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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FIRST REPORT OF THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING MARCH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1922

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FIRST EEPOET
OP
THE TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM
FOR   THE
FISCAL TEAR ENDING MARCH 31ST
1922
PRINTED   BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1922.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Kichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
■i
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the First Report of Tranquille
Sanatorium for the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1922.
J. D. MacLEAX,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1922. •  '   TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM STAFF.
Medical Staff:
A. D. Lapp, M.B., Medical Superintendent.
H. G. Chisholm, M.D., Medical Assistant. F. J. Kenny, M.D., Medical Assistant.
W. G. Lothian, X-ray Technician. H. C. Cowan, Dentist.
Office Staff:
A. Whitecboss, Bursar. G. Forbes, Stenographer.
Miss ,T. A. Morbice, Matron. Miss L. C. Buckley, Dietitian.
J. P. Bolton, Chief Engineer.   . J. Trevors, Laundry Manager.
A. N. Low, Storekeeper. {
il
Rjie-.-
Ml
1
:'Mmm;  TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT.
Tranquille, B.C., March 31st, 1922.
Doctor the Honourable J. D. MacLean,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your consideration the first Annual Report of
Tranquille Sanatorium, under the management of the Government of the Province of British
Columbia, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1921, to March Slst, 1922.
The institution was established in 1907 and was owned and operated by the Anti-Tuberculosis
Society of the Province of British Columbia until the begiiming of the past fiscal year, when it
was formally taken over by the Provincial Government. t
We have accommodation for 230 patients, but until the new Nurses' Home is ready for
occupation it will be necessary to use one wing of the main building, totalling twenty-five beds,
to house the nurses. There was a total of 179 patients admitted during the year and 191 were
discharged, showing a reduction in population at the end of the year. Three hundred and
eighty-nine patients received treatment during the year, and the statistical table on discharged
cases shows very gratifying results; there being 23 discharged with disease apparently arrested,
71 with disease in a quiescent state, and 32 improved.
The fact that about 33 per cent, of admissions were classed as incipient, and only 24 per cent,
were more than moderately advanced, speaks well for the medical men of the Province. These
figures compare very favourably with those from similar institutions.
A glance at the statistics of discharged cases will show how important it is that the disease
be recognized early, and that the patient be urged to take sanatorium treatment at once.
Laboratory.
Very little laboratory-work beyond routine examinations of sputum, urine, and blood has
been done, and no research-work has been attempted, as we have had no laboratory technician
and the physicians have not had the time to spare from their other work. We hope to add a
laboratory technician to the staff in the near future, when we will be able to make definite
progress in the way of research.
X-EAY*   DePjVRTMENT.        '
The X-ray Department has been a valuable aid to the physicians, and the technician,
Mr. Lothian, is to be complimented on the superior quality of his work.
Owing to the fact that we have no properly constructed solaria, very little heliotherapy has
been attempted. Our one quartz lamp has been used in as many cases as possible, and very
satisfactory results have been obtained in those cases suffering from intestinal tuberculosis.
Dental Service.
The dental service is now recognized as a very important factor in the treatment of all
chronic diseases. We are very fortunate in having a well-equipped dental clinic, with a resident
dentist, and a great deal has been accomplished during the past year. The dentist has found
the X-ray to be so valuable that a complete set of dental films is now taken as a routine in each
new case, and many teeth, which by other methods of examination would have been considered
healthy, have been discovered to be infected.
Financial.
The financial operations are set forth in detail in the Bursar's report, and show the net
per capita cost of maintenance to be $1.30 per day, which 1 think is very satisfactory, as the
repairs and renewals which were necessary this year added considerably to the cost of maintenance. This bill was offset to some extent by the fact that no depreciation was charged, as
the work done added considerably to the value of the buildings.
Sanatorium Fabm.
The Farm Superintendent's report shows a net profit of $2,282.42. The work has been somewhat hampered by inadequate buildings and the need for more land.    The results have been I 6 Tranquille Sanatorium. 1922
very satisfactory, as we have had sufficient milk of excellent quality to supply the whole
institution. As it is imperative that we have our own milk-supply, and as every bit of land
is required to provide feed for the dairy herd, we cannot expect the farm to provide us with
much else until it is enlarged.
Building Operations,
A Nurses' Home, which was badly needed, is under construction and will soon be ready for
occupation. This building is up to date in every respect and will be a great asset to the
Institution, as it will not only add to the comfort of the nursing staff, but will release twenty-
five more beds for patients.
A root-house in connection with the store is being constructed and will be ready for use
next autumn.
Modern dairy and horse barns are nearing completion, as well as new cement silos and a
well-equipped dairy building.
A spur was built from the main line of the Canadian National Railway, greatly facilitating
the handling of heavy freight and coal.
Recommendations.
One of our greatest needs is suitable houses for our employees and members of the staff
who are married.
A new auditorium is badly needed; the room which is used at present is not only much
too small, but is very ill-ventilated and wholly unsuitable, especially in an institution for the
treatment of such a disease as tuberculosis.
The old shacks along the approach to the Sanatorium are an eye-sore and should be torn
down as soon as possible; they should be replaced by more up-to-date buildings on a different
site.
As much work as possible should be done each year towards improving and beautifying
the grounds.
The question of obtaining a water-supply by gravity should be thoroughly investigated, as
we have to depend on machinery altogether for water for our fire-protection, as well as for
domestic use.
A building with an open-air school-room large enough to accommodate twenty children
should be added to the present accommodation as soon as possible.
Probably the most pressing need in tuberculosis work in the Province is accommodation
for advanced cases. A large percentage of our beds are occupied by cases with no prospects
of recovery, who are deriving no benefit from sanatorium treatment. Many of them have been
here for years, occupying beds required for less advanced cases, delaying their admission until
many of these also become hopeless. It is impossible to discharge these advanced cases at
present, as there is no suitable place to send them.
Acknowledgments.
I wish to express my appreciation of advice and services rendered by Dr. J. S. Burris, of
Kamloops, who has been acting as consulting surgeon for years.
The thanks of the institution are particularly due to the Visiting Committee of the Kamloops
Branch of the Red Cross, to the Military Branch of the Y.M.C.A. of Vancouver, and also to the
various organizations in Kamloops who provided a play or concert for the entertainment of
patients and staff almost every week during the winter.
I take the opportunity to thank my assistant physicians, Drs. Chisholm and Kenny, for
their efficient and valuable services, and to express my appreciation of their co-operation to the
various officers and members of the staff. In conclusion, I wish to thank you for the support
that I have had from your Department.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. D. LAPP,
Medical Superintendent. 13 Geo. 5
First Report.
I 7
STATISTICAL TABLES.
Statistics foe Yeae ended Maboh 31st, 1922.
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March 31st, 1821
Number of patients admitted during year   .,
Number of patients treated during year  	
Number of patients discharged during year	
Number of patients in Sanatorium, March Slst, 1922
Civil.
Military.
Total.
210
72
107
170
380
m
124
191
1014
94
19S
Cases admitted durixg Year ended March 31st, 1922.
Males   160
Females        19
Total    179
Civil state—
Males. Females.
Married   80 5
Single     76 14.
Widowed        4
Totals    160 19
Classification—
Incipient       59 = 32.96%
Moderately advanced     77 = 43.00%
Far advanced     41 = 24.04%
N on-tuberculous       2
Total      179
Cases discharged during Year ended March 31st, 1922.
RESULTS.
Classification on Admission.
Arrested5'     Quiesl;ont-      Improved.
Unimproved.
Dead.
Incipient   46 — 24.08%   	
19
4
17
44
10
7
16
0
3
9
14
Moderatelv advanced, 80 — 41.88%   	
Far advanced, 40 = 25.2'3%  	
7
10
Classification of the Sixteen Cases discharged as Xon-tubeeculous.
Bronchiectasis   1
Chronic bronchitis :  2
Debility  4
Syphilis   1
Asthma   -  1
Psychasthenia  1
No disease   6 I 8
Tranquille Sanatorium.
1922
Repobt op Pneumo-thoeax Teeatment fob Yeab ended Ma'rch 31st, 1922.
Number of treatments given  176
Number of cases in which treatment was attempted       7
Number of cases in which treatment was successful        4
Reasons for which it was attempted—
Hemorrhage         3
Toxaemia •...      4
Age Classification of Cases admitted dueing Year ended March 31st, 1922.
1-10
11-15
16-20
21-25
26-30
31-35
36-40
41-45
46-50
51-55
Over
years
ales.
Females
1
1
4
4
23
4
31
1
27
4
2S
2
15
20
1
5
1
oa years
Addresses.
Vancouver     85
New Westminster   5
Cranbrook   1
Penticton      3
Tranquille  3
Balfour     1
Robson   1
Sardis     1
Salmon Arm     2
Langley  Prairie     2
Burnaby     2
Slocan     1
Fraser Mills     1
Dewey     1
Silverton    1
Vernon   1
Kelowna     1
Victoria    21
Nelson  1
Prince Rupert    1
Fernie  3
Smithers  1
Mission City  1
Armstrong  1
Kamloops  9
Shuswap  1
Duncan  1
Aldergrove   1
Peachland   1
Nanaimo  2
Coombs  1
Maillardville  2
Miscellaneous. D.S.C.R. patients coming in
from outside Provinces   16
Occupations of Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1922.
Tailor  3
Plumber  3
Rancher  15
Engineer     7
Book-keeper  3
School-teacher     1
Electrician     1
Cashier  1
Glover   1
Lumberman  4
Orderlies    2
Prospector   2
Upholsterer  1
Surveyor   ,  1
Teamster   3
Bank clerk   ;  1
Clerk     19
Labourer    9
Coal-miner  9
Barrister  1
Waiter    3
Broker    2
Sailor   4
Factory-girl  1
Accountant    3
Photographer    3
Soldier   2
Housewife   6
Street-car conductor    1
Fireman  4 T
I
•a 2
•• .;* ""  Occupations of Cases admitted—Continued.
Piano-tuner   1
Nurseryman    1
Laundry manager  1
Switchman     1
Bridgeman  1
Telegraph operator  1
Laundry-maid  1
Elevator operator   1
Watchman  1
Time-keeper     1
Shipwright     1
Pool-room keeper  1
Wood-worker     1
School-girl   2
Musician   '  1
Milliner  1
Steam-fitter  1
Student       1
Motor mechanic  2
Motorman     2
Cook    2
Painter  2
Tinsmith  1
Advertiser   2
Station agent ■  1
Secretary   2
Salesman   3
Blacksmith  2
Stenographer  2
Carpenter     4
Shoemaker     2
Longshoreman   -.. . 2
Dental mechanic   1
Chauffeur     1
Watchmaker   1
Nationalities of Cases admitted during Year ended March 31st, 1922.
Scottish     40
Welsh '.  7
American   7
Swedish   3
Jew •  1
Slavonian  1
Italian    1
French    1
Belgian  2
English  54
Canadian   51
Irish   6
French-Canadian   1
Pole  1
American Indian  1
Danish   1
Norwegian   3
Japanese    1
Religion.
Protestant  10
Roman Catholic  25
Methodist     10
Lutheran    ,  2
Polish  1
Congregational   3
Buddhist  1
Church of England  59
Presbyterian   47
Baptist  7
Bible student    1
Hebrew     1
Seventh Day Adventist  1
Unknown      2
Definition oe Teems used in the Admission and Discharge of Patients. .
Classification on Admission.
Lesion.— (1.) Incipient.—Slight infiltration limited to the apex of one or both lungs, or a
small part of one lobe.
(2.) Moderately advanced.—Marked infiltration, more extensive than under incipient, with
little or no evidence of cavity formation.    No serious tuberculous complications.
(3.) Far advanced.—Extensive localized infiltration or consolidation in one or more lobes;
or disseminated areas of cavity formation;  or serious tuberculous complications.
Symptoms.— (a.) Slight or None.—Slight or no constitutional symptoms, including, particularly, gastric or intestinal disturbance or rapid loss of weight; slight or no elevation of
temperature or acceleration of pulse at any time during the twenty-four hours. Expectoration
usually small in amount or absent.   Tubercle bacilli may be present or absent.
(6.)  Moderate.—No marked impairment of function, either local or constitutional.
(c.)  Severe.—Marked impairment of function, local and constitutional. I 10 Tranquille Sanatorium. 1922
Classification on Discharge.
Apparently cured.—All constitutional symptoms and expectoration with bacilli absent for a
period of two years under ordinary conditions of life.
Arrested.—All constitutional symptoms and expectoration with bacilli absent for a period
of six months;  the physical signs to be those of a healed lesion.
Apparently arrested.—All constitutional symptoms and expectoration with bacilli absent for
a period of three months;  the physical signs to be those of a healed lesion.
Quiescent.—Absence of all constitutional symptoms; expectoration and bacilli may or may
not be present; physical signs stationary or retrogressive; the foregoing conditions to have
existed for at least two months. •
Improved.—Constitutional symptoms lessened or entirely absent; physical signs improved or
unchanged;  cough and expectoration -with bacilli usually present.
Unimproved or Progressive.—All essential symptoms and signs unabated or increased.
X-ray Report for Year ended March 31st, 1922.
Stereoscopic films, pairs   259
Miscellaneous, chiefly gastro-intestinal      54
Complete sets dental   199
Alpine Sun Lamp.
Number of treatments given  1,199
DENTAL REPORT.
Teanquille, B.C., April 1st, 1922.
The Medical Superintendent, •
Tranquille Sanatorium, Tranquille, B.C.
■Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my report for the year ended March 31st, 1922,
which report I trust you will find in order.
Number of patients examined   30S
Number of sets of X-ray films (mouth)  199
Number of patients treated   268
Number not requiring treatment       8
Number of patients too ill for anything but emergency treatment     32
Number of completed cases  131
Number of patients showing, in one form or another, definite evidence of
oral infection     26
Our first effort has always been to remove all evidence of oral infection, especial attention
being given to foci of infection at the apices of the teeth; and after this to see that the patient
was supplied with sufficient teeth with which to masticate his food.
All strictly bed patients are given appointments of only one-half hour's duration, but patients
on exercise are given more time, but never more than an hour.
All patients are examined as soon as possible after admission, and all now receive both a
clinical and an X-ray examination. As most patients remain in the institution three months at
least, all dental work can be carried on after consultation with the medical officer in charge of
the ward, and this is the procedure which has been adopted.
Although it is impossible to attribute the improvement of a patient to any one factor, yet
there are a number of cases on record where the condition showed marked signs of improvement
after having received the required dental treatment.
The services of a graduate nurse are retained in the clinic, as it is felt that sterilization,
the care and handling of patients, and a knowledge of their physical condition are all too
important to leave to untrained hands. 13 Geo. 5
First Report.
I 11
All teeth that can be saved are treated in the usual manner and filled;   all up patients are
required to report every three months for a prophylactic treatment.    In this way notice is taken
of the care with which patients carry out the instructions given them as to the care of their teeth.
Respectfully submitted.
Haeold C. Cowan,
Dentist.
METEOROLOGICAL REPORT.
Month.
April
May  	
June
July	
August . .
September
October . .
November
December
January .
February .
March   . . .
Maximum
Temp.
Deg. F.
71
85
■85
89
01
76
70
62
49
42
46
Minimum
Temp.
Deg. F.
28
37
44
46
47
©6
-11
13
Average
Temp.
Deg. F.
48.2
59.3
66.2
74.9
70.3
56.5
54.3
33.3
20.0
14.0
Hours of
Sunshine.
118-8.8
282.5
205.5
319.3
258.1
181.7
161.6
55.9
61.4
83.3
107.9
155.3
Rain.
Inches.
0.30
0.77
0.64
0.12
0.38
0.50
0.05
0.6
0.19
■0.10
Average
Humidity.
55.9
51,2
53.8
62.4
67.7
6,8.7
72.8
64.9
100.0
100.O
100.0
Snowfall.
Inches.
4.0
3.0
BURSAR'S REPORT.
Teanquille, B.C., March 31st, 1922.
Dr. A. D. Lapp,
Medical Superintendent, Tranquille Sanatorium,
Tranquille, B.C.
Sib,—I beg to submit herewith the Financial Statement for the year ended March 31st, 1922.
During the year a great deal of work has been done, repairing and renovating our old
buildings, thereby adding considerably to our operating expenses. In this connection you will
note that no depreciation charges have been made, as the buildings have been greatly enhanced
in value by the work done on them. A considerable amount of repair-work has yet to be done
to bring the institution up to the standard desired.
Our daily average population for the year is somewhat low, being 190.04 per day, and this
is accounted for by the necessity of closing certain sections so that repairs could be proceeded
with.
During the year ten municipalities paid for the maintenance of 63 patients at the rate of
$2.50 per day. The Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment has paid for 231 ex-soldiers
at the monthly per capita rate; and 40 patients paid for their own maintenance at varying
rates, according to what they were able to afford. We have carried on the free list 55 patients
who were unable to pay anything.
The gross cost of our maintenance amounted to $271,730.08 and our revenue to $181,495.98,
making the net per capita charge to the Province $474.81 for the year, or $1.30 per day.
I take this opportunity of thanking you for the valuable help you have extended to me in
my work, and to express to my staff appreciation of the efficient and faithful manner in which
they have carried out their duties.
I have, etc.,
A. Whitecboss,
Bursar. I 12 Tranquille Sanatorium. 1922
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1922.
Assets.
Land  $ 36,110 17
Buildings   372,472 82
Plant and equipment  .'  70,866 50
Furniture and fixtures   15,305 22
Inventories    13,785 69
Deferred insurance  2,428 62
Petty Account  1,000 00
Accounts receivable   43,107 03
Railway spur •  2.432 02
$557,508 97
Deficit (cost of operations. 1921-22)          90,234 10
$647,743 07
Liabilities.
Government of British Columbia   $647,743 07
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1922.
Insurance   $    3,222 69
Salaries     83,537 76
Office supplies  1,713 14
Travelling expenses and transportation  3,906 79
Fuel, water, light, and power   42,785 73
Maintenance and repairs of buildings  26,306 16
Furniture and fixtures   10,982 7S
Provisions  80,1S9 90
Medical and surgical supplies  5.391 16
Incidentals and unforeseen  13,693 97
By Donations     $    8,200 00
Receipts from maintenance of patients       173,295 9S
Balance         90.234 10
$271,730 08 $271,730 OS
Expense and Revenue Statement for Yeab ended Mabch 31st, 1922.
Operating Expense Accounts.
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries—■
Medical and clerical staff   $ 13,696 08
Sundry employees        69,841 68
 $ 83,537 76
Office supplies—
Books, journals, etc  $      280 62
Postage and office supplies          1,544 79
Telephone and telegraph   91 96
 1,917 37
Travelling expenses and transportation         4,535 84
Carried forward    $ 89,990 97   13 Geo. 5 First Report. I 13
Expense and Revenue jStatement for Year ended March 31st, 1922—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought fonoard     $ 89,990 97
Fuel, water, light, and power—
Fuel     $ 43,839 74
Oils, packing, etc ,  837 31
 44,677 05
Maintenance and repairs—
Repairs and renewals    $ 26.200 18
Janitors' supplies         2,065 58
 2S,265 76
Furniture and fixtures—
Bedding   $    5,184 76
Furniture and fixtures ,  123 28
Miscellaneous         7.663 60
 12,971 64
Provisions—
Groceries  $ 33,307 88
Meats       29,125 26
Fish          1.808 04
Milk and eggs       21,774 69
 86,015 ST.
Medical and surgical supplies—
Drugs and instruments $    2,490 07
-X-ray and sundry          2,193 52
        4,6S4 19
Incidentals and unforeseen—
Laundry      $    2,151 76
Freight and express          6,855 70
Railway spur   ,         4,700 90
Interest on mortgage          1,774 00
Miscellaneous         2,171 62
 17,653 98
• Total operating expense by voucher   $284,259 46
Inventories as at March 31st, 1921— *
Fuel   $    1,098 48
Provisions         2,473 30
Office supplies  696 50
Medical and surgical supplies          1,789 30
Furniture and fixtures   848 64
Maintenance and repairs  231 66
Miscellaneous            1,001 42
 8.139 30
Proportion of insurance for the year         3,222 69
$295,621 45
Less inventories as at March 31st, 1922—
Fuel  $2,989 SO
Provisions      3,861 54
Office supplies          900 73
Medical and surgical supplies        829 65
Furniture and fixtures      2.837 50
Carried forward  $11,419 22 $295,021 45 I 14 Tranquille Sanatorium. 1922
Expense and Revenue Statement for Year ended Mabch 31st, 1922—Continued.
Operating Expense Accounts—Continued.
Brought fonoard   $11,419 22 $295,621 45
Maintenance and repairs      2,191 26
Transportation           175 21
$ 13,785 69
By Refund, motor licences 	
Post Office Department Account	
Provisions sold  	
Receipts for board 	
Sale of thermometers 	
Refund, Canadian National Railway Spur Account .
Balance cost of spur transferred to Capital Account
Sundry receipts for laundry 	
125 10
32S 74
2,202 90
2,234 83
252 68
2.267 98
2,432 92
260 53
23,891 37
Gross cost of maintenance for year  $271,730 OS
Revenue.
By Donations from Greaves Estate     $    8,200 00
Receipts from Department of S.C.R     12,8,929 71
♦     Receipts from municipalities       36,710 00
Receipts from private patients         7,656 27
 181.495 98
Net cost of operation for year ending March Slst, 1922   $ 90,234 10
Summary of Profit and Loss Account.
Yearly
per Capita
Cost.
Insurance      $    3,222 69       $     16.95S
Salaries    83,537 76 439.579
Office supplies  1.713 14 9.014
Travelling expenses and transportation  3,906 79 20.557
Fuel, light, water, and power   42,785 73 225.140
Maintenance and repairs ...  26,306 16 138.424
Furniture and fixtures   10.9S2 78 57.792
Provisions   80,189 90 421.963
Medical and surgical supplies  5,391 16 2S.36S
Incidentals and unforeseen  13,693 97 72.058
$271,730 OS       $1,429.SJ
Less donations      $    8,200 00
„     revenue, Maintenance Account     173,295 9S
1S1,495 98 955.041
Net cost to Government for maintenance of patients   $ 90,234 10       $   474.812
Remarks.
Number of patients in residence, March 31st, 1921   210
Daily average population for year ended March Slst, 1922  190.04
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  $1,429.85
Gross maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  . 3.91
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 year  474.S1
Net maintenance per capita cost, 1 day  1.30 13 Geo. 5 First Report. I 15
Expense and Revenue Statement for Yeae ended March 31st, 1922—Continued.
Capital Expenditures.
Nurses' Home    $23,321 84
Barns   23,289 58
Mortgage repaid   22,000 00
Plant and equipment  1,822 50
Furniture   ...»  3,755 22
FARM SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.
Teanquille, B.C., March 31st, 1922.
Dr. A. D. Lapp,
Medical Superintendent, Tranquille Sanatorium,
Tranquille, B.C.
Sib,—I beg to submit the report of the Tranquille Sanatorium Farm for the year ended
March 31st, 1922.
The crop yield in all lines was exceptionally good, and it was safely harvested without loss
of any kind whatever. The crop in the lower meadow was sufficient to feed the range cattle
during the entire season, notwithstanding the fact that the winter was much longer than usual.
The alfalfa-crop was above the average, and only two car-loads of hay had to be purchased to
carry the dairy herd and horses through the winter. Three hundred tons of corn and sunflower
ensilage were put up, which will be sufficient to feed the dairy cattle well into the summer months.
The dairy herd has done well during the year, fully supplying the Sanatorium with milk.
This herd has been tested for tuberculosis twice during the year, no reactors being found either
among the mature or young stock.
Two hundred and six head of range cattle were carried through the winter. These stood
the long winter well and went out on the range in good condition.
One of the greatest difficulties met with during the year was the shortage of barn accommodation and trouble in handling the dairy herd during building operations.
Several new farm buildings are under construction. A dairy-barn, 40 by 100 feet, wifti a
large loft above, is nearing completion. This barn is equipped with every modern convenience
for the care and comfort of the stock. A large horse-barn, 76 by 30 feet, with accommodation
for twenty-two head, is also under construction. Two 30-foot cement silos and a modern well-
equipped dairy will be constructed this spring.
The hogs, as usual, have proved profitable, though their housing accommodation is extremely
poor.    The orchard bore an average crop of about 600 boxes.
The farm closed this year with a net profit of $2,282.42.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have, etc.,
D. W. Strachan,
Farm Superintendent.
TRANQUILLE SANATORIUM FARM.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1922.
Assets.
Building and improvement  $11,552 02
Farm equipment  •  4,739 89
Automobile    4S0 94
Live stock •  27,505 00
Real estate  137 88
Bank balance   916 71
Accounts receivable •  2,S88 69
Tranquille Dam Account   421 72
Carried forward   $48,642 85 I 16 Tranquille Sanatorium. 1922
Balance-sheet, Maech 31st, 1922—Continued.
Assets—Continued.
Brought forward      $ 48,642 85
Feed Account  727 00
Provisions  495 00
$49,864 85
Liabilities.
Treasury advance  $ 1,000 CO
Accounts payable  •  281. S5
Capital surplus   $46,290 58
Capital profit for year        2,282 42
 48,573 00
$49,864 85
Profit and Loss Account, Maech 31st, 1922.
Salaries—
Farm Superintendent   $2,400 00
Employees        6,001 28
 $ 8,401 28
Provisions        1,732 47
Fuel, Light, and Water—
Coal-oil and gasolene    $   178 32
Fuel  •        191 83
Water rights  10 42
         380 57
Feed       3,917 57
Blacksmith and repairs    726 76
Seed, Fruit-boxes, etc.—
*Seed   $    86 15
Fruit-boxes     84 52
  170 67
Drugs and veterinary   45 60
Implements, harness, hardware • 394 52
Incidentals and unforeseen   535 28
•Balance, profit for year       2,282 42
$18,587 14
Profits, live stock   $ 1,808 75
Receipts—
Farm produce sold   15,970 93
Fruit-sales  403 20
Teaming    •  47 55
Sale of hides    18 65
Sundry—
Milk-sales     132 09
Pork    142 52
Board and meals, contractor for barn .... ■  63 45
$18,587 14
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by William H. Cl'llin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1922.

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