance in procuring these gauge-readings.
The method of strengthening Bull River was a little out of the ordinary, and was done in
conjunction with the British Columbia and Alberta Power Company to enable them to transport
heavy machinery to their hydro-power plant up Bull River. This Howe-truss bridge was reinforced by a system of cables, two on each side of the bridge, fixed at one end and passing over
posts and under more central beams in fixed metal grooves, and over posts at the other end and
held taut by large concrete weights hanging loose against rubbing-posts.    This was very effective.
Phillip's Bridge was reinforced by struts placed between the abutments and the first panel
points. In this ease the great height of the bridge above water gave ample clearance for such
a method to be safely used.
Of other works of maintenance of bridges, the following were important: Pile wall at
mouth of St. Mary River to protect Fort Steele Bridge; cribbing and clearing of Moyie River
to protect bridges on the Moyie Lake Diversion;   crib-protection at Horsethief Bridge.
Following the policy of replacing unnecessarily large wooden structures over small creeks
or dry ravines, at the expiration of life of the wooden structure, by. metal culverts and fill, the
following were done: Bridge 12-53 at Hosiner; Bridge 5-36 and Bridge 5-135 on the main
trunk road to Golden;   and Bridges 8-84, 8-85, and 8-88 on Mission-Marysville Road.
Of bridges constructed, the following are the most important: Cotton Creek Bridge on
Moyie Lake Diversion, a high trestle bridge; three other smaller trestle bridges on this diversion; Coal Creek Bridge, near Fernie; a CO-foot king truss on concrete abutments; total length,
273 feet, successfully and economically carried out by contract in the remote south-eastern
corner of British Columbia; four stringer bridges in the Columbia District, as well as one
bridge, No. 5-1, reconstructed. Assistance was rendered the Forest Branch in constructing two
bridges on Gold Creek.
The bridge numbers were placed on the bridges throughout the district; a great convenience
in identification of all bridge records.
River-bank Protection.—Work was carried on at North Fernie, principally sheet piling with
rock  backing;    above  Fairy  Creek  Bridge,  spur  crib;   Kicking  Horse   River,   completion  of G 18 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
concrete-slab work near Golden;   Toby Dam. extension to crib near Athalmer;   and at mouth
of St. Mary River a scheme was arranged to be undertaken the following year.
Ferries.—Some assistance was rendered in installing a ferry service on the Kootenay River
near Cherry Creek to give settlers shorter access to the Kootenay Central Railway. The ferry
itself belongs to Mr. Bechtel. Investigations were made at the request of settlers on the
Kootenay River near Flagstone for a ferry, the work to be carried out in the following year.
Donald Ferry, Parson Ferry, and Brisco Upper Ferry were maintained on the Columbia at
little expense.
Buildings.—Data and information-were procured for the Architect's Department in connection with a gaol at Kimberley and schools at Yahk, Corbin, and Waldo>
A garage was erected at Cranbrook and a mechanic installed to take charge of all Government cars. This was a very important step in the interests of economy and convenience to all
governmental departments operating not only cars but other machinery in this engineering
district. Improved housing conditions for tools and equipment were also provided for in
Cranbrook, Fernie, and Athalmer, and necessary arrangements made for powder-houses.
Machinery.—A mechanical loader was procured for Columbia District, also small patrol
graders; and a " Cletrac " tank-type tractor for Cranbrook. Graders and other minor equipment
were procured- for Cranbrook and Fernie Districts, as well as an approved adjustable snow-
plough to keep certain jitney-roads open for auto-traffic in Cranbrook District.
Subdivision Plans for Approval.—In all, thirteen plans were submitted and passed after
examination and some modifications.
Surveys.—Results of surveys carried out were elaborately reported on with accompanying
data, notably Gateway-Elko proposition; Corbin Road; routes from Cranbrook to Columbia
District; improvement diversions from Cranbrook to Kingsgate; and diversions of the main
trunk road in the Columbia District.
Investigations were made and reported on in connection with improved road and sidewalk
to Cranbrook Cemetery; diversion at Rampart to eliminate two railway crossings and a section
of poor road of the Interprovincial Highway; also with regard to constructing road-bed of more
permanent type than gravel to take care of excessive traffic on the Interprovincial Highway
leading out of Cranbrook.
Investigations were made in West Fernie to improve drainage conditions.
The usual number of applications to construct works within Government rights-of-way were
dealt with, the most extensive being that of the British Columbia and Alberta Power Company
to erect pole-lines carrying 66,000 volts.
Again I wish to thank you and your staff in Victoria for help and encouragement in carrying
on the work of this district, and to express my appreciation of the loyalty and effort of those
working directly with me here.
Respectfully submitted. J. C. Brady.
District Engineer.   ■
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 7.
District Engineer's Office,
Prince Rupert, B.C., September 14th, 1922.
P. Philip, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the fiscal year 1921-22, as follows:—
Organization.—Our present organization seemed to work quite smoothly, and it was therefore
deemed unnecessary to make any drastic changes. It must be stated, however, that the work
suffered for lack of close supervision. The area over which the work was spread was so great
. and the supervising staff so small that it was impossible to give the work the close personal
supervision that it should have received. The total cost of work performed was $347,000 and
the cost of supervision was $19,600, or 5.7.per cent, of the total.
An attempt is being made to encourage the better class of foremen and skilled labourers to
follow road and bridge building as a trade, and it is noticeable that we are succeeding in this
to a limited extent. The difficulty is that we have practically no employment for such men in
winter. It is felt that the maximum efficiency will not be obtained until more men take up this
class of work and stay with it. -    i
Macadam-work, Creston-Erickson Road.
North Fork of Kettle River at Grand Forks, 130-foot span.
I  13 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer, District INo. 7. G 19
Weather.—The weather, generally speaking, was very unfavourable. The spring of 1921
was fair and fine, but during the late summer and all through the fall the rainfall was excessive.
At times it was all but impossible to carry on grading operations in the water-soaked materials.
Instead of getting low water in the rivers in the early fall as is usually expected, high-water
conditions obtained, which resulted in great inconvenience and excessive cost in construction of
bridge foundations which had been started in August. The rainy season extended into November,
making a long period in which work of any kind was difficult and expensive, and rendering the
maintenance of dirt roads in passable condition almost impossible.
Labour.—There was a very marked improvement in labour conditions. Wages were reduced
25 cents per day. Men were not scarce and were more inclined to give a fair day's work. I am
safe in saying that, on the whole, 30 per cent, more work was obtained for the same expenditure
in wages as in the previous year.
Materials.—Materials and supplies were more easily obtained and at reduced prices in most
lines.    Freight rates were, however, higher, as also were travelling expenses.
Roads and Trails.—The maintenance of roads and trails was rendered difficult largely on
account of the weather conditions. It was very forcibly shown that the most important thing
in road-building is drainage. All roads in this district that were poorly drained or not drained
at all were in a very bad condition at the close of the season. The well-drained, gravel-surfaced
roads stood the test remarkably well.
The reconstruction of old roads drew heavily upon the appropriations. Approximately 50
miles of road were reconstructed, the greater part of this mileage being second-class roads.
Considerable gravelling was done, but only on such sections as had been previously ditched
and crowned.
Among the new roads constructed, only the more important will be mentioned. The Alice
Arm Shore Road, connecting the wharf and the town of Alice Arm, was a heavy piece of rock-
work. The clearing of the Port Clements-Telell Road was practically completed. The Neale
Settlement and a number of other settlement roads were rough-graded. Six miles of the
Hazelton-Fort George Project and 5 miles of the Colley Mountain Road were completed.
All trails were fairly well maintained and a considerable mileage of new trails, particularly
in the mining sections, was constructed.
The most noteworthy departure in road-construction was the introduction of a light steam-
shovel into road-grading operations in this district. On its record for the season it amply
warranted its initial cost and expense of running. Its usefulness in heavy side-hill grading is
beyond question. It is estimated that it reduced the cost of construction on the Colley Mountain
Road as compared to construction with teams by 30 per cent.
River-protection.—Although the rainfall for the year was very heavy and for a long period
the rivers ran very high, they did not reach to extraordinary high levels and no great damage
was done to either public works or private property. It is estimated that the total damage did
not exceed $6,000, and this was largely confined to the Bear River section. The Alice Arm wing-
dam was extended and was responsible for preventing damage to the town. Minor protection-
works were carried out on the Bella Coola River by the Department, and by co-operation on the
part of the settlers, the Bella Coola Logging Company, and the Department some very good work
was accomplished in removing log-jams, cutting dangerous trees, and opening up channels on the
river.    I expect to obtain increasingly good results from this co-operation in the future.
Bridges.—The maintenance of bridges is becoming very heavy, but on the whole the bridges
were fairly well maintained during the year. A more general substitution of culverts and fills
is being promoted in order to cut down as far as possible the maintenance cost. In many cases,
however, this involves a large capital expenditure, and many of the smaller bridges are not being
renewed as soon as they ought to be, in the hope that funds will be forthcoming to carry out the
more permanent work.
Eleven bridges were reconstructed, the most important being the Bulkley River Bridge at
Houston.
Thirteen new bridges were built, the most important and expensive being the Bulkley River
Bridge at Quick. It consists of two 150-foot Howe-truss spans and 196 feet of trestle approaches.
The piers are of concrete masonry.
The most noteworthy departure in bridge-construction was the adoption of masonry piers
for the above bridge.    This is beyond doubt a step in the right direction, as it is very difficult G 20 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
to build timber piers to withstand such ice-crushes as obtain on such rivers as the Bulkley.
Also the substitution of iron clamps and keys for timber clamps and keys in timber Howe
trusses is bound to result in better and more permanent structures.
Ferries.—All ferries were well maintained, with exception of the Terrace Ferry, which was
allowed to break loose and go down-stream and was badly damaged in Hell's Gate Canyon.
A start was made on the construction of a new power-ferry of all-steel construction and
modern design for Francois Lake. The ferry at Kitwanga was discontinued in the interests of
economy, there being practically no traffic.
Wharves.—Only minor repairs to the Cow Bay Floats and Bella Coola Wharf were done.
All fender-piles were renewed in the Prince Rupert Wharf, and a new level crossing over the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway tracks was obtained and road approaches thereto graded, giving
much freer access to the whole water-front in that section and improving wharfage conditions
very considerably.
Conclusion.—Taken as a whole, the year 1921-22 was the best year, from the standpoint of
work accomplished in the past five years. Although the appropriations were reduced as compared to the previous year, the results obtained were greater and better.
One could hardly wish for more loyal service on the part of those responsible to this office
or more hearty co-operation on the part of the officials of other departments.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
A. L. Carruthers,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. S.
District Engineer's Office,
P. Philip, Esq., South Fort George, B.C., July 12th, 1922.
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report for the fiscal year ending March 31st,
1022.
The bulk of the year's programme was actively carried out during the early part of the
season, advantage being taken of the excellent weather conditions then prevailing, and, with
labour plentiful, a marked improvement was noticed in the quality of work undertaken throughout the district.
Trunk Roads.—The more important trunk roads were again given prime attention, especially
on the sections carrying the bulk of traffic; particularly main roads adjacent to the centres of
population, as at Prince George, Vanderho-of, and Fort Fraser. These roads were improved to
such an extent as to require the minimum cost for future maintenance, which will allow the
major portion of the district appropriation to be expended on the completion of colonization
roads so much needed in the various settlements throughout the district.
Federal Aid Project No. 16, Cariboo Road, was, with the exception of a 2-mile gap, graded
its entire length between Prince George and the southern boundary of the district, at Woodpecker;  the work being carried out by contract in two sections.
On account of the heavy nature of some of the side-hill grading the road-bed was not
excavated full width. It was also desirable to open up the entire road in order to benefit settlers
as far as possible, who hitherto had no summer outlet to Prince George.
Where practicable, metal culverts were used on this work and have proved satisfactory.
Land-settlement Roads.—On account of active development in these areas further road
facilities had to be provided, especially at Vanderhoof, where some 10 miles of new road have
been opened up and improved as far as funds would permit.
The Prince George Area roads were improved to some extent, but on account of the
curtailment of funds it was not possible to do all that was desired.
Local Roads.—The usual maintenance-work was undertaken on the more important of these
roads, but, for reasons above stated, it was not possible to carry out the original programme,
thereby necessitating work in some of the isolated sections to be held over for another year.
Urgent repairs, however, were carried out where necessary and no great hardship was evidenced.
Peace Rimer District.—Part of the main road from Pouce Coupe to Grande Prairie was
substantially improved in order to take care of the steady increase of traffic, and the many miles < :l
I  13 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer, District No. 9. G 21
of road allowances now  opened up  on the Pouce Coupe  Prairie were well  maintained  and
improved.
A new road was cruised from the new Cutbank Bridge to the Peace River, opposite Taylor
Flats, and approximately 3y2 miles on this location were slashed during the winter. Upon the
completion of this road, and with a ferry installed on the Peace River, a through route will be
available for traffic, giving access to all the settlements on the north side of the Peace River.
This work will fulfil a long-felt want.
Bridge-work.—The late spring, which prevented a heavy run-off of snow-water, caused little
or no damage to any of our bridges. In the Peace River District, where floods are usually
expected, precautions were duly taken.
A large number of small bridges were replaced by culverts and fills, a practice which is
being encouraged wherever possible. No truss bridges were erected during the season. The
spans of the Nechako River Bridge at Vanderhoof were raised 4 feet to allow a reasonable
high-water clearance.    Several king-truss spans at other points were tightened up and repaired.
New pile trestles were erected over the Upper Mud River on the road between Blackwater
and Endako, and over Stony Creek, 1 mile from Vanderhoof.
Ferries.—A new pontoon ferry was constructed for operation on the Nechako River at Fort
Fraser, giving access to a new settlement to the south. Otherwise the maintenance of existing
crossings formed the principal item under this heading. From all indications the ferry service
was well handled by the respective ferrymen.
General.—The whole of the year's work was carried out by local labour, and.where
practicable returned soldiers were given first consideration.
I wish here to record with regret the death of one of the Department's most faithful
servants, in the person of the late General Foreman, Hugh Taylor.
A keen interest has been taken by all the staff for the betterment of the service, which,
coupled with the support from headquarters, has created much added efficiency.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Arthur Dixon,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 9.
District Engineer's Office,
P. Philip, Esq., Quesnel, B.C., May 12th, 1922.
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for the year 1921-22 for this
engineering district, comprising Cariboo and Lillooet Electoral Districts:—
Labour.—Conditions were good, no trouble being experienced in obtaining sufficient first-class
labour.
Weather.—Most favourable weather conditions prevailed throughout the year, there having
been no damage to public works by cloudbursts in Lillooet District. The winter was remarkable
for the long period of very cold weather and the absence of the usual Chinook winds. Snowfall
was below average.
Roads and Trails.—Lillooet: The principal new work done was the construction of a road
from Sheridan Lake to Lone Butte Railway Station, 12% miles in length. The usual maintenance-
work was carried out; metal culverts were again used to replace old pole culverts on the Cariboo
Main Road.
Cariboo: The gravelling of the Cariboo Main Road between Miles 212 and 2*19 was completed
and the road was thoroughly drained, metal culverts being used as much as possible. Grade
improvement was made at " Red Bluff," near Quesnel, a reduction being made from a maximum
of 17 to 12 per cent. About 1% miles of the Borland Mountain section, Chilcotin Main Road,
was gravelled and drained. A section 2 miles in length was built on the new Williams Lake-
Springhouse Road.    Maintenance-work was done throughout the district.
Ferries.—The new pontoon ferry was inaugurated at Macalister. The ferries now consist
of seven pontoon type, two scow type, and one boat.
Bridges.—Lillooet: A new bridge consisting of two 45-foot king trusses was built by day-
labour across Seton Creek.   The suspension bridge at Lillooet was redecked and overhauled. G 22 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
A reinforced-concrete abutment 38 feet high was completed on the East Chilcotin  Suspension
Bridge.    New bridges were also built at Wright and Enterprise.
Cariboo: A new bridge 219 feet in length, comprising two 40-foot king trusses and one
100-foot Howe truss and approaches, was built by day-labour across the North Fork of Quesnel
River near Spanish Creek. A new bridge of one 40-foot king truss with trestle approach, length
over all 124 feet, over Chilcotin River at Chezacut was built by day-labour; three bridges were
reconstructed and forty-nine repaired.
Protection.—A breach 250 feet in width was made in the dam at the outlet of Quesnel Lake
in March, 1921. This dam, built across the South Fork of Quesnel River by the Gold River
Mining Company in 1901 for the purpose of working the bed of the river for gold, was 850 feet
in length and 11 feet high. The area of the lake affected was 138 square miles. The structure
had been very well built, but as no maintenance-work had been done the timbers were decaying
and it was considered a menace to the public safety.
Surveys.—Seventy-two miles of road surveys were made.
General.—Several small works were let by contract with very satisfactory results; the
contract for the maintenance of the Winter Road. Barkerville Main, being particularly
satisfactory.
.   The past season's work has again demonstrated the economic efficiency of auto-trucks and
tractors in highway-construction.
Respectfully submitted. G. C. MacKay,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF SUPERVISING ARCHITECT.
Office of Supervising Architect,
, P.\rliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., September 27th. 1922.
P. Philip, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report of the work carried out in the
Architectural Branch during the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1922:—
The year has been one of continued activity, and it has been necessary to continue with the
services of two extra temporary assistants to cope with the amount of work in hand and to
give that supervision which has become necessary owing to the importance and quality of work
being carried out.
On your instructions, at the request of the Honourable the Provincial Secretary, I visited
numerous Mental Hospitals in Canada and the United States to obtain the latest ideas in planning such buildings with the view of designing the new jVeute Block to the Mental Hospital at
Essondale.
This tour was most instructive and beneficial, as I was enabled to obtain all the necessary
information required to design this building along the most modern lines, and at the same time
benefit by the experience of other institutions where improvements on their buildings could
be made.
I also took opportunity to view other public buildings in the places visited, such as hospitals,
sanatoriums, and educational buildings, that may be of benefit to me later in planning such
buildings in the event of the same being required, and much valuable information was obtained.
I was indeed gratified at the kindly consideration and assistance given to me by the
Staffs of the various Institutions visited, not only in Canada but in the United States, which
considerably lessened my task.
Parliament Buildings and, other Government Buildings, Victoria.—The work generally has
been the upkeep of the Parliament Buildings, the Court-house, Victoria, the Saanicli Mental
Hospital, and the Normal School. The rewiring of the Parliament Buildings has- shown marked
progress, whilst the grounds to the Normal School have been considerably improved, and when
the scheme has been completed a distinct improvement will have been made to this building.
I wish to bring to your attention the assistance Mr. Partington has rendered me in the actual
carrying-out of the work on these grounds.   ^J^^vfe.
«fc*sigi§
I  13 Geo. 5 Report of Supervising Architect. G 23
Mental Hospitals.—The plans for the new Acute Building at Essondale were completed and
the tenders awarded and work commenced, which will take about eighteen months to complete.
From criticisms I have received from well-known authorities on planning of these buildings,
1 have every reason to believe that a most up-to-date structure along these lines will be produced
and at the same time harmonize with the existing Chronic Buildings adjacent to it.
A continuance of the housing scheme for employees at this institute has been made and
plans prepared and quantities provided for same, also for a house for the Steward. At the
Colony Farm a piggery and root-house were erected.
New Westminster Mental Hospital.—A new building for occupational therapy and stores
was erected, besides several important alterations inside the Hospital Building, whilst the
Nurses' Home was completed during this year.
The upkeep and maintenance to both Mental Hospitals were carried out by this Branch.
Boys' Industrial School.—These buildings were completed and occupied during this year.
The grading around the building and the roads will be done during the forthcoming year.
Court-house, Prince Rupert.—The work on this building has steadily progressed during the
year and practically the whole of the work has been closed in.
Deaf, Dumb, and Blind School.—The late Boys' Industrial School at Point Grey was
remodelled and improved as a Deaf, Dumb, and Blind School, and I am more than satisfied
with the transformation brought about.
Oakalla Prison Farm.—The Warden's house was completed during this year and a most
creditable piece of work has been performed, considering that the work was done by prison-
labour, with the assistance of one or two guards. The upkeep and maintenance of thisl building
were also supervised.
Schools.—The twelve-room brick school at Armstrong was completed during this period and
the district is now in possession of one of the best-equipped schools in the Interior.
The following rural schools were also erected:   2 four-room schools;   1 three-room school;
2 two-room schools;   1 one-room school;   1 two-room addition;   8 one-room additions;   1 four-
room addition.
Sundry repairs were also carried out to various schools and heating improvements made
to others.
Liquor Stores.—The Department carried out the alterations and fitted up the Government
Liquor Stores around the Coast and places that were easily accessible from this office.
Tranquille Sanatorium.—A large amount of work was carried out at this institution,
including a new Nurses' Home, new cow and horse barns, silos, root-house, etc. The whole of
the existing buildings were repainted externally and considerable alterations and renovations
made internally to the various units, which has made a wonderful improvement to their
appearance and usefulness.
A start has been made on the rewiring of the older units under the direction of the Inspector
of Electrical Energy.
Government Agencies.—The maintenance and upkeep of the various Government Agencies
has been carried out and supervised by this Branch. The expenditure has not, however, been
heavy.
Other Government Buildings.—The upkeep and maintenance of other Government Buildings
and institutions have been carried out and supervised during the year, including Girls' Industrial
School and Normal School, Vancouver, and Old Men's Home, Kamloops.
Garages.—Three new garages were erected for the Engineering Branch of this Department at
Kamloops, Cranbrook, and Merritt.
Gaols.—Minor improvements and maintenance to various lock-ups and county gaols were
carried out during this year.
Assistance has been given to various cities and municipalities and Hospital Boards in
inspection of plans submitted by local architects to comply with Government regulations, and
in some cases plans and specifications have been prepared for these authorities, whilst assistance
has been given to other Government departments in their building problems.
There has been a distinct drop in building prices during this year, and in the forthcoming
fiscal year prices are expected to be normal.
In conclusion, I wish to thank you, sir, and the Deputy Minister for your kindly assistance
and interest in our work, and to the staff of this Branch for their whole-hearted support and efficient manner in which they have carried out their work.   I would also like to express my
thanks to Mr. Muirhead and Mr. Peck for their assistance and advice on many of our problems.
Photos of several of the important works carried out during this year are attached hereto.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Hi. Wthittaker,
Supervising Arclt itect.
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF BRIDGES' AND BUILDINGS.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., October 16th, 1922.
P. Philip, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the fiscal year 1921-22, as follows:—
Inspection of only the more important structures, or those known to be in need of renewal
or repairs, was carried out, and individual report made in each case recommending repairs or
renewals as occasion required. Three hundred and eighty-four bridges were thus inspected, in
addition to which I inspected a number of bridge locations, ferries, and river-bank erosion and
protection, which necessitated the travelling upwards of 18,000 miles. In the case of new
structures I have, as far as possible, made a personal examination of the proposed site,
preparatory to deciding on the lay-out, in addition to which the District Engineer sent in a
survey thereof.
Work on new structures has been carried out both by contract and day-labour, depending
on the location and extent of the work to be done.
Maintenance of existing structures has generally been carried out in a prompt and workmanlike manner by the several officers responsible.
The cost of materials has been somewhat lower than they were in the previous year, and
in consequence much work which was held over from last year has been carried out at less cost.
In order somewhat to check the extraordinary traffic passing over some of the bridges they
have been posted with load limits, but it must be understood that this can only be a temporary
measure in some cases, and that when being rebuilt they will require to be designed to meet the
new conditions.
In preparation for the erection of a new bridge over the Columbia River at Revelstoke, wash
borings were made on a line with Wilson Street at various points iu the river-bed during the
winter whilst there was ice on the river, and valuable information was obtained regarding the
substrata.
Vanderhoof Bridge over the Nechako River was raised a height of 4 feet by using 25-ton
screw-jacks and placing corbels and caps on top of the piers, thus increasing the water area and
lessening the danger of the bridge being carried away by driftwood.
The excessive floods of last October in a limited area along the Coast did considerable
damage to- bridges. Sooke and Coquitlam Bridges were completely carried away and damage
was dome to a number of others on Vancouver Island and Coast of Mainland. The Sooke Bridge
was immediately replaced; the length of the span was increased and every precaution taken to
prevent any further damage from flood. This flood also caused considerable damage to banks
of rivers, involving additional expense for protection of roads and bridges.
Replacing our wooden bridges by steel structures has not generally been considered justifiable
on account of the difference of cost in favour of timber, but since the reduction in the price of
steel the difference is much less, and I recommend that all the bridges on our permanent roads,
over the larger rivers, be renewed when necessary by steel and concrete.
A considerable number of bridges has been replaced by fills during the year.
I have inspected the more important ferries and approaches thereto and have found that
they have been kept in good order and an efficient service maintained.
Respectfully submitted.
T. Kilpatrick,
Superintendent of Bridges and Buildings. Rock Creek Bridge, No.  15-55, Greenwood District.
Cariboo District.    North Fork of Quesnel Iliver Bridge.    Completed.
I  13 Geo. 5
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19I4-IS       1915-16        1916-17      1917-18       1918-19       1919-20
Fiscal   \eart>
CORRESPONDENCE   CHART
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
1920-21
1921-22
general office 13 Geo. 5
Valuation of Plant, etc.
G 81
VALUATION OF PLANT, ETC.
Statement as at Maech 31st, 1922.
Electoral District.
Large
Plant.
Tools
Camp
Equipment.
Horses and
Harness.
Totals for
Equipment.
Totals for
Materials
on Hand
only.
Alberni   	
Atlin   	
Cariboo   	
Chilliwack	
Columbia   	
Comox    	
Cowichan   	
Cranbrook    	
Delta    	
Dewdney   	
Esquimalt    	
Fernie   	
Fort   George
Grand Forks
Greenwood   	
Islands   	
Kamloops   	
Kaslo   	
Lillooet  	
Nanaimo   	
Newcastle  	
North  Okanagan
North Vancouver
Omineca    ....;..
Prince Rupert  . ..
Revelstoke   	
Richmond   	
Rossland  	
Similkameen
Slocan  	
South Okanagan .
Trail 	
Yale 	
1
6,
lo,
14
5
14
17
18
15
8.
11:
20,
15,
6,
1,
9,
1.
24,
8,
5.
265 00
691 00
263 50
399 00
574 00
700 00
935 00
,881 00
449 00
,532 OO
,940 00
115 00
350 00
,485 00
,240 OO
,407 00
,931 50
910 00
,653 00
765 00
,010 00
,862 00
,033 00
268 71
308 00
,127 00
,666 50
668 00
,185 00
,333 00
857 00
,625 00
133 50
Totals    $335,562 71
50
50
1,389 50
2,727 50
1,444 25
205 00
1,401 00
3,0,00 00
897 50
1,442
432
732 15
3,044 75
610 75
2,478 05
550 OO
S70 00
831 25
2,204 48
1,290 25
532 00
384 O0
613 00
648 10
'501 85
1,364 50
3,664 75
1,861 72
193 50
76 25
2,049 00
1,949 50
412 00
1,079 60
1,758 40
$42,739 60
226 35
2,150 00
1,168 83
150 00
839 00
1,700 OO
250 00
1,429 OO
80 00
' 100 00
813 00
419 00
3,460 70
251 55
045 00
3,378 79
411 00
842 00
65 00
38 90
46 00
1,937 80
2,445 00
891 95
35 00
540 OO
1,037 00
284 45
734 50
1,842 85
$28,212 67
$ 1,115 00
2,265 00
260 00
4,845 00
2,450 00
500 00
5,830 00
120 00
128 00
1,110 50
$18,632 50
50
50
15
9,880 85
8,683 50
22,141 58
6,754 00
18,074 00
19.400 00
7,082 50
17,752
17,961
19,364
19,797 75
6,144 75
28,133 75
8,286 55
9,855 00
12,238 25
28,973 77
17,011 25
8,527 00
1,149 00
1,088 00
10.549 00
1,580 85
33.401 01
14,537 75
7,880 67
7,860 00
779 25
13,774 00
5,447 50
8,553 45
17,439 10
13,845 25
1,212 00
2,529 30
785 74
9'50 00
112 95
2,166 50
1,440 26
562 50 '
4,153 23
286 65
124 00
1,425 00
17 50
2,495 08
569 75
199 35
325 25
1,186 50
$425,147 48  j   $21,095 00
Grand total, plant, etc.   ...
materials only
$425,147 4S
21,005 CO ■
G 32
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
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STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE.
Salaries and Expenses.
Vote 240—Minister's Office.
Salaries     $      9,426 25
Expenses:
Office     $   720 89
Travelling      2,665 51
  3,386 40
Total     $    12,812 65
Vote 241—Administration.
Salaries      $    54,056 04
Expenses:
Office     $6,109 21
Travelling        3,445 01     "
 9,554 22
Total    $ ■ 63,610 26
Vote 242—Maintenance of Parliament Buildings and Grounds.
Salaries  $    55,390 84
Expenses:
Fuel and light     $26,961 90
Maintenance and repairs to buildings      24,650 08
Gardening and grounds         8.S45 56
Scavenging, cleaning, and janitors' supplies       2,813 59
Telephones'          1,098 37
Taxes          1,040 15
Insurance     11,100 00
Garage         2,598 44
Miscellaneous    106 99
         78,715 OS
Total   $  134,605 92
Vote 243—Maintenance of Government House and Grounds.
Salaries     if      3,601 25
Expenses:
Fuel, light, and water    $4,133 30
Maintenance and repairs to buildings      5,113 62
Gardening and grounds      S,551 34
Rent and taxes        449 28
Rent of Secretary's house        1,002 15
Insurance           580 00
Miscellaneous  '...'.        557 19
         20,386 88
Total    $    23,988 13 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. G 39
Vote 244—District Engineers.
Salaries     $    40,532 50
Expenses:
Office      $ 8,592 78
Travelling       13,374 05
21,966 83
Total   $     62,499 33
Vote 245—Steam-boiler Inspection.
Salaries      $    42,702 41
Expenses:
Office      $3,089 34
Travelling     6,273 61
Testing instruments  67 50
Launch        3,032 21
 12,462 66
Total  '   $    55,165 07
Vote 246—" Electrical Energy Inspection Act."
Salaries     $      5,873 25
Expenses:
Office     $   511 25
Travelling       1,168 92
 1,680 17
Total .'  $      7,553 42
Vote 247—" Factories Act."
(Under the Administration of Department of Labour.)
Salaries      $      6,310 00
Expenses:
Office   $   205 10
Travelling  2,252 51
  2,457 61
Total   $       8,767 61
Roads, Trails, Streets, Bridges, and Wharves, etc.
(Vote 24S.)
Roads, Trails, and Streets.
Alberni District.
Road—Bainbridge     ? 189 34
Bamfield     303 63
„       Beaver Creek    751 22
Biggs  17 00
„       Canadian Highway  5,268 16
Central Lake    519 95
Church    •  98 00
City of Alberni  •  708 52
City of Port Alberni    181 75
Claudet  28 °°
„        Commerford     56 25
„       Coombs   29 25 G 40 Public Works Report (1921-22).
A Iberni District—Continued.
Road—Dawson       $ 536 3S
Deep Bay    203 76
Dumont     143 45
Errington    522 25
Flores Island    99 00
Garden     1S8 00
Gilbert     290 75
Goose Harbour Lagoon   2,624 90
Grafton Avenue   272 89
Hillier's     344 62
Holberg   1,267 30
Island Highway     10,930 60
Jenkin's  73 75
Knight's    7 00
Lake Shore   3S1 87
Limestone     75 25
Morelle's  * .*  37 00
Nootka  238 00
Parksville Crossing     224 25
Port Alberni    133 35
Pratt's    '  126 00
Quatsino    688 75
San Josef Valley    273 51
Sea Otter Cove    287 14
Sprout Lake  922 21
Station    ' ,  220 50
Stewart     32 00
Stranby  856 32
Thompson     243 75
Toflno-Ucluelet     2,286 03
Wadey     150 72
Walker's   116 62
Winchester  245 75
Woodward    155 61
Wrotnowski     137 20
Minor Road—Auld     53 50
Barker     39 90
Batty      1 75
Bayne     65 28
Beaver Creek Wharf   162 75
Bellview  '  220 24
Best    4 50
Bigmore    60 38
Biological     219 25
Boorman     191 00
Brick Yard   65 50
Buck's  59 50
Cherry Creek  ;  125 75
Clark's     59 82
Compton  117 70
Corfleld   56 50
Departure Bay     101 75
Drinkwater     30 00
Dunn   113 50
Faber     171 25
Fern     159 25 13 Geo. 5                              Statement of Expenditure. ' G 41
Alberni District—Continued.
Minor Road—Fisher      $ 121 50
Giant Powder Co  69 00
Gilliflllan   23 00
Glanville     63 00
Grandview   29 00
„             Greenard     11 75
•  „             Hector   40 50
Jensen   13 88
„             Kitsuksis     77 50
Leffler   117 25
Maggie Lake   211 50
Malpas     4 50
„             Martindale     57 25
,, Matterson            ,'    67 50
Milltown     42 25
„             Mission    19 25
Moeillet     155 70
Moore's    37 36
„             Morrison     88 50
McCoy Lake   55 50
„             Mclvibben   71 50
North-west Bay   219 00
Popham     102 00
„            Price's   215 75
„   '         Pym's  67 00
„             Qualicum     8 75
River    27 25
Rupert     60 €0
„             School-house    49 25
Shearme    115 00
Shelley     57 75
Somers ■  92 37
Spooner's    22 00
„            Turner and Rutherford  69 75
View  74 01
„              Wellington   '.  106 52
Wither's     11 29
Wright's   140 25
„             Young's     69 75
Trail—Comox    56 34
Barclay     28 50
Post-office   68 50
Plant and tools  '  5,458 17
Camp equipment    53 99
Material    855 27
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $2,886 95
Office        1,410 36
Auto          712 61
 — 5,009 92
Garage     31 50
Total   $    50,017 44 G 42 Public Works Report (1921-22).
Alberni District—Continued.
Summary.
Expenditure    $50,017 44
Transferred to Bridges   303 77
Total     $50,321 21
Atlin District (North).
Road—Atlin-Surprise     $ 156 75
Big  Horn     200 00
Birch  Creek     49 50
Boulder Creek    93 50
„        Fourth of July-Fox Farm   5 50
Klehini River   550 00
„       Indian River ,  33 00
McKee Creek    173 25
O'Donnel River    99 00
Otter Creek     600 00
Ruby  Creek  187 00
Stephendyke    33 00
Spruce Creek    264 00
Volcanic Creek  206 25
Wright   Creek     57 75
Trail—Winter Trail-Portage  16 50
Street—Atlin     3S 50
„        Discovery     16 50
Plant and tools   *  373 00
Camp equipment    168 05
Material     98 70
Stable     846 01
Supervision—General Foreman    $2,208 50
Office     52 25
  2,260 75
Total  "  $ 6,526 51
Atlin District (South).
Road—Bear River     $ 4,944 11
„        Grease Harbour-Cranberry  (east)     200 00
.,        Grease Harbour-Cranberry   (west)     200 00
S tewart-Hyder   597 21
Trail—Ayansh-Sand Creek   '  44 65
„       American Creek '.  50 00
Bear-Nass     631 80
Bitter Creek   590 85
Glacier (west)     106 86
Illiance    3,962 25
Kincolith Wharf    490 71
Kitsault River    3,470 86
,,       Marmot River  608 70
Plant and tools   275 35
Camp equipment    350 60
Material  580 00
Supervision—General Foreman    $2,840 81
Office           228 32
  3,069 13
Total   $ 20,173 08
J 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 43
$
42 00
547 75
110 00
737 22
72 00
104 50
516 00
100 00
572 39
67 18
70 72
1 50
$      2,941 26
Atlin District (Telegraph Creek).
Road—Casca	
„       Dease-Telegraph  Creek   	
„       Glenora 	
Trail—Dease  	
„       Glenora   	
„       Klappan	
„       Teslin	
Thibert  Creek   	
Street—Telegraph  	
Plant and tools 	
Camp equipment  	
Supervision—Office   	
Total	
Summary.
North Atlin    $ 6,526 51
South Atlin    '     20,173 08
Telegraph  Creek          2,941 26
Total     $29,640 85
Cariboo District.
Road—Alexandria-Quesnel   $
„       Alexandria   (east)   	
„       Alexandria Ferry   	
„       Allen's 	
„       Alexis Creek-Nazko 	
„       Beaver Valley	
„       Barkerville-McCallum   	
„       Bear River-Fraser River	
„       Beaver Lake-Beavermouth  	
„        Bear Lake-Barkerville .'	
„        Barkerville Main   	
„        Cariboo Main 	
„        Chilcotin Main 	
„        Chilanko-Chezacut   	
„        Chilco'tin-Soda Creek 	
„        Dibbs-CottO'iiwood  Canyon   	
„       Dragon Lake  	
„       Hanceville-Alexis Creek  	
„       Harpers Camp-Quesnel 	
„        Mission  	
„       McLean's   	
„       North Star   	
„       150-Mile-Harpers Camp   	
„       137-Mile-Springhouse  	
„       108-Mile-Harpers Camp   	
„       158-Mile-Quesnel  Forks   	
„       152-Mile-Diversion   	
„       177-Mile-Beaver Lake  	
„       Peavine Ridge 	
„       Pleasant Valley-Antler 	
.,       Quesnel Forks-Keithley Creek 	
„        Quesnel-Nazko  	
,,       Quesnel Ferry  (east)   	
1,084 54
786 50
209 52
148 00
491 06
30 00
42 00
169 00
22 50
304 21
6,316 97
14,586 38
5,662 04
290 25
325 86
32 00
987 68
152 75
269 00
307 44
24 00
297 21
3,851 85
411 39
136 75
2,307 78
1,647 53
284 13
174 00
107 50
400 73
1,650 01
47 58 G 44 Public Works Report (1921-22).
Cariboo District—Continued.
Road—Quesnel-Quesnel Forks      $
„       Quesnel-Blaekwater   	
„        Quesnel Dam   	
„       Soda  Creek-Alexandria   	
„       Springhouse-Williams Lake   	
„        Soda Creek-Williams Lake 	
Soda Creek-Mud Lake	
„        Soda Creek Ferry 	
„        Soda Creek-Mackin Creek 	
„       Upper Horsefly  	
„        Winter   	
„       Williams Lake-Deep Creek 	
„       Williams Lake (south)  	
Trail—Goat River	
Street—Quesnel  	
Powder-magazine, Quesnel  	
Plant and tools  	
Camp equipment  	
Stable  	
Supervision—General Foreman    $2,783 25
Office           336 93
Auto           585 20
1.795
48
1,308
36
578
46
111
77
4,337
83
448
29
383 OS
173
74
445
30
1,438 45
370
86
276 00
SS
12
271
00
461
09
30
00
4,589
63
930
30
46 44
3,705 38
Total   $    65,347 74
Chilliwack District.
Road—General    $ 146.44
Abbotsford-Riverside    2,874 09
Abbotsford Townsite    771 96
Chilliwack River   432 94
Columbia  Valley     773 36
Huntingdon  Townsite     545 IS
Provincial Highway No. 1    2,662 66
Provincial Highway, No. 2  1,034 75
Provincial Highway, No. 5  3,210 04
Provincial Highway, No. 7  4,636 83
Provincial Highway, No. 10   2,676 SI
Provincial Highway, No. 11  2,917 49
Sumas Mountain   243 25
Vedder Mountain-Rock-quarry   163 79
Plant and tools    1,441 S8
Material    271 63
Supervision—Assistant  Engineer      $1,165 05
Office           240 04
Auto          490 50
Total 	
Columbia District.
Road—Adolph-Johnson   ,
„       Anderson   	
„        Arnold   	
,,       Athalmer   	
.,       Athalmer-Wilmer   	
1,895 59
?
26,698 69
$
45 00
24 50
325 50
404 88
99 00 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 45
Columbia District—Continued.
Road—Beard's Creek 	
Blaeberry School 	
Brisco	
Brisco   (south)   	
Cameron 	
Campbell   	
Canyon  Creek   	
Colin McKay   	
DeGeoTdie  	
Ellis and Stoddart ....
Findlay Creek  	
Flemstrom   	
Forster's Landing	
Golden-Donald   (lower)
Golden-Donald   (upper)
Graham   	
Granite	
Hartley 	
Holmes and Drakin  ....
Horsethief  	
Houlgrave  	
Hynes  	
Invermere  Siding   	
Johnston   	
Jolly	
Kettleson  	
Madden 	
Main Trunk   (east)   ...
Main Trunk (west)   ....
Miller   	
Mitchell   	
Moberly Branch   	
Moberly School  	
Mons   	
McBeath   	
Oberg and Johnston . . .
Ottason 	
Palliser  	
Paradise Mine   	
Ptarmigan Mine  	
Raugh  	
Red Rock   	
Sinclair Loop  	
Spence   	
Toby, No. 4   	
Toby Creek Cut-off	
Toby Hill   	
AVilmer Pontoon   	
Windermere  Cemetery
Windermere Loop  	
Wolfenden 	
Trail—Canoe River 	
Kootenay 	
Toby Creek 	
Street—Athalmer 	
Donald 	
79 00
45 69
465 75
36 75
264 16
386 65
110 OS
42 32
459 46
31 00
59 45
55 38
940 50
543 36
397 91
402 18
27 37
70 50
175 16
514 49
17 00
18 75
113 93
108 26
56 50
46 13
271 27
6,118 74
4,076 19
37 50
49 00
122 76
22 50
73 50
275 OS
27 25
699 18
42 21
923 81
67 00
76 50
2,193 91
50 62
69 75
1,239 42
535 43
50 81
36 00
15 00
2S3 55
51 00
17 50
53 00
97 50
97 85
3 75 Columbia District—Continued.
Street—Golden	
„ Invermere    ■	
,, Wilmer   	
Plant and tools  	
Camp equipment 	
Material	
Supervision—Assistant  Engineer     $2,545 26
Office        1,756 62
Auto          570 44
Total 	
Comox District.
Road—Alert Bay 	
„        Anderton   	
„       Back    .'	
„        Bristol's	
„       Burns and Parkin 	
„        Cache Creek-Shushartie 	
Cliffe's	
„       Comox-Hardy  ,	
„        Comox Hospital	
„        Concession, No. 1  	
,,        Concession, No. 2 	
,,        Cortes Island  	
„        Courtenay-Comox   	
„       Cowie, John  	
„        Creech   	
„        Cross,   Bridge's	
„      . Cross, Hodgson's 	
„        Cross,  Rennison's   	
,,        Cross, Ryan's  	
„        Cross,  Smith's   	
„        Cross, Union  	
„        Cumberland-Comox Lake 	
„        Cumberland-Courtenay   	
„        Cumberland-Dove Creek 	
„        Cumberland-Roy's	
,,        Demnan Island   	
„       Fraser and Harrigan 	
„       Hardy   	
„       Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour	
„       Higgins and Knight 	
„       Hornby Island	
„       Huband's  	
„        Hugh Marsden	
„       Kiiland's   	
„        Kirby   	
,,       Lake Trail, No. 52  '	
Lake Trail-No. 7 Mine  <	
„       Lake Trail-Power-house 	
„       Lasqueti Island  	
„       Lever's   	
„       Little River	
Lot  163   	
2.279 75
579 24
99 38
3,426 81
92 34
224 91
4,S72 32
$ 35,618 97
$    35
79
652
74
843 68
15
75
"  28
60
31 00
37 49
53
88
2
24
11
50
80S
54
621
77
1,261
85
173
47
871
80
20S
92
40
35
261
35
23
84
93
84
26 25
1S7
34
656
63
121 26
731
67
782
26
8
00
1
00
356
61
59
86
778
88
38 25
40
12
45
37
1
00
889
59
1,582
26
152
42
618 04
36 50
892
90
42
49 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 47
Comox District—Continued.
Boad—Lund-Malaspina  	
Lund-Powell River	
Malcolm Island  	
Marsden and Kilpatrick  	
Mary Island 	
Merville Settlement   	
Milligan and Parkins  	
Minto  School 	
Muir   	
Muir and Hawkins	
McQuillan and Piercy 	
Powell River-Cranberry Lake
Powell River-Grief Point   ...
Powell Lake-Olsen Lake	
Read Island  	
Redonda Island  	
Ryan and Hudson	
Salmon River 	
Sandwick-Bridge's   	
Savary Island  	
Section 33, Township 4	
Sharpe and Moore	
Smith and Ledingham   	
Texada Island 	
Torrent's   	
Tucker Bay School-house ....
Urquhart   	
Valdes Island 	
Victoria-Campbell River	
Plant and tools  	
Camp equipment  	
Material	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer
Office   	
„ Auto   	
Launch   	
$2,748 82
1,692 98
1,013 59
623 35
298
50
297
59
2
50
165
43
31
50
1,397
29
354
39
275
48
28
05
20
41
85
24
501
75
2,091 02
23
88
73
00
16
31
6
75
1,318
34
678
47
137 14
102
25
81
62
49
49
1,287
10
61
64
11
50
21
00
1,305
58
16,240
35
4,716
79
324
91
1,294
99
6,07S 74
Total    $    53,506 10
Cowichan District.
Road—General    	
Bazett  	
Beach   	
Bench   	
Bowden-Vaux    ,
Cameron-Taggart   	
Carvell-Jackson    	
Caven   	
Chapman   (new)   	
Chapman   (old)   	
Cherry Point  	
Cowichan Lake  	
Cowichan Lake (north)
Cowichan Lake (south)
Cowichan River	
119 12
120 50
9S9 29
79 15
11 50
340 38
77 07
19 00
130 00
117 60
196 46
3,992 38
98 00
232 50
477 25 G 48
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Cowichan District—Continued.
Road—Cuthbert   •	
„        Duncan  	
„        Fisher   	
„       Glenora  	
„        Glenora Crossing 	
„        Halhead  	
„       Hall and Hawkins 	
Hillbank   	
„        Hinks-Parry  	
„       Howie's   	
„       Indian   	
Kelly   	
Koksilah Flats 	
„       Koksilah-Riverside 	
„        Lakeside   	
„        Lane's  	
„       Manley 	
„       Marshall   	
Miller   	
Moss   	
„       McKinley-Doupe   	
Old Koksilah  	
„       Old School-house 	
„        Old Victoria  	
„        Pannell  	
„        Parker   	
„        Phipps   	
„        Riverside Drive 	
„       Rowe's   	
„        Sahtlam River 	
„        Shaw   	
„        Shawnigan-Mill^ Bay   	
„        Sheppard	
„        Silver-mine   	
„        Stevens  	
„        Telegraph   	
„       Victoria-Campbell River	
Wallich   	
„        Walter's  	
„        Wilkinson   	
„        Wilson   	
Trail—Clo-oose	
„       Cottonwood-Cowichan Lake  	
Street—Alder   	
Ditching and draining 	
Plant and tools  	
Camp equipment  	
Material 	
100 50
2SS 38
279 10
479 50
100 00
467 02
38 25
24 00
429 25
99 46
784 55
25 60
193 S3
247 90
307 SO
99 00
119 25
165 50
110 00
14 88
24 50
1,145 35
394 00
832 68
10 00
45 00
43 00
194 25
13 00
255 01
34 00
4,536 34
52 00
76 50
97 00
415 S5
8,509 68
52 75
427 00
229 50
19 50
79 50
16 00
45 00
2,335 74
2,844 40
120 90
10 54
  $   861 15
Total 	
...'        683 99
2,038 10
                 . $
36,423 12 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 49
Cranbrook District.
Road—Baker  Estate   	
Bett's   	
,.       Booth Creek  	
„       Brander   	
.,        Cranbrook-Baker Mountain 	
.,        Cranbrook-Gold  Creek   	
„       Cranbrook-Kimberley 	
„        Cranbrook-Kingsmill   	
.,       Cranbrook-Mission  	
„        Cranbrook-Moyie 	
„        Cranbrook-New Lake   	
Cranbrook-Wardner  	
,.        Curzoii Junction-Kingsgate  	
Eager Hill-Fort Steele  	
„       Gold Creek Settlement 	
„        Green   	
.,       Green Bay 	
„       Ha-ha Creek 	
„       Hanson-Campbell	
„        Horie Subdivision 	
Kelly 	
.,       Kimberley-Cherry Creek  	
„       Kimberley-North Star 	
„       Kimberley-Sullivan Mine  	
Kootenay Orchards 	
„       Macdonald Dairy   	
„       Meadowbrook Settlement  	
Miller	
„       Mission-Fort Steele  	
„       Mission-Marysville  	
,.       Mission-Wasa  (lower)   	
Mission-Wasa   (upper)   	
„       Moyie-Goatfell  	
„        McKenzie Mill  	
„       McPhee   	
Peghin   	
„       Perry Creek  	
.,        St. Joseph Prairie	
„        St. Mary Lake 	
Sullivan Mine   	
,,       Tunnel   	
„        Wanklyn  School   	
„       Wasa Bridge-Canal Flats  	
„       Wattsburg-Weaver  Creek   	
Wycliffe Branch  	
Wycliffe-Cherry Creek  	
-Perry Creek 	
St. Mary River 	
t—Kimberley 	
Staterville  	
Wardner   	
Yahk 	
and tools 	
equipment  	
4
Trail-
Street-
Plant
Camp
85 30
168 50
55 13
75 00
23 26
1,993 40
7,222 07
6 50
543 45
4,632 19
155 SS
6,493 84
1,351 40
2,236 92
101 32
47 00
297 63
60 00
17 75
50 00
69 26
280 68
371 03
75 10
33S 21
6 50
214 32
222 00
1,034 50
154 45
59 25
469 31
4,222 09
89 63
81 14
224 63
246 50
717 14
1,290 32
273 90
155 09
972 54
1,487 60
1,335 84
374 24
53 88
144 50
49 36
315 06
349 83
72 26
565 88
3,447 15
634 71 G 50 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Cranbrook. District—Continued.
Material    $ 422 SO
Cranbrook Garage  2,367 31
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,463 25
Office     88 55
Auto           796 60
  3,348 40
Total    $     52,152 95
Delta District.
Road—General   $ 2 80
County Line    400 00
New Westminster Bridge Approach   '.. .. 115 60
Pacific Highway    4,061 94
Provincial Highway, No. 1   1,591 59
Provincial Highway, No. 1a   4,249 49
Provincial Highway, No. 2    7,022 49
Provincial Highway, No, 3    1,123 57
River     ,  200 00
Spur at Cloverdale   80 89
Towline     1,000 00
White Rock-Ocean Park    400 00
Plant and tools    3 00
Material   150 00
Gravel-pit     500 00
Supervision—Assistant Engineer,      $1,076 57
Office           123 22
Auto         340 90
  1,546 69
Total  	
Dewdney District.
Road—General  	
„        Athey '	
„       Baker   	
Chell	
„        Cedar Valley  	
.,        Dewdney Trunk Road, Section 1 	
„       Dewdney Trunk Itoad,  Section 2  	
,,        Dewdney Trunk Road,  Section 3   	
„       Dewdney Trunk Road, Section 4  	
.,        Dewdney Trunk Road, Section 7  	
„        Dewdney Trunk Road,  Section 8  	
„       Dewdney Trunk Road, Section 9  	
.,        Farm's   	
„       Hatzie Front Road 	
„        Hawkins    .-.
„        Hyde and  Baker   	
„        loco 	
„       Johnston   	
Lot 16, Group 1 	
„        Lower Road, Coquitlam  	
„       Macaulay 	
,,     . Malcolm  	
„       Mission-Stave   Lake   	
$ 22,448 06
$   133
65
9S
50
7
00
49
00
178
17
160 46
5,132 90
2,594 35
407
75
551
11
1,704
70
224
55
528
61
1,025
75
82
50
119
SS
190
25
213
75
25
38
603
75
59
50
97
75
210 50 13 Geo. 5                              Statement of Expenditure.
G 51
Beivdney District—-Continued.
.-■■'■ $
5,318 09
66 00
36 00
99 00
1,110 98
80 18
142 50
230 50
583 49
2,425 77
300 00
1,307 57
264 00
1,314 23
9 00
832 75
64 50
58 50
160 38
462 38
4,268 98
24 55
3,253 47
„       Rusfein-Stave Falls  	
„        Salvaster  	
Shook   	
Smith   	
„        Stave   Falls   	
,,        Sterling	
Office   	
Total 	
   $1,730 11
        721 02
        801 74
   $
36,818 58
236 05
4 50
25 00
10 00
35 00
66 00
25 75
126 75
19 00
1,660 04
135 38
69 50
49 00
705 48
85 25
40 25
21 15
26 00
331 36
24 50
Summary.
$36,818 58
249 83
Total	
.  $37,068 41
   $
Esquimau District.
Albert Head  	
Glintz    '	
L Esquimalt District—Continued.
Road—Coldstream 	
„        Grant   	
„       Hammond   	
i „       Happy ATalley 	
Hart   	
„        Helgensen's  	
,,       Helmcken   	
,,        Island Road (Port Renfrew)   	
„        John Creek 	
„        Jordan River  	
„       Kemp   	
„        King's 	
„        Lagoon  	
„        Luxton-McKenzie  	
. „       Maple Avenue   	
„        Metchosin   	
Miller   	
„        Millstream 	
„       Millstream Lake  	
„       Milne	
„        Murray   	
Neild 	
Otter Point 	
Phillips	
„        Plowright	
„        Porier	
„        Quarantine   	
„        Robinson   	
„        Rocky Point  	
„       San Juan (east)  	
,,        San Juan  (west)   	
„        Shirley   	
„        Sooke   	
„        Sooke River  	
„        Sooke Wharf Approach 	
„        Station  	
„        Summit   	
„        Sylvester	
„        Swannick 	
Taylor	
Thetis Lake	
„        Vancouver Island Trunk   	
„       Victoria-Campbell  River   	
„        Whittaker	
Wright   	
„       Young's Lake	
Trail—Elliott's   	
Plant and tools 	
Camp equipment 	
Material  	
Supervision—General Foreman    $1,286 10
Office      1,167 43
Auto     662 92
Total 	
978 41
120 00
25 00
1,126 81
30 00
12 00
25 16
90 50
116 38
1,480 29
156 00
91 40
54 50
17 88
107 13
1,000 70
45 00
180 39
996 51
25 00.
7 50
24 00
602 43
80 75
18 75
37 60
141 15
17 25
397 48
358 39
70 50
659 74
3,566 17
235 38
12 50
230 56
1,731 25
64 25
36 25
27 80
119 55
4,729 25
612 00
49 00
84 75
41 51
36 00
2,125 83
42 00
908 63
3,116 45
$ 30,565 69 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. G 53
Fernie District.
Road—General   $ 17 00
Beard's  50 63
„       Bechtel Ferry  156 95
Bridge's Settlement    128 25
„       Brulotte    84 75
Bull River-Fort Steele   2,315 00
Bull River  (south)     1,225 91
Cokato Settlement    460 38
Elk Valley  10170
Elko-Morrissey     4,202 76
Elko-Roosville    1,298 17
Elko-Waldo  1,405 04
Fenwick   139 52
„       Fernie Cemetery   82 25
„        Fernie City Park  146 75
Fernie-Coal Creek   2,529 44
„       Fernie Dairy    340 88
„       Fernie-Hosmer  3,316 35
Fernie-Lizard Creek  4 75
„       Fernie-Morrissey      951 24
„       Flagstone-Gateway   243 16
Flathead Valley   2,236 85
„       Fort Steele-Columbia    2,054 87
„       Fort Steele-Wildhorse   365 13
Hosmer-Michel  2,302 78
Jaffray-Elko      1,419 69
„       Michel-Crowsnest     3,902 87
„       Morrissey Railway Crossing   167 63
McDougall     62 84
Waldo-Flagstone    1,316 16
Wardner-Bull River     2,438 50
Wardner-Jaffray    ],34S 15
Trail—Sand Creek  . 361 48
Street—Bull River    252 68
Elko     420 90
Michel      45
West Fernie  149 75
Plant and tools   4,S05 16
Camp equipment    525 78
Material   1,574 29
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $1,895 27
„ General Foreman       1,088 75
Office        1,481 79
Auto      1,485 56
Total   $    50.85S 21
Fort George District.
Road—General     $          67 90
Aleza Lake-Newlands    735 82
Bevier    632 21
Bobtail Lake-Upper Mud River  •  50 00
Braeside   702 34
Campbell-Hulatt    1,105 93
Carr's     15 00 G 54
Public Works Eeport (1921-22).
Road-
Fort George District—Continued.
-Chilko Settlement     $ 356 50
Crescent Lake   387 75
Oullerton     150 00
Dunster-Tete Jaune   15 00
Eaglet Creek-Giscome   484 73
Eaglet Lake-Willow River     40 00
Encombe  30 00
Engen  (north)  1,586 23
Erickson     97 00
Finlayson    -    449 50
Foreman's  156 00
Fort George-Blaekwater   631 00
Fort George-Chief Lake   632 00
Fort George-Hazelton    9 95
Fort George-Isle de Pierre   640 35
Fort George-Willow River   333 75
Fort Fraser-Stella    78 50
Francois Lake Settlement    1,630 39
Giseome Station  (south)     266 50
Goose Country    130 00
Hammond     68 00
Hemmingville-Canoe River    264 29
Henderson    8 00
Hulatt   (south)     327 05
Kelly  250 00
Mapes     954 35
Miworth   (south)  8 00
Mount Robson    257 50
Mud River  (south)     752 10
McBride-Cariboo     1,234 27
McBride-Dunster     8 00
McBride (east)     1,047 38
Ness Lake   773 43
Nithi River   96 00
Nulki Lake-Corkscrew Creek  265 10
Poole  200 00
Schaefer     699 06
Shelley (north)     2 10
Stuart Lake-McLeod Lake     151 00
Vanderhoof  (east)  14 50
Vanderhcof (south)     189 90
Vanderhoof-Stuart Lake   4,304 88
Vanderhoof-Sturgeon  Point     1,669 71
Webber Lake   441 80
West Lake  140 00
Williams   200 25
Willow River    1,194 73
Willow River-Giscome Portage    162 83
R.A., No. 11, Peace River   313 52
R.A., No. 13, Peace River   30 96
R.A., No. 14, Peace River    13 50
R.A., No. IS, Peace River    1,899 30
R.A., No. 20, Peace River    1,473 35
R.A., No. 22, Peace River    59 21
R.A., No. 28, Peace River    402 61
R.A., No. 30, Peace River   123 43 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 55
4,144 11
154 00
308 00
152 25
6,470 67
3,083 17
4,089 82
14,906 86
400 32
200 00
9,679 46
$    75,003 12
Fort George District—Continued.
Road—R.A. No. 77, Peace River	
Trail—Fort St. James^Manson Creek	
Street—McBride	
„ South Fort George  	
Plant and tools 	
Camp equipment  	
Material  	
Stable  	
Powder-house	
Purchase of horse	
Supervision—General Foreman    $5,948 52
Office        1,286 80
Auto     2,444 14
Total   ,	
Summary.
Expenditure    $75,003 12
Transferred to Bridges        1,607 50
Total     $76,610 62
Grand Forks District.
Road—Bear Creek-Pass Creek 	
Cascade-Fife 	
„       Cascade-Laurier   	
„       Cascade-Paulson   	
„       Christina Lake (west)   	
„       Deep Creek-Boundary Lake   ;	
„       English Cove-Head of Lake  	
„        Fife-Christina Lake 	
„        Grand Forks-Carson  (north)   	
„        Grand Forks-Carson  (south)   	
„        Grand Forks-Cascade (north)   	
„        Grand Forks-Cascade  (south)   	
„        Grand Forks-Franklyn  	
„        Grand Forks-Hardy Mountain  	
Grand Forks-Pass Creek  	
„        Grand Forks-Summit City 	
Mill Creek 	
„       Moody Creek-Cascade  	
„       Morrissey Creek (east)   	
„       Morrissey Creek  (west)   	
„       Norway Mountain-Paulson   	
„        Pass Creek-Rock Candy 	
„       Phoenix-Greenwood  	
Sub-lot 152  	
Sub-lot 184-1475   	
Sub-lot 500  	
„        Sub-lot 519 .'	
Sub-lot 534  	
„       Sub-lot 535	
„        Summit City-Phoenix   	
„        Sutherland Creek-Fife   	
Trail—Christina Lake ..-	
1,796 65
1,755 42
108 50
705 01
28 00
304 50
98 00
72 50
84 50
272 45
2,135 75
155 52
1,598 80
337 50
1,197 43
1,379 17
30 00
192 25
461 87
42 00
115 50
35 00
52 50
30 75
32 00
102 50
45 00
177 25
15 00
22 50
936 87
171 50 G 56
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Grand Forks District—Continued.
Plant and tools	
Camp equipment  	
Supervision—General Foreman    $2,234 85
Office           179 81
Auto          467 83
Total 	
Greenwood District.
Road—General  	
„       Anaconda   	
„       Baker Creek 	
„        Beaver Creek 	
„       Beaverdell Station   	
Boltz  	
„        Boundary  Creek   	
„       Bridesville-Molson   	
„        Camp  McKinney-McLean's   	
,,       Camp McKinney-Rock Creek 	
„        Camp McKinney-Sidley   	
„        Caron   	
„        Deadwood-Copper Camp 	
„       Eholt-Moore   	
Eholt-North Fork 	
„        Eholt-Summit 	
„        Fillmore  	
„        Greenwood-Eholt   	
„        Greenwood-Midway   	
„        Greenwood-Phoenix   	
„        Hartley-Phoenix   	
„        Ingram Mountain  	
„        Johnston Creek  (east)   	
„        Kerr Creek  	
,,       Kettle River (east)  	
,.        Kettle River  (main)	
„        Kettle River   (west)   	
Lett's Sawmill  	
„        Link Creek	
„       Long  Lake-Jewell   	
,,        Lynn  Creek   	
„       Meyer Creek 	
„       Midway-Rock Creek 	
McCarren Creek  	
„       Nicholson Creek	
„        Oxley   	
„       Rock Creek-Myncaster  	
Rock Creek-9-Mile 	
„        Rock Mountain	
„        Rock Mountain-Bridesville	
„        Rock Mountain-Myncaster	
„        Sally Mines	
„       Sidley Mountain  	
„       Twin Creek   	
Trail—Carmi-Penticton 	
958 57
35 00
2,882 49
$  18,36S 25
52 00
15S 00
87 50
397 50
313 25
158 50
169 25
390 61
89 50
131 25
295 50
167 75
117 00
7 00
60 50
387 00
110 00
726 25
898 10
634 30
97 50
316 50
14 00
338 2S
137 50
1,907 60
1,064 25
244 00
68 00
115 50
424 00
280 00
1,644 81
384 00
615 45
95 00
1,449 60
2,396 52
553 20
277 25
581 50
340 25
503 75
97 00
50 00 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 57
•Greenwood District—Continued.
Trail—Lightning Peak	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—General Foreman
Office   	
„ Auto   	
$2,306 00
184 71
1,408 SO
Islands District.
Road—General   	
Gabriola Island—
Road—Centre  	
Cross 	
„       Culvert's   	
East   	
„        Eastholm   	
Elgie   	
„       Horseshoe   	
„       Main   	
School 	
„       Taylor 	
„       Wharf Approach
Galiano Island—
Road—Bluff   	
Burrill   	
Cook   	
„       Gardiner  	
Main  	
„       Montague 	
„        Morgan  	
„       North End	
„       Retreat Cove   . ..
Mayne Island—
Road—Gallagher  	
Horton Bay	
Main   	
Point Comfort   . .
Village Bay	
Waugh   	
North Saanich—
Road—Bazau Bay	
„       Beacon Avenue  .
Birch   	
„       Bradley Dyne   . .
„       Breed's Cross  ...
„       Centre 	
„       Downey   	
East   	
„       Horth Cross  	
Maple   	
„       Marine Drive ...
„       Meadlands 	
„       Mount Newton ..
Queen's Avenue .
School Cross	
262 00
340 39
3,899 51
Total   $    23,848 12
3 50
251 06
60 50
9 23
422
04
12
25
34 35
14 00
359
40
17
50
136 00
152
88
49
50
128
50
16
25
24 00
170
75
102 00
32 00
260 00
205
75
89 50
150 00
347
75
300 00
181
00
75
00
80 00
13S
72
137
51
247
25
292
14
38 00
so
75
,351 04
156
75
170
63
51
75
241
63
259
63
54
75
93
75 G 58
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Islands District—Continued.
Road—Swarts Bay 	
„       Victoria   	
West  	
„       Wilson   	
Street—Fifth   	
Sixth  	
Third   	
North Pender—
Road—Boat Harbour 	
„       Browning  	
„        Clam Bay   	
„       Hooson's   	
„       Hope Bay  	
„       James Point  	
Otter Bay   	
„       Port Washington	
Wallis Point 	
South Pender—
Reads—Boulder  	
„        Crane's	
„       Spalding's   	
Wharf 	
Saltspring  (North) —
Road—Atkins  	
Blackbourne   	
Beddis   	
Canal   	
Cranberry   	
Divide  	
Fernwood	
Ganges Wharf Approach
Hereford Avenue	
Lower Ganges   	
Mansell   	
McFadden   	
North  End   	
Rainbow    	
Robinson   	
Rossman   	
Tointec  	
Tripp  	
Upper Ganges   	
Vesuvius   	
Wilkinson   	
Saltspring (South)1—
Road—Beaver Point	
Burgoyne Bay  	
Crusher Bins   	
Garner's  	
Hill and Branford 	
Isabel Point  	
General    	
Saturna Island—
Road—Deep  Bay   	
General  	
46
50
20
90
,431
88
22
25
78
95
19
00
94
55
145
51
92
00
355
26
275
00
,292
81
20
00
319 50
95 00
70 00
94 00
86 00
162
75
23 00
20
00
41
85
251
03
46 00
339 25
768 82
24
50
346
75
167 20
746 97
69 00
81
00
253
S7
99 00
140 00
125
00
4 25
136 00
209 53
166
00
429
50
572
02
705
16
511
51
42
00
51 00
359 25
307
71
642
90
55
45
J 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 59
35 81
162 00
120 93
18 82
207 00
1,920 20
858 77
3,528 81
Islands District—Continued.
Thetis Island-
Road—Andrews  	
„       Culvert's	
„       Main	
Wharf	
„       General 	
Plant and tools  	
Material	
Supervision—General Foreman    $2,432 00
Office           867 49
Auto           229 32
Total  ..
Kamloops District.
Road—General  	
„       Adams Lake	
„       Armour  	
„       Barriere River	
„       Beaton-Fish Lake 	
„        Birch Island-Lost Creek 	
Blind Bay-Eagle Bay 	
„       Bulman-Fraser-Palmer   :	
„        Campbell .Creek  	
„        Campbell Meadows	
„       Carlin Gulch 	
„       Celista   	
„       Chase Creek 	
„       Cbase-Kault-Salmon Arm  	
„       Coal Creek  	
„       Copper Creek 	
„       Douglas Lake-Grande Prairie	
Ducks-Monte Creek	
„       Ducks Range  	
Falkland-Todd Hill  	
„       Ferguson-Hazelhurst 	
„       Fruitlands   >    ....
,,        Harpers Camp  	
Heffley Station   	
„        Kamloops-Chase   	
„        Kamloops-Nicola   	
„       Kamloops-Savona  	
„        Kamloops-Shuswap North   	
„       Kamloops-Tranquille   	
„       Knouff Lake	
„       Lac du Bois and branches 	
„       Lackenby Station-Douglas Lake	
„       Long Lake and branches 	
„       Louis Creek  	
„       Mamit Lake  	
„       Mobiey-Tappen   	
„       North Thompson  (east)   	
„        North Thompson   (west)   	
Notch Hill-Blind Bay-Greer 	
Notch Hill-Chase   	
27,148
41
305
50
1,081
71
120 40
114
00
237 00
2S5
30
1,308 04
228 05
265
20
521
SO
309
39
1,775
51
2,161
31
1,311 02
200 00
29
00
225
25
52
02
1,494 40
638
61
465
10
250 00
244
33
97 00
2,772
17
2,981
70
2,186
68
1,470
97
1,945
71
721
00
279
10
96 90
525
2S
2,455
22
187 00
1,047
75
5,493
46
7,490
88
488
35
200 00 G 60 Public Works Report (1921-22).
Kam loops District—Continued.
Road—Notch Hill-Sorrento Wharf    $ 606 80
Notch Hill-Tappen  751 52
Notch Hill-West Squilax   172 25
Oxley Valley     350 00
Paxton Valley     454 00
Peterson-Betts   '  28 09
Reserve Creek   2,205 60
Rose Hill (new)      210 50
Rose Hill  (old)     453 50
„        Salmon Arm Municipality    1,039 S5
„        Squilax-Anglemont    4,353 00
Squilax-Turtle Valley   300 00
Strawberry Heights   *  495 32
Sullivan  Valley-Vinsulla     280 04
„       Sunshine Valley  375 00
Tappen-Carlin    484 07
Todd Hill-Grande Prairie    1,404 41
White Lake  161 00
Trail—Savona-Copper Creek  66 00
Street—Chase  808 57
Plant and tools   6,342 09
Camp equipment    1,750 33
Material    783 10
Stable    343 32
Winter feed, 14 horses   '... 642 93
Kamloops Garage  7,321 SO
Supervision—General Foreman    $2,269 45
Office           960 00
„ Auto         777 74
  4,007 19
Total     $     S0,2o2 4S
Summary.
Expenditure     80,252 48
Transferred to Bridges          437 80
Total   '.  $S0,690 2S
Kaslo District.
Road—Ainsworth   (north)      $ 113 25
„       Ainsworth (south)     2S6 50
Alice     53 00
Argenta     160 8S
„       Beach  68 75
Bluebell    '.  76 12
„       Boswell-Kuskanook     154 50
Boswell-LaFrance    392 89
„        Canning     144 75
Canyon-Porthill     762 22
Corn Creek  100 00
Cory     57 50
„       Crawford Creek  298 57
„        Creston-Erickson    1,164 34
Creston-Goatfell  3,34S 55
„        Creston-Goat River    15 00 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 61
Road-
Kaslo District—Continued.
-Creston-Kuskanook 	
Creston—Lister   	
Creston-Summit  	
Dellie   	
Duncan River (east)   	
Elsie-Holmes 	
Ferguson   	
Gardner   	
Grey Creek-LaFrance  	
Hamil Creek 	
Haskins   (east)   	
Hood-Medf ord   	
Hope  	
Houston   	
Howser-Argenta   	
Howser Station  	
Jackson   	
Kaslo-Ainsworth .-	
Kaslo Creek  (North Fork)   	
Kaslo Creek (South Fork)  	
Kaslo  (north)   	
Kaslo-Zwicky  	
Koehle   	
Lardeau River (east)   	
Leach 	
Lindsay 	
Little 	
Lynchville   	
Mclntyre   	
MeMurtrie 	
Nettie L	
Peters  	
Pilot Bay 	
Queen's Bay  	
Queen's Bay-Balfour 	
Samuelson  	
Simmons   	
Swanson  	
Tangye   	
Taylor  	
Trout Lake  	
Trout Lake  (east)   	
Etica 	
Wadd	
Whitewater 	
Wigan 	
Williams 	
Wilmot	
Woodberry Creek  	
-Beaver 	
Blue Ridge	
Brown Creek   	
Canadian   	
Cooper Creek  	
Daisy	
Trail
3,834 26
429 50
569 24
16 87
57 75
219 92
1,407 25
116 50
232 78
11 25
63 45
48 87
24 50
1,172 32
263 89
30 00
60 75
2,024 42
65 25
52 72
547 20
442 16
7 50
26 25
323 62
130 88
337 37
318 71
78 75
425 00
21 24
50 00
86 25
5 99
124 70
67 50'
11 25
■ 150 00
34 63
38 75
951 00'
15 00
310 63
97 25
81 00
129 37
25 00
13S 15
247 S7
37 50
IS 75
22 50
5 00
41 25
52 50 G 62 Public Works Report 11921-22).
Kaslo District—Continued.
Trail—Elsmere   $ 3 75
Emerald Hill     19-50
Ethel    10 00
. ,.        Gainer Creek     15 00
Great Northern    20 00
.,       Howser Lake (east)  . 22 75
Lardeau River (North Fork)     22'50
.,        Lardeau River (South Fork)     11 24
„        Lockhart Creek    50 62
Lucky Boy  30 00
Old Gold •  3 75
„        Poplar Creek  7 50
Silver Glance   8 25
„        Spring Creek  57 75
Triune  10 00
Walker    48 75
Win-slow   35 00
Street—Creston    .•  1,033 62
,,         Ferguson  18 75
Kaslo ..■    ' 105 75
„         Lardeau    7 50
,,         Trout Lake    58 75
Plant and tools  2,748 09
Kaslo Tool-house '.  5 00
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,952 60
Office            36 60
  2,989 20
Total    $    30,641 85
Lillooet District.
Road—Big Bar   $ 100 25
Big Bar-Big Bar Mountain  .  40 50
Big Bar Ferry   89 75
„        Big Bar-Grinder-Kostering    152 75
„        Big Bar Mountain  80 75
Big Creek   45 50
Bonaparte  133 00
Bridge Creek-Horse Lake  3,016 27
Bridge River     3,591 69
„        Bridge River Canyon   101 50
Canim Lake-McNeill    '  487 50
Canoe Creek-Churn Creek  102 50
Cariboo Main   11,439 59
„        Cayoose Creek    2 50
Chilcotin Main  3,469 11
„        Churn Creek-Hanceville   12 75
Clinton-Alkali  2,112 43
Clinton-Alkali via Kelly Lake   418 12
Clinton Station  .'  143 25
Colton   15 12
Criss Creek   674 25
„       Deadman Creek   155 25
„        Empire Valley  215 50
Fawn  3 50
„       Fountain Valley  56 00 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 63
Lillooet District—Continued.
Road—Hanceville-Stone      $ 5 25
Hat Creek   1.172 SO
„       Jones-Dickey     705 00
Lillooet-CIinton    i 2,901 03
Lillooet-Lytton     3.645 13
„        Lillooet-Seton Lake   483 75
Lillooet Station    360 87
„       Mound-Loon Lake    71 75
„       Mound-Upper Bonaparte     91 00
„        McKinley-Hamilton-Ogden     38 00
„       McKinley-Horsefly     17 50
North Bonaparte  341 00
North Fork  . 1,781 09
„       100-Mile House-Canim Lake   585 25
„       Raphael-Pigeon-Mason     160 90
„        Riske Creek-Gang Ranch     50 75
Roe Lake   297 00
„       Roe Lake via Hanson    160 00
Scottie Creek    54 50
„       South Bonaparte  80 75
Tatla Lake     186 00
„'      Tranquille-Criss Creek    9 00
Upper Big Creek     54 00
„       Upper Hat Creek    611 70
„       Veden-Chilcotin Mouth    56 00
„       Watson's     347 15
Wqods Bay-High  Bar     64 50
Trail—Gunn Creek   702 50
Pavilion Ferry   21 00
West of Fraser    16S 25
Street—Clinton     277 77
Lillooet    137 55
Plant and tools   '.  3,285 35
Canip equipment   1,167 61
Stable   ,  612 74
Supervision—General Foreman      $3,002 70
Office        1,229 10
Auto     1.073 71
  5,305 57
Total    $    52,669 34
Summary.
Expenditure     $52,669 34
Transferred to Bridges  136 16
Total      $52,S05 50
Nanaimo District.
Road-^General  $ 78 00
Brechin    100 50
„       Departure Bay   647 81
„        Ditching and draining   628 59
„       Extension   175 60
„        Fielding and House  103 50
Five Acres  1,313 18 G 64
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Nanaimo District—Continued.
Road—Harewood	
Holden-Corso   	
Island Highway 	
Jingle Pot  	
Newcastle Townsite  	
Old Victoria 	
Raine's 	
Richardson   	
South Wellington    ■	
Victoria-Campbell River 	
Street—Machleary 	
„        Nicol	
Plant and tools  ■	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer     $760 00
Office      140 00
Auto          84 43
Total
Nelson District.
Street—Fairview 	
„       Rosemont	
„        South Nelson    "	
Plant and tools	
Supervision—'General Foreman    $180 00
Office         10 00
.   Total
Newcastle District,
Road—General    	
Adshead   	
Barnes	
Beck's  	
Bennie's, Xellow Point
Brenton	
Cameron  	
Code's   	
Ditching and draining
East Wellington	
Extension 	
Fiddick's   	
Haslam	
Heemer	
Hill-Michael-Doole  ...
Holden-Corso   	
Jingle Pot  	
Lockner   	
Michael and Doole
Old South Wellington
Quennell	
South Forks  	
South Wellington
Thatcher	
243 00
120 00
2,710 27
170 00
199 00
2 70
29 00
35 00
993 60
2,653 86
45 00
530 45
463 99
984 43
$
12,227 48
$
20 00
686 60
S67 S2
265 49
190 00
2,029 91
54 00
40 00
125 00
L,931 41
430 32
166 00
74 50
108 50
527 00
405 08
796 95
50 00
234 00
459 47
23 50
681 12
432 55
455 00
63 00
163 10
142 50
317 13
566 65
18 50 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 65
Newcastle District—Continued.
Road—Thomas, Yellow Point  $ 429 51
„       Victoria-Campbell River   8,544 07
Waterloo     973 70
Weigle  •  14 50
„       Wilgress    10 50
Plant and tools  506 53
Supervision—Assistant Engineer     $804 83
Office       609 68
Auto  .230 64
  1,645 15
Total    $    20,389 24
New Westminster District.
Road—D.L. 172   $      1,001 28
North Okanagan District.
Road—Alber's Range   $ 3 50
Bass  22 50
Big Horn   21 75
„        Bluenose     145 00
Boleau Creek     169 06
„        Cameron Point   3 62
„        Carlin Orchards   54 75
Cedar Hill   17 25
Coell-Jones     14 06
.,        Commonage    12 50
„        Creighton Valley    353 00
„       Deep Creek and branches  1,255 19
„        Deep Creek-Salmon Arm '  437 53
Eastside    229 77
East A^ernon    665 25
Edgar  1,365 18
„        Emery    11 25
Enderby-Mara     1,199 90
„        Fortune (new)   ■.  36 00
Fowler-Willett    2,889 39
Gibson  99 25
„        Glenemma-Armstrong     291 82
Glenmary  389 75
„        Grandview Bench    6S4 38
Grindrod   423 53
Grindrod (west)    •  24 87
Hadow  11 25
Harris Creek     294 12
„       Headgates and branches   124 13
Inch Logan    26 00
Kamloops   •  4,538 51
Kelowna   S,354 96
Keddleston   98 50
Keddlestone (north)    35 00
L. and A. Subdivision    629 95
Long Lake •  391 70
„        Loon Lake  423 4S
Mabel Lake-Enderby  2,614 61
Mabel Lake-Lumby     W47 9S G 66 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
North Okanagan District—Continued.
Road—Mara Lake   $       1,031 55
„       Mara Lake-Sicamous   5 00
Matthews  •  9 00
Miller     122 13
Mine    .'  314 00
Monashee   3,841 23
Monk's     9 00
„       Morgan's    ,  144 00
Mud Lake    28 00
Mud Lake (east)    99 76
,.        Okanagan Landing    1,499 50
Old Mission  10 75
Old Spallumcheen   100 63
Old Upper   84 75
Oyama Fruit Lots  215 60
Pillar Lake  ■  24 68
.Pleasant Valley   2,660 87
Pyatt   311 40
Riverside     393 38
„       Ruck's  •  3 50
„        Salmon Arm-Enderby    705 35
„        Salmon River-Enderby    13 50
Salmon River Valley    819 74
Salt's   186 75
„        Shuswap Avenue (south)     86 00
Shuswap River Drive    169 50
„        Smedik    557 31
Squaw Valley   160 50
Sugar Lake  574 S9
Sullivan's   7 00
Trinity Valley  511 07
„       Tronson    •  4 50
„       Vernon-Enderby     185 00
Ward's     24 25
Warren Creek     47 29
Westside     870 54
Whttevale Subdivision   248 90
Woods Lake ,  48S 07
Wolfgang    150 90
Street—-Lumby Village    19 50
Plant and tools   3,247 68
Noxious weeds   102 05
Gravel-pit     300 00
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $2,373 85
Office        2,005 22
Auto          760 82
  5,139 SO
Total  	
North Vancouver District.
Road—Bargain Harbour 	
Beach Avenue (east)	
„       Beach Avenue (west)  	
„       Beach Drive  	
Bowen Island Trunk  	
$
50,740 05
$
150 50
166 75
232 50
155 00
363 81 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 67
North Vancouver District—Continued.
Road—Bridgeman  	
Carter	
Cemetery 	
Chamberlin  	
Chaster 	
Cowan 	
D.L. 1316 	
D.L. 1622 	
Dyke 	
Gambier Island 	
Gibson-Seechelt 	
Gower Point	
Grafton 	
Green   	
Green Lake	
Hanbury   	
Healy   	
Hintza   	
Judd	
Kearton   	
Langlois  	
Lockyer   	
Lower  	
Magee  	
Marine Drive 	
Mason	
Miller   	
Mintie    .	
Moodyville 	
McLaughlin	
North   	
North-west Bay 	
Old Cariboo  	
Paradise Valley	
Pemberton Meadows ...
Pemberton Portage ....
Porpoise Bay   	
Pratt 	
Reid 	
Roberts Creek   	
Scarborough   	
Squamish Valley 	
Trunk  	
Trail—Egrnont 	
Nye   	
Redroof   	
Saginaw  	
Plant and tools 	
Gamp equipment  	
Supervision—General Foreman
Office   	
„ Auto	
„ Launch   	
$1,959 79
523 34
2 85
56 68
41 00
30 00
56 25
114 38
25 00
25 00
150 00
31 00
169 65
90 13
2,579 58
70S 20
198 25
7 00
25 00
.50 00
110 00
. 50 00
24 00
7 00
256 00
61 25
59 73
6 75
225 00
68 50
26 00
S5 75
87 50
7 74
112 80
598 00
89 25
97 50
2,870 86
242 63
140 00
34 50
121 75
260 25
82 75
3,689 S3
113 50
198 50
133 08
4 50
47 50
6S3 58
17 55
2.542 66
Total   $    18,525 21 Oniineca District.
Road—Adams Settlement   $ 199 87
„       Ailport-McDonald   51 50
„       Aldermere-Pleasant Valley     1,744 S8
Bedore Settlement  281 01
Bourgon Settlement    300 00
Buck River   116 87
Colleymount  953 93
Cronin  '.  618 37
„        Day Lake  56 25
Driftwood Creek   241 05
Eakin  Settlement     278 36
East Round Lake   500 00
„       Endako-Francois Lake    500 20
Forrestdale Station  140 00
Glen Meadow-Salmon Creek    33 75
Hazelton-Aldermere    1,379 56
Hazelton-Skeena Crossing    927 79
.Heal-Norris  934 48
Hubert-Babine-Dome Mountain  •.  1,064 79
Hudson Bay Mountain  192 50
„       Hynes Settlement    542 68
Keefe's Landing-Ootsa Lake   3,876 25
Kispiox Valley   1,580 95
Lawson Settlement   99 37
Main Fraser Lake  4,776 78
McCabe Settlement   160 87
McClure Lake Cut-off  1,000 00
„        McKilligan Settlement   355 41
Neale Settlement  2,138 71
New Hazelton High Level    18 00
North Francois Lake  4,881 78
North Round Lake   577 12
Ostram Settlement    112 50
Palling  Station     193 62
,.        Pleasant Valley-Francois Lake    1,764 69
Poplar Park    525 00
„       Raymond Settlement  191 25
Rosenthal   260 00
Silver Standard   7 50
,,        Smithers Bridge-Hudson Bay Mountain  1,047 00
„        Smithers-Canyon Creek     510 11
Smithers Cemetery   72 25
.,        South Side of Decker-Palling   57 37
,,        South Hazelton-Comeau Settlement    45 00
Telkwa-Canyon Creek   1,497 82
Telkwa Collieries     585 48
Telkwa Cut-off  '  1,500 00
Telkwa-Howson Creek     24 37
Uncha Lake    4,014 30
Wakefield   300 87
West End of Franeois-Ootsa   >  963 87
West Side of Bulkley (Chicken Lake-Teikwa)    903 24
West Side of Bulkley (Moricetown-Chicken Lake)     2,071 03
West Side of Kispiox River  300 00
„-      West Side of Skeena   21S 75
„        Widen Settlement    202 50 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 69
Omineca District—Continued.
Trail—Ground Hog  $ 298 00
„       Manson Creek  441 50
Street—A Street, Telkwa  27 50
„         New Hazelton  50 61
Smithers   383 67
Plant and tools    3,482 38
Camp equipment   1,41S 97
Material    1,220 41
Stable   i  8,118 12
Supervision—Assistant Engineer  $3,262 50
Office        2,183 12
Auto         707 78
,                                                                                                      6,153 40
Total    $    69,496 06
Prince Rupert District.
Road—Anaham-Chilcotin    $ 167 60
„        Anaham Lake     175 50
Ardagh    492 12
Bohler's     13 68
Brackenridge-Copper City    911 13
Braun's Island   34 93
Canoe Crossing    1,508 S9
,.        Cedarville-Kitwanga     1,897 69
Clayton   37 50
.,        Clayton   (north)     147 50
Collison Bay-Thunder Inlet  99 50
Copper City-Kitimat  2,254 92
Corlette  274 68
Delkatla-Chown Point        .      2,909 12
Duncan's  64 00
Fiddler Creek-Doreen Station   65 00
Firvale   153 25
Gold Creek-Usk  48 80
Graham     240 00
Hagensborg     2,594 39
Johnston     100 25
Keith     113 00
Kitimat  86 87
Kitsumgallum Main    1,441 64
,.       Kitsumgallum-Terrace   545 50
„        Kitwanga-Andimaul   193 87
Kitwanga-Nass  75 00
Kitwanga Wagon  213 50
Kircaldy  30 00
Manskinisht-Kitwanga     1,220 84
Merkley     135 01
Moore-Donald  5 00
McLeod     196 50
McPherson   2,335 05
Nadu River   273 50
„       Port Clements-Mayer Lake   896 73
„       Port Clements-Nadu •  277 50
Saloomt  67 75
„        Sandspit-Copper Bay   271 06 Prince Rupert District—Continued.
Road— Skidegate-Queen Charlotte City   $ 333 75
Skidegate-Tlell   3,164 04
Smith Island  306 20
Stillwater     103 50
„     . Stonie-Atnarko   108 90
Terrace Ferry  670 75
Usk-Vanarsdol      4,699 33
Viger   10 46
Waterfront     1,277 65
West Settlement    251 25
Xakoun Point-Tow Hill  93 75
Trail—Beaver River  168 00
Cannery     24 00
Copper River    851 15
Egan's   199 91
Gold Creek •  1,503 55
„       Honan River •  28 13
Legate Creek     179 95
Oona River    660 39
Salt Lake  540 85
Silver Lake  •  268 50
Thornhill Mountain         '       150 OO
Street—Bella Coola    294 74
Masset  28 50
Port Clements •  66 00
Port Essington   , 959 61
„        Port Simpson    1,456 74
Terrace   1,760 20
Plant and tools  1,854 91
Camp equipment  575 65
Material   7,165 58
Stable    188 86
Powder-magazine, Delkatla     11 55
Supervision—General Foreman      $2,476 37
Office    '.  61 50
  2,537 87
Total  	
Revelstoke District.
Road—Approach to South Pass Bridge 	
Approach to Woods Bridge	
Arrow Lake  	
Arrowhead Mill 	
„       Arrowhead (north)  	
„       Asbestos Claims, near Sidmouth	
.,       Beaton-Camborne  	
Beaton—Comaplix	
Beaton—Trout Lake  	
„        Big Bend 	
Bowle-Solsqua  	
Craigellachie-Malakwa   	
Craigellachie-Malakwa (north)   	
,,       Deep Water Landing 	
Edwards   	
„       Erickson	
$  55,062
98
$   114 00
55
55
379
50
1
00
1,459
68
50
00
198
70
264
75
1,547
92
1,846
54
259
00
288
35
218
42
491
19
41
25
12
25 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 71
Revelstoke D istrict—Continued.
Road—Evans   	
„       Fish River	
5-Mile (south)  	
,,       Galena Bay Logging  	
„       Galena Bay (south)  	
„       Halcyon  	
.,        Hall's Landing  (north)   	
„        Hall's Landing (south)  	
„        Lennard's	
„       Malakwa-Bowie   	
„       Malakwa   (local)   	
Montana Slough	
„       Nelson   	
Nicol  	
,,       Olson's   	
,.        Revlestoke   (east)    	
„       Revelstoke (local)   	
.,       Revelstoke (south, via Fourth Street)   	
„        Revelstoke  (south, via Fourth Street)   	
„        Revelstoke (south, via Eighth Street)  	
„       Revelstoke (south, west of river)   	
„       Revelstoke (west)  	
•„        Samuelson	
Siltas	
6-Mile (south)	
,.        Solsqua-Bowie  	
,.        Solsqua-Sicamous	
,',        Sommerville   	
Taft-Craigellachie	
„      Wigwam	
Williamson Lake	
Trail—Beatrice	
.,     Big Bend Main	
Carnes Creek 	
Goldfinch  	
Halcyon   	
Pool Creek  	
Roseberry	
Silver Creek 	
Turner	
Street—Arrowhead	
„ Beaton   	
Plant and tools 	
Camp equipment 	
Material 	
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,535 52
Office        237 20
Auto      1,309 25
Total 	
Richmond District.
Road—General  .'	
„       Approach, Lulu Island Bridge	
Marine Drive  	
41 50
238 96
67 00
92 50
278 60
67 50
272 61
287 00
62 00
943 93
774 33
715 01
75 75
35 25
72 14
1,401 93
629 47
3,912 02
3,912 02
902 34
890 08
5,120 63
8 75
209 27
3,340 28
98 75
314 14
11 09
120 64
389 38
10 75
14 25
750 25
36 00
39 75
40 00
302 13
12 00
58 00
400 00
153 90
11 90
1,100 04
67 15
436 13
4,081 97
$
36,130 83
$
156 00
925 17
2,488 16 Richmond District—Continued.
Road—No. 3   $      2,36S 63
„        University  194 54
Plant and tools   426 81
Supervision—General Foreman    $892 13
Office      489 82
Auto     107 70
Total  ,  $
Rossland District.
Road—General 	
„       Amiable School -.	
.,        Big Sheep Creek 	
Columbia-Kootenay ■	
Dechamps (north)   	
Deer Park 	
,.       Drake's	
„        Merry	
.,       Rock Creek 	
Rossland-Paterson   	
,.        Rossland-Trail (new)   	
Rossland-Trail (old)  	
Stony Creek  	
,.        Violin Lake 	
Trail—Dewdney	
Plant and tools 	
Supervision—General Foreman   $180 00
Office        85 05
1,489
65
$  8,048 96
$    131
09
85
00
411
60
22
50
370
07
111
25
117
50
10
00
220
42
1,375
99
3,586
28
150
03
295
37
269
20
52
50
120 69
265 05
Total    $
Saanich District.
Road—Admiral's Cross 	
,,       Burnside	
Cadboro Bay	
,.       Dean  	
Gorge   	
Holland   	
Mount Newton	
.,       Observatory	
,,        Ross-Durrance 	
Plant and tools	
Supervision—Auto	
Total    $      5,784 27
Similkameen  District.
Road—General   $ 271 02
'Allison-Copper Mountain    41 25
Armstrong Ferry  101 00
Beaver  Lake     58 00
Bowe's Subdivision   5 75
Cedar Creek    28 50
China Creek    34 50
$   7.594
54
$   210
^5
431
57
1,500
00
5
00
1,290 00
12
75
300
,00
886
so
1,050
09
96 50
1
25 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 73
Similkameen District—Continued.
Road—Copper Mountain   $ 722 9-4
„       Dalby Meadows   47 75
Darcy Mountain  45 00
Deer Valley     27 50
Dog Lake  12 00
Fairview-Keremeos     421 00
„       Fairview—McKinney-Rock Creek    3,695 90
Fairview-Osoyoos     729 00
Fairview-Pentioton   4,825 93
„        Fairview-Vaseaux     69 00
Fairview-White Lake  519 50
Farleigh   21 25
5-Mile  228 09
„        Granite-Coalmont    184 50
Granite Mountain   4 50
Hedley-Princeton  1,385 46
Hembre Mountain  11 50
Hope-Princeton    39 00
Kaleden Townsite   65 75
Kaleden-Okanagan Falls  197 75
.,        Keremeos Creek Crossing   80 00
Keremeos-Hedley    \ ..  598 80
Keremeos Junction   1,013 90
Keremeos Station  457 02
Kruger Mountain   180 50
Lowe's Subdivision   1,705 56
Marron Valley    312 05
McLean Creek   12 00
Myers Flat-Okanagan Falls  299 50
1-Mile   .......  442 94
Osoyoos Orchards  12 25
Osoyoos-Sidley Mountain   398 75
„        Osoyoos-Similkameen    439 50
Penticton-Carmi     56 00
Penticton-Fish Lake  2,604 60
Penticton-Naramata   372 22
, Penticton-Summerland     850 25 '
Penticton Trunk  270 00
Princeton-Otter Lake  2,129 25
Princeton-Stevenson Creek  70 00
Princeton-Tulameen   18 50
Richter Mountain   51 50
Shingle Creek     437 50
Similkameen City-Burr  91 00
South Keremeos  306 75
South Similkameen   1,017 65
Sterling Creek  63 00
Summers Creek   125 00
Tulameen-Summit City   225 50
Trail—Hedley-20-Mile   29 50
Hope   230 00
Street—Hedley  3S 50
Keremeos  28 00
Okanagan Falls   51 25
Princeton   768 57 G 74
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Similkameen District—Continued.
Plant and tools	
Camp equipment  	
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,489 35
Office     1,023 54
Auto         818 26
3,276 93
298 15
4,331 15
$ 37,487 54
Summary.
Expenditure  $37,487 54
Less transferred from Bridges    24 96
Total   $37,462 58
Slocan District.
Road—Appledale   $ 13 00
.,       Applegrove-Slierwood  58 45
Arrow Park        154 40
Beaver Creek    403 06
.,        Black Prince  Ill 75
Brook's ,  27 49
Burton City  40 00
Cariboo Creek  102 63
Columbia River (east)     2,270 37
Columbia River (west)     663 45
Crescent Bay    130 65
,.        Edgewood Cemetery   21 87
„       Edgewood-Vemon   1,524 69
„        Ferret's  7 50
4-Mile Creek   1,353 21
Goat Creek    72 25
Harrison     157 64
Hewitt Mine   17 50
Jacob's    23 62
Jordan  1 88
Lemon Creek    40 00
Little Slocan River   25 50
McCormack   100 00
Nakusp-Box Lake  124 99
'„       Nakusp (east)    '.  7 50
Needles-Fire Valley   289 32
,,        New Denver Canyon    18 70
„       New Denver-Bosebery   391 95
New Denver-Silverton  634 98
New Denver-Three Forks  3,051 09
„     ■ Noonday Mine  8 75
North Fork of Carpenter Creek   137 73
Passmore    44 87
Payne Mines  48 75
Red Mountain  857 68
„        Republic Mine    11 25
Ruth Mine     95 00
Sandon-Cody     156 00
„  ;    Sandon Flume  1,512 28
Sandon-Three Forks  644 66
Sandon Town   308 56 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. G 75
Slocan District—Continued.
Road—Shakespeare Avenue  $ 50 50
Slocan River (east)     1,328 52
„        Slocan River  (west)     612 39
„        Slocan  Star     55 00
Springer  Creek  667 60
„        Standard Mine     68 75
10-Mile  Creek     164 41
Trussell's     25 00
„       Van Roi   33 75
West Demars   26 25
Whatshan  31 82
New Road—Bird's Landing   5 25
„             Carroll's Landing    232 50
„              Young's  724 54
Trail—Broadwater     24 50
Chieftain     15 00
Cinderella     30 00
8-Mile-10-Mile     20 00
„       Farquier-Applegrove     9 38
Hampton     25 00
Hope  50 00
Jo-Jo     30 00
„       Kooskanax   47 70
,,       Lemon Creek     150 25
Lightning Creek     58 13
Lone Bachelor   30 00
Millie Mack     64 89
„       Mountain Creek     26 25
Myrtle  15 00
Reco     55 '61
Sunimit-12-Mile    50 63
Sunset  •  97 50
,,        Surprise     25 00
Tamarac   167 00
10-Mile Creek   73 00
Wakefield   25 00
Street—Nakusp     1,037 79
„       New Denver      ' 575 30
Renata    ■  97 84
Silverton     91 09
Plant and tools  576 02
Supervision—General Foreman    $2,7S5 75
Office        790 87
  3,576 62
Total   $    26,825 75
South Okanagan District.
Road—General     $      1,829 75
Arawana  48 00
Atkin's     32 25
Bathville    "  5 00
Bear Creek    99 00
Belgo Subdivision   681 77
Benvoulin     2,043 80
Bulman   175 50 G 76
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
South Okanagan District—Continued.
Road1—Dark's Hill-Meadow Valley    $
Fox   	
Gallagher 	
„       Gellatly-Lake Shore	
Glenmore Subdivision  	
,,       Glenmore Aralley 	
.,        Glenrosa Main  	
„        Guchigan   	
„       Hydraulic Creek 	
Joe Riche	
,.       Joe Riche-Clemeiit's Ranch 	
„        Kelowna-Vernon   	
K.L.0	
K.L.O.  Subdivision  	
,,       Lake Shore 	
,,        Lewis Bailey  	
,.       Meadow Valley  	
MeDougal Creek  	
,.        McKinley  Wharf   	
Naramata   Subdivision   	
North Naramata 	
„       Oceola	
,.        Okanagan Centre Subdivision 	
Peachland-Princeton   	
Penticton-Naramata  	
Roxby  	
„        Rutland  Subdivision   	
.,        Scotty  Creek   	
Shingle  Creek   	
/,.        S.K.L. Fruit Lots  	
,,       South Okanagan and branches	
.,       Summerland-Meadow Valley   	
„       Summerland-Peachland   	
Spencer's   	
Spier's   	
Three Lake Valley	
,.       Trepanier and branches 	
,,       Westbank-Kelowna Ferry  	
,.        Westbank-Peachland  	
Westbank Subdivision 	
Westbank Subdivision  (old)    ,	
.,       Westside	
„       Woodlawn Subdivision	
Woods Lake 	
Street—Naramata Village  	
„       Richter 	
Plant and tools 	
Camp equipment  	
Material   	
Supervision—General Foreman     $3,032 45
Office        2,164 10
Auto           918 24
Total   $
42 88
9 4S
15 00
377 75
1,240 25
117 75
125 00
81 50
344 75
114 50
93 62
1,418 60
596 75
426 65
164 30
230 00
S18 50
48 00
49 50
794 50
42 50
377 25
1,893 90
64 00
487 00
811 62
955 82
49 50
17 25
74 25
265 21
42 2;"i
3,423 IS
199 87
104 75
112 50
42 50
955 SO
316 10
9 51
372 25
816 00
26 50
845 87
200 50
136 00
1,407 61
50
10 25
6,114 79
32.289 38 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 77
156 00
161 00
514 20
1,727 11
South Vancouver District.
Road—General  	
Kingsway  	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—Assistant  Engineer    .'   $1,063 40
Office           287 63
Auto         376 08
•
Total	
Trail District.
Road—Cain's-Bear  Creek   	
,.        Columbia Gardens Subdivision 	
Dundee   •	
„        East Robson (north)   	
Emerald Mine   	
.,       Free Silver Mine  	
„        Fruitvale—Pend  d'Oreille   	
Fruitvale  Subdivision   	
„        Granite   	
.,        Granite-Beasley   	
Granite Mill	
.,        Green City	
.„       Harrop-Procter   	
.,        Knox   	
.,       Kootenay River  	
Lambert's Mill  ,	
,,       Lost Creek	
Mollie Mine       ....
„       Nelson-Balfour   	
.,        Nelson-Fort Sheppard 	
„        Nelson-Waneta   	
„        Pass Creek  	
„        Pend d'Oreille	
„        Queen Mine •	
„        Salmon River  	
Second Relief  	
Silver  King   	
„        Slocan  River   	
• .,        Trail-Castlegar   	
„        Trail-Fort Sheppard  	
Trail-Fruitvale Cut-off	
„        Trail-Sayward   •	
„        Trail-Smelter Junction  	
„       Upper Granite  	
„       Yellowstone  	
.,        Ymir Mine   	
„       Ymir Townsite 	
„       Yrnir-Wilcox	
Trail—Bayonne Mine   	
Bolietti's   	
„       Dewdney   	
„        Kokanee   	
Street—Procter   	
„ Salmo   	
Plant and tools 	
$  2,558 31
$   106 86
470 85
54 50
64 12
1.61 62
61 00
204 31
56 10
2,677 74
29 38
58 12
225 00
620 SS
831 02
3,164 38
112 75
370 13
151 75
' 6,569 79
5 00
5,727 21
54 00
6S6 62
64 25
478 11
32 00
216 00
1,085 96
4,725 62
G5 00
104 98
731 37
518 92
356 56
1,331 21
122 25
500 77
307 75
57 50
98 61
15 00
41 75
66 40
570 48
2,554 50 G 78 Public Works Report (1921-22).
Trail District—Continued.
Camp equipment     $ 122 45
Nelson Tool-house   513 69
Supervision-—General Foreman     $2,004 65
Auto          483 S5
  2.488 50
Total   $ 39,641 82
Yale District.
Road—Aberdeen Mines   $ 30 00
„       Anglesey Estates     37 50
„        Ashcroft-Spences Bridge     67 00
Back Valley    69 00
Barnes  Lake  128 25
Bate's     43 30
„        Benjamin   117 50
Botanic Creek     407 05
Cache Creek-Savona    1,212 31
Cain Valley   401 94
Cariboo   1,503 93
Chaumoix     511 30
„        Cisco    96 35
Coldwater  926 91
Collettville    327 62
Cornwall     162 05
,,       Coutlee Mountain   110 15
Coyote  Valley  35 00
.,        Cumming's     152 90
Davidson     76 70
„ •     Deadman Creek   134 23
„       Douglas Lake-Quilchena     61 00
8-Mile     118 84
Evans     50 00
Farrell     250 00
Fish Lake    253 05
5-Mile  165 89
George's   ft .. 70 00
Gladwin  86 45
„        Grande Prairie     1,144 85
Haig-Yale     200 25
Harrison Hot Springs   504 72
Highland Valley   ,  692 62
Hope-Haig  127 01
Hope-Rosedale  3,203 80
Hope-Yale    13 50
Iron Mountain  49 00
,,        Kamloops   '  801 47
,.       Kane Valley   59 15
Leise    162 45
Lindley Creek     131 80
Lindley Creek—Midday Valley   318 50
Lindley Creek-Shulus  104 50
Lytton-Lillooet     2,261 83
Mamit Lake   '.  1,128 15
„       Manning-Thacker    19 85
Marshall  13 35 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. G 79
Yale D istrict—Continued.
Road—Matthews     $ 7 00
Merritt-Kamloops     2,383 39
Merritt-Princeton     1,850 43
Midday Valley    84 35
Mill Creek   88 75
Mitchell  165 68
Murray Creek     277 85
McKay     14 00
Nicola-Kamloops     38 25
Nicola-Princeton Cut-off   403 90
Othello     107 39
Otter Creek     1,356 21
Petit  Creek     218 30
Pike Lake    52 90
„        Savona  161 45
Silver Creek   219 88
Spences Bridge-Boston Flats        . 2,635 15
Spences Bridge-Merritf     5,575 25
Sunshine Valley     . 76 90
Upper Hat Creek    554 75
Upper Venables Valley    180 00
Venables Valley   225 00
Voigt Valley   250 25
Walhachin   37 75
Winch   407 08
Yale     587 50
Trail—Princeton "  363 85
Summers Creek  28 00
Street—Ashcroft     165 75
Hope     556 90
Lytton  93 00
Plant and tools    2,105 02
Camp equipment    602 38
Merritt Garage    .*  4,150 43
Merritt Powder-house    192 11
Stable    139 43
Supervision—j\ssistant  Engineer      $2,826 65
Office           982 14
Auto        1,113 OS
  4,921 87
Total    $    49,821 12
Bridges.
Alberni. District.
Alberni, No. 1     $             5 00
Alberni, No. 2     ,          28 00
Alberni, No. 3     25 75
Alberni, No. 4    81 10
Alberni, No. 6  113 38
Alberni, No. 8     S 05
Alberni, No. 9    27 00
Alberni, No. 10    30 00
Alberni, No. 11     .         24 20
Alberni, No. 12     541 07 Alberni District, Bridges—Continued.
Alberni, No. 19   $
Alberni, No. 22  	
Alberni, No. 23   	
Alberni, No. 24    .'	
Alberni, No. 25  	
Alberni, No. 26	
Alberni, No. 27	
Alberni, No. 28   	
Alberni, No. 29   	
Alberni, No. 30  	
Alberni, No. 32   	
Alberni, No. 34  	
Alberni, No. 35   	
Alberni, No. 36  	
Alberni, No. 44, Cherry Creek	
Alberni, No. 56  	
Alberni, No. 57  	
Alberni, No. 58  	
Alberni, No. 85    _	
Cape Scott, No. 1  	
Cape Scott, No. 2  	
Cape Scott, No. 3 	
Cape Scott, No. 4  	
Cape Scott, No. 5	
Cape Scott, No. 6 	
Cape Scott, No. 10	
Cape Scott, No. 11  	
Coombs, No. 1  	
Coombs, No. 2      ...
Coombs, No. 3  	
Coombs, No. 4   	
Coombs, No. 5  	
Coombs, No. 6  	
Coombs, No. 7   ,	
Coombs, No. 8  	
Coombs, No. 9  	
Coombs, No. 10   :	
Coombs, No. 12	
Coombs, No. 13   '	
Coombs, No. 14  	
Coombs, No. 15	
Coombs, No. 19  	
Errington, No. 1	
Errington, No. 2  	
Errington, No. 3  	
Errington, No. 4  	
Errington, No. 5  	
French Creek 	
Holberg, No. 13  	
Holberg, No. 16 	
Holberg, No. 17   ,	
Holberg, No. 23  	
Holberg, No. 28	
Holberg, No. 38 	
McCoy Creek, No. 37	
10 OO
13 57
220 09
7 25
26 25
16 25
51 31
10 12
28 57
43 00
4 00
7 00
7 00
77 06
677 71
115 19
347 40
21 8S
30 60
7 25
7 25
7 25
36 50
22 50
74 00
2 13
16 87
19 10
4 50
38 90
8 50
8 00
8 50
15 50
10 00
10 50
21 50
5 50
10 00
4 OO
16 00
1.15 OO
89 00
30 75
83 13
14 50
39 75
86 00
33 00
515 24
252 00
2 00
2 00
2 00
1,756 33
J 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 81
Alberni District, Bridges—Continued.
Nanoose, No. 2      $ 25 30
Nanoose, No. 3    31 80
Nanoose, No. 5     15 05
Nanoose, No. 6     574 32
Nanoose, No. 7    32 30
Nanoose, No. 8    11 25
Nanoose, No. 9     152 88
Parksville, No. 1  127 40
Parksville, No. 2   14 50
Parksville, No. 3   13 06
Parksville, No. 4    336 14
Parksville, No. 7   67 03
Qualicum, No. 3   8 00
Qualicum, No. 4     38 00
Qualicum, No. 6    19 50
Qualicum, No. 7    642 59
Qualicum, No. 8    35 50
Qualicum, No. 9  20 20
Qualicum, No. 11    31 00
Quatsino, No. 1    11 25
Quatsino, No. 2  27 50
Quatsino, No. 6    42 50
San Josef,  No. 2     16 00
San Josef, No. 3  156 32
Spruce, No. 193   7 35
Strandby, No. 1    '  70 00
Strandby, No. 2    18 00
Strandby, No. 3     17 50
Strandby, No. 4  20 50
Strandby,  No. 5  53 25
Tofino, No. 1  114 61
Toflno, No. 2     177 03
Ucluelet, No. 2     12 20
Ucluelet, No. 4    9 15
Ucluelet, No. 5  6 15
Wellington, No. 1    67 25
Wellington, No. 6  212 3S
Clayoquot Wharf (trestle)   (approach)     302 24
General    92 70
Total   $      9,602 45
Expenditure    $9,602 45
Less transfer from' Roads         303 77
Total  $9,29S 68
Atlin District.
North Atlin—
Big Horn Road, Nos. 1 and 2    $ 200 00
Gold Run, No. 14   *  11 00
Half-way, No. 15   5 50
Pine Creek  • • • 200 00
McKee Creek, No. 22  11 00
Stephendyke, No. 32     11 00
8 Atlin District, Bridges—'Continued.
South Atlin—
Alice Arm Road (trestle)    $ 856 84
American  Creek     917 75
Bear   River     2,576 11
International   290 25
Muddy Gulch    460 00
Camp equipment   • 18 SO
Material   31 30
Plant and tools   72 75
Telegraph Creek—•
Casca, No. 49   78 00
Casoa, No. 50  72 00
Casca, No. 51  177 16
Tahltan, No. 61    183 62
Total     $      6,173 OS
Cariboo District.
Antler, No. 5    $ 265 50
Australian  Creek     710 70
Arras   135 00
Baker     47 00
Bear Lake, No. 174    S3 50
Bear River, No. 13   78 50
Beaver Creek    102 55
Big- Lake    66 05
Blackwater    •  20 00
Borland Creek    115 96
Bullion, No. ICO     143 62
Buckskin Creek, No. 154  148 75
Copeland's, No. 39   2,427 66
Deep Creek, No. 42  50 00
Deep Creek, No. 45   485 70
Deep Creek, No. 164   137 27
Dry Gulch, No. 50  21 00
Eagle Creek     36 00
8-Mile Creek  85 50
First Creek  263 00
4-Mile, No. 69   94 00
4-Mile, No. 73   343 67
Goose Lake, No. 155    84 00
Goose Lake, No. 156    97 00
Granite Creek    50 00
Horsefly Mine Road  76 65
Horsefly, No. S5  511 33
Keithley Creek     543 65
Lemon Creek  55 00
Lynn    64 25
Morehead, No. 162  88 49
Mclnnes, No. 168   148 62
McLeese, No. 175  1  46 50
Nazko    16 00
Ninds     53 00
North Fork of Quesnel River  14,923 52
147-Mile Post, No. 137    149 00
177-Mile Post, No. ISO  195 75 13 Geo. 5                                Statement of Expenditure. G 83
Cariboo District, Bridges—Continued.
Onward, No. 166  '..  $ 125 00
Peters Creek, No. 176  36 00
Poquette    92 04
Quesnel, No. 97  1,403 20
Quesnel Lake Dam (protection)    2,498 28
Rocky Creek  126 30
Sacker Creek    99 90
Sheridan Creek  105 12
Snowshoe    116 75
Soda Creek   51 00
South Fork of Quesnel River  76 05
Vimy    128 00
West Creek, No. 5   232 OO
Whitestone  46 75
Williams Creek, No. '150   47 00
Williams Lake, No. 136  254 00
General  !  42 50
Total   $    28.443 58
Chilliwack District.
Abbotsford   $ 31 70
No. 3   2,400 59
No. 9 ,  74 69
No. 21   261 36
No. 22   41 65
No. 23  3 55
No. 24  28 06
No. 25   578 87
Riverside Road    26 25
Vedder Road  3S8 42
Yale Road  509 70
Total   $      4,344 S4
»
Columbia District.
Abel Creek  $ 22 88
Athalmer, No 68  21 31
Anderson, No. 82  20 19
Arnold, No. 182    20 38
Blaeberry  (upper)     3 75
Blaeberry  (lower)     176 00
Briscoe  521 86
Bugaboo   169 00
Calipeen    435 01
Campbell Road, No. 81     33 88
Canyon Creek  631 25
Carb-Spruce, No.  110    287 41
Chee, No. 179   235 14
Dejordie, No. 174  154 77
Dutch Creek   574 23
Eidelweiss   156 26
Findlay Creek   48 25
Goldie Creek     1077
Horse Creek   100 50
Horsethief    3,127 52 Columbia District, Bridges—Continued.
Hyiu      $ 493 22
Kicking Horse-  136 54
Kootenay   (upper)     43 00
Lagwin     414 12
Moola     246 11
Passicock's     237 51
Ravine •.  34 15
Spillimacheen, No. 64  109 19
Spillimacheen, No. 67    4 75
Toby Creek   62 50
Toby Creek, High Level, No. 105   8 50
12-Mile    75 49
Wait-a-bit     912 85
Washout Creek, No. S   110 64
Wilmer, No. 47    180 08
Wilmer (pontoon), No. 71    177 95
Windermere    '  29 26
General     48 42
Total   $    10,080 42
Comow District.
Bunker's      $ 5 25
Caljouw, No. 1   115 84
Caljouw, No. 3     189 84
Cape Mudge, No. 27   29 12
China Creek    73 74
Chudy, No. 1  172 62
Cook's (north), No. 33   ■  162 31
Cougar Creek, No. 57   96 00
Courtenay River    1,226 58
Courtenay Slough    8 75
Cramer's      295 50
Cumberland and Dove Creek, No. 2   1,154 39
Cumberland and Dove Creek, No. 3  830 94,
Dalrymple's     69 50
Galarnos, No. 54    709 28
Garven's   6 74
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour   45 00
Hargreaves    166 78
Harrington     10 85
Holt's, No. 2   6 55
Hopkin's, No. 68   715 35
Joyce   ..'  373 70
Kitty Coleman (right), No. 1  2 60
Kitty Coleman  (right), No. 2    2 67
Kitty Coleman   (left)     2 60
Millecheap's     11 00
Murdock's     284 31
Nahwitti River, No. 91    2,392 37
Piercy's     14 00
Potter's   13 00
Power-house, No. 99   27 29
Puntledge, No. 1    67 41
Quimsam River   1 75
Rennisoh  18 78 13 Geo. 5                              Statement of Expenditure. G 85
Comox District, Bridges—Continued.
Rosewall, No. 112     $ 39 42
Round's    •  48 98
Salmon River (second crossing)     8,354 89
Salmon River (third crossing)  130 37
Salmon River, No. 11   ■.  10 50
Salmon River (Sacht's Crossing  221 07
Salmon River, K     12 88
Sandhill's, No. 135    1 75
Scott's   14 37
Scuddy's  166 78
Shields, No. 1  11 50
Shelter Point, No.  141     489 22
Shushartie, No. 2  1,151 94
Smith's   (north),  No. 146     691 33
Smith's (south), No. 145   12 00
Theodosia River, No. 233 :  124 50
Trent River, No. 154   29 67
Washer Creek    18 75
Waterloo    3 50
White River   784 02
Plant     491 00
Total    $    22,110 85
Cowichan District.
Bonsall Creek   $ 35 47
Checwhat River  403 25
Chemainus River     469 35
Clemclemlitz    311 64
Cowichan Station    99 44
Dobson  20 72
Dodd's     90 57
Duncan   876 33
No.  84     219 26
No.  85     90 80
No. 86  28 50
Goulding's    74 51
Beating's     52 08
Kelving     54 33
Koksilah     168 89
McLennan's   21 00
Meade   28 00
Millstream     60 10
Mount Baker Road '  Ill 53
Pimbury  142 75
Quamichan, No. 91   47 00
Riverside  30 00
Robertson River  75 72
Somenos   12 00
Store (footbridge), Clo-oose '  128 50
Taggart's    573 70
Wilkinson     Ill 88
General    ^  518 07
Total    $      4,855 97 G 86
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Cranbrook District, Bridges.
Aldridge, No. 70     $
Aldridge, No. 242	
Alki   	
Bark Shanty	
Cassing-Mayook   	
Colony	
Coolee, No. 142  	
Coolee, No. 214  	
Cotton Creek, No. 247   	
Curzon   	
Dale, No. 244 	
Diversion   	
East, No. 233	
Ebert's Avenue  	
Eimer, No. 252 	
Gold Creek	
Goatfell   	
Irishman's Creek, No. 206	
Irishman's Creek, No. 211 ,	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 83  	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 84  	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 85 	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 88  	
Lamb Creek, No. 63 	
Linklater, No. 251	
Lippett   	
Mark Creek   	
Meadow Creek 	
Mineral Lake, No. 194	
Moyie Lake, No. 246  	
Narrows, No. 7.1	
North Fork, No. 236  	
Old Town, No. 49	
Palmer Bar   	
Robertson   	
Ryan   	
St. Mary Lake 	
Stone, No. 245  	
Swansea   (large)   	
Swansea  Slough   	
Swansea   (small)   	
Ward's Ranch   	
Wasa  	
Wattsburg, No. 241   	
Wright, No. 249	
Wycliffe   .	
Yahk	
Material	
General  	
Total   	
Delta District.
Canoe Pass  .~	
Clayton  (Yale Road)    !	
dive's Valley 	
$    137
41
74 07
175
68
48
75
30
00
83
00
30
88
152
25
6,654
07
46 50
766 29
89
73
5
50
38
00
100
01
249
06
101
14
250
78
76 32
198
00
769
62
564 98
268
70
93
02
17
20
61
25
96 00
49 52
44
32
2,378
29
38
57
5
50
137
25
38
34
80 75
88
25
33 40
1,716 41
82
93
270 04
13
44
176
27
100 00
571
29
49 00
914
88
46 50
175
50
10
90
18,199 50
498 09
886 80
S90 25 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 87
387 67
412 24
4,097 94
1,434 70
Delta District, Bridges—Continued.
No.  6   	
No. 7 	
Serpentine River 	
Thompson and Weaver  	
Total   	
Dewdney District.
Anderson   	
Bouchier 	
Cambridge	
Clark	
Conley  -	
Coquitlam    !	
Deroche Slough, No. 15 	
Dewdney   ..'	
Doherty    •	
Donitelli 	
Gifford, No. 1	
Graham, No. 17  	
Gunn 	
Hawkins   	
Hoy  Creek   	
loco   •.	
Ira  Reid   	
Kanaka 	
King   	
Martin	
Marsden	
McKenny   Creek   	
McLean   	
McPherson  	
Nameless   	
Nicomen  	
Omara 	
Piedmont   	
Pitt River 	
Rennie   	
Reserve 	
School-house   	
Scott Creek 	
Shook   	
Stave River   	
Sunnyside    '.	
Tiellard - •	
Total     $
Expenditure     $10,705 73
Less material transferred from Roads       2,249 S3
Total     $10,455 90
Esquimalt District.
Albert Head (twin)   $
Atkins Road  ■	
Bennett   	
$  S.607
69
$    42
50
3S
75
41
74
1
66
20 51
3,011
72
15 00
1,503
61
193
35
41
70
36 00
85
00
355 61
197 25
76 16
48
67
48
88
63
70
175
59
156 68
4
50
30 71
718 29
343
92
3
96
441
67
65
88
29
62
469
02
18
46
302
59
8
36
1,438
07
. 269 87
145
29
261
00
49
84
10,705 73
14 38
10 00
255 29 G 88
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Esquimau District, Bridges—Continued.
Camp Creek    $ 442 04
Coal Creek  105 00
Craigflower     105 S7
Deadman River   16 13
Finlayson Arm, No. 25   21 60
Finlayson Arm, No. 29  207 20
Goldstream, No. 3    200 00
Hall's    •  145 63
Jamieson     52 25
Jordan River, No. 19  •  10 75
Jordan River, No. 43   25 00
Jordan River, No. 44   25 00
Jordan River, No. 45   26 63
Jordan River, No. 46   25 00
Jordan River, No. 47     . 25 00
Jordan River, No. 48  :  25 00
Jordan River, No. 49  .  25 00
Jordan River, No. 52  49 00
Jordan River, NO. 53   24 00
Jordan River, No. 54  40 00
Jordan River, No. 55   25 00
Jordan River, No. 56   25 00
Jordan River, No. 57   25 00
Jordan River, No. 58 .'  25 00
Jordan River, No. 59   25 00
Jordan River, No. 60  63 28
Jordan River, No. 61  64 45
Jordan River, No. 62  '  55 15
Jordan River, No. 63  '.  8 19
Koksilah     1,152 52
Millstream  22 75
Niagara  Canyon     400 04
Parson's     585 79
Reid, No. 153    379 71
San Juan (east)     122 38
Sooke   (demolition)  245 00
Sooke   (temporary)  1,484 50
Sooke, No. 35    7 63
Sooke, No. 91   97 33
Sooke, No. 92   2 25
Sooke, No. 97   '17,520 79
Victoria-Campbell River, No. 146    150 00
Victoria-Campbell River, No. 150   250 00
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 130   47 75
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 132  50 00
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 136 ;  104 25
Total   $    24,814 53
Fernie District.
Bechtel, No. 96     $ 445 OS
Bramstead's, No. 97  350 25
Bull River, No. 33  3,527 20
Carbon Creek, No. 90  242 95
Carbon Creek, No. 92   165 86 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 89
Fernie District. Bridges—Continued.
Carbon Slough, No. 91  	
Cedar Valley   	
Coal Creek, No. 49 	
Coal Creek, No. 61	
Elkmouth, No. 8  	
Elkmouth  (small)   	
Elko 	
Erickson, No. SI  	
Erickson, No. 88  	
Erickson, No. 89  	
Fairy Creek  	
Fernie, No. 4  	
Fernie City Park, No. 86 	
Flathead, No. 85  :	
Fort Steele, No. 20 	
Hartley Creek	
Hosmer, No. 2   '.	
Hosmer Creek, No. 53 	
Levitt   	
Little Bull River, No. 13 	
Michel, No. 11   	
Michel, No. 12  	
Michel, No. 13  	
Michel Prairie, No. 1	
Morrissey, No. 5	
Old Town   	
Phillips, No. 7  	
Round Prairie  	
Sand Creek, No. 70  	
Sheep Creek	
Waldo, No. 4	
Wardner  ,	
Wasa, No. 20 	
Wasa, No. 42  	
Waters Ranch  	
Wilson Creek  	
General	
Total      $
Expenditure      $24,836 72
Less credit, Alberta Power Co. (Bull River Bridge) 500 00
Total      $24,336 72
Fort George District.
Bailey    $
Bayes   	
Beaver  Creek   	
Beaverly Creek  	
Bedoine   	
Bell   	
Bogot   	
Buffalo Creek	
Camp Creek  	
Canoe River  	
Canyon Creek   	
$    227
06
110
32
3,549
65
155 95
869 03
37
OS
30 00
7
45
72
38
201
85
37
87
66
75
52
10
7.329
89
454
86
251
03
210
00
2,203
40
3S
01
17
63
595
73
166
15
78
75
121 50
16
88
9
75
981
47
491
95
8
35
102
00
203
04
60 00
54
50
39
50
54 62
260
OS
937
90
24.836 72
258 00
50 00
52 00
182 00
692 36
121 50
340 50
303 87
621 60
935 09
25 50 Fort George District, Bridges—Continued.
Coleman  $ 403 09
Cut Bank  1,274 79
Dawson Creek, No. 2    717 53
Dean Creek -.  135 63
Deep Creek    40 00
Dibble     174 30
Dodd     507 50
Dunster (Y2 mile west)     100 00
Dunster, No. 135   399 60
Dry Creek    32 00
Dry Williams Lake, No. 1    3S 00
,Dry Williams Lake, No. 2   41 15
Dry Williams Lake, No. 3    41 10
Erickson    86 00
Fairis  150 00
Fort Fraser  (trestle)     1,454 15
Fort George-Hazelton Road    6,137 21
Fort George-IIixon Creek    7,1S0 70
Fort George-Willow River     11 99
Fox Creek    335 50
Fynn    ,  371 92
G.T.B  135 50
Green Timber   200 00
Harding Gulch, No. 9    778 90
Hart     50 00
Hatch     255 80
Hudson Bay Slough    1,337 05
Indian Reserve    44 00
Kerr's    244 49
Kidd     100 00
Little Valley Creek   70 00
Millar     8 00
Mill Creek   195 00
Milne's     602 45
Moose  32 00
Mount Robson     120 60
Mud River, No. 72  53 80
Mud River, No. 73  50 00
Mud River, No. 74    555 15
Mud River, No. 75    1,670 68
Murray Creek   280 50
McBride Creek, No. 1    231 64
McBride Creek, No. 2    286 90
McDonald, No. 1   58 75
McDonald, No. 2  58 75
Nantly River     92 00
Nechako-Prince  George     538 00
Nechako-Vanderhoof     3,094 12
Ocock  239 39
Outram    158 00
Palmer     C03 40
Pariso    68 00
Pinker  321 00
Poison Creek     150 13
Poplar   32 75 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. G 91
Fort George District, Bridges—Continued.
Potter's   $ 66 76
Pouce Coupe-  716 SO
Raymond    346 36
Rock Creek    92 88
Ross Creek    509 22
Salmon River   85 00
Sand Creek   293 25
Silver Creek    174 00
Squirrel Creek   253 75
Stellako     63 00
Stewart     32 00
Stony Creek, No. 113   16 00
Stony Creek, No. 115   2,422 59
Streigler     748 35
Sturgeon Point     143 25
Sweet Creek  254 00
Switch Creek    211 61
Taylor   408 50
Tradestoa (4 bridges)     643 07
Trout Creek    156 50
2-Mile Creek, No. 20  109 00
2-Mile Creek, No. 77   50 00
Unnamed, No. 1     257 82
Unnamed, No. 2     381 60
Unnamed, No. 3     268 06
Wade Creek    48 00
Willow Creek  80 00
Plant   188 06
Material  472 50
Total     $    45,628 90
Expenditure    $45,628 90
Less transferred from Stable        1,607 50
Total     $44,021 40
Grand Forks District.
Cascade   	
Cascade-Paulson Road  (5 bridges)   	
Carson	
Cooper 	
First Street 	
Fourth Street 	
Gilpin  	
Hardy 	
Lynch Creek 	
Smelter Lake 	
Yale 	
General  •	
Total   	
Expenditure   $12,323 08
Less credit. Yale Bridge (cement-sacks returned).. 65 68
Total     $12,257 40
$   354
76
700 00
87
95
54
25
39
75
220
82
78
75
- 27
39
27
36
1,652
79
9,025
46
53
80
$  12,323 OS G 92 Public Works Report (1921-22).
Greenwood District.
Beaverdell	
Boundary Falls, Nos. 15-11 	
Boundary Falls, Smelter Nos. 15-7 	
Caron   	
Eholt Creek	
Floyd   	
Greenwood   	
Hingley 	
Ingram  	
Kettle River 	
Lancashire	
Meyers   	
Midway	
Murray	
McBride's	
Rock Creek 	
Rusk Creek 	
Westbridge   	
Williamson (lower)   	
Williamson (upper)  	
Total   	
Islands District. -
Main Road, No. 27	
Morgan's, No. 26 	
Saltspring Island, No. 16-15	
Total   $ 260 67
Kamloops District.
Adams River (upper)      $ 99 14
Barriere (North Thompson)     581 68
Blackwater (North Thompson)     224 00
Carlin  Gulch  479 23
Chase Creek   10 36
Chase-Squilax,  No.  1     338 75
Chase-Squilax, No. 2    232 80
Clearwater Creek    147 02
Clearwater River     3,625 47
Deadman Creek   237 84
Granite Creek     88 75
Greer's     652 32
Hornet Creek   79 11
Jake Creek   119 75
Kamloops (east)     1,321 54
Kamloops  (west)     1,017 84
Lewis     146 34
McMurphy (suspension)     87 IS
Peterson Creek  731 58
Price Creek  114 79
Pritchard    :  1,580 93
Riddell's  76 00
Rock Bluff (trestle)    139 55
Savona    261 00
Scotch Creek, No.  1     40 13
$   103
51
25
00
159
73
49 50
20
00
15
50
175
75
29 00
219
75
414 93
49
50
20
00
16,410
24
115
13
164
00
4,220
67
21
75
10,093
32
53
00
84
60
$ 32,444
88
$    23
46
165
OS
72
13 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 93
145 43
658 14
82 00
2,756 27
75 00
509 99
239 50
50 00
49 00
245 40
$    17,243 83
Kamloops District, Bridges—Continued.
Scotch Creek, No. 2 	
Scotch Creek, No. 3   	
Scotch Creek, No. 4	
Shuswap  (North Thompson)   	
Skiddum Creek  	
Squilax, No. 1  	
Squilax, No. 2  	
Stillwater Flats, No. 23  	
Stillwater Flats, No. 24 	
Timber  Creek   	
Total	
Expenditure   $17,243 83
tLess transferred from stable ,         437 80
Total   $16,806 03
Kaslo District.
Ajax   	
Albert  	
Alpine 	
Arrow Creek	
Bigiow   	
Blair 	
Burden  	
Canadian  	
Canal	
Canning   	
Canyon 	
Cascade   	
Circle City   	
Coffee Creek 	
Cromwell  	
Cumming's   	
Daney  	
Duck  Creek   	
Erickson 	
Ferguson	
5-Mile	
Flint  	
Flossie Creek  	
Floyd Creek  	
Gallos   '.	
Ganior Creek  	
Goat River  	
Gerrard	
Gold Gulch  '	
Grady  	
Great Northern   •	
Hagen   	
Halfway	
Hall Creek  	
Harrison   	
Healy   	
Hinck's 	
Howard    '	
40 00
27 00
4 50
137 70
17 25
36 00
50 25
12 00
53 37
18 00
120 63
4 00
12 00
11 00
12 00
8 00
58 00
84 00
276 15
12 00
12 00
8 00
42 49
72 75
53 69
23 00
39 50
8 00
6 00
84 00
50 00
153 27
52 00
41 25
45 02
4 00
250 25
8 00 Kaslo District, Bridges—Continued.
Jesty      $ 53 69
Kidd Creek 	
Kochle's 	
Kootenay Valley  	
Lardeau	
Leach   	
Liberty Hill   	
Lizzard   	
Long   	
Medford 	
Montezuma   	
Maybe .'	
Nashville	
Nisk's  	
North Fork	
Poplar, No. 140	
Porcupine   	
Porter 	
Rapid   	
Reclamation   	
Scott 	
Shorne Creek 	
Shutty   	
Silver Cup 	
Skinner   	
Stanley 	
Sullivan Creek	
Sundry small bridges  	
Tenderfoot   	
Thompson	
Triune   	
Trout Creek	
Victoria   	
Walker 	
Watson	
Whitewater 	
Total     $      7,608 94
Lillooet District.
Big Creek, No. 2   $ 12 00
Bridge River, No. 6   442 00
Chilcotin  (suspension), No. 26   7,830 98
Criss Creek, No. 2S ' 16 75
Crooked Lake-Bridge Lake, No. 88   46 50
Dry Gulch, No. 1S9  45
Enterprise, No. 187  2,040 50
51-Mile Creek, No. 160    232 10
Graham Creek, No. 70   50 00
Gunn Creek, No. 1    23 75
Gunn Creek, No. 2  23 75
Hanceville, No. S3    136 50
Hat Creek, No. 71    17 20
Lillooet Hatchery, No. 90  29 00
Lillooet  (suspension), No. 89   5,714 46
Muskrat Lake, No. 104   80 70
39
60
46
00
3,673
58
26 00
39
00
4
50
84 00
4 50
17
25
8 00
8 00
4 50
466
10
16
on
11 25
29
50
8
00
4 00
37
49
10
00
50 00
53
OS
16
00
12
CO
4
00
72
75
18 00
4 00
125
00
12
00
48
00
26
00
540
66
47 36
42 00 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 95
Lillooet District, Bridges—Continued.
111-Mile Creek, No. 170     $ 92 98
Seton Lake, No. 118   3,700 15
Seton Lake, No. 119   29 50
South Fork, No. 120  40 00
Ward's Ferry   166 25
Wright, No. 186   2,486 14
Total      $    22.671 46
Expenditure    $22,671 46
Less transferred from Material   136 16
Total     $22,535 30
Nanaimo District.
Cbase River     $ 680 38
Cook's    21 50
Dickinson's     56 75
Five-acre Lots  20 00
Gourlay, No. 2   204 S9
Millstream, No. 1    53 72
Millstream, No. 2  176 05
Nanaimo, No. 1   1,195 60
Richardson Road  245 57
General   67 05
Total     $      2,721 51
Newcastle District.
Bush Creek, No. 1    $ 99 85
Bush Creek, No. 2  5S SO
Bush Creek, No. 3    98 10
Davis  53 00
Diamond Crossing  1 00
First Creek   173 41
Haslam  Creek     786 63
Jingle Pot, No. 1    133 30
Jingle Pot, No. 2  60 80
Jingle Pot, No. 3    34 00
Jingle Pot, No. 4  38 50
Morrison, No. 1    86 50
Morrison, No. 2    218 90
Morrison, No. 3  :  235 63
Morrison, No. 4    52 20
Nanaimo, No. 2    190 32
Thatcher's  269 98
Waterloo     1 10
Wellington  (east), No. 1   ..  22 00
Wellington  (east), No. 2    35 00
Westwood's    27 00
General   343 05
Total      $      3,014 07
North Vancouver District.
Alice Creek, No. 17   $ 144 25
Barbour, No. 1  3 12
Bowden, No. 54   1,602 33 G 96 Public Works Report (1921-22).
North Vancouver District, Bridges—Continued.
Burnt (Pemberton Meadows)   	
Camp   	
Cheakamus, No. 61 	
Gibson-Seechelt Road, No. 62 	
Hall Point 	
Hannon  Point   	
Langdale   	
Low   (North-west Bay)   	
Miller Creek  	
Mission Creek, No. 50 	
Owl Creek  •	
Pemberton Valley Road, No. 104 	
Pemberton Valley Road, No. 107  ,	
Pemberton Valley Road, No. 113  	
Pemberton Valley Road, No. 115  	
Pemberton Valley Road, No. 122   ,	
Pemberton Valley Road, No. 123 	
Pemberton Valley Road, No. 124 	
Pemberton Valley Road, No. 125 	
Redroofs Trail  (2 foot-bridges)	
Reserve	
Romayne   	
Ryan Creek 	
Soames	
Squamish Valley Road, No. 3 	
Squamish Valley Road, No. 4  	
Squamish Valley Road, No. 6 	
Squamish Valley Road, No. 8	
Squamish Valley Road, No. 10 	
Station	
Wakefield	
Wilson   	
Wiren	
Total      $      8,226 IS
North, Okanagan, District.
Alber's, No.  2     $ 200 62
Ashton Creek, No. 1   10S 79
Ashton Creek, No. 2   238 00
Baxter, No. 98  208 75
Brickyard     96 39
Butter's, No. 14  76 31
Cherry Creek    226 40
Creighton  43 77
8-Mile     206 84
Enderby  121 50
Finlinson  122 00
Foster's     25 39
Genier, No. 45    20 55
Grindrod, No. 48   224 S9
Hammond  185 01
Irish Creek, No. 62    9 52
Johnson     328 12
Kelso     1,318 50
Kingfisher     79 38
$
655 47
S 00
461 50
20 50
217 66
4 50
117 25
93 25
72 57
30 50
249 98
126 00
116 75
258 34
294 39
175 00
175 00
213 50
100 00
. 91 00
409 29
749 SO
3S 50
353 40
44 20
192 38
39 45
255 48
67 50
576 82
230 00
9 00
29 50 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 97
North Okanagan District, Bridges—Continued.
Lumby     $ 24 50
Mara    20 38
Massey     6 00
Monks      12 44
Morgan's     51 99
Moore's    43 51
Moser    ."  4 00
Pass    ,  164 00
Pine Creek    32 25
Railroad  , .«  213 87
Reiswig     33 50
Robertson, No. 103    832 50
Robinson, No. 102   21 50
Rock-cut     78 15
Schwab, No. 108     44 61
Seymour Arm, No. 182   7  119 79
Shunter's     7 25
Sicamous, No. 98     2,066 72
Silver Creek  74 75
6-Mile, No. 1   23 29
Sullivan's, No. 124    867 26
Tomkinson, No. 127    633 33
No. 129, Trinity, No. 2    3 50
Unnamed, No. 170  90 43
Unnamed, No. 182   4S 38
Whiteman's      1 23
Total   	
Omineca District.
Boulder Creek     $ 25 00
Buck River, No. 2   7 50
Bulkley River, No. 12    72 51
Burns Lake   2,156 29
Canyon  Creek     25 00
Charleston Flat     717 99
Clarke's (Bulkley River)     487 50
Deep Creek  321 75
Driftwood     25 00
Endako, No. 1    50 00
Endako, No. 2    47 75
Endako  (east of Priestley)     1,068 74
Endako (west of Priestley)  800 00
Glazier Creek   25 00
Gramophone Creek    51 87
Groundhog Trail    185 00
Haguelgate  (suspension)     102 28
Houston    4,745 42
Hynes Settlement    40 19
Kispiox Canyon   28 30
Kuldo     302 50
Lund  Creek     45 00
Mile 105   606 73
Mile 112, No. 63  598 65
Mile 113, No. 64    591 50
Mud Creek     248 61
7
9,365 S9 G 98 Public Works Report (1921-22).
Omineca District, Bridges—Continued.
Nadina    $ 15 00
North Bulkley  S00 00
Pleasant Valley    2 19
Porphyry     25 00
Quick   39,606 53
Rist Creek   578 00
Savory    .'  350 00
Skeena (suspension)  125 00
Shovel Creek  500 00
Smithers, No. 79   • :  394 83
Toboggan Creek, No. 91   '  48 00
Toboggan Creek, No. 92    44 50
Telkwa River (at Telkwa), No. 84   139 15
3-Mile, No. 88   22 50
Two Bridge Creek  25 00
Total      $ 56,051 78
Prince Rupert District.
Alwin Creek    $ 14 50
Cedar River    20 00
Clayton    37 38
Delkatla   Slough     320 40
Dry   Gulch     55 40
Emma  Creek     76 25
Gordon  Creek  46 75
Hieileu     62 00
Johnston   2S 50
Leanto  178 40
Little  Canyon River     96 60
Manson Way (approach)     902 93
Mill  Creek     1,390 33
Mud Lake    22 OO
McLeod  Road     34 91
Nygaard    36 96
Oona River    2SS 30
Pacific (foot)     91 50
Pacific Slough  144 67
Saloomt     75 25
Sangon River  80 00
School    3 60
Spring Creek  12 75
Store   47 25
Suicide Creek   499 25
S'visdahl  9 92
Terrace •  114 45
Thornhill Creek   57 20
Thorsen  (Bella Coola)     1,122 41
2-Mile Creek, No. 34  48 15
Williams Creek    250 50
Total      $ 6,174 51
Revelstoke District.
Anderson's, No. 167    $ 13 00
Beaton-Compalix '  350 85
Beaton, No. 24  ■ 250 39 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 99
Revelstoke District, Bridges—Continued.
Beatrice Trail, No. 7 	
Beatrice Trail, No. 8 	
Beatrice Trail, No. 10 	
Beatrice Trail, No. 17 	
Big Bend   (trestle)   	
Big  Mouth	
Bossley Slough, No. 171	
Boyd's Ranch, No. 80 	
Bowie,  No.  169   	
Camp Creek  	
Cannes   Creek    '.	
Canyon Creek (Jordan Trail)	
Casharto  Slough, No.  153	
Clanwilliam   	
Columbia River, No. 148  	
Craigellachie, No. 9	
Creek,  No.  82   	
Crowle's Ranch, No. 154  	
Downie Creek, No. 62  	
Downie Creek, No. 85 	
Dry Slough, No. 150 	
Eagle River  (east)   	
8-Mile   	
Erickson   	
Fish River Canyon, No. 33 	
First Slough, No. 149	
5-Mile,  No. 74  	
5-Mile   (North  Fork,  Illeeillewaet)   	
Gold fields, No. 96 	
Goldstream, No. 91  	
Greely,  No.  119	
Greely, No. 120 	
Halcyon    	
Illicillewaet, No. 141  (upper)   	
Illicillewaet,  No.  142    '.	
Illicillewaet, No. 152   (lower)   	
Illicillewaet (IV2 miles east of Albert Canyon)   	
Isaac Creek,  No.  130   	
Laforme Creek, No. 58 	
Lonzo   	
Malakwa   (foot)	
Mammoth   	
Menhenick  Creek   	
Mica Creek  	
Mile 19, C.P.R.   (Revelstoke West Road)   	
Montana  Slough   	
Moorwood,  No.  126   	
Mcintosh, No. 146	
Mcintosh, No. 79 	
McKay's Gulch   	
McQueen   	
9-Mile (North Fork of Illicillewaet)   	
North-east Fork of Eagle River, No. 164	
Pool Creek, No. 95 	
Pool Creek, Trail, No. 139 	
Power-house, No. 140	
8 25
8 25
8 25
11 25
497 50
209 00
6 25
20 00
52 06
25 00
15 00
20 00
303 10
7,705 22
3,224 75
34 69
54 25
91 19
10 00
105 00
61 59
554 04
147 53
25 00
195 00
86 20
10 00
'  8 00
331 90
286 61
286 25
3 75
16 00
2,156 16
76 55
971 59
4 00
16 00
100 00
488 21
4 38
62 50
8 00
20 00
6,383 19
2,242 27
22 63
1 25
20 00
21 25
80 00
12 00
11 25
27 00
9 00
135 83 G 100
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Revelstoke District, Bridges—Continued.
Pradolini Creek 	
Revelstoke  (south), No. 141  	
Revelstoke West Road, Station 77-70 	
Sable Creek   	
Salmon, No. 107  	
Second Slough (west of Columbia)   	
77-Mile  (north of Revelstoke)   	
Sicamous  (foot)   	
Silver Creek, No. 155  	
Sims-Solsqua   	
Slough  (east of Bowie)    ."	
Slough (east of Solsoua), No. 157	
Slough, No.- 81 	
Slough, No. 118 	
Slough, No. 121  	
Small Creek, No. 116 	
Small Creek, No. 117 	
Snow service  	
Solsqua-Bowie, No. 156   	
Solsqua House, No. 170	
South Pass Creek 	
Station, No. 867	
Station, No. 882	
Station, No. 987  	
Station, No. 753-50 (Revelstoke West Road)   	
Stringer  	
Three Valley (over C.P.R.)   (2 bridges)   	
Three Valley  (over Eagle River), No. 166  	
Tumtum, No. 146 	
Watson's   	
Willis Lake   	
Yard   	
Materia]  	
Total  	
Richmond District.
Eburne  	
Rossland District.
Deschamps Road (north)  	
Jumbo Road 	
Old Rossland Trail 	
Rock Creek, No. 1 	
Rock Creek, No. 9  	
Rossland Trail, No. 1 	
Rossland Trail, No. 2	
Rossland Trail, No. 3  	
Rossland-Patterson Road  ■	
Stony Creek Road  	
Stony Creek, No. 3 	
Stony Creek, No. 4	
Material 	
Total   	
$   159
75
125
62
402
87
13
CO
16
88
94 28
12
00
1,361
30
4
00
40
00
41
18
68
59
120
00
3
00
o
O
75
3
38
3
00
241
25
3
75
18
75
1,052 48
3
SO
3
SO
3
00
357
12
172
18
5,218
22
4,910
42
156
16
18 00
94
08
227
65
104 07
$ 43,040 51
$  7,070
88
$   111
63
27
87
107
07
13
75
25
55
93
12
15
00
2
50
27
70
55 00
10
00
20
00
124
32
633 51 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 101
$
2,351 98
$
36 00
72 54
157 64
50 50
6,108 52
948 01
55 00
127 00
34 00
86 50
30 00
119 00
26 00
39 37
$       7,890 08
Saanich District.
Hagen 	
Similkameen District.
B.K.J., No. 32-46  	
B.K.J.,  No. 32-81	
B.K.J., No. 32-30  	
Fairview, No. 31 	
Fairview-Penticton Road, No. 15, Sec. B  	
Fairview-Penticton Road, No. 32-67  	
Keremeos Creek, No. 119 	
Keremeos Creek, No. 120 	
Keremeos Creek, No. 121 	
Keremeos Creek, No. 134 	
S.C. No. 1, No. 32-140	
S.C. No. 3, No. 32-141   	
South Keremeos,  No. 145   	
Plant and tools 	
Total	
Expenditure   $7,890 08
Transferred to Roads   24 96
Total      $7,915 04
Slocan District.
Appledale, No. 2 	
Appledale, No. 3  	
Arrow Park, No. 3 	
Arrow Park, No. 4 	
Arrow Park, No. 5 	
Arrow Park, No. 0  	
Arrow Park, No. 16  	
Arrow Park, No. 17 	
Arrow Park (north)   	
Arrow Park  (south), No. 1  	
Arrow Park  (south)  No. 3 	
Arrow Park  (south), No. 19  	
Arrow Park  (south)   No. 20  	
Arrow Park (south), No. 21 	
Boulder Creek, No.  178   	
Carpenter Creek-New Denver-Silverton Road	
Cariboo Creek Road, No. 8 	
Cariboo Creek Road, No. 10 	
Cedar Creek, No. 176	
Cemetery Road, No. 1	
Cemetery Road, No. 2 	
Columbia River Road, No. 2 	
Columbia River Road, No. 3  	
Columbia River Road, No. 8 ...,	
Columbia River Road, No. 17	
Columbia River Road, No. 18  	
Columbia River Road, No. 19 	
Columbia River Road, No. 26 	
Deer Park Road (south)    '	
Dog Creek  (North Fork), No. 1  	
Dog Creek (North Fork), No. 2  ,	
261
39
5
00
7
00
2
00
2
25
10
75
7
50
7
00
17
50
11
50
16
13
39
88
10
14
15
70
14
18
129
50
20
00
41
45
25
00
42
19
52
01
3
75
6
50
8
75
48
00
50
82
8
75
16
88
36
70
48
77
212
76 Slocan District, Bridges—Continued.
Eagle Creek, No. 132   $ 19 03
Edgewood-Needles  5 38
4-Mile Creek, No. 3    211 41
4-Mile Creek, No. 4   75 00
4-Mile Creek, No. 5   202 66
4-Mile Creek, No. 6    200 00
Goat Creek    22 18
Harrison Road, No. 1  46 88
Harrison Road, No. 2    45 75
Inonoaklin    56 76
Lemon Creek  ..».  45 00
McCormack's     36 25
New Denver-Silverton, No. 3    455 86
New Denver-Three Forks, Mile 4  361 00
North Carpenter Creek  306 34
Passmore      316 60
Perry  Siding     1,421 41
Pre-emption, No. 163    9 75
Red Mountain Road, No. 1   10 75
Red Mountain Road, No. 2   42 15
Robinson, No. 33-170   4,585 03
Robinson Creek, No. 33-320  79 49
Sand Creek  :  449 84
Slocan River Road  (east), No. 3    3 75
Slocan River Road  (east), No. 4    8 00
Slocan River Road (east), No. 5   39 00
Siocan River Road  (east), No. 10    4 CO
Slocan River Road ■ (west), No. 176   28 00
Slocan River Road  (west), No. 184   23 00
Siocan River Road (west), No. 185  23 00
Slocan River Road (west), No. 186  26 00
Slocan  River Road   (west),  No.  187     10 00
Stony Creek  41 50
Tait Creek     311 86
10-Miie Creek Trail    99 50
Trussell Road, No. 1    6S 13
Trussell Road, No. 2   81 25
Vallicum     158 91
Walker    426 63
Whatshan     81 31
Wilson Creek    682 49
Williamson     341 45
Winlaw     240 13
Bridge-site survey, Brown-Robinson Road   55 00
Total      $ 12,949 18
South Okanagan District.
Camp Creek, No. 2   $ 215 73
Camp Creek, No. 3   783 05
Camp Creek, No. 4   945 42
Camp Creek, No. 5   3,497 20
Dry Gulch, No. 10    86 62
4-Mile,  No. 34-18    '  1,517 94
Gully    3 50
Joe Ritchie Road (third creek)    24 45 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 103
South Okanagan- District, Bridges—Continued.
Mill Creek, No. 1  	
Mill Creek, No. 3  	
Mill Creek, No. 24  	
Mission Creek 	
Mission, Road, No. 31 	
Mission Road, No. 32	
McDougall Creek	
Naramata	
Power  Creek   	
Sawmill   	
Scotty Creek 	
Slough, No. 37  	
Trout Creek	
Woods Creek	
Total  $
Trail District.
Beaver Creek   $
Blueberry  Creek   	
Castlegar  (foot)   	
China Creek  	
Crescent Valley	
East Robson North Road 	
Fruitvale-Pend d'Oreille, No. 1  	
Granite Road, No. 1   	
Granite Road, No. 2   	
Granite Road, No. 3  	
Granite Road, No. 4   	
Granite Road, No. 5	
Granite Road, No. 6  	
Garrity  Creek    .'	
Knox Diversion  	
Kootenay River Road (Bear Creek)   	
Lost  Creek	
Nelson-Balfour, No. 1   	
Nelson-Balfour, No. 2  	
Nelson-Balfour, No. 3	
Nelson-Balfour, No. 6 	
Nelson-Balfour, No. 10  ; ..
Nelson-Balfour, No. 11 	
Nelson-Balfour, No. 12  	
Nelson-Balfour, No. 14  	
Nelson-Balfour, No. 15  	
Nelson-Waneta, No. 1  	
Nelson-Waneta, No. 2 	
Nelson-Waneta, No. 7	
Nelson-Waneta, No. 8	
Nelson-Waneta, No. 11  	
Nelson-Waneta, No. 12  	
Nelson-Waneta, No. 14  	
Pass Creek	
Pend d'Oreille River Road, No. 1	
Pend d'Oreille River Road, No. 2  	
Pend d'Oreille River Road, No. 3  	
Porcupine Creek, No. 2 	
$
49 24
644 75
164 50
22 00
388 90
38 12
293 25
13 95
12 00
96 00
313 15
2 20
IS 80
34 50
9,165 33
37
07
330 09
2S
70
530 63
1.55
18
323
34
20
80
765
67
12
80
13
75
S
75
251
35
5
62
323
33
324
63
121
68
141
00
67
34
95
74
52
63
101
50
459
15
SO
00
84
87
71
97
328
11
28
45
13
00
115
12
22
50
303
50
121
00
54
07
39 90
31
75
31
75
31
75
2
10 Trail District, Bridges—Continued.
Salmon River Road  (Sheep Creek)   	
Sand Creek  	
Second Relief Road, No. 3 	
Selwin Street  (South Nelson)   	
Silver King Road 	
Slocan River Road 	
Tarvey's  Creek   	
Thrums Creek   	
Trail-Castlegar, No. 5 	
Trail-Castlegar, No. 0 	
Trail-Castlegar, No. 7 	
Trail-Castlegar, No. 8  	
Trail-Castlegar, No. 9 	
Trail-Castlegar, No. 10 	
Trail-Say ward  (Columbia River), No. 1  	
Trail-Sayward  (Columbia River), No. 3  	
Trail-Say ward  (Columbia River), No. 4  	
Yellowstone Road, No. 1   	
Yellowstone Road, No. 2  	
Yellowstone Road, No. 5  	
Yellowstone Road, No. 9  	
Total   	
Yale District.
Armitage   	
Ashcroft, No. 96  	
Budge	
Burns   	
Chapman, No.  149   	
Cheam Slough   	
Cleasby, No.  119   	
Colletvilie	
Ccquahalla   	
Curnow     ,
Deadman Creek 	
Dry Creek, No. 50	
Dry Gulch, No. 67  	
Dry Gulch, No. 69  	
Dry Gulch, No. 71   	
Dry Gulch, No. 101   	
Dry Gulch, No. 16S  	
Dry Gulch, No. 169  	
Dry Gulch, No. 170  	
8-Mile,  No. 127  	
Emergency work, Nos. 11, 12, 13, 14, 1.9, and 20	
Fink '.	
Gulliford Road   	
Harpers Mill   	
Hope 	
Hope-Rosedale, No. IS  	
Kelly's   	
Lindley Creek   	
Lytton, No. 66  	
Mara, No. 5   	
Mara, No. 6  	
$    14
00
5
00
8
75
42 66
55
29
40 79
117 00
382
91
25 00
28
00
32
20
32
15
72
99
50
40
5,014
09
39 00
23
75
2,20S
33
21
50
- 28
75
14
50
$  13,785
65
$    46
13
1.2S1
58
16
25
100
75
411
50
3,007
35
113
46
409
as
7
75
15
50
12
50
40 00
570
75
20 25
19
00
SO
25
8
00
14
00
146
21
9
00
IIS
37
133
65
71
50
97
82
611
40
12
94
131
54
35
36
685
S3
1,265
99
1,64S 49 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 105
Yale District, Bridges—Continued.
Maria Slough 	
Martel, No. 82 	
Martel, No. S3	
Middlesboro 	
Minnabarriett 	
Murray Creek	
Nicola, No. 156	
Nicola, No. 158  ?	
Otter Creek  :	
Princeton Trail	
Ritter Road, No. 29a	
School 	
Silver Creek 	
Spences, No. 78 	
Sunshine Valley 	
Texas	
Trout Creek, No. 159 	
Trout Creek, No. 160 	
Trout Creek, No. 161  	
Trout Creek, No. 162	
Unnamed, No. 16 	
Unnamed, No. 47	
Unnamed, No. 57 •	
Unnamed, No. 60 	
Unnamed, No. 61 	
Unnamed, No. 171 	
Yale Creek, No. 52	
Plant and tools	
.Material   	
Total  	
Bridges Generally.
General	
Maintenance and Upkeep of Launch " I'll Away."
Expenditure     $
Contingencies.
Printing, stationery, blue-prints, etc A   $
PKOTECTION   TO   RlVEK-nANKS.
Alberni—Spruce River ,   $
Atlin—
Alice Arm Shore Road .-  $      87 75
Kitsault River       1,278 82
Chilliwack—Vedder River  	
Columbia—
Kicking Horse River   $    456 05
Toby Creek Dam       1,482 14
Cranbrook—St. Mary River  ■.	
Dewdney—Port Coquitlam  •	
Fernie—
Fairy Creek    $    623 81
North Fernie        1,650 12
45
21
5
94
5
417
9
614
160
23
386
306
323
440
52
105
2
3
6
35
70
2
10S
14
280
120
21
00
S9
50
68
50
65
00
69
SO
50
4S
93
11
71
65
00
50
50
50
25
25
00
70
40
SO
00
95
32
49
14,820 85
$  3,30S 66
4,003 32
15,234 24
175 95
1,386 57
4,941 53
1,938 19
3.711 65
1,749 72
2,273 93 Peotection to River-banks—Continued.
North Vancouver—
Capilauo River     $10,100 00
Squamish Dykes, repairs   447 50
Squamish River, log-jam   323 SS
Squamish Valley Road  258 50
 $    11,129 S8
North Okanagan—Shuswap River   488 02
Prince Rupert—
Bella Coola River  $    6S3 26
Necleetseonnay River    304 91
  9SS 17
Revelstoke—Illecillewaet River     3,307 20
Slocan—Sandon Flume    936 95
South Okanagan—Mission Creek   1,166 61
Trail—No. 1 Bridge, Yellowstone Road  6,188 55
Yale—Coldwater River   3S1 20
Total      $     40,744 12
Wharves.
Alberni—Paul's Landing at Mill Bay   $ 278 60
Atlin—Stewart    1,695 24
Cowichan—Cowichan Bay    73 25
Esquimalt—Port Renfrew     28 SO
Prince Rupert—
Bella Coola      $      30 00
Cow Bay-Launch Harbour  203 41
Prince Rupert Wharf      18,420 08
         18,653 49-
Revelstoke—Hall's  Landing     4 SO
South Okanagan—
Kelowna-Westbank       $     495 37
Rainbow     60 00
Westbank    '       3,023 50
 3,57S 87
Total     $    24,313 05
fc Road Machinery.
Alberni   $       8,821 43
Cariboo  11,244 50
Columbia    .'  3,639 00
Comox    i  3,122 00
Cowichan    2,326 38
Cranbrook     2,631 60
Delta    . 5,542 59
Dewdney     4,597 00
Esquimalt    ,  2,657 15
Fernie     4,142 00
Fort George    1,757 57
Greenwood     5,003 00
Islands  2,100 00
Kamloops      2,276 00
Kaslo    !  589 19
Nanaimo     2,665 SO
Newcastle  1,065 SO 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. G 107
Road Machinery—Continued.
North Okanagan    $      2,177 00
North Vancouver  1,132 50
Omineca     19,881 40
Revelstoke    2,467 41
Similkameen     6,441 00
Slocan     258 00
South Okanagan    4,349 00
Trail     S,S68 85
Victoria     1,537 35
Miscellaneous  178 67
Total  $   111,472 19
Subsidies and Maintenance, Steamboats, Ferries, and
Bridge-tenders.
(Vote 249.)
Ferry—Agassiz-Rosedale  $    21,354 04
Alexandria     1,696 35
Avola  2,339 41
Barnston  2,524 20
Big Bar    093 25
Birch Island   82S 92
Blackpool     1,176 77
Braeside  911 57
Bridge River    367 50
Castlegar    5,478 49
„     , Cedarvale     699 01
Chinook Cove   800 84
„        Clearwater Crossing  1,222 04
Copper City  118 07
Dermody     497 27
Donald     21 25
Ducks      1.080 57
,.       East Summerland (Summerkmd-Naramata)    3,016 25
Francois Lake    9,394 00
Fort Fraser     4,249 80
Fort St. James   1,853 87
Goldstream     301 10
„       Gravel's (Quesnel River)    750 69
Hall's Landing   1,412 84
Harrison-Chilliwack  1,200 00
Hazelton     483 87
High Bar   1,092 08
Horsefly   (Wood-jam)     116 63
Hulatt   1,247 32
,,        Indian Reserve    '.  1,422 63
Kelowna-Westbank  4,000 00
„       Kitsault River   748 88
Kootenay River  (Reclamation Farm)     4,803 56
Ladner-Woodward     45,917 55
Lytton      m        959 93
„        Mission Ferry  16,988 76
McAlister     4,574 91 G 108
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Steamboats,  Ferries, and  Bridges-
Ferry—McBride	
McClure Station   	
Mount Olie  	
Nelson   	
Pacific    *	
Parson's   	
Pavilion (20-Mile Post above Lillooet)  	
Quesnel	
Remo   	
Salmon River  (second crossing)   	
Slocan River  (at Slocan)   	
Soda Creek 	
Sorrento-Scotch Creek	
Squilax	
Stuart Siding 	
Takia Lake 	
Taylor's Flat  	
Terrace	
Upper Nass River, Grease Harbour	
Usk	
Vavenby   	
Vinsulla  	
Bridge-tender—Canoe Pass   	
„ Eburne Bridge   	
„ Kamloops Bridge 	
Pitt River	
Subsidies—Arrowhead-Beaton	
„ Dog Lake	
„ Lower Shuswap Lake 	
„ Upper Shuswap Lake  	
Contingencies   	
-Continued.
1,269 79
818 50
1,418 19
27,442 31
426 09
237 94
2,111 97
2,023 15
2,022 72
1,085 11
606 94
1,491 21
5,578 56
2,772 87
278 40
200 00
1,146 01
5,138 98
500 00
1,415 63
1,307 67
899 80
720 00
1,080 00
540 00
1,680 00
3,900 00
1,250 00
200 00
4>000 00
64 40
Total     $   220,270 46
Special Warrants.
Special Warrant No. 11—" Rule oe the Road."
Expenditure    '$     12,488 51
Matsqui Drainage.
Commissions     $    60,000 00
"Mines Development Act," Supplementary.
(Vote 204.)
Alberni District.
Road—Bear River-Ptarmigan Mines  	
„       Saucy Lass Group-Ucluelef-Cascade 	
Trail—Bear River  	
„        Black Prince	
Atlin District.
Road—Bay View Mines 	
„       Easf Creek  	
„        North-east Fork of Kitsauit River 	
500 50
248
50
14
00
206
50
300
00
400
00
453
00 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. G 109
" Mines Development Act "—Continued.
Atlin District—Continued.
Trail—Columbia Group-Clearwater Creek   '■
„       East" side of Kitsault River  	
„       Hastings Arm   	
„        Homestake Mine  	
„        Illianee   	
„       Marmot River  	
„        Silverado .	
„        Vanguard  	
Columbia District.
Road—Ptarmigan Mine 	
Trail—Bugaboo   	
„        Canoe River  	
„        Canyon  Creek   	
„        Carbonate   	
„        Carbonate-Spruce Camp  	
„        South Fork of Spillimacheen River 	
Toby Creek	
Bridge—North Fork of Spillimacheen River	
Comox District.
Road—Marjorie Group from Vananda Mines 	
„        Vananda-Retriever Mines   	
Cowichan District.
Trail—Buttle Mountain     490 45
Cranbrook District.
Trail—Whitefish     142 50
Fernie District.
Trail—Sand Creek    299 50
Fort George District.
Road—Cameron's Property-Government Creek    999 00
Greenwood District.
Road—Providence Mine   	
„        Vendella Mine  	
Kaslo District.
Road—Charleston Mine-Wargo's Cabin 	
„        Idaho Landing-Porcupine Flats :	
„        Kaslo Creek  (South Fork)   	
„        True Fissure Mine  '.	
„        Utica 	
Trail—American   	
„       Cascade Creek 	
„       Dismuth 	
„        Fidelity   	
„       Foggy Day   	
„        Grant   	
Ibex   	
„        Silver Cup 	
„        Whitewater-Keystone Group 	
„       Woodbury Creek  	
300
00
883
83
500
00
1,071
47
4,258
51
1,394
05
1,500
00
150
00
303
CO
99
75
399 25
564
70
125
63
86
25
59 50
78 00
248
01
75
00
143
50
151
00
150
00
139
13
50
00
208
62
31
25
440
50
33
12
35
00
401
so
66 25
72 00
175
00
87
00
52
50
261
70
124
37 375
40
202
50
99
38
1,141
62
49 25
200
00
100
00
80
00
1,000
00
500
00
75
00
50
00
G 110 Public Works Report (1921-22).
" Mines Development Act "—Continued.
Lillooet District.
Road—Canoe Creek-Margaret Claim     $ 125 00
„        Canoe Creek-Goodenough Lake    180 00
Bridge—Suspension Bridge, Bridge River   400 00
North Vancouver District.
Trail—Indian River   100 00
Omineca District.
Road—Cronin   	
„        Empire Group   	
,,        Rocher Deboule 	
,,        Telkwa Collieries   	
Trail—Dome Mountain  	
Prince Rupert District.
Road—Collison Bay-Thunder Inlet 	
„        Thornhill Mountain   	
Trail—Beaver River  	
„        Kitnaiakwa 	
„        Lucy O'Neil Group-Maroon Creek      	
Revelstoke District.
Road—Montgomery Group-Downey Creek  	
Trail—Asbestos Claim (near Sidmouth)   	
Rossland District.
Trail—Murphy Creek     119 75
Slocan District.
Road—L.T.  Group   	
„        North Fork of Carpenter Creek  	
„        Ruth  Mine   	
„        Springer  Creek   	
„       Willow Point-Lemon Creek 	
Trail—Anna   	
„        California   	
„        Hampton   	
,,        Mountain Chief  	
Similkameen District.
Road—20-Mile Creek	
Trail—Roach River  	
„        Summit Canip   	
Bridge—Eagle Creek  	
Trail District.
Road—Elizabeth and Humming Bird Claims 	
„       49 Creek-Gold Hill Group  	
„       Lost Creek-United Verde Mine  	
Molly Gibson Mine	
„        Willow Point-Lemon Creek 	
Trail—Bayonne  	
„        Good Hope—Bird Creek Claim 	
„        Monarch Mine	
50 00
1,471
11
1.49
38
464
73
99
00
174
75
198
76
25
00
155
30
78
00
100 00
200 00
28
00
150
00
310
50
1,500
00
100 00
402
50
124
87
150 00
125 00 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 111
" Mines Development Act "—Continued.
Yale District.
Road—Basque Chemical Co.'s Spur  	
Trail—Ladner Creek 	
„ ,     Siwash Creek 	
Miscellaneous   	
Total   	
1,348 18
911 73
- 200 00
3^2 50
32.468 94
Relief Work.
(Vote 239a.)
Alberni District.
Road—Coombs    $
Comox District.
Road—Back   	
„        Higgin's and Knight  	
„        Muir and Hawkins 	
„        Ryan and Hudson	
Cowichan District.   ■
Road—Beach	
,,        Bench	
,,        Cameron and Taggart 	
Cherry Point   	
„        Cowichan Lake  	
„        Fisher	
„        Glenora   	
„        Halhead   	
„       Hinks-Parry   ■	
„       Indian   	
„        Koksilah Riverside 	
„        Lakeside   	
Moss   	
Old Koksilah   	
„        Old School-house	
Old Victoria   •	
„        Rowe's   	
„        Shawnigan-Mill Bay  	
„        Telegraph   	
,,        Vaux   	
„        Victoria-Campbell  River   	
Dewdney District.
Street—Railway   (west)    	
„ Seattle   	
Esquimalt District.
Road—Colwood   	
Duke's   	
Lagoon   	
Otter Point 	
Quarantine   	
Sooke   	
499 50
248
50
10 50
31
50
3
50
200
00
70 00
141
64
65
00
208 00
45
13
43
75
130
50
38
75
110 00
60
0#
50
00
56
OO
S4
94
110
00
191
13
05
00
40
OO
98
oo
75
00
714
89
360 00
13S
75
51 00
22
25
22
25
171
25
9
8S
804
64 G 112 Public Works Report (1921-22).
Relief Work—Continued.
Fernie District.
Road—Interprovincial  Highway     !
Fort George District.
Road—Fort  Fraser-Rorison   	
„        Government Creek   	
„        Sunset-Taylor's Flats	
Islands District.
Road—Burgoyne   	
„        Cranberry   	
„        Divide  	
„        General    	
North  End	
„       Robinson's   	
„        Upper Ganges   	
Nanaimo District.
Road—Departure Bay 	
„        Five Acres	
„        Harewood	
„        Old Victoria  	
„        South Wellington  	
„        Victoria-Campbell River	
Newcastle District.
Road—Beck's  	
„        Departure Bay 	
„        East Wellington	
„       Jingle Pot  	
„        Victoria-Campbell River	
North Okanagan District.
Road—Kelowna 	
North Vancouver District.
Road—Egmont   	
„        Roberts Creek	
,,        Skookumchuck  	
Prince Rupert District.
Road—Waterfront     4S1 50
Revelstoke, District.
Road—Beacon-Camborne     150 01
Bowie-Maiakwa  1,013 91
„       Bowie-Solsqua  454 06
Craigellachie-Malakwa     1,842 76
Craigellachie-Malakwa  (north)     233 14
„        Montana Slough  7 50
Olson's     77 52
,,        Protection, Lower Illecillewaet River   526 11
„        Revelstoke-Arrowhead  433 25
Revelstoke (east)     28 00
Revelstoke  (local)  95 60
Revelstoke (south)  290 25
,       Revelstoke (west)    407 25
4,493
04
336 00
521
60
2,001
22
150
16
10 00
184
00
100 00
7
00
7
00
40
50
-45
00
800
42
150
00
20
50
13(5
50
387
75
299
25
150
00
260
00
90
50
252
51
1,828 92
303
25
388
25
11
80 13 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 113
Relief Work—Continued.
Revelstoke District—Continued.
Road—Solsqua-Sicamous  $         318 38
Bridge—Upper Ilieciilewaet .,  16 35
Plant and tools    101 40
Trail District.
Trail—Kootenay River    15,587 09
Trail-Castlegar     2,938 01
Total    $     42,954 51
Capital Account.
STATUTORY EXPENDITURE.
" British Columbia Loan Act, 1919."
Sec. 7  (a).—Trunk and Main Roads.
Alberni—Tofino Ucluelet 	
Atlin—
Alice Arm $    3,151 85
Stewart-Hyder Trestle    17 23
Columbia—Main Trunk   (east)   	
Comox—
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour  $      100 00
Merville Land Settlement        2,649 84
Cranbrook-Interprovincial Highway, Section H 	
Delta-
Johnston   $ 84 77
Ladner Trunk  270 00
McLellan  S4 77
Provincial Highway       27,194 96
Esquimalt—
Goldstream $ 884 63
Sooke    ,  5,944 37
Vancouver Island Trunk  2,563 33
Fernie—Waterton Lake-Flathead  	
Fort George—Vanderhoof Land Settlement 	
Grand Forks—Rossland-Christian Lake  	
Islands—East Saanich	
North Okanagan—
Eagle Pass-Mara Lake   $    8,038 35
Mara-Sicamous  15 12
Omineca—
Colley Mountain   $        60 93
Fort George-Hazelton    1S1 80
Prince Rupert—Port Clements-Tlell 	
Revelstoke—Revelstoke  (west)   	
Richmond—Nos. 5 and 9, Lulu Island	
Saanich—Dean   	
S19 00
3,169 08
40 00
2,749 84
10,108 68-
27,634 50
9,392 33
435 50
318 25
2,600 50
10,851 90
8,053 47
242 73
309 25
39,069 14
16,374 00
7 90 " British Columbia Loan Act, 1919 "—Continued.
Sec. 7 (a).—Trunk and Main Roads—Continued.
Similkameen—Osoyoos-Sidiey Mountain    $ 45 50
Yale—Dewdney Trail-Hope Mountain   456 87
General engineering   434 50
Total   $   133,612 94
Expenditure   $133,012 94
By   Dominion   Government's   contribution   under
" Canada Highways Act, 1919 "       75,047 47
Total    $ 58,565 47
"Highway Loan Act, 1920."
Trunk and Main, Roads.
Alberni—Tofino-Ucluelet      $ 181 00
Atlin—Alice Arm Shore  25,457 83
Cariboo—
Cariboo Main   $ 27,464 36
Chilcotin Main .,        5.000 00
 32,464 36
Columbia—■
Findlay Creek   $      490 93
Main Trunk (east)          1,132 87
Togart Diversion   139 21
  1,763 01
Comox—
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour $   4,296 33
Merville Settlement          5,821 43
 10,117 76
Cranbrook—Interprovincial Highway   33,075 58
Delta—
Johnston $    1,821 07
Ladner Trunk, Sections A, C, and D      81,862 31
Ladner Trunk, Section B        41,472 75
Latimer           1,484 72
McLellan           1,810 28
Provincial Highway, Section A    892 54
Provincial Highwas', Sections C and D    141,785 99
South Approach, New- Westminster Bridge '.        2,281 95
Survey, Dyking Commissioners        15,000 00
       288,411 61
Dewdney—
Clarke Hill   $    1,001 S4
Dewdney Trunk, Section 1    910 83
Farm's           5,473 12
Hatzic Prairie-Dewdney         5,289 61
Ioco-Sunnyside         11,848 64
River        2,999 98
 •        27,524 02
Esquimalt—
Craigflower-Parsons Bridge  $      506 00
Detours     2,098 33
Goldstream     570 57
Island  Highway      45,531 34 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure.     . G 115
" Highway- Loan Act, 1920 "—Continued.
Trunk and Main Roads—Continued.
Esquimalt—Continued.
McTavish Ditch $        76 13
Sooke     645 00
 $    49,427 37
Fernie—Waterton Lake-Flathead    777 13
Fort George—
Blackwater-Stony Creek $      184 00
Fort George-Hazelton       12,918 49
Fort George-Hixon Creek      48,270 31
Fort George-Summit Lake        6,675 10
Grande Prairie  816 40
R.A. 11   4S8 04
R.A. 14  591 37
R.A. 18  528 20
R.A. 22   67 50
R.A. 30   74 00
R.A. 34   201 50
R.A. 38   370 50
R.A. 86   88 00
R.A. 209         1,238 80
Spirit River    576 00
Prince George  Settlement    ,        2,627 48
Vanderhoof Settlement          2,950 76
         78,072 45
Grand Forks—Rossland-Christina Lake          234,799 46
Islands—
East Saanich   '. $ 32,388 64
Detours           2,567 13
         34,955 77
Kamloops—
Chase-Squilax-Sorrento    , $   9,309 30
Kamloops-Chase Diversion     972 34
Kamloops-Falkland         13,334 37
Kaniloops-Savona          2,967 84
Old Enderby         4,250 00
Old Enderby, through McGuire's Orchard   194 87
Salmon Arm-Enderby        1,500 00
Salmon Arm-Grande Prairie           3,500 00
 36,028 72
Kaslo—
Argenta-Bulmer $        45 25
Camp Lister Settlement         2,365 91
Creston-Goatfell         14,796 45
Creston-Kuskanook         2,489 00
Houser-Argenta         2,353 21
         22,049 82
Lillooet—Lone Bute-Roe Lake   615 15
Nanaimo—
Island Highway $ 49,739 85
Robins Street       47,214 91
 96,954 76
North Okanagan—
Eagle Pass-Mara Lake  $ 48,486 64
Mara-Sicamous   -  110 40
48,597 04 G 116 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
" Highway Loan Act, 1920 "—Continued.
Trunk and Main Roads—Continued.
Omineca—
Colieymount    $    9,949 73
Fort George-Hazelton        13,601 96
North Francois Lake        1,046 54
 $    24,598 23
Prince Rupert—Port Clements-Tlell    9,598 65
Revelstoke—
Arrowhead   (north)    $     1,000 00
Columbia River Bridge           7,869 16
Revelstoke   (south)     597 08
Revelstoke   (west)       137,334 06
 146,800 30
Richmond—
Bridges, Woodward Landing  $    1,900 96
Culvert, No. 5 Road   846 32
Nos. 3 and 9 Roads      50.747 19
         53,494 47
Rossland—Rossland-Christina Lake     43,276 92
Similkameen—
Fairview-Penticton  $ 52,313 12
Osoyoos-Sidiey Mountain   '        8.364 11
 60,677 23
Slocan—
New Denver-Three Forks $ 11,491 48
Edgewood-Vernon         7.537 92
         19,029 40
South Okanagan—
K.L.O $       139 40
Kelowna-Vernon    775 16
Summeriand-Peaehland         12,945 74
 13,860 30
Trail—Trail-Castlegar  14,127 47
Yale—
1-Mile    $    3,212 16
West Side of Harrison River        20,198 41
 23,410 57
General  Engineering     3,724 02
Total     $1,434,470 40
Location of Roads.
Atlin—
Alice Arm Shore  $      202 60
Ardagh Extension   -  22 35
Bear River     48 00
Kitwauga-Audimaul     0 00
Kitwanga-Indian Reserve    32 40
Marmot River  20 45
Salmon River Extension    70 00
Stewart-Hyder    5 00
Chilliwack—  $ 406 SO
Sardis-Rosedale   $        42 00
Vedder Mountain Quarry   26 77
  68 77
Columbia—Main Trunk Diversion  2,917 37 13 .Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
G 117
1,357 19
2,051 41
5,401 30
42 55
1,704 65
" Highway' Loan Act, 1920 "—Continued.
Location of Roads—Continued.
Comox—
Island Highway $ 130 90
Lund-Powell River   161 22
Salmon River (east)     1,065 07
Cranbrook—
Cuanbrook-New Lake $ 23 35
Interprovincial  Highway     1,014 48
McDonald Landing   37 55
Wasa Bridge-Canal Flats   939 68
Wycliffe-Cherry Creek   ■  36 35
Delta-
Latimer     $ 26 50
Pacific Highway    3,704 41
Provincial Highway   570 69
Scott Diversion  1.099 70
Esquimalt—
Island Highway  $ 28 05
Pike Lake-Millstream    '   14 50
Fort George—Vanderhoof-Stuart Lake 	
Fernie—
Coal Creek Diversion  $ 250 92
Corbin    63 06
Elko-Morrassey  13 75
General   110 60
Newgate-Waldo   100 00
Wasa-Columbia    3.S68 10
Islands—
Ditch, East Saanich $ 73 70
John Dean    87 34
Kamloops—
Chase-Salmon Arm $ 254 40
Kamloops-Savona     94 50
Lillooet—Williams Lake-Iron Mines   	
Nanaimo—Island Highway    •	
Newcastle—Adshead  	
North Okanagan—Kelowna-Vernon Diversion 	
North Vancouver—Wilson Creek 	
Omineca—
Main Fraser Lake   $ 59 28
McDonald Landing   61 00
North Francois Lake   59 27
Prince Rupert—
Alice Arm Shore  $ 62 10
Breckenridge-Copper City     6 00
Cedarville-Woodeock     60 00
Corlette     11 60
4,406 43
161 04
34S 90
810 70
55 70
78 50
565 20
9 00
179 55 " Highway Loan Act, 1920 "—Continued.
Location of Roads—Continued.
Prince Rupert—Continued.
Cow Bay Crossing $ 99 35
Kallum Lake Main   11 60
Lakelse-Copper City     16 40
Lakelse-Hotsprings    30 25
McLeod   11 60
McPherscu    11 60
Port Clements-Tlell     55 35
Usk-Pitman   34 70
Usnick  25 00
General surveys  :  394 23
  $ 829 78
Revelstoke—
Revelstoke-Arrowhead $ 343 12
Revelstoke (south)    2,218 16
Revelstoke   (west)     169 05
 2,730 33
Rossland—Rossland-Christina Lake   5,172 34
Similkameen—
Fairview-Penticton Diversion  $ 1,318 15
Hope-Princeton    4,576 63
Penticton-Summerland     345 00
Trail—
Heddle $ 90 75
Kootenay River   196 87
Nelson-Ymir    2,740 92
South Fork of Salmon River  4,129 85
6,239 78
7.158 39
Yale—
Ashcroft-Spences Bridge    $      521 66
Harrison-Lillooet     610 52
Hope-Rosedale    226 60
Spences Bridge-Cache Creek   581 28
Spences Bridge-Boston Flats   3 75
  1,943 81
General surveys   700 00
Total      $    45,339 49
Road Machinery.
Chilliwack $ 232 50
Comox   81 95
Cowichan    31 50
Delta    232 50
Fernie    23 60
Fort George    27 50
Kamloops   '  1,657 40
Kaslo  483 87
Newcastle   12 98
Omineca    1,447 00
Rossland   1,284 96
 $      5,515 76
General engineering    1,0S0 14
Total     $      6,595 90 13 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. G 119
" Highway Loan Act, 1920 "—Continued.
Road Machinery—Continued.
Total expenditure, Roads     $1,434,470 40
Total expenditure, Location of Roads  45,339 49
Total expenditure, Road Machinery  6,595 90
Total expenditure    $1,486,405 79
By    Contribution,    Dominion    Government,
under " Canada Highways Act, 1919 "..       324,655 20
Total    $1,161,750 59
"Loan Act, 1921," Sec 6 (/).
British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited   $   108,S66 54
Statement of Expenditure.
Vote 240. Salaries and expenses, Minister's Office  $    12,812 65
241. Salaries and expenses, General Office  63,610 26
242. Maintenance of Parliament Buildings and Grounds  134,605 92
243. Maintenance of Government House and Grounds  23,988 13
244. Salaries and expenses, District Engineers  62,499 33
245. Salaries and expenses, Steam-boilers Inspection   55,165 07
246. Salaries and expenses, Electrical Energy Inspection  7,533 42
248. Roads, trails, and streets   $1,273,682 70
Bridges     510,968 07
Protection of river-banks  40,744 12
Wharves  24,313 05
Launch " I'll Away "   4,003 32
Road machinery   111,472 19
Miscellaneous   15,234 24
 1,980,417 69
„    249.    Subsidies and maintenance, Steamboats and Ferries  220,270 46
Special Warrant No. 11—" Rule of the Road "   12,488 51
Commissioners, Matsqui Drainage  60,000 00
" Mines Development Act"     32,468 94
Relief-work    42,954 51
" Loan Act, 1919," sec. 7 (a)^Trunk and main roads   $   133,612 94
" Highway Loan Act, 1920 "      1,486,405 79
$1,620,018 73
By Dominion Government's contribution under " Canada Highways Act, 1919 "   $ 75,047 47
324,655 20
       399,702 67
1,220,316 06
" Loan Act, 1921 "—British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited        108,866 54
Total     $4,037,997 49 G 120
Public Works Report (1921-22).
TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED.
April 1st, 1921, to March 31st, 1922.
Schools.
Work and Tenderer.
Canyon City :
George   Hendren   	
F. P. Rogers	
Castlegae :
Howard Ferguson  	
L. H. Rawlings  	
E. Croy  	
T. H. Waters & Co	
John Burns & Sons	
F. P. Rogers   	
Department's estimate   	
East Kelowna :
F. P. Rogers	
Dore & Ryan   	
Western Construction Co	
A. C. Bennett   	
Oyama—Addition :
F. P. Rogers  	
W. A. Cryderman  	
loco :
H. P. Leek  	
Dominion Construction Co	
F. P. Rogers  	
Hodgson, King & Marble	
B. J. Ryan Contracting Co	
R. C. Smith »,
T.   Carson   (by wire)    	
Langford—Addition:
Jas. Sraethurst	
W. M. Ross 	
Turk & Brandon   	
McWilliam & Munroe  	
F. P. Rogers   	
Procter:
W. F. Gooding  	
F.  P.  Rogers   	
McCharles & McDougall   	
Department's estimate   	
Smithers :
E. H. Shockley	
Western Construction Co	
Sangster & Co ,	
T. Carson (by wire)   	
Westbank :
Dore & Ryan   	
F. P. Rogers  	
Western Construction Co	
1'ahk :
F.  P. Rogers   	
,T. MacLeod  	
E. Croy 	
Sainsbury & Ryan  	
Amount.
$ 3,265 00
4.965 00
3,800 00
4,878 73
4,000 00
6,181 38
6,250 00
6,710 00
5,826 00
3.889 00
4,150 00
4,950 00
3,656 00
5,100 00
8,250 00
16,135 00
16,692 00
17,319 00
17,927 00
18,193 00
19,701 00
18,970 OO
2,445 00
2,714 00
2,900 00
2,980 00
4, 10 00
4.450 00
5,215 00
6,750 00
6,248 00
9.200 00
11,704 57
14.578 00
11,000 00
3,238 00
3,525 00
3.700 00
3,925 00
4,150 00
4.200 00
4.221  65
Remarks.
Awarded.
Considered too
low.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Received   too
late.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded. 13 Geo. 5
Tenders.
G 121
Schools—Continued.
Work and Tenderer.
Amount.
Remarks.
4,735 00
Awarded.
4,970 00
5,475 00
5,625 00
5,800 00
7,066 00
7,693 00
7,942 00
3,662 00
Received too
4,800 00
late.
4,878 73
4,728 00
Awarded.
4,950 00
14,286 00
Awarded.
16,500 00
16,800 00
17,111 00
18,010 00
16,770 00
Received  too
late.
33.987 00
41,985 00
29,987 00
Awarded.
32,995  00
33,747 00
10,950 00
11,800 00
12,239 05
2,850 00
4,040 00
5,200  00
Awarded.
3,632 62
Awarded.
3,745 00
4,427 00
6,100 00
32,400 00
Headquarters  at
Calgary.
32.434 00
Awarded.
34,900 00
35,000 00
35,797 00
36,404 00
38.531  00
39,982 00
40,412 00
41,740 00
44,989 00
45,961  30
46.844  00
49.478 00
5,000 00
Grant Mine :
F. P. Rogers   	
T.   Carson    	
L. C. Young  	
P. McPhee	
J.  Smethurst   	
McDonald, Watson & Withers 	
E. J. Ryan Contracting Co	
Malcolm McRae   	
G. F. Wilson  	
Department's estimate   	
Note.—Similar school built at Castlegar for	
Corbin :
A. McLean  	
R. A. Kerr   	
Ashcroft :
Western Construction Co	
R.  Stoddard   	
Macbeth & Miller  	
Clapperton & Woodward	
F. P. Rogers  	
T. Carson  	
Meeritt :
First call:
T. Carson   	
E. J. Ryan Contracting Co	
Second call:
T. Carson	
P. MacLean   	
E. J. Ryan Contracting Co	
Oliver :
First call, 2 rooms:
Robertson   &   Partners    	
AVestern Construction Co	
McLachlan & Clayton 	
Second call, 1 room:
E. Croy   	
F. P.  Rogers   	
E. Croy (2 rooms)  	
Union Bay :
Treheme & Edwards   	
L. C. Young   	
F. P.  Rogers   	
Phoenix Contracting Co	
Salmon Arm :
Bennett & White Construction Co	
M.  Vistaunet   	
McDougall & McNeill  	
T. Carson   	
P. Tardif & Co	
M. A. Clark	
H. J. Davies 	
Broley & Martin  	
Hodgson, King & Marble  	
Smith Bros. & Wilson  	
E. J. Ryan Construction Co	
Johnston & Co., Ltd	
Robertson & Partners  	
Western Construction Co	
(a.)   Okanagan Plumbing & Heating Co.  (heating only) G 122
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Schools—Continued.
Work and Tenderer.
Amount.
Remarks.
Cumberland—Plumbing and alterations :
McDowall & Mann   	
R.  J.  Nott   	
W. It. Menzies & Co	
L. C. Young  	
Hayward & Dods	
Deaf and Dumb School, Vancouver—Renovations and alterations
Dominion Construction Co	
E. D. Cook & Co	
E. J. Ryan Co	
E.   Chrystal  & Co	
Hodgson, King & Marble	
Western Construction Co	
G. M. Champion	
Smith Bros. & Wilson   	
C. F. Perry  	
Department's estimate   .	
(a.)   Light Electric Co.   (electric work only)	
7.540 00
8,437 00
8,683 00
9,213 00
9,000 00
19.270 00
19,500 00
20,700 00
20,885 60
21,221 00
22,136 00
23,800 00
26,700 00
27,867 00
25,000 00
1,900 00
Awarded.
Received  too
late.
Awarded.
Government Buildings, Gaols, etc.
Tranquille Barns :
B.C. Builders  	
Bennett  & White   	
Jardine  &  Forshaw   	
Macbeth & Miller   	
McDougall & McNeill	
Smith Bros. & Wilson   	
Western Construction Co	
Robb MacKay	
Essondale—Acute Building :
McDougall & McNeill  	
Hodgson, King & Marble   	
Smith Bros. & Wilson  	
Grant Smith & McDonnell   	
Carter Hall Aldinger Co	
E. J. Ryan Co	
Cranbrook Garage:
Faulds, McQueen & Pearce, Ltd
Jones  & Doris   	
F. P.  Rogers   	
Kamloops Garage :
Macbeth & Miller   	
Robb MacKay	
Wood-Foyster   Co	
F.  P. Rogers   	
Merritt Gaeage :
Philip   McLean   	
Department's estimate   	
Teanquille Nueses' Home :
H. J. Davies   	
Dominion  Construction  Co.   . ..
Johnston   &   Co	
Western Construction Co	
Robertson  &  Partners   	
E.  J. Ryan Co	
Smith Bros. & Wilson  	
32,863 00
35,827 00
39,655 00
41,723 00
44,999 00
45,050 00
54,416 00
56,619 15
573.800 00
874,869 00
587.400 00
594.042 00
610,929 00
040.000 00
5,546 00
5,757 90
7,100 00
4.450 00
5,184 75
6,000 00
7,400 00
3,350 00
3,360 00
20.353 00
29,444 00
29,891 35
31,500 00
31,500 00
31,995 00
32,300 00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded. 13 Geo. 5
Tenders.
G 123
Government Buildings, Gaols, etc—Continued.
Work and Tenderer.
Remarks.
Teanquille Nurses' Home—Heating :
Kamloops Plumbing & Heating Co	
Orr Bros	
C. Beck  	
Barr & Anderson 	
Murray   Bros.   ...,	
Leek & Co	
Campbell & Hillier  	
Teanquille Sanatorium—Alterations and repairs
T. Carson  	
Western Construction Co	
Alice Arm Lock-up.
T. W. & A. Falconer   	
Peince Rupert Court-house :
Building:
Albert  &  McCaffery   	
Dominion  Construction  Co	
Hodgson,  King & Marble   	
Heating:
■   R.  J.  Nott   	
McDowell  & Mann   	
Murray Bros., Ltd	
Kelly   &  Mallett   	
Or r Bros., Ltd	
Steen & Longwill	
Leek & Co	
Barr   &   Anderson   	
Kimberley Lock-up :
J.   H.  Perkins   	
F. P. Rogers	
Jones & Doris   	
Western Construction Co	
S. J. Ryan 	
4.19© OO
4,395 00
4,485 00
4,500 00
4,867 00
4,913 00
5,305 00
16,000 00
21,653 00
6.630 00
386.900 00
398,200 00
398,408 00
18,491 00
19,272 00
20,174 00
20,394 65
20,825 00
21,040 00
21,666 00
21,940 00
5,145 00
5.310 00
6,300 00
7,925 00
9,750 00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not   awarded.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Miscellaneous.
Oakalla Prison Chimney-stack :
Custodis Canadian Chimney Co	
F. P. Rogers  	
D. J. Curr	
Engineering Corporation,  Ltd.   (new stack   (Armco), painting,
removing old stack)
Nelson and CeestoS Ferey-baeges :
Kawlings & LaBrash	
M. Sutton et al	
G. W. Hale 	
D. M. Burgoyne	
Francois Lake Ferry-boat:
G.T.P. Drydock Co	
Atlas Boiler Works  	
Hoffar Motor Boat Co	
Rosedale Ferry-slip Pile-driving :
Palmer Bros ■•	
W. Greenlees	
4,100 00
5,397 00
5,500 00
1,050 00
7,946 90
8,243 00
9.496 89
9,780 00
24,500 00
25,766 00
38,755 00
3,200 00
4.620 00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Received  too
late.
Awarded.
Awarded. G 124
Public Works Report" (1921-22)
Miscellaneous—Continued.
Work and. Tenderer.
Agassiz Ferey-boat : ,
Westminster Marine Co	
D. P.  McMillan   	
Star Shipyards 	
B.C. Builders   	
Hoffar Motor Boat Co	
B.C. Marine	
Vancouver  Shipyards   	
Steam-crciser—Department of Boiler Inspection
Hoffar Motor Boat Co	
V. M. Defoe  	
Vancouver  Shipyards   	
G.T.P. Drydock Co	
Westminster Marine Railway   	
R. F. Stephens	
Victoria Machinery Depot  	
7,500 00
9,000 00
9,583 32
9,713 00
11,950 00
12*500 00
13,000 00
7,295 00
7,968 00
10,250 00
11,450 00
11,542 00
12.615 66
15,203 00
Remarks.
Awarded.
Sot awarded.
ROjADS.
Trans-Provincial Highway, Esquimalt District (V.I.)—Paving
Asphaltic Concrete '(Alternative):
Type (a):
Nickson Construction Co	
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Harrison & Lamond	
Type (b):
Nickson  Construction  Co	
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Harrison & Lamond	
Palmer Bros	
Type (c):
Columbia Bitulithic,  Ltd	
Cement Concrete (Alternative):
Nickson  Construction  Co	
Hodgson, King & Marble  	
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Harrison & Lamond	
Palmer Bros	
Alternative Tender for Pavement 6 inches thiols:
Nickson Construction Co. .-
East Saanich Road—Paving:
Asphaltic Concrete (Alternative)
Type (a):
Harrison & Lamond  	
Type (b):
Nickson Construction Co.   	
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Harrison & Lamond  	
Type (2a):
Harrison & Lamond	
Type (2b):
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Nickson Construction Co	
Harrison & Lamond   	
Cement Concrete (Alternative):
Nickson  Construction Co	
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Harrison & Lamond    '.	
Hodgson, King & Marble  	
Palmer Bros	
39,435 00
40,095 00
50,413 00
38,027 00
45,023 00
48,301 00
52,052 00
47,019 00
32,945 00
35,519 00
38,478 00
41,501 00
42,400 60
30,129 00
56,100 60
44,432 80
45,039 50
54,715 00
81,664 00
47,399 00
50,370 10
80,272 50
33.485 10
34,447 05
36,427 95
30,229 85
44,763 95
Awarded.
Awarded. 13 Geo. 5
Tenders.
G 125
Roads—Continu ed.
Work and Tenderer.
Amount.
Remarks.
East Saanich Road—Drainage Works
Type (1):
Nickson  Construction  Co.   . .
Hodgson, King & Marble  . . .
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Palmer Bros	
Harrison & Lamond   	
Type (2):
Nickson  Construction  Co.   . .
Hodgson, King & Marble  . . .
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Harrison & Lamond	
Moyie Lake Diversion :
Section H:
DeWolf & Ham  	
Section I:
DeWolf & Ham  	
Eagle Pass Road :
Mara Lake Section:
Smith & Tupper	
Clayton  Bros.   & Angelus   . .
Robertson & Partners, Ltd.  .
McDonald & Reda  	
Odin, Hansen & Co	
Kelowna-Vernon Road :
J. McAlpine & Co	
R. Munson & J. Thompson . .
Mauley Byrns	
Clayton Bros. & Angelus   . . .
Robertson & Partners	
Michael  Hereson   	
Odin  Hansen   	
Fort George-Hixon Creek :
Section 1:
David Jennings   	
Bowles & Pickard  	
Section 2:
Caine & Brawn	
David Jennings   	
Bowles & Pickard	
Alice Arm Shore Road :
D. II. Morrison	
Murray  Churchill	
0. M. Watson & Co	
J. It. Williams, Ltd	
Robertson & Partners, Ltd.  .
Fairview-Penticton Road :
Robertson & Partners   	
Nickson  Construction   Co.   . .
Donald Keith  	
Clayton Bros. & Angelus   . . .
$ 16,941 04
19,100 95
20,852 15
21,448 35
22,134 47
11.963 10
12.613 42-
14,814 80
14,836 52
87,370 50
7,953 50
25,356 80
30,423 00
32,238 65
38,399 49
39,430 27
31,212 80
32,000 00
36,577 00
38,059 25
39,793 40
47,603 60
48,053 06
24,450 00
25,336 00
20,168 45
21,899 00
22,806 50
20,245 00
23,091 50
23,380 50
23,472 50
26,038 10
33,936 28
35,677 00
37,309 00
33.036 28
Not awarded.
Not awarded.
Not awarded.
Not awarded.
Tender   considered too low.
Awarded.
Not awarded.
Deposit cheque
not marked.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Tender received
too late.
Deposit too
small. Cheque
not marked.
Awarded.
Awarded. G 126
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Roads—Continued.
Work and Tenderer.
Amount.
Remarks.
Trans-Provincial Highway, Nanaimo District (V.I.)—Pavin;
Type (a):
Harrison   &   Lamond   	
Cotton Co.,  Ltd	
Type (b):
Harrison  &  Lamond   	
Cotton  Co.,  Ltd	
Type (c):
Columbia Bitulithic,  Ltd	
Type (a):
Department's   estimate    	
Type (b):
Department's   estimate   	
Vancouver-Ladnee Road—Paving :
Asphaltic Concrete (Alternative):
Type (a):
Columbia  Bitulithic,  Ltd	
Harrison   &   Lamond   	
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Type (o):
Columbia Bitulithic,  Ltd	
Harrison   &  Lamond   	
Type (c):
Columbia Bitulithic,  Ltd	
Type (d):
Columbia Bitulithic,  Ltd	
Cement Concrete (Alternative):
Nickson  Construction  Co	
Vancouver   Cement  Co	
Palmer   Bros	
Hodgson, King & Marble  	
Harrison   &   Lamond   	
Cotton  Co.,  Ltd	
W. P. Tierney & Co	
Trans-Peovincial Highway, near Cloverdale—Paving :
Asphaltic Concrete (Alternative):
Type (a):
Cotton Co.,  Ltd .'	
Nickson Construction Co	
Type (b):
Cotton Co.,  Ltd	
Nickson Construction Co	
Cement Concrete (Alternative):
Palmer   Bros	
Vancouver   Cement Floor Co	
Nickson Construction Co	
Hodgson, King & Marble  	
Cotton  Co.,  Ltd	
Teans-Peovincial Highway, Serpentine Flats :
T. J.  Sullivan   	
Vancouver  Cement Floor Co	
Mayne Construction  Co	
Nickson Construction Co	
Palmer   Bros	
Northern Construction Co	
Cotton Co.,  Ltd	
Hodgson, King & Marble 	
$ 76,901 00
85,744 00
73,697 25
85,744 00
86,928 50
84,088 50
81,525 50
36,817 00
40,598 80
47,190 00
35,556 40
39,548 40
39,968 50
38,707 90
46,929 30
48,035 90
50,121 50
52,618 50
61,798 00
62,788 00
71,330 82
62,018 00
66,565 05
62,018 00
63,467 45
46,732 40
50,308 61
52,357 52
57,291 30
58,885 20
59,439 90
62,215 29
66,879 37
69,939 74
79,477 59
83,695 96
87,177 48
104,365 74
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Deposit cheque
not marked.
No deposit
cheque.
Deposit cheque
not marked.
Awarded. 13 Geo. 5                                                Tenders.
>
G 127
Roads—Continued.
Work and Tenderer.
Amount.
Remarks.
Trans-Provincial Highway, Rossland Christina Lake :
Robertson  &  Partners   	
Percentage
basis.
$166,712 25
169,720 75
169,924 50
170,141 50
171,762 50
181,989 00
223,844 75
92,013 90
89,834 80
98,239 90
96,060 80
79,112 00
85,495 30
77,198 00
84,538 30
85,492 00
83,578 00
161,740 26
179,617 90
157,328 16
174,976 56
160,934 16
7.641 48
9,097 00
7,368 57
8.642 15
8,414  73
119,325 80
137,599 00
103.697 00
122,210 00
cheque.
M. P. Tierney & Co	
No deposit
cheque.
Grant Smith & Co. & McDonnell, Ltd	
A. W. Davis  	
Ladnee-New AVestminster Road—Paving :
Section A:
Proposal A—Asphaltic Concrete on Metal Base:
Type (a):
Type (b):
Type (c):
Type (d):
Section C:
Proposal A:
Type (a):
Type (b):
Type (c):
Type (d):
Sections A and C (combined as One Contract):
Proposal A:
Type (a):
Cotton  Co.   Ltd	
Type (o):
Type (c):
Awarded.
Type (d):
Section D:
Asphaltic Concrete Resurfacing:
Type (a):
Type (b):
Type (c):
A. warded.
Type (d):
Section A:
Proposal B—Cement Concrete:
Section C:
Proposal B: G 128                                 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
	
Roads—Continued.
Work and Tenderer.
Amount.
Remarks.
Sections A and C (combined as One Contract):
Proposal B:
$223,254 90
263,802 00
295,570 00
78,561  00
97,980 00
104,050 00
104,200 00
122,782 00
129,550 00
Sections A and C (combined as One Contract):
Proposal C—Asphaltic Concrete on Cement Concrete Base:
Type (a):
Cotton Co., Ltd	
Hardy Bay Road:
Wharves.
Prince Rupert Whaef—Reconstruction of Part:
$3,700 00
Ferries.
Lowee Shuswap Lake Feeey Service :
$2,600 00
4,000 00
3,000 00
Awarded. Service
subsequently
discontinued.
Contract   renewed.
Awarded.
Upper Shuswap Lake Ferry Service :
Arrow Lakes Lumber Co., Ltd	
Summerland-Naramata :
Bridges.
Cheam  Slough Bridge :
$2,850 00
1,631  00
2,340 00
2,842 78
2,940 00
3,298 00
5,000 00
15,150 00
15,179 00
18,265 00
3,467 00
3,600 00
6,443 80
7,149 25
8,932 00
1,325 00
597 00
478 00
13,800 00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awar ded.
Clanwilliam Bridge—Erection only :
D. C. Fraser :     	
McCharles  &  McDougall	
McDonald, Watson & Wither	
Midway Bridge :
Robinson Bridge :
Westbridge Bridge—Erection only :
B. D. Griffin  	
Sicamous Foot-bridge—Material only :
Dominion Bridge Co.  (steel)   	
Sooke River Bridge : 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 129
REPORT OF CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MACHINERY.
New AVestminster, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
The Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In accordance with the provisions of the " Boilers Inspection Act," I have the honour
to submit to you the Twentieth Annual Report of the operation of the steam-boilers and machinery
inspection service for the year ending March 31st, 1922.
The personnel of the service at present consists of the Chief Inspector, twelve District
Inspectors, one clerk, one stenographer and filing and record clerk, and three stenographers,
located as follows: Chief Inspector, three Inspectors, one clerk, one stenographer and filing
and record clerk, and one stenographer and typist at the head' office in New Westminster,
District A; three Inspectors and one stenographer and typist in Victoria for District B; one
Inspector in Nelson for District C; three Inspectors and one stenographer and typist in
Vancouver for District D;   and one Inspector in Vernon for District E.
During the year the following changes of staff have taken place: Miss A. B. Mann, filing
clerk and stenographer at head office, left the service on April 30th, 1921. Miss R. G. Eddy
was promoted to fill the vacancy on May 1st, 1921, on which date Miss R. M. McMurphy was
appointed stenographer to fill the position previously held by Miss Eddy. Mrs. R. Thomas,
stenographer in the Vancouver Office, resigned on November 11th, 1921, when Miss E. H.
Lightfoot commenced as stenographer on the same date.
The following is a summary of the routine work performed in the office of the Chief
Inspector during the year, exclusive of inspections, engineers' examinations, and the work of
engineer surveying, details of which will be found in the reports of the Inspectors for the
different districts and that of the Chief Engineer Examiner:—
Letters inward    4,663
Letters outward     6,724
Telegrams inward          37
Telegrams outward        40
Inspectors' monthly reports examined       144
New designs examined, calculated, and reported on         95
Amendments to designs examined, calculated, and reported on        13
Fees collected for designs     $488
Number of miles travelled by Chief Inspector   2,844
I am pleased to report that there have been no boiler-explosions during the year, no accidents
resulting in fatal personal injury, and only four resulting in personal injury.
Under " Summary of Defects," it will be seen that eight safety-valves were found to be
overloaded, two of them to a dangerous extent. One boiler was found operating without a
safety-valve, one with the safety-valve inoperative, and twenty-two boilers with safety-valves
defective in construction. Twenty steam-pressure gauges were found inoperative and 202
defective.
The number of new boilers built for British Columbia was fifty-nine, as compared with 113
of the previous year; forty of these were built in British Columbia, six built under inspection
in Eastern Canada, eight built in Eastern Canada not under inspection, and five built in the
United States. Of these", fifty-six were put into operation during the year, the remainder being
held In stock.
The number of second-hand boilers imported was eighteen; from Eastern Canada eleven and
from the United States seven.
Boilers inspected for the first time during the year number 102; forty were taken out of
service being condemned as unfit  for further use.
The total number of boilers now on our books is 6,280.    Of these, 3,100 were inspected
internally and externally, six internally only, and 113 externally only.
9 The number of plates tested during the year was 112, as compared with 259 of the previous
year. Five plates were rejected as unfit for use in boiler-construction, as compared with three
of the previous year.
In addition to the usual work of this office, we have during the year undertaken extra work
as follows: Supervised repairs on Ladner-Woodward and Mission-Matsqui Ferries and supervised construction of new Agassiz-Rosedale Ferry; supervised repairs and operation in connection with steam plants in Government buildings; and carried on inspections for the Workmen's
Compensation Board.   The summary of inspections and safety orders made is attached hereto.
Appended you will find a summary of the total work done by all of the District Inspectors as
well as their separate reports, together with a summary of the work done for the Workmen's
Compensation Board.
In conclusion, I desire to thank you for your active interest in support of this office, and
also to thank the members of the staff for the efficient manner in which they carried out their
work during the year.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Inspector.
Summary of Total Work done by District Inspectors for Tear ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers   78
„           boiler-plates inspected    112
,,           boiler-plates rejected    5
„           boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  40
„           boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada  6
„           boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  8
„           new boilers inspected built in United States   5
„           new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   9
„           new boilers inspected  (total)     56
„           boilers imported from Eastern Canada   (second-hand)     11
„            boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)     7
„           boilers unclassified    24
„           first inspections    102
„           inspections, external and internal   2,820
„           internal Inspections only   6
„           external inspections only    113
„           special inspections after repairs   22
„           visits in addition to inspections   915
„           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   2,605
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced   S3
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs     3S
,,           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    42
„            boilers considered unfit for further use   6
„           accidents to engines and boilers  12
„           accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)     4
„           investigations    23
„           inspections completed •... 2,902
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   220,257
Number of defects observed as per summary   1,773
Number of defects considered dangerous   170
Inspection fees earned   $28,119.56
Inspection fees collected    $40,843.12
Miles travelled by the Inspector  54,584
Betters inward  6,203
Letters outward     10,065
Telegrams inward   56
Telegrams outward   37
Boilers taken out of service  46 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 131
Summary of Total Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers without safety-valves   1
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative   1
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded   8 2
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction   22 7
Boilers without pressure-gauges  1
Pressure-gauges inoperative    20 19
Pressure-gauges defective   •  282 15
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing  4 1
Cases of defective stays  9
Cases of broken rivets   5 1
Cases of defective riveting   4 3
Cases of broken stays or braces  '   70 6
■Cases of loose stays or braces   25
Boilers damaged by low water  6 1
Defective settings     96 16
Boilers with fractured plates  '  36 8
Boilers with burned plates   5 3
Boilers with blistered plates   13 1
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   71 10
Oases of internal corrosion   112
Cases of scale or encrustation   131 1
Cases of internal grooving   5 1
Cases of external corrosion   117 2
Cases of defective tubes  97 4
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement  17 5
Cases of broken feed-valves '.  4
Serious leakage around tube-ends   103 3
Serious leakage in rivet-joints   6 1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  76 26
Defective water-gauges     39 11
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  19 4
Water-columns without blow-outs   11 2
Cases of broken test-cocks   179
Connections to water-columns without valves   5
Neutral sheets not stayed .  3 1
Furnaces out of shape   12
Boilers without fusible plugs    IS 1
Boilers low at front end ■ 38 1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   26 3
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off  7
Defects in engines   16 1
Boilers without stop-valves   3
Cases of defective steam-pipes   9 7
Unclassified defects   41 3
Totals     1.773 170
John Peck,
Chief Inspector of Steam-boilers. G 132 Public Works Eeport  (1921-22).
Report of the Chief Examiner.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
The Honourable the Minister of Public Works,        ■
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you the following report with respect to examinations
of candidates for engineers' certificates for the year ending March 31st, 1922:—
During the year I have received 712 applications for examination for the different grades
of certificates.
On March 31st, 1921, I had on hand 247 applications, making a total of 959. Of these, 583
have been examined: 146 applicants have had their fees returned, as their testimonials did not
show the necessary service qualifications required by the Act. This leaves on the " Accepted for
Examination " file 230 application forms.
Results of Examinations.
No.
Class. examined. Passed. Failed.
First   7 5 2
Second    29 19 10
Third    132 90 42
Fourth     248 166 82
Special logging-donkey    49 38 11
Special creamery    9 7 2
Special heating   54 51 3
Special Doukhobor     3 2 1
Special road-roller   1 1
Temporary     51 51
Totals         5S3               430 153
Examination fees collected by Chief Inspector   $2,437 50
Examination fees collected by other Inspectors   75 00
Duplicate certificate fees   47 50
Total     $2,560 00
Trusting this report will meet with your approval.
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Inspector. 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 133
Workmen's Compensation Board.
Summary of Inspections and Safety- Orders for the Tear ending March 31st, 1922.
Inspector. Inspections.      Safe?y°Orders.     SpeclaL
District A—
J. D. Kay                      1
A. S. Bennett   45 246                 1
J. B. Tait    36 179
District B—■
S.  Baxter     21 51
J. Clark    68 .363
L. Duckitt   12 26
District C—■
A. Sutherland  7 36
District D—
Geo. O. Madigan   3 18
F. Bath     15 52
F. Biggam   22 45
John O'Neill '.  33 136                 1
District E—
Jas. Davidson  48 168
Totals   310' 1,320                 3 G 134 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Senior Inspector's Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the year ending March 31st, 1922.
The greater portion of my time has been occupied with the routine work of the head office,
engineers' examinations, and examining and figuring designs for new boilers and fittings.
Engineers' examinations were held during the first week of each month, and candidates for
special certificates were examined frequently between these times.
Designjwork fell off during this year, as firms appear to be waiting for the adoption of the
Canadian Interprovincial Regulations before sending in new designs. As the latter will probably
be adopted this year, there will be a large number of designs to be considered during the coining
year.
Work connected with other branches of the Public Works Department has again taken up
about 20 per cent, of my time. This consisted chiefly of supervising the construction of the new
Agassiz-Rosedale Ferry ; supervising repairs to the ferry-boats " Beaver " and " Eena "; inspecting and reporting on gasolene-launches, bridge-swing gearing, etc.; also work in connection with
public buildings,
Mr. Bennett was on leave of absence for three months. This necessitated considerably more
work for Mr. Tait and myself, but we were unable to do more than the most necessary inspections
in the south section of the district.
Appended is a detailed account of the work done.
Trusting this report meets with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John D. Kay/, '
Senior Inspector, District A.
ReMjIRKS.
Held engineers' examinations monthly and examined candidates for special certificates
between these.
Summary of Work done in District A for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers  78
inspections, external and internal    11
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   11
investigations    2
inspections  completed  11
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   785
Number of defects observed as per summary  18
Inspection fees earned   $128.35
Inspection fees collected  §128.35
Miles travelled by the Inspector   2,195
Letters inward  In head office
Letters outward   „
Telegrams inward   „
Telegrams outward   „
Work done for other Districts.
Supervising construction and machinery installation, making designs of details, etc., for
Agassiz-Rosedale Ferry. Also supervising repairs to Mission Ferry and Ladner Ferry. Time
required, about 85 days.
Making three inspections of Eburne Bridge electrical swing-gear. Time required, 2 days.
Inspecting launches for other departments, 2 days. Work in connection with public buildings,
7 days. 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 135
Summary' of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number. Dangerous.
Defective settings     2
Cases of internal corrosion (pitting)           10
Cases of external corrosion    6
Total           18
John D. Kay/,
Senior Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A and Head Office.
Inspector's Report, District A (South).
, New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 1922.
Owing to my absence in England for three months' leave a considerable number of boilers
in my district were not inspected.
I am pleased to say that no serious accidents occurred in this district during the year.
Trusting the enclosed report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
A. S. Bennett,
Inspector, District A (South).
Summary of Work done in District A (South) for Year ending March' 31st, 1922.
Number of inspections, external and internal   195
special inspections after repairs   1
visits in addition to inspections    38
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   177
boilers on which pressure was reduced   6
inspections completed  195
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   16,231
Number of defects observed as per summary  IIS
Number of defects considered dangerous   1
Inspection fees earned  $2,318.55
Inspection fees  collected     $3,020.93
Miles travelled by the Inspector  3,226
Letters outward  373
Work done for other Districts.
I made forty-five written reports and gave 246 orders for the Workmen's Compensation
Board.
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Pressure-gauges defective  	
Cases of broken stays or braces 	
Defective settings  	
Boilers with burned plates 	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
Cases of internal corrosion 	
Cases of scale or encrustation 	
Cases of external corrosion	
Number.
Dangerous
35
2
14
1
1
7
8
5
20 G 136
Public Works Eeport  (1921-2i
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects.
Cases of defective tubes	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement ...
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  ...'	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  	
Water-columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Boilers low at front end 	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Defects in engines  	
Number.
4
1
5
3
4
1
1
3
1
2
1
Dangerous.
Totals
      118 1
A. S. Bennett,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A (South).
Inspector's Report, District A (North).
New AVestminster, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 1922.
Boilers Nos. 40878 and 41388 were considered unfit for further service, otherwise the different
plants were found to be in a satisfactory condition.
Boiler No. 41388 developed a number of cracks close to the longitudinal seam on the back
sheets. This boiler had seen comparatively little service and the failure of the plates was due,
probably, to inferior workmanship rather than the style of joint-lap.
Boiler No. 40787, locomotive type, developed bad grooving on the crown-sheet at the rear
row of stays.
I am pleased to have to report no serious accidents to boilers or machinery.
A number of inspections were made for the Workmen's Compensation Board, and I found
the managements willing to co-operate in the " safety-first" movement.
Trusting this report meets with your approval,
I have, etc.,
J. B. Tait,
Inspector, District A (North).
Summary of Work done in District A (North) for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of inspections, external and internal	
special inspections after repairs	
visits in addition to inspections	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
boilers on which pressure was reduced	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions
boilers considered unfit for further use ....
accidents to engines and boilers	
investigations  	
inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary	
270
1
14
261
10
1
2
1
5
270
20,851
286 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 137
Summary of Work done in District A (North)—Continued.
Number of defects considered dangerous ...
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters outward	
Boilers taken out of service	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Pressure-gauges defective	
Cases of broken rivets	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates 	
Boilers with burned plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
Cases of internal corrosion	
Cases of scale or encrustation	
Cases of internal grooving	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes 	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Number.
10
2
10
3
1
4
46
33
5
19
12
2
1
28
8
2
6
$2,999.60
$3,963.65
, 6,507
276
2
Dangerous.
1
1
2
Totals        286 6
J. B. Tait,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A (North).
Summary of Total Work done in District A for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Results of Examinations.
Class.
First	
Second  	
Third  	
Fourth  	
Special logging-donkey
Special creamery  	
Special heating 	
Temporary   	
No.
examined.
Passed.
Failed
7
5
2
13
11
2
45
37
8
63
42
21
11
10
1
6
5
1
7
7
10
10
Totals         162
Summary of Work done.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers
inspections, external and internal	
special inspections after repairs 	
visits in addition to inspections	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
boilers on which pressure was reduced	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions	
boilers considered unfit for further use	
accidents to engines and boilers ■	
120
42
78
476
2
52
449
16
1
2
1 G 138
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Summary' of Work done—Continued.
Number of  investigations   	
„ inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary
Number of defects considered dangerous ...
Inspection fees earned 	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters outward	
Boilers taken out of service 	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Pressure-gauges defective  	
Cases of broken rivets	
Cases of broken stays or braces	
Defective settings   	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Boilers with burned plates 	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
Cases of internal corrosion 	
Oases of scale or encrustation	
Cases of internal grooving	
Cases of external corrosion	
Cases of defective tubes 	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water-columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Boilers low at front ehd	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Defects in engines 	
Number.
45
2
2
26
3
2
11
64
38
5
45
16
1
7
4
4
1
1
31
9
4
1
7
476
37,867
422
7
$5,446.50
$7,112,93
11,928
649
2
Dangerous.
1
Totals
      322 7
J. D. Kay,
A. S. Bennett,
J. B. Tait,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, District A. 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 139
Senior Inspector's Report, District B.
« Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
.   Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for the general work done in "this
district during the past twelve months:—
Engineers' examinations were held monthly in Victoria, tri-monthly in Nanaimo, and as
opportunity presented at Anyox, Atlin, Cumberland, Fraser Lake, Hutton, Alberni, Longworth,
Amsbury, Port Alice, Vanderhoof, Prince George, and Prince Rupert.
The Inspectors of this district examined 133 candidates, of whom eighty-six passed and
forty-seven failed to secure the desired grade of certificate they sat for.
I received thirty-two applications for examination in ;the various grades, with fifteen for
re-examination.    I approved of twenty-one of those and received $75 in fees.
During the year I travelled 7,301 miles, earned to the end of 1921 $2,030.35, and collected
$1,877.09. For the last three months, when the new order of paying annual fees prevailed, I
collected $5,938.25, but there are still a number of annual fees outstanding for the current year.
This office received 2,551 letters and mailed out 3,472.
I made some 193 inspections and a similar number of hydrostatic tests on steam-boilers,
finding 134 defects, of which fifteen were considered dangerous. As you will note, this is a
reduction from the numbers in previous years and would suggest greater care and efficiency on
the part of the respective engineers, combined, perhaps, with the steam-plant owners supplying
more aid and stores to their engineers.
A considerable number of surveys of machinery as regards safety-guards have been done on
behalf of the Workmen's Compensation Board, as well as the inspection of small boilers not
coming under the " Steam-boilers Inspection Act."
Few new boilers have been constructed in this district and few have heen brought in from
other parts outside the Province.
Frequent visits were made to the various steam plants as opportunity and time allowed, the
number of such visits being 143.
The number of accidents reported to this office have been reduced from the numbers so
reported in former years, one of which was an explosion of gas retained in the pockets, or
corners, of two water-tube boilers. It might be well for boilers fired by oil or gaseous fuel
to have suitable steam-jets installed in such corners to ensure the blowing-out of all explosive
gases retained therein before restarting operation. No one was hurt by the explosion, but
damage was done to the setting, being blown out.
One engineer was hurt by the breaking of the crank of his logging-donkey engine. Another
was slightly scalded by the fracture of an elbow on his steam-pipe. This elbow was rather thin
on one side and showed an old crack. Another engineer got his hands badly burned by electricity
while handling some of his lighting system. One mill was burned down and the engine was
damaged, while the boiler, which was in a separate room, escaped damage.
In conclusion, I would acknowledge the careful and efficient assistance of my two colleagues
in carrying out the inspection-work of this far-flung district.
I append the detail of work done and trust same meets with your approval.
i I have, etc.,
S. Baxter,
Senior Inspector, District B.
. Engineers' Examinations.
Number of applications for examinations     32
Number of applications for re-examination     15
Number of applications approved     21
Examination fees   $75.00 G 140
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Remarks.
Examinations held monthly in Victoria, tri-monthly at Nanaimo, and as opportunity presented
at Anyox, Atlin, Cumberland, Fraser Lake, Hutton, Alberni, Longworth, Amsbury, Port Alice,
Vanderhoof, Prince George, and Prince Rupert. %
Summary of Work done in District B tor Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of boiler-plates inspected 	
„ boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia
„ new boilers inspected built in British Columbia	
„ new boilers inspected  (total)	
„ boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)   	
„ boilers imported from United States (second-hand)  	
„ boilers unclassified  	
„ first inspections  	
inspections, external and internal	
„ external inspections only	
„ special inspections after repairs 	
„ visits in addition to inspections	
„ boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
„ boilers on which pressure was reduced	
„ boilers unsafe without extensive repairs 	
„ boilers repaired under Inspector's directions 	
„ accidents to engines and boilers	
„ accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)   	
„ investigations  	
„ inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary 	
Number of defects considered dangerous 	
Inspection fees earned 	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters inward  	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward 	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service	
Summary- of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction
Pressure-gauges inoperative   	
Pressure-gauges defective 	
Defective settings 	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
Cases of internal corrosion 	
Cases of scale or encrustation 	
Cases of external corrosion	
Cases of defective tubes 	
Cases of broken feed-valves	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks	
Defective water-gauges  	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water-columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Boilers without fusible plugs 	
Number.
2
2
24
12
5
3
2
6
2
2
12
5
4
3
3
31
7
27
8
5
10
3
1
1
12
188
5
3
143
193
8
1
5
5
2
3
193
14,9S1
134
15
036.55
721.59
7,301
2,551
3,472
28
19
25
Dangerous.
1
1
1
4
1
$2
?7 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 141
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects.                                                          Number. Dangerous.
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  5
Defects in engines           3 1
Cases of defective steam-pipes          1 1
Unclassified defects            1 1
Totals         135 16
S. Baxter,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peek, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, Neio Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 1922.
During the year I have inspected steam plants on Vancouver Island, the Northern Coast
and the Queen Charlotte Islands, and have also inspected plants for the Workmen's Compensation
Board, and am pleased to say most of the plants are now well and efficiently guarded.
Return-tube boiler No. 21138-B.C. failed at the longitudinal seam, second course, under a
hydrostatic test of 160 lb., the plate fracturing for 6 feet 6 inches along the line of rivet-heads.
On examination the fracture showed that the plate was cracked almost through, but this could
not be seen from the inside as the inside lap covered the crack. This boiler was only 11 years
old and had a treble-riveted lap-joint.
One engine was wrecked, due to the connecting-rod bolts at the crank end breaking, but
luckily no one was hurt.
Most of the plants I inspected were in an efficient condition, and I append herewith a
summary of work completed, which I trust will meet with your approval.
I have, etc.,
L. Duckitt,
Inspector, District B.
Remarks.
I assisted with examinations in Victoria and held examinations in Nanaimo, Port Alice, and
various places on the Northern Coast, details of which will be found in Mr. Baxter's report.
Summary of Work done in District B for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)    3
„ boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)     1
„ first inspections    4
„ inspections, external and internal    312
„ external inspections only    10
,, special inspections after repairs   2
„ visits in addition to inspections   53
„ boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   283
„ boilers on which pressure was reduced . ...-  lo
„ boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   1
„ boilers repaired under Inspector's directions   2
„ boilers considered unfit for further use   1
„ accidents to engines and boilers   2
„ inspections  completed     322
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  30,697 Summary of Work done in District B—Continued.
Number of defects observed as per summary '  220
Number of defects considered dangerous   79
Inspection fees earned  $2,862.30
Inspection fees collected   $2,613.65
Miles travelled by the Inspector  6,971
Boilers taken out of service  1
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded   2                   2
Boilers with safety-valves defective   5                   3
Pressure-gauges inoperative   18                18
Pressure-gauges defective     51
Cases of defective stays   1
Cases of defective riveting   1
Cases of broken stays or braces  14                   3
Cases of loose stays or braces   3
Defective settings     13                 11
Boilers with fractured plates   3                   2
Oases of internal corrosion   13
Cases of scale or encrustation   3                   1
Cases of external corrosion    12
Cases of defective tubes   23                   1
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement   6                   5
Serious leakage around tube-ends   3                   2
Serious leakage in rivet-joints  1                   1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   15                 15
Defective water-gauges     16                   8
Cases of broken test-cocks    5
Connections to water-columns without valves   1
Boilers without fusible plugs   2
Boilers low at front end    2
Cases of serious leakage of fittings    3                    3
Cases of defective steam-pipes   4                   4
Totals         220 79
Remarks.
I inspected two boilers for the Provincial Government of a total horse-power of 288, the
fees of $36.90 not being charged.
L. Duckitt,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B. 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 143
Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 1922.
This past year, despite seeming dull times, has been a very busy period. As usual, my work
carried me over most of Vancouver Island and to Anyox and along the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway.
At Anyox much trouble has been experienced for some years with blisters developing on the
lower tubes of the water-tube boilers. This trouble, it can now be correctly concluded, was due
to oil. As the sources of oil are removed and oil is cleared from the system, this trouble will
gradually disappear.
Many plants are introducing an increased volume of combustion-chambers, and in every
instance where this has been done high efficiency has resulted.
Many cases of broken stays on vertical boilers have been noted. In one case over forty
broken stays were marked for renewal. It is fortunate that broken stays are so easily detected.
The fire-box in this particular boiler was changing shape.
Once again I wish to remark on the usefulness of the test-slot in lap-seams. This test-slot
might well be made a little longer, as the grooving which it detects sometimes takes place back
from the edge of the inner plate.
The enclosed form gives the details of my work, which I trust you will find satisfactory.
• I have, etc.,
John Clark,
Inspector, District B.
Remarks.
Examinations were held in Victoria, Nanaimo, Cumberland, Prince Rupert, and at the
various places along the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
Summary of Work done in District B for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)    1
„           first inspections   .'  1
„           inspections, external and internal    327
„           external inspections only    39
„             special inspections after repairs    3
„           visits in addition to inspections  181
,,           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   317
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced   4
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   26
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions   8
,,           accidents to engines and boilers  2
„           investigations    ■ 4
„           inspections  completed     326
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   33,010
Number of defects observed as per summary  213
Number of defects considered dangerous   24
Inspection fees earned  $2,835.27
Inspection fees collected   $2,814.41
Miles travelled by the Inspector   7,495
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number. Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded          1
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  1 1
Pressure-gauges defective          55 5 G 144
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Dangerous.
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Cases of defective stays  7
Cases of defective riveting  1
Cases of broken stays or braces    14
Cases of loose stays or braces   3
Boilers damaged by low water  3
Defective settings     9
Boilers with fractured plates   2
Boilers with burned plates    1
Boilers with blistered plates    12
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets    15
Cases of internal corrosion   3
Cases of scale or encrustation   30
Cases of external corrosion  8
Cases of defective tubes  7
Serious leakage around tube-ends    12
Defective water-gauges   3
Broken blow-off pipes or. cocks   2
Water-columns without blow-outs   1
Cases of broken test-cocks   S
Furnaces out of shape '  7
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   2
Defects in engines    5
Unclassified defects   1
Totals     213
24
Remarks.
The above details show the work done by me for the past year.
John Clark,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
SUMMARY OF TOTAL WORK DONE IN DISTRICT B FOR YEAR
ENDING MARCH 31st, 1922.
Engineers' Examinations.
Number of applications for examinations ."  32
Number of applications for re-examination  15
Number of applications approved  21
Examination fees    $75.00
Results of ExjVminations.
No.
Class.                                               examined.          Passed. Failed.
Second  '         5                  2 3
Third          32                 17 15
Fourth          70                43 27
Special logging-donkey            8                   7 1
Special creamery          1 1
Special heating         16                 14 2
Temporary           10 10
Totals         142                 94 48 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 145
Summary of Work done.
Number of boiler-plates inspected  27
„           boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  8
„            new boilers inspected built in British Columbia    5
new boilers inspected (total)     10
„           boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)     7
„           boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)  2
,,           boilers unclassified    1
„           first inspections    17
„           inspections, external and internal    827
„           external inspections only    54
„           special inspections after repairs   S
„           visits in addition to inspections   377
„           boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   793
„           boilers on which pressure was reduced   27
„           boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   28
„           boilers repaired under Inspector's directions   15
„           boilers considered unfit for further use ....'  1
„           accidents to engines and boilers  9
„           accidents resulting in personal injury  (not fatal)     2
„           investigations    7
„           inspections completed     841
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  7S,6SS
Number of defects observed as per summary  567
Number of defects considered dangerous   118
Inspection fees earned      $7,733.92
Inspection fees collected    $13,149.65
Miles travelled by the Inspector  21,767
Letters  inward     2,551
Letters outward     3,472
Telegrams inward   28
Telegrams  outward     19
Boilers taken out of service  26
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. , Number. Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded   3                  2
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction   8                   5
Pressure-gauges inoperative     20                  19
Pressure-gauges defective     130                  6
Cases of defective stays  8
Cases of defective riveting   2
Cases of broken stays or braces   2S ,                6
Cases of loose stays or braces   6
Boilers damaged by low water    3
Defective settings  34                 15
Boilers with fractured plates   5                   2
Boilers with burned plates   1                  1
Boilers with blistered plates    12                   1
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   20                10
Cases of internal corrosion   19
Cases of scale or encrustation  35                   1
Cases of external corrosion  26
Cases of defective tubes  32                  1
Cases of defective feedjwater arrangement  6                   5
Cases of broken feed-valves   2
Serious leakage around tube-ends   27                   2
10 G 146 Public Works Report (1921-22).
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Serious leakage in rivet-joints     1 1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  20 19
Defective water-gauges  23 10
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks    5 1
Water-columns without blow-outs  4 1
Cases of broken test-cocks    44
Connections to water-columns without valves   1
Furnaces out of shape   7
Boilers without fusible plugs   9
Boilers low at front end   2
Cases of serious leakage of fittings    10 3
Defects in engines   8 1
Cases of defective steam-pipes   5 6
Unclassified defects   2 1
Totals      568 119
S. Baxter,
L. Duckitt,
J. Clark,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, District B.
Inspector's Report, District C.
Nelson, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit my tabulated report for the year ending March 31st, 1922, showing
the work done in this district.
I have, etc.,
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector, District 0.
Results of Examinations.
No.
Class. examined. Passed. Failed.
Second   5 2 3
Third    6 4 2
Fourth          10 6 4
Special logging-donkey    1 1
Special heating   1 1
Special Doukhobor  3 2 1
Temporary     2 2
Totals        28 IS 10
Remarks.
Applications on file, 19.   Third Class, 6 (3 notified twice, 3 once, 1 not notified) ;   Fourth
Class, 10 (2 notified 3 times, 5 twice, 3 once) ;   Special Doukhobor, 3 (1 notified once, 2 twice). 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 147
Summary/ of Work done in District C for Year ending M.i.HCH 31st, 1922.
Number of boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  1
boilers inspected built under inspection in Eastern Canada   6
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia    1
new boilers inspected (total)     7
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)     2
boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)     2
boilers unclassified    4
first inspections    16
inspections, external and internal    189
special inspections after repairs  3
visits in addition to inspections   144
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  176
boilers on which pressure was reduced    9
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   1
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    12
accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)    1
inspections completed     ■      186
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   17,841
Number of defects observed as per summary   351
Number of defects considered dangerous   11
Inspection fees earned     $2,334.26
Inspection fees collected      $3,466.82
Miles travelled by the Inspector   4,815
Letters inward  549
Letters outward     1,015
Telegrams inward  22
Telegrams  outward     14
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Pressure-gauges defective  	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing	
Cases of defective stays 	
Cases of broken rivets 	
Cases of defective riveting 	
Cases of broken stays or braces	
Cases of loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water  	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates	
Boilers with burned plates  	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  	
Cases of internal corrosion  	
Cases of scale or encrustation	
Cases of external corrosion  	
Cases of defective tubes	
Cases of defective feed-water.arrangement ..
Cases of broken feed-valves 	
Serious leakage around tube-ends	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  	
Defective water-gauges    '	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks	
Water-columns without blow-outs	
Cases of broken test-cocks  	
Connections to water-columns without valves
Neutral sheets not stayed 	
Number.
31
3
1
3
2
4
15
1
20
10
2
38
6
35
22
12
6
2
16
13
3
4
2
51
2
1
Dangerous G 148 PuBtic Works Report (1921-22).
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.        Dangerous.
Furnaces out of shape   3
Boilers without fusible plugs   6
Boilers low at front end   26
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  2
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off  1
Defects in engines   6
Boilers without stop-valves   3
Cases of defective steam-pipes   2
Totals     351                 11
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District C.
Senior Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report for the year ending March 31st, 1922
(see tabulated report).
During the year we have had very few accidents reported. Only one fatal accident occurred,
due to the engineer at the Fraser Valley dairy plant opening the blow-off into a drain under
repairs, scalding one of the men in the trench so badly that he only lived a short time.
There is an increase in fees collected, due to the change in time of collection. This also
entailed an increase in correspondence over last year.
The prospects for the coming year do not seem very bright. Very few of the logging camps
have opened up so far, and we can expect fewer boilers manufactured or shipped in unless there
is a greater improvement in conditions.
I have, etc.,
Geo. O. Madigan,
Senior Inspector, District D.
Remarks.
Most of my time was employed in office, on records, correspondence, arranging work for
Inspectors, and collecting fees.
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Inspection fees collected   $14,130.04
Miles travelled by the Inspector   57
Letters inward  2,470
Letters outward  3,946
Telegrams inward   3
Telegrams outward  2
George O. Madigan,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D. 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 149
Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster,
B.C.
Sir,—I have pleasure in forwarding you my report for the year 1922.
The majority of the inspections carried out during the year took place in logging camps and
canneries located between Vancouver and Smith Inlet, the number of camps visited being 142 and
containing 383 boilers. The launch " Adanac " was used for this purpose and covered a distance
of 2,280 miles.
I am pleased to inform you that the boilers and engines on the whole were found to be in
good condition, as the enclosed tabulated report goes to show.
Trusting that you will find the report satisfactory,
I have, etc.,
F. Bath,
Inspector, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1922,.
Number of boiler-plates inspected 	
„ hoilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia
„ new boilers inspected built in United States	
„ new boilers inspected  (total)   	
„ first inspections 	
„ inspections, external and internal  	
„ external inspections only  	
„ visits in addition to inspections 	
„ boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
„ boilers on which pressure was reduced	
„ inspections completed   	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected 	
Number of defects observed as per summary 	
Number of defects considered dangerous 	
Inspection fees earned (total shown in Mr. Madigan's report).
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative	
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction
Pressure-gauges defective    '	
Cases of broken stays or braces	
Cases of loose stays or braces 	
Boilers with fractured plates 	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes  	
Serious leakage around tube-ends 	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints 	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings 	
Number.
1
K
l
36
29
2
1
1
9
10
35
1
IS
2
2
2
4
424
IS
18
326
5
444
27,571
166
3
3,395
Dangerous. G 150
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number. Dangerous.
Cases of defective steam-pipes   2
Unclassified defects   5 2
Totals         166 3
F. Bath,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New, Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to remit with this a tabulated statement of inspection-work for the
year ending March 31st, 1921.
In volume there is shown a considerable shrinkage as compared with last year, due to the
general depression which has obtained in all business activities of the country. It will be
noticed, however, that the boiler-manufacturing industry in the Province practically filled all
local needs, the few exceptions being machine units of special design and purpose. The new
material for boiler-work has shown improvement in quality since the war, as is evidenced by
only one failure out of sixty-one plates.
Hoping this report will meet your approval, and thanking you personally for continued
support and help in the work.
I have, etc.,
Fred Biggam,
Inspector, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of boiler-plates inspected  	
boiler-plates rejected	
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection
new boilers inspected built in United States 	
new boilers inspected  (total)   	
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)   	
boilers imported from United States (second-hand)   	
boilers unclassified  	
first inspections  	
inspections, external and internal  	
internal inspections only	
external inspections only  	
special inspections after repairs 	
visits in addition to inspections 	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
boilers on which pressure was reduced  	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs 	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions	
inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  	
Number of defects observed as per summary 	
Number of defects considered dangerous 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
01
1
19
5
1
24
J.
3
6
25
212
4
21
3
122
213
5
3
3
244
17,867.9
251
8
1,956 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 151
Summary' of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers without safety-valves 	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction
Boilers without pressure-gauges	
Pressure-gauges defective  	
Cases of broken stays or braces	
Defective settings	
Boilers with fractured plates 	
Boilers with blistered plates	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets	
Cases of internal corrosion 	
Cases of scale or encrustation  	
Cases of external corrosion	
Cases of defective tubes	
Cases of defective feed-wafer arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends 	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Water-columns without blow-outs 	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Connections to water-columns without valves	
Boilers without fusible plugs 	
Boilers low at front end 	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings	
Defects in engines 	
Unclassified defects 	
dumber.
1
11
1
29
4
2
5
1
1
19
22
5
12
1
16
4
16
4
4
4
49
1
1
1
4
1
32
Dangerous.
Totals
      251 9
Fred Biggam,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—Please find attached annual report for year ending March 31st, 1922.
Although several cases of cracked shell-plate were observed, accidents with attendant loss
were avoided. Other defects required attention such as may be obtained within the plant. The
case of excessive vibration was a little unusual, requiring extra care in piping while persisting
in  search for the cause.    In  this  matter  improvements  are being  effected.
As illustrating the possibility of accident through frost, a boiler which had been left filled
with water through a period of disuse was found after a cold spell with its shell spiit open
and such other distortions as to eliminate the question of repairs.
So far as I have been able to observe, the standard of candidates for engineers' certificates
has been well maintained. G 152
Public Works Report (1921-22).
I would add that, in making inspections for the Workmen's Compensation Board, I find
that while causes of accident are noticeable, the tendency toward improvement is progressive
and suggestions are given careful attention on the whole.
Trusting that the work done in the past year is to your satisfaction.
I have, etc.,
John O'Neill,
Inspector, District D.
Summary' of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   20
boiler-plates rejected  4
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  6
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  1
new boilers inspected built in United States   3
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   3
new boilers inspected  (total)     8
boilers, etc., unclassified    11
first inspections    12
inspections, external and internal    453
internal inspections only   2
external inspections only  12
special inspections after repairs  0
visits in addition to inspections  140
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  453
boilers on which pressure was reduced   16
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   3
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  S
investigations    3
inspections completed  467
Total horse-power of boilers inspected       34,081.45
Number of defects observed as per summary   69
Number of defects considered dangerous   3
Inspection fees earned (total shown in Mr. Madigan's report).
Miles travelled by the Inspector    2,000
Boilers taken out of service    1
Work done for other Districts.
Inspected and tested No. 40449 at Great Northern Cannery. Sherman, Pacific Great Eastern,
for District A. Inspected and tested S.S. "Beaver's" boiler for Mr. Peck, Chief Inspector New
Westminster.    Inspected and tested No. 11613 at South Vancouver for District A.
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Pressure-gauges defective    p,
Cases of broken stays or braces   3
Boilers damaged by low water   1
Defective settings  5
Boilers with fractured plates  il
  2
  1
Dangerous.
Cases of internal corrosion
Cases of scale or encrustation  	
Cases of external corrosion  	
Cases of defective tubes  	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement
Serious leakage around tube-ends  	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  	
Defective water-gauges   	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  	
12
1
1
1
2 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 153
Dangerous.
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects Number.
Neutral sheets not stayed   1
Furnaces out of shape    2
Boilers without fusible plugs   1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   2
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off   3
Unclassified defects   (boiler-shell bulged,  vibration  of plant,  B.C.  Fir &
Cedar Co.)    2
Totals
69
Remarks,
Safety orders issued under Workmen's Compensation Board, 33.
John O'Neill,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
SUMMARY   OF   TOTAL   WORK   DONE   IN   DISTRICT   D   FOR   YEAR   ENDING
MARCH 31st, 1922.
Results of Examinations.
Class.
Second 	
Third 	
Fourth 	
Special   logging-donkey   ..
Special creamery 	
Special heating	
Special road-roller	
Temporary	
No.
examined.
Passed.
Failed
6
4
2
45
28
17
S3
60
23
29
20
9
1
1
26
25
1
1
1
17
17
Totals
208
155
53
Summary of Work done.
Number of boiler-plates inspected 	
boiler-plates rejected   	
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia ..
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection
new boilers inspected built in United States	
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia 	
new boilers inspected (total)   	
boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)   	
boilers imported from United States (second-hand)   	
boilers unclassified  	
first inspections 	
inspections, external  and internal   	
internal inspections oidy  	
external   inspections only   	
special inspections after repairs 	
visits in addition to inspections  	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
boilers on which pressure was reduced 	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions	
investigations  	
inspections completed   	
31
6
5
3
39
1
3
17
41
1,089
0
51
9
280
992
2(1
6
11
3
1,155 G 154
Public Works Report (1921-22).
Summary of Work done—Continued.
Total horse-power of boilers inspected	
Number of defects observed as per summary
Number of defects considered, dangerous
Inspection fees collected	
Miles travelled by the Inspector   	
Letters  inward   	
Letters outward   	
Telegrams   inward   	
Telegrams  outward   	
Boilers taken out of service  	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers without safety-valves 	
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative  	
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded   	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  	
Boilers without pressure-gauges  	
Pressure-gauges defective  	
Cases of broken stays or braces	
Cases of loose stays or braces  	
Boilers damaged by low water  	
Defective settings   	
Boilers with fractured plates 	
Boilers with blistered plates  	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion  	
Cases of scale or encrustation 	
Cases of external corrosion	
Cases of defective tubes  	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement 	
Serious leakage around tube-ends  	
Serious, leakage in rivet-joints 	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  	
Water-columns without blow-outs 	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Connections to water-columns without valves  	
Neutral sheets not stayed   	
Furnaces out of shape 	
Boilers without fusible plugs	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings 	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off
Defects in engines	
Cases of defective steam-pipes 	
Unclassified defects 	
sumber.
1
1
5
12
1
74
36
2
1
7
17
1
2
21
23
21
34
2
52
5
35
8
8
4
51
1
1
2
2
1
10
3
1
2
39
73,521
480
14
$14,130.04
8,008
2,470
3,946
3
2
1
Dangerous.
Totals
      486 15
G. O. Madigan,
F. Bath,
F. Biggam,
J. O'Neill,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, District D. 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 155
Inspector's Report, District E.
Vernon, B.C., April 1st,  1922.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, Neto Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 1922.
During the year there have been no accidents to boilers, but there were two cases of steam-
engines greatly exceeding the normal speed and one case of an engine being damaged by water.
There was no fatal accident, but in one of the cases of overspeed a planer attendant was
seriously hurt, and it was almost miraculous that it was not a fatality. In the other case two
fans were wrecked in a planing-mill.
In both these cases the governor was equipped with a good " knock-off " appliance. These
and other known cases of the failure of an apparently most satisfactory automatic safety appliance make it clear that an attendant should always be at hand to be ready to shut down an
engine when through friction, rupture, or slipping of the belt the governor fails to control. In
neither case was the speed sufficient to rupture the fly-wheel, but in both cases rotating pieces
in the mill were wrecked.
In the other accident water was pulled back from a hot pond through the exhaust-pipe into
the engine-cylinder, causing rupture.
A repetition of the latter accident has been guarded against by providing a large air-vent
on the exhaust-pipe between the pond and the cylinders.
During the year I inspected boilers in the Okanagan, Nicola, North Thompson, and
Columbia Valleys and in the Cariboo and Chilcotin Districts, and examined candidates for
engineers' certificates in Vernon, Kamloops, Golden, Revelstoke, and Merritt, as well as visited a
large number of plants and inspected the guards on machines for the Workmen's Compensation
Board.
It is very noticeable that the standard of guarding of machinery in all industries is becoming
high and the willingness of the operators to receive suggestions for improvements in guarding
is very gratifying.    It is bound to have the effect of reducing accidents considerably.
Trusting that this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
James Davidson,
Inspector, District E.
Results of Examinations.
Class.
Third  	
Fourth	
Special creamery
Special heating .
Temporary  	
No.
examined.
Passed.
Failed
4
4
22
15
7
1
1
4
4
12
12
Totals
43
36
Summary of Work done in District E for Year ending March 31st, 1922.
Number of boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection	
boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)   	
boilers unclassified  	
first inspections  '.	
inspections, external and internal   	
external inspections only 	
visits in addition to inspections 	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
boilers on which pressure was reduced 	
2
1
2
25
239
8
62
195 G 156
Public Works Report  (1921-22).
Summary of Work done in District E—Continued.
Number of boilers unsafe without extensive repairs	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions
boilers considered unfit for further use	
accidents to engines   	
accidents resulting in personal injury  (not fatal)
investigations  	
inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  	
Number of defects observed as per summary 	
Number of defects considered dangerous 	
Inspection fees earned 	
Inspection fees collected	
Miles travelled by the Inspector	
Letters inward   	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward 	
Telegrams outward   	
Boilers taken out of service	
$1
Summary or Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  	
Pressure-gauges defective   	
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing 	
Cases of defective riveting 	
Cases of loose stays or braces 	
Boilers damaged by low water 	
Defective settings   	
Boilers with fractured plates  	
Boilers with burned plates 	
Cases of internal corrosion 	
Cases of external corrosion   	
Cases of defective tubes  	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends 	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges   	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Cases of broken test-cocks	
Connections to water-columns without valves  	
Neutral sheets not stayed   	
Boilers without fusible plugs   	
Boilers low at front end  	
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off .
Cases of defective steam-pipes 	
Number.
1
6
244
12,340
42
19
,998 63
673 74
8.066
633
9S3
3
2
17
Dangerous.
2
4
1
3
Totals
        -12 19
Jas. Davidson,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District E. 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 157
LIST OF REGISTERED DESIGNS.
List of Boiler Manufacturers, with their Number of Approved and Registered Designs.
American Nitrogen Products Co., Vancouver, B.C  1
Alley & McLellan, Glasgow, Scotland   1
Allbright-Nell Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
American Radiator Co. of Canada, Toronto, Out  31
American Hoist & Derrick Co., St. Paul, Minn, U.S.A  26
Ames Iron Works, Oswego, N.Y., U.S.A  6
Atlas Engine Works, Indianapolis, U.S.A.  1
Averting & Porter, Rochester, England  1
Avery Co., Peoria, 111., U.S.A  2
Babcock & Wilcox, Renfrew, Scotland   27
Badenhausen Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  4
B.C. Iron Works, Victoria, B.C  1
B.C. Marine Railway Co., Vancouver and Victoria, B.C  6
Beatty, M., & Sons, Ltd., Welland, Out  15
Berg Machinery Manufacturing Co., Toronto, Ont  1
Bell, Robert, Engine & Threshing Co., Ltd., Seaforth, Ont  7
Brown Hoisting Co., Cleveland, Ohio., U.S.A  2
Bros., William, Minneapolis, U.S.A  7
Broderick Boiler Co., Unere, Ind., U.S.A  2
Browned Co., The, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A  3
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Bucyrus Co., South Milwaukee, U.S.A  23
Buffalo Steam Boiler Co., Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A  1
Canadian Allis-Chalmers, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  3
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto, Ont  22
Canadian Collieries, Ltd., Union Bay, B.C  1
Canada Iron Corporation, Ltd., Midland, Ont  6
Canadian Northern Railway, Winnipeg, Man  3
Canadian Talbot Boiler Co., Vancouver, B.C  1
Case, J. I., Threshing Co., Racine, Wis., U.S.A  22
Casey-Hedges Co., Ltd., Chattanooga, Tenn., U.S.A  1
Canadian Western Manufacturing & Supply Co., Calgary, Alta  1
Clyde Iron Works, Duluth, Minn., U.S.A  10
Climax Manufacturing Co., Corry, Pa., U.S.A  6
Clayton, Son & Co., Leeds, England   1
Columbiana Boiler Works Co., Ltd., Ohio, U.S.A  4
Continental Iron Works, New York, U.S.A  1
Cochrane & Co., Annan, Scotland  1
Decarie Safety Boiler Co., Vancouver, B.C  4
Diamond Boiler Works, Minneapolis, U.S.A  1
Doty Engine Works, Goderich, Ont  6
Dutton Co., C. IL, Kalamazoo, U.S.A  7
Engineering & Machine Co. of Canada, St. Catharines, Ont  95
Empire Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C  9
Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  5
Farquhar Co., A. B., York, Pa., U.S.A  7
Foden, Ltd., Sandback, England  2
Frost Manufacturing Co., Galesburgh, 111., U.S.A  38
Garr, Scott & Co., Richmond, Inch, U.S.A  1
Gem City Boiler Works, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Georgian Bay Engine Works, Midland, Ont  1 List of Boiler Manufacturers—Continued.
Goldie-McCulloch Co., Gait, Ont  51
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Co  2
Gray, Andrew, Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C  8
Great Northern Railway, Winnipeg, Man  2
Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont  21
Hamilton Manufacturing Co., W., Peterboro, Ont  1
Heaps Engineering Co., Ltd., New Westminster, B.C  4
Holt Manufacturing Co., Stockton, Cal., U.S.A  2
Houston, Stanwood & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Imperial Oil Co., Sarnia, Ont  6
International Engineering Works, Amherst, N.S.  34
International Boilers Works, Stroudsburg    2
Inglis Co., John, Toronto, Ont  8
Industrial Works, Bay City, Mich., U.S.A  3
Johnston Bros., Ferryburg, Pa., U.S.A  3
Keeler, E., Co., Williamsport, Pa., U.S.A  1
Kelly Springfield Road Roller Co., Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Kewanee Boiler Co., Kewanee, 111., U.S.A  15
Keystone Driller Co., Beaver Falls, Pa., U.S.A  3
Kidwell Boiler Co., Milwaukee, Wis., U.S.A  1
Leonard & Sons, E., London, Ont  37
Lefell & Co., James, Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Lidgerwood Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.A  4
Lyons Boiler Works, DePere, Wis., U.S.A  2
Manitowoc Iron Works, Manitowoc, Wis., U.S.A  2
Mann's Patent Steam Cart & Wagon, Leeds, England  3
Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C.    8
Marion Steam Shovel Co., Marion, Ohio, U.S.A  49
Marion Osgood Co., Marion, Ohio, U.S.A  6
Marsh & Henthorne, Belleville, Ont  10
Matheson & Co., J., Ltd., New Glasgow, N.S  10
Marshall & Sons Co., Ltd., Gainsborough, England   1
Mainland Iron Works, Vancouver, B.C  1
MacDougall Co., John, Caledonian Iron Works, Montreal, Que  3
Mechanical Manufacturing Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Murray-Latta Machine Works, Vancouver, B.C  1
Nagle Engine & Boiler Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
National Machinery Co., Vancouver, B.C  2
Nicol Boiler Works, Vancouver, B.C  2
Napanee Iron Works, Napanee, Out.  1
North Shore Iron AVorks, North Vancouver, B.C  41
Northern Aluminium Co., Toronto, Ont .'  3
Ofeldt Boiler Co., New York, N.Y., U.S.A  1
Oil City Boiler Works, Oil City, Pa., U.S.A  1
Orr & Sembower, Reading, Pa., U.S.A  19
Pennsylvania Boiler AVorks, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  3
Poison Iron Works, Toronto, Ont  1
Puget Sound Iron & Steel AA'orks, Tacoma, AVash., U.S.A  2
Risdon Locomotive & Iron Co., San Francisco, Cal., U.S.A  1
Robey & Co., Lincoln, England   2
Rooke, Wm., Arancouver, B.C  2
Ross & Howard Iron AVorks, Vancouver, B.C  35
Ruston-Proctor Co., Lincoln, England    7
Sawyer-Massey Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont  15
Seattle-Astoria Iron AVorks, Seattle, AVash., U.S.A ,. 1
Standard Iron AA^orks, Vancouver, B.C  1 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 159
List of Boiler Manufacturers—Continued.
Sterns Co., Erie, Pa., U.S.A ."  1
Schwab-Lezotte Boiler Co., Milwaukee, U.S.A  1
Sumner Iron Works, Everett, Wash., U.S.A  1
Swift & Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Taylor-Forbes & Co., Ltd., Arancouver, B.C  31
Thew Automatic Shovel Co., Lorraine, Ohio, U.S.A  5
Toronto Iron AVorks, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  1
Union Iron Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  48
Vancouver Engineering Works, Vancouver, B.C ,. 94
Victoria Machinery Depot Co., Arictoria, B.C  36
Vulcan Iron AVorks, Vancouver, B.C  70
Arulcan Iron Works, Seattle, AVash., U.S.A  1
Vulcan Iron AVorks, AVilkes-Barre, Pa., U.S.A  1
Vulcan Iron Works, Winnipeg, Man  4
Waterous Engine Works, Brantford, Ont  71
Washington Iron Works, Seattle, AVash., U.S.A  44
Western Dry Dock & Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Port Arthur, Ont  2
Wickes Boiler Co., Saginaw, Mich., U.S.A  5
Willamette Iron & Steel AVorks, Portland, Ore., U.S.A  11
List of Makers who have Registered and Approved Boiler Accessory Designs.
Spring Safety-valves.
6
in.
1
5
in.
1
in.
1
4
in.
1
3
1
2
3}
in.
2
1
3
in.
2
5
2
2
1
1
2i
in.
5
1
1
3
3
1
I
1
2
in.
5
H
in.
3
in.
3
i
in.
2
in.
2
i
in.
American Steam Gauge & Valve Co., Boston, U.S.A	
1
4
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
2
1
1
i
i
i
i
....
1
1
1
3
1
3
6
1
4
1
4
7
1
T. McAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B	
1
1
L
Main Stop-valves.
Crane & Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  10
Empire Manufacturing Co., London, Ont  8
G. M. Favis Regulator Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  16
Lagonda Manufacturing Co., Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A  13
Morrison, Jas., Brass Manufacturing Co., Toronto, Ont  2
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., AVindsor, Ont  2
Sumner Iron Works, Everett, AArash., U.S.A  1
Steam-gauges.
Ashcroft Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  5
Federal Gauge Co., Chicago, UL, U.S.A  3
Marshall-town Manufacturing Co., Marshalltown, la., U.S.A  1
Morrison, Jas., Brass Manufacturing Co., Toronto, Ont       2
Rooke, AV. M., & Co., Vancouver, B.C       1
United States Gauge Co., New York, U.S.A.   . . :v       2 G 160 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
List of Makers of Boiler Accessories—Continued.
Blow-off Cocks and Valves.
Babcock & AVilcox, Montreal, Que  2
Crane Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  4
Cadman Manufacturing Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A  1
Elliott Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A  1
Engineering Specialties Co., Toronto, Ont t... 4
Homestead Aralve Manufacturing, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A ;  2
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  3
Judson Governor Co., Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A  1
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A  6
Morrison, Jas., Brass Manufacturing Co., Toronto, Ont  1
Safety Appara
Kilkenny Automatic Safety Appliance Co., Walla AA'alla, AATash., U.S.A  1
Water-gauge Fittings.
Babcock & Wilcox, Montreal, Que  4
Edna Brass Manufacturing Co., Cincinnati, U.S.A  1
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  1
McAvity & Sons, T., St. John, N.B  1
Morrison, Jas., Brass Manufacturing Co., Toronto, Ont  3
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  4
Huyette, Paul B„ Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  1
Waterous Engine AVorks, Brantford, Ont  1
Test-cocks (or Valves).
Babcock & Wilcox, Montreal, Que  1
Case, J. I., Threshing Machine Co., Racine, AVis., U.S.A  1
Huyette, Paul B., Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  1
Morrison, Jas., Brass Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
McAvity, T., & Sons, St. John, N.B  2
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., AVindsor, Out  2
Superheaters.
Moore & Co., Seattle, Wash., U.S.A  1
Power Specialty Co., New York, U.S.A  3
Rooke, Win., & Co., Vancouver, B.C  1
Economizers.
Green Economizer Co., Toronto, Ont  3
Sturtevant, B. F., Co., Boston, Mass., U.S.A  1
Combined Check and Feed Valves.
Babcock & Wilcox, Montreal, Que  1
Lagondo Manufacturing Co., Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Lytte Manufacturing Co., Montreal, Que  2
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  3
Retorts, Digesters, etc.
Alaska-Copper Co., Arancouver, B.C Copper kettle 1
Black Clawston Co., Hamilton, Ont Mangle-cylinder 1
Bucyrus Copper Co., Bucyrus, U.S.A Copper kettle 1
Engineering & Machine Co. of Canada  Drying-rolls 1 13 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. G 161
List of Makers of Boiler Accessories—Continued.
Letson & Burpee, Ltd., Arancouver, B.C Retort 1
Schaake Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C Retort 3
Schaake Co., Ltd., Arancouver, B.C Steam-jacketed kettle 1
ATulcan Iron AVorks, ATancouver, B.C Digester 4
Arulcan Iron Works, Arancouver, B.C Water-tank 1
Booth Coulter, Toronto, Ont Copper kettle 8
Dominion Engineering Co., Ontario   Drying-rolls 1
Ross & Howard, Vancouver, B.C Corliss-cylinder 1
Manitowoc Engineering Works, Manitowoc, Wis., U.S.A Digester 1
Canadian Ingersoll-Rand Co., Ontario Tire-vulcanizer 1
Sumner Iron Works, Everett, Wash Engine-cylinder 1
Pfaudler Co., Rochester  Milk-evaporators 2
Barrett & Co., Marpole, B.C Tube-still 1
Barrett & Co., Marpole, B.C Retort 1
Canadian Laundry Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont Body-ironer 1
Canadian Laundry Machinery Co., Toronto, Ont Flat-ironer 1
City Welders, Arancouver, B.C Copper kettle 1
Heaps Engineering Co., New Westminster, B.C Rubber digester 1
Oakland Brass Co., Oakland, Cal Vacuum pan 1
Pacific Copper Co., Arancouver, B.C Copper kettle 4
Patterson Boiler AVorks, Vancouver, B.C , Fish-tank 1
Sverson Evaporating Co., Chicago, 111 Evaporator 1
Arancouver Engineering Co., Arancouver, B.C Digester 5
Arancouver Engineering Co., A7ancouver, B.C Nitrate-drier 1
Arancouver Engineering Co., Arancouver, B.C Air-receiver 1
Woodcraft Co., St. Paul, U.S.A Tire-vulcanizer 1
AVillamette Iron & Steel Co., Portland, Ore Digester 1
Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt, B.C Copper kettle 3
Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt, B.C Saturating-tank 1
North Shore Iron Works, North Arancouver, B.C Still 1
AVaterous Engine AVorks, Brantford, Out Boiler-stays 1
Feed-water Regulators.
Northern Equipment Co., Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
Babcock & Wilcox, Montreal, Que  1
Oil-burners.
Willamette Iron & Steel Co., Portland, Ore., U.S.A  1
Return-steam Traps.
Cole, G. AV., Toronto, Ont  7
Steam-separators.
Cochrane Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  1
Stokers.
National Machinery Co., Arancouver, B.C McLean underfeed stoker 1
Check-valves.
Crane Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A.  1
Governors.
Sumner Iron Works, Everett, AVash., U.S.A  1
11 ENGINEERS WHO OBTAINED CERTIFICATES.
(Year ending March 31st, 1922.)
First Class.
Alexander, Albert    14975 Crawford, James
Bonallo, Keir    15453 Gibson, AV. R. . .
Cartwright, Frank     15012
Second Class.
Antrobus, James   15164
Brown,  E.  H  15012
Campbell, C. C  15260
Cain, R. L  15458
Charles, A. H  15461
Doekar, F. W  15089
Drysdale, J. H  15364
Etter, M. M  15471
Greeushields,  George     15073
McWilliam, Robert  15100
McKay, W. B	
Mercer, C. II	
Noble, A. J	
Neilson, A. S	
Oxley, Lonzo  	
Pilchard, A. E.
Rattray, Alexander
Simmer, Ernest . . .
Taylor, R. L	
Third Class.
Adams, W. R   15101
Allard, R. P. B   15444
Angus, AVilliam    15020
Anderson, James    15324
Austin, A.  G   15447
Baldwin, AV. J   15125
Beatty, J. R   15126
Brown, R. G   14977
Broedell, W. H   15378
Braithwaite, C. R   15455
Bunar, August   14963
Caldwill, J. F   15380
Charters, W. M   15168
Chatwin, A. G   15460
Cordwell, Richard    15193
Crandell, H. W. B   15466
Dean, D. R   15263
Dickson, A. H    15000
Dickson, Robert    15362
Duck, A. G    15208
Edwards, W. C   14683
Edward, P. L   15069
Elliott, A. R   15410
Evans, A. H    15382
Fowler,  Jasper       15294
Gait, AVilliam      15092
Giberson, Zibea    14966
Gilligan, J. H   14980
Gray, William    15475
Gray, G. AV   15477
Hill, M. F   15480
Holmes, T. G   15094
Hopper, G. B   15095
Ho'by, M. J   15482
Houlden, F. M. M  15484
Ibbott, C. J   15486
Isbister, William   15140
Jackson, E. H. W   15141
Jenson, C.  R   15169
Jones, L. S  15109
Karr,  Sandon      15265
Kettleson,   Elmer      14967
King, Earl     15496
Knowles, T. 0   15497
Lloyd, AV. J   15030
Loyst, L. S	
Lyon, Alexander  . .
Mavon, S. G	
Major, AV. D	
Mason, C. G	
Marrion, T. J.  . .'. .
Miller, James	
Mowatt, II. M. ...
Morse, E. A. W.  . .
Morris, J. E	
Munro,  John   	
Murphy, G. C	
McGregor, Forbes .
McKean, Robert  . .
McKay, S. F	
McKechuie, A. H.
McKee, Alfred ....
McMillan, Robt.   . .
McNutt, J. L	
McNaughton, A. F.
Nicholson, J. N. . .
North, Horace ....
Ogilvie, D. W. C. .
Patterson,  AV.  G.   .
Peck, H. F	
Pearse,  H.  E	
Piper, H. E	
Purdy, A. L. M.  . .
Pye, E. II	
Rice, B. R	
Robertson, John . .
Robertson, G. A. . .
Shantz, G. G	
Stuart, A. G	
Stone, Albert	
Stewart, Thomas . .
Struthers, Robert .
Strachan, E. M.
Stark, AV.  H	
Taylor, J. J	
Tyler, AV. E	
A'anderburg, C. II.
AVarne, J. T	
Wilson, Allan ....
AVright, AV. M.  ...
15467
14965
15252
15422
15426
15175
15018
15148
15528
14970
15396
15502
15503
15031
15096
15142
15239
15509
14968
15511
15512
15387
15514
15517
14969
15172
1520S
15369
150S0
15081
15320
15254
15520
152S3
14971
15271
15522
15524
15272
15035
15083
15059
15273
15203
15042
15113
15243
15307
15344
15540
14996
15398
15183
15157
15323
15549 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 163
Anderson, L. N.   ...
Atkinson, Thomas . .
Barnes, L. F	
Baker, Robert  	
Benjamin, H. F.  . ..
Biggs,  John   	
Bird, F. P	
Bordewick, Harold  .
Browning,  James   . .
Brown, A. F	
Bray, AV. A	
Bruhn, R. E	
Bundy, Joseph	
Buswell, Stanley . . .
Burr, A. C	
Cameron, J. L	
Cardinell, F. O	
Campbell, J. A	
Chattel, Thomas  . . .
Clark, AV. E	
Colling,  Edwin   ....
Coultish, R. W	
Cook, S. M	
Code, AAr. M	
Cobb, A. P	
Cruse, C. E	
Currie,   Wm	
Davies, F. B	
Darville,   J.   S	
Derbyshire, Thomas
Dion, A. J	
Downes, E. J	
Donovan,  Cornelius
Downton, G. H.  ...
Drysdale, C. F	
Duff,  Robert   	
Dunn, E. A	
Fades, J. E	
Evans, T. M	
Ferguson, C. J	
Foley,  Carl   	
Forsyth, A. B	
Friel, James	
Freeland, Frank  . . .
Fraser,   Roddie   ....
Fulton, H.  G	
Galloway, R. A.  ...
Gamon, AAr. S	
Gibson,   Hugh   	
Gilchrist, A. M.   ...
Gidley, J. AV	
Gianninni, Angelo . .
Glover, Edward
Graham, Williard  . .
Gruhs, Bernard  ....
Grindrod, Albert  . ..
Graves, R. D	
Hanson, C. M	
Hagen, Wm	
Hauck, Carl	
Hague, G. S	
Herman, AV. P	
Henderson,  Alex.   . .
Hiland, AV. B	
Hooper, Douglas . . .
Horton, J. C	
Houlden, F. W. M. .
Fourth Class.    •
15545 Huzzey, T. F	
15010 Hunt, Morley	
15332 Isbister, T. F	
15448 Jackson, Leonard  ..
14976 James, W. D	
15451 Jenson, T. A	
15191 Jessop, C. J	
15452 Jones,  Hugh   	
15127 Johnson, Harry  ....
15314 Johnson, John  	
15349 Kelly, Edward	
15377 Laird, II. E	
15087 Laviolette, James  . .
15348 Lemieux, F. D	
15457 Mechin, E. V	
15128 Mason, E. G	
15167 Marsh, E. H	
15219 Manuel, E. J	
15233 Merry, D. B	
15381 Mitchell,  Thomas   . .
14978 -     Menchion, R. B.  ...
14979 Mills, C. S	
15360 Mitchell, G. H	
15462 Mollison, W. C	
15463 Murphy, J. P	
15335 McBrier, James	
15409 McCallum, John ....
15325 McGregor, Forbes ..
15301 McCallum, David  ..
15015 McDonald, James  . .
15067 McKnight, P. T. ...
15052 McLean, H. D	
15068 McLaughlan, Edwin
15131 Macphaiden, F. H. .
15363 McQuarrie, R. S.
15132 Nelson, J. N	
15336 Nelson, Frank  	
15209 Nicholson, J. D.  ...
15133 Nicholls, AV. H	
15071 Nicholson, John ....
15105 Olsen, G. O	
15472 Patterson, R. W.
15090 Patterson, John ....
15106 Parker, Thomas	
15412 Paul, W. R	
15091 Pettipiece,  G.  E.
15234 Philpot, G. H	
15414 Phillips, P. R	
15016 Pierce, H. S	
15054 Pottruff, AV. H	
15235 Power, F. P	
15415 Price, Charles  	
15002 Price, C. J. D	
15197 Radelet, Leon   	
15317 Richards, Harry   . . .
15350 Rice, E. G	
15476 Ridd, C. II	
15221 Riley, John	
15236 Robertson, Thomas .
15365 Ross, George  	
15417 Roots, G. J	
15074 Roberts, John	
15318 Ross, K. A	
15093 Robinson, C. E	
14984 Robertson, John	
15366 Ross, J. S	
15483 Rutherford, Thomas
15281
15485 '
15487
15489
15492
1502S
15386
14986
15029
15264
15419
15498
15499
15500
14987
15110
15266
15505
15506
15144
15251
15319
15508
15005
15199
15077
15032
15033
15368
15516
15223
15079
15339
15388
15519
15174
15253
15270
15321
15425
15082
15391
15427
15428
15521
15295
15147
15255
15525
15111
15392
15178
15526
15306
15037
15151
15152
15429
14990
14991
15038
15039
15215
15256
15342
15393
15006 Fourth Class—Continued.
Sawyer, S. A  14992
Sharp, Nicholas  14993
Sampson, James  15534
Scott, Robert   15154
Shanohan, J. F  15099
Sherberg, Oliver  15306
Shaw, R. W  15343
Sigurdson, Harry    15394
Smith,  Sidney     15275
Smith, John   15296
Smith, G. AV  15430
Smith, V. J  15537
Stevens, Frank    14995
Sutherland, F. AV  15431
Swan, E. G  15322
Taylor,  C. H  15007
Taylor, Randall	
Teck, Andrew   	
Thomas, Joseph
Trapp, G. H	
Turnbull, R. E	
Upton, H. C	
Van der Wall, AVill
Vey, Frederick	
Warnock, Joseph ...
AA'atson, John   	
Whistler, H. W.  . . .
AA7hite, Christopher .
AVilliams, D. P	
AVilson, R. C	
Wilson, L. V. '	
Young, T. H	
Special Logging-donkey.
Baird, AVilliam      15327
Bayne, A. P   15401
Bell, David   15011
Berglund, N. J   15165
Beckitt, M. L   15279
Bond, Wm   15454
Bruce, Russell     15456
Buck, CM   15297
Buck, J. M   15379
Carlson, Gus     15192
Caulfield,  J. W   15212
Choate, F. D   15051
Chisholm, Alex   15130
Cockerill, Harold   15103
Coulson, G. S   15104
Douglas, Robert   15469
Ennis, AV. L   15220
Finnie, C. F    15354
Fraser, James   15413
Gilfillan, Clifford . .
Jack, Alexander .. .
Johnson, Carl	
Johnston, Rolapd ..
Lindstrom, Charles
Meyers, AV. N. ....
McLellan, Collin  . .
Nielson, F. L	
Olson, Frank  	
Peterson, Charlie ..
Pealo, G. A	
Rutgers, Pilchard .
Shannon, John ....
Shepherd, F. E. ...
Shimek, F. P	
Ternan, A. W	
Thompson, James .
Torhier, Rudy ....
Walker, S. A	
Special Heating.
Allan, William  15206
Alexander, Horatio  15312
Anderson, W. J  15190
Armstrong, William    15313
Baker, H. W  15207
Bloom, A. C  15116
Blackinore, W. K  15359
Cleasby, Thomas   15280
Cocroft, Henry  15088
Cox, AV. R  15261
Currie, H. B  15408
d'Ambrumenil, Harry  15288
Gibb, David    15135
Gibbs, Mathew  15474
Harmer, IL* J  15187
Hardman, Sampson  15299
Hannis, Albert  15351
Hodgson, A. R  15352
Hoyle, T. A  15481
Jones, Foster   15185
King, H. G  15003
King, H. C  15222
Knights, A. A  15300
Lewis, Henry   15238
Lipp, Charles  15289
Morrison, Angus    15171
Moran, P. J	
MeCaw, Samuel .. .
McCarthy, J. J.
McCreath, James ..
McKenzie, J. M. . .
McLellan, William
McNeil, Henry
McNicol,  Allan   . . .
Nisbet, J. C	
Pearce, N. R	
Prickitt, R. A	
Read, E. F	
Rickleton, W. V. . .
Richards, Henry . .
Roadknight, Geo. ..
Scott, AVilliam	
Smith, Harry	
Smith, J. C	
Steiner, E. G	
Thrower, C. E.
Thomas, G. H	
AVhelan, C. L	
Willie, R. L	
AArilson, J. S	
Worsfold, Edward .
15180
15397
15114
15182
15258
15045
15546
15184
15086
15547
14997
15432
15017
15205
15400
15160
15055
15384
15418
15434
15501
15241
15146
15389
15048
15097
15098
15533
15161
15274
15277
15044
15211
15308
15372
15198
15302
15309
15515
15373
15304
15173
15290
15346
15201
15341
15150
15202
15284
15224
15242
15291
15538
15310
15084
15244
15328
15159
15345
15286 13 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
G 165
Special Creamery.
Arter, Alexander
Beckitt, M. L. . .
Carpenter, W. L.
Gardiner, J. M. .
15329
15279
15298
15210
Jones, Stanely
Randall, J. J.
AArest, C. H. ..
15057
15149
15247
Popoff, G. W.
15049
SpeclUj Doukhobor.
   15177 Sharstobitoff, W. G	
Special Road-roller.
Hammell, J. H   15138
Atkins, R. AV	
Abbott, R. H	
Amburn, Robert .. .
Bakker, Gerardus .
Beckett, Hugh
Booth, W. H	
Boyd, C. A	
Brown, A. F	
Carter, R. R	
Duncan, David
Dunford, Michael ..
Emery,  LA	
Evans, G. R	
Farmer, R. AV. . . .
Falconer, R. W. ..
Falconer, J. R.
Fell, A. P. B	
Fowler, W. A	
Galbraith, Quintin
Gibson, G. S	
Hamilton, George .
Harris, Herbert . . .
Hayward, A. E.
Hardwick, Geo.  . ..
Hanley, G. V	
Henney, J. T	
■    Temporary.
15402 Hood, W. B	
15330 Kitt, William	
15311 Kirby, Frederick . .
15060 Lamont, Alexander
15293 Legge, A. D	
14998 Maceabe, Sydney . .
15249 Meyers, W. M.  ...
15061 Mitchell, J. E	
15374 Moore, C. A	
14972 Moase, S. E	
15009 Money, A. E	
15062 Norman, S. C	
15123 Nolan, E. A	
15117 Pettipiece, G. E.
15118 Prest, W. J	
15189 Rattray, Alexander
15438 Reid, A. J	
15163 Reid, Thomas	
15278 Richardson, David
15441 Ross, N. G	
15186 Stewart, K. G.  . . .
15188 Thorsen, Thor	
15229 AVarman, Harry  . .
15375 Wallin, E. E	
15403 Wood, Fred	
15442
15357
149/3
15120
15440
15019
15436
15063
15439
15124
15246
15248
15126
15358
15121
15250
15115
15119
15228
15050
15355
15292
15435
15356
15437
14942 G 166 Public Works Eeport  (1921-22).
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY.
Office of Inspector of Electrical Energy',
Court-house, Vancouver, B.C., August 1st, 1922.
J. E. Griffith, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report on the work of this office for the
" year ending March Slst, 1922 :—
The report deals with the work carried out under the " Electrical Energy Inspection Act "
and also with other electrical work carried out by the office and outside the scope of the Act.
As indicated in previous reports, the work of the office has changed materially during the last
few years. A wider interpretation has recently been given to the Act in order to cover to a
greater extent than formerly electrical equipment and installations of low voltage. Formerly,
attention was directed particularly to power-houses, sub-stations, transmission-lines, and industrial
electrical equipment operating at the higher voltages, and which generally were considered as
liable to constitute accident hazards. On account, however, of several electrical accidents
having occurred on 110-volt circuits, we considered it necessary to give increased attention to
electrical wiring and equipment operating at this voltage, and this brings all electric-light
wiring more or less within the scope of the work of the office. It has also been found advisable
to give greater attention to low-voltage wiring generally on account of the possible fire hazard
which may arise from defective wiring installations, as in many cases such a hazard may have
associated with it an accident or life hazard.
Inspection.
During the year all parts of the Province have been covered, with the exception of the
territory adjoining the Grand Trunk Railway in the northern part of the Province and certain
other localities where inspections were made during the previous year or where no electrical
changes or installations have been made since our previous inspection. The following cities and
- municipalities were collaborated with during the year, and in most of them preparations are
being made for changes in their by-laws to bring same into conformity with the latest regulations : Kamloops, Revelstoke, Armstrong, Vernon, Kelowna, Summerland, Penticton, Cranbrook,
Nelson, Fernie, Nanaimo, Courtenay, and Cumberland.
Our separate list of the inspections made under the " Electrical Energy Inspection Act "
give further indication of the territory covered during the year. Many other companies, firms,
and owners of electrical installations have been corresponded with during the year in the
course of distributing our regulations, giving installation instructions in individual cases and
in approval of plans and specifications.
We have kept closely in touch by correspondence with the various local Inspectors in different
cities and municipalities, and have endeavoured to get the local authorities to bring their
electrical by-laws into conformity with our requirements. This has been found necessary owing
to the inability of the office with its present staff to adequately cover all low-voltage installations.
In pursuance of this, we have during the year distributed a draft by-law for the guidance
principally of the small municipalities, and have lodged copies of our regulations with the local
authorities with the intention that in the revision of the by-laws our regulations would be
embodied therein. A number of the less populous municipalities, of course, have no electrical
by-law and are not in a position to engage the services of any local Inspector; consequently we
are endeavouring, as far as practicable, to cover such territory direct from this office. AVe also
make note in this report of the other electrical work performed which is outside the scope of
the Act.
As mentioned on previous occasions, an amendment to the Act is under consideration with
a view to obtaining a system of charging inspection fees which will be more appropriate to the
nature of the work of the office as now carried out. It has also been found with the present
method of apportioning the expense of inspection at the end of the year that on account of
change of ownership, shutting-down of plants, etc., difficulty is experienced in making collections. 13 Geo. 5 Inspector of Electrical Energy. G 167
A system is contemplated consisting of the issue of permits for electrical installations and the
establishment of an inspection-fee basis depending on the number of motors and the horse-power
or kilowatt capacity of the plants inspected.
Electrical Rules.
Overhead Work.—Our regulations governing overhead-line construction have been brought
into final form and approved by Order in Council, and distributed to the various power companies and municipalities owning or operating such construction.
Interior Wiring.—A set of interior-wiring rules has alfeo been prepared in draft form and
distributed. These rules are tentative in the meantime, as they cover many different classes of
work and under conditions which vary considerably in different parts of the Province, and
consequently may be subject to minor changes. Our intention is to arrive at uniformity of
regulations without unduly lowering the standard of work or increasing the expense of the
installations. It is expected, however, during the coming year, that the interior-wiring rules
will be brought into final form and submitted for approval by Order in Council.
Power-houses.—Our various specifications and rules governing the installation of different
parts of electrical equipment in power-houses and sub-stations have been consolidated into a set
of rules entitled " Electrical Safety Rules for Power-houses and Sub-stations." These are based
on what our practice has been during the past three years, and are also modelled in general
form along the lines recommended in Part 1 of the National Electrical Safety Code. We have
submitted copies of the rules to the various power companies and manufacturers of power-house
equipment for criticism and comment. They have on the whole been favourably received, and
we expect shortly to embody several minor alterations and issue them in final form.
Rules for Inductive Interference.—AVith the extension of high-voltage transmission-lines
which is taking place throughout the Province, we have found it necessary to impose certain
requirements in the constructing of such lines in order to minimize harmful inductive interference between the power-transmission lines and telephone-lines which they parallel.
Particular cases of paralleling lines have been treated individually as they arise, but a draft of
a set of regulations for general application has been made governing this feature of the
construction of high-voltage lines.
Rules for Resuscitation from Electrical Shock.—AVe have adopted the rules for resuscitation
from electric shock by the Prone Pressure method, as recommended by several Commissions
which were formed for the purpose of making recommendations in this matter. We purchased
a supply of these rules in booklet form, and also in wall-diagram form from the Canadian
Electrical Association, and circulated same amongst electrical operating companies and owners
of high-voltage electrical equipment generally. Copies of the booklet have also been lodged with
various Police Departments and hospital authorities, as well as safety-first organizations, and a
decided advantage is expected to accrue from a broader knowledge of the recommended methods
of treatment in cases of electrical shock. I have also had communication with the Arancouver
Medical Association regarding the matter, with a view towards unifying the methods of resuscitation to be employed along the lines recommended in our booklet.
Lighting Rules.—As mentioned in my report of two years ago, regulations comprising a
lighting code were then prepared. This code has for its purpose the governing of the amounts
of artificial illumination which should be provided for in electrical wiring installations for
different classes of work and different manufacturing processes. It-was considered that such a
code would obviate the overloading of wiring circuits due to the general tendency now to use
larger lighting units, and also would result in the reduction of accidents in industrial plants
and around moving machinery generally. The code as prepared was tentative and educative
only, and we had hoped that by the present time conditions would have reached such a state
that we could with advantage issue the rules of the code as definite regulations, but to date we
have not considered it advisable to do so. There is, however, a natural and spontaneous
improvement in the directions contemplated.
Generating Plants.
New generating plants have been put in operation during the year by the East Kootenay
Power and Light Company; Nanaimo Light, Heat and Power Company; and Nakusp Electric,
Light Company.    In addition to these plants, which are for public supply, several generating
units  have  been  installed  in lumber-mills  and  other  industrial  plants.    A  new  distribution G 168 Public Works Report  (1921-22).
company known as the " Royston Light and Power Company " commenced operation during the
year at Royston, Vancouver Island. This company purchases electrical energy from the
Canadian Collieries, Limited, and supplies consumers in the Royston District.
The East Kootenay Power and Light Company's hydro-electric development on the Bull
River, 20 miles east of Cranbrook, has been the largest generating plant installed during the
year. A description of the proposed activity of this company has been given in a previous
report under the name of the " British Columbia and Alberta Power Company, Limited."
AArith regard to conditions in existing generating plants, these on the whole continue to be
satisfactory, particularly in the larger plants. There is a general improvement in practice as
regards new construction or where reconstruction is under way, both in power-houses and in substations, and all new work generally is being installed in accordance with our regulations.
AArith the extension of the field of operation of several of the larger power companies by the
building of high-voltage transmission-lines, there is a tendency for the number of the smaller
generating plants to decrease. AVitIi the transmission of electrical energy to Cranbrook, Fernie,
and other towns in the East Kootenay by the East Kootenay Power and Light Company, the
steam plants in several of these towns are being discontinued. A similar condition also applies
to several towns in the Okanagan Valley on account of the AVest Kootenay Power and Light
Company now giving a supply of electrical energy in bulk to several of the towns there by
means of a transmission-line system connecting to the Copper Mountain high-voltage line at the
town of Oliver.
Transmission and Distribution.
The most important high-voltage transmission-line work executed during the year was that
carried out in the East Kootenay District and in the Okanagan Aralley by the two companies
mentioned. The transmission-line system mentioned in last year's report for supplying the towns
of Cranbrook, Fernie, and Michel has now been completed. The 60,000-volt line from Oliver
has been completed for supply to Penticton and Summerland, and a further extension on the
east side of the lake to Kelowna is being commenced. The British Columbia Electric Railway
Company has also added several sections to its 34,000- and 11,000-volt lines in connection with
the supply to several of the sub-stations in and around Arancouver and also Victoria. All of
these lines have been constructed in a substantial manner in accordance with our requirements.
' The major portion of new distribution-lines constructed continues to be located in the rural
districts. In the Fraser Aralley District the British Columbia Electric Railway Company has
extended its distribution system considerably, and also a number of lines have been constructed
on private property for connection to the distribution lines of the company. AYhere the latter
lines carry low-voltage lighting secondaries only, we have provided a special specification which
admits of the use of metal side-brackets instead of cross-arms, as experience has indicated that
on account-of these extensions in many cases being erected by the owners themselves there is
less likelihood of defective construction when side-brackets are used than when poles have to be
gained and cross-arms mounted.
Fair progress has been made in the reconstruction of existing lines which were not in
conformity with our requirements and which require rebuilding. AArork of this nature is being
carried out in most of the Okanagan Valley towns and also in the Cities of Revelstoke and
Cranbrook. In many eases this work has consisted primarily in the replacing of defective poles
and giving greater cross-arm and pin spacing. The elimination of all the older overhead-line
construction can only be gradually obtained, but fair progress towards this end is being made.
Telephone-lines.
The location of the greatest activity in the construction of such lines has been on Vancouver
Island, where the British Columbia Telephone Company has made considerable extensions to its
system. Application continues to be made to the Department for each extension on the Provincial
highways, and the official permits of the Department issued in each case with such qualifications
as regards the location and form of construction as required by this office. As the Dominion
Government has pole-lines throughout a considerable part of the Island, and as various municipalities or power companies also have pole-lines there, the interests of all the utilities receive
attention prior to the granting of right-of-way for new pole-lines. This in several cases has
entailed considerable correspondence and negotiation, but agreement in all those cases dealt
with has been reached. In the building of these lines joint pole-construction has been erected
in several instances. 13 Geo. 5
Inspector of Electrical Energy.
G 169
Throughout the Province generally application is now made to the Department prior to the
construction of either power or telephone lines on the Provincial highways.
Utilization Equipment.
From the list of electrical inspections already submitted for the calendar year 1921, the
scope of the field covered in pursuance of our inspection of electrical installations in factories
and industrial plants generally is shown. The new installations are installed in accordance with
our regulations under the " Electrical Energy Inspection Act," and also the electrical regulations
of the Workmen's Compensation Board. The gradual elimination of older equipment in existing
factories is proceeding principally in the direction of the elimination of open switches and fuses
and replacing of open wiring. In the small factories installation of externally operated switches
can be generally effected, without remodelling the electric circuits, but in larger installations
the providing of such switches necessitates frequently an entirely new scheme of electrical
distribution. Each condition is considered on its merits and detailed instructions are given
following our inspection and stipulating the exact changes required. In some instances where
the expense would be considerable we have given fairly liberal time in which to effect the
changes, and in all cases have called for the more defective and hazardous conditions to receive
first attention.
xVCCIDENTS.
Throughout the period under review there have been feurteen electrical accidents in the
Province. There were three deaths, two occurring in connection with an accident to employees
of the Marsh Construction Company, operating the electrical dredges on the Sumas reclamation
scheme, and one fatal accident to a lineman while working on a British Columbia.Electric Railway Company pole at Chilliwack. Of the twelve non-fatal accidents, most of the injuries received
consisted of burns, many of them slight. One occurred to a station operator, two to linemen,
and the others to persons engaged in non-electrical occupations..
Occupation.
Date.
Cause and Remarks.
Printer	
Electrician    	
Operator	
Janitor	
Machine operator . .
Conveyor attendant.
Dredge-hand   	
Signalman   	
Miner   	
Elevator attendant .
Lineman    	
Electrician    .'.	
Lineman   	
Electrician	
Lineman	
Vancouver  Stationers'  Printing
ing Office
Powell River Co.
B.C. Electric Railway Co., Vancouver
Bank of Nova Scotia Building,
Vancouver
Kamloops Creamery Association
Consolidate'd Mining & Smelting
Co., Trail.
Marsh Construction Co., Sumas
Granby Mining & Smelting Co.,
Anyox
David Spencer Co., Arictoria . . .
AA'est Kootenay Power Co.
1921.
Robert Dollar Co., Ltd., Sawmill
Now Westminster City	
B.C.  Cement  Co	
B.C. Electric Railway Co	
12
"
19
..
27 ... .
May
20	
June
13
6 	
Aug.
6 	
Oct.
28	
Nov.
25 ,
1922.
Jan.
4	
,,   11 .
„   11 .
Feb. 24 .
March 8.
Putting    in    main    switch    with
starter in " on " position ; right
eye and left hand burned.
Testing   fuses    with    a   bank    of
lamps ; burned hands and face.
Working on  generator when  running ; flash to eyes.
Putting in switch for elevator on
short circuit ; burned eyes.
Throwing   a   lever   for   machine,
slipped and touched open switch,
shock and burns to shoulder.
Switch   blew   out   through   faulty
operation ; burned face.
] Dredge-boom    touched    34,000-
(      volt line ;   result fatal.
Touched    trolly-line ;    injuries   to
back and side ; severe shock.
Changing bank  of series  500-volt
lamps    caused     short    circuit;
burned back of both hands.
Working   on section a lizing
switches     on     telephone-lines;
touched  both  sides  of  switch;
severe' shock.
Sleeve caught fuses, causing short
circuit; burned hand and face.
Pole broke and fell when changing
wires ; injuries to both legs.
Testing series  lighting circuit  on
steam-shovel   when    operating;
bums to face and hands.
Repairing series line light fixtures,
came in contact with 2,300-volt
wires :  fatal. G 170 Public Works Eeport  (1921-22).
General.
The following indicates the nature of the work carried out by the office, and additional to
the work actually coining under the " Electrical Energy Inspection Act " :—
Public Works.—In conjunction with the office of the Supervising Architect and Public AVorks
Engineer, electrical work has been carried out in preparation of specifications, supervising
electrical installation-work, ordering of material, etc., for Tranquille Sanatorium; Boys' Industrial School; Parliament Buildings; Court-house, Arancouver; Deaf and Dumb School; Courthouse, Prince Rupert; Eburne Bridges; Mental Hospital, New Westminster; Mental Hospital,
Essondale; Oakalla Prison Farm, and various other schools, Court-houses, and institutions.
Rule of the Road.—Estimates were prepared by this office on the approximate cost of the
track and overhead trolly alterations necessitated by the British Columbia Electric Railway
Company changing to right-hand running. These alterations are proceeding and the progress
of the work and expense of same are being followed by this office on behalf of the Department.
Adjustment of Rates.—During the year, following on the Okanagan Telephone Company
seeking the approval of the Government for revision of its telephone tariffs and in accordance
with instructions issued, an inquiry was commenced by this office for the purpose of reporting
on a new schedule of telephone rates and charges. A public hearing was held at Vernon on
June 8th, 1921. The financial statements of the company were brought under review from the
year 1914 and report on findings and recommended schedule of rates and charges duly submitted.
This schedule was subsequently approved by Order in Council.
Inspector of Dykes.—A specification was drawn, tenders called, and the electrical work
supervised in connection with the installation of the new pumping plant at Maple Ridge. Other
work of a lesser nature in connection with the other pumping plants was carried out for the
Inspector of Dykes.
Land Settlement Board.—AVe have co-operated with the Engineers in the Sumas Dyking
District with regard to the erection of the transmission-lines throughout the works at Sumas,
the installation of the electric dredges, and the electrical equipment for the new pumping plants.
Workmen's Compensation Board.—Our inspection of electrical equipment in factories, etc.,
coming under the Board continues. All electrical accidents resulting in claims to the Board are
investigated by this office and reports submitted. The electrical regulations prepared by this
office and embodied in the safety rules of the AVorkmen's Compensation Board continue in satisfactory operation. Extensions to these rules are contemplated, and also it is expected that
certain of our overhead construction rules and our power-house and sub-station regulations, as
mentioned in the earlier part of this report, will be embodied in the next issue of the regulations
of the Board.
Office of Fire Marshal.—During the year we investigated cases of fires allegedly of electrical
origin in conjunction with the Provincial Fire Marshal. AVe have found the tendency still
continuing, more or less, whereby the electric wiring is brought under suspicion as a cause of
fires when the real cause is entirely unknown, and in many cases where the suspicion has been
unwarranted. In the town of Princeton and the City of Nanaimo, and to a lesser degree in
other cities, general inspections from the fire-hazard standpoint were made on request of the
Fire Marshal, and following on same the owners of many premises where the wiring .was
defective were communicated with and improvements in the installation carried out. In this
matter generally we are co-operating with the lire Marshal, and from time to time making
reports to him and conferring in the matter of possible electrical fire hazards.
Other work of a varied nature dealing with matters of lighting, power installations, electrical energy contracts, and electric wiring generally has been carried out from time to time for
other.offices and departments of the Government.
I have, etc.,
J. Muirhead, *
Inspector of Electrical Energy. 13 Geo. 5 Inspector of Dykes. G 171
INTERIM REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF DYKES.
Viotoeia, B.C., August, 1922.
J. E.  Griffith, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—The following observations are intended as an interim report upon the Dykes Department's work for that part of the year up to July 31st. As its year closes on September 30th, it
is difficult to report intelligently upon some of its activities, more particularly with regard to
finance;   consequently some references will necessarily be incomplete.
The Department, under the provisions of the " Dyking Assessments Adjustment Act, 1905,"
deals with the administration of the Dyking Districts of Coquitlam, Pitt Meadows No. 1, Pitt
Meadows No. 2, Maple Ridge, and Matsqui, and the Matsqui Drainage District No. 1. Its
responsibility covers such engineering-work as the maintenance of the dyking-works, dykes,
flood-gates, pumping equipment, etc., as well as the major drainage details of the lands interested,
and also provides the medium through which these lands reimburse the Government of the
Province for financial aid extended in 1905 and subsequently. This report will therefore deal
with that responsibility under two main headings—Finance and Works.
(1.) Finance.
This phase of the Department's work entails expenditure ou maintenance under section
13 (1) of the Act referred to, and revenue by way of collections on these expenditures, together
with payments on interest and sinking fund accounts to meet the liabilities imposed 'by section 4
of that Act, as well as deferred maintenance accounts arising out of extraordinary expenditures,
section 13 (2), such as electrical installations, permanent concrete flood-gates, etc., supplementary
pumping equipment, and improvements to drainage facilities.
Assessment rolls compiled each year and filed in the Land Registry Office, New Westminster,
on or before November 15th, .distribute these combined charges over the lands concerned in the
ratio of charges to acreage, make those assessments a first charge upon the land and payable to
December 31st following. After that date 6 per cent, interest is added until the following
August 1st. Lands upon which arrears exist at that date are required to be exposed at tax sale
on the third Monday in September, after due advertisement. Owing to existing conditions it
was deemed advisable to allow two years' arrears to accumulate during the latter part of the
war period and up to the present, so that this detail has not latterly applied.    •
The following summary shows the amounts included in the last assessment roll and levied
against   each   district:—
Coquitlam District—:
Maintenance expenditure    $ 4,642 27
Payment Account, 1912-14, electrical installation       1,294 00
»       „        .flood-gates     695 20
1905, capital         2,899 40
Rate per acre, $2.87172. $ 9,530 87
Pitt Meadows No. 1 District—
Maintenance expenditure    $ 1,171 27
Payment Account, 1912, electrical installation    412 25
„    flood-gates           14S 25
1905, capital     S90 77
Rate per acre, $2.232365. $ 2,622 54
Pitt Meadotos No. 2 District—
Maintenance expenditure    $ 1,815 24
Payment Account, 1912, electrical installation     721 OS
„ „     flood-gates     156 43
1905, capital   852 63
Rate per acre, $2.42106. $ 3,545 38 G 172 Public Works Eeport  (1921-22)
Maple Ridge District—
Maintenance expenditure   $ 7,3S6 04
Payment Account, McKinney Creek Diversion   686 67
1912, electrical installation   1,262 26
„     flood-gates     631 25
1905, capital    6,369 80
Rate per acre:   High land, $1.32226 ;  low land, $2.22400. $16,336 02
Matsqui District—
Maintenance expenditure  $10,977 00
Payment Account, 1920, wash-out  2,747 34
„                   „     new pumps     2,77S 64
„     sluices   993 74
1912, electrical installation     659 92
1905, capital   6,250 00
Rate per acre, $2.38941. $24,406 64
The rolls for 1921, of which the above are extracts, include an increase of some $5,767.16 over
previous years to make up for insufficient annuities to retire previous expenditures on such works
as electrical installations, concrete flood-boxes, etc.
The total collections from September 30th, or the end of the last departmental year to July
31st, 1922, amounted to $39,385.41, with an amount involved in this year's tax sale of $10,005.93.
Further arrears not brought to account at this year's tax sale are as follows:—
Pitt Meadows No. 1   $   616 57 $    503 76
Pitt Meadows No. 2         371 33 1,357 13
Coquitlam      1,827 06 4,905 48
Maple Ridge       1,378 97 8,734 64
Matsqui      3,734 30 11,281 64
These amounts may be expected to be reduced materially after the present harvesting season.
A material reduction has been possible in maintenance expenditure for the year closing
September 30th next, on account of the dry summer, and consequently less power-consumption
during the pumping season;   also because comparatively little emergency work was necessary
during the summer flood season.
(2.)  Works.
This phase of* the Department's activities concerns itself with the defence line of the dykes,
with interception canals incidental to them which protect the five districts already mentioned;
the pumping equipment which is brought into operation during certain seasons when unwatering
becomes necessary; and the main drainage facilities such as natural watercourses within those
districts.
Dykes and Interception Canals.—Attention was drawn in last year's report to the general
conditions maintaining with regard to these structures and how, because of the high costs ruling
for a number of years, little or no work had been done in the way of maintenance, so that a
considerable amount of work was necessary in each district to bring about desirable conditions.
It was further pointed out that because of the expenditure involved a patchwork policy had
been adopted, whereby a little work each year would, when pieced together, finally lead to those
conditions without overburdening the district concerned. This policy is still being followed and
considerable work has been done in the way of slashing brush and river-bank protection. The
first-mentioned work has been greatly supplemented by the control of grazing privileges on the
dykes. Grazing permits are now issued to those wishing same, by which the holder in exchange
for the privilege undertakes to close-cut all brush and weeds on the area to which his permit
applies. No cattle over the weight of average yearlings are allowed on the dykes, and these
they agree to remove at such times as are ordered.
No expenditure has been made on the work of slashing brush, the work having all been done
by the local caretakers in their leisure. Sections where seepage has been found, and therefore
known to be weak, have been cleared thoroughly to permit of closer inspection and patrol at
flood-time, and the clearing is gradually being extended to embrace the dykes throughout. 13 Geo. 5 Inspector of Dykes. G 173
Some weak sections mentioned in last year's report have received further attention. At
Matsqui No. 1 Slough and dyke junction, where the trouble was owing to the sand strata on which
the dyke rests and through which the slough had cut, test-pits were sunk near the outside toe
of the dyke to determine the thickness of the sand strata. It was hoped that good bottom could
be found near enough to the surface to permit of the sealing of this strata by a trench through
it filled with clay. The test-pit showed this method to be impracticable and soil-auger borings
were then made on the section inside the dyke. These borings supplied information which led
to the adoption of a method of dealing with the situation which has proved very successful.
A trench with a bottom width of 5 feet was excavated from the inside toe of the dyke across
the weak section, which the borings had proved to be an old slough-bed, in the shortest direction
to shoulder on the opposite bank of this old slough. This trench was then filled with one-man
rock. Some 400 tons of rock were required, and this, owing to its weight being concentrated,
is gradually finding bottom. Owing to its form it is acting as a filter and the cutting action
which was so alarming has now disappeared.
The expense of this work was reduced to the item of labour costs as a result of the successful
efforts of the Department in interesting the Maintenance-of-way Department, Canadian National
Railways. That company's main line, being only 200 yards removed from this dangerous section,
would be immediately affected by a failure at this point; consequently they co-operated with the
Department to the extent of supplying the rock free on their cars opposite where it was required.
The matter of the weakness extending all along the Matsqui defence because of the existence
of the old borrow-pit from which material for the dyke embankment was taken has received
further attention, but as the remedy involves a large expenditure, no work other than survey-work
has been undertaken.
Mention was made in last year's report to the seepage evil arising from the existence of this
borrow-pit, and how, because of the cutting action set up by the excessive pressure of flood-time,
the seepage had increased in proportion until some 130 acres of low-lying land behind the dyke
had become subject to flood from this cause. The accumulation of seepage-water in these low-
lying places had no means of egress other than evaporation and the question of placing weepers
through the dyke to supplement this means was being considered. One such weeper was established during the winter under the supervision of the Department and without expense to the
district, the owner of the land benefited doing the work and paying for the material used in the
work.   The method was as follows:—
A clay strata of sufficient thickness was found as near to a low natural sump as possible
and a trench excavated in the clay to a level slightly below this natural sump in the direction
of the proposed weeper and ending 12 feet back from the inside toe of the dyke. An 8-inch steel
pipe was then driven at the required depth horizontally through the dyke footing, a'distance
of 35 feet to the centre of the borrow-pit outside the dyke. Here a concrete box was constructed
into which the weeper-pipe emptied and to which pipe a flapper-valve was attached. In this
box an intake for the water from the borrow-pit was provided and another pipe led from the
box to the river. A concrete collar on the pipe near the outside of the dyke, around which
puddled clay was worked, provided an excellent cut-off.
A concrete well or collecting-basin constructed 50 feet back from the inside toe of the dyke,
into which underdrains from the natural sump and other low areas led, and which was connected
to the driven pipe by a dry line, removed the danger of saturating the foundations.
Owing to the nature of the dyke foundations all along the Matsqui front, it is unwise to
disturb the foundations and the Department insisted upon the method outlined above.
The result is very satisfactory.
The matter of the seepage at Matsqui constitutes the most important difficulty confronting
the Department and the Matsqui Dyke will not be safe until it is finally disposed of. It arises
out of the material encountered and the method adopted in the construction of the dyke originally,
and the situation is as follows:—
A borrow-pit was selected on the wet side of the dyke from which material was taken for
the dyke structure. This borrow-pit unearths a porous strata which passes under the dyke
and in addition provides an added depth, so that the pressure-head amounts to some 1,000 lb.
per square foot at freshet stages in the river. This pressure on a saturated foundation was
responsible for the failure in the structure at Well's corner in July, 1920, which cost the district
$13,103.48, and because of it careful patrol and emergency work are necessary each year, with G 174 Public Works Beport  (1921-22).
attendant expense and anxiety.    The remedy lies in the filling of the borrow-pit by pumping in
silt from the river.
A complete survey was made in this connection and it is found that 305,000 cubic yards of
material will have to be moved at a probable cost of $45,000.
As the three railway companies which cross the Matsqui Prairie were able to lower their
fill and to eliminate trestles and other means of equalizing the pressure on their fills at flood-
time because of the dyke, it was thought fair and just that because of the enormous saving thus
effected to them they should contribute toward the expense of putting the dyke in a safe condition.
Their managements were communicated with and a joint meeting was held at Vancouver in
October of last year. At this meeting the C.P.R., C.N.R., and B.C.E.R. were represented by one
of their engineers, the farmers by Mr. Alex. Cruickshank, and the Department by the writer.
The situation was discussed at the meeting and all were agreed as to the necessity of the work
and the method. Later, however, the managements of the C.P.R. and the B.C.E.R. reported that
they could not see their way clear in entering into the work in any way. At this point the
writer outlined the situation to the Board of Railway Commissioners, asking for an opinion as
to their jurisdiction in the matter, and their Assistant Chief Engineer, acting on their instructions, made an examination on the ground. It is hoped that his report to the Board on the
situation may have been favourable, but the outcome is still very uncertain.
Notification of the Board's sittings on their AVestern tour now in progress has been received,
and the matter will be heard at ATictoria on the 18th day of September. Failing the co-operation
of the railway companies, it is feared that the necessary work cannot be done because of the
burden which the cost would entail if borne entirely by the land-owners.
A weak section in Maple Ridge District (Section 5, Block 5 N.) where seepage was in
alarming proportions received attention. Here a cottonwood log which had been allowed to
remain in the embankment at its construction and which had decayed was the source of the
trouble. The expenditure involved in providing a remedy was not great, but in view of what
might have happened had its presence not been discovered, the folly of such construction methods
is apparent.
A weak section on the Lillooet end of the Maple Ridge Dyke which had not previously been
known to the writer developed during the exceptional rain-storms of October 27th, 28th, and
29th. The storm, which outclassed anything in the memory of the oldest settlers, raised the
Lillooet River to a level 1.3 feet higher than some points on the crest of the dyke, and although
every effort was made to hold the dyke intact, it failed through the saturation of a peaty seam
near its base and a wash-out 120 feet in length followed.
-The opening was arched as early as possible with sheet-piling and the new fill was made
by day-labour with the Department's plant. In addition, this section was raised to a height
2.5 feet, plus shrinkage, above the new Lillooet flood record and over a distance of 1,500 feet,
and a section near by, known to be weak because of seepage, was strengthened. This work,
together with an item referred to later under river-bank protection, necessitated an outlay of
$4,737.48, the repayment of which, it is suggested, be spread over a term of years.
The same flood caused a failure in the Pitt Meadows No. 1 Dyke at two points. One of
these was due to overflow as in the case just mentioned. The other was in a new fill and the
failure was due to sudden pressure owing to the failure of au outside dyke privately owned.
Owing to the pressing engagements of the Department's plant and also to the fact that the
area in this district is not under any intensive cultivation, only such temporary work as was
required to handle the summer flood situation was done in the way of renewal, but this will
receive attention before the fall floods.
Flood-gates.—The flood-gates, of which there are eleven—three wooden structures and eight
concrete—required and received some minor repairs. A leak of considerable size developed in
the concrete box at Upper Coquitlam during the high stages of the summer flood, but owing to
the exceptionally dry season it was possible to allow the water to rise on the inside and thus
approach an equalization in pressure.    Repairs to this are in hand.
The two wooden structures, one at Matsqui and the other at Coquitlam, are approaching the
limit of their useful life, especially with respect to their decks, but owing to the high prices still
maintaining in this class of construction it is thought advisable to nurse these along by some
slight repairs and watch a favourable time for their renewal. 13 Geo. 5 Inspector of Dykes. G 175
One additional flood-box is contemplated for the Maple Ridge District, where, under the
present arrangement in an extreme case, drainage-water is required to flow some 6 miles to the
present outlet.    This feature is dealt with further under notes on drainage.
Speaking generally, the flood-gates are in good condition, though some needed repair-work
will probably come to light with the recession of the present summer flood.
River-bank Protection.—During the year a small amount of work was done at three points
where the break already mentioned occurred; the Lillooet River at an elbow was getting dangerously near the dyke. Here a sheer was constructed with piling in clay as an anchor. The body
of the sheer was constructed cheaply with brush and clay, and as it is only pressed into service
during floods it is hoped that it will be of a permanent nature. It has done the work intended
admirably during the summer floods and shows no signs of weakening. Its cost is included in
the item covering the repairs to wash-out and raising the dyke on the Pitt River, west side.
Near the centre of Section 9 the river had been encroaching on the dyke over a distance of some
300 feet. Here a peaty strata overlying clay" extended under the dyke, and this strata was
suffering greatly from wash so that the dyke was in danger. Here 200 tons of one-man rock
was distributed so as to pitch the section and check further erosion.
On the Pitt River, east side, Section 10, erosion caused by heavy wind-storms and wave
action had taken out a longitudinal section of the dyke, .and it was feared that the remaining
embankment was not of sufficient weight to withstand the pressure of the summer flood.
Accordingly it was reinforced with good material near at hand, a clamshell rig being utilized
in moving this material. Some further work is required in the way of a protection-fence, the
pile posts for which were put in place.   The cost of this work was $350.
In addition to the work done, there remains a great amount of work to be done in the way
of river-bank protection. At Matsqui there are problems which do not permit of as ready solution
as the three cases treated this year because of the deep water close to the bank, owing to the
deep channel having been shifted by natural agencies. On account of this depth of water it is
a question whether an inexpensive method would be a benefit or a waste of money. Rock grains
properly located as regards direction of current and at proper intervals would be a sure remedy,
with equal sureness as regards high costs.
An inexpensive method used extensively on the Mississippi River is under consideration
and may be worth a trial. It consists of anchoring large trees unlimbed in such a position that
the limbs act as sweeps and check the stream-velocity, thereby inviting the deposit of material
and the raising of the river-bottom to form a bar. This tends to throw the channel, and this
action tends to build a new bank where required, thus protecting the old bank.
Erosion has been rapid in late years at certain sections, but fortunately these sections are
far enough removed from the dyke as not to require immediate attention. It is, however, a
question becoming more vital each year.
Interception Canals.—There are three major interception canals, two in Coquitlam District
and one in Maple Ridge, and their function is to carry high-land water outside the area enclosed
by the dykes and thus obviate the costs of pumping.
A small outlay was necessary on the one in Maple Ridge District known as the McKinney
Creek Diversion, by way of repairs to a fill which formed the canal bank through a low section.
In this connection it is worthy of note that a slightly higher location would have eliminated
such fills and greatly lessened maintenance costs.
In Coquitlam District the interception ditch known as the Upper Coquitlam Back Ditch had
become silted in and its carrying capacity reduced to such an extent that it was not functioning.
This was improved in anticipation of the usual heavy rains in May, hut considerable work
remains to be done, and this it is intended to do with the Department's plant probably in the
fall of this year.
Pumping.—To provide drainage at such times as the rivers remain high enough to close
the several flood-gates a total of twelve centrifugal pumping units, all electrically operated, have
been installed. Their total first cost was $125,000 and their combined delivery against a lift
of 10 feet is 213,000 imperial gallons per minute.
The flood-gates closed this year (at Matsqui) on May 17th, as compared with May 14th,
1921, and May 16th, 1920. They opened this year on July 21st, compared with August 22ud,
1921, and August 26th, 1920;  so that the pumping season was shorter this year than usual. G 176 Public Works Eeport (1921-22).
The total pumping costs this year to July 31st were:—
Electric power consumed   $5,051 08
Oil and consumable supplies   Ill 77
Wages to motormen  1,725 00
Repairs     525 36
Insurance  525 00
$7,oas 21
This represents a charge of 32 cents per acre, not including interest and sinking fund on
plant charges.
The pumping requirements in any year depend upon precipitation and evaporation and the
flood-heights and time of duration of same attained by the rivers, the latter factor being cumulative in effect since it introduces the factor of seepage. All of these factors were favourable
this year, so the pumping costs are comparatively low.
Drainage Facilities.—Mention was made in last year's report to the general conditions existing in every district. Until that time the Department had recognized no responsibility beyond
the maintenance of the existing works, and because no one had assumed the initiative, natural
agencies had destroyed the drainage facilities of those districts to such an extent that the
productive qualities of the soil were lessening year by year at an alarming rate. Collection of
dyking assessments were becoming harder and harder, until it became necessary to allow two
years in arrears to accumulate. It seemed evident that increasing the productive qualities of
the soil would increase production and therefore make the collections easier, and it was set up
that the Department should accept the responsibility. Accordingly work in this direction has
been taken in hand by the Department.
The finishing of the Matsqui drainage job in an economical manner had necessitated the
purchase of an excavating-machine, and this plant has been kept in the Department for such
work. It is intended that the plant be rented to the job in hand at a fixed rental of $350 per
month of one shift, with $200 additional for each extra shift; said rental to include cost of
renewal of all more or less permanent parts.
The cost to the job being only rental, consumable supplies, and labour—overhead in the way
of accounting and engineering being absorbed by the Inspector of Dykes and his permanent staff
—it is possible to undertake any necessary work at a minimum of cost.
During the year, in addition to finishing up the Matsqui drainage job, referred to later, and
the repairs to the Maple Ridge Dyke already referred to, some 12 miles of natural waterways
in the Maple Ridge District have been widened and deepened by the cleaning-out of silt and
vegetable growth. As an illustration of the extent to which these waterways had become choked,
it is submitted that for a cut 22 feet wide on top the work on some miles entailed the handling
of 20,000 cubic yards of dirt.
The work referred to was started in October, but owing to the fall floods and the break in
the dyke, which required immediate attention, the work had to be discontinued. A start was
again made on December 10th, double-shifting from January 6th to the present time.
The expenditure to date has been $10,591.56. On the basis of bids tendered on similar work
at Matsqui, the cost of this by contract would have been $24,000 plus plant rental, brushing,
replacing and removing bridges, pipe-lines, etc., so that this comparison alone would seem to
justify the method adopted.
The benefit of the work is quite evident, but in order to make it 100 per cent, benefit the
land-owners must do a lot of individual work in the way of underdraining. This point is always
impressed upon them whenever an opportunity arises, and it seems that the prosperity of this
district is just around the corner.
The work is progressing rapidly and when finished it is hoped that necessary arrangements
can be made to enable the Department to undertake similar work to the benefit of other districts.
Upper Coquitlam District requires a small amount of work in this connection and the owners
in Pitt Meadows No. 1 are becoming anxious that they be attended to. Necessarily, the cost
of these works must be borne by the lands benefited.
Matsqui Drainage.—This project was finished early in the year, the laterals being completed
by hand and the slough-work with the excavating-machine referred to above. 13 Geo. 5
Inspector of Dykes.
G 177
The cost of the 4% miles of slough-work was $6,840.42, included in which is $1,925 for
plant rental.    The hand-work cost $3,327.98.
In addition to the above, considerable work had to be done this summer in the way of
cleaning laterals and some additional cribbing, because of the action of the heavy frosts last
winter. This has been done by day-work under the Matsqui Dykes caretaker at a cost of
$476.80, with a small area yet to be covered.
Flood Conditions.—There are two seasons in each year when flood conditions constitute a
hazard. The spring flood coming after the middle of May and holding sometimes along into
July is due entirely to the snow melting in the mountains, and the consequent hazard is
proportionate to the height attained and time of duration. It is dependent upon ruling temperatures in the Interior and some other conditions, such as the prevailing winds, lateness of the
season, etc.    With this flood the Matsqui District is most vitally concerned.
The fall freshet comes usually about the last of October and is due entirely to precipitation.
With it the Pitt River districts are most vitally concerned. The following table shows a comparison of spring flood-heights for several years:—
Spring and Summer Flood-heights.
Fraser River   (Matsqui)
Pitt River.
Year.
Date.
Local
Gauge.
Above
Mean
Sea-level.
Date.
Local
Gauge.
1894
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
191'7
1918
1019
1920
1921
1922
June    6
„     27
3
July    0
June 18
„      11
„     12
July   13
June    o
,.     16
„     17
May   31
June 19
„     26
„     15
22
May   29
June 28
„     12
„     23
„     27
July   18
June 12
9
26.
22.
20.
19.
28.
18.
17.
14.
18.
21.
19.
16.
20.
17.
20.
18.
12.
20.
19.
21.
18.
22.
22.
21
37
85
90
00
63
80
35
55
85
45
25
95
75
35
35
45
75
70
.90
.40
.80
.35
.75
.00
25.01
21.49
19.54
17.64
22.29
17.44
15.99
13.19
17.49
20.09,
17.89
1.1.59
19.39
15.99
18.99
17.09
11.39
19.34
18.54
20.04
17.44
20.99
21.39
19.64
June 6
., 28
»» 3
July 6
June 18
„ 12
„ 12
July 12
June 5
„ 15
., 18
1
,, 19
„ 27
„ 16
., 23
May 29
June 29
., 11
,. 23
., 28
July 18
June 13
9
14.75
12.00
10.75
0.75
12.75
9.82
8.75
7.40
9.70
11.50
10.20
8.90
10.70
9.20
11.00
10.10
7.90
11.50
10.70
11.80
10.10
12.00
10.80
9.7
The danger-point at Matsqui is around a height of 19 feet on the local gauge, but a lower
flood-height over a long period ;of duration is of equal danger owing to the formation and the
point of saturation. As the table does not show the duration and bearing on this point, the
following is- offered;—
Gates closed. Gates opened.
1920      May 16 Aug. 26
1921      May 15 Aug. 23
1922      May 16 July 21
During the flood the Department's organization  for patrol—patterned  after  the Miami
Conservancy District organization—was necessary only for a short time, and no emergency work
was necessary.
With regard to the fall freshet of last year, there are no records available for comparison,
but it is claimed to have set up a record in  memory  of the oldest settlers.   The Britannia
disaster, the loss of the bridges on the Coquitlam River, the breaks in the Lillooet Dykes, and
12 G 178 Public Works Report (1921-22).
the damage done at the Stave Falls hydro-electric plant would bear out the contention of these
old-timers.
The Fraser River rose some 9 feet at Matsqui, closing the flood-gates—an unheard-of thing
up to then—necessitating pumping. The Stave Falls plant, which is the source of power, was
out of action and the pump could not be operated, and the Matsqui District suffered slightly
from flooding. However, the gates soon opened and the run-off, owing to the sloughs having
been cleaned, was quick.
In the Pitt River districts conditions were even worse owing to the swollen Lillooet River
running over the dykes and the subsequent failure. This was referred to earlier in this report
and the apparent results mentioned. There is, however, one result which will not be apparent
until the next fall flood, and that is that the flood mentioned by deposition has built up the
bottom of the Lillooet River so that its cross-sectional area has been greatly decreased.
Having this in mind, the Dominion Government were approached with regard to giving it
necessary attention. Similar work was done there by them previously and it was hoped that
that precedent might enable them to do it again. Nothing has been done and it is feared that
the next fall freshet may prove disastrous. As the work involves a considerable expenditure
and as lands which are unorganized are largely benefited, it is not considered that the Department can go further in the matter.- Meantime, every effort will be made to hold the dykes
against the elements. The success of these efforts, however, under the present conditions of the
river, must depend upon prevailing weather conditions.
General. i i
In reviewing the Department's work for the year, it is gratifying to note the absence of
contentious matters and the spirit of harmony which is being built up between the Department
and the farming communities with which it deals and which it serves.
Those communities comprise some of the most ideal.farm lands contributing to the agricultural wealth of the Province, and the administration of the Dykes Department can go far toward
making those lands prosperous and to radiate contentment.
It is the firm belief of the writer that all dyked lands on the Fraser should be administered
from one head. That head need not necessarily be the Government of the Province, for with
the large area which such an organization would control and the low overhead made possible
by such a great distribution, the saving from that item alone would be great. In a comparatively
short time proper management of such an organization would have made it so sound financially
that the appeals for Government assistance now so common and insistent would disappear.
Proper plant and equipment for all classes of work could be maintained, and such work as
river-bank protection, renewals and repairs to dyking-works, ditching and drainage-work, and
even road-work undertaken at a minimum cost and a saving, conservatively estimated at 50
per cent., effected.
It is felt by the writer that a movement in this direction must sooner or later be made,
which movement should embrace the lands presently administered by the Department. Meantime, in an effort to give the dyking districts to which this report has had reference the best
possible service at a minimum cost, it has been recommended that the headquarters be removed
from Arictoria to New Westminster. The adoption of this move will, it is hoped, be felt next year
in the way of better results both as regards finance and works.
Yours obediently,
Bruce Dixon,
Inspector of Dykes.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by William h. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1922.

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