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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA TWENTY-SIXTH REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING ELEVENTH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1922]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TWENTY-SIXTH REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
ELEVENTH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS
AND THE FIFTIETH REPORT OF VITAL STATISTICS
DEPARTMENT, BEING A SUMMARY REPORT
FOE  THE
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30th, 1922
PRINTED   BY
AUTHORITY OP THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullix, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1S22.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July Slst, 1922.
To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Beport of the Provincial Board
of Health for the year ending June 30th, 1922.
j. I). Maclean,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT of the
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoeia, B.C., July 31st, 1922.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sie,—I have the honour to submit the Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the Provincial Board
of Health.
The year past has been an uneventful one. We have been singularly free from any epidemics
and the work of the different departments has been continued along constructive lines. The
development in the departments has been satisfactory, and I beg leave to give you a summary
review of the work done and the outlook for the future.   The division of our work is as follows :—
(1.) Sanitary.—The regular programme of the Department has been carried out in regard
to the inspection of logging camps through the Provincial Police, and I am pleased to report
during the past year that there have been fewer calls upon the Department for attention to
neglect of the sanitary regulations.
I think emphasis should he laid upon the remarkable changes which have taken place
during the past few years in regard to the conditions of the camps in British Columbia. Every
year has shown a decided improvement. Employers are recognizing the fact that the Department insists upon the regulations being carried out, and the employees express satisfaction that
their complaints receive prompt attention.
In addition to this, the Department is solicited for advice in connection with Municipal
Boards of Health, and at all times our Chief Sanitary Inspector has given immediate attention
to requests that have reached us.
Following your wishes, particular attention has 'been given during the past year to the
summer camps. This is a growing problem with the increase in the number of places which are
used during the season, but they have been visited regularly, literature distributed, and notices
posted.
In this connection, I may say that the Department is alive to the growing necessity of
control of motor traffic. The tourist traffic is increasing each year, and regulations are being
drafted to enable supervision being maintained over the free camping-grounds which during the
past year have begun to be established in the different parts of the Province along the tourist
routes.
In this connection, we are working in conjunction with the Boards of the Pacific States
in order that there may be a uniformity of regulations, and in order to deal with these international questions we have effected the organization of the Health Officers from California,
Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia*. There will be a uniformity brought about in regard
to the handling of questions which are common to all of us, and which are becoming increasingly
important on account of the increase in the travel.
We are also making arrangements, through the Department of Quarantine of the Federal
Government, to bring about a uniform procedure in regard to the examination of ships, and an
examination made at Williams Head will be acceptable to the United States authorities. At the
present time, immediately succeeding the examination made by the Canadian authorities, the
United States officer has to make a further examination and issue papers to enable the ship to
visit American ports. The Canadian examination will be accepted if the present suggestions
are carried out. The Department at Ottawa requested our co-operation in this, and we have
been able to give assistance to them owing to the fact that we had already formed our Association
of Pacific Coast Health Officers.
(2.) Venereal.—The work being carried on under the "Venereal Diseases Suppression Act"
has made very satisfactory progress, and I am informed by the Federal Government that British
Columbia is doing as much work as the clinics in Toronto and Montreal, and British Columbia,
on the general work in connection with the education of the public, stands first. We have been fortunate in securing the services of a number of leading citizens in the
formation of a voluntary organization. Literature is being distributed continually, and the
effect is noted in the fact that there is a great increase in the demands for the pamphlets \vL\icli
we issue. In fact, we have trouble in keeping pace with the demand. Meetings are being held,
and all organizations, such as the Rotary Club, Kiwanis, Gyro, Church organizations, Church
Synods, and all of the women's organizations, have been addressed, and committees formed in
each of these to assist our voluntary association in the educational work.
The effect of all this is noticeable in the increased work in the clinics, an increase which
has necessitated during the past year an increase of accommodation, principally in the Vancouver
clinic. Twice we have had to rearrange the premises in order to accommodate the increasing
number of patients. For the past twelve months there have been in the clinic 1,751 new cases
and 28,413 treatments.
The facilities' provided by the Government are sufficient for the present needs, and our
endeavours now are directed along the line of follow-up work in order, if possible, to deal with
the floating population, who are a continual source of infection.
The medical profession are becoming much more alive to the advantage of the work and
with a better understanding on their part their co-operation is increasing.
The greatest need in this work is -the provision of a detention home. The Act allows us
to detain people infected, but we have no place to put them other than the gaols or the hospitals.
We have utilized both on occasion, but we find it very difficult to deal with them unless we have
a proper place. It will take time to bring about sufficient educated public opinion to enable us
to ask for contributions, but we have the work well under way and within the next year we
should see practical results towards the establishment of such an institution.
(3.) PuMic-health Nursing.—Under the assistance that we have received from yourself, we
are able to report most satisfactory progress. The policy, as outlined by yourself, has been
that this work must develop by local support through taxation, and in order to assist in this an
amendment was passed to the " Public Schools Act" which practically places the appointment
of the nurse on the same basis as the appointment of the teacher to the school staff. This,
together with the privilege of grouping schools, makes the cost upon each School Board very
small.    The grant from the Government towards the salary, is the same as that to the teacher.
Where we have placed nurses we have assisted financially until such time as the people
thoroughly understand the work, and this was followed up by voluntarily placing the work on
the taxes and doing away with dependence on voluntary contributions.
The Public Health Course in the University is training nurses. With the two .classes that
have graduated and the sixteen in the present class, they will have trained fifty-six nurses, all
of whom have secured positions with the Government, the Red Cross, the Victorian Order, and
a few have secured positions outside of the Province.
The demand for nurses is increasing and we have requests before us at the present time for
nurses which will be filled as soon as the organization in the districts is completed.
In this connection the Women's Institutes have been in the forefront of the work, and
through the officials in the Agricultural Department their co-operation has been systematized.
There are twelve nurses directly under the Provincial Board in the field and three more
points ready for a nurse. In addition to which the Red Cross has Public Health Nurses, all of
whose qualifications have been accepted by the Provincial Board. They have seven nurses in
the field.
The Department has provided for these nurses all the literature necessary in their educational
campaign, and their school-work, supplemented by this literature, has been remarkably successful.
Meetings have been held and addresses given by officials of the Department, and these have been
found to be particularly helpful in explaining the policy of the Government and the health-work
in general.
The best indication of the evidences of awakening of public opinion in regard to this work
is shown by the great increase in the work of the Department, and our work has been directed
along the lines of stimulating this awakening, recognizing the fact that the enforcement of the
laws can only be carried out when it is backed by intelligent public opinion.
The best way to obtain the backing of public opinion is to demonstrate by work actually
done the benefits that can be derived, and I cannot do better than give a synopsis of the work
as is being carried on in the Saanich Health Centre. aanich War Memorial Health Centre.
^<*
Arrival of some of the babies.  13 Geo. 5 Board op Health. B 7
The account given below is applicable also to the Health Centre at Duncan, and in a lesser
way in regard to some details is being carried out by all of our Public Health Nurses.
Work being directed from the Saanich Health Centre.
Well-baby Clinics.—Two each month;  148 babies registered to date.
School-work.—Fifteen schools; fifty-four class-rooms; approximately 2,000 children.
Individual class-room inspection once each month, except in case of communicable disease
appearing, in which case the nurse makes a daily examination of the pupils until the danger
of an outbreak is passed. The teachers are instructed in observing signs of symptoms and
reporting to the Health Centre.
Pupils are weighed every month and measured o«ce in the school-year by the nurse.
Subsequent months the children are encouraged to weigh themselves and record the result,
under the supervision of the nurse.    Charts are placed in every class-room for this purpose.
After each inspection the nurse gives a " health " talk to the class upon such matters as
personal cleanliness, care of the teeth, etc.    The talks are made suitable to the grade.
Little Mothers' League Classes.—A definite course on infant hygiene, which includes the
proper dressing and feeding of babe, with practice on a baby doll, covers a period of twelve
weeks, ending in an examination, with badge and certificate issued by the Provincial Board of
Health for girls between ages of 10 and 14 years.
Attractive Health Posters are being placed in every class-room. Children are encouraged
to make health posters themselves about vegetables, fruit, teeth, sunshine, etc.
Dental Work.—Appointments made for a certain number of school-children five days of each
week. The dentist works at the Centre three hours, from 9 a.m. to 12; in this way twenty-five
pupils, approximately, are attended weekly.
Tonsil Clinics.—The last Friday of each month we aim at having at least five tonsil
operations done. The children are put to bed and cared for, and remain from six to thirty-six
hours, until quite recovered.
Chest Clinics.—Once each month all suspects are encouraged to attend, and, if considered
necessary, supervision is maintained at intervals by visiting the homes.
Social Service.—A limited amount of social-service work is done.
Infant, Welfare.—All babies are followed up " by the nurse who has attended the confinement."    We aim at watching these children all through the pre-school period.
Home-nursing and Hygiene.—These lectures are conducted through all the fall and winter
months. Eleven lectures given monthly; three different classes being held on the same subject,
covering a period of twelve weeks, with examination and certificate issued by the Provincial
Board of Health.
Addresses.—These are given as part of every month's programme on the work of the Health
Centre, the V.O.N., baby welfare, public health, and other kindred subjects. The people choose
the subject they are most interested in. .   .
District.—The district work includes maternity-work and all nursing which is not communicable, also a certain amount of educational work.
At the Health Centre are six beds. These are utilized for a certain type of patient, such as
malnutrition, rickets, etc.
At the present time two patients are being nursed in the Centre; one a man who sustained
a fractured tibia and fibula, the other a child who sustained a fractured jaw. Both accidents
happened in the neighbourhood of the Centre.
Extension of the Wcrrk.—We are considering organizing a prenatal clinic and also an eye
and ear clinic. The difficulty which presents itself, a very real one, is the transportation. The
nursing staff has too much jitney service to perform at the present time, and with the work
growing as it is with such surprising rapidity, it might be well to consider the question of
transportation absolutely as a separate service and not include it in the nurses' programme.
Otherwise the possibilities of extending the work, which are almost limitless as I see the situation
at present, will be much retarded. Au increase of staff is also a question which requires very
serious consideration, with an additional automobile. The two at present in use are not adequate
to our present needs, and will certainly not meet our future work and needs if a proper public-
health programme is to be carried out. (4.) Laboratories.—Since the adoption of your policy in regard to carrying out public-health
work in the laboratories of" the Vancouver General Hospital and the Jubilee Hospital, we find
that the medical profession are depending on these facilities more and more, and work which
is free in regard to health matters is increasing very markedly, and not only the profession but
the general public know that the services furnished free by the Government are available.
In connection with the free work, the vaecines and antitoxins are sent out on request, and
it is gratifying to note that, although there was such a decrease in the number of cases of
smallpox, 64 cases reported this year as against 137 last year, yet there were requests for 2,665
points of smallpox vaccine.
There were also 240 doses of typhoid vaccine sent out and S17,000 units diphtheria antitoxin,
as well as 2,500 units of tetanus serum;  all distributed free.
(5.) Child Hygiene.—Following the formation at Ottawa of a National Council of Child
Hygiene, the work is assuming Dominion-wide proportions. British Columbia was first in the
line to organize local councils, and we have, especially with the Women's Institutes, Child
Hygiene Councils throughout the Province. Conferences are held and programmes are provided
by the Department.
The Dominion Council has adopted the scheme used in British Columbia, and wall form a
basis of a programme to be submitted to all of the Provinces.
I may say that the infantile deaths under 1 year of age in Vancouver and Victoria are the
lowest of any cities in the Dominion.
The advance made in our work has been very practical, and while it has not been spectacular,
yet a strict adherence to the policies approved by yourself and devoting efforts to the education
of the public has brought about splendid results and the expansion of the work is continuing.
The advances from year to year are substantial.
For the coming year our plans are intended to develop the work of the different departments'
as outlined in the beginning of the report.
There might be added to these the plans which you yourself have in regard to the
tuberculosis-work. Our idea is to continue the campaign of public education, emphasizing
this in every way through publications and through holding meetings.
We could Intensify this work by an enlargement of the staff, but I feel that the plan that
we have followed heretofore is satisfactory and is accomplishing results without the added
expense of too many departments. These departments are so interlocked that with proper
guidance from the Department we can carry on.
A table of infectious diseases reported during the year is incorporated in this report, in
addition to which,epidemics were reported as follows:—
Chiekenpox—Chilliwack, Oak Bay, Port Coquitlam, Sandon District, and Powell River.
Diphtheria—Salrno and Gabriola Island.
Influenza—Chilliwack, Duncan, Field, Islands District, Mission, Nakusp, Port Coquitlam,
Sidney, Williams Lake, Woodfibre, Victoria, Summerland, Ashcroft, Creston, Cumberland, Renata,
and Windermere District.
Mumps—Alberni District, Ashcroft District, Chilliwack, Duncan, Hazelton District, Nelson,
Oak Bay, Penticton, Prince George, Saanich, Sandon District, Victoria, and Port Alice.
Scarlet fever—Mission District and Nelson.
Typhoid fever—Trail District.
Whooping-cough—Ashcroft District, Greenwood, Nakusp, Penticton, Trail District, Edge-
wood, Cumberland and District.
Cemeteries approved: Burton, Sooke, Hullcar, Campbell River, Powell River, Greater
Victoria, and East Wellington (Chinese).
Water-supplies approved: Oliver, Coldstream (temporary), Prince Rupert Extension, White
Rock, West Summerland Extension, and Kamloops Extension.
Sewerage systems approved: Ocean Falls, North Vancouver Extension, Nelson Extension
(Fairview), and Kamloops Extension. •
The report of the Vital Statistics Department is much curtailed this year owing to the
arrangement with the Census Department of the Federal Government at Ottawa. All certificates
of births, deaths, and marriages are forwarded to that Department, and, beginning with this year,
these returns will be published amongst the Vital Statistics returns for the Dominion as a whole.
This is referred to in the small Vital Statistics Report which we include. Doctor's examination.
! WHUirfr-.
"- "
Ready to depart.  13 Geo. 5 Board of Health. B 9
Probahly the greatest advance that has been made is manifested in the increased interest
taken by voluntary organizations in health-work, the Women's Institutes being particularly
active, and much of the progress that we have made has been due to their active co-operation.
The work of the Department is onerous and requires unceasing attention on the part of the
members of the staff. This attention has been given without stint, and I feel very much indebted
to them for their interest in the work and the material assistance that they have given.
At all times the encouragement which we have received from you,  as  Minister of the
Department, has been stimulating and much appreciated.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial Officer of Health. B 10
British Columbia.
1922
TABLE SHOWING RETURNS OF CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES IN THE PROVINCE.
8 "2
So,
o
QJ
PL,
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1
20
25
1
20
IS
22
i
23
3
9
15
1
1
2
7
19
36
2
32
30
Cobble Hill
9
3
2
0
80
1
1
2
1
41
1
3
35
2
"i
3
1
24
1
2
2
14
4
15
5
Delta Municipality    ....
Esquimalt Municipality	
4
4
36
3
2
6
26
Field	
1
4
1
8
80
3
2
4
3
2
14
5
2
1
1
3
7
22
13
2
3
2
1
7
IS
■>
S
9
8
1
1
"3'
39
5
1
'6?'
8
4
6
1
1
5
2
1
12
5
21
5
200
4
Oak Bay	
8
3
16
21
6
10
11
150
82
1
i
2
1
2
5
18
1
5
5
17
5
172
i
3
1
3
"2'
9
1
5
3
3
1
6
1
1
1
4
17
2
60
i3
Revelstoke District    ....
Richmond Municipality	
1
ii'
79
18
■«—
4
1
1
3
1
4
2
1
1
190
84
5
1
40
148
22
3
4
12
4
5
134
Trail District 	
30
18
4
74
17
5
63
4
16
196
10
56
5
1
272
66
2
27
18
6
1
Vancouver, West	
1
54
439
7
19
1
12
269
3
1
1,542
1
1
Wyatt Bav	
64
Totals	
320
l
100
650
325
417
423
27
5
238
554
8 13 Geo. o Board op Health. B 11
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1922.
//. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Officer of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your consideration my Twelfth Annual Report on
Sanitary and Quarantine Work for the Provincial Board of Health.
During the past year general sanitary conditions throughout British Columbia have been
highly satisfactory. This applies especially to the unincorporated territory. Increasing industrial development has naturally increased the work of sanitary supervision, but the work is made
much easier than formerly owing to a greater spirit of co-operation manifested towards our
officials by employers and employees alike. Years of patient propaganda for improved sanitary
conditions are to-day reflected in the well-arranged sanitary measures provided in 95 per cent,
of our industrial plants and camps. Another fact worth noting in that connection, which might
be simply coincident, is that British Columbia has less industrial strife than any part of the
civilized world.
The larger portion of our industrial camps are located along the 6,000-mile coastal line of
British Columbia, and these places, numbering many hundreds, are periodically inspected through
the medinmship of our quarantine launch. The sting of this work, which is oftentimes fraught
with danger and long hours of duty, is removed by the genial welcome and co-operative spirit
exhibited towards your officials by both master and man, and any suggestions for sanitary
betterment are welcomed and heeded.
A serious outbreak of typhoid occurred during last summer at a northern coastal camp.
After exhaustive tests and surveys the cause was found to be an unsuspected carrier temporarily
visiting the camp. The outbreak was stamped out and the convalescent and recovered patients
instructed along prophylactic lines. The sanitary measures are being strictly watched at this
camp, where several typhoid-recovered employees are yet domiciled. The superintendent, who
was one of the afflicted, is lending every effort to prevent a repetition and assisting the Department in its bacteriological observations. Fortunately this camp is quite isolated and can only
be reached by launch.
Sanitation in Outlying Districts.
The growing prosperity and education of our people has been marked by an increased desire
on the part of our country citizens to install modern sanitary conveniences, such as pneumatic
water-pressure systems and septic sewage-disposal plants for their homes. This commendable
move means more to the future than appears on the surface. The coming of such sanitary
conveniences, coupled with good roads and radio appliances, will be real factors in the " back
to the farm " movement.
This Department has spent considerable time in advising applicants for information along
sanitary lines, more especially septic-tank systems. Through the co-operation of the Public
Works Department we have been able to lend blue-prints and plans suitable for various conditions of soil and location. In this manner our people are assisted in their desire for modern
sewage-disposal at a minimum cost. Owing to the variable character of location, surface and
subsoil, it is impossible to have a standard plan to fill every need. We are keeping in touch with
the various types now in use in order to be in a position to further advise as to requirements
based upon actual observation of existing types.
The present tendency is to neglect a very important factor for complete success—namely,
the proper disposal of the effluent from the septic chamber; and whilst this is often clear and
odourless when discharging, unless thoroughly distributed by means of an ample soak-away pit
or sub-irrigation plan, it is sure to become an offensive nuisance and a decided menace during
fly season. B 12 British Columbia. 1922
Food Canning and Preserving Establishments.
The food-canning industries of British Columbia are almost confined to two articles, the
world-renowned sockeye salmon and Okanagan fruit. In regard to the former, the fish are
delivered to the canneries by the fish-boats direct from the fishing-grounds in fresh and firm
condition and are immediately put through the canning process, which consists of gutting and
cleaning in a most thorough way with modern and ingenious machinery in an almost human
manner. Every care is observed to keep the machinery scrupulously clean and free of rust.
Cans are of the modern, sanitary, Solderless type. From the time the salmon leave the sea to
the time it is cooked and sealed ready for shipment it is scarcely handled by human hands and
the probability of infection or contamination is quite remote.
It is only in the disposal of the refuse that we have to find fault, and even in that respect
the number of canneries defaulting do so under extenuating circumstances, and their number is
negligible. Located as they are in isolated places on the sea-front, where shoals of dogfish await
the opportunity of devouring all refuse thrown from the cannery dock.
Our regulations demand that all refuse from canneries be conveyed to an incinerator or
towed out to sea beyond the 3-mile limit, and whilst your officers are ever ready to assume their
responsibilities in enforcing regulations, there are times when a prosecution would be persecution,
and the allowable discretion is based on circumstances and the proper safeguarding of the
public health.
Fruit and Vegetable Canneries.
The industry has reached the stage predicted by this bfanch of your Department. At the
time, regulations governing food preserving, canning, storage, and packing establishments were
adopted. These regulations have been carried out. The following letter asking for co-operation
was sent to all firms :—
To the Managers of Fruit Canneries and Packing-houses:
Sir,—I beg to advise that regulations governing the operation of all establishments where food is
prepared or handled for human consumption has been issued by this Department. A copy is herewith
enclosed for your careful perusal. It is not the intention of this Department to handicap you in any
manner, but rather to help promote a growing and valuable industry along lines which will place its
products before the world as having come from establishments where cleanliness and strict sanitary
conditions are insisted upon. I would remind you that such conditions in our salmon-canneries have
placed the British Columbia salmon in the enviable position it commands to-day throughout the markets
of the world. The Okanagan Valley, with unlimited and wonderful possibilities, will be promoted or
throttled according to your manner of co-operation along the lines demanded by our regulations. It is
gratifying to learn from our Inspector, Mr. DeGrey, that 95 per cent, of the canners and packers are
heartily co-operating and in sympathy with our efforts, and we hope this support will be unanimous
without our having to insist upon the observance of the regulations.
All municipalities have authority to enforce these regulations. Furthermore, every Provincial
Constable is a Sanitary Officer with instructions to inspect such establishments frequently.
Anticipating your hearty co-operation,
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
To-day the sunny Okanagan has developed into a fruit-hive of health and industry and its
limits are not by any means in sight.
The fruit canning and packing establishments are inspected by Provincial and municipal
officers and cleanliness is the watchword at every establishment. It is gratifying to know that
the majority of the larger establishments are in the hands of men locally known as " fussy for
cleanliness."
Summer Resorts.
This phase of our work is one which calls for much resourcefulness. Nearly all of these
summer resorts are in unorganized territory and in many cases remote from any supervising
official. They are visited through the aid of our departmental launch, inspected and posted with
the departmental warning notices of a sanitary and prophylactic nature.
Our observations show that in the selection of camping resorts insufficient attention is given
to an adequate supply of drinking-water and the care and location of latrines.
Propaganda through the agency of our posters and booklets seem to have a far-reaching and
inexpensive effect, and the results already noticeable seem to justify the saying that " The
common-sense of the people is the chief reliance of successful health-work.'' /
13 Geo. o Board of Health. B 13
Watershed-protection.
This branch of our work is one of vital importance, especially considering that nearly
one-half of our population is dependent upon our vigilance on the Burrard Iulet watershed.
The writer makes frequent visits of inspection to Capilano, Lynn Valley, and Seymour Creek
watersheds, and is constantly in telephonic touch for any untoward emergency or required drastic
action. The co-operation of this Department with the Health Departments of the cities affected
ensures the people's drinking-water free from contamination other than that of flood or freshet.
Nuisances.
This branch of your service has been called upon to take action for the abatement of
nuisances from slaughter-houses, chicken-farms, hog and cattle pastures, oil, chemical, and
fertilizer plants, sewage foreshore and drains in various parts of British Columbia.
In some alleged nuisance cases the cause presents a serious problem, sometimes affecting
the industrial life of a community. It is then that an appeal to reason has to be made to avoid
persecution and loss, because a nuisance is not necessarily a health menace. However, in the
majority of cases we have successfully had the nuisances abated.
Summary.
The number of inspection visits to logging camps during the past year approximates 350;
to mining-camps, 30; to canneries, 100; other industrial plants, 50; summer resorts, 25;
nuisances, 15 ; cemeteries, 3 ; territory embraced all British Columbia. The majority of logging
camps are located on the Coast between the 49th and 51st parallel, thus necessitating much water
transportation.
Before concluding, I beg to remind you of the very efficient service rendered to this branch
of the service by the Provincial Police officers all over the Province. To carry on our constantly
increasing work without their services as Sanitary Officers would be very difficult.
I have, etc.,
Frank DeGrey,
Chief Sanitary Inspector. B 14 British Columbia. 1922
MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
i Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1922.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg leave to submit the Eleventh Annual Report of the Medical Inspection of Schools
for the Province of British Columbia.
The tables appended give a full description of the work being done by the Medical Inspectors,
and we note that the advent of the Public Health Nurses, with the follow-up work which we have
been hoping for, is now thoroughly under way.
Our correspondence reveals that the nurses' influence is awakening the public attention, and
the parents are more alive to the necessity of correcting the defects which the Medical Inspectors'
reports show as existing in the children.
The University of British Columbia is continuing the Public Health Course for nurses, and
there have been, including the present class of sixteen, fifty-six nurses trained, all of whom have
obtained positions. That their worth is recognized by the voluntary organizations, such as the
Women's Institutes and the Parent-Teachers' Associations, is shown in the increased requests
that we are receiving for Public Health Nursing Service, and also from the requests that we
are receiving that the Public Health Nursing Service be substituted for that of the Medical
Inspectors. The Department is not in accord with these requests, but we are endeavouring to
relieve the medical men of a great deal of the routine work, and the present plan is to have
the medical men's services retained as consultants. The medical man will make a thorough
examination of the receiving class; the nurse will carry on the routine work and have the
doctor to act as her consultant for any cases which she considers necessary should be sent to
him. In this way we are able to keep the expenses within the present bounds, or at least
maintain the services of both the doctor and the.nurse at a very small increase.
What is particularly gratifying is the preventive work carried on by the nurses. Classes
are formed amongst the pupils, literature supplied by the Department, and school chores provided
for. By " school chores " we mean giving certain definite duties for the children to follow out
in regard to their personal hygiene. The idea has been very acceptable to the children, and the
spirit of competition engenders strict attention to their carrying-out of the " health habits " that
are prescribed by the nurse.
The most striking feature in respect to this work is the influence that it has on the homes.
The children are insisting upon the parents permitting and co-operating with them in carrying
out the work.
Many commendatory letters have been received from parents, and the fact that we have
managed to secure the interest of the children has done a great deal in popularizing health-work
in the schools.
Naturally the growth of the population provided increased material for examination from
year to year. New schools are being opened, but we are able with our organization to meet
these increases.
While criticism has been offered in regard to some of the medical men. and no doubt justly
so in some cases, yet the great majority of the medical men are appreciating more and more the
benefits that the children are deriving, and also learning that the public are determined that
the rising generation shall receive all the benefits within their power.
The people are beginning to appreciate the fact that the millions of dollars spent in education
is spent as an investment. The theory that an educated citizen is the best citizen is universally
accepted, and the taxpayers have begun to realize that it is poor business to spend money without
stint in providing for the mental education of a generation that is more than one-third physically
defective. The child who is physically defective will never grow up into a condition that will
enable him to be an asset to the state.
I am submitting a detailed report of the schools examined.
I have, etc.,
H. E. Young,
Provincial Officer of Health. 13 Geo. 5 Board of Health. B 15
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors:   151.
Reports from Medical Inspectors:   131.
High Schools.
High schools.   1920-21, 52 : Reported, 30; not reported, 22.   1921-22, 52 :  Reported, 27 ; not
reported, 25.
Pupils inspected:  1920-21, 3,049;  1921-22, 3,90S, an increase of S59.
Gbaded City Schools.
Cities.    1020-21,  35:   Reported,  25;   not  reported,   10.    1021-22,   35:    Reported,  2(3;    not
reported, 9.
Pupils inspected: 1920-21, 32,392 ;  1021-22, 30,218, a decrease of 2,174.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities.    1920-21, 27:   Reported, 21;   not reported, 6.    1921-22, 25:   Reported, 22;
not reported, 3.
Pupils inspected:  1020-21, 18,150;  1021-22, 21,617, an incerase of 3,458.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected:  1920-21, 438, at a cost of $9,574.25;  1921-22, 506, at a cost of $11,364.80.
Schools not inspected:  1020-21, 160 ;  1021-22, 152.
Pupils inspected:  1020-21, 11,231;  1021-22, 13,395, an increase of 2,164.
Cost of inspection per pupil: 1920-21, 85 cents;  1921-22, 84 cents.
Percentage of defects :  1020-21, 93.98;  1021-22, 04.01, an Increase of 0.03. B 16
British Columbia.
1922
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
cj
to
5" .
o
55 .
D
<u t*>
QJ
a* .
o ty
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6 £
5
o '5
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8|
"8 q
2
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3
S5 CJ
S
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OK
«l
Burnaby, North .
Chilliwack ,
Cranbrook  	
Cumberland	
Duncan... .
Esquimalt
Fernie	
Grand Forks.
Kamloops....
Kelowna
Ladner.. .,	
Langley	
Merritt	
Nelson	
New Westminster:
Duke of Connaught..
Peachland	
Point Grey:
King George V.
Prince of Wales.
Prince Rupert ..
Revelstoke	
Rossland........
Surrey	
Trail	
Vancouver:
Britannia.  .
King Edward..
King George..
Kitsilano
Technical	
Vancouver, North.
Vancouver, South.
Vernon	
E. M. Eaton	
R. McCaffrey	
G. E. L. MacKinnon .
G. K. MacNaughton.
H. N. Watson...
J. S. McCallum..
D. Corsan	
W. Truax	
M. G. Archibald..
W. J. Knox	
A. A. King	
B. B. Marr....
G. H. Tutill. .
Isabel Arthur.
D. A. Clark	
Wm. Buchanan.
T. H. Lennie....
H. E. Tremayne
.1. IT. Hamilton..,
J. W. Coffin	
F. D. Sinclair	
C. S. Williams ...
R.  WIghtman and B.  H.
Wilson
R. Wightman and M. P. Hogg
R. Wightman.
\i. A. Martin. .
G. A. Lamont.
W. Arbuckle..
E. E. Farrer   .
Miss Morrison.
C. W. Thorn ...
Miss E. Hardy.
May Ewart..
Mrs. Brown.
Miss Bell....
E. M. Pavne.
27
24
181
131
77
77
86
36
59
54
18
40
67
67
77
70
130
130
96
96
32
31
29
27
30
29
213
195
453
453
25
24
207
231
146
145
97
97
165
100
101
101
50
50
68
6S
555
126
562
243
427
100
345
142
349
122
279
277
503
550
104
96
2
19
s
5
18
11
11
4
21
19
2
2
14
6
1
7
1
1
30
15
3
14
12
6
2
4
2
17
17
16
9
9
10
12
30
3
4
2
1
1
1
3
4
i
3
"i"
8
9
2
3
4
2
9
5
1
13
1
4
3
3
1
2
"s
1
1
2
2
1
5
2
16
16
1
11
6
1
I
3
i
GRADED   CITY
Alberni	
Cranbrook:
Central	
Kootenay Orchards
South Ward	
Cumberland	
Duncan:
Central ...
Crofton   ..
Genoa Bay.
Westholme
Enderby	
Fernie	
Grand Forks...
Kamloops   ....
Kaslo..».	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith..
Merritt	
A. D. Morgan	
G. E. L. MacKinnon.
G. K. MacNaughton.
H. N. Watson
H. W. Keith	
D. Corsan	
W. Truax.	
M. G. Archibald .
D. J. Barclay
W. J. Knox	
■h E. Montgomery ,
G. H. Tutill	
Miss E. E. Farrer
C. W. Thorn .
Miss E. Hardy.
104
94
3
1
3
1
475
475
12
1
26
58
26
58
468
441
105
33
43
50
94
13
344
331
10
29
14
30
32
28
1
7
1
13
10
5
21
19
7
1
220
182
1
17
1
5
7
842
842
41
16
63
474
460
2
1
20
1
20
5
585
577
45
3
20
5
34
43
200
180
4
31
1
38
14
510
510
4
2
18
6
18
14
420
412
1
1
6
1
23
49
352
231
4
10
1
9
12
4
4
105
81
3
1
7
87
233
30
122
24
25 13 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
B 17
SCHOOLS.
>
OH
-a
<y    .
Sow
« a
HO
0
'0
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary. Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
a
0)
>
to
m
a
M
a
u
p
to
a
B
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
4
"e
i
i
"i"
"i'
12
51
29
22
7
Heart trouble, 2 ;   tonsillitis, 3
Good	
Yes.
11
7
13
Cardiac, 1; ansemic 1; wax in
ears, 7
Fair.
39
Mumps, 3 ; influenza, 5..
Ventilation,   heating,   and surroundings poor
Good	
Yes.
0
3
24
24
15
4
2
10
53
6
24
20
"l9
16
Heart, 12	
6
25
Good	
2
Chorea, 1; cardiac, 1;  anremia,
5; flat-foot, 1; chronic bronchitis, 1
1
4
10
Scarlet-fever, 2; mumps,8
■
64
16
Cardiac, 6 ;   orthopaedic,   5;
nervous, 3 ;  anaemia, 1
"   	
1
20
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 23; orthopaedic, 5 ; anaemia, 5
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 15; orthopaedic, 6; anaemia, 4
1
1
Heat and ventilation poor
29
10
2
4
3
1
92'
5
3
8
27
13
8
4
5
11
6
35
Good"-
4
1
27
Vaccinated, 30;  not vaccinated, 38
Measles, 1; chicken-pox, 1
Ventilation fair ...
Ventilation, poor..
Ventilation, good.
Ventilation, poor..
Good	
Inadequate.
45
32
13
12
32
17
Scarlet-fever, 1; typhoid, 2
Scarlet-fever, l;measles,l
Yes.
102
Heart, 10	
1
27
Fair.
SCHOOLS.
32
3
1
77
32
4
4
306
170
11
264
10
5
5
1
2
1
2
1
71
1
60
410
3
186
65
20
3
323
104
93
98
164
38
19
26
216
1
17
110
41
53
Inf. paralysis, 1; Pott's disease,
1; cardiac, 1
Wax in ears, 115; catarrh, 63;
anaemic, 45; blepharitis, 24;
cardiac, 4; skin-disease, 19;
pulmonary, 2; orthopedic, 4;
kidney trouble, 1; stammering, 1; paralysis, 1
Deformity, 2; cardiac, 3.
Nervous, 1	
Cardiac, 1    ,
Heart trouble, 127	
Valvular heart trouble, 2	
Nervous, 1; discharging ear, 1.
Cardiac, 9; chorea, 11; flat-
foot, 10; anamiia, 14; chronic
bronchitis, 9; curvature of
spine, 4; deformed feet, 4;
squamous eczema, 10
Whooping-cough.
Influenza.
Mumps.
Mumps.
Mumps, 23; chicken-pox,
52; pink-eye, 26
Chicken-pox, 14; measles,
5; scarlet-fever, 8
Good	
Fair.!	
Good	
Temporary
Good	 B 18
British Columbia.
1922
GRADED   CITY
Name of School.
Nelson .
New Westminster:
Central 	
Lord Kelvin	
Lord Lister.......
Richard McBride.,
Queensborough ...
Herbert Spencer..
Port Alberni ...
Port Coquitlam:
Central	
James Park
Port Moody	
Prince George ..
Prince Rupert.
Revelstoke:
Central
Selkirk..
Rossland .
Slocan . .
Trail	
Vancouver:
Aberdeen.
Bayview	
Beaconsfield.,
Cecil Rhodes..
Central	
Charles Dickens .
Dawson	
Fairview.	
Florence Nightingale.,
Franklin	
General Gordon.
Grandview..
Grenfell
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
4. cj
Isabel Arthur      755
D. A. Clark
C. T. Hilton	
G. A. Sutherland .
C. R. Svmmes .
C. Ewei-t	
II. E. Tremayne .
J. H. Hamilton ..
J. W. Coffin ...
\V. E. Gomm ..
C. S. Williams.
Drs. Wightman and Hogg...
ir Wilson..
Hogg...
m Wilson..
u Hogg...
Hogg...
it Wilson..
,i Hogg...
" Hogg...
H Wilson..
Wilson.
Hogg..
Miss Stark.
E. G. Hodson.
I. M. Smith.. .
H. Jukes	
I. M.Smith...
M. D. Schultz.
E. G. Hodson.
V. B. Stevens.
E. G. Hodson.
D. Bellamy .. .
V. B. Stevens.
Wilson.
Wilson.
296
876
481
70
417
172
158
90
172
260
707
260
320
441
75
619
408
412
492
M. K. Cruickshank
H. Jukes	
I. M.Smith....
M. K. Cruickshank
290
361
475
69
400
161
137
85
172
260
150
312
441
71
619
438
363
440
45
766
681
439
413
942
903
E46
516
736
724
333
500
324
544
565
635
132
119
HH
103
10
103
26
26
20
26
32
12
17
433
40
28
53
28
83
115
9
12
7
5
.8
5
• V
12
9
9.
2
5
7
1
1 13 Geo. 5
Boaed of Health.
B 19
SCHOOLS—-Continued.
an
Other   Conditions,   specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease, etc.).
o
□
o
H
<v
H
>
W
M
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.  State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated,    poorly
heated,  etc.
Closets.    State
if   clean   and
adequate.
293
10
125
383
386
81
127
119
8
114
111
38
197
166
32
54
50
6
194
180
27
23
3
20
31
26
28
64
19
22
26'
7
4
16
24
107
24
2
45
33
i
14
19
46
404'
12
7
122
7
11
420
89
1
110
2
10
47
3
12
57
1
7
54
8
3
134
5
94
1
11
163
7
15
86
7
9
196
3
29
75
60
"'¥
4
7
100
9
16
1
2
Chorea,   1;
disease, 2
valvular   heart
Cardiac,  37 ;   orthopaedic,  17;
nervous, 5 ;   wax in ears, 17 ;
anaemia, 2
Cardiac, 8; orthopaedic, 4; wax
in ears, 12 ; anaemic, 1
Cardiac,   10 ;    orthopaedic,  12 ;
nervous, 1; wax in ears, 12
Cardiac,   11 ;   orthopaedic,    9;
nervous, 1 ; wax in ears, 12
Cardiac, 2 ; nervous, 1; wax in
ears, 2
Cardiac,  18 ;   orthopaedic,  16 ;
nervous, 2 ; wax in ears, 10
Phthisis, 1	
Pulmonary T.B., dormant, 4
Pulmonary T. B., dormant, 1... |    4
Infantile paralysis, 2	
Blepharitis, 17; nervous, 2;
anaemic, 1; heart, 2 ; uvula
missing, 1 ; stye 1; nasal
catarrh, 1; acne, 1; deformed
chest, 1
Asthma, 1; defective speech, 2;
spinal defect, 1
Tnfantile paralysis, 1	
Amputation leg, 1; congenital
hip disease, 1
Cardiac, 3 ; nervous 1	
Cardiac, 43 ; orthopaedic, 168.
Vaccinated,   226;    cardiac,   5;
pulmonary, 5
Vaccinated,   199;   cardiac,   19;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   125;    cardiac,
pulmonary, 4
Vaccinated, 107; cardiac, 5.
Vaccinated,   189;     cardiac,   9:
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,  399;    cardiac, 16:
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,  162;   cardiac,  10;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   549;    cardiac,   16:
pulmonary, 4
Vaccinated,   170;    cardiac,   7;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated, 296;   cardiac,  18:
pulmonary, 4
Vaccinated, 125; cardiac, 3.
Vaccinated, 158; cardiac, 8.
Vaccinated,   215;    cardiac,
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated, 20; cardiac, 1..
Mumps, 127; scarlet-
fever, 24; chicken-pox,
12 ; pink-eye, 9 ; diphtheria, 1
Diphtheria, 1 ; scarlet-
fever, 13; pertussis, 6;
mumps, 12; chicken-
pox, 30
Chicken-pox, 2..
Chicken-pox, 3.,
Influenza   and   chicken-
pox
Influenza	
Influenza and chicken-
pox
Scarlet-fever, 2	
Chicken-pox, 3	
Vaccinated, 315; not
vaccinated, 235
Scarlet-fever, 1 .
Scarlet-fever, 6; diphtheria, 1; mumps, 3;
chicken-pox, 1; whooping cough, 2
Scarlet-fever, 3; diphtheria, 6; mumps, 11
Diphtheria, 1; measles,
1; chicken-pox, 2
Measles, 1; mumps, 2;
chicken-pox, 9; whooping-cough, 13
Scarlet-fever, 1; diphtheria, 3; measles, 3;
chicken-pox, 3; whooping-cough, 2
Scarlet-fever, 6; diphtheria, 4; chicken-pox, 9;
whooping-cough, 7
Scarlet-fever, 1; diphtheria, 5; measles, 2;
mumps, 1; chicken-
pox, 1; whooping-
cough, 6
Scarlet-fever, 5; mumps,
2; chicken-pox, 3;
whooping-cough, 2
Scarlet-fever, 10; measles,
1; mumps, 1; chicken-
pox, 2; whooping-
cough, 4
Scarlet-fever, 1	
Scarlet-fever, 2; diphtheria, 7; measles, 1;
mumps, 1; chicken-pox,
4; whooping-cough, 7
Scarlet-fever, 2; mumps,
2; chicken-pox, 19;
whooping-cough, 10
Good.
Good	
ii    	
Satisfactory
Good.......
Inadequate.
Ventilation altered
„ fair...
ii fair...
M good..
n fair...
n bad...
ii fair...
i r fair...
ii fair...
ii bad,..
good.,
fair...
fair.
Good.
Good.
Fair.
ii
Yes.
Inadequate.
Fair.
Clean.
Bad.
Clean. B 20
British Columbia.
1922
GRADED   CITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
W
S
r-
«
a
n t>j
a>
OJ
Ph *3
►-i a/
u
~ —
«
£ s*
£; .—
-3
c —
O
Is
i-1.5
O g
o H
1
%  o
S'5
a! S
OK
O
a
0)
<1
— a
3   O
Vancouver— Continued.
Hastings	
Henry Hudson.
Kitsilano	
Laura Secord .
Livingstone...
Macdonald..
Model	
Mount Pleasant..
Nelson ,
Roberts .
Seymour .
Simon Fraser.
Strathcona ...
Tennyson	
Blind	
Vancouver, North:
Lonsdale	
Queen Mary ..
Ridgeway ....
Vernon	
Drs. Wightman and Wilson.
Hogg..
Dr. Wightman...
E. A. Martin  ...
W. Arbuckle.
Hogg..
Wilson.
Wilson.
Hogg..
Wilson.
Wilson.
Hogg..
Hogg..
Wilson.
Hogg..
M. K. Cruickshank
D. Bellamy .
I. M. Smith...
M. D. Schultz.
M. K. Cruickshank
M. D. Schultz...  .
V. B. Stevens	
M. ft. Cruickshank
H. Jukes .
M. A. McLellan.
M. D. Schultz.
M. A. McLellan.
D. Bellamy.   ...
E. G. Breeze.
Mrs. Brown.
Miss Payne.
662
661
8
2
3
645
640
18
8
5
8
469
465
14
5
1
6
490
567
37
1
1
1
413
435
29
5
5
3
635
500
23
1
4
2
516
526
33
4
2
2
763
745
76
2
20
6
756
735
16
3
2
6
985
1117
48
8
10
9
916
858
42
7
18
11
657
648
47
7
7
3
1065
1113
52
4
21
4
648
632
31
11
9
3
S
8
8
406
598
4P0
878
401
592
487
872
2
2
99
1
4
6
9
31
10
43
5
6
8
4
20
18
14
53
97
100
88
63
90
100
79
111
118
142
117
53
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Burnaby:
Armstrong Avenue.,
Bar net..	
Douglas Road....
Edmonds Street .
Gilmore Avenue .
Hamilton Road..
G. de B.Watson
C. M. Eaton ....
G de B. Watson
C. M. Eaton .
G. de B. Watson .
32
20
32
19
5
1
2
6
75
442
57
367
1
9
2
2
"i"
619
602
19
2
48
10
21
90
25
25 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 21
SCHOOLS—Continued.
be =2
o
« s
wo
o
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
g
.
p
o
s
o
3
QJ
a
to
a
>
m
a
W
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
149
4
131
9
8
50
3
9
103
1
6
78
6
10
112
11
98
3
7
231
1
24
149
12
173
11
11
216
9
17
116
8
9
299
6
3
80
7
15
121
177
147
254
2
3
2
9
2
8
5
102
Vaccinated, 4; cardiac, 4
Vaccinated,   230;
pulmonary, 4
Vaccinated,   138;
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated,   1S3;
pulmonary, 1
Vaccinated,   150;
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 224;
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated,   175;
pulmonary, 5
Vaccinated, 323,
pulmonary, 2
Vaccinated,  287;
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated,   399;
pulmonaiy, 5
Vaccinated,  457;
pulmonary, 2
cardiac,   6:
cardiac, 7;
cardiac,   4;
cardiac,   7;
cardiac, 20:
cardiac, 6;
cardiac, 26;
cardiac, 12;
cardiac, 11;
cardiac, 11;
Vaccinated,   306;    cardiac,   8;
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated, 796;   cardiac, 16:
pulmonary, 3
Vaccinated,   274;    cardiac,   7:
pulmonary, 3
Defective heart, 3.
Defective heart, 3.
Defective heart, 7.
Scarlet-fever, 3; diphtheria, 1; measles, 1;
mumps, 1; chicken-
pox, 23; whooping-
cough, 3
Scarlet-fever, 1; diphtheria, 1; mumps, 9;
chicken-pox,20; whooping-cough, 5
Scarlet-fever, 1; measles,
2; mumps, 1
Scarlet-fever, 2; mumps,
3; chicken-pox, 32;
whooping-cough, 7
Scarlet-fever, 4; diphtheria, 6; measles, 3;
mumps, 1; chicken-
pox, 10
Scarlet-fever, 1; diphthe-
ria, 4; mumps, 6;
chicken-pox, 1; whooping-cough, 1
Diphtheria, 5; measles,
4; chicken-pox, 71
whooping-cough, 5
Scarlet-fever, 5; diphthe-
ria, 11; chicken-pox,
6; whooping-cough, 1
Scarlet-fever, 8; diphtheria, 2; mumps, 4;
chicken-pox, 7; whooping-cough, 9
Scarlet-fever, 1; measles,
4; mumps, 2; chicken-
pox, 7; whooping-
cough, 1
Scarlet-fever, 11; diphtheria, 1; measles, 4;
mumps, 2; c h i cken^
pox, 41; whooping-
cough. 4
Scarlet-fever, 9; diphtheria, 4; measles, 5;
mumps 3; chicken-pox,
1; whooping-cough, 1
Scarlet-fever, 6; diphtheria, 2; measles, 12;
chicken-pox, 6
Scarlet-fever, 6; measles,
4; mumps, 9; chicken-
pox, 5; whooping--
cough,10
Scarlet-fever, 4; typhoid-
fever, 2
Ventilation fair.
fair.
fair...
fair...
fair...
fair...
good..
good..
fair...
bad...
good .
New ventilation
good; old ventilation bad
Ventilation good..
Good.
Bad.
Clean.
Clean; unclean.
Clean.
SCHOOLS
5
4
2
6
17
92
19
149
125
6
1
Wax in ears, rhinitis, 1	
Bronchitis, 1 ; heart, 3; wax in
ears, 1 ; uncleanliness, 2
Eczema, 1; strabismus, 2 ; wax
in ears, 5; ptosis, 1; rhinitis, 2; uncleanliness, 1
Wax in ears, 50 ; uncleanliness,
22 ; rhinitis, 48 ; bronchitis,
26 ; heart, 31; blepharitis, 2 ;
strabismus, 2; conjunctivitis,
1; tonsillitis, 20; nervous, 2
Rhinitis, 1	
Scarlet-fever, 5; whooping-cough, 1 ; measles,
3
Infantile paralysis, 2 —
Good. B 22
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School   Nurse.
"3
CQ
w
at
rt
m
a
a
S-i <o
■H.2
* 3
°g
4* a>
p
'€3
CD
IB
■-  ~
•2 "*
to
c
p
a>
o £
QJ    O
0».2
*3 c3
4>    fc-
•0
2 5>
i>s
OS
Q>
CK
QP3
<
u.21
—  ~
Burnaby—Contimied.
Howard Avenue .
Inmau Island..
Kingsway, East..
Kingsway, West.
Nelson Avenue..
River way, East..
Schou Street..   .
Second Street....
Sperling Avenue.
Chilliwack:
Atchelitz.  	
Camp Slough	
Cheam	
Chilliwack, East.
Fairfield Island..
Lotbiniere	
Parson's Hill	
Promontory	
Rosedale	
Sardis 	
Strathcona	
Sumas	
Vedder Creek ...
Yarrow	
Coldstream :
Coldstream	
Lavington	
Delta:
Annacis Island...
Annieville	
Boundary Bay.   .
Canoe Pass	
Delta, East  	
Inverholme	
Ladner	
Mosher Siding ,. .
Sunbury 	
Trenant	
Westholme	
Esquimalt	
Kent:
Agassiz	
Harrison Mills ...
Langley:
Aldergrove 	
County Lane
Fernridge	
Glen Valley	
Langley, East   ..
Langley, Fort ...
Langley, Prairie .
Langley, West...
Loehiel	
Milner	
Murrayville	
Otter	
Patricia	
Springbrook
Willoughhy..
C. M. Eaton .
G. de B. Watson.
C. M. Eaton	
G. de B. Watson
C. M. Eaton .
G. de B. Watson .
C. M. Eaton	
T. C. Elliot .
J. 0. Henderson .
J. C. Elliot	
J. C. Henderson .
J. C. Elliot.   . ...
W. Arbuckle .
W. Arbuckle .
A. A. King .
J. S. McCallum.
P. McCaffrey ...
B. B. Marr ,
Miss Morrison .
40
37
156
150
156
146
436
428
30S
73
85
70
50
65
68
44
60
18
13
117
155
64
23
11
10
32
35
13
37
44
32
19
21
207
12
60
30
24
580
164
18
67
50
35
36
26
94
130
21
94
120
61
44
34
24
70
48
66
63
43
51
17
12
118
136
49
23
11
11
27
SO
10
32
37
30
17
20
179
12
13
680
149
18
59
41
31
34
24
31
18
109
42
24
21
13
63
8
151
3
6
5
9
1
5
27
2
10
4
1
195
64
7 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 23
SCHOOLS—Continued.
CD
>
an
13
a a
HO
CD
'3
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
d
a
CO
OS
o
d
a
a
o
%
to
a
3
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
17
9
30
3
71
5
2
14
2
6
2
i
"2'
12
5
10
11
3
4
2
3
30
4
6
4
2
1
Uncleaniiness, 4; bronchitis, 2;
heart,   2;  wax  in   ears,  3;
rhinitis, 6 ; tonsillitis, 2
Uncleanliness, 2 ; bronchitis, 6;
heart, 8;   wax  in ears,  4;
rhinitis, 8 ; tonsillitis, 5
Wax in ears, 2 ; strabismus, 2..
Uncleanliness,   9;   bronchitis,
10 ;  heart, 21;  wax in ears,
38; blepharitis, 2; strabismus,
3; rhinitis, 33; tonsillitis, 15;
nervous, 2
Eczema,   1 ;  uncleanliness, 2;
seborrhcea, 1; strabismus, 1 ;
catarrh, 3; heart, 1; rhinitis, 1
Uncleanliness, 1 ; conjunctivitis, 1;   rhinitis,   1; wax in
ears, 1
Uncleanliness, 1; wax in ears,
8 ;  bronchitis, 1;   heart, 2 ;
blepharitis, 1;   tonsillitis, 2;
rhinitis, 4 ;   infantile paralysis, 1
Uncleanliness, 1;   wax in ears,
3; catarrh, 1
Heart, 2 ;  rhinitis, 3 ;   wax in
ears, 5
Good	
Yes.
34
i
2
2
1
2
1
1
36
101
Scarlet-fever, 1; whooping-cough, 6
Good	
»
41
15
i
i
Chicken-pox, 4; whooping-cough, 7 ;  scarlet-
fever, 1
Mumps,  14;   whooping-
cough, 1
"
25
31
i
8
55
n
"
28
ii
48
Fair.
41
Good.
18
6
,,
11
,,
5
.
74
Good	
Very fair.
22
Yes.
9
,,
12
1
,,
6
Good	
Good.
11
4
6
,,
2
i
1
i
3
Clean.
15
,,
,,
4
.-,
Fair.
10
Clean.
1
Splendid.
2
i
Fair.
22
Good.
2
6
Whooping-cough	
Contagious  conjunctivitis
Good	
Poor.
Clean.
5
22
4
1
2
1
11
22
1
Good.
1
324
Cardiac, 2; infantile paralysis, 1
1
5
Mumps, 32 ; influenza, 30
Yes.
46
3
Good	
,,
0
Good.
5
„
1
i
3
"%
1
5
Measles	
,,
Fair.
1
i
3
1
3
5
1
2
4
3
Overcrowded	
Poor.
4
,,
12
Good	
Good.
11
*i
Chicken-pox;   scarlet-
fever
,,
5
1
Poor.
7
2
Good	
Good.
4
3
Scarlet-fever;    chicken-
pox
Poorly heated	
Overcrowded	
Good	
Poor.
1
Not clean.
1
l
2
Poor.
1
Fair. B 24
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
C3
IS
3
'm
OJ
0)
*"   HH
CO
o ~
°a
p
o *
£ o
a>'£
(D +J
o
6 b
O K
qj <y
% «i
0> OJ
V   £
f5  cu
E
G2
Qt*
qh
Q«
<1
-      •o      « ,
Maple Ridge :
Albion	
Alex. Robinson	
Hammond	
Haney	
Maple Ridg-e	
Ruskin	
Webster's Corners..
Whonnock	
Matsqui:
Aberdeen	
Bradner  	
Clayburn.	
Dunach	
Glenmore	
Jubilee	
Matsqui	
Mount Lehman	
Peardonville	
Poplar	
Ridg-edaie   	
Mission :
Dewdney  	
Ferndale	
Hatzic	
Mission	
Silverdale	
Silverhill	
Stave Falls	
Stave Gardens	
Steelhead	
Oak Bay:
Monterey	
Willows	
Peachland :
Peachland	
Trepanier	
Penticton:
Penticton	
Poplar Grove	
Pitt Meadows:
Pitt Meadows	
Richardson   .
Point Grey:
David Lloyd George
Edith Cavell	
Kerrisdale   .
Lord Kitchener	
Magee	
Prince of Wales	
Queen Mary	
Richmond:
Bridgeport	
English	
J. F. Saunders.
A. J. Stuart
J. N. Taylor.
Wm. Buchanan.
II. McGregor ...
G. Morse	
T. H. Lennie
Miss O'Brien.
33
61
72
140
130
48
36
51
41
64
63
12
41
15
94
48
18
43
61
54
357
32
19
21
14
17
83
10
40
16
395
303
203
365
30
56
65
132
125
48
34
49
58
60
9
34
12
80
48
15
36
63
31
40
17
21
12
15
80
10
40
15
436
280
401
326
370
360
52 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 25
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
|
s
o
o
so
c
>
o
«
y
W
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building. Slate
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
183
ISO
Cardiac, 2 .
Anaunic, 1.
Deformed chest, 1 ; nervous, 1
Cardiac, 1 .
Neurasthenics, 2...,
Acute bronchitis, 2.
Neurasthenic, 1	
Acute bronchitis,  5;    neurasthenic, 3
Pulmonary, 2 ; orthopaedic, 2,
Anaemia, 6;  speech defect, 1;
orthopaedic, 4; pulmonary, 1
Nervous, 5 ; epilepsy, 1; stammering, 2; pulmonary, 6
Cardiac, 3; eczema, 1; acne, 1:
orthopaedic, 4
Nervous, 1; cardiac:, 21; orthopaedic, ft ; anaemic, 5
Cardiac, 14 ; anaemic, 2; orthopaedic, 7
Nervous, 2 ; cardiac, 15; pub
monary, 3 ; orthopaedic 5 ;
anaemic, 4
Nervous, 3; cardiac, 9; pulmonary, 2 ; orthopaedic, 6 :
anffimic, 3
Nervous, 3; cardiac, 20; orthopaedic, 9 ; anaemic, 10
Nervous, 1 ; cardiac, 9 ; orthopaedic, 2 ; anaemic, 2
Nervous, 3; cardiac, 15; orthopaedic, 8; anaimic, 2
Scarlet-fever, 5..
Scarlet-fever, 2 .
Mumps, 25	
Mumps, 25	
Good.
Scarlet-fever.
Scarlet-fever.
Scarlet-fever, 3..
Scarlet-fever, 6..
Influenza, 5	
Influenza, 29; jaundice,
10; scarlet-fever, 21
In rl u e n z a, 5 ; scarlet-
fever 1
Scarlet-fever, 7	
Scarlet-fever, 1.,
Influenza	
Mumps; chicken-pox; in-
fluenza; scarlet-fever
Mumps ; influenza .
Mumps, 8t ; whooping-
cough, 8; chicken-pox,
3; croup, 1; influenza, 6
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox,
24
Scarlet-fever, 1; whooping-cough, 3; chicken-
pox-, 2
Scarlet-fever, 1 ; whooping-cough, 22; infantile
paralysis, 1; chicken-
pox, 1
Scarlet-fever, 2; whoop-
ing-cou^h, 1 ; diphtheria, 1
Measles, 1; chicken-pox,
2; whooping-cough, 3.
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox,
1 ; whooping-cough, 1;
scarlet-fever, 7
Mumps, 23; measles, 1 ;
scarlet-fever, 2; whooping-cough, 3; chicken-
pox, 26
Measles, 2 ; influenza, 7 ;
whooping-cough, 3
Smallpox, 3	
Adequate; dirty.
Adequate.
Crowded and total- jClean;  in ad e -
ly inadequate..,      quate.
Good  Adequate.
Crowded .
Good.  ...
Satisfactory	
Utterly  unfit   for
use as school	
Satisfactory	
Inadequate.
Adequate.
Clean ; adequate.
Unsatisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
Crowded	
Satisfactory ...
Poorly heated-
Vcn tilation un-
satisfactory;con-
dition of building excellent
Excellent	
Satisfactory
Excellent.
Good.
Modern and satisfactory
Modern and satisfactory
Modern and satisfactory
Frame; ventilation
fair
Modern; heating
and ventilation
poor
Modern hut
crowded ; ventilation fair
Modern and satisfactory
Good;   full capac
ity
Bad lighting	
Yes.
Satisfactory.
Clean; adequate.
Adequate; clean.
Good.
Not adequate.
Adequate; clean. B 26
British Columbia.
11)22
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
A 53
BQ
a 3
d
'u
p
a
a
0) >.
.- -a
As
na
>
a) -
•3.2
a>
O T-
to  1)
£  .
OH
to
O
a
a
■a
•4
•3
Richmond—Continued.
W. K.Hall	
29
76
25
40
95
24
128
264
151
46
59
76
180
68
65
68
44
48
102
202
311
124
331
17
41
157
28
30
32
91
66
52
39
46
32
'38
50
26
36
91
143
105
55
309
160
34
423
728
62
412
437
553
587
29
76
.25
38
95
24
119
209
140
45
67
75
152
62
58
02
42
44
98
269
309
124
300
17
35
152
27
25
32
76
48
40
38
40
22
35
47
26
34
70
130
105
55
301
158
32
441
719
69
423
438
591
587
i
5
3
3
i
i
6
4
3
3
2
3
5
2
8
10
4
12
22
17
4
2
3
20
5
8
6
1
1
15
35
35
10
87
2
5
33
5
4
1
18
8
11
7
5
3
5
7
8
10
14
20
12
13
78
28
5
165
303
27
168
186
206
243
1
2
2
6
2
7
6
1
3
7
1
1
i
6
8
2
10
8
12
3
2
10
4
6
5
1
Mitchell	
Trites	
Saanich:
Cedar Hill	
J. P. Vye	
it             ....
i
1
4
"          •■
Gordon Head	
Model	
:
i
i
1
2
1
Saanich, West	
	
i
38
2
1
i
2
2
3
1
28
34
47
44
53
42
39
1
1
5
6
2
2
2
6
3
2
20
71
1
1
6
i
"3'
1
1
1
"4
4
3
6
2
2
lo
8
3
32
92
6
37
19
32
40
1
1
i
5
i
i
1
6
7
6
4
61
6
"8'
14
15
3
....
1
9
8
39
11
1
15
73
8
23
15
9
19
10
18
27
45
4
Tolmie	
Surrey:
Anniedale   	
Kensington, East	
4
6
10
9
8
39
11
1
12
64
7
20
12
5
13
Westminster, South	
White Rock   	
Vancouver, North:
R. V. McCarley	
North Star	
Roche Point 	
Vancouver, South:
Miss Bell	
ii             ....
n             ....
Miss Bell ..
ii             .... 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 27
SCHOOLS.
>
a   .
be <a
i- -a
« d
a2
HO
c
O
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc. J.
3
d
a
w
0*
a
s
s
u
0
fcfl
H
5
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
5
i
2
7
2
3
6
1
1
3
1
Scarlet-fever, 2	
Whooping-cough, 1.
Measles, b	
Smallpox, 1	
Whooping-cough, 5	
Measles, 3	
84     ..	
Good	
Adequate; clean.
4
Ventilation and
light poor
Good	
Ventilation and
heating only fair
Good	
Good	
12
10
56
Yes.
99
2
51
43     ..    	
3      n     	
21
Fair.
33
1
13      ii    	
Yes.
27
•Z9      -	
54       n     	
17     n
Very good	
Good	
Steps need repairing
Good	
65
1
24
*
34
25      -.      	
29
i
5      ii    	
22
2      ,,
Must be improved
Yes.
91
23     n    	
8      ii    	
104      n     	
34
4
1
1
58
2
7
44
10
6
12
25
4
9
5
8
1
10
10
5
9
20
25
1
2
4
3
9
28
99
20
i
i
1
92
Cardiac, 1 ; pulmonary, 2	
108     .,    	
Typhoid, 1; pneumonia, 1
Mumps;  chicken-pox...
Excellent	
Good	
Inadequate	
Lighting and heating poor
Satisfactory	
Adequate	
Good	
67
Anaemic, 9; eczema, 4; granular
lids, 3 ;  cardiac, 4; orthopaedic, 2
Yes.
3
Inadequate.
Fair.
8
1
9
"2'
Chronic neuritis,  1 ;  deviated
septum, 1
Chronic neuritis, 1;   defective
palate, 1
18
4
4
1
"2
8
Adequate.
Fair.
7
4
10
"i
4
1
....
1
1
1
3
1
19'
1
fi
12
Lighting poor	
5
10
1
Temporary	
9
4
3
1
Crowded; n o water;
inadequate
9
12
2
2
6
Good	
8
16
4
Clean; adequate.
9
6
5
1
Ventilation fair...
52
20
Valvular heart, 1;   bronchitis,
1; spinal curvature, 1
5
Chicken-pox ; whooping-
ing-cough ;  mumps
"
5
Unsanitary.
Clean; adequate.
ii
207
30
102
4
40
33
66
69
15
62
2
29
37
45
31
Heart, 19	
4
5
3
2
6
2
4
11
19
8
10
9
29
7
3
3
2
2
Scarlet-fever, 1; measles,
2 ; mumps, 1;  whooping-cough,  10; di ph-
theria, 3
Scarlet-fever, 8; mumps.
1; measles, 2 ; whooping-cough, 16; diphtheria, 2; chicken-pox, 6
Chicken-pox, 1	
Whooping-cough, 3; scarlet-fever,  4 ;  chicken-
pox, 1
Chicken-pox, 1; diphtheria, 1
Chicken-pox, 23 ; scarlet -
fever,   11;   whooping-
ing-cough, 14; mumps,
2; diphtheria, 3
Scarlet-fever, 3; chicken-
pox, 14; diphtheria, 9;
carriers, 26
405
32
Heart, 2	
?,04
Heart, 8 	
1
19
1
M
182
233
284
Heart, 9  	
it
ii B 28
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL MUNICIPALITY
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
Oi
53
to
ft
a
rf
3
^•g
*S
0) >»
0)
t- c
CO
■d
O —
o
m
5
C£
si a
oi 2
0!>
o *r
o _
OK
o> t-i
CM
o
c
Vancouver, South—Continued.
Norquay	
Secord	
Selkirk it..
Sexsmith
Tecumseh ...
Van Home ..
Wolfe	
Vancouver, West
Cypress Park
Dundarave ..
Hollyburn ..
22nd Street..
Wyeliffe	
.
349
207
922
356
239
945
35
35
40
3
2
28
21
93
3
1
8
24
12
37
25
16
36
234
249
47
23
1
5
9
597
588
39
1
61
3
37
34
370
329
38
2
19
5
16
11
665
652
36
1
38
6
21
14
23
SO
175
22
73
173
6
3
1
104
10
79
7
3
149
110
407
80
2'20
RURAL   AND
Abbotsford	
Adelphi	
Ai ns worth	
Albert Canyon .
Albert Head  	
Alert Bay	
Alex. Manson   	
Alice Siding	
Allenhy   	
Allen Grove	
Anaconda 	
Anarchist Mountain
Anderson Creek	
Annable	
Appledale	
Argenta	
Arrowhead	
Arrow Park, East...
Arrow Park, West . .
Ashcroft	
Ashton Creek	
Athahner	
Atlin	
Bainbridge	
Balfour	
Balmoral	
Barkerville	
Barnston Island	
Bar ri ere River	
Barriere Upper	
Baj'nes Lake	
Bearhead	
Beaver Creek	
Beaver Cove	
Beaver Lake	
Beaverly	
Beaver Point	
Beghie	
Belford	
Bella Coola	
Bella Coola, Lower..
Bcllevue	
Bevan	
T. A. Swift .
C. J. Willoughby .
D. J. Barclay	
J. H. Hamilton ...
R. Felton	
G. H. Wilson	
A. A. Gray	
G. B. Henderson .
Lee Smith  	
H. McGregor	
J. M. Burnett ...
M. G. Archibald.
C. S. Williams ..
H. H. MacKenzie .
D. J. Barclay.    ..
J. H. Hamilton...
E. H. S. McLean..
S. E. Beech.
H. W. Keith	
F. E. Coy	
E. E. Rogers	
A. D. Morgan .. .
D. J. Barclay . ...
W. Scatchar'd
M. Callanan	
G. Morse	
C. J. Willoughby
H. A. Christie	
W. R. Stone	
A. D. Morgan 	
G. H. Wilson	
F. Vere Agnew
C. Ewert	
E. M. Sutherland ..
J. H. Hamilton . ..
H. H. MacKenzie ..
W. Reinhard	
E. H. S. McLean...
G. K. MacNaughton.
Miss Gawley.
C. W. Thorn .
W. Whittaker.
Miss Taylor.
(School closed.)
Mrs. Carruthers..
207
177
13
10
9
7
9
7
9
9
45
27
12
12
10
12
23
23
6
6
8
8
24
18
13
10
11
11
41
38
10
10
28
24
19
10
22
18
76
76
16
16
25
22
12
12
13
9
24
21
15
13
17
17
20
20
14
14
33
32
16
13
14
7
13
13
7
7
8
8
20
IS
15
15
21
20
26
23
22
21
9
9
78
76
4
1
3
0
6
37
5
1
1
2
2
3
i
4
1
2
10
1
3
3
'2
3
1
5
3
16
1
4
1
1
3
4
5
5
8
7
12
4
1
2
1
2
1
4
1
2
30
1
4
1
1
5
3
2
1
51
5
5
3
2
i
2
1
1
2
5
i
"5'
2
3
1
1
1
2
6
3
4
6
3
4
3
6
4
4
4
2
"2
1
i
3
4
4
i
1
i
3
4
2
1
1
1
1
16
1
12
3
29
4
11 13 Geo.
Board of Health.
B 29
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition of
Other Conditions, specify
FJ
Acute Fevers which
Building.    State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
V
>d
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Car
o
h
have occurred
-i- %
1
diac Disease,  etc.).
d
a
u
m
CD
s
ft
p
during the Past
Year.
adequate.
OH
ec
c
>
H
tf
162
107
471
37
2(1
108
113
12
257
57
165
32
297
59
9
43
2
21
55
31
36
4
40
4
Heart, 4 ; pulmonary, 1..
Heart, 2	
Heart, 19; pulmonary, 6.
Heart, 3 ; pulmonary, 1.
Heart, 9 ; pulmonary, 3.
Heart, 13.
Heart, 16 ; pulmonary, 7	
Nervous, 1   ....
Nervous, 1; cardiac, 2; orthopaedic, l
Cardiac, 4; orthopaedic, 2	
Cardiac, 2.
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 1
Mumps, 3 ; chicken-pox;
14; whooping-cough, 9
diphtheria, 2; smallpox, 1; carriers, 2
Scarlet-fever, 2; typhoid,
2; chicken-pox, 7
Scarlet-fever, 3; mumps,
33 ; whooping-cough,
6 ; diphtheria, 3 ; carriers, 1; chicken-pox, 8
Scarlet-fever, 1; whooping-cough, 4 ; chicken-
pox, 1
Scarlet-fever, 2; chicken-
pox, 11
Influenza, 1 ; measles, 6.
Influenza, 4 ; whooping-
cough, 2; chicken-pox,
1; measles, 6
Measles, 4	
Satisfactory.
Main, satisfactory;
annex, ventilation, poor
Satisfactory	
Good.
Clean; adequate.
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
50
4
4
23
1
6
1
Nasal obstruction, 2; cardiac,
1; uvula amputation, 1; deviated septum, 2
Influenza; varicella, 5...
Erratic heating...
Good ?	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Clean ; adequate.
Yes.
4
9
2
8
8
5
1
6
4
3
i
10
l
2
i
1
4
I
Influenza	
Clean; adequate.
11
1
Mumps, 3	
Ir
3
7
2
O.K	
Foul.
7
Yes.
6
4
5
10
1
7
4
32
1
1
1
,20
7
8
Vaccinated, 6;  not vaccinated, 5
O.K.
3
Good	
Good.
,,
2
1
1
3
,,
7
Anaemic, 3 ;  flat chest 1;  pulmonary, 4; asthma, 1
Crowded	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Ir
26
6
11
7
Clean.
Chicken-pox	
,,
1
,,
,,
5
Crowded	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Crowded and poorly ventilated
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
6
„
11
1
ii
5
,,
,,
3
1
1
1
52
Fair.
Yes.
,,
2
7
5
18
19
4
2
'
tl
„
Fair.
6
1
Yes.
Measles; grippe	
,,
	
„
2
Colds	
Whooping-cough .  	
„
55
Cardiac, 2; anaemia, 4 ; ortho-
pasdic, 1; pulmonary 1; skin
disease, 9; wax in ears, 25
2
1 B 30
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
ta
a
3   .
o:s
Is
s
0
d
*«
33
0) >.
0)
5 a
0>
0 -r
OK
s
CO
J5   .
a; ^J
'0
a
0
■a
3  O
24
8
8
20
12
12
13
9
10
9
10
16
15
17
22
9
27
28
S6
9
121
12
26
28
23
8
56
29
49
30
8
12
10
32
15
62
21
15
27
33
82
39
12
50
38
11
81
24
124
13
108
20
13
11
26
14
15
10
49
102
25
12
10
10
19
9
39
64
11
20
7
8
18
9
11
9
9
10
7
15
16
15
12
17
9
25
28
84
9
101
11
26
28
22
6
41
28
49
30
7
12
8
27
12
62
19
11
25
24
30
39
9
4fi
38
11
74
23
121
11
101
17
12
10
26
12
15
10
42
97
24
12
10
6
19
9°
28
58
12
8
2
f>
2
1
7
2
6
6
3
2
3
W. Ehlers	
1
2
'i
1
1
'4
2
1
1
1
2
4
Blueberry Creek	
4
G. H. Williams	
Bonaparte Valley	
4
1
4
3
4
6
3
1
3
1
1
7
1
1
2
F. Jnglis	
2
3
1
2
"2
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
3
1
8
5
1
3
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
"i'
1
2
1
i
1
1
2
7
W. R. Stone	
(School closed.)
14
3
19
Miss Thoenen	
2
"6
2
2
4
i
1
2
1
4
"i
2
4
5
2
10
2
3
1
"4'
1
4
W. Truax.                      	
3
Bulkley, North	
3
9
Burgoyne Bay	
3
15
14
3
6
1
2
l'
1
1
2
1
2
3
2
1
1
i
2
1
1
4
"i
i
9
3
1
3
1
4
2
W. F. Shaw.  .
14
J. J. Gillis    .     ,   	
5
Can\on City	
E. Buckell	
5
1
5
2
2
W. Truax	
4
T. .). McPhee	
22
Castledale	
1
7
4
T. J. McPhee   	
3
7
1
5
3
1
1
2
1
"i'
27
12
4
l'
4
2
22
3
2
13
T. J. McPhee	
.
6
Chase .-	
27
?.
3
1
2
12
48
Chilco	
3
W. R. Stone	
3
1
4
2
4
.1. M. Burnett	
2
2
4
1
1
1
2
7
2
1
Clifton	
R. W. Irving	
2
S. E. Beech	
1
4
i
1
"2'
1
1
16
6
1
"e"
31
14
13
R
W. R. Stone	
8
1
5
2
1
4
1
1
3
2
3
1
8
3
11
3
3
A. A. Gray	
1
C. S. Williams	
in
7
R. Felton	
H. P. Millard	
J. C. Elliot	
Miss Gawley	
3
18
6 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 31
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition of
Building.   State
Other Conditions, specify
g
Closets.    State
>
■a
©  ■
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Car
•
o
0
during the Past
poorly venti
if clean and
© sz
u rd
©
diac Disease,  etc.).
a
©
Year.
lated, poorly
adequate.
a
CSt
heated, etc.
OH
HO
©
>
a
K
ii
1
4
3
Good	
Unsatisfactory	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
i
2
6
'
Good.
7
1
5
Pertussis	
2
O.K	
.
9
2
1
3
2
4
3
4
3
2
2
Vaccinated, 4;  not vaccinated, 5
O.K.
Good.
Pertussis, influenza	
6
Chorea, 1; slight deformity, 1.
-   • -■■:	
3
5
10
Scarlet-fever .  	
..
11
1
5
Verv good	
Good	
Crowded ; poorly
ventilated
6
IS
1
2
5
1
"s
s
3
2
19
1
9
2
5
5
Needs renewing.
9
1
1
1
Good.
3
48
33
9
1
1
4
19
6
3
5
lower jaw, 1; eczema, 1; congenital condition, 1
•
Very inadequate.
Clean; adequate.
19
Satisfactory	
Temporary bldg...
Fair	
Good	
Fair	
Crowded	
Unsatisfactory	
Good	
15
8
1
1
n
Yes.
7
Require cleaning.
16
in
8
l
l
Influenza....  	
Clean; adequate.
9
„
17
Yes.
7
2
1
4
' z'
1
5
3
1
1
4
Mitral stenosis, 1	
r>
Satisfactory*	
4
t1
3
Colds	
Need cleaning.
in
1
7
1?
Fair	
Bad	
Incomplete	
Good    	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Good.	
Fair.
23
6
1
O.K.
1
Bad.
9.7
4
S
1
5
Yes.
5
15
7
1
6
2
1
1
76
9
10
2
1?
,,
64
Satisfactory.
1
Poor; needing re
71
2
Scarlet-fever, 2	
pairs.
O.K.
1?
Clean.
4
O.K	
O.K.
"i'
4
Good	
Very poor	
Good	
1
Poor.
Clean.
i
6
5
"2
(r
"9
9
9
5
Nervous,   5;   cardiac,   2;   pulmonary, 3
3
Influenza	
Scarlet-fever,   2;    influenza, 5
11
Yes.
12
Measles; scarlatina	
Influenza	
Vaccinated, 11; not vaccinated, 8
Vaccinated, 4;  not vaccinated, 5
.
M
5
Cold	
Poor building	
O.K	
,,
tt
6
1
2
5
1
18
7
One closet.
11
O.K.
Dirty,
8
T.B. chest and hip, 1; goitre, 2
Enlarged thyroid, 5	
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Satisfactory.
27
7
1
Vaccination, 12; non-vaccination, 46
Fair. B 32
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL   AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
B
<H Si
m
VI
&
" ©
°a
. £
A 1>
c.
o
a
a
Is
©   >t
eg
0
>
0 2
a>
at
a
*A   .
0 -b
t*  3
£ -a
a) k
t-i 0
0 u
on
a
I"
U —,
— a
= 0
Cooper Creek	
Copper Mountain	
Corbin	
Cortes Island	
Craigellachie	
14
16
54
19
14
9
25
19
22
222
11
11
9
20
12
21
21
20
11
34
18
43
20
15
15
in
13
15
in
13
15
12
21
30
9
23
31
15
25
10
46
13
39
13
94
16
16
12
8
37
18
16
23
15
12
7
9
13
13
31
60
64
43
16
14
57
11
36
95
60
12
14
33
14
16
50
19
10
9
22
16
20
214
9
8
8
20
12
17
15
18
10
32
17
42
13
12
16
10
13
15
8
12
15
12
15
28
9
22
27
15
22
9
40
13
39
13
90
16
16
12
7
37
18
16
21
14
10
6
7
10
12
29
60
64
41
12
12
60
10
36
75
60
12
14
32
1
1
1
8
1
4
6
2
1
7
8
9
R. Elliot	
7
W. F. Shaw..
1
3
1
6
6   •
4
1
1
3
Crawford Bay.  .	
Crawford Creek	
Crescent Vallej'	
Creston	
Crowsnest	
Cultus Lake	
"s
2
2
5
1
1
33
2
1
2
1
15
i
1
3
R. Elliot	
i
2
1
1
2
Dashwood  	
Decker Lake  	
Deep Creek	
Deer Park	
L. T. Davis	
A. A. Gray	
A. G. Beale	
H   M. Keith..
1
1
1
i
5
i
2
2
6
5
1
2
2
5
4
4
1
2
3
11
4
4
9
5
10
4
6
2
1
2
64
4
10
1
8
2
3
2
J. E. H. Kelso	
4
E. If. S. McLean	
T. J. McPhee...
Diamond Crossing	
1
1
1
4
5
3
5
"5'
1
1
1
4
2
1
3
2
1
3
Driftwood Creek	
C. H  Hankinson	
H. H. Murphy	
M. B. Campbell...
Dunster	
Eagle Valley	
E. Buckell	
"3
2
1
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
J. M. Burnett	
Elk Bridge	
Elko .  ,
R. C. Weldon	
1
5
5
1
"i'
1
4
5
5
1
8
4
1
4
5
1
1
10
"«'
1
4
i
H. A. Christie	
W. R. Stone 	
Mrs. Carruthers ..
6
2
1
1
1
2
1
Elphinstone Bay	
Enderhy, North	
Engen	
Erickson	
W. J. Knox	
1
5
'3
1
3
7
2
W. R. Stone	
H. M. Keith	
W. R. Stone	
C. S. Williams	
L. T. Davis	
i
1
1
2
2
3
1
3
•
Falkland	
Fauquier ,	
Miss C. Davies..   .
J. E. H. Kelso   	
2
1
1
2
Fife	
Firvale 	
"i'
1
2
1
1
.J. E. H. Kelso	
Fish Lake    	
H. A. Christie	
Mrs. Carruthers...
1
Floral Creek	
Florence Mine	
Forest Grove	
D. J   Barclay	
2
1
1
1
"i'
5
13
12
10
7
3
3
28
4
F. Vere Agnew	
1
11
5
4
2
2
3
6
4
1
13
5
4
4
3
6
4
W. R. Stone	
8
4
2
3
"i'
1
io
8
2
2
11
i
3
2
Fort George	
Fort Steele	
F W. Green	
Francois Lake, South	
W. R   Stone 	
C. J. Willoughby	
4
1
6
32
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
13
16
1
1
25
27
"2'
4
Fruitvale.	
C. S. Williams	
Galiano, South	
■ 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 33
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Oi
>
Oi oi
an
6
u
0
Other Conditions,  specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
1
u
©
>
©
w
6
to
©
a
o
%
&
B
2
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
5
13
2
8
Good	
Yes.
4
12
"    	
.
7
.
3
H
6
o
11
19
7
3
8
2
..
94
..
3
„
((
4
i
1
Good	
Good	
Clean; adequate-
7
5
2
3
4
i
Good.
?
"     	
Yes.
Well kept.
Good.
8
6
,
4
.
19
4
i
,,
9
"i
2
1
1
1
1
i'
(l
Yes.
5
	
6
6
4
(t
,,
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
3
2
5
Good	
(l
"2
is'
"2
6
i'
1
"4
5
1
1
1
4
2
5
.
7
,,
12
Scarlet-fever; influenza..
10
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
1
3
Anaemia, 2; cardiac, 1; chorea, 1
8
Yes.
4
1
1
6
(|
3
6
1
10
4
Vaccinated, 3 ;  not vaccinated, 11
.
10
11
Cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 3 .  ..
Very sanitary	
O.K.
Boys, bad; girls,
good.
Vaccinated, 12; not vaccinated, 78
64
1
3
3
3
Good.
Anaemia, 2; growth on tongue, 1
Good 	
Good.
7
2
2
1
2
ie
Rather crowded ..
Fair	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
1
Good	
Poorly lighted	
Good	
Well kept.
Clean.
2
1
7
Yes.
2
Not absolutely.
Need moving.
Good.
3
7
Fair	
Good	
6
6
"3
9
15
5
4
1
Blepharitis, 2; cardiac, 1; atrophy muscles, 1; anaemic, 1;
uvula absent, 1
Cardiac, 2; blepharitis, 3; uvula
absent, 1
Good	
German measles	
H
Deficient expansion of lung, 1 .
2
■ h
.
n
.,
Very good	
O.K	
11
Yes.
18'
14
46
32
Vaccinated, 40; not vaccinated, 20
frozen in winter.
5
5
	
Requires lining ,..
1
,,
1 B 34
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL   AND
GQ
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Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
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Gill	
Gilpin	
Glacier	
Glade	
Glenbank    	
Glenemma	
Glenrosa 	
Glentanna	
Golden	
Goldstream	
Gowland Harbour ...
Grande Prairie 	
Grandview Bench.
Grantham	
Grant Mine	
Gray Creek	
Grassy Plains	
Grindrod	
Hall's Landing	
Happy Valley	
Harewood..	
Harper's Camp ...
Harrcgate	
Harrop	
Ilatzic Prairie ....
Hazelton	
Hazelton, New	
Headquarters.  . ..
Hedley	
Heffley Creek	
Heffley Creek, Upper.
Heywood'a Corner
Highlands	
Hillcrest	
Hilliers 	
Hilltop	
Hilton	
Hope 	
Hope Station..   ,
Hornby Island	
Horse Creek ,
Hosmer	
Houston ,
Howe Sound	
Hulatt	
Hume	
Huscroft	
Hutton	
Ingram Mountain  .
Invermere	
Irving Landing	
Isabella Point	
Jaff ray	
James Island ......
Jesmond	
Johnson's Landing.
Jordan River	
Jura	
Kaleden	
Kaleva	
Kedleston	
Keefe's Landing....
Kelowna, East	
Kelowna, North	
Keremeos	
Kettle River, North.
Kettle Valley	
Kildonan	
Killarney	
Kimberley	
Kingsgate	
Kinnaird	
Kitchener	
Kitsumgallum .
Koch Siding ...
A. B. Morgan ....
W. Truax	
J. H. Hamilton ...
H. H. MacKenzie .
E. H. S. McLean..
P. D. van Kleeck .
Wm. Buchanan ...
C. H. Hankinson..
Paul Ewert	
R. Felton	
W. F. Shaw	
C. J. Willoughby .
H. W. Keith	
II. P. Millard	
T. J. McPhee	
D. J. Barclay.  ...
A. A. Gray	
H. W. Keith	
J. H. Hamilton ...
R. Felton	
T.J. McPhee	
F. Vere Agnew ...
Paul Ewert	
IT. H. MacKenzie..
A. J. Stuart	
■H. C. Wrinch	
II. P. Millard.
M.D. McEwen.
II. H. Murphy.
P. D. van Kleeck.
R. Felton	
II. W. Keith	
L. T. Davis	
W. Truax.	
G. Williams	
J. C. Elliot	
H. Meadows	
Paul Ewert	
D. Corsan    ,
C. H. Hankinson.
F. Inglis	
W. R. Stone	
I. Arthur	
G. B. Henderson.
J. Sandilands	
J. M. Burnett.   ..
F. E. Coy	
A. Hendarson	
E. M. Sutherland..
H. A. Christie   ...
F. R. Pollock ..   ..
S. E. Beech	
D. J. Barclay	
R. Felton	
Lee Smith	
H. McGregor	
G. H. Wilson	
G. Williams	
A. A. Gray	
W.J. Knox	
M. D. McEwen...
W. Truax	
J. M. Burnett.   ..
A. D. Morgan....
Lee Smith 	
D. P. Hanimrton .
G. B. Henderson
C. S. Williams ...
G. B. Henderson.
G. H. Bleecker...
H. H. MacKenzie .
Miss C. Davies..
M. B. Campbell.
Miss Gawley....
A. Michie.
Miss C. Davies...
Miss O. Gawley...
Mrs. Carruthers.
A. Purcell.
21
15
10
10
16
16
43
34
39
36
6
6
14
14
8
8
139
123
17
13
14
14
20
3
9
8
31
20
48
39
9
7
5
5
39
37
14
14
29
28
378
353
8
7
12
9
21
20
11
9
28
28
20
20
27
23
57
57
17
16
5
3
13
13
6
6
17
15
20
20
13
12
23
20
64
54
6
7
12
12
13
12
22
21
11
11
106
92
10
16
203
157
17
15
8
9
6
6
19
16
19
18
14
14
42
37
36
36
12
10
11
11
22
21
11
11
8
8
9
5
8
8
10
10
55
50
26
25
76
76
9
9
24
24
16
12
14
13
83
78
11
11
13
13
20
20
104
96
13
12
1
1
1
7
3
2
1
3
6
i
6
i
4
4
6
1
3
6
4
10
3
2
3
14
5
1
1
4
1
2
3
1
1
5
6
4
2
9
"i'
2
1
1
3
6
1
1
1
2
1
32'
2
2
2
W
1
57
1
8
1
5
6
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1
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2
i
1
9
9
1
2
1
2
7
10
2
1
1
1
2
3
i'
4
3
"7
1
1
2
2
1
10
1
19
2
2
2
4
10
3
1
20
1
18
2
2
i
2
6
IS
5
17
6
20
9
6
11
5
30
1
2
3
1
5
"2
2
i
3
2
9
4
3
2
9
4
2
5
7
3
20
15
7
?
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
"2
3
•>
1
1
3
1
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"2
3
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
24
1
1
2
1
4
■   0
3
2
6
7
4
1
8
1
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1
3
3
1
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1
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11
1 13 Geo. 5
Board op Health.-
B 35
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
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Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
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Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition  of
Building.   State
if  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate'.
5
"i'
Good	
Clean; adequate.
3
3
7
3
2
1
4
i
l
l
4
13
8
10
3
13
10
Closed for repairs
Good.
4
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory.
4
"3
49
2
Irregular heart, 1; murmur, 1.
5
7
Mumps, 1; influenza....
Satisfactory.
Yes.
1
4
i
5
2
7
1
4
25
2
1
3
Scarlet-fever; whooping-
cough
4
15
4
Good	
3
11
3
1
1
3
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good.
5
4
Satisfactory.
81
4
Old ; dilapidated..
Valvular leakage	
4
15
1
2
7
10
1
S
Very satisfactory.
Satisfactory	
5
Vaccinated, 5 ;   not vaccinated, 18
19
1
1
Yes.
3
2
2
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory.
Yes.
11
6
4
1
....
5
1
2
2
35
4
Good	
7
2
3
1
8
14
Chicken-pox	
7
Fair 	
Good	
49
,
4
6
SI
7
26
Chorea, 2'   heart murmur, 1
Mumps, 63 ; measles, 20;
scarlet-fever, 6
Not very good
building
Good	
Fair.
Yes.
2
7
Satisfactory	
Good	
O.K.
2
14
6
1
"3'
Adequate.
Yes.
31
13
3
4
9
4
n
4
Whooping-cough, 6	
2
6
1
2
1
1
1
....
1
1
6
3
11
i
1
4
2
Yes.
1
Curvature of spine, 1; anaemia,
4; flat-foot, 1
2
3
Chicken-pox, 3; mumps, 1
Influenza	
29
Satisfactory   	
Fair	
Crowded	
Good	
2
T.B. bone, 1	
6
Clean.
4
17
Verv good	
O.K 	
Good	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
6
3
4
2
Vaccinated, 7 ;   not vaccinated, 6
Whooping-cough; chicken-pox
4
4
Eczema, 1; orthopaedic, 1	
"i"
Fair only.
11
1
Good. B 36
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL AXD
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
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18
13
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63
29
12
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62
43
68
16
13
10
9
25
53
42
27
13
14
32
52
23
66
31
23
27
12
11
11
18
13
71
45
151
149
38
41
11
9
47
11
12
12
8
15
7
12
11
10
18
14
16
23
92
94
24
63
20
19
14
13
12
56
24
12
10
48
41
46
16
13
10
8
25
53
41
27
13
13
29
49
19
62
21
23
25
12
11
11
18
13
71
41
144
149
31
40
8
7
44
10
12
11
8
15
fi
11
9
10
16
13
14
23
91
89
24
56
19
17
1
6
1
2
3
2
6
1
2
12
7
7
"2
1
9
        5
W. R. Stone  	
1
1
1
1
R. Felton	
Miss 0. Gawley ...
H. P. Millard	
Lillooet	
2
i
2
1
8
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
' i
2
7
2
A. C. Nash	
G. B. Henderson 	
R. W. Irving; H. H. Murphy
2
"i'
1
'3
3
2
1
2
11
4
3
2
3
1
15
4
. 15
2
4
4
4
3
6
26
9
4
4
3
6
8
38
5
3
4
5
7
3
3
3
27
2
41
42
5
14
3
7
i"
2
3
1
2
2
3
3
5
8
Loos	
C. J. Willoughby	
G. Williams	
W. F. Shaw	
H. R. Fort..	
G. Williams	
Magna Bay	
Miss W. Ehlers ...
4
1
6
5
2
1
3
1
i
2
1
'3'
i
1
"e
5
2
G. H. Wilson	
W. R. Stone	
H. W. Keith	
H. H. Murphy  	
1
....
8
H. A. Christie	
7
2
3
2
2
1
10
17
15
2
2
6
3
3
4
23
2
29
33
5
C. S. Williams	
W. R. Stone	
2
9
11
3
8
6
2
1
1
2
2
9
9
3
3
3
1
W. F. Shaw    	
H. P. Millard	
R. Felton	
Miss 0. Gawley ...
R. C. Weldon	
i
2
2
3
3
W. J. Knox	
Mitchell Bay	
G. H.Wilson	
H. H. Murphy	
1
1
E. II. S. McLean....
1
2
2
2
2
F. W. Gret*i	
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
J. M. Burnett	
1
H. P. Millard	
Mrs. Carruthers..
2
1
1
3
1
1
E. H. S. McLean..
1
3
10
"i'
2
8
4
1
11
2
i
"2
7
3
8
5
8
3
io'
5
1
15
16
2l'
8
T. J. McPhee	
A. Michie	
Needles	
W. R. Stone	
J. E. H. Kelso	
\
1
1 13 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
B 37
ASSISTED SCHOOLS— Continued.
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(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
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5
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
if crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
7
1
1
Good	
Good.
i
Satisfactory	
Bad, Junior div...
Good	
First div. dirty and
and overcrowded
Clean; adequate.
3
8
2
4
1
3
"i'
1
1
10
2
3
2
Eczema with asthma,  2;   cardiac, 1
Enlarged thyroid, 2; asthma, 1
3
4
11
2
Vaccinated, 2:   not vaccinated, 22
ti
4
2,7
Good.
8
6
Furunculosis, 1;  acne, 1;  herpes, 1
5
2
2
1
1
Dilapidated  and
far from school.
Clean; adequate.
Require cleaning.
3
7
9
Measles, 14; scarlet-fever,
4
Influenza, 7	
Requires more ventilation
15
3
14
14
5
4
2
13
5
7
3
Chronic bronchitis, 1; epileptic, 1
1
Not always clean.
6
Good	
9
Good.  ..
Fair only.
5
15
Poorly heated	
Satifsactory   	
Needs repairs	
Satisfactory	
O.K	
5
25
15
1
Yes.
2
8
Need repairs.
9
3
i
"j"
6
1
8
7
7
Vaccinated, 8;  not vaccinated, 3
O.K.
6
Satisfactory	
O.K	
6
6
Vaccinated, 18; not vaccinated, 43
Good	
Yes.
11
l
17
22
4
13
65
57
3
6
Enlarged thyroid, 1; V.D.H.,1
2
91
Blepharitis, 1;  strabismus, 1;
eczema, 3 ; cardiac, 1
Strabismus, 1; eczema, 1; cardiac, 1; blepharitis, 1; paralysis, 1
Scarlet-fever  and   influenza
Scarlet-fever; influenza;
smallpox, 1
Walls and  ceiling
very dirty;building out of repairs
Overcrowded	
Fairly clean.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
91
5
1
2
32
2
Anaemia,   1;   wax in  ears, 15;
blepharitis, 2; orthopaedic, 1;
skin disease, 3
i
Lighting and ventilation poor
Good	
New   one  being
erected
Good  	
Good.
Yes.
4
5
7
5
6
Anajmic, 2;  cardiac, 1;  squamous eczema, 2
5
5
Satisfactory	
Building allowed
to deteriorate
Good	
One requires
cleaning and
repairs.
Yes.
6
i
l
8
3
1
3
1
2
Colds	
Good.
4
2
,
4
4
2
o
Satisfactory	
Very    unsatisfactory
Good	
Yes.
7
l
4
4
4
1
10
1
2
1
16
7
5
1
22
1
1
Vaccinated, 5;   not vaccinated, 11
6
<>
1
Rheumatic fever, 1 ...,
..
39
..
«0
6
Good	
14
,.
8
Well kept. B 38
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
d £
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91
11
17
32
23
17
9
72
65
10
14
15
15
140
36
11
20
32
57
14
10
58
15
14
23
18
21
16
73
26
23
34
12
6
54
18
13
8
11
8
18
38
9
22
8
7
20
61
13
270
136
15
43
20
73
20
11
10
9
19
19
17
7
9
19
22
35
12
32
14
7
10
87
10
12
30
20
16
9
69
57
6
14
13
13
132
31
11
20
31
54
14
10
68
10
12
20
18
20
16
71
17
8
30
7
6
54
14
11
7
11
8
18
37
10
19
8
19
68
13
256
135
14
40
19
71
19
7
10
9
18
19
14
7
9
16
19
31
30
12
7
10
20
22
2
3
8
2
2
4
8
4
4
3
(School closed)
1
1
2
2
7
2
2
4
1
"i'
J. J. Gillis	
3
12
A. J. Stuart	
5
Nob Hill	
H. P. Millard	
5
1
H. R. Fort	
8
9
7
2
8
16
2
2
i
6
1
3
2
3
12
"i'
2
6
5
1
6
1
3
2
4
17
Northfield 	
T. J. McPhee	
9
II. H. .Murphy	
2
J. M. Burnett	
2
1
"2
i
19
1
1
4
Y
3
6
5
3
Okanagan 	
Okanagan Centre	
W. J. Knox	
8
1
1
Okanagan Landing	
W. J. Knox  •	
W. F. Shaw	
3
1
8
3
A. Purcell	
7
1
5
"e
i'
"i'
1
"2
7
1
2
4
4
1
2
6
4
2
7
6
2
6
1
2
2
7
3
6
"l
16
2
6
VV, R. Stone	
6
4
R. Felton	
4
W. Truax   	
6
G. Williams	
5
7
H. P. Millard	
3
1
"4
1
1
6
9
A. C. Nash .  	
4
L. T. Davis	
tf
2
"l'
2
1
2
1
2
3
Paxton Valley	
C J. Willoughby	
1
2
1
N.J. Paul	
C. J. Willoughby   ..
0
1
2
i
1
2
1
1
8
E. M. Sutherland	
■>
3
4
C. J. Willoughby ...
1
1
I
6
23
61
6
2
2
1
C. Ewerr	
'si
i
2
1
6
5
1
'5
1
.1
"s
15
26
2
5
3
9,
J. C. Elliot....
3
0. 0. Lyons	
12
4
48
74
8
2
2
2
3
1
1
2
9
6
L. T. Davis	
2
0. 0. Lyons.
1
2
M. B. Campbell...
' i
1
1
1
i
i
W. F Shaw   	
L. T. Davis	
Red Gap	
W. F. Shaw	
3
7
8
J. E. H. Kelso   	
E. M. Sutherland	
l
2
1
1
1
6
1
i
1
2
i
5
2
2
1
M. G. Archibald	
J. E. H. Kelso  	
C.W. Thorn
7
1
W. W. Birdsall	
J. M. Burnett	
2
1
2
1
i
1
2
5
R. Felton	
Miss 0. Gawley ...
1
4 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 39
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
01
>
oi J3
o *.
■f.  Oi
Oi  oi
an
oi   .
t. -a
ca a
HO
oi
0
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
u
DQ
«
1
oi
a
a
a
o
p
a
s
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.    State
If  crowded,
poorly ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
"3'
1
4
1
1
ii'
1
i
1
'9'
2
'3
1
35
Typhoid-fever, 2	
Good
Yes.
2
No.
2
2
4
16
A little crowded...
Satisfactory	
Good	
Needs better ventilation
Adequate; clean..
Good...' '.'.
7
4
6
15
3
1
Vaccinated, 1; not vac-
Pertussis and influenza..
30
12
1
Chronic bronchitis, 3; incipient
phthisis,!; slightdeformity,2
"
4
8
6
8
8
6
3
4
7
5
Need repairs.
1
4
Curvature of spine, 1; aneemic,
1 ; chorea, 2 ; eczema, 1
Mumps, 3 ; chicken-pox,
5
2
.
12
20
4
14
.
5
4
•■„•
2
3
Dirty.
Yes.
7
6
Good	
Cold .
5
3
9
8
"i
4
7
2
"6
Good	
4
Satisfactory	
Good	
8
1
1
15
Yes.
12
4
Vaccinated, 4 ;  not vaccinated, 4
15
6
3
2
3
2
4
3
6
Vaccinated, 4 ;  not vaccinated, 2
0. K...
O.K.
9
4
3
Very good	
Good
Very good.
Clean; adequate.
0
2
5
2
2
2
1
Satisfactory	
Good building but
no water.
Satisfactory.
Good.
Poor.
Satisfactory.
ii
Good	
Satisfactory.
3
10
3
6
4
3
2
i
8
1
10'
4
3
2
1
8
10
5
9
54
13
54
3
22
4
66
7
6
14
Nervous, 2 ; blepharitis, 2; wax
in ears, 2
2
1
11
3
Yes.
7
Good	
3
,.
4
1
1
3
12
•j
■
2
,
4
4
(1
9
.,
,,
10
2
i
"i
1
1
Curvature of   spine and neurotic, 1
.
2
7
.
3
Good	
School to be built.
.,
i B 40
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
D
pud
o.-.
la
ai
O.
P    .
a. «
W  01
«a
°a
25 3
o
p
S3
01 >.
>.«
■So
01
>
? i
** V,
oi.i
a>
01   .
01 -r
0) t
a
Ii
«
".5
£ si
u ^
01  oi
% u
ata
oi
s
g
<
-oi
II
c 0
R. W. Irving	
14
11
18
26
116
70
18
50
15
9
12
43
26
40
10
12
18
7
12
20
14
11
14
11
13
8
18
11
13
140
16
82
8
25
49
21
95
62
11
10
15
26
24
10
84
15
10
9
8
7
8
S
15
14
6
20
14
9
6
10
26
8
27
9
21
13
15
14
10
14
12
8
14
8
17
25
113
65
19
50
15
8
12
43
18
33
10
11
16
5
12
19
11
10
14
11
13
8
18
10
12
133
15
68
5
23
49
20
95
61
10
10
14
22
10
8
78
15
10
9
8
5
8
8
15
14
6
20
12
9
5
9
25
8
25
9
20
11
14
12
8
13
12
8
2
2
2
3
2
"i
"i
"i
2
4
4
1
W. R. Stone	
G. K. MacNaughton 	
W. J. Knox	
(School closed)....
M. B. Campbell...
1
6
3
1
10
2
1
2
2
2
3
2
1
2
3
7
1
2
1
6
1
2
1
1
i
2
7
2
15
8
3
i
i
9
1
3
1
"2
8
1
4
11
11
A. G. Beale	
in
J. C. Elliot	
3
C. S. Williams	
99.
12
3
W. Truax	
2
E. E. Topliff    	
3
1
5
3
2
"i
12
9
H. P. Millard	
13
E. M. Sutherland 	
W. F. Shaw	
1
1
i'
3
2
i
5
1
M. G. Archibald	
2
1
W. F. Shaw	
7
5
Shelter Point	
"3
W. F. Shaw	
R. Felton 	
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
4
6
11
6
G. Williams   	
W. Ehlers	
1
"l
1
1
3
1
1
1
6
3
3
E. Buckell	
2
A. G. Beale	
o«
E. Buckell  	
i'
3
"5'
1
3
2
5
"5
"3
1
13
99
2
4
15
7
1
1
1
3
10
1
8
1
1
13
1
3
1
18
1
2
14
7
M. B. Campbell...
25
R. Felton	
4
Miss 0. Gawley ...
Miss W. Ehlers ...
1
"l
1
"2'
4
"5
1
1
4
"8'
2
3
4
3
1
1
4
4
1
Spencer	
6
J. J. Gillis	
6
Sproat 	
N. J. Paul	
1
10
5
W. R. Stone	
3
4
1
3
Sullivan Hill	
1
H. H. Murphy	
1
3
E. H. S. McLean	
1
E. Buckell	
3
G. Williams	
2
3
Syringa Creek	
J. E. H. Kelso	
2
1
F. W. Green	
1
1
1
1
' i
2
M. B. Campbell...
1
2
5
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
"2
4
4
4
E. E. Topliff	
1
1
1
1
■2
2
3
Topley   ...
C. J. Willoughby	
H. W. Keith	
W. Scatchard 	
1 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 41
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Oi
% 5
oi a)
-a
01     ■
m a
"3 *
HO
Other Conditions, specify
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac Disease,  etc.).
a
I
01
>
Oi
3
w
Si
01
ft
a
a
o
is
to
a
2
Acute Fevers which
have occurred
during the Past
Year.
Condition of
Building.   State
if crowded,
poorly  ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
3
1
14
2
Good	
3
Poorly placed.
14
8
Nervous; anemia; wax in ears;
stammering
Anemia, 3; curvature of spine,
1; squamous eczema, 3; flat-
foot, 1; chronic bronchitis, 2;
chorea, 1
13
Mumps, 9 ; pink-eye, 5 ;
Good	
Very dirty.
11
25
17
l
i
4
1
2
13
4
i
11
Vaccinated, 32; not vac-
Good	
Poor repair.
2
1
3
Badly placed.
Clean; adequate.
23
10
Pneumonia, 1; typhoid, 2
Vaccinated, 6;  not vaccinated, 27
5
i
1
Enlarged thyroid, 4; V.D.H., 1
5
.
9
.
1
9
2
"3"
8
1
4
8
.
6
Yes.
Lisp, 1;  nocturnal eneuresis, 1
" 	
8
2'
"s*
7
1
6
8
■
3
" •■■	
4
0
Yes.
6
	
Not very clean.
Yes.
3
2
29
1
Scarlet-fever, 3; typhoid-
fever, 1
Cardiac, 1; nervous, 1; old hip-
joint disease, 1
"    	
1
3
"    	
'5'
2
1
5
1
2
Good.  	
Clean; adequate-
31
i
Nervous, 3; cardiac, 1; eczema,
2; anaemic, 1
1
"3"
2
1
11
1
2
10
Fair.
10
4
50
3
5
One room crowded
Good	
..
..
..
5
.
„
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Room small	
Yes        	
2
„
,,
2
2
2
lt
Very clean.
2
.
4
1
1
2*
4
3
3
1
"i"
5
Yes.
Pit too shallow.
Yes.
New building.  ..
Good	
,,
S
,,
1
„
4
2
"3
2
1
4
1
8
,,
,,
Poor.
Yes.
Slightly crowded..
Satisfactory   	
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Onlv one.
7
Yes.
,,
ii
M
,,
5 B 42
British Columbia.
1922
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical   Inspector.
School Nurse.
ft
3
o —
o
A Oi
w
'£.
£ -a
^  01
t-i.—
°S
. oi
o M
A <"
P
o
"C
p
a
"3
01 >>
> -J
oi t^
Oi 01
C3
01
IJ
01   .
£ si
+- P
o'S
"3 oi
OK
GQ
2; .
oj in
> p
5 !p
0 £
2
p
-a
<
T3
.si
p 0
an
10
100
41
97
27
11
22
94
7
24
39
9
35
8
57
28
206
59
10
18
11
14
19
44
18
29
10
16
13
35
12
35
53
57
62
26
21
21
10
97
39
97
27
11
22
73
7
24
33
7
33
8
61
28
196
58
8
17
9
14
17
42
11
26
9
15
7
34
12
33
53
50
50
25
20
21
io
4
10
1
"2
18'
"4'
3
14
4
6
1
29
4
23
3
W. R. Stone   ,.
3
29
33
E. M. Sutherland..  .
2
1
i
4
2
13
3
4
3
13
5
7
4
M. G. Archibald
3
Waldo    ....
H. A. Christie   .
'7
5
4
4
18
21
i
1
1
T. J. McPhee	
W. R. Stone 	
1
4
4
12
T. J  McPhee	
1
1
7
2
1
1
"2
10
2
2
i
2
1
1
5
1
1
g
1
1
12
2
M
38
9
4
H. H. Murphy	
4
4
W. F. Shaw,	
1
3
6
White r,ake
2
1
2
1
4
Willow Point   	
4
1
2
1
1
8
8
1
i
1
2
F. E. Cov	
3
1
3
1
'5'
3
1
3
2
1
2
7
6
8
3
C. G. G. Maclean	
2
1
1
1
10
4
5
6
6
3
9
1
"2
2
8
W. J. Knox	
6
F. W. Green	
9
Yahk
1
Yale	
P. McCaffrev	
10
14 13 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
B 43
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Condition of
Other Conditions, specify
ri
Acute Fevers which
Building.    Slate
Dlosets.    State
01
•a
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Car
6
u
have occurred
if crowded,
if clean and
t> x3
it m
oi
diac Disease, etc.).
d
"3
Oi
01
To
during the Past
Year.
poorly ventilated, poorly
adequate.
01 %
OH
■3 eS
o
0
u
01
>
o
m
a
S
heated, etc.
7
1
55
5
1
,
Chicken-pox	
64
Cardial,  1 ;   wax in ears, 18;
pulmonary, 2; blepharitis, 7,
aineniic, 5 ; skin disease, 6 ;
orthopaedic, 2
8
3
2
3
4
6
4
15
1
5
3
1
5
i
1
3
Good	
39
7
M
7
8
10
6
1
16
2
3
8
1
1
1
19
56
1
99
Very satisfactory..
3
5
24
28
6
Good	
5
Neurotic, 2	
1
Good	
6
93
1
2
4
2
Temporary bldg...
5
6
6
"l
2
5
2
3
22
3
6
Crowded; light and
ventilation poor
Good	
9
6
3
i
5
1
"i"
9
3
1
8
•>
6
1
1
2
2
12
8
Valvular leakag-e, 1; nervous, 1
Nervous, 1; rapid heart, 2; mitral regurgitation, 1
Chronic bronchitis, 3; cardiac,
1; anaemia, 2
4
Crowded and poor
7
17
1
Rheumatic fever, 2	
Poor lighting and
ventilation
Good	
5
3
8
Cardiac, 1; orthopaedic, 6	
16
1
Vaccinated, 17; not vaccinated, 4
Good	
One closet.
Yes.
Not adequate.
Yes.
Fair.
Yes.
Yes.
Fair.
Yes.
Unclean.
Yes.
Po or.
Yes. REGISTRAR'S REPORT UNDER THE VITAL STATISTICS ACT.
Victoria, B.C., August 31st, 1922.
H. E. Young, Esq., M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Secretary, Provincial Board of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Fiftieth Report of Vital Statistics for the six months
ending December 31st, 1921.
The publication of this report for a period covering only the six months ending December
31st, 1921, has been considered advisable that a reversion may be made to the former practice
of issuing reports by years January 1st to December 31st, instead oi by years July 1st to June
30th, as has been the case since 1918.
The issue of this report will make it possible to rearrange the statistics given in the reports
for the six months 1918, 1918-19, 1919-20, 1920-21, so that figures will be available by years 1918,
1919, 1920, and 1921.
It is the intention of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics to issue a Report of Vital Statistics
for the year 1921 for the Dominion of Canada by Provinces, cities, and larger towns. As full
particulars will be included in their report regarding vital statistics for British Columbia, this
report will be considerably curtailed by the omission of certain tables which have been included
in previous reports. It may be stated, however, that all these tables will be kept on file at
Victoria and will at all times be at the service of the public.
Inasmuch as this is the Fiftieth Report of Vital Statistics, some reference to the figures of
the first report issued in the Province may be of interest. The period covered by the first report
was the last four months of 1S72 and the year 1873. The Province at that time was divided into
nine registration districts and a District Registrar was appointed to each district. The number
of District Registrars at the present time is sixty.
The total number of registrations for the last four months of 1872 and the year 1873 were
as follows: Births, 214; deaths, 149; marriages, 103. For the year 1921 the figures read:
Births, 11,644;  deaths, 4,4S9;   marriages, 3,994.
The census of 1S71 gave British Columbia a population of 36,247, while that of 1921 gave
the Province a population of 523,323.
The total number of registrations from the time the Act went into force to June 30th,
1922, were as follows: Births, 128,681; deaths, 63,748; marriages, 58,133; a total of 250,562
registrations.
All registrations received at this office since the year 1S72 are arranged and indexed in
alphabetical order, assigned to their proper places and properly bound in volumes. At the
present time the number of volumes is as follows:   Births, 404;   deaths, 294;   marriages, 239.
Population.
The publication of the official figures for the Dominion census of 1921 makes it apparent
that our estimates of the population of the Province for the past two or three years have been
somewhat too high. The 1921 census assigns British Columbia a population of 523,323, whereas
for the years 1919-20 and 1920-21 we based our rates and percentages on an estimated population
of 555,536 and 575,000 respectively.
In view of the above, it has been considered advisable to revise our estimates of the population in the tables for these years so as toi afford a truer basis of comparison with the rates and
percentages for the six months ending December 31st, 1921.
In determining the population for these periods, 51,647, the number by which' our estimate
exceeded the census, has been deducted from the years 1919-20 and 1920^21, and for the six
months ending December 31st, 1921, 2,365, the natural increase from July to December, 1921,
has been added to the census figures. This will give the following populations for the respective
years:  503,889;  523,353;  525,71S.
As at the time of writing this report we have been unable to secure figures from the Census
Department as to the number of Chinese, Japanese, Indian, and East Indian in the Province, no
change has been made in our previous estimate of these races. 13 Geo. 5
Board of Health.
B 45
Registrations (not including Indians).
The following table shows the total registrations for the years 1919-20, 1920-21, and the
six months ending December 31st, 1921; also the rates per thousand of population for births,
deaths, and marriages :—
•
1919-20.
Population, 478,240.
1920-21. '
Population, 497,553.
July 1 to Dec. 31, 1921.
Population, 499,918.
10,002   20.91
9,308           19.46
4,88S           10.22
4,660  ....    9.72
10,687           21.47
4,564             9.17
4,267          .8.67
4,514  9.07
5,823  11.64
5,454  10.90
2,089     4.17
1,977 3.95
2,053   4.10
Registrations foe Province (not including Indians).
The following table shows the number  of  registrations  in  the various divisions  of  the
Province for the years 1919-20, 1920-21, and 'the six months ending December 31st, 1921:—
Births.
Deaths.
Marriages.
Divisions and Groups
of Divisions.
1919-20.
1920-21.
July 1st
to Dec.
31st, 1921.
1919-20.
1920-21.
July 1st
to Dec.
31st, 1921.
1919-20.
1920-21.
July 1st
to Dee.
31st, 1921.
1,722
630
3,916
1,145
192
1,001
499
897
10,002
1,698
625
4,627
1,385
312
1,204
560
1,121
11,532
731
378
2,380
678
159
627
315
555
5,823
728
278
2,096
569
95
515
194
413
687
257
1,944
550
96
448
202
380
4,564
322
117
890
254
47
192
85
182
2,0S9
755
177
2,371
386
63
427
125
346
643
174
2,283
443
69
419
164
319
301
89
983   '
190
47
217
81
145
4,888
4,650
4,514
2,053
Births.
In connection with births, it may be noted that the rate per 1,000 of population for birth
registrations for the six months ending December 31st, 1921, and actual births shows a slight
tendency to increase as compared with 1920-21.
Of a total of 5,823 birth registrations, 4,226, or 72.57 per cent., show that both parents are
of British origin or nationality; 1,766 registrations give both parents as English, 570 as Scotch,
174 as Irish, 9 as Welsh, and 156 as other British.
The number of Japanese registrations of births for the six months ending December 31st,
1921, was 348, and the number of Chinese 148.
The number of births (actual) for the six months ending December 31st, 1921, was 5,454,
as against 10,687 in the year 1920-21, and the number of delayed registrations 369, as against
845 for the year 1920-21.
The natural increase (excess of births over deaths) for the six months ending December
31st, 1921, was 2,305, as against 6,123 for the year 1920-21.
Deaths.
The rate per 1,000 of population for death registrations shows a slight decrease as compared
with the year 1920-21.
In regard to deaths, it may be remarked that the number of deaths of children under 1 year
old has decreased very considerably, and a like decrease is noticeable under the heading of
" Diseases attributed to Early Infancy."
For the six months ending December 31st, 1921, the number of deaths of children under
1 year of age (exclusive of still-born) was 267, or 13.50 per cent, of all deaths for that period,
as against 651, or 14.73 per cent, in the year 1920-21.
For the six months ending December 31st, 1921, 239 deaths (including still-born), or 11.44
per cent, of all deaths, were classified under " Early Infancy," as against 640, or 14.02 per cent.,
in the year 1920-21. B 46
British Columbia.
192S
Of the total number of decedents (still-births excluded), 1,391, or 70.35 per cent., are
described as being of British origin; 535 males and 327 females are given as married, 505 males
and 264 females as single, 110 males and 160 females as widowed, 3 males and 2 females as
divorced, and the balance not given.
Marriages.
The number of marriages shows a tendency to decrease, being 2,053, as against 4,514 in the
year 1920-21 and 4,650 in the year 1919-20.
Classified List of Deaths.
The following is a classified list of deaths which have occurred in British Columbia for the
years 1916 to December 31st, 1921.   This table does not include Indians.
1. General diseases	
2. Diseases of nervous system and organs of special sense..
3. Diseases of the circulatory system   	
4. Diseases of the respiratory system	
5. Diseases of the digestive system.  .... 	
6. Non-venereal diseases of the genito-urinary system and annexa
7. The puerperal state	
8. Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue	
9. Diseases of the bones and organs of locomotion	
10. Malformations	
11. Diseases of early infancy	
12. Old age	
13. Affections produced by external causes	
14. Ill-defined, including executions	
Totals	
1916.
1917.
1918.
(6 Mos.).
191S-19.
1919-20.
1920-21.
936
965
523
1,242
1,140
1,131
389
380
220
449
445
388
466
540
293
528
611
646
494
439
278
2,944
818
474
224
268
109
189
259
287
206
204
102
216
223
264
50
59
17
40
47
54
15
23
8
16
17
13
3
3
1
6
12
11
55
51
24
42
45
23 ■
438
405
186
447
591
640
SO
54
37
76
90
95
473
455
226
414
643
603
68
50
23
85
47
35
3,887
3,896
2,046
6,696
4,888
4,564
July 1 to
Dec. 31,
1921.
517
227
300
193
139
102
27
7
7
17
539
35
264
15
2,089
The results of the foregoing table have been segregated for purposes of comparison, and each
division has been charged with what it is responsible for in the six months ending December
31st, 1921. No. 1, " General Diseases," included returns for " tuberculosis," " cancer," and
" influenza."    These three items are responsible for 374 deaths, or 1S.91 per cent, of all deaths. 13 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
B 41
Allotment of all Causes of Death to each Mining Division, July to December, 1921.
Mining Division.
Ul-r-
OP
t "
Oi ,^
Aai
o
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il ni c
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ol
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3
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X  «
SO
2
•6
0i
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ci
0
n
1
1
2
10
6
1
1
2
2
i
1
1
3
17
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
i
1
1
	
1
1
2
6
i
4
4
"%
2
T
ii
1
5
1
1
14
2
3
10
31
1
4
2
14
4
2
2
1
4
14
6
5
1
12
2
2
2
6
i
4
1
2
2
3
1
2
11
3
2
Yale ..                          	
—
1111
1
4
3
1
2
3
1
ill:
3
10
3
2
1
6
Totals	
9
3
47
4
1
1
28
2
2
14
2
21
5
...„
1
1
2
"1'
3
8
2
3
5
22
6
2
16
1
1
i'
4
1
3
75
3
1
2
5
1
2
11.
1
1
2
3
i'
4
5
9
59
1
52
20
4
6
1
3
14
12
1
1
192
13
1
3
4
3
4
47
5
4
1
8
5
4
1
2
1
2
1
—
1
43
5
2
1
5
2
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
27
6
7
5
1
1
17
Totals	
24
7
117
4
6
2
1
3
9
1
4
2
2
"i
.„.
5
6
2
"i"
6
28
32
12
1
3
1
1
3
1
2
3
1
4
2
12
1
1
2
6
44
4
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
"i
25
1
1
9
1
5
1
1
2
1
13
1
15
56
6
2
13
1
i
79
37
1
3
'a
i
i
45
23
99
4
15
14
2
134
34
6
3
1
5
1
50
20
3
'is'
36
17
69
3
4
6
2
3
87
22
1
1
18
50
2
1
3
1
57
13
2
2
2
15
4
1
8
1
1
2
"i'
13
6
6
2
5
7
1
41
53
i
3
25'
4
1
87
6
5
1
1
2
2
1
18
1
i
1
2
2
2
5
1
Totals	
North Vancouver District	
36
6
12
1
1
182
206
4
1
16
18
1
36
1
2
4
4
6
38
3
1
6
1
1
60
17
1
58
1
"2
61
17
4
21
6
1
7
14
699
25
2
4
49
67
30
1
14
3
4
.1
7
1
14
2
Totals	
246
43
6
890
66
4
4
3
6
3
1
15
2
239
20
13
5
Oak Bay	
3
1
1
28
6
3
2
9
20
"i
1
20
11
1
3
3
18
2
2
3
21
4
3
h
12
18
21
6
3
2
....
1
4
i
l
1
86
21
322
28
3
5
15
22
2
5
16
45
2
1
5
1
9
7
9
11
36
1
1
111
24
28
91
51
8
1
254 B 48
British Columbia.
1922
Allotment of all Causes of Death to each Mining Division, July to December, 1921—Cont'd.
Mining Division.
is
1»
a a
3 B
g S
O
||
1
1
1
o
"3 A
■- E
'3.-S
£ 5
1
1
1
*
frs
aSi
l
"3 8j
•"S
B  ?     •
sis
, ?t\ Oi
g  g-g
fcCSot?
■3    '
41
si
3 J
B*
E O^
oo oo
o p ~
B bco
o tro
E
O
O
>>
O
a
&
1
B
o
m
bo
5
"3 .
B m
U  Oi
Oi   00
V, oi
HO
-6
Oi
<B
-a
"3
o
H
2
1
6
2
1
1
1
7
Atlin -	
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
5
4
2
12
1
1
4
4
10
6
2
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
5
2
8
3
2
1
33
4
3
5
227
7
300
11
193
3
139
1
27
9
127
7
112
2
35
23
264
13
2
2
15
85
7
517
102
7
17
2,089
The following table of diseases (exclusive of Indian returns) has been compiled from returns
of the whole Province from the year 1903 to December 31st, 1921. This table, like the preceding
one, has been segregated, and each division shows its liability to or immunity from the diseases
contained in the list far the six months ending December 31st, 1921.
<*■
ci
Disease.
0
S3
©
Or4
CO
■*
CD
f^
CO
o
.    .H
"3
X
^
^
rt
•"*
1-1
r"t
1-1
1-1
85
32
23
24
3
5
*■?■
24
42
9.
34
39
1
63
72
1
65
102
1
92
99
42
13
2
9
20
4
10
1
1
1
2
10
6
1
7
11
13
11
1
14
12
6
17
4
9
8
1
136
Scarlet fever	
17
8
4
6
4
6
16
14
31
12
18
3
1
7
2
1
5
10
3
167
12
3
4
4
26
9
18
15
23
15
27
23
9
37
21
14
19
16
15
2
312
21
11
it;
6
10
7
16
2
21
26
29
5
14
10
23
5
68
10
36
10
35
n
11
11
11
18
18
36
19
17
7
9
16
285
40
59
34
37
12
9
584
126
129
1«7
178
243
180
137
172
316
368
422
403
425
367
413
236
431
443
421
178
5,755
Oanrer (all forms)	
34
43
34
36
68
-1!)
79
113
148
180
159
205
221
259
248
144
288
318
342
187
3,155
19
115
24
104
16
100
20
110
47
217
44
152
33
36
153
46
42
164
51
60
237
85
63
258
124
51
195
66
47
183
64
47
157
62
49
228
140
36
224
9?
23
131
48
38
308
96
37
119
203
51
118
222
18
94
45
768
3,367
1,377
2,449
302
14
6
2,771
Diarrhcea and enteritis ....
22
48
48
45
53
33
59
74
53
130
113
108
72
35
53
17
52
50
65
25
1,155
402
426
425
■158
778
618
624
783
1,134
1,308
1,193
1,101
1,068
1,205
1.163
651
4,002
1,610
1,357
584
20,892
'      1 13 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
B 49
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining Division, July- to December, 1921.
Mining Division.
's *
o
p.
s
3
>
. 01
C3
5
ha
a
O  fct
JS (3
d
.B
p.
a
Si
B
.3
CB
B
'oo    .
o *£■
0 S
»s
.£_
Br3
1
■jo
bX
OS
'■?
B
o
K
1
ci
i'i
•§§
B B
O  Oi
*"  B
pa a.
1
V
B
ci
O  e  N
E.B  B
B ho 1)
££,5
a
8-2
PS   +3
SI
3
o
EH
2
3
1
1
1
6
2
2
i
1
150-Mile House	
Yale ..
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
Totals	
2
11
5
1
18
2
1
2
26
4
4
2
1
1
2
2
i
l
28
3
i
l
1
4
10
6
2
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
7
1
11
1111
	
	
l
l
i
51
1
18
1
1
1
2
2
11
77
13
6
1
1
2
2
7
3
2
1
1
l
3
3
6
66
3
5
1
3
4
i
i
5
12
1
1
3
35
2
1
2
Totals	
1
30
	
—
2
6
1
210
20
14
North Vancouver City	
2
7
1
i
7
i
i
2
1
1
16
1
1
2
4
2
i
8
4
3
——
1111
1
1
mi
5
1
3
1
75
13
1
1
4
19
98
9
2
4
8
23
Totals	
42
2
258
5
1
2
5
13
3
33
6
7
1
2
23
1
1
Totals	
l
5
69 B 50
British Columbia.
1922
Allotment of Specified Diseases to each Mining Division, July to December, 1921—Continued.
Mining Division.
T3
'3 *■
— >
o
&.
s
CO
to
1
HI
o
CO
O   b£
£8
#
.b
p.
(S
ci
N
B
Oi
B
CB
B
oo
'oo    .
3 S
B.S-
g
cj.b
B^-
oi-s
OS
*s
O
PP
ci
g'l
•BE
E B
O  CJ
.3
'b
o
B
S
E
Ph
c3
B b&ci
O  e  N
E'S j
£  O  B
B
H
o
3
2
2
1
1
3
2
1
i
i
2
2
8
1
Golden                                 	
9
1
1
1
3
i
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
6
1
Trail	
3
1
7
2
4
1
i
l
l
l
1
1
14
24
1
2
1
1
29
1
1
7
25
3
1
1
2
1
1
34
1
i
2
5
7
1
9
10
Totals	
6
50
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
14
1
4
. .  1 '. . .
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
8
i
1
Atlin	
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
3
1
1-
4
1
a
1
o
12
1
9
5
178
2
187
18
4
45
5
94
1
1
Cancer.
The number of deaths from cancer for the six months ending December 31st, 1921, was 1ST,
or 9.45 per cent, of all deaths (exclusive of still-born), as against 342, or 8.01 per cent., in the
year 1920-21.   There were 3 deaths from cancer among the Indians (not included in the above).
Tuberculosis.
The number of deaths from tuberculosis for the six months ending December 31st, 1921,
was 178, or 9 per cent, of all deaths (exclusive of still-born), as against 421, or 9.86 per cent,
in the year 1920-21. ' The above does not include 53 deaths from tuberculosis among tie Indians.
The" following table shows the assignment of deaths from tuberculosis to the various races:—
Race.
Population.
Deaths.
Per Cent, of
Deaths from
Tuberculosis.
July 1st to Dec.
31st, 1921.
Rate   per   1,000
of Population.
1920-21.
Rate   per   1,000
of Population.
Whites   	
467,551
25,800
14,000
16,867
1,500
137
53
23
16
2
69.30
22.94
9.95
6.92
0.86
0.29
2.05
1.66
0.94
1.33
0.75
3.60
3.71
1.30
0.66
Totals	
525,718
231
99.97 13 Geo. 5
Board op Health.
B 51
The following information is given as a comparative statement re the ages of decedents for
the years 1919-20, 1920-21, and the six months ending December 31st, 1921:—
Age.
Under 1 year	
1 to 2 years	
2 to 5 years	
5 to 10 years	
10 to 20 years	
20 to 30 years	
30 to 40 years	
40 to 50 years	
50 to 60 years	
60 to 70 years	
70 to 80 years	
80 to 90 years	
90 years and upwards
Age not given	
Totals	
623
77
124
106
213
423
650
621
650
509
427
214
32
4,618
651
61
96
105
167
319
470
581
562
549
430
203
43
4,419
July 1st to
Dec. 31st,
1921.
267
27
48
52
83
122
232
254
292
273
194
98
22
13
Per Cent, of
Deaths, July
to Dec, 1921
13.50
1.36
2.42
2.63
4.19
6.17
11.73
12.84
14.76
13.80
9.81
4.96
1.11
0.66
99.93
In the above table still-born are not included with deaths under 1 year. In 1919-20 the
number of still-births was 270; in 1920-21, 297; and in the six months ending December 31st,
1921, 112.
Registration of Indians.
The following shows the number of registrations received at this office for the six months
ending December 31st, 1921:  Births, 196;   deaths, 174  (4 still-born included) ;   marriages, 32..
" Adoption Act."
Fifty-one certificates of adoption were received and filed during the six months ending
December Slst, 1921.
The following are the cash receipts for the six months ending December 31st, 1921: Vital
statistics, $S66.75;  marriage licences, $120.
The number of searches made re vital statistics was 908 and the number of certificates issued
was 1,098.    The number of letters received and answered was 2,307.
It would be ungracious to conclude this report without tendering our thanks to all officers
connected with this branch of the Health Department for their unfailing courtesy and promptness
on all occasions.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
, Herbert B. French,
Deputy Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William. H.  Cuxlin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1922.

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