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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1919-1920 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1921

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 REPORT
OP  THE
MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS
OF  THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FISCAL YEAR 1919-1920
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PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY  OF  THE   LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by William H.  Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1921.  To His Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of my Department
for the fiscal year ending 31st March, 1920, in compliance with the provisions of
the " Public Works Act."
J. H. KING,
Minister of Public Works.
Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1921.  PUBLIC WORKS REPORT.
REPORT OF PUBLIC WORKS ENGINEER.
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., October 15th, 1920.
J. E. Griffith, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Public Works.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the fiscal year 1919-20.
As the District Engineers, in their reports enclosed herewith, have particularized the work
done in their respective districts, my comments shall be confined to matters in general.
Organization and Supervision.
Partly due to the greater amount of work connected with the Peace River block and the extra
work in the Lower Mainland, a rearrangement of three of the engineering districts and the
creation of another engineering district (No. 9) became necessary. To fill the new positions
assistants were promoted, thus carrying out our policy to advance, where competent, officials
presently in the service. If the nature of the work accomplished and the fewer complaints
received are any criteria of the operations of the outside staff, same should be recorded as
satisfactory and efficient.
The submission of engineering data and plans to the Commissioner of Highways, Ottawa,
in connection with applications for Federal aid under the " Canada Highways Act" has involved
considerable detailed work on the part of both the indoor and outdoor staffs, at consequently
increased overhead expenditure.
Roads and Trails.
With such a large mileage of roads (approximately 15,000 miles) to maintain with the
comparatively small appropriations available, the problem of spending the funds judiciously
yearly becomes more intensified. It is obviously impossible to take adequate care of anything
like all the requirements, not to mention the ever-increasing demands for new construction. As
will be noted from several of the District Engineers' reports, attention was concentrated on
substantially improving portions of the main travelled routes and keeping the other portions
in a reasonably good state of repair. Such semi-permanent road-work was undertaken on proper
locations, revised where necessary. The remainder of the roads were kept fairly passable. This
policy of doing a little well on the best alignment and grades, rather than distributing temporary
work over a large mileage, of oftentimes badly located roads should in time meet with results
and justify its continuation until such times as ample funds are available for more general
reconstruction-work. Owing to the unusually severe winter on Vancouver Island and in the
Lower Mainland there was considerably more maintenance, many roads having been partially
reconstructed at higher expenditure. More attention is being paid to the dragging of earth and
gravel roads with appreciably favourable results. In the Central Interior and other localities
where the patrol system of road maintenance was adopted, the improvements were of such a
nature as to merit more general use of highway patrols over well-defined sections of main trunk
roads. Greater attention has been given to drainage, as it is fully recognized that most of our
difficulties in preserving a serviceable road-surface are chiefly due to lack of the elementary
drainage facilities. Local foremen are being instructed as to the imperative necessity of getting
the water out of and away from the road-bed as a preliminary to further work, either maintenance
or construction.
In this connection many culverts of a temporary nature or deficient in design are being
replaced with substantial culverts of sufficient waterway. Where the road-work is permanent,
concrete, corrugated iron, and other durable material are used in culvert-construction.
Numerous accommodation roads were built for incoming settlers in the Interior, but so rapid
is the development of some of the agricultural areas that it is impossible to keep pace with the
demands for new roads. Probably the tendency towards closer settlement will in time eliminate
the needless extension of highways or the construction of spurs thereof to provide for isolated
settlers.   This will help to conserve our road appropriations. D 6
Public Works Report (1919-20).
In endeavouring to meet the new traffic problems created by the introduction of motor-trucks
on lateral roads previously used solely by horse-traction, several miles of earth road were
surfaced and otherwise structurally improved. So much damage is, however, being done to
many roads, particularly by logging-motor outfits, that it is quite beyond the means of the
Department to take care of such abnormal conditions. Hence in several instances roads were
limited under the " extraordinary traffic " regulations to the use of ordinary traffic. With a
view to safeguarding our main travelled routes, it is proposed to amend the " Highway Act" so
that more stringent and speedy action will he possible.
This fiscal year is notable as witnessing the initial stage in what will ultimately be a
comprehensive system of .hard-surfaced highways. Realizing that good roads adjacent to cities
are of primary importance in the development particularly of natural resources, commencement
was made on hard-surfacing the most important trunk highways—the Island Highway, Vancouver Island, and the Trans-Provincial Highway south-east of New Westminster. The former
was paved 18 feet wide with one course concrete for a distance of 2 miles, and the preliminary
work preparatory to a similar paving undertaken on 3.27 miles of the latter. As it is fully
realized that, for financial reasons alone, gravel surfaces must necessarily constitute the greater
proportion of our trunk roads, the Malahat Drive and other important sections of the Island
Highway were resurfaced with gravel and stone in conjunction with widening and improvement
schemes. The needs of the Interior were not overlooked, about 100 miles of main roads having
been opened up or reconstructed additionally to the ordinary improvement-work. Amongst those
are the historic Cariboo Road, the Fort George-Hazelton Road, the Francois Lake Road, the
1-Mile Road, the Revelstoke West Road, the Thrums-Brilliant, and portions of the Trans-
Provincial Highway in the Kootenays, all being important factors in the trunk-highway programme which the Department has ever in mind. Municipalities came in for their share of
hard-surfaced highways, the work usually having been done by contract under the direct
supervision of the Department, part of the cost of the work being usually contributed by the
municipalities benefited.    Such work comprised the following:—
Fraser Avenue, South Vancouver, 0.50 mile, bituminous surfacing 12 feet wide; River Road,
South Vancouver, 1.40 miles, bituminous surfacing 12 feet wide; No. 3 Road, Lulu Island, 2.65
miles, asphaltic concrete 16 feet wide; Marine Drive, North Vancouver, 2.40 miles, bitulithic
surface 14 to 16 feet wide;  Yale Road, 1.55 miles, bitulithic surface 18 feet wide.
Here I would like to emphasize the ueed for careful maintenance by the interested
municipalities of all such hard-surfacing, in order that any defects in construction, etc., may
be rectified before the body of the pavement becomes seriously affected. To provide for such
contingencies in future, the " Highway Act Amendment Act " brought before the House at the
close of this fiscal year specifically defines the obligations and duties alike of the Department
and the municipalities.
Regarding the road-work generally, difficulties were again experienced in some districts in
procuring the necessary labour and teams at the proper season. As formerly, returned men
were given the preference in employment, our records showing that a large proportion of the
employees had seen military service. Much of the road machinery ordered early in the year
was not delivered in time to obtain the maximum benefit from same, but the extended use of
trucks, tractors, and mechanical loaders has amply demonstrated their worth in expediting the
work in an economical manner and making the Department more independent of unreliable
team-supply.
Particularly in connection with the Trans-Provincial Highway, considerable survey-work was
undertaken and plans prepared. Much relocation-work was also carried out in furthering the
Department's policy to reconstruct highways on the best procurable alignment and grades.
The. usual amount of maintenance-work was undertaken on mining roads and trails on
behalf of the Department of Mines.
Bridges.
Nine bridges were constructed by contract at an aggregate cost of over $100,000. Chief
among the structures huilt by contract was the 132-foot timber swing-span and 1,000 lineal feet
of trestle approaches over the South Thompson River at Pritchard at a cost of approximately
$30,000. This bridge dispenses with the ferry service at this point and fills a much-felt want
in this district. It is worthy of note that the bridges built by day-lahour forces compare most
favourably both as regards cost and workmanship—indeed, in many cases the work has been 11 Geo. 5 Report op Public Works Engineer. D 7
done cheaper than would have been possible by contract. Now that the Department has several
good bridge-gangs in charge of competent bridge foremen, it is the intention to undertake as
much construction-work as such gangs can conveniently handle. Here 1 should like to specially
mention the splendid services rendered by our highly capable and most energetic Provincial
Bridge Inspector, Mr. Kilpatrick, whose combined knowledge of theory and practice has been
of incalculable value both to the indoor and outdoor officials. To him are primarily due the
credit for many of the radical changes in our plans and our field methods.
Ferries.
The principal work done was the reconstruction and reinforcement of the S.S. " Beaver " for
use on the Ladner-Woodward Ferry and the construction of a new power ferry-boat for the
Mission-Riverside ferry service.
Partly to meet the heavy initial outlay (about $50,000) a tariff was put into effect on August
1st, 1919, at the former ferry. With such a greatly improved and expeditious service on a good
schedule, the charges appear to meet with general approval. A tariff will also be imposed on
the Mission Ferry next fiscal year, thus following out the Department's policy to put all the
larger power-ferries on an equal basis, whereby operating expenses will be met by receipts.
Many of the smaller ferries continue to be a source of trouble and expense, as they are out
of" date and often unable to successfully withstand the freshets and high-water currents, but
renewals are being made as circumstances demand. Generally the ferry services rendered appear
to meet with the approval of the people most intimately concerned, the ferrymen for the most
part being anxious to fully accommodate the travelling public. It is worthy of note that the
majority of the employees on ferries are returned men.
Wharves.
With the transfer of the bulk of the wharves to the Federal Government the Department
has been relieved of considerable responsibility and expense. With the exception of the Prince
Rupert Wharf, it is not the intention to further maintain any of the wharves not taken over by
the Federal authorities. Consequently several wharves liable to be a source of danger have
been closed and barricaded. The wharf at Prince Rupert is now on a better revenue-producing
basis to justify necessary extension at an early date.
River-bank Protection.
Work was confined to the Kicking Horse River, Golden, where the operations of previous
years were continued in conjunction with the Federal Department. So far no advantage has
been taken of the " River-bank Protection Act" to have general protection-work done on a local
improvement basis. Many of our main roads being necessarily located on the narrow valleys
adjacent to river-banks, there is always a need for a certain amount of protection-work, but the
cost of such work is charged to the roads or bridges directly benefited.
General.
The Engineers' Convention continues to be a feature of considerable interest and instruction
alike to the Engineers and the Department. Last convention's papers being chiefly confined to
comment and discussion on actual work engaged on throughout the year rendered the proceedings
of the greatest possible value. This occasion also affords an unusual opportunity to the headquarters staff for discussing estimates, proposed plans, etc., with the Engineers individually.
Several papers of outstanding merit are to be published in technical journals.
Herewith I ha*ve pleasure in forwarding the report of the Supervising Architect.
Detailed reports of expenditures on roads, bridges, ferries, wharves, and public buildings,
together with other data, are also submitted herewith.
I again desire to express appreciation for the assistance of and services rendered by the
various heads of departments and District Engineers, all of whom have contributed to the welfare
and more efficient operation of the Department as not to allow of any singling-out of a particular
individual for special mention.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
A. E. FOREMAN,
Public Works Engineer. ,
D 8
P.ublic Works Report  (1919-20).
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 1.
District Engineer's Office,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., October 23rd, 1920.
A. E. Foreman, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer,  Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the annual report for Vancouver Island District.
During the year the principal road-work that has been carried on in the various districts
on Vancouver Island was repairs and maintenance to existing roads.
Increased wages curtailed operations, but this has been offset to a certain extent by the
use of new labour-saving machines purchased by the Department. Increased motor-truck traffic,
especially by loggers, has necessitated unforeseen expenditures in extra maintenance. This
extraordinary traffic will increase year by year and unless curtailed during wet seasons will
damage roads to such an extent that ordinary traffic will be dangerous or impossible.
A start has been made to improve drainage conditions on all roads. A great deal more
attention to this important factor is required before the best value can be obtained from
gravel roads.
Road maintenance, like all other classes of work, is costing more than heretofore (and it
is noticeable that men did more work per hour when working for less money and longer hours).
There is not so much demand for employment on road maintenance during the fine weather on
account of it not being continuous work during the season. If men could be assured of three
or four months' steady work there would be increased application for work.
Patrolmen are useful not so much on roads over which there is continual heavy traffic as
von less important roads, and it has been found that, when gravel has been placed in magazines
at the sides of the roads, one or two men with a wheelbarrow can do a large amount of repair-
work. A good deal of the success of patrolmen lies in the selection of the men; some men being
of no use as patrols.
The extra road machinery supplied to Vancouver Island District has demonstrated the
economy of such investment. The mechanical loader, loading a 2%-yard truck in four minutes,
and the truck travelling twice the rate of a wagon, shows without further data that the machines
will, if properly cared for, pay for themselves before they are worn out. Tractors hauling
graders cover more than twice the distance in the day than graders hauled by teams, the former
travelling uphill without stops.
The cost of hauling gravel last spring in the Alberni District by Ford motor-truck averaged
39 cents per cubic yard per mile. The 2%-ton Federal truck has proved a success, especially ou
long hauls.
The most important road-work on the Island wTas the commencement of the lS-foot concrete
paving on the Island Highway between rarsons Bridge and Craigflower Bridge, approximately
2 miles. This work was let by contract, but concreting was stopped, on account of frost, at the
junction of the Helmcken Road. The contractor continued preparing the road-bed during the
winter to the Craigflower Bridge.
Improvements were also carried out on the Malahat portion of the Island Highway. Strong
protection-rails were erected at some dangerous places. A rock-quarry was opened up near the
summit and a rock-crusher installed, and crushed rock was deposited on the roadway at the
summit, saving a long haul with gravel, which is unobtainable at that high elevation above
sea-level.
Severe frosts, during the month of December, combined with heavy motor and truck traffic,
broke up the surface of many miles of roads on the Island, and a following rain washed away
large amounts of gravel surfacing.
Returned soldiers were given every consideration. Employment was given to soldiers living
outside the districts, in Victoria and other municipalities.
Respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently.
A. E. Hodqins,
District Engineer. Island Highway, Newcastle District.    Shale-surfaced.
Mechanical loader at work in gravel-pit.  11 Geo. 5 Report op Engineer, District No. 2. D 9
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 2.
District Engineer's Office,
Court-house,
Vancouver, B.C., August 15th, 1920.
A. E. Foreman, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit annual report in connection with the above district, comprising
Yale, Chilliwack, Delta, Dewdney, North Vancouver, South Vancouver, New Westminster, and
Richmond Districts.
Yale District (now in District No. 3).—The most important work undertaken was the
construction of the 1-Mile Road, being a continuation of a trunk road surveyed in 1910, and
partially constructed between that date and 1914. The most difficult section, that through the
canyon, was started in the summer of 1919 under the supervision of Assistant Engineer Mackay.
The completion of the road will be of great advantage to Princeton and Merritt.
Considerable clearing and widening was undertaken on the Hope section of the ITope-
Rosedale Road, being portion of the Trans-Provincial Highway.
Chilliwack District.—The Provincial Government participated equally with the City of
Chilliwack in the cost of constructing a bitulithic pavement 2 feet thick on existing macadam
base of the Trans-Provincial Highway. The contractors experienced adverse weather conditions
last fall and the work was suspended until summer of 1920. The old macadam base was of such
construction that the scarifying had to be abandoned, the depressions having been built up with
binder. This brings before us the great outstanding problem of hard-surfacing an old macadam.
The majority of our macadam roads are usually of an average width of 12 to 14 feet when
bituminous hard-surfacing is contemplated with a view to preserving the old macadam. The
minimum width of proposed surface is 15 feet, thus requiring new macadam shoulders to be
built from 2 to 3 feet wide. If the old macadam is uniform and in good condition, same should
he left intact and shoulders added, although this will result in unequal density of base. Hence
the question of preparing the macadam base the previous year to hard-surfacing would be worth
considering.
River-bank Protection.—Early in the year work was completed on the Vedder bank-
protection ; the rock wall had been subjected to a number of flood-waters and has stood the
test satisfactorily.
Delta District.—The most important piece of work undertaken by the Department in this
district was that in connection with hard-surfacing the Trans-Provincial Highway from New
Westminster to South Port Mann Post-office, a distance of 3.27 miles. At the close of 1919 the
rough grading was practically completed. The cutting from Station 56-76 exposed interesting
materials, ranging from fine sand to coarse gravel ; in one section the gravel overlaid a blue silty
material of fine grain containing shells (possibly from the sea) ; none of this material was used
in embankments directly under the pavement. As muskeg was encountered for a distance of
approximately 600 feet, the peat was excavated for a depth of 3 feet and 22 feet wide; a heavy
mattress was spread on the bottom of excavation, upon which was laid cedar puncheon 6 inches
thick and 20 feet long. The whole excavation was back-filled with selected material. The
excavation was well drained into side-ditches.
The balance of work in Delta consisted of the usual maintenance and repairs; 10,576 cubic
yards of gravel were hauled and spread with good results. Approximately 3 miles of old
macadam road were given a coating of gravel. During the year a 2-ton Federal truck was
purchased in lieu of the old Kelly truck and has given good; satisfaction.
A mechanical loader purchased late 'in the summer proved very successful. The Department
has shown the lead to the surrounding municipalities in the matter of installation of modern
plant, such as trucks and loaders.
Considerable dragging of roads was necessary during the winter months, and in this
connection I strongly advocate the purchase of a heavy tractor for use in hauling road-graders.
The bridges in Chilliwack and Delta were maintained in good condition throughout the year.
Careful surveys have been made for the location of Agassiz and Rosedale Landings.
Harrison-Chilliwack,   a   subsidized  ferry,   has  continued  to  give  fair   service.    At  Mission- Riverside the landings have been maintained in good condition; the old carriages, having proved
a failure, are to be replaced with ones of better design to suit the new ferry. Barnston Island
Ferry was in operation on same basis as preceding years.
Ladner-Woodward Ferry.—In July, 1919, the old ferry " Wm. H. Ladner " was replaced by
the steel boat S.S. " Beaver." This boat has given continuous good service. As soon as the
new boat was placed on the run a schedule of charges was put into operation.
Dewdney District.—In this district the roads and bridges were maintained in excellent
condition. The Dewdney Trunk Road continues to carry heavy motor-truck traffic, necessitating
continual maintenance throughout the year.
During the year the loco Road was completed to the railway-track, thus connecting the oil
plant with Port Moody, Westminster, and Vancouver. The old road was in a most dangerous
location, crossing the railway at three level crossings.    The new location has one level crossing.
The use of Nicomen gravel for resurfacing has been continued with excellent results. Over
5,000 cubic yards have been hauled and placed on the roads. Ordinary gravel used, 2,900 cubic
yards; crushed rock, 2,500 cubic yards. The 2-ton Federal truck purchased for this district has
given good results.
North Vancouver District.—With the exception of hard-surface pavement in the City and
District of North Vancouver, very little new-construction-work was carried out in this district.
The district vote was ample to carry out the usual maintenance. Numerous requests came from
settlers in this district for the construction of roads, but the majority of these were not presently
warranted.
Over 1,000 lineal feet of bridges were replaced with permanent fills at a cost less than the
amount required to repair old structures. The Moodyville Trestle was an example of poor
location; over 650 feet of trestle has been replaced by a permanent fill. An amount of $4,000
could have been expended in repairing the old structure, whereas the permanent fill was made
for $3,250.
The Department participated in the cost on a 50-50 basis with the City and District of
North Vancouver in the hard-surfacing of Marine Drive from Lonsdale Avenue to the western
limit of the District of North Vancouver, a distance of 2.4 miles. A standard bitulithic pavement
2 inches thick was laid on the old macadam base. The base was scarified and new rock added
where necessary, making o solid foundation. It was found advisable to scarify portion of the
base on the western section of the work, the depressions being filled with binder. Altogether
this work is a good example of bituminous pavement, every skill being used in its construction.
A number of automobiles and light trucks have been introduced into the Gibson-Sechelt
and Squamish sections of this district, which will necessitate a larger expenditure on the roads
in these sections. With the exception of Pemberton Meadows, all the roads have been maintained
in a condition suited for the traffic.
Particular mention should be made of Pemberton Meadows Road, located alongside the
Lillooet River, which every year overflows and destroys any work done on the road. Large
expenditures have been made in the past, but owing to the conditions stated no permanent work
is in evidence. So long as the present river conditions exist the highway cannot permanently
be established. A survey will he made of the valley with a view to relocating the road, but
until river-bank protection is considered we cannot look for a satisfactory highway—a matter
which affects the farmers vitally.
South Vancouver District.—The principal works carried out were resurfacing River Road
from Fraser Avenue to Point Grey Municipality and Fraser Avenue from Fifty-ninth Avenue to
River Road, the former work being tarvia flush-coated on the old macadam base, depressions
filled with medium-sized rock and Tarvia " X." The latter is asphaltic macadam on the old
macadam base. These two sections will require to be carefully maintained each year; spending
large sums on repairing these old surfaces has resulted in restoring practically abandoned roads
to their place amongst first-class pavements, and the increased traffic is such that, unless close
inspection is given and repairs carried out when necessary, our work is absolutely nullified. I
would strongly recommend that an annual inspection be made of all resurface-work with a
view to seeing that the maintenance is carried out by the responsible party.
New Westminster District.—The principal works carried out were resurfacing *River Road
in D.L. 172 and the north approach to Westminster Bridge, the former being a gravel base bound
with tarvia, the latter being tarvia macadam.    The River Road has withstood the traffic and Island Highway.     Dumping concrete on sub-grade.
Island Highway.    Preparing to commence concrete
operations after lunch.  11 Geo. 5
Report op Engineer, District No. 3.
D 11
heavy frosts, with little damage to the surface. The bridge approach has carried all the heavy
traffic from the Fraser Valley and the local traffic to the Canadian National and Great Northern
Railway depots.
Richmond District.—The work for the fiscal year consisted in general repairs to Marine
Drive in Point Grey, the construction of two crib's for the protection of the roadway at the
Davis property, and one crib near to LeFevre property to prevent the caving of the road. As
an additional protection to take care of drainage, a galvanized pipe suspended from a 1-inch
cable was installed west of the wash-out adjacent to the Davis property. It is hoped by this
means to effectively stop the erosion of the bank.
Paving on No. 3 Road, Lulu Island, was extended an additional 2.7 miles, the northern half
being an aspbaltic concrete surface 2 inches thick, 16 feet wide; the southern half being a refined
tar concrete known as " Lithta."
General repairs were carried out on the Eraser Avenue Bridge, including the raising of
swing-span which had sagged.
An asphaltic concrete wearing surface was laid on the decking of Eburne Bridge for a
length of 100 feet and has proven entirely satisfactory. General to all districts, the very
severe frosts of last winter proved disastrous to the roads, necessitating heavy expenditures
for dragging, etc. Particular attention is being given to the matter of adequate drainage for
the roads; there is no need to enlarge on this point. Very often a uniform surface pleasing
in appearance is placed before any other requirement, with poor results; in this district drainage
has been given first consideration.
The increased mileage of permanent pavements now under contract has placed heavy
responsibilities on the assistants in charge of the districts where these pavements are being
laid. It is a high tribute to them that, in addition to their ordinary district work, they carried
out the details required iii paving contracts in a highly capable manner. This report would be
incomplete without reference to the loyalty and co-operation I have received from the Assistant
Engineers and General Foreman Wylie, without which I would be unable to carry out my
duties. There never was a time in the history of road-building in this Province where so much
responsibility rested on the Engineers, for modern traffic has demanded the highest type of
road-construction in every detail.
I express my appreciation for the courtesy and encouragement I have received from the
Department.
Respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
P. Philip,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 3.
District Engineer's Office,
Kamloops, B.C., November 30th, 1920.
G. P. Napier, Esq.,
Assistant Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit annual report for year 1919-1920.
During the early part of the fiscal year the fill across the reserve slough was finally surfaced
and opened for traffic, thus cutting out a heavy yearly bridge maintenance as well as the regular
renewals.
Throughout the year 600 miles of road had grader or drag work done on them and 25 miles
were gravelled. In addition to this, 24% miles of our main highways were reconstructed and
surfaced. The reconstruction on this work consisted of reduction of grades, better alignment,
and better drainage.
In Salmon Arm Municipality two-thirds of a mile of macadam was laid on a 50-50 basis
with the municipality. In this connection it was found that the crusher plant used was
inadequate and plans are being laid to have better equipment on the work in 1920-21.
General repairs to culverts, wash-outs, etc., were carried out over the 1,400 miles of roads
in the Kamloops District. D 12 Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Construction consisted of three-quarters of a mile on the Campbell Meadows Road and
three-quarters of a mile on the Meadows Creek Road at Celista. The Chase Creek Road, which
consisted of very heavy rock-work, was brought nearly to completion and will be finished
next year.
During the late fall many surveys were made, so that a comprehensive programme for
1920-21 could be carried out.
The maintenance for bridges in Kamloops District for the past year, considering the number
of structures, was very light, running well under $6,000. The Pritchard Bridge was started
and completed during the year; it is a swing-span structure and about 1,200 feet over all, and
was built by contract. This bridge filled a long-standing need in the South Thompson section.
» Eleven ferries were operated during the year and gave general satisfaction. Heavy repairs
were required at Mount Olie and Blackpool, and these ferries are now in first-class shape.
In Lillooet District the greater part of the work consisted of general repairs. Some 300
miles of road were covered by grader-gangs. The main Cariboo Road was gravelled between
the 100-Mile and the 105-Mile posts, also from Clinton south for several miles. The main piece
of construction carried on in this district was the outlet between Criss Creek and Kamloops.
This road was temporarily connected at Frog Creek, but in the future should be carried through
to connect with Criss Creek Settlement at or near Alexander's.
Considerable bridge-work and cribbing had to be done at Gunn Creek, a tributary of Bridge
River. This stream had been continually giving us trouble, but we now believe we have the
situation in hand. The bridge across North Forks was also renewed and raised to a higher
level, making a better connection with the road, which before had an almost impossible grade
at the east approach.
Ferries were renewed at both Big Bar and High Bar. The sites of both of these ferries
were changed to what we considered safer water, and are now giving entire satisfaction.
Respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
G. B. Whitehead,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 4.
District Engineer's Office,
Penticton, B.C., December 3rd, 1920.
G. P. Napier, Esq.,
Assistant Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith my general report on the work done in the above district for
the fiscal year 1919-20.
Roads.—During the above season about 14 miles of new roads were constructed, making a
total of some 2,294 miles for the whole district. About 104 miles were gravelled 4 inches deep
for an approximate width of 10 feet. This is in addition to general repairs carried out on the
total mileage. A considerable sum was expended on improving the. grades and alignment of the
existing roads.
In the more settled parts of the district we are having to contend with increasing volume
of heavy traffic. Some trucks carry a net load of 6 to 7 tons, and we are coming to the point
where main trunk roads will require a permanent system of maintenance; that is to say, section
crews will have to be engaged permanently to keep the main highways in a passable condition.
In connection with this it is earnestly to be hoped that an Act will be passed regulating the
loads to be carried on these trucks.
Labour conditions during the past year have been far from satisfactory. In certain portions
it was almost impossible to obtain either men or teams from the settlers in the vicinity.
To the best of my knowledge, there has been no very serious criticism offered by the public
generally on the condition of the roads as a whole, but a more systematic method of maintenance
would undoubtedly give better satisfaction and would be less expensive in the long run.
?Y<m7s.—About 890 miles of trails are kept in a more or less satisfactory state of repair
as occasion demands;   a  considerable amount  of this work  being  done under  the "Mines Island Highway.     Screening, tamping, and spading concrete.
Island Highway.    Curing concrete.  11 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer, District No. 4. D 13
Development Act" for the convenience of and to assist the prospectors, etc. The keeping-open
of these trails is also of great assistance to the Fire Rangers, and it is recommended that an
effort should be made by this Department to open up trails to all large timber areas.
Bridges.—During the past year thirteen bridges were renewed and ninety-two repaired, the
largest being the bridge across the Shuswap River at Enderby, which was built by contract at
a cost of $16,400, or $23.23 per running foot. Considering the prices of material and labour, this
may be considered very reasonable.
Most of the other renewals were small spans of 19 to 40 feet, except the Lynch Creek Bridge,
which contained a Howe-truss span of 100 feet in length. The cost of this bridge was $31.25
per lineal foot.
In view of the frictioning of the floor-beams by the operation of heavy trucks, a stronger
type of the floor system is to be recommended.
Ferries.—In this district both local steamboat services and ferries are subsidized by the
Department. In the case of the former the idea is to help settlement and business where the
building of roads is not possible. The ferries are virtually part of the system of through roads.
The following ferries are in this district:—
Shuswap Lake Steamboat Service: Takes in all points of the Great Shu&wap Lakes, as
traffic requires;  operates the year round, except when lakes frozen over.
Kelowna-Westbank Ferry: This is for the convenience of all classes of traffic on the main
trunk road running north and south, and can be said to be part of the system of main trunk
roads.    It is used the year round and is one of the most-travelled ferries in the Interior.
Summerland-Naramata Ferry: Maintained for through connection for the settlements at
the south end of Okanagan Lake. Saves a rouud of about twenty miles; operated the entire
year.
Dog Lake Steamboat Service: For passengers and freight to the country south of Penticton
and settlements on Dog Lake;  not operated in the winter months.
As very few complaints have been received by me during the past year, I have every reason
to believe that a sufficient service is being maintained by all of the above ferries.
Wharves.—The only two wharves now under the jurisdiction of this Department are the
Kelowna and Westbank Ferry Wharves; these will both have to be renewed during the coming
season, for which provision has been made in the Estimates.
River-bank Protection.—We have had very little occasion to expend money for the above
purpose in this district, with the exception of some small sums for a number of bridge approaches
on Mission Creek.
Surveys.—During the past year 160 miles of the Trans-Provincial Road was surveyed under
my direction, the detailed plans and profiles of the approximate cost being submitted to the
Department. These include: Christina Lake-Rossland survey, 41.75 miles; Fraser Canyon,
94.25 miles;   Osoyoos-9-Mile Creek Road, 13.40 miles;   total, 159.40 miles.
In addition to this, I made a careful reconnaissance of 250 miles in order to determine the
most feasible route before the location parties were placed in the field. The average cost per
mile, including detailed plans, estimates, etc., is approximately $210 per mile. It is submitted
that this is a very reasonable cost considering the increased wages and cost of supplies, and will
compare very favourably with the expenditure on this work in former years.
General.—Speaking generally and after reviewing carefully the entire situation, I do not
think the public would have anything very serious to complain of in the administration of this
district so far as I am concerned. I am led to believe this by the lack of complaints which
I have received during the last two years.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
W. K. Gwyer,
District Engineer. D 14
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 5.
District Engineer's Office,
Court-house,
Nelson, B.C., September 14th, 1920.
A. E. Foreman, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit general report dealing with the work carried out in Engineering
District No. 5 during the fiscal year 1919-20.
Roads and Trails.—This was the first year since the reorganization of the Department that
it might be said we had sufficient appropriations to begin carrying out permanent work, and by
March 31st, 1920, we were enabled to leave several stretches of our main trunk roads very much
improved. Definite plans were also made to adopt and follow up a policy of doing only sufficient
repair-work on lateral or secondary roads to keep them passable, thus enabling us to set aside
as large a sum as possible for the main trunk roads.
In the Nelson Electoral District the entire appropriation was spent on general maintenance
and gravelling. The maintenance-work was done chiefly by use of a four-horse grader, with
which most of the streets in the Fairvew Addition were rounded up at a cost of about $150
per mile.
In the Trail Electoral District, in which are the heaviest travelled roads in West Kootenay,
in addition to general repairs the work done consisted in widening and gravelling. As we had
the use of a 2-ton Federal truck tor a short time in the late fall, only short sections were
gravelled where the gravel was conveniently situated. In this short time we demonstrated the
saving that could be made with truck-haulage as against team-work, and it is our intention to
have loading-platforms and bunkers installed at all suitable gravel-pits, so that gravelling costs
can be reduced to a minimum.
On the trunk road from Nelson to Trail, a length of 45 miles, it will be necessary to make
several diversions as soon as funds are available, and at these points we did only sufficient work
to keep the surface fit for traffic, thus avoiding needless expenditure on widening on the existing
location. Other stretches of the road, however, were widened, ditched, gravelled, and kept in
good condition for the ever-increasing auto traffic.
As we had a good organization available, a start was made on the Thrums-Brilliant Road
and good progress made throughout the winter. This 4%-mile connection will prove a great
boon to the travelling public in forming a direct outlet from Nelson to the Boundary country.
On the road from Trail to Columbia Gardens (the Trail-Sayward Road), and on which
there is considerable local jitney traffic, as well as through traffic, decided improvements were
made. Side-hill cuts were widened out, loose sand was cleaned off, and while the good fall
weather lasted gravel surfacing was put on by truck-haul.
From Ymir to Columbia Gardens, which is part of the Nelson-Waneta Road, much improvement was made on the road-surface, while from Columbia Gardens to Waneta the road was kept
in good repair.
The Pend d'Oreille River Road, 18 miles in length, extending from Waneta to the Salmon
River, is, on the whole, poorly located and entirely unsuitable for auto traffic, especially at its
upper end, and therefore only sufficient work was done to keep the road open for traffic. The
Nelson-Balfour Road was widened in places, also gravelled and generally improved.
In the Rossland Electoral District the rock-surfacing of the Rossland-Trail Road was
continued, 1,069 tons of crushed rock having been supplied to us by the Consolidated Mining
and Smelting Company at an average cost of 5S cents per ton f.o.b.« Warfield Siding.
From Rossland to Patterson the road was widened and ditched and some gravelling done
near the Patterson end. All the other roads in the Rossland District were repaired where
necessary, considerable attention having been given to those where ranchers required to get
in and out.
In the Kaslo Electoral District one-third of the appropriation was spent between Sirdar and
Goatfell and around Creston, making necessary diversions on the trunk road, and building 1 mile
of approach roads to the new No. 3 Bridge across Goat River near Eriekson. In connection with
the latter work, this is the third road to be built to a bridge crossing in this vicinity. Trans-Provincial Highway, Thrums-Brilliant section.     View before  construction.
'.,
Trans-Proyincial Highway, Thrums-Brilliant section.     View after construction.  .
11 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer, District No. 5. D  15
The old low-level bridge built fourteen years ago is still in place, but the grades on the
approach roads are 14 per cent, in clay loam and are prohibitive for traffic in wet weather. To
. obviate this a high-level bridge was built in 1916, but it went out with high water in June of
the same year, and even had the bridge remained it was not at an elevation sufficient to reduce
all of the grades. The new bridge, the site for which was chosen after careful examination and
survey, is at such an elevation that the roads leading out from the canyon have a ruling grade
of 8 per cent. This is one of the greatest improvements of any which have been made by the
Department in the engineering district, and as the soldiers' settlement area develops their
shipping-point will be Erickson Station and their route by way of the new bridge.
All the other roads in this locality in use by the public had sufficient work done on them to
keep them open for traffic, but, as previously pointed out, gravel is hard to obtain for resurfacing,
and it is our intention in the coming fiscal year to macadamize portions of the main road, particularly in the neighbourhood of Creston and Erickson, and a rock-crushing plant will be in
operation for this work during the summer of 1920.
Kaslo and Ainsworth were connected up by the construction by contract of 4 miles of road.
At the other points in the Kaslo District, such as Crawford Bay, Kootenay Bay, Boswell, and
Ainsworth, also in the Lardeau and Trout Lake section of the district, all roads in use were kept
open and in fair condition for traffic.
In the Revelstoke Electoral District the only new work carried out consisted in the building
of small branch roads for settlers, but good wrork was done gravelling the main roads east, west,
and south of the town, also the lower part of the Big Bend Road.
In the outlying sections of the district between Taft and Sicamous,  also around Hall's
'   Landing, Arrowhead, Galena Bay, Beaton, and Camborne, repair-work and small road extensions
were made to meet the needs of the people as far as our appropriation would permit.    The
principal undertaking was the extension of the Revelstoke West Road from Boulder, which road
will ultimately provide through communication with the Okanagan.
The Arrowhead North Road was also opened up from Arrowhead to the existing road south
of Hall's Landing Ferry, thus affording an outlet by road to the increasing settlers in this
district.
In the Slocan Electoral District most of the money was spent on maintenance, but a big
improvement was made on the New Denver-Rosebery Road by the building of three-quarters of
a mile of a diversion and reducing the grade from 16 and 17 per ceut. to a maximum of 9
per cent.
In the Slocan Valley and in the Arrow Lake section sufficient work wras done on repairs to
existing roads and oil the construction of new branch roads to meet the needs of the communities.
In all of the electoral districts the main trails were cleaned out, and in the Slocan District
alone the sum of $2,344 was spent on this work, while in the Kaslo District it cost $2,504.
Bridges.—The following truss bridges were rebuilt during 1919-20:—
Revelstoke Electoral District: Greely Bridge, one 120-foot Howe truss and 97 feet of
approaches.
Kaslo Electoral District: No. 3 Bridge, Goat River-Erickson, one 150-foot Howe truss on
concrete piers (only partly constructed in 1919-20) ; Woodbury Creek Bridge, one 65-foot King
truss and approaches.
Besides the building of these truss spans, several new stringer bridges were constructed and
necessary repairs made to other structures.
In connection with our truss bridges, the new standard plans prepared by the Department
are found to be a great improvement on the old style, especially the substitution of iron clamps
and steel bars in place of the wooden clamps and the covering of all the chord-leaves with
galvanized iron, which will assuredly lengthen the life of those structures.
Practically all of our bridge-work was carried out by day-labour under a competent bridge
foreman, and although the cost of some of the work seemed high, we have proven that we can
do the work better and at a lower figure than submitted by contractors. My opinion is that
while cheaper work can be got by day-labour on truss spans, the same thing does not apply to
trestle or stringer bridges, because bridge-framers are highly paid men, and while it is necessary
to have them on truss spans, they are too expensive to put on to other classes of bridge-work,
and contract-work on these might be more economical. D 16
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Ferries.—No new ferries were installed during 1919-20. On May 17th, 1919, the ferry across
the Columbia River at Castlegar made its first trip, and, besides proving satisfactory, the traffic
returns from month to month demonstrate its usefulness.
During the winter months we had considerable trouble operating the Nelson Ferry and the
Hall's Landing Ferry owing to the freezing-over of the waterways, and while the former only
lost two or three days, the latter was laid up for several weeks, the traffic crossing on the ice in
the meantime.
General.—Most of our old foremen were retained, especially those engaged on the trunk
roads, and in this way we are getting gradually into better methods of handling our work.
There was never a greater need for road machinery than at the present time, but some of
the general foremen use the machinery they have to much better advantage than others, and in
their districts the results are plainly evident.
One thing I would strongly recommend is the provision of clerical assistance to each general
foreman in the summer months, so that he can devote his time to the supervision of his outside
work.
Meantime, I have one general foreman who types all his own vouchers and pay-rolls, keeps
a careful record of all expenditures, types all correspondence, and spends any time that is left
on supervision.
I have to record the co-operation throughout the year of all the general foremen, all of
whom I have found willing and anxious to get results, also the help obtained from the various
Government Agents and their assistants.
Respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
W.m. Ramsay,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 6.
District Engineer's Office,
Cranhhook, B.C., October 7th, 1920.
A. E. Foreman, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the following report for the fiscal year 1919-20:—
A general description of the district (its extent and topographical features, with their
bearings on the construction and maintenance of public works) having been given in the report
of 1918-19, I will confine my remarks to the work that has been done during the fiscal year.
First of all, I wish to express my appreciation of the kindness and help given to me by the
Department and by my predecessor, and the assistants, general foremen, and Government Agents,
upon my taking office as District Engineer in what was to me mostly unfamiliar territory, at so
late a date in the fiscal year—namely December 1st, 1919.
Roads.—Twelve hundred miles of road are kept opeii for 'traffic in Engineering District No. 6.
This mileage was taken care of for the year in question; those portions upon which the auto
traffic was heavy demanding and receiving special attention.
Quite apart from the maintenance and following a general programme of progressive
improvement, 30 miles of road were surfaced with gravel and 3iy2 miles of road constructed.
Trails.—Approximately 800 miles of trail are travelled by the various prospectors and
hunters throughout the district, hut only about 10 per cent, required attention and S3 miles
were repaired during the year.
Bridges.—There are in the district 372 bridge structures. Of these, sixty-five are truss
bridges, 300 'stringer and trestle bridges, and one cable bridge. The longest bridge is Elkmouth
No. 8, in the Fernie District, consisting of sixty 16%-foot trestle spans, one 60- to 63-foot King
truss, and two 140- to 144-foot Howe-truss spans;   total length, 1,341 feet.
The largest Howe-truss span is on Elko Bridge No. 6, with span of 160 feet. There are
numerous Howe-truss spans of 150 to 154 feet. All these bridges were taken care of without
loss or interruption to traffic during the high-water season. " *'■..' 'Vl^2?"    £.      '  —   ^?        ' s>     s
60-foot King truss, Mount Robson, Fort George District.     Built by day-labour.
Goat River Bridge, Erickson, Kaslo District.     150-foot span, built by day-labour.  11 Geo. 5 Report of Engineer, District No. 7. D 17
In addition to the maintenance and protection, new Howe-truss bridges were built by contract
across the Blaeberry River on the Golden-Donald Lower Road and across the Elk River at
Fernie.
Tenders were called for new bridge-construction at Golden, over the Kicking Horse River;
at Brisco, over the Columbia River;  and at Dutch Creek.
Under day-labour Horsethief Bridge was completed; three new stringer bridges were built
on the Sanborn Road; a new bridge was built over the North Fork of the Spillimacheen River
on the Carbonate-Spruce Camp Trail; Fairmont Bridge over the Columbia River was renewed
by a 60-foot King truss; a trestle bridge on Toby Road was renewed; a 50-foot stringer span
over the Spillimacheen River was reinforced by trussing; a new trestle bridge was built over
Elk log-channel at West Fernie;  and a new 50-foot King truss over Fairy Creek.
River-bank Protection.—The work of protecting the town of Golden from flood-water of the
Kicking Horse River was carried on in continuance of the scheme commenced in the previous
fiscal year, and resulted successfully in safeguarding the town and adjacent roads from damage.
Protection-work at Fernie, likewise commenced in the previous fiscal year, was continued, with
equally successful results. Other cases of needed river-bank protection at Natal and West Fernie
were looked into and reported on with a view to doing the work in the next fiscal year.
Ferries.—There are three ferries in the district—two at Brisco, which have been in for some
years, and one near Donald, installed this year. These are small cable-ferries, operated by the
settlers themselves and not requiring a ferryman, the only charges against them being for upkeep,
new cable occasionally and sundries. One of the Brisco ferries was given a complete overhauling
this year.
Surveys and Location of Roads.—Nearly all the surveys required for new bridges and for
roads constructed to date have been made by the staff, but in connection with the scheme of
permanent improvements to the primary highways, involving about 150 miles of relocation,
arrangements were made towards the end of the fiscal year to employ a locating engineer, who
is now busily engaged on this work.
Owing to the fact of my late arrival in taking over the district, in which my first duties
were to familiarize myself with the territory and to investigate the many requirements for the
coming fiscal year, I am not able to do justice to the district in the report herein respectfully
submitted.
Yours obediently,
J. C. Brady,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 7.
District Engineer's Office,
Prince Rupert, B.C., September 10th, 1920.
A. E. Foreman, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit report for the fiscal year 1919-20:—
Organization.—A few necessary changes were made in the personnel of the Public Works
staff in this district. Two new general foremen were appointed for the Atlin District, replacing
others. Also a number of the former local foremen were not reappointed. In many cases they
were replaced by returned soldiers. Returned men were given a preference wherever possible,
and it is worthy of note that they gave, on the whole, very satisfactory service.
Labour Conditions.—Labour conditions were worse than in 1918-19. There was a scarcity
of men in all but a few sections. It was found necessary to increase the rate of pay to conform
to rates paid generally. But the disturbing factor was the unsettled state of labour. It was
hard to get men to stay on the job or to render a fair day's work. The strike in sympathy
with Winnipeg resulted in causing a serious delay in the forwarding of much-needed plant and
materials. The effect was to produce a noticeable falling-off in the amount of work accomplished
per man per day.
Weather Conditions.—Generally speaking, the weather was favourable. All through the
Interior there was a light rainfall.    Materials  were for the most part in fine condition for D 18
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
handling and very little time was lost to rain. Winter, however, closed in very early. There
was a heavy snowfall recorded over the whole district on October 6th, and from that date on
it was impossible to continue work in some sections.
Costs.—The above conditions served to increase costs. This increase is estimated at 20 per
cent, over that for the previous year, and was due partly to the increase in wages and materials
and partly to the reduced amount of work done per day per man. This was not peculiar to
Government work;  employers generally complained of the same condition.
In connection with this matter, it should be stated that the cost of supervision, including
the salaries of general foremen, Assistant District Engineer, District Engineer, and their staffs,
travelling expenses, office expenses, etc., equalled 4.6S per cent, of the cost of the work supervised.
Roads and Trails.—The appropriations for roads and trails were considerably increased 'over
those for 1918-19. Against this must be set the increased cost of and the increased necessity
for new roads. The reconstruction and maintenance of existing roads and trails, as usual,
absorbed a large part of our funds. The percentages are as follows: Construction, 55 per cent.;
reconstruction, 20 per cent.;  and maintenance, 25 per cent.
A considerable mileage of new work was undertaken. The prospect of obtaining substantial
aid from the Federal Government resulted in a renewed effort to construct the remaining sections
of the trunk road from Endako to Hazelton, thus making this road a part of the Provincial main
highway system, and incidentally providing a much-needed road to new settlers. Of the 16 miles
between Burns Lake and Rose Lake, 8 miles were constructed. In addition, 6 miles of the North
Francois Lake Road were built. This latter road connects with the trunk road at Burns Lake
and will form an important part of the main system.
Owing to extensive development of mineral properties in the Portland Canal section, and
particularly on the Salmon River, a lot of new construction was made necessary. The Premier
Gold Mining Company, with the assistance of the Provincial Mines Department, completed the
construction of the Salmon River Road from Hyder, Alaska, to the Premier Mine. In order to
permit of traffic and business originating on the British Columbia side of the line reaching the
Canadian port of Stewart, it became imperative to build a mile of road from Hyder to the Stewart
Wharf. This section of 1 mile is all heavy granite-rock cutting, with the exception of three
trestles totalling 890 feet in length. So far this is the most expensive mile of road built in
this district.
The above are the main sections of new work carried out, but in addition a great number
of short roads to settlements and trails to mining properties were constructed. As far as possible
new work was confined to the main roads and trails.
Reconstruction of old roads was carried out as far as funds would permit. Special attention
was paid to the elimination of steep grades and to widening, crowning, and ditching. It is the
intention to put all the roads into such a condition that they can be repaired by machinery and
ultimately surfaced with gravel without any further regrading.
The maintenance-work was lighter than usual and it was possible to do a greater portion of
it with graders and drags. Motors are being used more generally, maintenance of dirt roads thus
becoming more difficult each year. In the near future it will be necessary to commence surfacing
all the main roads with gravel. To date very little of this has been done, because it seemed
better policy to apply all our appropriations to regrading and ditching and at a later date undertake extensive surfacing with up-to-date equipment for handling materials. It is not proposed
to do any gravelling by hand, nor is it proposed to get expensive equipment until there is considerable work provided for and ready.
With necessary additional assistance it was possible to carry out some much-needed survey
work.    The location of new roads and trails was pushed well ahead of the construction.
Bridges.—A great number of bridges were built by the Department during the years 1910 to
1913. Numbers of these have outlived their usefulness and immediate renewal became necessary.
As far as possible standard designs were used. With a view to making the structures as
permanent as timber structures can be made, the best materials obtainable were used. More
attention was paid to the framing and the covering with sheet metal of parts liable to rot.
Owing to the increasing trouble with ice in all the larger creeks and rivers, it is becoming
more necessary to pay more attention to substructures. It is doubtful whether the use of timber
piers can be longer continued safely. Big Bar Perry, Lillooet District, spring, 1920.
Big Bar Ferry, Lillooet District, spring, 1920.  11 Geo. 5
Report of Engineer, District No. 8.
D 19
Ferries.—With the exception of a new engine provided for the Francois Lake Ferry, no new
work was done on any of the ferries. More attention was paid to landings and approaches than
formerly.    In some instances there is still carelessness shown in the handling of the ferries.
Wharves.—A now float was put in at Queen Charlotte City and a new fish-shed erected on
the Prince Rupert Wharf.    All wharves were kept in good repair.
River-protection.—Small amounts were spent in a number of places on the removal of
log-jams and the mattressing of banks. A new quarried-rock dam was built to control the
Necleetsconnay River above the town of Bella Coola and protect the various public works in
the vicinity. Less trouble was experienced with high water in the rivers than usual. On the
other hand, ice did considerable damage to bridges all over the district.
General.—I beg to again record the support and encouragement given by the headquarters
staff and the co-operation of other departments, and the commendable service rendered by my
office staff and field organization generally. A very hard year's work was doue under conditions
that were unsettled and difficult.
Respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
A. L. Carruthers,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF ENGINEER, DISTRICT No. 8.
District Engineer's Office,
South Fort George, B.C., August 4th, 1920.
A. E. Foreman, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report for the fiscal year ending March 31st,
1920.
In a general way, and as in past years, the work was necessarily confined chiefly to general
repairs to existing roads, although several miles of new settlement roads were opened up; and
while a good deal of the work carried out will be more or less of a permanent nature, yet there
is still to be evidenced in all parts of the district the expensive manner of keeping some of the
longer roads open for traffic by the unavoidable " annual patch " method, partly due to lack of
funds, but principally to poor location in the first instance.
The outstanding drawback to carrying out any amount of permanent work is the ever-
increasing demand for new roads for settlers, many of which call for expensive construction to
provide even a sleigh-road, and when this is done the spring and fall weather conditions make
it so difficult to travel that they cannot pull an empty wagon through. They usually advise that
unless the Government improves it further they will have to get out of the country or lose their
crops, etc. On the contrary, Central British Columbia, of which this district forms a large part,
is a comparatively new country and is being gradually settled with a good class of farmer, and
in the majority of cases some reasonable outlet has had to be provided, so that, until some other
restriction is placed on the land open for pre-emption which would tend to discourage isolated
settlement, it is doubtful if this expense can be much reduced.
Roads.—Material improvements to the existing main roads were made during the year as
far as grade and alignment are concerned, but it was not possible to undertake any surfacing,
apart from short stretches here and there, which had to be done to make a passable road.
Several short diversions were also completed.
Cariboo District.—The Main Cariboo Road became subject to very heavy traffic, due to the
commencement of activities by the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, and a considerable amount of
drainage was caused by the operation of heavy motor-trucks.
A large part of this road has not been surfaced, and until this is done there is no doubt of
the fact that it will always be badly cut up after rain, the ruts becoming so deep in places as to
even defy efficient work with a road-drag, as well as remaining a continual bill of expense to
maintain.
The southern end of this road, between Soda Creek and the 52nd parallel, has had more
attention than the section north of Soda Creek, and on account of the natural gravel-belts which
it traverses a large portion of the road requires the minimum of attention. D 20
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
A patrol system was again used on this stretch with much success. Between Dog Prairie
and Quesnel 4 miles were gravelled, the work being carried on until freeze-up. Between Quesnel
and Barkerville only necessary repairs were carried out.
The Main Chilcotin Road wras much improved, especially with the surfacing of the upper
part of Borland's Hill, an excellent rock-pit having been discovered practically on the summit.
The west end of this road, between Redstone and Chezacut, was made passable for auto traffic,
much good work having been accomplished.
An important diversion was commenced on the road to Harpers Camp, which does away
with what is locally known as " Gumbo Hill," which has been a source of annoyance to the
travelling public ever since it was built. The diversion affords a good route and has been much
appreciated.
The commencement of the new trunk road between Quesnel and South Fort George was
one of the most important works, and while no finished road-was made between Quesnel and Big
Prairie a winter road was opened up. This road, which is really an extension of the old Cariboo
Road, will eventually link up with the construction which has been commenced from the Fort
George end and provide a first-class trunk highway, which will no doubt prove to be of great
assistance in opening up North and Central British Columbia, which is now practically cut off
from the remainder of the Province as far as highways are concerned. When completed, this
road will be some 15 miles shorter than the present route via Blackwater.
Fort George District.—In the northern end of the district the important main roads rediating
from South Fort George were generally improved where necessary. On the Summit Lake Road
a 4-mile diversion was opened up and graded, giving a more direct route to this important lake,
which is the commencement of navigation to the Peace River country. The freight traffic on this
road is fairly heavy and is steadily increasing.
The road leading west from South Fort George to Vanderhoof and the settlement roads in
the vicinity of Vanderhoof were all more or less materially improved or extended to cope with
the requirements of new settlers coming into the country.
At Fort Fraser similar work was carried out on the main travelled roads and good results
were obtained.
The Fort George-Qnesnel Main Trunk Road was extended, 6 miles having been graded.
Right-of-way was slashed to full width for 12 miles and opened up as sleigh-road for 16 miles.
This road was extensively used last winter by settlers and the contractors for the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway. It follows the section-lines due south for 14 miles, which is rather an interesting point as far as British Columbia is concerned, and opens up some 60,000' acres of land-
settlement territory.
The surface of the roads in the immediate vicinity of the City of Prince George are becoming
subject to excessive wear by the greatly increasing number of automobiles and trucks operated
upon them, and it will be necessary to carry out some extensive surfacing in the near future, as
the expense of trying to keep up earth roads is becoming prohibitive.
A tractor was supplied the district for general road-work and was used all summer in
conjunction with an Adams leaning-wheel grader, excellent work being carried out with this
machine where it was possible to use it.
Bridges, Fort George District.—Several truss spans were erected during the season in various
parts of the district, those over the Fraser River at Mount Robson, at Tnrcotte's Gulch, Vanderhoof, and over the Cutbank River in the Peace River Block being the most worthy of mention.
All of these are C0-foot King trusses, the two latter being pile structures.
Numerous small bridges were replaced or repaired, and the usual repairs to existing truss
bridges were carried out;  little or no damage being occasioned by high water.
On account of the enhanced cost of material and general rise in wages, the cost per foot of
the various classes of bridges was quite marked. It is to be noted, however, that better bridges
are now being erected than in former years. Standard designs have been adopted, and it but
remains for careful construction in order to prolong the life of our wooden structures of all types.
Cariboo District.—A truss bridge- made up of one 100-foot Howe truss and two 60-foot King
trusses was erected near Alexis Creek over the Chilcotin River to replace the old structure which
was washed out the previous year. This bridge is well built, and while the lumber was obtained
locally, the balance of the material had to be hauled nearly 170 miles by team-truck. Vanderhoof Bridge.     High water, June, 1920.
Vanderhoof Bridge. June. 1920.     Water.  14 inches below lower chords.  .. <
11 Geo. 5 Report op Supervising Architect. D 21
The existing bridge over the North Fork of the Quesnel River, which is a 90-foot King truss,
was strengthened. This is an exceptionally long span for King-truss design, and, considering
the number of years it has been erected, the material was found to be in good condition. The
construction-work, however, was very poor.
A standard trestle was erected at Williams Lake over Williams Lake Creek to replace the
old bridge, which was unsafe.    Various other bridges were repaired throughout the district.
Ferries.—The ferry as a means of crossing rivers has, unfortunately, still to be considered,
especially in this northern section, where settlement is taking place to a greater extent than in
other parts of the Province. The district being divided as it is by the Fraser, Nechako, and
other large rivers, makes it almost essential that some utility of this kind be provided for settlers,
so that the pontoon ferry has been of great assistance.
Some of the existing crossings have proved to be useless at. certain seasons of the year,
especially at very high water, when the approaches become flooded, or at extreme low water,
when the ferry often cannot land. Where such conditions exist and where settlement is increasing, substitution by the erection of a bridge is no doubt warranted. Designs for a better type
of running-gear have been drawn up, and when installed will be a great improvement over the
system now in use.
The usual river service was maintained by the British Columbia Express Company between
South Fort George and Soda Creek, but was seriously handicapped by the low condition of the
water and the regrettable loss of the subsidized steamer " B.X.," which was wrecked by striking
a rock some 35 miles below South Fort George.
The only new ferry installed this year was over the Quesnel River, IS miles from the town
of Quesnel.
Labour, etc.—The increased cost of labour and the difficulty in getting it proved to be a
great disadvantage. The commencement of railway activities and the usual requirements for
farm-help, etc., all tended to make it practically impossible to keep any organized crews;
consequently the work had to suffer in some parts of the district.
Coupled with the high cost of labour has been the increased cost of material of all kinds,
and where this has had to be shipped in by rail or otherwise the almost prohibitive price has
resulted in the curtailment of all classes of work.
General.—A large number of requests for roads, etc., have been looked into, necessitating
much travelling on the part of all concerned, and from the decreasing number of complaints
received it would appear that improvement in quality and service has been given.
I wish to compliment the general foreman and staff for the unfailing interest they have
shown in the work, and also the head office for the support and encouragement which has always
been so liberally given.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
A. Dixon,
District Engineer.
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISING ARCHITECT.
Supervising Architect's Office,
Victoria, B.C., October 15th, 1920.
A. E. Foreman, Esq.,
Public Works Engineer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report on the work carried out in this office
for the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1920:—
The work in this Branch has considerably increased during this year owing to the increased
building operations carried out by the Government, and it has necessitated taking on additional
assistance in the person of G. S. Ford, who has considerably strengthened the staff and made it
possible for one official to make more frequent inspection of the works during construction.
This is a very necessary part of our duties, as contractors understand that they will have a
thorough check made of their work, and it is of great assistance to the contractors, as new men •
often fail to appreciate our intentions even though stated clearly and shown on drawings. Since it bas been possible to make more frequent trips of inspection, a better class of building
has been erected and reputable men have obtained the work, and a harmonious feeling has existed
between the contractors and the Department.
I would like, however, to suggest that more visits be made to more outlying points on the
Grand Trunk Railway, as I feel sure the results will more than balance the outlay invested.
The work generally was carried out under the following headings:—
Soldier Housing.—Plans and specifications of several different types of houses were prepared
and distributed to all municipalities and cities adopting the scheme, who were at liberty to adopt
them in whole or part, or prepare their own designs with ours as a guide.
In the Municipality of South Vancouver this Branch erected ten houses directly, and the
municipality afterwards continued their erection under their staff. Accompanying is a photograph showing several of these houses erected by this Branch.
Many additional plans were prepared for this municipality and other points, but were not
erected for personal reasons of the parties intending building.
Fairview Demonstration Farm.—Several designs for houses and bills of quantities for same
were prepared for erection on this development-work, which houses, I understand, have been
erected by the officials of the Water Rights Branch.
Schools.—The work generally on schools during this period were additions to existing school-
houses and minor repairs; - plans for five new schools were prepared to be erected during the
coming year.
A twelve-room brick school was designed for the City of Armstrong, due to the consolidation
of the district for school purposes, but the building is to be erected during the coming year.
This school is most modern in plan and equipment, and no doubt is ahead of other schools
throughout the Province, with the exception of those in large cities.
The upkeep and repairs to the Normal Schools at Victoria and Vancouver have been taken
care of by this Branch.
At the request of the Department of Education this office has prepared plans and specifications for school-houses for several municipalities who have erected the buildings themselves, and
also have given them advice with a view to improvements in sanitation, ventilation, and heating.
Boys' Training-school.—It was first proposed to erect the new buildings to house the present
inmates of the Boys' Industrial School on the present site at Point Grey, but later the site was
changed to Coquitlam, adjacent to the Mental Hospital at Essondale, to centralize this class of
work, and owing to the fact of the great facilities that could be given for their training, and a
beautiful site was secured.
The original plans were discarded after a visit from Dr. Clark, of the Dominion Lunacy
Commission, who made a mental survey of the various institutions and recommended segregating
the boys under normal and subnormal headings, and new plans and specifications were prepared
on the lines suggested, at a cost of $260,000, but the buildings are to be erected during the coming
year and comprise three cottages, two for subnormal boys and one for normal, taking care of
fifty boys to a cottage. A dining block and administration building are also included in this
scheme.
According to the report of Dr. Clark and other medical men interested in this work, the
buildings will be ahead of anything on these lines on the continent.
The excavation, foundations, heating, and electrical installations and outside drainage and
roads are being carried out by patient-labour under the supervision of the various tradesmen at
the Mental Hospital, Essondale.
Mental Hospitals, New Westminster, Essondale, and Saanich.—The general upkeep and
maintenance of these buildings was administered by this Branch and several improvements
were made for further increasing the accommodation for patients. Plans were also prepared
for thirty-two attendants' houses, laid out on a town-planning scheme, the building of which is
to be carried out in sections starting next year.
Gao^s.—General minor alterations were carried out to the various lock-ups and gaols,
including Oakalla Prison Farm, and plans prepared for a new lock-up at Hanceville.
Parliament Buildings.—Considerable alterations and repairs were carried out during this
year, including the acoustics and ventilation and redecorating the Legislative Assembly Hall,
which has made a vast improvement to conditions existing previously. 11 Geo. 5
Report of Supervising Architect.
D 23
A start has been made in redecorating the whole of the offices, etc., to these buildings, which
have been in need of it for some time.
Provision for new offices for the Water Rights and Arts and Crafts Association have been
provided by putting a floor over the stack-room to the Library, and which has considerably
reduced the congestion in office accommodation.
During this year this Branch took charge of the various decorations and illuminations, etc.,
for the various celebrations for Royalty and other notables, and including the erection of the
base for the Queen Victoria statue in front of these grounds.
Government House.—This residence was redecorated and provided with new furnishings
where required for the new Lieutenant-Governor, and the greenhouses were completely overhauled
and put in good order.
Agencies and Court-houses.—The general upkeep and repairs to the various Government
Agencies were taken care of by this Branch, and notable alterations made to the Court-house
at Vancouver for the Assessor and Collector, Forestry Department, and police offices.
Whilst at Vernon extensive repairs were carried out to strengthen the roof over the Courtroom, which was in danger of collapse, but has now been placed in such a condition that no
further danger may be expected.
A new Court-house and Government Building have been erected at Ocean Falls.
Hospitals.—At the request of the Hon. the Provincial Secretary several sketch-plans were
prepared for small hospitals for various districts.
General.—Alterations and repairs to other Government work, such as Liquor Vendor's Store,
Labour Bureau, and repairs, alterations, and new furniture required for different offices, have
been carried out under the direction of this office.
During this period the price of material has risen to abnormal heights, and it has been
practically impossible to design buildings with a view to coming within the appropriation allowed
in the Estimates and give the accommodation required.
In conclusion, I wish to thank you, sir, and the Deputy Minister for your assistance and kind
consideration for the staff of this Branch and the interest taken in our work. I also wish to
thank all members of my staff and tradesmen for their loyal support and assistance in the
carrying-on of this Branch.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Yours obediently,
Henry Whittaker,
Supervising Architect. D 24
Public Works Report (1919-20)
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Public Works Report (1919-20).
VALUATION   OF  PLANT,   ETC.
Statement as at Maecii 31st, 1920.
Electoral District.
Alberni 	
Atlin	
Cariboo   	
Chilliwack	
Columbia	
Comox	
Cowichan	
Cranbrook	
Delta	
Dewdney	
Esquimalt	
Fernie	
Fort George	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Islands	
Kamloops	
Kaslo	
Lillooet   	
Nanaimo	
Newcastle	
North Okanagan
North Vancouver .
Omineca	
Prince Rupert
Revelstoke	
Richmond	
Rossland	
Similkameen	
Slocan 	
South Okanagan ..
Trail	
Yale	
Totals.
I 8
3.
11.
9,
10,
3
6,
14,
13,
13
24,
1,
8.
7.
4.
15.
2,
io!
223
320
355
811
076
891
431
510
899
265
384
505
860
,515
,000
533
,621
,571
,344
625
HI
867
800
198
644
597
735
584
629
524
551
$225,979
$ 1,281
2,491
2,248
364
466
1,442
876
1,778
395
381
2.238
353
2,631
339
1,200
720
1,644
1,073
1,045
231
509
750
604
1,097
2,138
1,894
318
78
2,060
1,081
442
1,136
2,175
$37,478
Camp
Equipment.
I  139
1,459
2,004
35
489
177
30
1,847
80
l,i90
848
2,689
216
800
1,659
127
715
' 40
266
475
2,569
725
652
123
39
600
133
471
687
1,444
22,728
Horses and
Harness.
730
3,675
674
275
620
1,700
25
587
$15,475
Total for
Equipment.
$ 7,643
8,000
19,282
10,210
11,705
5,510
7,337
18,135
14,374
13,646
27,812
2,706
19,455
8,070
6,000
1,253
20,544
3,771
13,293
231
1,174
9,127
2,946
11,166
7,086
7,i90
5,038
117
7,395
4,798
9,542
10,347
6,757
$301,660
Total tor
Materials 0221
hand only.
121
1,085
799
674
156
394
370
147
055
530
146
•67
558
388
198
220
19
251
17,168
Grand total, plant, etc	
n materials only.
.$301,660 00
.    17,168 00 Ford trucks hauling stone, Alberni District, Vancouver Island.
2%-ton Federal truck being loaded from a gravel-bin fed by scrapers from above.  ■
11 Geo. 5
Statement op Expenditure.
D 27
7,920 00
2,947 45
STATEMENT   OF   EXPENDITURE.
Salaries and Expenses.
Vote 230—Minister's Office.
Salaries   	
Expenses:
Travelling    $2,365 60
Office supplies          581 85
i
Total 	
Vote 231—General Office.
Salaries    «   $
Expenses:
Travelling     $2,403 40
Office supplies     5,756 99
Total    $
Vote 232—District Engineers.
Salaries     $
Expenses:
Travelling    $12,507 22
Office supplies   ,      6,73S 00
Total 	
Vote 233—Steam-boiler Inspection.
Salaries   	
Expenses:
Travelling    $5,966 00
Office supplies     2,650 24
Launches      3,105 12
Testing instruments, chemicals, etc  48 IS
Total 	
Vote 234—" Electrical Energy Inspection Act."
Salaries   	
Expenses:
Travelling  '.  $  409 45
Office supplies        163 36
Total 	
$    10,867 45
46,457 47
8,160 39
54,617 S6
32,637 06
19,245 22
$     51,882 2S
$     37,549 93
11,769 54
49,319 47
$      4,090 67
575 81
$      4,666 4S D 28
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Vote 235—" Factories Act."
Salaries     $      5,595 00
Expenses:
Travelling    $1,790 10
Office supplies          254 29
  2,044 39
Total   ,  $       7,639 39
Vote 236—Maintenance of Government House and Grounds.
Salaries      $      2,918 41
Expenses:
Fuel, light, and water   $3,27S 29
Maintenance and repairs of buildings      9,005 15
Gardening and improvement of grounds       9,84S 58
Ground-rent and taxes        473 53
Miscellaneous         568 16
         23,173 71
Total    $    26,092 12
Vote 237—Maintenance of Parliament Buildings and Grounds.
Salaries  $    53,491 67
Expenses:
Fuel, light, and water   '.   $24,536 93
Maintenance and repairs of buildings      22,667 50
Gardening and grounds     10,410 05
Scavenging, cleaning, and Janitors' supplies        1.S73 02
Telephones .*  248 39
Taxes         1,034 22
Insurance        11,100 00
Garage        2,027 62
Miscellaneous    301 37
 74,199 10
Total   $   127,690 77
Roads, Streets, Bridges, and  Wharves.
(Vote 23S.)
Roads, Trails, and Streets.
Alberni District.
Road—Alberni     $      1.66S 54
Bainbridge   2,468 15
Banfleld     446 50
Beaver Creek    920 55
Beaver Creek Wharf, No. 100   152 00
Bellevue Avenue, No. 144   620 25
Best's, No. 2   75 00
Biological, No. 100  79 00
Boorman's, No. 105   8 00
Brickyard, No. 175   •  26 00
Cape Scott, No. 7   998 .24
Central Lake, No. 10  471 00
Chalet, No. 8 '  16 00 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 29
Alberni District—Continued.    *
Road—Chatsworth, No. 163    $ 492 00
Cherry Creek, No. 11   178 63
China Creek, No. 19   60 00
Church, No. 109   100 00
Clark's, No. 171   50 00
Clarke and Robson, No. 107  53 00
Clayoquot-Fcluelet, No. 18    1,025 68
Coleman, No. 12  55 62
Compton's, No. 13  '  117 00
Corfleld Bros., No. 110   14 20
Departure Bay, No. 110    404 50
Drinkwater,  No. 22     47 56
Dumont-Donner, No. 112  '  51 50
Dunn's, No. 114  37 00
„       Errington Cross, No. 117   95 25
Evans, No. 185   92 00
Faber's, No. 24  96 50
Fisher's, No. 119   136 00
Flores Island, No. 76   168 00
Giant Powder Co.'s, No. 122   121 00
Gilbert, No. 191  1,159 43
Godfrey, No. 1SS  '  46 00
Grafton Avenue, No. 121    251 00
„        Grandview, No. 27    67 75
„        Greenard Addition, No. 28    94 25
Guelette and Wallace, No. 120 '  73 00
Hector's, No. 31  99 00
„       Hendricksons     148 00
Hiflier and Jones, No. 125  '  310 47
Holberg (sundry), No. 33  999 36
Home Lake, No. 82    100 00
Jenkins, No. 187    650 50
Kitsuksis, No. 34  91 00
Knight's, No. 127  56 50
Koprino, No. 84  :  50 00
Lagoon, No. 128     4 50
Lake Shore, No. 38  196 70
„       Leffler, No.  170     23 00
„        Limestone Island, No. 86  59 00
Lot 50   137 00
„        Lowery and Craig   '.  47 67
Martindale Bros, and Butler, No. 136   126 04
„       Matterson, Brewer, et at., No. 131   75 50
Milltown, No. 45    43 00
„        Mission, No. 46    62 38
Morelle's     56 00
Morrison, No. 133    34 50
Muller's  31 00
McCoy Lake, No. 47   124 39
McKibben, No. 135    12 00
Nanaimo, No. 48  627 00
North-west Bay, No. 137    301 00
Page's, No. 142  20 00
Parkville, No. 140   152 50
Peninsula-Ucluelet, No. 92   142 50
Pillar's, No. 139  8 50 D .30
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Alberni District—Continued.
Road
—Plummer's, No. 173	
Port Alberni  	
Pratt's, No. 175  	
Prices, No. 169   	
Quatsino  (sundry), No. 93  	
Quatsino Wagon, No. 51 	
Bath's, No. 144	
San Josef, No. 58  	
School-house, No. 146	
Sea Otter Cove 	
Simmons, No. 149  	
Somers, No. 55	
Sproat Lake, No. 56	
Stanhope and Scott, No. 150	
Starkey and Stewart, No. 151  ....
.Stranby, No. 59  	
Swayne's, No. 148	
Temple and Reid, No. 155  	
Thompson's, No. 60   	
Turner and Rutherford, No. 154 ...
Ucluelet   	
Vallemar, No. 179 	
Vargas  Island   	
Virginia Mill, No. 186 	
Victoria-Campbell River	
Walker and Martin, No. 63 	
Ward's, No. 157 	
Wark, No. ISO 	
Weigles and Jones, No. 15S	
Weigle's, Peter, No. 161	
Wither's, No. 64  	
Wright's, No. 160	
Young, Baird, and Benson, No. 162
Trail—Noot and Bland, No. 90	
„       Nootka	
equipment  	
and tools  	
ral  	
Camp
Plant
Genei'E
Supervision—General Foreman      $   390 42
„ Assistant Engineer     2,780 37
Auto           92S 25
Office           779 70
25 00
75 00
310 00
350 00
294 50
95 00
8 00
238 75
578 70
76 20
20 00
64 00
554 82
24 00
71 50
305 50
36 75
28 00
56 56
149 50
27 00
46 00
299 50
1,067 17
6,385 23
58 50
29 55
73 50
182 45
27 00
67 86
40 00
27 50
25 00
239 25
239 65
1,530 69
72 00
4,S78 74
Total    $    36,503 48
Total expenditure   $36,554 94
Less material transferred to Bridges     $34. 4S
„     Protection to River-banks       16 9S
  51 46
Total      $36,503 48
Atlin District (North).
Road—Atlin-Surprise .
„ Big Horn River
„        Birch Creek   ...
574 78
580 50
110 65 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 31
Atlin District (North)—Continued.
Road—Boulder Creek  	
„        Clark's   	
„        Fox Ranch   	
„       Klehini River 	
McKee Creek   	
„        O'Donnel River  	
„       Ruby Creek 	
„        Spruce Creek Wagon  	
„        Stephendyke   	
„        Wann	
Wood    ,	
„        Wright Creek  	
Trail—Indian River	
„        Lincoln Lake   	
Streets—Atlin  	
„ Discovery	
Bridge  approach—Halfpenny   	
Bridge—Gold Run	
' Halfway	
„   '     Stephendyke   	
Plant and tools 	
General  	
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,240 25
Office     36 15
Total 	
Atlin District (South).
Road—Bear River, No. 1  	
„        Glazier Creek  (east)   	
„        Glazier Creek   (west)   	
„        Salmon River, Stewart-Hyder Section 	
Trail—Ayansh-Grease Harbour   ^	
„       Bear-Nass, No. 8  	
„        Big  Mission   	
„        Bitter Creek 	
„       Hyder-Stewart   	
,,       Illiance, No. 19  	
„       Kitsault River  	
„        Marmot River, No. 13  	
Street—Stewart  	
Camp equipment   	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,6<89 43
Office     87 61
Total  	
Atlin District (Telegraph Creek).
Road—Casca, No. 2  	
,.       Telegraph-Dease  	
Trail—Dease 	
„        Glenora 	
„        Klappen   	
„       Teslin   	
224 38
100 00
134 52
191 SO
S35 77
121 42
396 05
922 14
120 42
432 59
15 00
63 56
359 50
191 82
130 00
67 80
22 50
11 00
20 00
20 00
88 16
25 00
2,276 40
$       S,0OS 76
$ 913 05
8 25
130 00
1,638 S7
250 00
73 00
330 00
508 00
1,283 74
413 OS
4,270 56
125 00
10 00
244 30
312 70
2,777 04
$     13,287 59
$ 78 25
627 10
421 40
79 30
100 00
417 31 Public Works Report  (1919-20).
$
50 00
41S 00
16 35
27 35
26 33
8 45
2,269 84
Atlin District (Telegraph Creek)—Continued.
Trail—Thlbert Creek 	
Street—Telegraph   	
Camp equipment	
Plant and tools  	
General  	
Office 	
Total    $
Summary.
North Atlin     $ 8,008 76
South Atlin    13,287 50
Telegraph Creek   2,269 84
Total      $23,566 19
Total expenditure  $25,412 12
Less transferred to Location of Roads        1,S45 93
Total      $23,566 19
Cariboo District (North).
Road—Alexandria Ferry   (east)     $
„        Alexandria Ferry   (west)   	
„       Antler Creek	
„        Barkerville-Antler Creek  	
„        Barkerville-Bear Lake   	
„       Barkerville-Bulkhead    	
„       Big Prairie-White's Landing   	
„       China Lake 	
„        Dibhs-Cottonwood Canyon  	
„        Dragon Lake (east side)   	
„       Dragon Lake  (old)   	
„        Duffey's	
„        Kersley-Dale   	
„       Main Trunk	
„        McLean   	
„        Quesnel-Alexandria  '	
„        Quesnel-Big Prairie 	
„        Quesnel-Blackwater   	
„        Quesnel-Dog Prairie   	
„       Quesnel-Fort George  ;	
„        Quesnel-Nazko  	
„        Quesnel-Quesnel Forks  	
„        Quesnel-River Ferry   	
233-Mile-Quesnel River  	
„       Willow River-Sugar Creek	
„        Winter   	
Trail—Hixon Creek  	
„       Stoney Lake 	
Van Winkle-Swift River	
Willow River  	
Street—Quesnel   	
Camp equipment  	
Material, balance on hand  	
Plant and tools  	
79 89
3S 00
62 49
559 99
187 SS
S 00
180 00
24 00
24 00
20 00
104 00
42 00
128 50
3,697 04
50 00
707 66
3,515 10
92 85
207 41
1.279 01
553 23
2,191 75
72 00
1,247 36
199 75
2,132 77
40 00
136 50
51 00
52 50
25 00
1,286 90
1,077 95
1,282 56 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 33
50 00
4,670 46
Cariboo District (North)—Continued.
General roads	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $1,647 89
„ General Foreman     1,394 50
„ Auto and Stable Account          774 52
Office           853 55
Total	
Cariboo District (South).
Road—Alexis Creek  	
„        Beaver Lake-Beavermouth	
„       Beaver Valley  	
„        Cariboo Main	
„        Castle Rock Ferry  	
„        Chilanko Forks-Chezacut Lake	
„        Chilcotin Main 	
„        Chilcotin-Soda Creek	
„        Chimney Valley  	
„        Cunningham  Settlement   	
„        Hanceville-Alexis Creek  	
„        Harpers Camp-IIorsefly   	
„        Harpers Camp-Quesnel Lake  	
„        Horsefly-Woodjam   	
„        Machin-Soda Creek   	
„        108-Mile-Harpers Camp   	
„        137-Mile-Springhouse  	
„       150-Mile-Harpers Camp   	
„       153-Mile-Harpers  Camp	
„        153-Mile-Horsefly	
„        156-Mile-Williams Lake  	
„       158-Mile-Quesnel Lake	
177-Mile-Beaver Lake  	
„        Peavine District	
„        Quesnel Forks-Keithley Creek  	
„        Quesnel Forks-Quesnel Dam 	
„       Soda Creek-Alexandria 	
„        Soda Creek-Williams Lake  	
„        Spriughouse-Williams Lake 	
„        Upper Horsefly   	
„        Wellington Lake-Springhouse   -	
Trail—Keithley   	
Camp equipment  ....:	
Plant and tools	
Supervision—General Foreman   $1,772 60
Stable Account          693 60
Office           147 61
Total  	
Summary.
Cariboo District   (North)     $26,080 55
Cariboo District   (South)        29,147 57
Total     $55,228 12
3
$ 26,080
55
$   386
72
186 00
1,164 24
1,539
41
751
00
3,335 93
847 37
84
75
103
25
250
00
416
02
278
25
760 65
298
30
348
00
415
50
515
56
2,428
67
5,673
22
1,470
73
140 00
62
25
206 46
248
00
213
50
4S
00
184
00
191
75
677
84
1,722 46
105
25
32
00
1,091
21
. 357
35
2,613 81
29,147 57 I) 34
Public Works Report (1919-20)
Chilliwack District.
Road—Abbotsford-Riverside, No.  4	
„       Ahbotsford Townsite, No. 3 	
„        Chilliwack River, No. 9 	
„       Clayburn-Straiton	
„        Columbia Valley, No. 8 	
„       Huntingdon Townsite, No. 6  	
„       Kelleher   	
„        Larmon	
„        Parsons Hill-Ryder Lake 	
„       River, No. 9  	
„        Sumas Mountain, No. 12 	
„        Vedder Mountain Quarry  	
Yale Road, No. 1  '	
Yale Road, No. 2	
„        Yale Road, No. 5 	
„        Yale Road, No. 7	
Yale Road, No. 10 	
Yale Road, No. 11 	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $1,100 30
Office           232 33
Auto           427 87
2,641 45
551 96
115 30
150 00
211 00
195 62
350 00
500 00
578 10
56 00
159 00
60 99
2,227 85
1,161 62
3,414 59
3,213 SO
2,469 75
2,968 95
29 15
1,760 50
Total    $    22,815 63
Total expenditure      $22,872 40
Less charged to Vedder Mountain Protection  56 77
Total   $22,815 63
Columbia District.
Road—Athalmer, No. 6	
Banff-Windermere, No. 12 .
Blaeberry School, No. 37 ..
Boulder Creek-Sitting Bull
Brisco   	
Buzzard   	
Campbell, No. 7 	
Canyon Creek, No. 13	
Findlay Creek	
Fisher, No. 59  	
Flemstrom, No. 60  	
Forster's Landing  	
Giant Mine  	
Golden-Donald (lower) ...
Golden-Donald   (upper)   ...
Grainger, No. 61  	
Hartley, No. 39  	
Holdgrave   	
Holmes and Dakin	
Horsethief, No. 5  	
Invermere  Siding   	
Johnston, No. 29  	
Jolly, No. 54	
Kettleson, No. 35  	
Laughlin, No. 33  	
1,701 66
47 50
8 00
111 93
205 00
17 03
308 71
658 18
24 00
102 20
67 03
834 88
24 81
747 32
138 49
IS 00
325 00
57 00
47 75
1,456 14
218 00
149 50
373 0,8
141 41
123 10 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 35
Columbia District—Continued.
Road—Main Trunk  (west side)   	
„        Main Trunk  (east side)	
Mitchell	
Moberly Branch, No. 3S  	
„        Moberly School, No. 56 	
„        Oberg and Johnson, No. 34	
„        Paradise Mine  	
Red Rock   	
„        Sanborn-Hamilton   	
„        Sinclair Loop  	
Toby Creek, No. 4 	
Toby Hill, No. 26  	
„        Wilmer Pontoon   	
„        Windermere Cemetery, No. 32 	
„       Windermere Loop  	
Trail—Carbolic,  Spruce Camp   	
„       Hutch   Creek   	
„       Jones	
„        Jubilee Mountain   	
Street—Golden, No. 43  	
„ Invermere, No. 46  	
„ Wilmer, No. 44 	
Camp equipment  	
Material	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer   $2,508 15
Office        1,396 15
Auto     571 26
Total 	
Total expenditure '  $27,358 47
Less charged to Location of Roads   $173 10
Bridges       561 92
„ „ Protection of River-banks   187 03
         922 05
Total     $26,436 42
Comox District.
Road—Anderton   	
Back   	
,,       Bristol   	
„        Burns and Parkins 	
„        Butcher's	
„        Cache Creek-Shushartie  	
„       Cessford's   	
Cliff   	
„        CdScession, No. 1  	
„        Concession, No. 2  	
„        Cortes Island	
„        Courtenay-Comox   	
„        Cowie, John   	
„        Creech 	
„        Cross, Bridge's 	
„        Cross, Hardy's  	
3,685 63
1,311 07
50 60
15 00
159 85
50
276 55
120 00
1,545 33
40 00
1,566 09
239 03
129 50
30 00
203 00
21 00
198 00
36 00
20 00
2,101 03
315 45
153 SO
282 24
175 88
1,379 59
4,475 56
26,436 42
515 15
1,097 65
190 50
125 25
37- 00
170 50
153 00
10 00
222 75
324 50
841 84
5S9 20
305 47
1,332 04
360 99
398 50 D 36
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Comox District—Continued.
Road—Cross, Hodgins's   	
Cross,  Rennieson's   	
Cross, Ryan's 	
Cross,  Smith's   	
Cross, Union 	
Cumberland-Comox Lake ..
Cumberland-Courtenay ....
Cumberland-Dove Creek . ..
Cumberland-Roy's	
Curran's  	
Denman Island  .	
Fanny Bay Station	
Fraser and Harrington  ....
Hardwick Island	
Hardy-Coal Harbour 	
Hawkins and McClusky  ...
Higgins and Knight 	
Hornby Island  	
Huband's   	
Kelland's   	
Kirby   	
Lake Trail-No. 7 Mine	
Lake Trail-Power-house  . ..
Lasqueti Island  	
Laurence and Biscoe  	
Little  River   	
Lot No. 117 	
Lot Nos. 231 and 83	
Lund-Malapin's   	
Lund-Powell River	
Malcolm Island  	
Marsden and Kilpatrick  . ..
Mary Island 	
Merville  Settlement   	
Milligan and Parkins 	
Minto School	
Muir and Hawkins	
McAllan   	
McQuillan! and Piercy   ....
Okeover Arm	
Powell River-Cranberry ...
Powell River-Grief Point ..
Powell River-Olsen Lake ..
Radford's  	
Read Island  	
Ryan and Hudson	
Salmon River 	
Sandwick-Bridge's   	
Section 28, Township 33 ...
Section 33, Union Bay .....
Smith and Ledingham	
Stewart and Cameron  	
Stillwater-Scotch Fir Point
Texada Island   	
Torrento	
Urquhart's    	
36 50
262 39
296 50
653 00
27 00
1,338 29
2,615 67
912 25
764 32
24 00
601 44
50 00
466 50
2 00
915 50
54 00
646 25
572 59
247 75
74 50
104 50
2,245 72
165 81
428 74
25 00
765 50
53 00
12 50
173 00
1,744 56
251 46
402 00
30 00
10,211 76
201 25
86 00
89 20
449 50
171 25
76 00
139 50
472 35
650 40
65 50
15S 50
28 00
1,774 25
1,655 12
110 00
100 00
93 50
48 10
72 50
2,637 37
52 00
311 04 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 37
996 25
2,448 40
567 74
25 ,00
402 92
278 03
4,723 35
285 91
5,752 62
58,769 89
Comox District—Continued.
Road—Vaides Island •.   $
„       Victoria-Campbell River	
Trail—Lake, No. 52	
„       Port Hardy 	
„       Thunder Bay   	
Camp equipment   -.	
Plant and tools ' '.	
General roads	
Supervision—Assistant District Engineer    $2,704 32
„ General Foreman          464 55
Office        1,530 78
Auto       1,052 97
Total   $
Total expenditure   $58,856 34
Less material charged to Bridges  86 45
Total  $58,769 89
Cowichan District.
Road—Bazett  ....:.  $
„        Beach	
„       Bear Valley	
„        Bench   	
„        Cameron-Taggart   	
„        Carvel-Jackson   	
„        Cavin	
„        Chaplin    	
„        Cherry Point	
„        Cowichan Lake	
„        Cowichan Lake  (north shore)   	
„        Cowichan Lake (south shore)   	
„       Devine-McLay    ,	
„        Dighton   	
„        Duncan-Sahtlam   	
„       Fisher  	
„       Garland Avenue  	
„        Garnet's   	
Glenora 	
„        Glenora Cross 	
„        Grant and Dick 	
Halhed   	
„       Hall and Hawkins  	
Hillbank   	
„        Hinks-Parry  	
„        Holland   	
„       Hopkins Swamp	
„       Howie's	
„       Indian 	
Koksilah Flats 	
„        Koksilah Mines	
„       Koksilah-Riverside	
„        Lakeside •	
„       Livingston-Dingwall   	
Marshall	
261 10
910 90
99 10
281 95
293 30
126 65
149 50
47 00
70 50
2,918 34
117 50
179 25
11 00
35 40
82 50
3S0 10
37 00
26 00
•612 65
S4 00
48 00
570 01
100 00
177 00
275 63
50 00
25 00
38 00
723 95
322 15
44 00
138 80
217 40
57 80
128 50 Cowichan District—Continued.
Road—Millar	
„        McKinley-Doupe    .'	
„        Moss    '	
Old Koksilah	
„        Old  Schoolhouse   	
Old Victoria	
„        Pannell	
„        Riverside Drive 	
„        Rowe 	
„        Sahtlam    .	
„        Shawnigan Lake  	
„       Sheppard  	
„        Silver-mine "■	
„        Soole	
„        Stevens 	
„       Telegraph .-	
Thain .'	
„       Victoria-Campbell River 	
„        Wace  	
Wallich-Hillbank	
„       Waters   	
„       Whisky Point 	
„        Wilkinson	
„        Wilson   	
Trail—Brown's   	
„        Cannery   	
„        School  	
Plant and tools	
General roads 	
Supervision—Assistant District Engineer     $1,042 10
Office           652 35
Auto -.        323 32
Total	
Cranbrook District.
Road—Bullock Ranch   	
„        Coolidge Ranch	
„        Cranbrook  (adjacent to city)   	
„        Cranbrook-Baker Mountain 	
„        Cranbrook-Fish  Lake   	
3,       Cranbrook-Gold  Creek   	
„        Cranbrook-Kimberley     '	
„        Cranbrook-Kingsmill   	
„        Cranb rook-Mission	
„        Cranbrook-New  Lake   	
„        Cranbrook-St. Mary River	
„       Eager Hill-Fort Steele 	
„        Fair Grounds	
„        Green Bay 	
„       Green    •	
„       Ha-ha Creek Settlement 	
„        Johns-Mennie	
Kimberley-Morrison   	
„       Kimberley-Sullivan Mine	
221 88
193 30
39 80
961 60
50 35
939 13
6 75.
104 50
42 75
469 95
695 09
50 75
105 50
72 85
90 50
825 40
92 00
2,S78 63
50 50
175 00
276 00
80 10
2,279 01
179 30
S3 00
102 00
67 00
3S6 43
216 50
2,017 77
23,393 32
10
50
26 50
1,342
36
279
25
251
20
27
87
8,526
05
437
85
773
5S
669
12
90
51
1,103
66
55
00
389
00
336
75
898
64
200
00
166
00
3,970
92 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 39
Cranbrook District—Continued.
Road—Main Trunk  (Cranbrook-Moyie)   	
„        Main Trunk   (Cranbrook-Wardner)   	
„        Main Trunk  (Moyie-^Goatfell)   	
„        Main Trunk  (Yahk-Kingsgate)   	
„       Marysville-St. Mary Lake	
„        Maycock Settlement 	
„        Meadowbrook   	
Mission-Fort Steele  (old)   	
„        Mission-Marysville	
„        Mission-Wasa   (upper)   	
„       Mission-Wasa (lower) 	
„       Munroe Lake	
„       McConnell's Meadows-Hamilton and Teel's Ranches 	
„       New Lake	
„       Perry Creek	
„        St. Mary Settlement 	
„        Standard Mill-Cox Ranch 	
„       Waldo Settlement  	
„        Wardner-Casey   	
„        Warduer-Gateway  	
„       Wasa Bridge-Skookumchuck 	
„        Yahk-Meadowbrook   	
Trail—Hell Roaring Creek  	
„       White Fish  (new)   	
Street—Slaterville	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools 	
Supervision—General Foreman    $1,874 13
Office     19 55
Auto   !        807 98
Total 	
Delta District.
Road—Old Yale, No. 2 	
„       Pacific Highway   	
Rock-bunkers-Cloverdale    •	
Scott, No. 4	
Yale, No. 2  	
Yale, No. 3	
Camp equipment	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—Assistant District Engineer    $925 53
Office     377 87
Auto        302 22
Total	
Detcdney District.
Road—Austin  	
„       Beaulieu	
„        Cedar Valley, No. 8  	
„        Clarke	
1,219 13
1,186 70
171 75
162 60
531 70
26 40
305 25
215 50
383 60
2,538 19
533 70
91 00
150 00
44 50
507 65
2,021 2S
45 50
53 00
50 00
243 38
302 25
48 00
210 00
40 00
64 91
449 95
2,017 92
2,701 66
$
35,870 28
$
690 50
9,153 70
80 89
2,000 00
6,378 51
1,534 78
45 90
52 30
1,605 62
$
21,542 20
$
2,742 91
39 00
149 00
2,143 25 Public Works Report (1919-20).
Dewdney District—Continued.
Road—Davis and Tupper 	
„       Dewdney Trunk, Section 1 	
„       Dewdney Trunk, Section 2 	
„       Dewdney Trunk, Section 3 	
„        Dewdney Trunk, Section 4 	
„        Dewdney Trunk, Section 6	
„        Dewdney Trunk, Section 7	
„        Dewdney Trunk, Section 8	
„       Dewdney Trunk, Section 9 	
„        Deroche-Athy   	
„        Gordon-Crossing   	
„        Gourlay's, Nicomen Island 	
„        Grand Avenue, No. 13 	
„        Hatzic  Front   	
„        Hatzic Island (north end)   	
„       Hatzic Prairie-Dewdney	
„        Hatzic  Prairie-Ferris   	
„       Hatzic Prairie-Sylvester 	
„        Hawkins	
„        Hyde and Baker  	
„        loco   	
„        Johnson     	
„        Macauley   	
Malcolm, No. 41	
„       Matsqui Landing  ■	
„        Mission-Stave Lake	
„       Mission Townsite	
„        Morrison   	
McDonald. ■
„        Mclntyre    •	
„        McNeil-Rennie-Campbell	
„       Newton  	
„        Nicomen Island Rock 	
„        Nicomen Island Trunk   	
„        North  Nicomen   	
Pickles, No. 62  	
River  	
„        River (south)  	
„       Ruskin-Stave Falls	
„        Shook and McEwan  	
„        Silverdale •	
„        Smith   	
„        Stirling-Morrison   	
„        Stave Lake 	
Upper Pitt Valley 	
„        Whonnock Flat	
Street—Ontario   	
Material on hand 	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—General Foreman   •  $2,176 57
Office          351 30
Auto          70187
Total	
116 50
599 65
4,918 54
3,854 23
1,334 94
187 00
1,533 29
971 49
410 75
339 09
30 00
597 08
46 00
565 25
S3 00
810 93
902 75
174 40
300 50
399 59
10,000 00
384 86
48 50
48 00
43 41
200 38
3,953 62
31 60
93 50
99 83
222 25
8 00
2,989 54
1,906 82
200 00
366 98
1,163 43
174 34
1,577 40
22S IS
1,734 S9
92 50
319 39
47 25
175 00
1,419 07
21 70
777 19
1,352 34
3,229 74
$    56,218 87 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 41
Dewdney District—Continued.
Expenditure      $56,849 97
Less transferred to Location of Roads  . . $531 10
,,     McKinney Creek Diversion       100 00
  631 10
Total   $56,218 87
Esquimalt District.
Road—Admiral's   	
„ Albert Head  	
„ Atkins 	
„ Barrow 	
„ Battersby  	
„ Bennett   	
„ Bllston Creek Fill, Happy Valley 	
„ Botanical    >	
„ Burnside	
„ Calvert   	
„ Ciark's	
„ Colwood    t	
„ East Sooke   _.	
„ Finlayson Arm  '.	
„ Fisher   T	
„ Fitzgerald	
„ Gillespie 	
„ Coldstream   	
„ Gunter's   	
„ Happy Valley _. *.	
„ Helmcken 	
„ Island, Port Renfrew 	
„ John Creek  	
„ Jordan   	
„ Kemp   	
„ Lagoon  Spit   	
„ Latoria   "	
„ Mann's	
Maple Avenue	
„ Metchosin	
„ Millstream Lake   :	
„ Millstream 	
„ Milne's   	
„ Muir's  	
Old Logging, Port Renfrew  	
„ Old Victoria   :	
Otter Point  	
Phillips 	
„ Poirier   	
„ Quarantine	
„ Robinson   	
„ Rocky Point  	
„ Ross-Durrance  	
„  .    San Juan  (east)   	
„ San Juan (west)  	
„ Shawnigan Lake  	
„ Shirley   	
„ Sooke   	
25 00
1S6 51
97 75
15 75
50 00
50 00
550 00
50 00
215 00
25 79
53 00
4,015 37
596 07
116 00
28 00
324 00
54 75
858 04
26 00
1,372 88
727 10
75 00
50 00
1,840 64
212 50
375 00
50 00
37 50
39 50
558 64
17 00
440 50
247 50
6 00
114 50
49 00
805 89
17 75
19 50
154 00
26 45
459 47
2,345 78
409 00
203 00
320 25
500 38
2,249 17 D 42
Public Works Report (1919-20).
136 46
76
87
314 00
48
50
S6
25
17
50
1,805
09
20 00
105
75
57
76
14 50
85
00
105 00
50 00
119
50
79
10
1,208
60
2,917 19
Esquimalt District—Continued.
Road—Sooke River   	
„        Sooke  (west)   	
„        Station   	
„        Swannick  	
Taylor	
„        Thetis Lake	
„        Vancouver Island Trunk 	
Whitty-Tappen   	
„        Wilson   	
„        Wright's   	
„        Young's Lake  	
Trail—Bugaboo   	
„        Deacon's   	
„        Elliott's   	
„       Halhead  	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—General Foreman   ;  $1,276 95
Office        946 25
Auto          693 99
Total  .-	
Fernie District.
Road—Baynes-Flagstone	
„        Baynes Lake-Dorr  	
„        Bridges	
„        Bull River  "	
„        Cemetery-Corbin   	
„       Douglas Settlement, No. 37 	
„        Dorr-Newgate 	
„       Elko-Jaffray   	
„        Elko-Morrissey   	
„        Elko-Rooseville	
„        Elko-South Fort  	
Elko-Waldo	
„        Fernie-Coal  Creek   	
„        Fernie-Lizard Creek	
„        Fernie-Hosmer	
„        Fernie-Morrissey 	
„        Fernie-West Cedar Valley	
Flathead Valley, No. 19	
„       Flagstone-Gateway  	
Fort Steele-Bull River	
„        Fort Steele-Canal Flats 	
„       Fort Steele-Wasa  	
„       Fort Steele-Wild Horse  	
„       JafEray-Wardner  	
„        Michel-Crowsnest   	
„       Michel-Elk Prairie 	
Michel-Elk Valley 	
„        Michel-Hosmer   	
„    .   Sand Creek-Jaffray	
„        Waldo-Dorr   	
„       Waldo-Flagstone ,■.'•,	
$ 28,910
95
$    82
00
104
00
1,007
15
60
75
423
39
215
10
94 00
262
05
3,583
75
937 50
146
23
1,529
35
820
25
41 00
2,513
25
1,607
75
407
90
30
45
427
50
1,061
40
552 98
3,477
2G
472
25
117
78
87
50
SOS
70
168
75
2,510 90
658
00
14 00
152
50 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
980 09
23 75
323 50
50 00
90 24
810 25
28 99
627 65
1,224 34
3,230 11
Fernie District—Continued.
Road—Wardner-Blue River	
„        Wardner-Waldo 	
„       Wasa-Canal Flats   	
Trail—Wild Horse 	
Street—Elko	
„        West Fernie, No. 24 	
Sidewalks—Bull River	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,028 90
Office           319 15
Auto          882 06
Total 	
Fort George-District.
Road—Aleza Lake-Newlands	
„        Bave   	
„        Becker	
Belard   	
„       Bevier 	
„        Blackwater-Endako	
„       Bobtail-Upper Mud River   .'	
„        Braeside 	
„        Campbell-Hulatt   	
„        Carr's   	
„        Chilko Settlement  	
„       Dale's   	
„        Daykin   	
„        Dome Creek 	
„        Dunster-Halliday Creek	
„        Dunster-Ranch Valley 	
„        Engen   	
„       Engen (north)   	
„        Erickson  	
„        Fort Fraser-Rorison   	
„        Fort Fraser Settlement 	
„        Fort Fraser-Stella   	
„        Fort George-Blackwater 	
„        Fort George-Chief Lake  	
„        Fort George-Isle de Pierre	
„        Fort George-Quesnel  	
„        Fort George-Stony Creek 	
„        Fort George-Summit Lake 	
„       Fort George-Willow River 	
„        Fort St. James-Manson Creek 	
Fort St. John-North Pine	
„        Francois Lake Settlement	
„        Giscome Portage-Summit Lake  	
„        Giscome Rapids   ■	
„        Giscome (south) 	
„        Goose Country  	
„        Grande Prairie	
„       Greer Valley 	
D 43
31,764 31
166 92
50 00
269 50
126 48
795 40
203 84
321 00
899 33
916 30
100 00
1,654 14
2o0 00
1,585 91
92 00
21 58
109 74
13S 50
733 32
219 74
1,552 55
'537 16
1,055 71
723 7S
2,577 19
928 IS
1,167 61
237 44
402 20
2,012 13
150 00
329 50
671 48
299 00
261 50
32 00
300 00
659 08
477 50 Public Works Report (1919-20).
Fort George District—Continued.
Road—Hargreave's	
„        Henderson Settlement  	
„        Hennington-Canoe River ~.	
Hunt-Lull   	
Hulatt (north)  	
„        Hulatt (south)  	
„        Lampitt	
„        Longworth (south)   	
Mapes   	
Mirch Lake	
„       Miworth (south)   	
„        Mount Robson   	
„        Mud River Valley (south)   	
„   .  McBride-Dunster 	
„        McBride  (north)   	
„        McBride  (east)   	
„        Nechako Flats  	
„       Necostie  Settlement  	
„        Ness Lake  	
„        Nicol-Bednesti    .-	
„        Nithi River	
„       Nulki Lake-Corkscrew Crest 	
„        Peace River 	
R.A., No. 2  	
R.A., No. 9  	
R.A., No. 11   	
R.A., No. 13	
R.A., No. 15  	
R.A., No. IS  	
R.A., No. 19  	
R.A., No. 20	
R.A., No. 22  	
R.A., No. 26  	
R.A., No. 50	
„        R.A., No. 77  	
R.A., No. 87  	
R.A., No. 209	
„       Schaefer  ;	
Shelly	
„        6-Mile-Buckhorn Lake 	
„        Smedley   	
„        Smith's   	
„        Stone Creek	
„       Taylor 	
„       Tsinkut Lake-Cottonwood Creek 	
„       Vancouver-Sackner	
„        Vanderhoof-Noonla	
„        Vanderhoof  (south)   	
„       Vanderhoof-Stuart Lake	
„        Vanderhoof-Sturgeon Point  	
„       Vanderhoof (west)   	
„        Webber  	
„       West Lake	
„       Willow River-Giscome Portage	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools  	
322 00
,541 68
32 00
112 9S
,410 90
5 45
150 00
63
,163 13
652 50
667 50
788 50
526 05
825 00'
287 13
94
769 00
150 96
892 00
397 50
567 94
24 00
318 86
100 00
712 00
818 70
58 96
194 25
200 00
16 80
150 00
,596 69
232 25
949 00
420 64
138 00
141 60
508 54
435 50
45 00
45 50
152 00
165 00
76 00
114 00
12 00
20 01
629 21
,418 79
,671 98
27 52
280 00
14 00
136 44
,173 07
,550 38 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
$      2,313 80
3,393 50
Fort George District—Continued.
Stable—Keep of horses in winter    $1,344 76
Stock on hand         969 04
Supervision—General Foreman     $1,580 50
General Foreman     2,990 49
„ Assistant District Engineer     1.107 06
Office     1,035 29
Auto        1.680 16
Total  .•	
Grand Forks District.
Road—Anaconda-Wellington, No. 1 	
„       Bear Creek-Pass Creek, No. 2 	
„        Cascade-Fife, No. 3  	
„        Cascade—Laurier, No. 4 	
„        Cascade-Paulson, No. 5	
„        Central, Camp Spencer, No. 6 	
„        Christina Lake, No. 7 ."	
„        Deep Creek-Boundary, No. 8 	
„        English Cove-Head of Lake, No. 9	
Fife-Christina Lake, No. 10 	
„        Fourth of July Creek-Phoenix, No. 11 	
„        Granby  Additioii-Phoenix   	
„        Grand Forks-Carson (north), No. 13 	
Grand Forks-Carson  (south), No. 14 	
„        Grand Forks-Cascade (north), No. 15 	
.„        Grand Forks-Cascade (south), No. 16 	
„        Grand Forks-Eholt, No. 17 	
„        Grand Forks-Franklin, No. 18  	
„        Grand Forks-Hardy Mountain  	
Grand Forks-Pass Creek, No. 20 	
„        Grand Forks-Summit City  	
„        Hartford Junction-Boundary-line	
Lot No. 152	
Lot Nos. 184, 1475 	
Lot No. 334 	
Lot No. 500	
Lot No. 519 	
Lot No. 534	
Lot No. 535 	
Lot No. 700 	
Mill Creek-Grand Forks, No. 24	
„        Moody Creek-Cascade, No. 25 	
„        Morrissey Creek (east)	
„        Morrissey Creek  (west)   	
„       Norway Mountain-Paulson	
„       I'ass Creek-Rock Candy 	
„        Phoenix-Greenwood  (north)   	
„        Phoenix-Greenwood  (south)   	
„        Summit City-Phoenix	
Sutherland-Fife 	
Trail—Christina Lake  	
Camp equipment  	
Material on hand	
Plant and tools ,	
$    65,545 49
$ 100 OO
1,805 SI
60 00
319 50
745 25
94 00
49 50
575 75
63 50
295 00
4S 00
100 00
209 81
563 05
2,908 87
97 10
50 00
2,052 80
465 15
1,095 25
1,421 63
100 00
68 00
84 26
89 50
124 75
5S 00
62 50
99 50
50 50
24 00
1S6 25
223 00
30 00
292 50
481 00
170 25
119 00
621 49
371 25
150 50
68 00
111 00
470 42 Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Grand Forks District—Continued.
Supervision—General Foreman
Office   	
„ Auto  	
$2,063 55
165 37
5S4 95
$      2,813 87
Total   $     19,989 51
Greenwood District.
Road—Anaconda-No. 7 Mine	
Baker Creek  	
Beaverdell Station   	
Beaver Creek  	
Bridesville-Molson   	
Boundary Creek	
Camp McKinney-Sidley	
Camp McKinney-Rock Creek
Caron   	
Deadwood-Copper Camp ....
Eholt-North Fork 	
Eholt-Summit Camp   	
Fish Lake  	
Greenwood-Eholt   	
Greenwood-Midway    r...
Greenwood-Phoenix   	
Hartley's-Phoenix  	
Ingram Mountain	
Johnson Creek  	
Kerr Creek  	
Kettle River  (East Fork)   . .
Kettle River  (Main)   	
Kettle River (West Fork)   ..
Letts-Sawmill	
Link Creek   	
Long Lake-Jewel Mine 	
Lynn Creek	
Midway-Rock Creek	
Myers Creek  	
McCarron  Creek   	
Nicholson Creek	
Rice Creek .. .s	
Rock Creek-Myncaster	
Rock Creek-9-Mile	
Rock Mountain	
Rock Mountain-Bridesville ..
Rock Mountain-Myncaster ..
Sally Mines 	
Sally Mountain	
Twin Creek 	
Boundary Creek	
Carmi-Penticton   	
Plant and tools	
Supervision—General Foreman   	
Office   	
Auto  	
$2,107 25
46 50
579 34
113 00
350 00
298 25
92 00
162 41
100 00
394 00
436 00
200 00
260 75
75 00
503 25
36 00
1,005 95
1,332 55
843 00
100 00
455 50
295 39
400 00
147 50
2,088 75
696 50
220 00
50 00
200 00
299 00
1,270 88
334 00
453 25
540 00
25 00
624 95
3,031 55
296 75
200 00
187 00
337 75
278 00
99 00
108 00
50 00
196 27
2,733 00
Total  •'  *    21<920 » 11 Geo. 5
rEMENT of Expenditure.
D 47
408
60
40
00
8 00
214
50
13
00
427
66
30
00
85
00
173
00
50
00
18
00
313
00
351
00
219
GO
10 50
Islands District.
Gabriola Island—
Road—Centre	
„        Coast 	
Cost 	
„        Cross 	
East	
„       Main   	
Martin	
Silva	
„       Taylor Bay	
Trail—School   	
Galiano Island (North) —
Road—Burril   	
„        Cook's   	
„       Main   	
Trail—North End  	
Galiano Island  (South) —
Road—South Galiano	
Mayne Island—•
Road—Horton Bay  '...-.	
„       Main	
„        Point Comfort'	
„       Village Bay 	
North Pender Island—
Road—Bedwell   	
,,        Clam Bay	
„       Hooson's  	
„        Hope Bay   	
„       James Point Extension  	
„        Mackinnon's   	
Otter Bay   	
Port Washington  	
„        School  	
South Otter Bay  	
North Saanich—■
Road—Bradley-Dyne  	
Birch 	
„       Breed's Cross 	
„        Centre  	
Chalet	
„        Cypress Avenue 	
,,       Downey   	
„       East 	
„        Horth's Cross  	
„        Marine Drive  	
„        Prospect  	
„        School  	
Scott   	
„        Store	
„       Thomas 	
West   	
Street—Beacon Avenue 	
„ Sidney   ..;	
Saltspring Island  (North) —
Road—Atkins   	
Beddis	
169
00
228
50
100
00
212
50
ISO
00
4
00
08 00
509
00
72
00
206
00
163
00
214 00
464
00
92
00
77 26
634
05
22
00
361
00
5
00
39
00
125
00
502
15
214
78
13 00
323
57
120
00
276
2S
175
50
6
38
254 50
264 05
935
00
123
50
24
25 Public Works Report (1919-20).
lsla nds D istrict—Continued.
Road—Canal 	
„        Collins-Crofton   	
„ 1      Cranberry	
„        Divide  ".	
„        Eperon	
„        Fern wood  :	
„        Fletcher   	
Fulford Main  	
„        Ganges  School  	
„        Graham Avenue  ,	
„       Lower Ganges  	
„       McFadden	
•   „        North End  	
„        Rainbow	
„       Rosmore 	
Scott   	
Stark  ;	
„       Tripp  	
„        Upper Ganges 	
„        Vesuvius 	
„       Walker's Hook 	
„        Walters   	
„       Wilkinson's   	
Saltspring Island (South) —
Road—Beaver Point 	
„        Burgoyne Bay '	
Fulford 	
„        Smith's  	
„        Tsaklea Point 	
Saturna Island—
Road—Main	
„       Payne's 	
„       Roman's   	
„        Sections 3 and 4 	
South Pender Island—
Road—Boulder	
„        Spalding 	
Wharf    	
Thetis Island—
Road—Wharf	
Camp equipment   	
Plant and tools  •	
General 	
Supervision—General Foreman  _  ?9S9 90
Office   '     735 94
Auto        19169
Total 	
Expenditure   •   $20,654 61
Less charged to Saanich    156 00
Total    $20,498 61
66 50
32 50
230 25
76 00
53 50
198 50
36 87
2,381 90
356 36
35 25
355 67
70 00
279 50
3 50
35 00
122 00
93 00
170 00
229 26
72 00
15 00
16 00
253 50
455 39
457 S9
570 50
249 50
80 50
336 50
58 00
100 00
250 00
72 00
119 00
9 00
11 50
179 40
676 37
233 34
1,917 53
$    20,498 61 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
1) 49
Kamloops District.
Road—Adams Lake  	
„        Armour 	
„        Barriere River 	
„        Beaton-Fish Lake 	
„        Birch Island-Lost Creek 	
„        Blind Bay-Eagle Bay  	
„        Bulman-Fraser-Palmer  	
„        Buse Meadows  	
„        Campbell Creek  	
„        Campbell Meadows  	
Canadian Northern Railway Siding, Copper Creek
„        Celista   	
„        Chase Creek   '.	
„        Chase-Kault-Salmon Arm  	
„        China Valley 	
„        Cherry Creek Station 	
„        Coal Creek	
„        Douglas Lake-Grande Prairie	
„        Ducks-Grande Prairie-Falkland 	
„        Ducks Range	
„        Ducks Station-Desidero	
Edith Lake 	
„        Goose Lake  	
„        Harpers Camp  	
„        Hudson Bay Gulch 	
„        Hudson Bay Meadow 	
„        Indian Reserve Fill  	
„        Irving Station	
„        Kamloops-Anglemont  	
„       Kamloops-Nicola 	
„        Kamloops-Savona   	
„        Kamloops-Shuswnp	
„       Kamloops-Tranquille  	
„        Lac du Bois	
„        Leigh  Creek   	
„        Long Lake 	
„        Louis  Creek   	
„        Martin's  Prairie   	
„        Mitchell-Moore 	
„        Mungar-Sinclair   	
„       McLeod Range 	
„        McMurphy  	
„        Nlcola-Trapp Lake-Palmer	
„       North Thompson (east side)    ,
„        North Thompson (west side)	
Notch Hill-Blind Bay  	
„       Notch Hill-Sorrento Wharf ':	
„       Notch Hill-Tappen	
Notch Hill-West Squilax 	
„        Old Men's Home  	
„        Oxley Valley ....-	
„       Paxton Valley	
„       Pritchard Bridge 	
„       Reserve Creek  	
„       Reserve Trestle Fill	
„       Rose Hill (new)   .'	
360 70
66 00
128 00
231 75
50 00
1,907 70
59 12
69 00
400 77
1,717 40
152 50
1,774 39
5,825 68
92 00
50 00
48 50
2S5 75
199 95
2,492 97
50 00
50 00
62 00
65 00
445 95
50 00
99 50
220 00
250 00
3,370 00
3,103 93
1,529 9S
3,211 86
1,634 63
50 00
47 90
477 79
1,311 SS
48 00
43 00
49 50
33 50
132 50
134 10
5,404 00
1,449 70
163 00
50 00
155 00
50 00
739 73
30 00
45 00
1S7 59
511 18
1,191 00
959 33 D 50
Public Works Report (1919-20;
Kamloops District-
Road—Rose Hill  (old)   	
„        Salmon Arm Municipality  	
„        Shuswap-Kault-Salmon  Arm   	
„        Squilax-Churn Creek 	
„        Strawberry Heights  	
„        Sullivan Valley  	
„        Sullivan-Vinsulla   	
„       Tappen-Carlin   	
„       Todd-Duck Meadow 	
„        White Lake 	
Trail—Mad River 	
Street—Chase 	
Camp equipment	
Plant and tools  	
General 	
Supervision—General Foreman   	
Office   ..	
„ Auto   	
-Continued.
$2,1S8 55
426 05
1,239 38
130 00
869 72
1,005 25
188 34
48 OO
112 00
4S 00
176 87
554 50
497 50
50 00
322 83
S21 18
1,846 61
618 75
3,853 98
Total
54,462 32
Kaslo District.
Road—Ainsworth   (north)   	
Ainsworth  (south)   	
Alice Mine 	
Argenta	
Attwood   	
Beach   	
Bluebell   	
Blue Ridge  	
Brown-Bevan  	
Brown  Creek   	
Canadian Pacific Railway Crossing
Canning   	
Canyon-Portbill  	
Cascade Creek  	
Cemetery   	
Coffee Creek 	
Crawford Creek 	
Creston—Erickson	
Creston-Goatfell   	
Creston-Gravel-pit   	
Creston-Goat River  	
Creston-Kuskanook  	
Creston-Porthill 	
Creston-Sirdar  	
Creston-Summit Creek  	
Duck Creek 	
Duncan River (west)  	
Erickson  	
Elsie Holmes	
Flint	
Fourth of July 	
Gallagher 	
Gardner's 	
at Creston
150 25
66S 14
88 50
17 00
59 50
33 50
50 75
14 00
4 50
17 50
77 14
52 00
664 85
184 55
20 00
100 00
151 50
439 20
1,267 20
350 00
63 50
4 20
288 75
399 35
578 25
123 50
122 35
52 50
314 50
50 00
36 00
44 00
21 00 -
11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 51.
Kaslo District—Continued.
Road—Grey Creek-LaFrance	
„        Hamill Creek  	
„        Holmgren 	
„        Hood-Medford   	
„        Hope   	
„        Houston   	
„        Howser-Argenta   	
„        Howser Lake  (east)   	
„        Howser-Lardeau   	
„        Jackson 	
„    ■  Kaslo (north)  	
„       Kaslo   (south)   	
„        Kaslo (North Fork)   	
Kaslo (South Fork)   	
„        Koehle   	
„        Lardeau River  (east)   	
„        Lindsay	
„        Lucky Boy	
,,        Lynchville   	
„        Meadow Creek  	
„        Mirror Lake 	
„        Mclntyre   	
„        McMurtrie-Stewart 	
Nettie L	
„        Peters   	
Pilot Bay  	
„        Queen's Bay-Balfour  	
„        Sanca-Boswell   	
„        Smith-Peterman   	
„        Spokane   	
„        Stanley   	
„       Trout Lake-Beaton	
„       Trout Lake  (east)   	
Trout Lake-10-Mile	
„        I; tica   .■	
„       Walker   	
,, Whitewater   	
„        Williams    	
Wilmot   	
„        Winslow or Summit  	
Woodbury   (North Fork)   	
Trail—Alpine	
„        Beaver    	
„        Boswell-LaFrance  	
„        Canadian   	
„        Cariboo Creek	
„        Cooper Creek	
„        Crawford Creek 	
„        Daisy   	
„        Emerald Hill	
8-Mile   	
Ethel  	
,,        Eureka   	
„        Ferguson  (northern)   	
Fidelity    	
„        Gainor Creek   	
58
00
2
25
50
00
19
50
12
00
146 62
727
60
180
61
68
00
16 00
255
50
134 85
99
25
,357 10
51
00
125
75
25
00
28
75
466
10
100
00
551
50
57
75
4
00
22
25
185
75
92
00
357
70
332
76
131
25
28
50
24 00
892
50
3S
25
,650
23
498
00
50
75
178
25
240
45
298
50
26
25
134 00
12
00
50
00
939 40
S
75
16 00
77
00
77 00
24
00
14
00
12
00
12
00
24
00
8
75
24
00
8
75 Public Works Report (1919-20).
Kaslo District—Continued.
Trail—Goat River   	
Great Britain  	
Hall Creek 	
Healey       	
LaFrance Creek	
Lardeau River (north)   ..
Lardeau River (south)   ..
Lardeau River (west)   ...
Lockhart Creek  	
Poplar Creek   	
Queen's Bay  	
Rose's Pass  	
Scranton 	
Silver Cup	
Silver Glance  	
Silver Hill  	
Spring  Creek   	
Tenderfoot    	
Triune	
Street—Creston   	
Kaslo   	
Lardeau    	
Trout Lake	
Bridge approach—Goat River . ..
River-protection—Lardeau River
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—General Foreman  .
Office   	
$2,739 58
101 28
250 00
IS 00
346 20
148 00
101 50
13 50
26 25
34 00
101 00
8 00
35 75
25 00
26 25
24 25
24 00
12 75
49 00
76 00
8 75
432 72
106 75
8 00
62 75
5,001 69
220 50
437 69
2,840 86
Total     $     28,974 21
Lillooet District.
Road—Beaver Dam   	
Big Bar-Big Bar Mountain 	
Big Bar and Branches 	
Big Bar Ferry-Kelly Lake	
Big Bar Mountain-Crows Mountain  	
Big Creek and branches  	
Bonaparte Valley .	
Bridge Creek—Canim Lake-105-Mile House	
Bridge Creek-Horse Lake '	
Bridge River Canyon 	
Bridge River 	
Canim Lake-McNeil-Mayhood 	
Canoe Creek-Churn Creek 	
Cariboo Main  	
Chilanko Forks-Tatla Lake-Klinaklini  	
Chilcotin Main  	
Churn Creek-Hanceville  	
Clinton-Alkali	
Criss Creek	
Deadman Creek	
Deadman Creek (upper)  	
Dog Creek-Churn Creek 	
Eagle    	
54 75
603 00
378 75
2,150 97
125 50
316 89
160 00
229 50
1,206 65
75 00
1,761 40
169 50
355 50
3,689 40
222 00
870 11
386 50
1,223 75
2,191 99-
383 00
38 00
42 50
647 70 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 53
Lillooet District—Continued.
Road—Empire Valley	
„        Hat Creek  	
„        Hat Creek (upper)   	
„       J ones-Dickey	
„        Lillooet-Clinton   	
Lillooet-Lytton	
„        Lillooet-Seton Lake  	
„        Lillooet Station  	
„        Marble Canyon	
„        McGilllvray  Creek   	
„        McKinley-Horsefly   	
„        North Bonaparte	
North Fork	
„        Raphael-Pigeon-Meason   	
„        Riske Creek-Gang Ranch 	
„        Roe Lake 	
„        Scotty Creek Mining  	
„        Springhouse Prairie-Pigeon 	
„        70-Mile House-Green.Lake-Porter's Ranch 	
„        70-Mile House-Horse Lake	
„        Short Portage	
„       Tatlayoko Lake	
„       Watch Lake  	
„        Watson Bar Creek 	
„       Woods Box-High Bar  	
„        Upper Dog Creek  	
Trail—Gun Creek	
„       West of Fraser	
Street—Clinton 	
„        Lillooet   	
Camp equipment  	
Material  	
Plant and tools  	
Stable   	
General 	
Supervision—General Foreman   $2,296 20
Office    ,        600 88
„ Auto          715 17
Total	
Nanaimo District.
Road—Brechin	
„       Departure   	
,,       Extension  	
„       Five Acres 	
„       Frew's 	
„        Gordon   	
„       Harewood   	
„        Jingle Pot  	
„       Marshall 	
„       Newcastle Townsite  	
„        Old Victoria   	
„        Pine Street Extension  	
Raines   	
191 00
301 25
118 00
1,100 50
2,192 12
2,325 37
601 00
444 00
89 75
49 00
25 00
406 00
1,870 37
50 00
24 00
429 88
4 00
15 00
227 00
40 00
34 00
71 75
141 00
43 00
193 25
70 00
30 00
374 00
50 00
323 00
712 75
498 S9
759 71
4,982 62
185 97
3,612 25
$  39,867
79
$    269
00
803
1.3
282
00
2,468
93
48
00
164
00
615
50
188
25
25
00
304 00
270
34
2 05
121
50 D 54
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
764 20
1,208 80
54 00
150 00
90 00
129 50
152 00
42 50
45 60
566 07
$      8,764 37
$    37 00
35 00
67 50
49 00
2,247 74
400 97
3 71
192 15
Nanaimo District—Continued.
Road—South Wellington   	
„        Victoria-Campbell River 	
„        Wellington    	
„        Wilkinson    	
„        York   	
Street—Machleary  2	
„ Nichol   	
„ Robin  	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer     $350 00
Office       102 83
Auto     113 24
Total 	
Nelson District.
Road—Mountain   	
„        McKim   	
„        South Nelson   	
„        Svoboda   	
Street—Nelson-Fairview 	
„ Rosemont   	
Plant and tools  	
General Foreman   	
Total	
Newcastle District.
Road—Adshead   	
„        Ainscough    	
„        Barnes   	
„        Beck's  	
„        Bennie's  (Yellow Point)   	
„       Brenton   	
„        Brown's   	
„       Carmichael's  	
„        Code's   	
„        Christie and Wallace 	
„        Cram's	
„        Davis	
„        East  Wellington   	
„        Extension   	
„        Fourth Avenue	
„        Frame's	
„        Gilfillame's	
„        Greenaway 	
„        Halberg's  	
„        Haslam's	
„        Heemer's   	
„        Holden-Corso	
„        Holmes	
„       Jingle Pot	
„        Juliet's  .. .•	
„       Ladysmith Extension 	
„   Lake 	
3,033 07
230 50
60 00
250 00
887 35
769 60
162 00
50 35
53 00
289 50
48 50
54 00
50 00
539 10
776 00
111 50
49 50
23 00
102 50
8 00
283 00
260 00
436 00
28 75
547 20
50 00
965 50
275 90 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
Newcastle District—Continued.
Road—Lockuer's  	
Meredith   	
Michael-Doole    	
Michael-Hill   	
Michael  	
Morden  	
Northfield School*.	
Old South Wellington  .. .
Old Victoria	
Patricia   	
Pearson's	
Quesnel 	
Richardson's, No. 42	
Richardson's, No. 45	
Saltair   	
South Forks 	
Southern's   	
South Wellington   	
Street's  	
Swan's   	
Thatcher's   	
Third Avenue	
Thomas-Yellow  Point   . ..
. Tiesus  	
Victoria-Campbell River  .
Vowell's   	
Waterloo   	
Watt's	
Weaver's   	
Westwood	
Wilgress   	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools  	
Supervision—Assistant  Engineer
Office   	
Auto   	
$1,059 S6
260 00
303 15
Total  	
Road—D.L. 172, River
New Westminster District.
North Okanagan District.
Cherry Creek Section—
Road—Deep Creek Cut-off  ...
Monashee  	
Outlet   	
„        Richlands Subdivision
„        Sugar Lake 	
Enderby Section—
Road—Deep Creek	
Enderby-Vernon   	
Fortune (old)  	
Fortune (new)  	
Glenmary   	
Gunther-Ellison  	
D 55
425 00
40 00
430 00
121 00
56 00
469 00
42 00
136 50
109 50
522 00
47 50
228 00
43 00
40 00
30 00
275 00
15 25
808 00
110 00
37 00
100 00
48 50
1,127 10
154 00
6,127 18
SO 00
836 75
17 25
117 50
42 60
159 50
19 74
152 05
1,023 01
21,980 68
3,113 90
600
10
730
IS
11
50
173
00
296
00
,568
75
221
00
31
50
2
16
556
25
245
00 D 56
Public Works Report (1919-20)
North Okanagan District—Continued.
Enderby Section—Continued.
Road—Loon Lake 	
„       Mallory Branch  	
„        Salmon Arm 	
„        Salmon River 	
„        School-house Branch	
„        Spallumcheen Municipality 	
Lumby Section—
Road—Creighton Valley  	
„        Dure Meadows	
Miller's  	
„        Shuswap Avenue 	
„        Whitevale Subdivision 	
Trail—Bluenose  	
„        Headgate   	
„        Larch Creek	
. „        Vernon-Monashee   	
Street—Lumby Village  	
Mabel Lake Section—
Road—Enderby-Mara	
„       Mabel Lake 	
„       Trinity Valley   	
Mara Section—■
Road—Carlin Orchards 	
Coel-Jones	
Enderby-Mara   	
Grandview 	
Grindrod	
Grindrod-West Bench  	
Grindrod (west side)  	
Inch-Logan   	
Johnston	
Mara  	
Matthews 	
Monk's ,	
Mud Lake	
Mud Lake (east side)   	
Riverside   	
Seymour Arm 	
Salmon River Section—
Road—Boleau Creek	
Cedar Hill	
Fowler-Willett  	
„        Glenemma-Armstrong   	
„       Morgan 	
„        Salmon River Valley	
„        Vernon-Kamloops   	
Shuswap Section—
Road—Lumby-Mabel Lake	
„        Rollings Lake 	
„     - School-house   	
„        Squaw Valley  	
Silver Creek Section—
Road—Foster    <	
Fowler-Willett 	
„       Haines   	
„   Salmon River 	
181 00
217 00
737 50
332 50
30 00
115 50
745 32
38 00
46 75
18 50
3 50
137 00
6 30
100 00
1,470 00
77 90
61 00
1,792 11
35 00
71 62
5 00
138 87
1,412 31
321 00
52 00
IS 25
53 70
83 00
332 75
119 50
13 50
37 00
6 63
176 42
387 00
138 75
11 00
48 00
87 80
526 50
108 55
1,016 52
788 75
49 00
46 50
467 75
172 50
1,137 50
■  54 50
477 00 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 57
North Okanagan District-
Spallumcheen Municipality—
Road—Pleasant Valley  	
Trinity Section—
Road—Bobbie Burns   	
Vernon Section—
Road—Baker-Hoy   	
Brickyard Gulch  	
Coldstream Municipality 	
Commonage 	
Eastside   	
East Vernon Subdivision	
Kamloops  	
Keddleston 	
Kelowna  	
L.A.  Subdivision   	
Long Lake 	
Monashee 	
Okanagan Bench 	
Okanagan Landing  	
Oyama Fruit Lots 	
Pleasant Valley  	
Tronson	
Woods Lake Fruit Land	
Whiteman Section—
Road—Bighorn	
„       Irish Creek  	
„        Westside 	
Plant and tools  	
Material on hand  	
General   	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer 	
„ Office   	
„ Auto   	
-Continued.
$2,277 35
814 24
.     801 66
125 64
28 50
100 00
9 00
500 00
333 20
40 00
926 45
665 70
713 12
1,947 22
224 50
685 52
732 76
94 75
611 50
95 25
96S 75
56 12
762 S4
50 00
140 00
346 OS
3,272 47
796 03
1,010 13
3,893 25
Total    $    38,198 33
Total expenditure  $38,598 68
. Less charged to Bridges   400 35
Total  $38,198 33
North Vancouver District.
Road—Beach Avenue  (east)   .
„ Beach Avenue  (west)
„ Beach Drive  	
„ Big Bend  ,
„ Blower's Lots 	
„ Bowen Island Trunk  ,
„ Burn
rns
Carter 	
Chamberlain   	
Cowan (Bowen Island) .
Dorman	
Eagle Cliff	
Gibson-Sechelt  	
Gibson Townsite	
Grafton  (Bowen Island)
87 50
50 00
50 00
15 00
50 00
427 19
28 00
25 00
118 50
40 00
15 00
60 00
2,557 08
50 00
1S3 12 D 58
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
North Vancouver District—Continued.
Road—Grantham Townsite  	
Grant-Glasford	
„        Green    w	
„       Hanbury 	
„        Hinsta-Henry  	
Judd   	
„        Kasne's 	
„        Lanlois   	
„       Lye-Lockyer   	
„       Magee  	
„        Mason-Sechelt   	
Millar	
„        Moodyville	
„        Moodyville Diversion  	
,,        Mortimer	
„        McLaughlin  	
„        Newlands  	
„        North   	
Old Cariboo	
„        Paradise Valley 	
„        Pemberton Meadows 	
„        Pemberton Portage 	
„        Pemberton Valley  	
„        Porpoise Bay    *	
Pratt	
Reid 	
„        Roberts Creek	
„        Roberts Creek (lower)  	
„        Sechelt-Salmon Arm	
„        Sechelt-North-west Bay 	
„        Side  	
„ Smith   (Bowen Island)	
„        Squamish Valley  	
„        Station   	
„       Victoria    •	
Wilander   	
Trail—Bargain Harbour	
„        Co-operative   	
„        Gam-bier Island  	
„        Hecley	
„        Sakinaw  	
„        Squamish Lake	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools   	
Scow—Dermody's	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $845 15
Office       227 44
Auto   (motor-cycle)        117 95
„ Evinrude motor         41 06
Total	
Omineca District.
Road—Aldermere-Pleasant Valley 	
„       Ashman's Coal Property  ^	
Barrett Station  	
74 50
149 75
20 75
40 00
89 00
35 00
26 00
115 75
185 00
2 00
412 00
40 00
2,863 43
2,23S 19
100 00
100 00
13 00
4 00
144 00
27 00
187 S2
1,10,8 66
1,903 66
77 00
74 63
75 00
512 59
230 00
24 02
537 20
25 00
2 00
3,024 38
206 00
188 00
52 00
72 50
141 85
96 00
6 50
33 50
71 35
43 35
460 22
118 42
1,231 60
$
20,933 01
$
5,064 35
294 75
758 25 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 59
Omineca District—Continued.
Road—Bourgon Settlement     $ 402 00
Burns Lake-Babine  996 22
Chicken Lake (east side)  220 00
Colley  Mountain    '  1,416 90
Driftwood Creek Sleigh  244 00
Eakin Settlement  100 00
East Round Lake  10S 00
„        Endako-Francois Lake  370 10
Forestdale-Dog Lake    510 00
Forestdale Station  208 10
„        Glen Meadow-Salmon Creek  317 00
Haynes Settlement   1,326 70
Hazelton-Aldermere  8,496 56
„        Hazelton-Skeena Crossing    1,447 00
Heal-Norris     343 75
Houston-North Bulkley  :  215 00
„        Hubert-Babiue-Dome Mountain  215 00
„       Hudson Bay Mountain Sleigh   1,328 59
„        Keefe's Landing-Ootsa Lake   .-  1,554 53
Kispiox Valley   4,677 30
„        Main-Fraser Lake     6,478 41
„       McCabe Settlement   507 00
McDonald Landing  335 45
„       New Hazelton High Level  250 75
9-Mile Mountain  817 80
„        North Francois Lake   4,038 50
North Round Lake   647 25
„        Pleasant Valley-Francois Lake  936 50
Poplar Park    607 90
„        Smithers-Hudsou Bay Mountain    484 60
Telkwa-Canyon Creek   1,367 30
Telkwa-Canyon Creek Cut-off   795 75
„        Telkwa-Howson  Creek     635 13
Uncha Lake  1,697 72
West Side of Bulkley  (Chicken Lake-Telkwa)     605 74
„        West Side of Bulkley (Moriceton-Chicken Lake)   ... *  860 50
„        West End of Francois-Ootsa Lake  1.146 75
„       West Side of Skeena   375 90
Trail—Groundhog     170 50
„       Manson Creek  709 00
Main Fork of Telkwa River  180 00
Camp equipment    1,552 62
Plant and tools  2,059 35
Stable (stock on hand)     1,229 22
Supervision—Assistant Engineer  ;  $3,1S8 20
Office        1,561 84
Auto          415 84
  5,165 88
Total    $ 64,329 62
Prince Rupert District.
Road—Anahim Lake   $ 392 40
„        Andimaul    272 00
Ardagh    364 30
„        Braekenridge-Copper City     681 75 Trail-
Prince Rupert District—Continued.
-Canoe Crossing     $      l
Copper City-Kitimat    2
Corlette   	
Dairy   	
Delkatla-Chown Point 	
Egan's   	
Firvale   	
Gold Creek-Copper River	
Gold Creek-Usk 	
Hagensborg    2
Houston Inlet •	
Hughes   	
Ikeda-Jedway   	
Kalltim-Lake Shore  	
Kitimat	
Kitkatla Trunk  	
Kitsumgallum Lake Main   5,
Kitsumgallum Lake Shore 	
Kitsumgallum-Terrace   	
Kitwanga-Andimaul  	
Kitwanga-Kitsequekla 	
Kitwanga Wagon	
Klinaklini   	
Lakelse Hatchery	
Legate Creek   	
Lome Creek	
Masset-Delkatla	
Meanskiuisht-Kitwanga     1.
Merkley	
Minette Bay	
McLeod 	
McPherson 	
North Beach 	
Old Masset-New Masset  	
Phillips Creek	
Producer «	
Saloomt   	
Silver Lake 	
Skidegate-Queen Charlotte City  1,
Skidegate-Tlell      2,
Stewart Landing  	
Stome-Atnarko 	
Terrace Ferry -  1,
Tow Hill-Spence Lake   1,
Usk-Vanarsdol  •■	
Walker's 	
West  Settlement  	
Yakoun Point-Tow Hill  	
-Carr-Whittle 	
Chimdemash   	
Copper River 	
Gold Harbour 	
Honan River 	
Mexican Tom  	
Nadu River 	
Oona River 	
,118
45
,662
75
526
30
46 00
713
•37
21 00
,314 35
145
20
588
65
JOS
06
61
85
113
70
92
20
28
10
19
70
428 67
,445
85
335
50
90
SO
9
70
50
70
745
57
644
20
3
25
331
50
683
48
88
40
,971
58
339
03
49 00
979
50
96
10
58
00
303
50
925
00
61
10
458
60
103
30
,949
81
,093
05
31
00
138
50
,506
72
,377
55
798
20
22
00
316
20
62
35
627
50
40 00
911
80
3
75
37
20
214
20
474 65
206
60 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 61
238 66
336 52
115 05
71 00
517 50
49 70
311 50
226 35
1,427 18
102 50
2,660 25
Prince Rupert District—Continued.
Trail—Queen's	
„        Smith Island	
Turner's   	
Street—New Masset 	
„ Port Essington    '	
„        Queen Charlotte City  	
Sidewalk—Salt Lakes (plank walk)  	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools  	
General 	
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,341 75
Office           293 10
„ Launch and boats    25 40
Total 	
Revelstoke District.
Road—Albert Canyon-Silver Creek 	
„ Arrowhead (north)  	
„ Arrow Lake	
„ Barlow   	
„ Beaton-Camborne   	
„ Beaton-Comaplix 	
„ Beaton-Trout Lake	
„ Big Bend 	
„ Boyle Avenue 	
„ Craigellachie-Malakwa   	
„ Craigellachie-Taft 	
„ Cranberry Creek-Hall's Landing  	
„ Crawford Creek 	
„ Deep Water Landing, Beaton	
„ Eagle Pass  	
„ Fish River  (Camborne)   	
„ Fosthall Creek	
„ Galena Bay 	
„ Greely Creek  	
„ Halcyon   	
„ Hall's Landing (north)  	
„ Hall's Landing (south)   	
,-, Hall's Landing Ferry 	
„ Halverson	
„ Hawley's   	
„ Hill Creek-Galena Bay 	
„ Johnson-Ross-Malakwa	
„ Kencheck (Galena Bay)	
„ Malakwa-Bowie   	
„ Malakwa-Craigellachie-Taft   	
„ Malakwa (local)   	
,, Malakwa   (north)   	
„ Malakwa-South Ditch 	
,, Maiakwa-Summerville 	
„ Malakwa-Tredget   	
„ Montana Slough	
„ McCoullock Creek  	
,, Nelson 	
„ Nichol's	
$  48,030
96
$    86 00
332
98
73
75
124
00
327
92
20
50
1,687
74
3,483
99
9
00
25
00
123
20
6
50
237
50
153
50
58S
50
722
75
256 50
369
87
1,465
30
65
70
765
31
545
25
119
80
101
75
14
00
31
60
63
75
16 00
109
50
196
75
500
55
9
25
143
00
10
00
14
00
10
00
' 36
00
32
00
13
00 D 62
Public Works Report (1919-20)
Revelstoke District—Continued.
Road—Okanagan  	
Olson's	
Payne's  	
Power-house   	
Procunier   	
Revelstoke  (east, west of Columbia River)
Revelstoke  (Eighth Street south)   	
Revelstoke (Fourth Street)   	
Revelstoke   (local)   	
Revelstoke (6-Mile South)   	
Revelstoke  (south)	
Revelstoke (south-west of Columbia)   	
Revelstoke   (west)   	
Roberts 	
Rosebery   	
Samuelson-Solsqua  	
Scott Creek 	
Sicamous-Eagle Landing	
Sicamous-Solsqtta-Bowie   	
Sillas  '..
Solsqua-Bertois   	
Solsqua-Bowie   	
Solsqua-Bowie-Malakwa    	
Solsqua-Julett   	
Solsqua   (local)   	
Solsqua-Payne   	
Solsqua-Sicamous   	
Somerville   	
Taft-Sicamous   	
Wards-Malakwa   	
Trail—Beatrice	
Big Bend Main   "	
Carnes  Creek   	
Craigellachie Railway Crossing  	
Downie  Creek   	
Eva   	
15-Mile   	
Goldfinch   	
Lexington 	
Pingston  Creek	
Waverly   	
Westerberg	
Wigwan   	
Street—Arrowhead   	
Beaton   	
Revelstoke  	
Bridge approach—Greeley Creek  	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools  	
General	
Supervision—General Foreman  	
Office   	
Auto	
$2,467 44
244 88
392 65
44 00
140 50
5 50
8 00
54 37
362 75
165 00
2,045 19
1,247 75
1,190 00
643 51
250 50
35 00
72 00
13 50
296 38
17 00
41 00
635 18
84 00
29 00
12 00
149 50
15 50
65 00
212 50
83 25
37 00
5 75
44 40
110 75
718 75
37 00
128 IS
52 00
21 00
75 00
IS 25
32 75
54 00
313 15
27 00
41S 69
388 61
26 27
32 25
377 25
37 15
1,200 16
32 75
3,104 97
Total   $ 2S,102 73 2       V   '.   .
11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 63
7,612 36
145 31
129 51
15 75
486 00
8,388 93
3,967 89
114 09
Richmond District (Point Grey Roads).
Road—Marine Drive   	
Street—Imperial   	
Plant and tools  	
Auto   	
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $3S8 05
Office          70 00
„ Motor-cycle          27 95
Total  	
Richmond District.
Road—River   	
Auto	
Total	
Rossland District.
Road—Big Sheep Creek  	
„        Columbia-Kootenay   	
„        Deschamps   (north)   	
„        Murray  	
„        Rock Creek 	
„       Rossland-Patterson   	
„        Rossland-Trail   	
„        Sheep Lake 	
„        Stony Creek   	
„        Violin Lake 	
Trail—Murphy Creek	
„        Old Rossland  	
Camp equipment  	
Plant anil tools	
Supervision—General Foreman    $374 20
Office          2 90
Total 	
Saanich District.
Road—Burnside   	
„        Observatory     •.
„        Ross-Durrance   	
„        West Saanich  	
Plant and tools  	
Total 	
Similkameen District.
Road—Allandale   	
„        Armstrong Ferry 	
„        China Creek  	
„        Copper Mountain 	
„        Darcy Mountain	
„       Deer Valley 	
„       Dog Lake 	
„        Fairview-Keremeos   	
„        Fairview-Osoyoos   	
„        Fairview-Penticton    	
„        Fairview-Rock Creek   	
4.0S1 98
148 50
104 00
41 00
78 00
165 00
1,605 52
3,550 34
34 00
2S8 50
311 35
18 50
99 50
1 95
82 07
377 10
6,905 33
$   6,009
67
92
50
1,614
93
500
00
30 00
S,247 10
64 50
76 50
21 53
1,921 10
57 50
44 00
104 50
946 15
446 50
2,364 75
97 00 D 64
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Similkameen District—Continued:
Road—Fairview-Vaseaux Lake    $ 25 00
„        Fairview-White Lake    637 50
„        Farleigh    17 25
„       5-Mile-Princeton     246 06
„        Granite-Coalmont     3S5 50
Granite Creek  135 00
„        Granite Mountain   i  8 75
„        Hambrie Mountain   33 00
Hedley-Keremeos     860 90
Hedley-Princeton     1,487 40
„     ' Hedley-20-Mile    7 00
„        Hope-Princeton     67 25
„        Kaleden-Okanagan Falls     172 00
„       Kaleden Townsite   450 97
„        Keremeos Junction Ranch    646 75
„        Keremeos Station     579 12
Kruger Mountain     233 00
„       Lowe's Subdivision  1,282 50
„        Marron Valley  540 82
„        Myers Flat-Okanagan Falls  188 50
McLean Creek    236 51
1-Mile-Princeton     203 20
Oro Pino     27 00
„        Osoyoos-Sidley Mountain    9S7 50
.„        Osoyoos-Similkameen  391 75
„        Penticton-Carmi     135 50
Penticton-Fish Lake  2,005 12
„       Penticton-Summerland  9S0 58
Penticton Trunk  193 39
Princeton-Otter Lake '  2,591 00
„        Princeton-Stevenson Creek  41 75
„        Princeton-Tulameen River   22 25
„        Richter  Mountain    .•  44 00
Shingle Creek  '  303 OO
Similkameen City-Burr   101 00
„        South Keremeos  284 25
„        South Similkameen  594 25
Sterling Creek  24 00
„        Summers Creek    136 00
Tulameen-Summit City  2S4 40
Trail—Hope  165 00
Wide West  48 00
Yellow Lake-Sheep Creek  155 50
Street—Hedley  54 20
„         Keremeos     5S 50
Main  3,354 83
Princeton  1.584 53
Camp equipment    712 27
Plant and tools  1|3°1 27
General    584 57
Supervision—General Foreman     $2,300 00
Office           585 80
Auto        929 60
  3,815 40
Total   ?    35,56S S2 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 65
Slocan District.
Arrowhead Section—
Road—Arrow Park 	
„        Columbia River  (east)   ...	
„        Columbia River (west)  	
„        Harrison    	
„        Rock Island-MacKinson's-Harrison   	
Burton and Graham's Landing Section—
Road—Belleview-Graham's Landing 	
„        Columbia River  (east)   	
„        Columbia River  (west)   	
Trail—Goat Canyon 	
Burton City Section—
Road—Millie Mack 	
„        McCormack  	
Trail—Cariboo Creek 	
Chieftain	
Millie Mack 	
Deniars (West) Section—■   *
Road—Columbia River  (east)   	
,,       AVest Demars  	
Deer Park and Renata Section—
Road—Blue  Bird   	
„       Deer Park  (south)   	
„        Dog Creek  	
„       Renata   	
Trail—Deer Park-Broadwaite 	
Edgewood Section—■
Road—Brown-Robinson   	
„       Edgewood-Cemetery  	
„       Edgewood-Fire Valley 	
„       Edgewood-Forslands   	
„        Edgewood-Vernon	
„       Ferratt's   	
„        Lightning Peak   	
Trail—Fauquier-Applegrove	
Street—Edgewood  	
Fauquier Section—
Road—Fauquier-Porter's   	
„        Fauquier   (south)   	
„        Fauquier  (upper)   	
Nakusp and Brouse Section—
Road—Crescent Bay 	
„        Nakusp  (east)   	
„        Stevenson 	
Street—Nakusp    -	
Nakusp Section—
Road—Alexander Avenue 	
„       Brouse   	
„       Columbia River (east)   	
„       Nakusp-Box Lake 	
„       Shakespeare Avenue ■	
„        Summit	
Trail—Hot Spring	
Needles Section—
Road—Columbia River  (north)   	
„        Craft's Ranch 	
5
150
00
2
50
457 00
1S3
00
37
50
54
56
52S
50
150 00
45
00
100 00
50
00
70
00
50 00
85
00
337
75
199
50
389
77
50
00
50
00
50 00
40
00
50 00
149
75
99
50
300
00
433
75
368
42
251
20
350
50
99
88
343
75
108
61
49
84
466
25
152
25
35
00
572
57
15
00
98
75
329
46
556
70
150
00
50 00
22
00
57 11
109
50 66
Public Works Report (1919-20)
Slocan District-
Needles Section—Continued.
Road—Needles-Fire Valley  	
Needles-Forsland's   	
„       Whatshan Lake  	
New Denver and Rosebery Section—
Road—East Fork of Wilson Creek	
„       New Denver-Hartney   	
„        New Denver-Rosebery  	
„       New Denver-Rosebery Diversion ....
„       New Denver-Silverton	
„        New Denver-Three Forks	
Street—New Denver 	
Sandon and Cody Section—■
Road—Cody   	
„       Payne   	
Star  	
Trail—Mountain Con 	
„        Reco   	
„        Sandon-Three Forks	
„        Wonderful-Queen Bess   	
Silverton Section—
Road—Comstock   	
„        Silverton—4-Mile  Creek   	
„        Silverton-Red Mountain  	
„       Standard   	
Trail—Condor	
8-Mile	
„        Fennel  Creek   	
„       Fisher Maiden  	
„        Metallic Mine  	
„        Noonday   '.	
Wakefield 	
Street—Silverton   	
Slocan City Section—
Road—Black Prince 	
„        Beaver Creek  	
„        Enterprise	
„        Evening Star  	
„        Goat Creek  	
„       Lemon Creek  	
Lily B '..	
„        Ottawa   	
„        Republic    	
„       Slocan City-Lemon Creek	
„        Springer Creek 	
10-Mile Creek 	
„        Westmount	
Trail—Summit Creek 	
„        10-Mile-Springer Creek  	
Slocan Valley Section—
Road—Lemon Creek-Winlaw 	
Lebado-Willett's   	
Little Slocan River '	
Passmore   	
Perry Siding 	
Winlaw-Lebado   	
Winlaw   (north)   	
-Continued.
~ 51 00
316 50
100 00
40 00
75 00
291 71
1,876 43
763 09
488 50
213 51
694 42
100 00
200 78
76 00
265 CO
307 50
135 00
90 00
3,120 94
433 75
24 00
110 00
S2 00
93 50
52 00
57 00
39 00
32 00
346 07
82 00
313 50
68 00
34 00
112 00
33 00
33 00
97 50
199 50
331 50
679 00
462 88
42 00
18 00
98 00
474 25
299 81
50 00
100 00
298 50
306 00
117 00 	
11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 67
Slocan District—Continued.
Slocan Valley-Section—Continued.
Road—Winlaw-Passruore   $ 451 76
Three Forks Section—
Road—Monitor-Queen Bess    9 00
Three Forks-Sandon  599 24
Trail—Jo-Jo     27 00
„        Lone Bachelor    ,. 48 50
„        McAllister  36 00
„        North Fork of Carpenter Creek   177 50
Rambler  193 00
„        Silverton   30 00
Three Forks-Alamo    14 00
Plant and tools '  438 21
Supervision—General Foreman    $2,418 30
Office           129 15
  2,547 45
Total     $    27,595 47
Alvaston Section  South Okanagan District.
Road—Bulman Back    -..  $ 65 00
Glenmore Valley     38 00
„        Kelowna-Vernon     964 50
Lewis-Bailey     293 00
McKinley Wharf   :  34 00
„     . Oceola-Okanagan Centre     314 00
„        Okanagan Centre Subdivision   375 00
Scottie Creek    280 00
Woods Lake Bottom   200 25
Kelowna Section—
Road—Belgo    485 40
Benvoulin     85 00
„        Glenmore  Subdivision ■  1,752 00
Gulchigan    588 65
Harris Branch  50 00
Harvey Ranch     50 00
Hydraulic Creek    169 00
Joe Ritchie   :  463 50
Kelowna-Vernon  2,353 20
K.L.O  1,583 07
K.L.O. Bench, No. 19  798 50
K.L.O. Fruit Lots, No. 28   297 00
Lake Shore    339 70
McKinley Wharf   48 00
Orchard's Gravel-pit  38 25
Richter    274 35
Rutland Gravel-pit    38 25
Rutland  Subdivision    '  1,878 21
„        South Okanagan and branches   509 47
Spiers    ,  149 25
Sterling Branch   50 00
„       Woodlawn  Subdivision     811 00
Naramata Section—
Road—Aitkins  234 50
„        Arawana and branches   19 00
„       Naramata Subdivision  466 94 D 68
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
South Okanagan District—Continued.
Naramata Section—Continued.
Road—North Naramata  	
„       Penticton-Naramata  	
Street—Naramata Valley  	
Summerland Section—
Road—Bathville 	
Meadow Valley   	
Meadow Valley and branches	
Peachland-Princeton   	
Shingle Creek 	
Summerland-Peachland 	
Trepanier and branches  	
Westbank Section—■
Road—Gellatly 	
Glenrosa and branches	
Glenrosa 	
Kelowna  Ferry   	
Westbank-Peachland   	
Westbank Subdivision  	
Westside	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools  	
General 	
Supervision—General Foreman      $2,460 45
Office    ,        553 44
Auto          8S5 76
Total   $29,761 80
Castlegar Section—
Road—Castlegar Ferry Approach
„        East Robson  	
„        Pass Creek  	
„       Trail-Castlegar   	
Columbia Garden Section—
Road—Nelson-Waneta 	
„       Trail-Sayward   	
Granite Road and Branches—
Road—Granite   	
„        Knox  	
„        Kootenay River	
Lambert's Mill  	
Harrop and Procter Section—
Road—Harrop-Procter 	
Nelson and Balfour Section—
Road—Molly Gibson	
„        Nelson-Balfour   	
Pend d'Oreille Section—
Road—Bunkers Hill	
4-Mile   	
„       Fruitvale-Pend d'Oreille ..
Pend d'Oreille	
Trail District.
169
00
585
75
357
25
12
00
61
00
■ 25
00
24 CO
52
00
3,153
51
100 00
104 00
39
25
178 00
2,139
75
329 00
425
25
187
35
379
00
833
59
611
46
3,899 65
Total   $    29,761 SO
Expenditure     $29,795 90
Less transferred to Bridges    34 10
1,108
99
75
00
151
00
1,071
00
1,335
27
731
50
1,958
22
50 00
424
77
150
00
609 91
50 00
2,603 94
260 00
100 00
606 50
1,396 44 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 69
Trail District—Continued.
Salmo Section—
Road—Athabaska   	
„        Boundary Lake   	
Burnt Flat	
„        California Mine	
„       Emerald  	
„        Fruitvale  Subdivision   	
,,        Hagland  	
„        Hudson Bay	
„        Lost Creek	
„       Nelson—Waneta	
„        Salmon River 	
Second Relief 	
„        Silver King 	
„        Wild Horse  	
Wolf Creek  	
„        Yankee Girl	
„        Yellowstone  	
„        Ymir Mine 	
Trail—Bayonne   	
„       Reno and Donnybrook  	
Street—Salmo  	
„ Ymir	
Shoreacres Section—
Road—Kootenay River  	
„        Pass Creek  	
„        Slocan River	
„       Thrums-Brilliant	
Trail Section—
Road—Bush   	
„       East Robson  	
„       Nelson-AVaneta   	
„       Pass  Creek   	
„        Ross   	
,.       Trail-Castlegar    -.	
Trail-Central Park	
„       Trail East and East Trail 	
„       Trail-Fort Sheppard   '	
Trail-Fruitlands Cut-off 	
„       Trail-Rossland   	
„       Trail-Sayward  	
Sidewalks—East Trail	
Camp equipment  	
Plant and tools  	
General  	
Supervision—General Foreman     $1,770 90
Office           200 73
Auto        479 06
Total 	
Yale District.
Road—Aberdeen Mines 	
„       Agassiz-Rosedale Ferry	
Ashcroft-14-Mile House	
54 00
10 00
344 75
54 00
350 00
744 26
150 00
28 00
156 50
1,599 98
441 75
529 32
61 00
298 50
100 00
14 00
2,309 11
53 90
40 00
100 00
122 49
49 75
1,553 00
1,119 00
1,064 44
35 20
31 50
22 00
264 00
166 00
36 50
3,835 95
104 00
314 97
169 50
161 50
67 30
2,030 95
16 20
66 94
675 73
24 50
2,450 69
?
34,503 72
$
22 50
197 34
602 90 D 70
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Yale District—Continued.
Road—Asheroft-Spences Bridge	
„       Back Valley  	
„       Barnes Lake 	
„        Bate's    *.	
„        Benjamin   "	
„        Cache Creek Bridge 	
„       Cache Creek-Savona  	
„        Chaumox   	
„       Cain Valley	
„        Cariboo  	
„        Coldwater   	
„        Colletteville 	
„        Coutlee Mountain  	
Cornwall Cut-off  	
„       Coyote Valley 	
„        Crisco   	
„        Deadman Creek 	
„        Douglas Lake 	
8-Mile Creek 	
5-Mile	
„        Fish Lake  	
„        Fish Lake Valley	
„        Footbridge-Coquihalla River 	
„       George's	
„        Gladwin   	
„        Grimshire's   	
„        Haig-Yale   	
„       Harper's Mill 	
„        Harrison Hot Springs	
„        Hat Creek   (upper)   	
„        Herling Island Ferry 	
„        Highland Valley   	
„       Hope-Haig	
„        Hope-ropcum    	
„       Hope-Rosedale  	
„        Iron Mountain	
„       Loon Lake 	
„       Lillooet-Lytton   	
„        Mamete Lake  	
„        Manning 	
„        Merritt-Nicola   	
„       Merritt-Princeton   	
„       Middlesboro	
Mill Creek 	
„       Murray Creek 	
„        Nicola-Kamloops  	
„       Nicola-Princeton	
„       Nicola-Stamp Lake	
„        North Lytton  	
1-Mile Creek  	
„        Olsen's   	
Petit Creek  	
„       Pike Mountain 	
„       Salmon River 	
„       Spences Bridge-Merritt 	
„        Sunshine Valley 	
,529
47
72
00
220 00
117 25
93
00
,979
65
945
32
233
25
98 50
322
OO
586
55
210
50
50
50
35
52
379
00
106
50
120
50
584
00
32
63
76 00
202
75
120 00
16 05
48
00
6S
00
259
50
539
50
38
75
489
50
480
40
597
06
639
85
108
75
788
SI
809
09
48
00
438
65
565
13
939
77
45
00
438
75
,069
70
122
00
270
75
138
00
53
90
ISO 00
427
28
429
15
7
25
60
45
267
95
51
50
130
50
173
56
118
80 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 71
Yale District—Continued.
Road—Venable Valley    $ 256 50
Voigt Valley    242 12
Walhachin  262 75
„       Water-gauge, Fraser River    12 00
Winch  237 25
Winney      43 25
Trail—Skagit     252 00
Street—Ashcroft     395 65
Hope   17 05
Lytton     94 87
Yale  79 87
Camp equipment    624 67
Material      • 2,063 63
Plant and tools :  1,022 46
Stable    '. '  2,052 63
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $2,843 20
Office           511 89
Auto          998 15
  4,353 24
Total   $ 41,807 58
Bridges.
Alberni District.
Alberni Cut-off, No. 1   $ 154 00
Alberni Cut-off, No. 3  11 00
Alberni Road, No. 6  *.  107 00
Alberni Road, No. 8   26 00
Alberni Road, No. 9   37 00
Cache Creek-Stranby Ferry   230 10
Chalet  50 30
Englishman's River, No. 9'  741 45
French Creek (near Parksville)    1,205 80
Hamilton Creek, No. 101  23 00
Hector, No. 55 (St. Joseph Valley)  48 43
Holberg, No. 1   ; •  22 00
Holberg, No. 2   7 75
Island Highway; No. 2  12 00
Island Highway, No. 3  17 00
Island Highway, No. 4  12 00
Island Highway, No. 5  11 00
Island Highway, No. 6  11 00
Island Highway, No. 7  21 50
Island Highway, No. 10  39 37
Island Highway, No. 11  15 33
Island Highway, No. 12 (Grandon Slough)    308 75
Island Highway, No. 13 (Grandon Creek)   312 65
Kitsuksis     3.528 85
Lake Shore, No. 1  • 8 71
Lake Shore, No. 2  •  8 70
Lake Shore, No. 3  ;  48 12
Lake Shore, No. 4   11 51
Mission   71 °4
McCoy Creek  20 4°
Nanaimo Road, No. 93  5 18
Peninsula-Ucluelet  4 Oo Alberni District—Continued.
River Bend (Somass River)      $ 18 CO
Rogers Creek     1,064 51
San Josef Valley, No. 1  25 00
San Josef Valley, No. 2 ,  138 39
San Josef Valley, No. 4   4 00
San Josef Valley, No. 6  9 50
San Josef Valley, No. 7   9 50
San Josef Valley, No. 8  4 25
San Josef Valley, No. 9   2 00
San Josef Valley, No. 10   3 25
San Josef Valley, No. 11   8 25
Thompson's     149 55
Tippet's   (at Powder-works)  260 09
Virginia  79 60
General  :  284 97
Total   $ 9,191 85
Atlin District.
Bear River     $ 2,452 93
Clearwater Creek (Kitsault Trail)    289 50
Halfway  »   2,6S3 94
Klehini  75 00
Marmot River  320 00
Pine Creek-McKee Creek Road   2,290 85
Stephendike-Pine Creek    2,917 28
Stikine, No. 22  895 02
Tahltan, No. 17  224 25
Tooya, No. 27  '.  155 50
General   16 50
Total  )...   $ 12,320 78
Atlin (South) District.
Little Deloire, No. 16    $ 150 00
Trout Creek  072 00
Total     $ 822 00
Cariboo District. •
Alexis Creek (Chilcotin River)       $ 12,655 02
Australian Creek   207 54
Baker Creek    239 00
Blackwater     2>563 42
Blackwater Road (11-Mile Creek)    S9 00
Big Lake    40 00
Blanch Creek    64 00
Blue Stone Creek  39 00
Boachie Creek  63 37
Boyd's Ranch   43_ 50_
Burns Creek    25 75
Canyon Creek (Fort George-Quesnel Road)    3-604 6^
Canyon Creek (Stewart Creek Road)    • ■ • • • 21 65
China Creek    *6 °^
Deep Creek (Quesnel-Alexandria Road)       ■ 276 7o
Deep Creek  (Quesnel-Blackwater Road)    • • • 127 23 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 73
Carib oo District—Continued.
Deep Creek, No. 1 (Main Road)  $ 13S 00
Deep Creek, No. 2  (Main Road)    "  161 00
Evans Creek   39 00
First Creek   153 00
4-Mile Creek, No. 1  115 00
4-Mile Creek, No. 2  -.  115 OO
4-Mile Creek  (Quesnel South)  190 00
Fraser Creek     63 00
Hansen's Gulch   , i  170 00
Higdon Creek   139 00
Hixon Creek  1,034 93
Horsefly     31 49
Kersley Creek   71 00
Knife Creek    '  207 25
Little Cottonwood  4,403 74
Mackin Creek  151 90
Menzinger  144 50
1-Mile Creek (Harpers Camp, 150-Mile House)    40 00
3-Mile Creek (St. Joseph's Mission, Williams)    32 00
8-Mile Creek  (Nazko)  63 37
8-Mile Creek (Harpers Camp, 150-Mile H»use) '  70 00
9-Mile Creek   936 89
10-Mile Creek, No. 1   301 25
10-Mile Creek, No. 2  150 65
18-Mile Creek  (Blackwater)     124 00
150-Mile Creek   499 94
177-Mile Creek  171 00
179-Mile Creek    166 50
182-Mile Creek  196 00
12-Mile Post  55 50
18-Mile Post  93 50
Montgomery Creek  41 50
Onward Ranch   391 45
Quesnel River  28 07
Quesnel River (North Fork)    1,181 42
Saunders    '  155 50
Simmons Creek *  53 25
Sisters Creek, No. 1   219 02
Sisters Creek, No. 2   '   386 05
Shank Creek, No. 1   454 58
Shank Creek, No. 2    130 20
Slough Creek   .'  186 50
Snowshoe    192 00
Soda Creek    687 49
Spring Creek (Quesnel-Blackwater Road)     45 00
Stony Creek    76 00
Valley Creek   72 SO
West Creek  60 00
Williams Creek  3 00
Williams Lake   1,016 75
Willow River  796 98
Wingdam Creek, No. 1   107 37
Wingdam Creek, No. 2  137 12
Wingdam Creek, No. 4  113 00
Total     $     36,841 37 D 74
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
$  1,010
80
25
00
105 90
20
50
526 CO
22
00
124
50
594
80
159
20
66
75
374
83
504
70
229
20
' 323
18
27
75
Chilliwack District.
Cultus Creek	
Cultus Lake	
Evans,  Thomas   	
Frost  Creek   	
Matsqui, No. 11 	
Provincial Highway, Nos. 4 and 5 	
Riverside Road, No. 9 	
Riverside Road, No. 24	
Rosedale   	
Sardis  	
Sumas River 	
No. 25	
No. 26 	
Vedder River  	
Vedder River, No. 2S 	
Total	
Columbia District.
Anderson   	
Athalmer    '......*...
Blaeberry	
Brisco   	
Brisco Pontoon, No. 104 	
Campbell   	
Carbonate Spruce  	
Dodd's 	
Dutch Creek	
Fairmont    ■
Findlay  Creek   	
Fitzsimmons   	
Grimes   	
Horse Creek, No. 5 .'	
Horseshoe	
Horsethief Creek 	
Hospital Creek 	
Kettleson No. 161   ■	
Kicking Horse  (new)   	
Kicking Horse  (old)   	
Jackpine 	
Sanborn Road, No. 162 	
Sanborn Road, No. 163 	
Sanborn Road, No. 164 	
Short, No. 105   	
Shuswap	
Sinclair Creek  	
Spillimacheen	
Toby   	
Unnamed, No. 1 	
Unnamed, No. 2  ■.	
Unnamed, No. 11 	
Unnamed, No. 90	
Unnamed, No. 112 	
Unnamed, No. 113 	
Unnamed, No. 116	
Unnamed, No. 118 	
$      4,115 26
9 00
56 00
14 10
102 26
104 55
47 40
523 99
185 OS
803 05
2,918 89
16 10
84 00
15S 425
428 99
662 40
1,484 96
20 50
51 3S
9,843 13
304 78
SI 00
469 40
247 03
313 36
40 50
436 24
18 50
799 77
5S2 16
16 00
55 20
88 00
48 00
88 00
88 00
86 75
85 00 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
Columbia District—Continued.
Unnamed, No. 119  $ 6 00
Unnamed, No. 135   46 00
Unnamed, No. 143   62 00
Vermilion (south)  46 00
Washout Creek   590 01
Wilmer Pontoon  217 20
General    '  103 80
Total  ; $ 22,432 93
Expenditure    $21,871 01
Material transferred from Roads          561 92
Total  $22,432 93   .
Comox District.
Bennett's Creek     $ 67 80
Black Creek  330 51
Brooklyn  379 45
Cache Creek, Shushartie, No. 4 '.  117 00
Caljouw     21 00
Cedar  29 83
China Creek    145 70
Coal  Creek     661 79
Cooks Creek    75 00
Cook's River  (north and south)     21 50
Cote's  (Salmon River)     160 60
Cougar     128 00
Courtenay River     90 42
Courtenay Slough, No. 36  .'  457 40
Cross Road, No. 1   57 45
Cumberland and Dove Creek, No. 2   42 40
Cumberland and Dove Creek, No. 3   42 45
Eagle River  53 73
Gillies Bay     23 50
Hadley's  40 25
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 1  11 25
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 2  6 75
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 3 .'.  2 25
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 4  2 25
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 5 '.  4 50
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 6  4 50
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 9....  900
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 10  S 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 13 I  9 00-
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 17  4 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 20  63 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 21 '.'.'.. 8 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 22   2 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 23  26 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 24  2 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 25  2 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 26  2 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 28  31 75
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 29  8 00
Hardy Bay-Coal Harbour, No. 30  17 25
Kittie Coalman, No. 1 !  383 70 D 76
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Comox District—Continued.
Kittle Coalman, No. 2  $ 884 OS
Kittie Coalman (left) .-  877 01
Lake Trail  (half mile from Courtenay)     9 00
Lasqueti Island  (Bolthen's)  48 50
Matheson's     „  64 17
Millecheap's  64 00
Milligan's    50 00
McQuillan's    11 57
Nahwitte Slough  :  126 40
Nellem's Camp  296 25
Oyster River  417 30
Portugese Creek     124 17
Potter's "... 46 00
Powell River  2,760 87
Powell River and Grief Point   29 00
Priest Lake   281 95
Proulx-Salmon River  '.... 160 60
Puntledge, No. 2  746 23
Raven Creek  6 08
Reece   85 72
Rennison  13 50
Rosewell Creek  129 55
Salmon River (Sach's Crossing)     16,479 53
Salmon River (Sach's Crossing, protection-work)    69 85
Salmon River (third crossing)  633 02
Sandhills •  4-5 00
Shushartie Bay, No. 1  .'  151 00
Shushartie Bay, No. 2  ".  383 96
Stewart's    •'  224 49
Swankie's  659 84
Texada Island   48 00
Trent - 165 02
Tsable River   7,764 80
Theodosa River    50 00
Tsable River (dismantling old bridge)    5SO 45
Tsolum River   33 09
27 miles from Government Agent's Office   20 00
Vananda    7 45
White River  513 92
Plant and material  1>458 80
Total    $    40,073 15
Coivichan District.
Cavin    ■  $ 51 00
Curry  ,   20 OS
Chemainus   10 50
Cowichan Lake    132 99
Cowichan Station    115 56
Dobson's  26 00
Dodd's    175 85
Duncan Wagon  384 06
Flett's    14 03
Garnet's     195 45
Glenora Cross  56 60
Halhed, No. 5S  •  134 7S 11 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. D 77
Coivichan District—Continued.
Halhed, No. 59	
Hill    '	
Hoadley   	
Jordan   	
Keating	
Koksilah Flats, No. 56 '	
Koksilah Flats, No. 57	
Koksilah Flats, No. 77 	
Koksilah Station 	
La Fortune 	
Lewis   	
Maingay's   	
McFarlane	
McLennan's	
Nangle's   	
Pimbury  	
Quamiehan   	
Robertson's   	
St. Anne's  	
Someuos  	
Twin	
Vaux  	
Victoria-Campbell River Road 	
Vye   ../	
Wilkinson 	
Plant and tools  	
General  	
Total	
Cranbrook District.
Alki  	
Arm of Kootenay River  (near Waldo)   	
Jap Ranch 	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 81  	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 82  	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 83  	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 84 	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 85  	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 86	
Kootenay Reserve, No. 87 	
Log Canal, No. 1 	
Log Canal, No. 2 	
Marysville   	
Mark Creek 	
Matthew Creek  	
Mission  	
Monroe  	
McPhee, No. 37  	
Narrows  	
Old Town 	
Perry Creek	
St. Joseph Creek, No. 1 	
St. Joseph Creek, No. 2  '	
St. Joseph Creek, No. 5 	
St. Joseph Creek, No. 6 	
$    127
no
30 00
17
00
17
00
12
63
14
26
49
00
220
4S
12
00
897
59
36 80
130 33
6
65
19
oo
31 00
716 48
323
40
39
50
5
94
5
74
1
25
52
90
35
43
25 00
54 00
137
13
424
80
$  4,759
71
$   814 51
102
00
12
50
13
37
376 93
619
01
40
7,8
24 37
40
78
- 239
54
43
70
47 91
168
01
90
12
269
16
24
50
8
50
276
77
S
50
341
91
74
00
49
50
16 00
4 00
40
00 'ublic Works Report (1919-20).
$    32
50
33
00
294
47
393
95
135
15
736
SO
2,201
49
137
43
130
74
90
11
108
69
60 00
88
18
30
SO
209
33
339
77
286
91
306
80.
169
80
$  9,538
64
IIS
IS
Cranbrook District—Continued.
St. Joseph Creek, No. 7	
St. Joseph Creek, No. 8 	
St. Joseph Creek (Hyde Street)    _	
St. Joseph Creek (5 miles from Cranbrook)   	
St. Joseph Creek  (Prairie)   	
St. Mary Lake 	
St. Mary River (dismantling bridges)   	
St. Mary River (side-channel)   	
Standard Mill 	
Sullivan Creek 	
Unnamed, main road (6 miles west of Moyie)   	
Unnamed, main road (15.4 miles west of Moyie)	
Unnamed, main road (15.7 miles west of Moyie)	
Ward's Ranch, No. 172	
Westport	
Whiteflsh Falls    '	
Wycliffe, No. 36   	
Yahk, No. 69 (Moyie River)   	
Yahk, No. 217  (lower)   	
Total	
Less refund, C.P.R	
Total  . $
Delta District.
Canoe Pass     $
Port Mann Creek	
Unnamed,  No. 3	
Total  s   $
Dewdney District.
Albion    $
Barton   	
Blaney, No. 9  	
Clark 	
Conley Creek	
Conley   	
Coquitlam   	
Derocbe	
Deroehe Slough  	
Dewdney, No. 14	
Graham   	
Harris  ..	
Hatzic Prairie 	
Hoy	
Jenkins  Slough   	
Kanaka Creek  	
Lucy Creek	
Maillardville   	
Marsden   	
McKamey Slough   	
Nicomen Island Trunk  	
Peart Gulch   	
Pitt River  ,	
9,420 46
3,799 64
12 57
10 00
3,822 21
1,902 85
133 50
78 45
1,185 10
746 2S
299 60
1,825 57
267 61
87 20
756 48
238 72
293 50
1,177 67
23 00
8 20
344 22
1,308 03
2 00
199 45
1,639 S7
97 26
603 90
313 21 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 79
Dewdney District—Continued.
Pump-house       $       1,075 67
Scorray  104 10
Scow Landing  (Stargo Slough)  137 80
Sharpe  482 00
Silver Creek  150 40
Squakim  49 25
Stave River   257 95
Sturgeon  Slough     5,374 32
Total    $    21,164 06
Less cash   1,029 36
Total   $     20,134 70
Esquimalt District.
Albert Head (twin)     $ 30 00
Burnside  215 35
Coal Creek  (Sooke)    '    50 50
Craigflower     11,530 58
Deadman's Slough   88 92
Finlayson's Arm     306 00
Gorge     977 55
Happy Valley, No. 2   320 12
Happy Valley, No. 3  53 00
Happy Valley, No. 4   351 25
Happy Valley, No. 5   127 56
Helmcken, No. 1   ,  2,810 39
Helmcken, No. 2    340 26
Jordan River Road, No. 1  75 26
Jordan River Road, No. 2  375 47
Jordan River Road, No. 3   91 41
Jordan River Road, No. 4  58 40
Jordan River Road, No. 5  63 08
Jordan River Road, No. 6  49 36
Jordan River Road, No. 7  58 59
Jordan River Road, No. 8  96 99
Jordan River Road, No. 9 j.  463 51
Jordan River Road, No. 10  71 54
Jordan River Road, No. 11  73 06
Jordan River Road, No. 12   69 86
Jordan River Road, No. 13   59 57
Jordan River Road, No. 14  59 57
Jordan River Road, No. 15 -.  35 00
Jordan River Road, No. 16 (Sandstone Creek)     1,406 97
Jordan River Road, No. 17  35 00
Jordan River Road, No. 19  156 84
Jordan River Road, No. 20  99 94
Jordan River Road, No. 21  489 95
Lagoon  (Mill Bay)     420 66
Lagoon  Spit  213 00
Neild's  (Metchosin District)     75 50
Parson's  813 99
Reid's     4 00
San Juan (east) -. 146 00
Sherwood  701 93
Skookum Gulch  :     •       207 95 Public Works Report  (1919-20).
663 12
217 05
170 S5
191 66
267 70
225 68
1,054 82
361 10
363 52
397 53
147 49
60 00
70 92
15 71
15 67
630 20
198 41
513 61
229 75
Esquimalt District—Continued.
Sooke 	
Sooke, No. 3 	
Sooke, No. 4 	
Sooke, No. 5 	
Sooke, No. 6 	
Sooke, No. 7	
Tugwell Creek  	
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 1 	
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 2 	
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 3 	
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 5 	
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 9	
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 14	
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. 17 	
Vancouver Island Trunk Road, No. IS 	
Victoria-Campbell River Road 	
Camp supplies   	
Plant and tools  	
General	
Total	
Fernie District.
Brule Creek	
Bull River 	
Coal Creek	
Elko, No. 6  	
Elkmoutii 	
Elk Slough (West Fernie)   	
Fairy  Creek   	
Fairy Creek  (Fernie-Hosmer Road)   	
Fairy  Creek   (protection-work)   	
Fort Steele  	
Hosmer   	
Little Fairy Creek	
Michel, No. 3  	
Michel, No. 10  	
Michel, No. 11  	
Michel, No. 12	
Michel, No. 13  	
Michel Prairie  	
Morrissey  	
McDougall's	
Newgate 	
Phillips   	
Sand Creek 	
2 miles east of Morrissey 	
Waldo  	
Wardner	
West Fernie, No. 4 	
West Fernie (over log-chute)	
Wilson Creek  	
Plant and material on hand 	
General  :	
Total  	
$  29,46S
67
$    235
50
16
80
645 45
1,117
86
1,297 42
2,615
24
15,871
19
2,022
25
560
40
688 01
1,237 50
155
87
529 30
13
88
13
88
565
94
13
87
120
00.
93
79
201
34
14 40
445
19
98
10
91
20
93
62
56
22
1,680
16
98
62
40
oo
669
93
192
30
$    31,495 23 11 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. D 81
Fort George District.
Baker Creek    $ 252 00
Bean Creek    197 00
Bear Trap  1,110 03
Beacon Gulch (Peace River)    100 00
Bevier   142 00
Blackwood  150 00
Bodkin Creek    192 25
Bourman  40 00
Braithwaite    199 00
Broderson     3 75
Brooks Creek    32 00
Cariboo Creek    ,  356 06
Carlson      255 OO
Chadwick  150 00
Clucluty     304 67
Cut-bank  410 84
Deep Creek  (Blackwater-Endako)     19S 25
DeWetter    126 00
Dry Creek (Hemmingville-Canoe River)    214 03
Dry Gulch, No. 1   287 50
Dry Gulch, No. 2   191 00
Dry Williams Lake    149 00
Eaglet Lake  394 49
Edwards Creek     241 00
Engen Creek   215 25
Erickson  Creek     276 00
French Creek  53 00
Gardiner  (Pouce Coupe District)     62 50
Goldie  84 00
Hall's Creek '. 30 00
Hall's, No. 1 (South Dawson Creek)     122 00
Hall's, No. 2    134 00
Hemmingville-Canoe River Road   40 00
Henderson Creek   260 00
Hixon Creek   49 50
Johnson      IS 00
Jorgenson Creek     102 75
Kennedy Creek  65 00
Lavoie    302 00
Lee  236 00
Linnen  482 39
Manson    108 00
Mica        ■        221 00
Mica, No. 1   336 50
Mica Gulch   632 50
1-Mile Creek  (Dunster West Road)     174 00
2-Mile Creek  (Mapes Road)     26 50
2%-Mile Creek   75 00
3-Mile Creek    125 00
5-Mile Creek    76 12
6-Mile Creek, No. 1  78 55
12-Mile Creek   80 00
12-Mile Creek  (Fort George-Quesnel Road)    '.  140 50
14-Mile Creek (Fort George-Stony Creek)  151 95
14-Mile Creek (Fort St. James Road)     137 89
15-Mile Creek  151 01
6 Fort George District—Continued.
16%-Mile Creek   $ 54 15
17-Mile Creek   95 70
18-Mile Creek   48 75
19-Mile Creek    48 50
20-Mile Creek  48 00
67-Mile Creek  45 75
Mill Creek    149 65
Morrison Creek   '.  20 00
Mowick  Gulch  205 SO
Murray Creek  73 00
McKim  341 50
McLean   (Pouce Coupe)     250 00
McLellan     53 00
McMillan Creek  123 75
McMillan Creek, No, 2  91 25
Mount Robson  7,114 70
Nechako River (at Fort George)  81 75
Nechako River (at Vanderhoof)  270 94
North Dawson  189 66
Ole's  (Necoslie Settlement)     140 53
Pine Creek  278 80
Pouce Coupe  20 00
Price     281 52
Queen Street  1,618 22
Rock Creek  125 00
Rolleg   (Necoslie Settlement)     168 97
Saskatoon  (Pouce Coupe District)     237 35
Slough of Fraser River  '.  160 50
Spruce Creek-Nass Lake Road   78 55
Stella  (east), 4% miles   '  98 00
Stella   (east), 5 miles    119 57
Stella  (east), 6 miles    Ill 25
Stella (east), 6% miles   79 00
Stella  (east), 11 miles   136 00
Stella (east), 12 miles  49 00
Stone Creek     2,221 99
Sucker     144 00
Sunbeam      102 O0
Swamp Lake East    26 75
Swan    363 88
Sweet Creek    136 00
Sweet Creek Hill, No. 1  170 00
Sweet Creek Hill, No. 2  186 00
Sweet Creek Hill, No. 3  185 00
Thompson Creek    254 56
Thompson Creek    19 50
Tinsley     155 25
Trankle Creek    140 00
Trembly  281 00
Trout Creek  30 50
Turcotte Gulch   5,371 64
Vachon     167 25
Waldorf Trestle   140 00
West Creek   22 00
West    '.  717 00 11 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure. D 83
Fort George District—Continued.
Wilson     $ 200 00
General     188 57
Total     $    34,973 58
Grand Forks District.
Carson      $ 436 65
Cooper  168 90
First Street  1,274 02
Fourth Street   48 88
Hardy  39 00
Lower Cascade   56 25
Pass Creek  60 00
Upper Cascade  9 75
Vaughan      269 01
Total   $      2,362 46
Greenwood District.
Anaconda  $ 95 85
Beaverdell  150 00
Blythe    121 01
Carmi     150 00
Caron  25 50
Copper Creek    147 00
Deep Creek  150 00
Folvik    20 00
Greenwood   5 75
Ingram  (Kettle River)     2,350 82
Kettle River  '  150 00
Kettle Valley     125 00
Lancashire    67 00
2 small (Midway, Rock Creek)    94 49
Midway   (Kettle River)     31 22
Motherdale  47 00
Nicholson  .. ;  150 00
Peanut Point     150 00
Robinson  150 00
Rock Creek    112 78
Westbridge     123 SO
White Cabin  150 00
Total     $       4,567 22
Islands District.
Canal  $ 251 79
Divide  (Saltspring)    '  2,054 33
Divide Station, No. 63  800 00
Fulford Harbour  (Saltspring)     1,551 92
Gabriola (north)   ' ...'.  354 00
Galiano  21 54
Kuper  (Thetis Island)     104 35
Saltspring    ...»  906 34
Toynbee     123 00
Tools and plant   47 00
General  154 00
Total  $      6.36S 27 D 84
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Kamloops District.
Alexander Slough   ,	
Avely  	
Barriere River (main road)  	
Barriere River (North Thompson)   	
Boulton Creek   	
Campbell Creek, No. 3 	
Chase Creek, No. 110 	
Chase Creek, No. Ill 	
Chase Creek, No. 112  '	
Chase Creek, No. 114 	
Coal Creek-China Valley Road 	
Edmonds	
Fadear Creek  	
Fox's Slough	
Galena   	
Hefferly Creek  	
Jacko Creek  	
Jones  Slough   	
Kamloops  (east)   	
Kamloops  (west)  	
Mad River 	
Mollette Creek  	
McMurphy Suspension 	
No. 108 (5 miles from Pritchard)   	
No. 109  (4 miles from Pritchard)   	
Raft  River  	
Reserve Creek, No. 2	
Reserve Creek, No. 90	
Reserve Trestle, No. 51	
Robbins Creek, No. 84 	
Rose Hill, No. 1	
Rose Hill, No. 2	
Salmon  	
Savona   	
Shuswap (South Thompson River)  	
6-Mile Creek	
Skookumchuck Creek 	
Slate Creek	
Squilax (Chum Creek), No. 106 	
Squilax (1% miles from Squilax), No. 107	
Sweedall Creek  	
Syphon   	
Total  	
Kaslo District.
Canadian   	
Canning, No. 117  •	
Circle  City	
Cornwall   	
Crawford Creek (at Wakefield)  	
Daney   	
Dickson 	
Ferguson   	
5-Mile   	
Gainor	
$    50 00
50 00
173
05
866
86
50
00
46 00
46 00
42
00
166
47
105
00
39
00
50 00
47
50
50 00
8
43
199
48
48
00
50 00
280 93
917 36
100
00
50
00
57
77
46 00
50
00
420
40
49
00
48
00
3S0
12
50
00
50
00
50
00
95
80
10
00
686
72
40
63
50
00
43
70
46
00
50
00
50 OO
80
10
5,790 92
6 00
20 25
6 00
6 00
200 61
6 00
21 50
6 00
4 00
4 00 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 85
Kaslo District—Continued.
Gerard   	
Goat River  	
Gold Gulch   	
Grey Creek 	
Halfway  	
Kaslo Creek, No. 114 	
Lardeau River, No. 133 	
Meadow Creek	
Medford	
Silver Cup 	
Snow Service  	
Summit  Creek   	
Triune 	
Trout Creek	
Victoria, No. 192  '	
Woodbury, No. 2 	
Woodbury, No. 3	
Woodbury, No. 4 	
Woodbury, No. 5 	
Woodbury, No. 7 	
Woodbury Creek  	
Zwicky    "	
Plant !	
Total  	
Lillooet District.
Antoine Creek   	
Atwood Creek 	
Baker   	
Big Bar Creek 	
Big Creek	
Branch of Big Bar Creek  _	
Bridge Creek	
Bridge River Forks	
Bridge River (mouth of)   	
Bridge River (South Fork)  	
Buckholder   	
Carson   	
Cayoosh Creek, No. 1 	
Cayoosh Creek, No. 2 	
Chilanko Creek  	
Chilcotin   (suspension)   	
Chimney Creek	
Chimney Creek (small), north of	
China Creek 	
Clinton Creek 	
Clinton Falls	
Copper Johnnie Creek 	
Decker Lake Road, No. 4	
Devilman Creek 	
Doering or 12-Mile (Bonaparte)  	
Dry Gulch Road  	
Eagle	
Falls Creek Road (Clinton Falls)  	
Fawn Creek Road, No. 4	
$    16
00
15,514
85
35
00
601
23
8
00
83 25
17
50
272
50
25
00
51
75
168
00
48
00
6
00
14 00
4
75
7
50
8
00
8 OO
S
00
49
00
2,0S3
00
213
50
59
50
$  19,598
69
$    48
00
3 50
30
10
33
00
3,6S6 99
14
00
440
02
28
00
277 30
77
00
2S
00
617
25
105
76
25
00
275 25
1,920
45
154
20
10
50
155
25
56 00
31
75
88
00
50 00
460 00
19
14
50
49
45
00
115
00
2^0
rwi D 86
'ublic Works Report (1919-20).
Lillooet District—Continued.
Grinder Creek	
Gunn Creek 	
Hanceville   	
Hatchery   	
Hunter Creek, No. 34 	
Jones and Dickey  	
Lillooet Station  	
Lillooet  (suspension)   	
Little Green Lake  ■	
Loch Raymond Station  	
9-Mile Creek, No. 82  (Tissett's)	
59-Mile Creek   	
83-Mile Creek	
93-Mile Creek	
111-Mile Creek	
117-Mile Creek 	
117%-Mile Creek  	
122-Mile Creek 	
6-Mile Post (North Bonaparte Road)   	
15-Mile Post  	
25-Mile Gulch (Lillooet-Lytton Road)   	
30-Mile Post	
50-Mile Post   ?.
51-Mile Post	
52-Mile Post	
57-Mile Post  	
Milk Ranch Road, No. 3 	
Mound (Bonaparte River)   	
McMillan Cut-off (Valley Creek)	
Portage  Creek   	
Rae  Lake	
Riley Dam 	
Riske Creek   	
Riske Creek   (North Fork)	
Sawmill   	
Seton Lake Creek 	
Seton Lake, No. 1 	
Seton Lake, No. 2 	
Seton Lake, No. 3 	
Sheep Creek  	
Sigh Creek (Watch Lake Road)  	
Tranquille River  	
Vedan's 	
Ward's Ferry 	
Watson Bar Canyon  	
Witty   	
Material on hand 	
Total  	
Nanaimo District.
Cook's   	
Nanaimo River  	
Patterson  	
General 	
Total 	
76 00
3,033 78
236 00
40 00
16 00
25 00
30 00
13 80
5 00
125 00
200 50
6 50
24 75
116 98
132 86
112 86
18 00
133 78
3 50
3 50
833 57
50 50
34 27
44 50
33 78
23 00
99 94
27 50
69 50
197 OO
46 50
409 70
25 00
22 50
3 50
6 00
51 00
51 00
32 00
10 00
49 00
399 00
19 50
904 02
32 00
30 50
IS 36
$
16,774 90
$
95 S3
114 40
123 36
5 00
338 59 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D-87
$
79 49
28 26
8 00
23 05
4 00
142 80
Nelson District.
Benton Creek  (3 bridges)   	
High Street 	
First Street  (Fairview)   	
Second Street   (Fairview)   	
Third Street  (Fairview)    	
Total 	
Newcastle District.
Boat Harbour 	
Boulder Creek   	
Breiiton Creek  	
Bush Creek 	
Bush Creek, No. 1 	
Bush Creek, No. 2 	
Davis    	
Deadwood   	
Deer Creek  	
Diamond  Crossing   	
First Creek  	
Haslam's   	
Haslam Creek   	
Heemer's	
Jingle Pot  	
Manson Creek   	
Morrison, No. 1   •	
Morrison, No. 2  	
Morrison, No. 3  	
Morrison, No. 4 	
Nanaimo River, No. 2 	
Salmie's   	
South Forks	
Stewart's   	
Thatcher's   	
Todd's	
Walker's   	
Westwood's   	
Wolf	
Tools and plant 	
General 	
Total	
North Okanagan District.
Baxter   	
B.X.  Creek	
Bonneau  	
Brickyard   	
Cook Creek 	
Enderby (old)   	
Enderby  (Shuswap)  	
Fortune   	
Foster's    •	
Grey Canal   	
Grindrod   	
$    20 00
135
00
83
00
46
70
49 40
22
00
52
40
132
00
82
00
164
25
631
69
40
00
773
89
129 00
15
00
133
25
921
41
209
25
147
81
69
00
224
91
28
00
18
00
23
38
71
60
120 00
39
36
95
00
170
13
15
20
312
53
$  4,975
16
$    36 00
221
84
362
40
1,033
34
684
79
849
38
8,889 46
839 03
7
90
166
27
119
78 D 88
Public Works Report (1919-20).
North Okanagan District—Continued.
Haines      $ 5 40
Hines  75 95
Jack     171 35
Johnson's     81 00
Johnson Creek, No. 13   225 36
Jones Creek, No. 5    51 50
Jones Creek, No. 10  359 00
Keddleston Road, No. 5   86 19
Keddleston Road, No. 7  161 45
Keddleston Road, No. S   71 81
Long Lake Road ■  291 19
Lumby     134 32
Mabel Lake   224 00
Mabel Lake, No. 3   243 50
Mabel Lake, No. 7  348 00
Maple Street, No. 25  4 70
Mara  205 85
Massey     5 00
Millar's      4SS 65
McKay  227 50
Oullett Creek  377 50
Pillar Lake   101 10
Railroad    85 18
Reiswig's     47 75
Sawmill    '  243 95
School-house  36 50
Schunter  1 00
Shuswap Avenue   140 77
Silver Creek  83 22
Woods Lake    32-00
General   292 14
Total     $     1S,17S 02
North Vancouver District.
Beach Avenue   $ S 00
Bowden   12 00
Bowen Island  (Trout Creek)     250 O0
Chief Billy     75 00
Flume, No. 48   32 50
Kink     30 38
Mission Creek, No. 51    Ill 00
Mission Creek (near Sechelt)    2,440 71
Moodyville Trestle    244 10
Nelson     47 00
Pool Creek  49 75
Reserve, No. 56   '  3 00
Roberts, No. 70    10 76
Slough No. 1 (Pemberton Valley Road)     8 00
Skookumchuck    110 50
Soames, No. 57    2 50
Squamish, Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 8  112 36
Squamish, Nos. 9, 10, and 11   101 31
Squamish, Nos. 16, 17, and 18  105 00
Squamish, No. 19     31 77
Squamish, No. 21     27 77 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 89
$
758 64
75 00
25 00
972 75
154 57
54 00
161 05
16 25
180 69
2 50
•
$
6,213 86
400 00
5,S13 S6
North Vancouver District—Continued.
Squamish, No. 23 (Big Slough)   	
Squamish, No. 25   	
Squamish, No. 26  	
Squamish,  No. 30   	
Trout Creek  	
Wilkman    .....
Wilson	
Wiren, No. 75 	
Wop, No. 44   '.	
Wynguret, No. 53 (Gibson Landing)	
Total  	
Less cash, Department of Indian Affairs, re Squamish, No. 23
Total 	
Omineca District.
Boulder Creek   	
Buck River, No. 1  '	
Bulkley River (Daylight Lake)   	
Bulkley River (at Hubert)   	
Bulkley River (at Houston)   	
Bulkley River (Pleasant Valley)   	
Canyon Creek 	
Cedar Creek  	
Driftwood Creek  	
Glacier Creek  	
Haguelgate   (suspension)   	
Kitsequekla  	
Kispiox 	
Moricetown   	
Porphyry Creek 	
Savory  (Endako River)   	
Skeena   (suspension)   	
Two Bridge Creek (Hazelton-Aldermere Road)   	
Total  	
Prince Rupert District.
Alwyn  Creek   	
Brackner  (Queen Charlotte Islands)   	
Buschell Point (Queen Charlotte Islands)   	
Brown Creek   	
Cedar River  	
Clayton   	
Dalkeith   Slough   	
Fiddler Creek	
Gold Creek	
Green's   	
Highway Creek  	
Hiellen River (Queen Charlotte Islands)   	
Hums Creek 	
Laird Slough   	
Lawn Hill  	
Liza Creek 	
Lome Creek  	
$  1,350
00
4 00
149
50
2,254 OS
2,123
54
20 01
1,748
90
499
65
1,453 00
1,750
00
1,760
00
44
02
341
SO
8
00
1,299
92
796
21
58
00
2,054
54
•
$  17,715
77
$    315
75
306
50
281
65
11
00
2.4S8
56
3,377
36
716
20
1,315
86
1,851
97
29
24
645
87
712
65
#
12
00
2,765
44
11
00
44 00
148
50 D 90                                   Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Prince Rupert District—Continued.
  $         296 24
McNaughton   	
               305 70
Nightwine Hill 	
670 76
               108 72
Pacific  (foot)   	
18 90
                  10 00
1,964 78
76 50
Skidegate—Tlell (Queen Charlotte Islands)   ,..
            1,000 00
182 31
Strutter's   	
                202 00
                  36 58
                  8 48
            1,663 33
Thornhill Creek	
                 44 00
               348 90
2,575 81
                 25 00
2,284 07
....                10 90
62 56
323 40
Total  	
   $     27,277 49
Revelstoke District.
...   .  $         732 7S
Barr's (Fish River)   	
19 00
....                 44 94
                  50 00
Big Bend Wagon (6-Mile)   	
                  82 00
Big  Mouth   	
                  50 00
101 75
7110 79
25 45
6 537 39
Goldfield  (Fish Creek)   	
3,822 43
65 01
9 481 99
489 69
Hill Creek, No. 1	
20 75
Hill Creek, No. 2	
41 50
Illecillewaet (5 miles east of Albert Canvon)  	
34 00
36 00
56 00
2 75
77 22
2 00 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 91
Revelstoke District—Continued.
Mica Creek   $ 20 25
Montana Slough  82 70
Moorwood    '  27 00
Mountain     195 01
Mcintosh     63 17
McKenzie Creek  22 13
McQueen's     113 30
Olson's  17 00
Pool Creek  134 00
Pool Creek  (pack-trail)     105 75
Power-house     29 41
Roberts   105 50
School-house (Hall's Landing Road)    471 45
Sicamous     198 51
Silver Creek  148 53
Slough No. 1 (mile south of Eighth Street)    42 89
Slough No. 2 (east of Solsqua)  50 73
Slough (north of Cranberry Creek)     377 89
Slough (south of Cranberry Creek)     14 73
Slough (west of Columbia)  17 40
Snow service    %  334 00
Solsqua     185 70
Somerville   ,  70 00
Spider and Beatrice Trail   26 00
10%-Mile   .-.'  13 75
12-Mile     9 00
Total 	
Richmond District.
Eburne (Lulu and Sea Island)   	
Fraser Avenue 	
Marine Drive, Beacon Gulch, No. 1 	
Marine Drive, University, No. 2 	
Marine Drive, No. 3 	
North Arm	
Plant  . .	
Total	
Rossland District.
Deschamp Road (north), No. 1	
Deschamp Road (north), No. 2	
Deschamp Road (north), No. 3	
Doukhobor 	
Rock Creek 	
Rock Creek, No. 1	
Rossland-Patterson Road 	
Stony	
Trail, No. 2 	
Trail, No. 3  ,	
Violin Lake, No. 1	
Violin Lake, No. 2	
General 	
Total  	
$
32,800 45
$
2,713 60
1,385 70
97 93
81 36
48 50
412 34
1 00
$       4,740 43
60 16
85 71
62 48
14 25
17 50
17 50
224 00
50 00
320 50
71 85
70 37
18 50
145 53
$      1,158 35 D 92 Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Similkameen District.
Coalmont, No. 51   $      1,6S6 40
Copper Mountain   100 00
Hedley-Princeton Road   192 00
Kaleden  (Okanagan Falls)  30 50
Lake Shore   5 OO
Mclntyre Creek  (or Sawmill), No. 36 . .' ,  2,218 06
Mclntyre Creek  (or Sawmill), No. 40   20 00
Mclntyre Creek  (or Sawmill), No. 66   12 41
Mclntyre Creek  (or Sawmill), No. 67   12 42
Mclntyre Creek (or Sawmill), No. 68  12 41
Mclntyre Creek  (or Sawmill), No. 69   12 42
Mclntyre Creek (or Sawmill), No. S3   79 37
Mclntyre Creek  (or Sawmill), No. 91  20 25
Mclntyre Creek  (or Sawmill), No. 101   46 00
Old Copper Mountain  506 37
Okanagan River, No. 30  1,800 43
Princeton, 19.1 miles, No. 87   285 18
South Keremeos     2,950 08
Tulameen     472 17
Total  ,  $    10,461 47
Slocan District.
Alexandria Avenue   $ 171 50
Appledale    49 45
Arrow Park-Graham Landing, No. 2  5 97
Arrow Park-Graham Landing, No. 4  4 22
Arrow Park-Graham Landing, No. 5   3 22
Arrow Park-Graham Landing, No. 10  18 92
Arrow Park-Graham Landing, No. 12  2S 92
Boulder Creek  10 62
Brown and Robinson Road  6 00
Carpenter  Creek     30 50
Cayuse Creek    140 00
Cedar Creek  29 93
Cody Creek    65 00
Dayton Creek   102 00
Demon Creek     9 00
Deer Park, No. 1   100 30
Deer Park, No. 2   45 00
Deer Park, No. 3   28 65
Dog Creek, No. 1  122 10
Dog Creek, No. 2  214 10
Fisher Maiden Trail   45 00
4-Mile Creek, No. 2   44 67
4-Mile Creek, No. 3   171 58
Great Western-Millie Mack Trail  134 52
Harrison, No. 1   51 13
Harrison. No. 2     4 00
Innoaklin  13 20
Ivanhoe Mill .-  129 41
Lemon Creek  8 42
Millie Mack, No. 1  17 50
Millie Mack, No. 2  17 50
Mineral-Cariboo Creek     33 25
McCormack-Burton City  165 25 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
Slocan District—Continued.
Nakusp-Brouse   	
Nakusp-Box Lake Road 	
New Denver-Rosebery 	
North Fork of Carpenter Creek, No. 1	
North Fork of Carpenter Creek, No. 2	
Narth Fork of Carpenter Creek, No. 3	
North Fork of Carpenter Creek, No. 4	
North Fork of Carpenter Creek, No. 5	
North Fork of Carpenter Creek, No. 6	
North Lot No. 79 (West Denham)  	
Pedro Creek  	
Perry Siding (Slocan River)   	
Perry Siding Slough 	
Pin Creek   	
Silverton-4-Mile 	
Slocan City  	
Sovereign Trail  	
Springer Creek 	
Star Creek 	
Stobo  Creek  	
10-Mile Creek, No. 5 	
10-Mile Creek, No. 7 	
10-Mile Creek, No. S 	
Vallicuni-McFaydeii   	
Vallicuni  (Slocan River)   	
Walker   	
Whustlam Creek  	
Williamson (Deer Creek)   	
Wilson Creek (Rosebery)  	
Winlaw  	
Total   	
South Okanagan District.
Alveston  	
Carsorso  	
Dry Gulch 	
K.L.O	
K.L.O.   (protection)   	
Lewis Bailey 	
Morrison   	
Ritchie (Joe)   	
Sawmill Creek 	
Material on hand  	
Total 	
South Vancouver District.
River Road	
Trail District.
Athabaska Road, No. 1 	
Athabaska Road, No. 2  	
Athabaska Road, No. 3 	
Blueberry 	
Boulder Creek 	
D 93
217 77
31 97
217 35
5 00
5 00
47 50
47 50
40 00
40 00
44 00
48 50
85 09
60S 20
52 50
75 96
38 00
46 75
116 65
39 00
40 02
16 00
13 00
176 00
69 00
56 95
390 06
16 OS
38 15
42 16
17 45
4,702 44
34 00
491 00
22S 00
486 56
175 55
22 00
39 20
173 00
23 40
21 86
$  1,694 57
71 40
49 60
71 45
83 10
24 00
62 75 Trail District—Continued.
Columbia River  (at Trail)   	
Crescent Valley  	
Falls Creek  (Shoreacres Division)   	
Fort Sheppard Road   ;	
Fruitvale-Pend d'Oreille Road, No. 2 	
Fruitvale-Pend d'Oreille Road, No. 3 	
Fruitvale-Pend d'Oreille Road, No. 4	
Garity  Creek   	
Kootenay River Road  	
Little North Fork, Salmon River 	
Mile 1.4, Granite Road (upper)   	
Mile 4.9   	
Nelson-Balfour Road (1.7-Mile)  	
Nelson-Balfour Road  (4.1-Mile)	
Nelson-Balfour Road  (6-Mile)   	
Nelson-Balfour Road  (7.2-Mile)    .'	
Nelson-Balfour Road  (S-Mile)	
Nelson-Balfour Road   (10.3-Mile)   	
Nelson-Balfour Road (11-Mile)   	
Nelson-Balfour Road   (11.2-Mile)   	
Nelson-Balfour Road  (12-Mile)   	
Nelson-Balfour Road  (12.7-Mile)	
Nelson-Balfour Road  (14-Mile)	
Nelson-Balfour Road (14.7-Mile)  	
Nelson-Waneta Road (1 mile north of Salmo)   	
Nelson-Waueta Road (1 mile south of Salmo)   	
Nelson-Waneta   (12.8-Mile)   	
Nelson-Waneta   (13.6-Mile)   	
Procter, No. 2 	
Salmon River, North Fork (at Salmo)   	
Salmon River  (at Salmo)   	
Salmon River (at Ymir)   	
Second Relief Mine Road 	
Sheep Creek 	
Shoreacres  	
Silver King Road, No. 13 	
Silver King Road, No. 1 	
Silver King Road, No. 2 	
Silver King Road, No. 3 	
Taghum   	
Yellowstone (2-Mile)   	
Yellowstone   (2.5-Mile)   	
Yellowstone   (7.6-Mile)   	
Yellowstone (8-Mile)   	
Yellowstone  (27.3-Mile)	
Total  	
Yale District.
Agassiz-Harrison Hot .Springs  	
Agassiz  (Maria Slough)   	
Ashcroft 	
Ashcroft-Spences Bridge Road	
Cache Creek 	
Canford   	
Chapman   	
$
14 00
195 27
4S 00
66 50
49 25
50 00
50 00
35 50
80 37
50 00
1 85
11 00
39 55
59 35
3 00
12 50
25 00
12 61
25 00
250 00
29 50
20 50
31 25
23 46
9 13
9 12
39 95
39 95
154 50
128 00
336 42
74 42
498 40
50 00
561 88
337 00
48 00
40 00
57 00
50 00
13 12
45 00
561 32
464 33
18 00
5,009 90
1 04
148 62
493 60
34 00
3,174 30
6 00
29 00 11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 95
Yale District—Continued.
Cisco  	
Cleasby 	
Collettville  	
Collettville  (lower)   	
Emery  Creek   	
4-Mlle-Mill Creek Road	
Hope-Rosedale Road, No. 5 	
Hope-Rosedale Road, No. 21 	
Hope-Rosedale Road, No. 25 	
Hope-Rosedale Road, No. 26 	
Logan   	
Lytton-Lillooet Road. No. 1  	
Lytton-Lillooet Road, No. 2  	
Merritt-Princeton Road (S6V2 miles from Merritt)
Mill Creek 	
Middlesborough   	
Murray Creek	
McKay-Lytton    *.	
Nicola River  (at Merritt)   	
Nicola River (at Spences Bridge)   	
Spences	
Spences-Merritt Road, No. 1 	
Spences-Merritt Road, No. 3 	
Spences-Merritt Road, No. 4 	
Sunshine Valley 	
Wa lhachin  	
Material on hand  	
Total
2 00
38 44
34 70
297 55
2,265 76
11 50
214 84
254 13
82 40
51 25
36 00
86 10
70 1(3
43 75
10 50
652 60
272 00
85 75
49 10
82 13
295 36
343 13
491 75
670 55
54 00
28 50
165 45
Bridges Generally.
General   	
Bridge Inspector
Total
$
10,575 90
$
234 11
4,090 39
?
4,324 50
Total for bridges
Location or Roads.
Atlin    ,
Columbia   ..,
Comox   	
Cowichan ...
Cranbrook ...
Dewdney ...
Esquimalt ..
Fort George
Islands   	
Kamloops ...
Kaslo  	
North Okanagan
Omineca   	
Prince Rupert ...
Revelstoke 	
Richmond  	
Rossland   	
465,315
46
1,845
93
173
10
504 01
258
73
1,198
81
531
10
309
80
714
24
719 60
. 55
10
95 45
557
58
1,239
35
581
20
485
40
23
50
235
00 D 96
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Location of Roads—Continued.
Similkameen 	
Slocan   	
South Okanagan   	
Yale   	
Total 	
Road Machinery.
Alberni   	
Atlin   '.	
Columbia   	
Comox  	
Cowichan  	
Cranbrook   	
Delta and Chilliwack	
Dewdney   	
Esquimalt   	
Fort George    .#	
Kamloops   	
Nanaimo   	
Newcastle   	
Okanagan  (North)   	
Okanagan  (South)   	
Omineca   	
Richmond   	
Similkameen  	
Slocan	
Trail	
Yale  	
General  	
Total 	
McKennet Creek Diversion.
McKenney Creek Diversion  	
Wharves, General.
Chilliwack—Agassiz-Rosedale Ferry Landing 	
Comox—
Manson's Landing     $    266 96
Comox     424 41
Cowichan—Cowichan Ray  	
Dewdney—Mission Ferry Landing 	
Islands—■ •
Gabriola     $      43 60
Galiano     9 00
Ganges  528 85
Mayne     90 25
Saturna     686 33
Thetis   3 90
North Vancouver—
Hopkins Landing, Howe Sound   $      13 50
Snug Cove  71 18
$   746
30
146
40
382
70
1,422
43
$  12,225
73
$  1,696
77
606
20
247
14
383
95
677
05
4,620
50
3,075 50
6,694
00
16.799
15
7,414 22
4,251
12
76
00
190
00
3,337
24
4,740
00
285
00
132
00
1,055
00
305
00
4,621
50
647
18
270
87
$  62,125
39
$      1,601 84
40 24
691 37
281 32
1,264 40
1,361 93
84 68 11 Geo. 5 Statement of Expenditure.
Wharves, General—Continued.
Prince Rupert—
Cow Bay Launch Harbour    $    239 02
Prince Rupert         7,871 79
Queen Charlotte Float  850 78
Revelstoke—Hall's Landing Wharf 	
Richmond—
Ladner-Woodward Ferry Landings    $ 1,343 50
Point Grey, Imperial Street   490 95
Similkameen—
Dog Lake     $    205 00
South Penticton    61 50
South Okanagan—
McKinley      $        1 80
Peachland   ....'  42 55
Wharves generally, surveys, etc	
Total	
Protection to River-banks.
Alberni—Little Qualicum River 	
Chilliwack—Vedder River   	
Columbia—Kicking Horse River     $14,313 27
Less cash    700 00
Cowichan—Koksilah River	
Dewdney—Upper Pitt River	
Fernie—
Elk River, west bank, North Fernie   $ 1,932 10
Flume, West Fernie  284 30
Fernie Annex          1,090 57
Michel River mouth  489 02
Kaslo—Glacier  Creek   	
North Vancouver—Squamish River diversion	
Prince Rupert—
Necleetsconnay River      $ 3,390 24
Bellakula River  271 65
Yale—Coldwater   (near Collettville)      $     831 37
Less cash  250 00
Total 	
Maintenance and Upkeep of Launch " I'll Away."
Maintenance and upkeep of launch " I'll Away "   $
Contingencies.
Printing, stationery, blue-prints, etc	
D 97
8,961 59
51 25
1,834 45
266 50
44 35
1,548 60
$
16,420 68
$
354 98
11,969 06
13,613 27
250 00
134 50
3,795 99
498 85
2S2 23
3,661 89
581 37
$    35,142 14
3,049 13
$      3,942 13
» D 98
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Subsidies  and  Maintenance,  Steamboats,  Ferries,  and
(Vote 239.)
Ferry—Alexandria   	
„        Agassiz-Rosedale 	
„        Barnston Island	
Big Bar  	
„       Birch Island  	
„        Blackpool    '..
„       Braeside 	
„        Briscoe   (upper)   	
„        Briscoe (lower)  	
„        Castlegar	
„        Chilliwack-Harrison  	
„        Chinook Cove	
„        Clearwater Crossing 	
„        Cedarvale 	
„        Copper City 	
„        Donald   	
„       Ducks    •	
„        Dunster   	
„        East Summerland  	
„       Fort St. James 	
„        Francois Lake   	
„        Coldstream   	
„        Gravels, Quesnel River  	
„       Hall's Landing	
„        Hazelton  	
„        High Bar 	
„        Horsefly-Woodjam   	
„        Hulatt   •	
Indian Reserve No. 3 (Miworth)  	
„        Kelowna   	
„        Kitwanga  	
„        Kootenay River, Reclamation Farm	
„       Ladner-Woodward   	
„        Lewis   	
„        Lytton    •	
„        MacAlister 	
„        Mission (Fraser River)  	
„        Mount Olie  	
„        McBride   	
McClure Station	
„       Nelson	
„       Pacific 	
„       Pritchard 	
„        Quesnel, Fraser River	
„       Remo  	
„        Sorrento, Scotch Creek   ■	
„       Soda Creek  :	
Sturgeon Point  •	
„       Terrace   	
„       Takla Lake	
„       20-Mile Post above Lillooet 	
„       Upper Nass •.	
Usk	
„       Vavenby   	
Bridges
!      1,409 58
17,154 43
703 94
4,311 27
876 00
1,471 82
1,479 03
215 40
70 50
5,385 49
755 60
1,123 33
994 55
718 18
497 85
160 27
807 49
917 29
1,574 18
1,070 38
4,939 62
200 53
1,747 87
1,743 95
499 65
3,923 40
40 75
1,172 41
1,200 03
3,599 30
1,015 96
1,710 53
25,968 33
38 00
1,140 21
345 00
44,745 23
1,757 76
2,132 13
1,073 66
7,529 37
668 05
1,066 85
2,508 07
843 03
2,157 69
1,311 42
339 50
2,045 95
100 00
600 00
527 50
1,430 42
877 80 11 Geo. 5 . Statement of Expenditure. D 99
Steamboats, Ferries, and Bridges—Continued.
Ferry—Viusulla   $ 900 68
Waterloo, Columbia River  62 50
Bridge-tender—Canoe Pass     720 00
Eburne    960 00
Kamloops    '. '.  540 00
Pitt  River     1,680 00
Steamboat subsidy—Dog Lake    1,250 00
Fort George, Soda Creek   10,000 00
North-east Arm, Arrow Lake   2,400 00
Shuswap Lake  4,049 00
Miscellaneous     13 60
Total  "  $  185,272 39
Capital Expenditure.
Vote 246—Roads, Streets, Bridges, and Wharves.
Fort George District.
Road—Aleza Lake-Newlands   $      1,238 22
„       Giscome (south)  387 50
Giscome-Willow River ' ......  319 60
McBride-Dunster  3,207 18
„        Necoslie Settlement   761 83
Richmond District.
Road—No. 3, Lulu Island   3,906 12
Plant and tools    23 52
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $838 14
Office       246 65
Motor-cycle          69 87
  1,144 66
South Vancouver District.
Road—Fraser Avenue  4,182 46
„        Hastings-Barnett     7,154 00
Supervision—Assistant Engineer    $675 60
Office       316 27
„ Motor-cycle          78 75
  1,070 62
Columbia District.
Bridge—Blaeberry   8,045 4S
Fort George District.
Bridge—Cut-bank River ■  5,062 38
Fort Fraser  272 73
„         Sturgeon Point    1,546 33
Grand Forks District.
Bridge—Lynch Creek   3,603 01
Kamloops District.
Bridge—Pritchard  28,963 65
Prince Rupert District.
Cow Bay Launch Harbour   1,835 63
' Total   $     72,724 92 D 100                                 Public Works-Report  (1919-20).
Mines Development Act.
(Chap. 43, 1916.)
Alberni District.
   $         437 40
Atlin District.
Road—Dease Lake 	
647 00
            2.925 49
Cariboo District.
10,000 00
4,356 27
150 00
500 40
200 00
               284-50
246 50
Chilliwack River.
Columbia District.
             122 45
             1,223 25
249 50
250 06
....              250 00
„       Sitting Bull Claims  	
               677 10
„       Toby Creek Cut-off	
               997 73
               250 00
               198 00
               150 00
„        North Fork of Toby Creek	
               103 50
               250 00
               250 00
Comox District.
                120 00
Cowichan District.
            2,500 00
               200 95
               100 00
Cranbrook District.
Esquimalt District.
380 00
49 S7
               300 00
Fernie District.
Road—Fort Steele-Wild Horse Creek	
992 00
12 00
Grand Forks District.
128 00
              400 50 -
11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 101
Mines Development Act—Continued.
Grand Forks District—Continued.
Trail—Galloping Mountain  	
„        Gloucester Cabin-Newby Creek	
„        Molly Gibson ,	
Foot-bridge—North Fork of Kettle River 	
Greenwood District.
Road—Pat Kennedy's-Black Diamond Mine	
„        Revenge Mine-Rob Roy 	
Kamloops District.
Road—Upper Indian Reserve-Collieries, Newhykulston Creek	
Trail—McLeod Group-Seymour River  	
Kaslo District.
Road—Hamill Creek  	
„        Kaslo—Ainsworth   	
„        Kaslo Creek (South Fork)  	
No. 1   '. ,	
Tariff Mine 	
Trail—Hall Creek	
„        Mowhawk   	
„        Stanley Basin	
Bridge—Porter-Tenderfoot  	
Lillooet District.
Road—Scotty Creek Mine  	
Trail—Bridge River Canyon 	
„       Gun Creek 	
Newcastle District.
Bridge^South Fork of Nanaimo River	
North Vancouver District.
Trail—Indian River 	
„        Upper Tonquille Creek	
Omineca District.
Road—Ashman Coal Property 	
„        Grouse Mountain 	
„       Harvey Group-Driftwood Creek 	
„        Hudson Bay Mountain Sleigh (Smithers-Coronado Group)   .
Trail—Debenture 	
„        McCabe Mines   	
„        Ootsa-Tahtsa   	
„        Owen Lake-Sibola	
„        Quartz Creek	
„        Red Rose 	
„        Schaefer, Wood, and Anderson (Chicken Lake)   	
„        Taltapan Mines  	
Prince Rupert District.
Road—Fiddler Creek 	
„        Okimdemash Creek (Continental Group)  	
Revelstoke District.
Road—15-Mile Creek (Albert Canyon)  	
Trail—Isaac Creek 	
„        Scout, Big Showing, and Mammoth Properties	
„        Silver Creek  	
70
00
112 00
150
00
170
12
100
00
200
00
487
50
S36
65
223
75
7,473
48
1,249
98
100
00
75
00
454 81
100
00
249
75
2
70
1,375 00
116 00
3,285
35
750 00
23 00
1,495*23
180 75
97 00
945 65
4,110 81
292 25
2,991 62
2,139 92
500 00
250 00
150 00
595 34
1,000 00
188 00
398 00
16 00
50 00
36 00
169 18 D 102
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Mines Development Act—Continued.
Rossland District.
Trail—Welcome Group  $ 200 00
Similkameen District.
Road—Ashnola River  100 00
„        Copper Mountain   1,681 75
„        Copper Mountain-Allenby  249 50
Kelly Creek  77 00
Red Star Group   300 00
Summit Camp     199 50
Trail—Bear Creek  150 00
Slate Creek  •  50 00
Slocan District.
Road—Black Prince  252 00
Metallic     148 00
Trail—Lightning Peak  531 00
North Fork of 10-Mile Creek  125 00
„       Rawhide (North Fork of Carpenter Creek)  ... .■  477 69
Wilson Creek    250 75
Trail District.
Road—Bird Creek  24 00
„       Eureka Mine (at Granite)     151 00
49 Creek  100 00
„        Reno and Donnybrook   110 00
Second Relief Mines  488 00
Trail—Kokanee Creek    72 00
Sheep Creek   150 00
Yale District.
Road—Ashcroft-Highland-Transvaal     1,626 95
Donahue Mine  (Stump Lake)     299 50
t,       Mary Reynold's Mine  400 00
Trail—Emancipation Mine   58 00
Ladner Creek   1,615 50
Siwash Creek  92 00
Total    ¥    74,342 51
British Columbia Loan, 1919.
District.
Name of Road.
Alberni   Island Highway 	
Atlin   Hyder-Stewart    	
Cariboo Chilcotin  Main   $ 3,858 43
 Quesnel-Fort George        8,432 86
 Main Trunk Road      20,778 49
Chilliwack Trans-Provincial  	
Columbia   Main Road (east side)      $18,727 SI
 Toby Creek Cut-off       3,771 70
Comox Island Highway
Total,
Electoral
District.
13,431 37
55,477 88
33,069 78
4,023 15
22,499 51
19,986 5S 11 .Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
D 103
District.
Cowichan .
Cranbrook
British Columbia Loan, 1919—Continued.
Name of Road.
.Island Highway 	
.Eager Hill-Fort Steele 	
.Main Trunk Road (Cranbrook-Wardner)
.Main Trunk Road (Moyie-Goatfell)  	
.Main Trunk Road (Cranbrook-Moyie) ...
. Yahk-Kingsgate 	
$ 2,948 15
18,030 63
6,267 76
6,640 34
4,250 51
Delta
.Pacific Highway
.Provincial Highway
.Old Yale Road	
$ 4,354 09
50,147 03
1,498 31
Dewdney
.loco-Port Moody	
. Brunette River-Maillardville
.Port Moody Municipality	
$25,195 55
4,949 76
3,417 80
Esquimalt
Fernie
. Island Highway 	
.Main Trunk Road-Morrissey Hill
. Fort Steele-Canal Flats 	
. Wasa-Canal Flats	
. Fort Steele-Wasa 	
. Fernie-Hosmer 	
. Morrissey-Elko   	
.Elko	
. Jaffray-AVardner 	
. Michel-Hosmer	
. Fernie-Morrissey 	
. Michel-Crowsnest  	
. Crowsnest-Wardner  	
Fort George
• Fort George-Quesnel	
.Fort George-Summit Lake
• Blackwater-Endako   	
.Fort George-Stony Creek .
$       28 22
827 94
3,739 60
' 6,451 85
5,677 78
3,729 00
5,021 87
4,001 87
2,018 00
700 58
3,472 50
36 00
$16,864 08
7,750 81
2,925 20
2,764 95
Grand Forks
Greenwood ..
.Trans-Provincial	
.Rock Creek Hill-Bridesville Summit
.Main Road (9 miles east)    >..
Islands
.Saanich-Sidney  (oiling)
.East Road 	
Kamloops
.Kamloops-Savona  	
.Kamloops-Falkland	
.Salmon Arm Municipality	
. Enderby  	
.Palmer's Corner-Indian Reserve ..
.Creamery-Palmer's Corner Valley
.Kamloops-Chase-Salmon Arm
.Salmon Arm Trunk Roads	
.Silver Creek	
$ 1,345 89
4.350 77
$ 3,937 51
1,485 50
$ 7,947 83
21,337 89
986 30
1,310 S4
249 50
995 69
3,999 .82
1,964 97
375 00
Total,
Electoral
District.
14,289 08
38,137 39
56,000 33
33,563 11
82,531 26
35,705 21
30,305 04
9,804 02
5,696 66
5,423 01
39,167 84 D 104 Public Works Report (1919-20).
British Columbia Loan, 1919—Continued.
Total,
District. •        ' Name of Road. Electoral
District.
Kaslo    Creston-Goatfell  $10,705 99
, Kaslo-Ainsworth      15,580 17
, '. Kuskanook-Sirdar  72 00
  $    36,358 16
Lillooet Cariboo Main  9,531 24
Nanaimo  Island Highway   3,701 25
Newcastle Island Highway    4,546 91
New Westminster Eraser River Bridge (approaches)    2,583 20
North Okanagan   Vernon-Kelowna     $ 2,752 50
„  Vernon-Salmon Arm     19,535 69
„  Vernon-Kamloops         3,745 90
         26,034 09
North Vancouver Keith Road-Marine Road  20,220 21
Omineca North Francois Lake  $11,873 70
, Main Fraser Lake     17,514 83
 '        29,388 53
Revelstoke Revelstoke (west)   $22,486 04
 Arrowhead (north)         8,922 59
         31,408 63
Saanich West Saanich  1,000 00
Richmond ; No. 3 Road, Lulu Island  $38,091 40
 No. 5 Road, Lulu Island  28 16
 No. 9 Road, Lulu Island  62 56
         3S,1S2 12
Similkameen Junction of Richter's Pass-Penticton   $ 2,867 48
 1-Mile         2,176 65
„  Osoyoos Bridge Crossing-Princeton     10,193 31
„  Osoyoos Hill, Anarchist Mountain       2,759 45
         17,996 89
Slocan  New Denver-Three Forks  20,152 21
South Okanagan Main Trunk Road  (south to north)     16,997 30
Trail   Thrums-Brilliant    23,212 95
Yale    Trans-Provincial Road (Camps 1 and 3)     $14,924 86
,  ._l-Mile-Princeton ■..    22,427 82
 .'Hope-Rosedale     14,096 51
51,449 19
Total   $   821,874 OS
Statement of Expenditures.
230. Salaries and expenses, Minister's Office    $    10,867 45
231. Salaries and expenses, General Office   54,617 86
232. Salaries and expenses, District Engineers   51,882 28
233. Salaries and expenses, Steam-boilers Inspection   49,319 47
234. Salaries and expenses, Electrical Energy Inspection   4,666 48
235. Salaries and expenses, " Factories Act"   7,639 39
236. Salaries and expenses, Government House  26,092 12
237. Salaries and expenses, Parliament Buildings and Grounds   127,690 77 :'
11 Geo. 5
Statement of Expenditure.
Statement of Expenditures—Continued.
238. Roads, streets, and trails  $1,105,625 28
Bridges '. 465,315 46
Location of roads  12,225 75
Road machinery  62,125 39
MeKenney Creek Diversion  1,601 84
Wharves, general   16,420 68
Protection of river-banks   35,142 14
Launch " I'll Away "     3,049 13
Miscellaneous  3,942 13
 $1,705,447 80
239. Subsidies and maintenance, steamboats and ferries        185,272 39
246. Capital expenditure, roads    $    23,395 71
Capital expenditure, bridges   47,493 5S
Capital expenditure, Cow Bay Launch   1,835 63
 72,724 92
" British Columbia Loan Act," 1919 :  Roads        821,874 OS
Total    $3,118,095 01 TENDERS RECEIVED AND CONTRACTS AWARDED.
April 1st, 1919, to March Slst, 1920.
Revelstoke West Road-B.ouldeu West.
Tenders received, August, 1919, for constructing road 14 to 16 feet wide:—
Angus McDonnell, Vancouver—
Section A, 3.31 miles    $49,528 50
B, 0.94    ,     16,353 00
C, 3.09    .,           33,175 50
7.34    „
An alternate tender by this firm for undertaking the work at actual cost plus 10 per cent,
was accepted for portion of Section A.
Trans-Provincial (Pacific) Highway.
Tenders for resurfacing and paving IS feet wide of Trans-Provincial   (Pacific)  Highway;
first unit from New Westminster Bridge (0 + 00) to Station 173 -4- 54:—
Firm.
One-course
Concrete.
Asphaltic Concrete.
Bitulithic,
On  Concrete
Base.
On Stone
Base.
On Gravel
Base.
16 Feet Wide,
on Rock Base.
(1.) H. P. Peterson Co., Van-
$115,006 50"
125,737 80
126,575 50
136.154 75
155,998 09
(2.) Palmer Bros., Arancouver
(3.) Nickson Construction Co.,
(4.) V. L. Marsh, New West-
$154,450 75
$144,518 75
(5.)   B.C.    Concrete    Road
Making   Co.,   New   West-
(6.) Cotton Co., Vancouver. .
(7.) Columbia Bitulithic Co.,
$121,530 90
115,178 00
$80,760 03f
(8.)   Department   of   Public
Note.—All tenders include cost of cement  ($19,200)  supplied by Department f.o.b. wharf.
* Tender  accepted. t Does  not  include  entire  grading  proposed   to  be  done  on  cost  plus  per
cent, basis.
One-mile Road, Station 406 to Station 485  (1.5 Miles).
Tenders received for constructing road 14 to 16 feet wide:—
Robertson & Partners, Vancouver, $44,950.
As the tender was considered excessive  (District Engineer's estimate, $15,450), no award
was made and the work was carried out by day-labour. 11 Geo. 5
Tenders.
D 107
No. 3 Road, Lulu Island.
Tenders received for paving 16 feet wide, 2.6 mile's   (24,874 square yards), August ISth,
1919:
Firm.
Amount.
Paving.
Remarks.
(1.)  Cotton Co., Ltd., Vancouver..
Cotton Co., Ltd., Vancouver. .
12.)  Columbia  Bitulithic  Co.,  Van
$47,260.
52,235.
50,992.
Asphaltic concrete.
Bitulithic.
Bitulithic.
Half  contract  awarded.
couver
r
(3.)  Harrison   &   Lamond,   Van- J
couver.                                               ]
L
(4.)  W. Bradshaw & T. J. Middle-
ton, South Vancouver
(a.)  26,117.
(6.)  28,605.
(c.) 33,580.
(d.) 37,311.
21,120.
I  Lithta of different
types.
Bituminous.
1
1 Half contract awarded
for   (6.)
New Denver-Three Forks Road  (5.17 Miles).
Tenders received, September, 1919, for widening 1.52 miles of existing road and constructing
3.65 miles new road 10 to 12 feet wide::—
fj. H. Rawlings and R. L. Gore Langton, Nakusp, $45,700.
Tender excessive;   work done by day-labour.
Island Highway, Vancouver Island—Craigflower Bridge to Parsons Bridge (2.1 Miles).
Tenders received, June, 1919, for regrading and paving 18 feet wide:—
Contractor.
(a.) One-course
Concrete.
(6.) Asphaltic
Concrete on
Concrete Base.
(c.) Asphaltic
Concrete  on
Stone   Base.
Remarks.
(1.)  Palmer Bros., Vancouver..
(2.)  Cotton Co., Vancouver  ...
$58,079 69
64,782 80
$70,486 09
75,808 00
$60,283 89
67,537 00
Awarded for (a).
Note.—Tenders exclusive of cement  ($17,000)  supplied f.o.b. wharf by Department.
Ferries.
Work and Tenderer.
Fort George and Soda Creek :
British Columbia Express Co.
Summerland-Naramata :
Okanagan Lake Boat Co.   . . .
Shuswap  Lake :
Arrow Lakes Lumber Co.
Kelowna-Westbank :
Leonard A.  Hayman   ...
Mission Ferry :
Steel Hull: ■
Yarrows,  Ltd	
Gasolene-engines :
Westminster Iron Works:   2 Model M.M. Wisconsin motors, 62
h.-p., installed   	
Canadian Fairbanks-Morse :" 2^4 cylinder D/4 40-80 h.-p. Niagara
marine engines, installed 	
Yarrows, Ltd.:   2-4 cylinder, 4-cycle Standard Buffalo gasolene-
engines, 40 to 60 h.-p. each 	
Ferris & Lucas :   Sterling engine .-	
Alternate Bids—Engines:
Canadian   Fairbanks-Morse:   2-6   cylinder   D/6  60-120   h.-p.
Niagara  marine,  installed   	
Westminster Iron Works:   2 Model M.M. 6-cylinder, installed ..
Varrows, Ltd.:   2-4 cylinder, 4-cycle Standard Buffalo of 50 to
80 h.-p. each !	
Amount.
$10,000 00
4,000 00
31,000 00
7,294 00
7,820 00
8,000 00
8,979 20
S.660 00
10,080 00
10,250 00
Remarks.
Awarded.
Renewed.
Renewed.
Renewed.
Awarded.
Awarded. Public Works Report  (1910-20).
Agassiz-Rosedale Ferry Landings.
The following is a summary of tenders received:—
Work.
No. 1.
W.   Greenlees,
Vancouver.
No. 2.
New Westminster Pile Driving  Co.
No.  3.
Nickson Construction Co.
Agassiz Landing complete ..
Rosedale Landing complete
Stringer-span bridge  	
$ 5,S40 15
5,125 20
910 00
$ 7,038 80
5,586 80
1,482 40
$ 7,503 00
6,460 00
1,078 00
Totals   	
Unit prices for more or less than plan—
Level portion, per lineal foot  	
Inclined portion, per lineal foot  	
Stringer span over 30 feet, per lineal foot.
Fender guide-piles, per lineal foot  	
Boom, per lineal foot   	
$11,875 75*
$15 00
15 00
15 00
50
80
$14,108 00
$21 00
22 00
21 80
47
1 00
$15,041 00
$14 70
15 20
15 50
39
2 50
Estimated cost, $11,163.85. * Awarded to W. Greenlees.
Charter.—W. McGrath.    Renewed.
Electrification of Eburne Bridge.
Name.
Amount of
Tender.
Deposit
Cheques.
Delivery.
Remarks.
(1.) G. C. Carter 	
$1,740 00
$174 00
July 31st	
Alternative bid, $1,360.
with   open   type   of
motor.
(2.) Munday, Rowland & Co.  ...
1,591 00
198 00
$382 additional for
totally   enclosed
motor   instead   of
open    type    crane
motor.
(3.) Taylor Engineering Co	
5,560 50
555 65
Indefinite;   30  days
after material procured ;   4   months
to deliver motor.
(4.) J. W. Bye & C. H. Macey..
3,500 00
350 00
With   enclosed   motor
-
and made weatherproof.
(5.) W. W. Fraser	
5,100 00
510 00
Reduction of $382 for
open type of motor.
Tender No. 5 accepted upon recommendation of Inspector of Electrical Energy.
Bridges.
Work and Tenderer
Pritchard :
Hodgson,  King & Marble   	
Macbeth & Miller,  Ltd	
Nickson  Construction  Co	
Armstrong,  Morrison  &  Co.   . ..
Robertson & Partners  . . ;	
R.  Moncrieff   	
W. Greenlees  	
River Road (South Vancouver) :      •
Palmer Bros	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co.   .
W. Greenlees  	
Nixon & Macdonald  	
Broley & Martin  	
Harrison & Lamond	
Amount.
Remarks.
$35,800 00
34,600 00
33,900 00
30,993 00
30,990 00
27,495 00
27,375 00
9,175 00
7.250 00
7,490 00
7,800 00
8,459 00
8,575 00
Awarded.
Awarded. 11 Geo. 5
Tenders.
D 109
Bridges—Continued.
Work and Tenderer.
Amount.
Remarks.
River Road  (South Vancouver)—Continued.
Foundation Co	
Cox  &  Verge   	
Robertson & Partners   	
Vancouver Pile Driving Co	
J. D. Cameron 	
C. E. Cooper  	
Tsable River :
Palmer Bros	
R.  Moncrieff   	
W. Greenlees   	
Robertson & Partners  	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co	
Squamish Valley  (Demolition) :
Smith   Bros	
W.  Stewart  	
Cox & Verge   	
Sturgeon Slough :
Fraser River Pile Driving Co	
J.  D.  Cameron   	
W. Greenlees   ,
Salmon River (Sack's Crossing) :
McDonald & Watson  	
W. Greenlees  	
R.   Moncrieff   	
Cameron & Humber 	
Briscoe :
James Henderson  	
A. G. Creelman & Co	
Dutch Creek :
A. G. Creelman & Co	
James Henderson   	
Enderby :
R.  Moncrieff   	
W.  Greenlees	
Armstrong,   Morrison  &   Co	
Blaeberry:
James  Henderson   	
Department's estimate  	
Albion :
H. Powell & A. Price  	
Fraser River Pile Driving Co	
Built by day-labour  	
Kitsuksus :
G. C. Hopper	
Geo. Forrest	
J. Weir 	
Nickson Construction Co	
Kicking Horse (Golden) :
A. G. Creelman & Co	
James Henderson 	
8.912 00
9,590 00
9,687 00
9,960 00
9,975 00
11,496 00
6.950 00
7,245 00
7.465 00
7,485 00
7,975 07
f (a.) 2,600 00
\ (b.)  2,300 00
2,450 00
Ua.)  1,656 00
1 (b.)     900 00*
4,315 77
5.512 00
5,549 00
15,412 00
15,780 00
16,480 00
22,951 50
7,859 50
9,360 00
4,452 00
4,808 00
16,400 00
17,320 00
22,568 00
7.037 75
6,362 00
2.850 00
1,921 40
1,725 51
4,950 00
3,147 00
7,000 00
4,900 00
12,094 00
16,785 40
Awarded.
* Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded. D 110
Public Works Eeport (1919-20).
No. 3 Bridge, Goat River, near Erickson.
Concrete piers built by contract by Wm. Dicken, Fernie—
Tender      $3,831 00
Additional work        663 20
$4,494 20
Tenders for superstructure and approaches—
Gore Langton & Rawlings, Nakusp  $22,800 00
A. McLean, Fernie     14,376 00
Actual cost, including piers, as built by day-labour, $23,026.38.
Note.—The bridge as built by day-labour should not be compared in price with that tendered
for previously, because the designs are different. The bridge as now built is much heavier and
has more ironwork in it than that for which tenders were called for.
Canyon Creek Bridge.
Firm.
Wrought Iron.
Cast Iron.
Gal.  Iron.
(1.) Vancouver  Engineering Works	
(2.) Ross & Howard   	
13c. per lb.
11 9-10c. per lb.
7%c. per lb.
10% c. per lb.
12y2c. per lb.
12 %c. per lb.
No. 2 awarded.     Bridge built by day-labour.
South Vancouver Soldiers' Houses.
Work and Tenderer.
D. G. Cameron's House :
F.  P.  Rogers   	
Thos. Carson	
Dr. Paul's House :
F. W. Pemberton   	
T. Carson	
F.  P. Rogers   	
F. J. Turner's House:
Christian & Russell  	
T. Carson  	
F. P. Rogers	
E. Chrystal & Co	
J. C Carman's House :
Christian &  Russell   	
F. P. Rogers 	
T. Carson  	
J. Y. Jacquot's House:.
F. P. Rogers 	
C. C. Chrystal & Co	
T. Carson  	
I. J. Garrod's House :
F. P. Rogers 	
R. J. Hirsciifield's House:
F.  P.  Rogers   	
J. Warwick  (taken over by Millen) :
First lot of tenders rejected  	
F. P. Rogers (second call for bids)
T. Carson (second call for bids)   . .
Nolan and Kinnarny (2 Dwellings) :
F. P. Rogers 	
J. H. Whittaker   	
,3. Layfield 	
Amount.
Remarks.
$2,135 00
2,287 00
2.875 00
2,779 00
2,662 00
2,100 00
2,235 00
2,335 00
2,400 00
2.100 00
2,881 00
3,090 00
2,725 00
2,864 00
2,885 00
2,435 00
2,435 00
2,350 00
2,492 00
4,675 00
5,000 00
7,000 00
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Too high.
Awarded.
Awarded. 11 Geo. 5
Tenders.
$4,525 00
$3,350 00
2,200 00
$1,482 00
1.487 00
2,527 00
650 00
795 00
819 00
4,477 00
5,465 00
4,778 00
4,465 00
2,500 00
3,000 00
3,900 00
3,000 00
8,450 00
9,069 00
$12,000 00
3,740 00
5,819 00
D 111
South Vancouver Soldiers' Houses—Continued.
Work and Tenderer.
Amount.
Remarks.
G.   A.   BlDDLECOMBE :
2,670 00
Not accepted.
Not accepted.
Squamish Soldiers' Houses.
Dr. M. J. Paul's House:
F. P. Rogers (first call for bids)  	
No bids in reply to second call.
Demonstration College at Fairview.
Joe McDonald   	
Department's  estimate   	
Built by day-labour.
Gaols and Government Buildings.
Vancouver Liquor Vendor's  (Alterations) :
E. Chrystal & Co	
McWilliam & Munroe 	
C. F.   Perry   	
Additional Alterations:
E. Chrystal & Co	
F. P.  Rogers  	
Wright  Bros	
Hope Mining Recorder's Office (Erection) :
Davies Construction Co.  (first call)   	
Walter Webster Bailey  (first call)   	
E. Chrystal & Co.  (first call)   	
T. Carson  (second call)   	
Not awarded; considered too high.
Vernon Court-house (Repairs) :
R.  Ford   	
H. J. Davies 	
W. A. Cryderman  	
Davies awarded contract on 10 per cent, basis; total cost not
to exceed $3,000.
Yahk Lock-up :
Jones & Doris   	
Ocean Falls  Court-house:
D. H.  Morrison   	
Department's  estimate   	
Schools.
Keremeos  (Addition) :
T.  Carson   	
Cawston:
T.  Carson   	
Denman Island :
McWilliam & Munroe  	
Awarded.
Awarded.
Not received
in time.
No deposit.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded. D 112
Public Works Eeport (1919-20).
Schools—Contin ued.
Work and Tenderer.
Errington :
F. P. Rogers 	
W. Ford	
McWilliam & Munroe  	
Turley Bros	
McRae  Bros	
Kimberley :
Davies Construction Co.   (first bid)   	
T. Carson  (first bid)	
McWilliam & Munroe  (first bid)   	
F. P. Rogers 	
Western Construction Co	
Amalgamated Construction Co	
Davies Construction Co *.	
G. G. Hunter	
Telkwa :
Telkwa Lumber Co	
Phillips  & Smith   	
McWilliam & Munroe 	
D. Harrison	
Vanderhoof   (Addition) :
T. Carson  	
Department's  estimate   	
Sidney (Repairs) :
Morris & Readings (first call)   	
Morris & Readings (second call)   	
McWilliam & Munroe  	
R. A. Green  	
R. C. Sipe 	
Vancouver Normal  (Bon.ERs) :
Vancouver Engineering Works	
Vulcan Iron Works 	
Armstro.ng (Erection) :
H. J. Davies  	
Armstrong (Heating) :
McDowell & Mann	
Murray Bros., Ltd1	
W.  R.  Menzies  &  Co	
Barr & Anderson  	
Orr Bros., Ltd	
R. J. Nott 	
Granby Bay  (Erection) :
T. Carson  	
Nelson & Currie	
McWilliam & Munroe 	
Boys'  Training  School,  Coquitlam   (Cottages)
Robertson & Partners 	
Sloan & Harrison   	
E. J. Ryan Contracting Co	
Administration and Dining Blocks:
Robertson & Partners 	
S. J. Ryan Contracting Co	
Baynes & Horie 	
Amount.
$ 2.615 00
2.675 00
2,956 00
3,350 00
2,847 90
9,700 00
15,364 00
15,400 00
15,075 00
16,475 00
15.000 00
Cost 4-15%
16,830 00
7.500 00
8.500 00
9,550 00
11,900 00
24.970 00
27,760 00
1,500 00
1,300 00
1,438 00
1,555 00
1,590 00
1,175 00
1,260 00
93,000 00
29,555 00
30.006 00
31.552 00
32,955 00
34,980 00
35,975 00
19.987 00
22.878 00
31,501 00
134.417 00
145.000 00
158,258 00
79,200 00
85,950 00
73.000 00
Remarks.
Awarded.
Too late.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Awarded.
Too late. 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 113
REPORT OF CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MACHINERY.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
The Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In accordance with the provisions of the " Boilers Inspection Act," I have the honour
to submit to you the Eighteenth Annual Report of the operation of the steam-boilers and
machinery inspection service for the year ending March 31st, 1920.
The personnel of the service at present consists of the Chief Inspector, twelve District
Inspectors, one clerk, one stenographer and filing and record clerk, and three stenographers,
located as follows: Chief Inspector, four Inspectors, one clerk, one stenographer and filing
and record clerk, and one stenographer and typist at the head office in New Westminster,
including Districts A and E, one of the Inspectors being employed most of the time in District D,
Vancouver; three Inspectors and one stenographer and typist in Victoria for District B; one
Inspector in Nelson for District C.; three Inspectors and one stenographer and typist in Vancouver
for District D.
During the year the following changes of staff have taken place: John Downie, Senior
Inspector at the head office, resigned on August 6th, 1919, and P. A. Goepel, Inspector at the
Vancouver office, on April 30th, 1919, both commencing business for themselves as consulting
mechanical engineers. John D. Kay was promoted to fill the vacancy on October 1st, 1919.
Mrs. Williamson, stenographer and typist at the head office, left the service on March 31st, 1919.
Miss A. B. Mann was appointed to fill the vacancy on May 19th, 1919.
The following is a summary of the routine work performed in the office of the Chief Inspector
during the year, exclusive of inspections, engineers' examinations, and the work of engineer
surveying, details of which will be found in the reports of the Inspectors for the different districts
and that of the Chief Engineer Examiner:—
Letters inward       6,725
Letters outward       7,832
Telegrams inward    39
Telegrams outward    30
Inspector's monthly reports examined        132
New designs examined, calculated, and reported on   92
Amendments to designs examined, calculated, and reported on  18
Fees collected for designs   $506.50
Fees collected for infractions of Act $700.00
Number of miles travelled by Chief Inspector     5,410
I am pleased again to be able to report that there have been no boiler-explosions during
the year.
The number of accidents to persons and machinery are fully set forth in the District
Inspectors' reports.
It will be noted that there were seven accidents to persons, five of which were fatal. The
fatal accidents were as follows:—
(1.) The engineer of a logging-donkey was killed by the valve connecting-rod becoming
disconnected at the valve-end, the other end being connected to an extension of the crank-pin;
the rod was thrown around, striking him on the head.
(2.) A logging-engine while being moved was brought near a high-tension electric line
carrying 60,000 volts; the current jumped to the smoke-stack and electrified the wire-hauling
cable; a logger came in contact with this cable and was instantly killed.
(3.)  This   accident  occurred   at  the  Peerless   Laundry,   Vancouver.    Early   in   April  the
engineer noticed steam leaking from the cast-iron head of a steam-mangle, near the trunnion;
holes were drilled and two screwed plugs inserted;  a few days after he noticed leakage between
these plugs and suggested to the manager that there might be a crack.   A new head was
8 ordered, but the engineer did not report to the Inspector as required by the Act. On Friday,
May 2nd, a bad leak developed in the same place. On Saturday morning both the manager
and the engineer became alarmed, the former suggesting the possibility of brazing, and although
the engineer saw a welder who told him that the crack could be brazed, no report was made
to the Inspection Department. At noon on Saturday the engineer reduced the working-pressure
with the idea of finishing up the week's work, intending on Sunday to cut into the material
to determine if possible the extent of the crack. About 2.40 the casting failed. The women
who were working at or near the mangle made a rush for the street; two of them while passing
the fractured mangle-end were struck by the escaping steam and water, and were so severely
scalded that they died shortly after. A thorough investigation was held, at which it was found
that the engineer had been negligent in not reporting the fracture to the Inspection Department
as soon as it was discovered by him, as required by section 29 of the regulations, and his
certificate was suspended for two months.
(4.) On April 11th, 1919, the governor on the main engine at Robertson & Hackett's mill,
Vancouver, failed to operate. The engine speeded up until the fly-wheel burst; Jas. Bogle, the
oiler, ran to close the throttle-valve, when a piece of the wheel struck him on the head, killing
him instantly.
Under " Summary of Defects," it will be seen that six safety-valves were found to be overloaded and nineteen boilers wrere inspected having safety-valves defective in construction. Under
the heading of " Pressure-gauges," 303 were defective and eighteen inoperative.
The number of new boilers built for British Columbia was sixty-four, as compared with
fifty-four for the previous year; forty-nine of these were built in British Columbia, five were
built under inspection in Eastern Canada, and ten built in the United States. Of these, sixty-two
were put into operation in British Columbia, the remainder being in stock at the end of the year.
The number of second-hand boilers imported was seventeen; from Eastern Canada eleven,
as compared with thirty-two during the previous year; and six from the United States, as
compared with fourteen for the previous year.
Boilers inspected for the first time during the year number sixty-three; thirty-eight w,ere
taken out of service, being condemned as unfit for further use.
The total number of boilers now on our books is 6,117. Of these, 2,494 were inspected
internally and externally, eight inspected internally only, and 152 inspected externally only.
A large number of old boilers entered on our register have been sent out of the Province,
many on account of the working-pressure having been cut down, and as no reports have been
made they still show on our books, but I intend during the coming year to have the District
Inspectors make up lists of these, so that they can be struck off the register.
The number of plates tested during the year was 398, as compared with 146 for the previous
year. Seven plates were rejected as unfit for use in boiler-construction, as compared with two
in the previous year.
In connection with defects discovered, I wish to mention a case where the engineer,
W. H. Paddon, noticed a slight leakage of steam on the side of the riveted joint opposite the
caulking-edge of the plate. He immediately closed down the boiler and reported to the Inspector,
F. Biggam, who at once made an examination of the boiler and applied the hydrostatic test.
It was found that the plate had been cracked from the inside, but the crack was covered by
the inner lap. If this had not been noticed and prompt action taken by Mr. Paddon, there is
no doubt a disastrous explosion would have occurred.
I am pleased to say that the active co-operation between this and other departments of the
Government service, and between the engineers in the various public buildings, is resulting in
much good and efficient work being done.
In addition to the usual work of this office, we have during the year undertaken extra work
as follows: Supervised repairs on the Ladner-Woodward, the Mission-Matsqui, and Agassiz-
Rosedale Ferries; supervised repairs and operations in connection with steam plants in Government buildings; carried on inspections for the Workmen's Compensation Board. The summary
of inspections and safety orders made is attached hereto.
Appended you will find a summary of the total work done by all the District Inspectors as
well as their separate reports, together with a summary of the work done for the Workmen's
Compensation Board, as well as two photographs and a photostat re the accident at the Peerless
Laundry. i ■■! ■ ,■!
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&.  11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 115
In conclusion, I desire to thank you for your active interest in support of this office, and
also to thank the members of the staff for the efficient manner in which they carried out their
work during the year.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Inspector.
/VJbril /$/g l„ 3fV7??<x7-ch,/q20
t R k*k*
IT
. h s 4 >. s
Summary of Total Work done by District Inspectors for the Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers   125
  389
  7
  49
boiler-plates inspected  	
boiler-plates rejected   ,	
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia D 116
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Summary of Total Work done by' District Inspectors—Continued.
Number of boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  5
„         new boilers inspected built in United States   10
„         new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   13
„         new boilers inspected  (total)     62
„         boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)     11
„          boilers imported from United States (second-hand)    6
„         boilers unclassified   17
„          first inspections    63
„         inspections, external and internal   2,494
„         internal inspections only   8
„         external inspections only    152
„         special inspections after repairs   33
„         visits in addition to inspections   915
„         boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   2,414
„         boilers on which pressure was reduced  69
„         boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   50
„         boilers repaired under Inspector's directions   67
„         boilers considered unfit for further use   11
„          accidents to engines and boilers  28
„          accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)  2
„         accidents resulting in personal injury  (fatal)    5
„         investigations  32
„         inspections completed     2,672
Total horse-power of boilers inspected    216,486.27
Number of defects observed as per summary   2,088
Number of defects considered dangerous   160
Inspection fees earned    $30,184.76
Inspection fees collected   $29,321.77
Miles travelled by the Inspector  51,610
Letters inward  6,040
Letters outward   8,175
Telegrams inward   63
Telegrams outward   46
Boilers taken out of service  38
Summary of Total Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Boilers without safety-valves   3 2
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative   2 1
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded   6 3
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction   19 3
Boilers without pressure-gauges  3
Pressure-gauges inoperative    18 12
Pressure-gauges defective     303 7
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing  4
Cases of defective stays  23
Cases of broken rivets   1
Cases of defective riveting  7 2
Cases of broken stays or braces   109 14
Cases of loose stays or braces   26 1
Boilers damaged by low water   5 3
Defective settings     86 9
Boilers with fractured plates   46 5
Boilers with laminated plates  2
Boilers with burned plates   16 6
Boilers with blistered plates    42     " 5 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 117
Summary of Total Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   83 7
Cases of internal corrosion   98 1
Cases of scale or encrustation   195 15
Cases of internal grooving  2
Cases of external corrosion  87 3
Cases of defective tubes   64 3
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement   64 3
Cases of broken feed-valves   8 1
Serious leakage around tube-ends   86 7
Serious leakage in rivet-joints   29 2
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  69 12
Defective water-gauges  '27 4
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  13 1
Water-columns without blow-outs   5
Cases of broken test-cocks  270
Connections to water-columns without valves   3
Neutral sheets not stayed   2 1
Furnaces out of shape   8
Boilers without fusible plugs   14
Boilers low at front end  64
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  37 2
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off  6 2
Defects in engines   15 5
Boilers without hand-holes   1
Boilers without stop-valves   8 3
Cases of defective steam-pipes  22 7
Unclassified defects   76 2
Totals    2,077 154
John Peck,
Chief Inspector of Steam-boilers. D US
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Report of the Chief Examiner.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
The Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you the following report with respect to examination
of candidates for engineers' certificates for the year ending March 31st, 1920:—
During the year I have received 1,271 applications for examination for the different grades
of certificates.
On March 31st, 1919, I had on hand 166 applications, making a total of 1,437. Of these,
865 have been examined; 294 applicants have had their fees returned, as their testimonials did
not show the necessary service qualifications required by the Act. This leaves on the " Accepted
for Examination " file 27S application forms.
Results of Examinations.
No.
Class. examined.        Passed. Failed.
First     11 6                   5
Second     4S 22                 26
Third     159 101                 58
Fourth     356 271                 85
Special logging-donkey     SO 5S                 22
Special creamery  5 5
Special heating    57 50                   7
Special Doukhobor    1 1
Special road-roller     4 4
Temporary     144 144
Totals     865               662 203
Examination fees collected by Chief Inspector   $3,277 50
Examination fees collected by other Inspectors   160 00
Duplicate certificate fees   110 00
Total   $3,547 50
Trusting this report will meet with your approval.
I have, etc.,
John Peck,
Chief Inspector. —
11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 119
Workmen's Compensation Board.
Special.
2
Summary of Inspections and Safety Orders for the Year ending March 31st, 1920.
District A— Inspector. Inspections.    Safety Orders.
J. D. Kay    29 166
A. S. Bennett  47 134
J. B. Tait    45 156
J. Davidson   7 29
District B—
S. Baxter   48 193
J. Clark   145 635
L. Duckitt  14 6S
District C—■
A. Sutherland ,  9 44
District D—
G. 0. Madigan   17 82
F. Bath  20 45
F. Biggam   33 101
Totals   414 1,653
Senior Inspector's Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C. ■
Sir,—I have the honour to hand you herewith my report for the year ending March
31st, 1920.
From April till the end of July I was doing field-work in the southern part of this district.
When Mr. Downie resigned in August I was put in charge of District A and the routine work
of the head office, and am still so employed. The field-work was of the usual character, except
for the following defects, which were of a dangerous nature:—
Boiler No. 11933b-c was found with the back-head, below the tubes, cracked behind the
angle-iron attaching the through stays to the head. This was due to excessive scale accumulating round the angle-irons, allowing the plate to be continually overheated.
Boiler No. 10837B-C had so many cracks at the lower girth-seam landing from rivet-holes
to edge of plate that it was necessary to cut away a part of the sheet and insert a patch.
Boiler No. 12612b-c was overheated, due to low water, the lower part of the shell being
considerably damaged.    One fly-wheel was found with a broken spoke.
At Small & Bucklin's mill the water-hammer ruptured the 10-inch main steam-pipe. One
cast-iron elbow was broken and another one torn from the pipe. Fortunately no one was injured
and the property damaged was small considering the latent possibilities, as the header was
attached to four 72-inch 10-foot boilers operating at 125 lb. pressure, with Dutch-oven furnaces,
and on account of the escape of steam into the boiler-room it was impossible to shut the boiler
stop-valves until the steam-pressure was almost off the boilers. It was then found that the
feed-water line had been carried away, so that no water could be put in to make up the loss
while steam was escaping. The Chief Engineer therefore decided to turn on a stream of water
from the fire-hose into the Dutch ovens. This was carefully done, with the result that little
damage was done to the boilers or settings.
During the year I made twenty-nine general inspections for the Workmen's Compensation
Board and also two special investigations of fatal accidents.
Since August my time has been fully occupied attending to engineers' examinations, engineers'
applications, designs, correspondence, and interviewing parties desiring information on subjects
relative to our various duties. D 120 Public Works Report (1919-20).
Considerable time has been spent on work for other branches of the Public Works Department, such  as the Eburne Bridge electric operating mechanism  and the supervision of the
installation of the machinery and equipment on the new Mission ferry-boat.
Appended is a detailed list of the work done and defects noted.
Trusting this report meets with your approval,
I have, etc.,
John D. Kay,
Senior Inspector, District A.
Remarks.
Inspections were held monthly and special examinations at any time during the month.
Summary of Work done in District A for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers and fittings  93
„         new boilers inspected built in United States   1
„         first inspections    1
„         inspections, external and internal   123
„         special inspections after repairs   5
„         visits in addition to inspections   71
„         boilers subjected to hydrostatic test    123
„         boilers on which pressure was reduced  1
„         boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   6
„         boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  6
„         accidents to engines and boilers   5
„         investigations     3
„         inspections completed  123
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   8,427
Number of defects observed as per summary  54
Number of defects considered dangerous   5
Inspection fees earned   $1,264.10
Inspection fees collected    $1,216.65
Miles travelled by the Inspector   ,  3,142
Boilers taken out of service  18
Expenses     $388.99
Work done for other Departments.
Inspections for Workmen's Compensation Board, 29 ordinary and 2 special; work in
connection with Eburne Swing-bridge, 3 days; work in connection with. New Mission Ferry,
S7 hours.
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Pressure-gauges defective      5
Boilers damaged by low water      1 1
Defective settings   2     4
Boilers with fractured plates     2 2
Boilers with burned plates     3 2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets      8
Cases of internal corrosion  11
Cases of scale or encrustation       3
Cases of external corrosion  s     2
Cases of defective tubes      1 1
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks     1
Cases of broken test-cocks      8
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off     3 1
Unclassified defects       2
Totals     54 7
John D. Kay,
Senior Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A. 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 121
Inspector's Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report covering the work done by me during
the year ending March 31st, 1920:—
I made two trips to the Okanagan and inspected all the boilers from Penticton to Vernon;
also one trip to the Revelstoke District and inspected all boilers, including the north end of
Arrow Lake. For the last three months I have been looking after the district south of the
Fraser River and British Columbia Electric Railway to Chilliwack.
I held engineers' examinations at Revelstoke, Golden, Kamloops, and Vernon.
I made an inspection of the " Muskrat" at Golden for the Public Works Department and a
special trip to Penticton to inspect a boiler and engine for the Land Settlement Board. The
expenses were charged to this Department.
I accompanied you on a special inspection trip to examine the steam plants at the Royal
Inland Hospital, Kamloops, and the Tranquille Sanatorium.
My time, when not on inspection-work, engineers' examinations, or examination of boiler
designs, has been occupied in making drawings, etc., in connection with the outside work of
this office, such as arrangement of dampers for Vancouver Court-house boilers; alterations to
Agassiz Ferry; a record drawing of the exploded mangle at Peerless Laundry, Vancouver;
charts and data for annual report of work done and cost of same.
Trusting this report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
A. S. Bennett,
Inspector, District A.
Summary of Work done in Districts A and E for the Year ending March 31 st, 1920.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers    15
first inspections   1
inspections, external and internal   155
external inspections only    7
visits in addition to inspections   41
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   133
boilers on which pressure was reduced  11
accidents to engines and boilers   1
investigations     2
inspections completed  162
Total horse-power of boilers inspected         11,288
Number of defects observed as per summary  123
Number of defects considered dangerous   7
Inspection fees earned  $1,735.40
Inspection fees collected  $1,724.15
Miles travelled by the Inspector  4,732
Letters inward   45
Letters outward '  3S7
Expenses      $489.97
Work done for other Districts.
Made forty-seven inspections for Workmen's Compensation Board, and gave 134 orders.
Made one special trip to Penticton for the Soldiers' Settlement Board; expenses charged to this
Department, $29.60. Inspected boilers for Provincial Government at Vernon,. Kamloops, Revelstoke, and Golden, for which no fees were charged. Inspected the " Muskrat" at Golden for
Public Works Department. D 122
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Dangerous.
2
1
«, Summary' of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Boilers without safety-valves       3
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative      1
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction     1
Boilers without pressure-gauges      1
Pressure-gauges inoperative      3
Pressure-gauges defective   26
Cases of defective stays      1
Defective settings     3
Boilers with fractured plates      1
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets  13
Cases of internal corrosion    16
Cases of scale or encrustation   10
Cases of external corrosion      9
Cases of defective tubes      2
Serious leakage in rivet-joints     1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks      4
Defective water-gauges      1
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks      1
Cases of broken test-cocks   16
Connections to water-columns without valves       1
Boilers without fusible plugs       1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings      2
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off     1
Cases of defective steam-pipes       5
Totals   123 7
A. S. Bennett,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, Districts A and E.
Inspector's  Report, District A.
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you my report for the year ending March 31st, 1920.
There were a few accidents to boilers in this district during the year. Three boilers were
damaged through excessive accumulation of scale and one boiler was injured by fire, which
occurred at the mill. One boiler was considered unfit for further service through being cracked
about two-thirds across the top tube-sheet.    This boiler had been in service for many years.
In addition to work in this district, I inspected boilers at Golden, Enderby, along the North
Thompson River, in the Cariboo and Kamloops.
One fatal accident occurred. The valve-gear became disconnected from the disk on a logging-
engine.    The engineer was struck by a revolving part of the gear and killed.
Defects, as tabulated, were such as occur in every-day operation.
Work for the Workmen's Compensation Board consisted of forty-five inspections and the
issue of 156 safety orders.
I have, etc.,
J. B. Tait,
Inspector, District A. 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 123
Summary of Work done in District A (North) for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection   1
„         boilers imported from Eastern Canada (second-hand)   (Alberta)     1
„         boilers unclassified    1
„         first inspections    3
„         inspections, external and internal   359
„         external inspections only    17
„         special inspections after repairs   2
„         visits in addition to inspections  23
„         boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   352
„         boilers on which pressure was reduced  7
„         boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    3
„         boilers considered unfit for further use   1
„         accidents to engines and boilers  4
„         accidents resulting in personal injury  (fatal)     1
„         investigations     5
„         inspections completed  375
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  29,6S0
Number of defects observed as per summary   318
Number of defects considered dangerous   11
Inspection fees earned    $4,533.05
Inspection fees collected  $4,217.00
Miles travelled by the Inspector   9,404
Letters outward  393
Boilers taken out of service  1
Expenses  $849.94
Work done for other Districts.
Trip to Golden and Enderby.   Trip inspecting boilers on the North Thompson, Cariboo, and
Kamloops.    A few inspections in the Fraser Valley. *
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative      1
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded      3
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction     2
Boilers without pressure-gauges      2
Pressure-gauges inoperative      1
Pressure-gauges defective  17
Cases of defective stays     5
Cases of broken stays or braces   67
Defective settings   fc  11
Boilers with burned plates      2
Cases of internal corrosion  33
Cases of scale or encrustation  65
Cases of external corrosion   32
Cases of defective tubes      3
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement      1
Serious leakage around tube-ends     3
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   21
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks      4
Water-columns without blow-outs       1
Cases of broken test-cocks   11
Boilers low at front end  16
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  6
Dangerous.
2 I) 124
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off     2
Cases of defective steam-pipes     3
Unclassified defects     6 1
Totals 318 11
J. B. Tait,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District A (North).
Inspector's Report, District E (A).
New Westminster, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peek, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, Neiv Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present my first annual report covering the period from the date
of my appointment, September Sth, 1919, to the end of the fiscal year, about seven months.
Very little of this work has been done in District E. Most of it has been done in the
Vancouver (or D) District owing to shortage of Inspectors and the rapid development of that
district.
What little work has been done in E District was during the month of March, when several
of the larger plants were inspected and examinations were held in Golden, Arernon, and Kamloops.
This district will be thoroughly gone over later.
Trusting that this report will be found satisfactory.
I have, etc.,
Jas. Davidson,
Inspector, District E (A).
Summary of Work done in District E  (A) for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of boilers unclassified 	
first inspections  	
inspections, external and internal '	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs 	
inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected 	
Number of defects observed as per summary 	
Number of defects considered dangerous 	
Inspection fees earned      $236.90
Inspection fees collected         $79.50
Miles travelled by the Inspector *.  534
Boilers taken out of service  1
Expenses           $55.80
1
1
22
22
1
22
2,022
7
1
Summary of Defects observed.
, Nature of Defects. Number.
Cases of external corrosion   3
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   1
Defective water-gauges   1
Neutral sheets not stayed   1
Boilers without hand-holes   1
Dangerous.
Totals
     7 1
Jas. Davidson,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District E (A). 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 125
SUMMARY OF TOTAL WORK DONE IN DISTRICTS A AND E FOR YEAR ENDING
MARCH 31st, 1920.
Results of Examinations.
No.
Class.                                              examined. Passed.             Failed.
First        11 6                  5
Second        27 11                 16
Third      55 42                 13
Fourth      124 102                 22
Special logging-donkey      25 23                   2
Special creamery •       5 5
Special heating     11 10                   1
Special road-roller        4 4
Temporary     44 44
Totals   301 247                 59
Summary of Work done.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers   108
„         boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  1
„         new boilers inspected built in United States   1
„         boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)     1
„         boilers unclassified    2
„          first inspections    6
„         inspections, external and internal  659
„         external inspections only    24
„         special inspections after repairs   7
„         visits in addition to inspections   132
„         boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   630
„         boilers on which pressure was reduced   19
„         boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   7
„         boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  9
„         boilers considered unfit for further use  ,  1
„         accidents to engines and boilers  10
„         accidents resulting in personal injury  (fatal)    '  1
„         investigations    10
„          inspections completed  682
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   51,417
Number of defects observed as per summary   502
Number of defects considered dangerous   24
Inspection fees earned    $7,769.45
Inspection fees collected   $7,237.30
Miles travelled by the Inspector  17,812
Letters inward  45
Letters outward   780
Boilers taken out of service  20
Expenses    «  $1,784.70
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Boilers without safety-valves      3 2
Boilers with safety-valves inoperative      2 1
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded     3 2
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction      3
Boilers without pressure-gauges      3
Pressure-gauges inoperative      4 1
Pressure-gauges defective    48 3 D 126 Public Works Report (1919-20).
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Cases of defective stays     6
Cases of broken stays or braces   67
Boilers damaged by low water     1 1
Defective settings    18 2
Boilers with fractured plates     3 2
Boilers with burned plates     5 2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   21
Cases of internal corrosion  60
Cases of scale or encrustation   78
Cases of external corrosion   46
Cases of defective tubes      6
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement      1
Serious leakage around tube-ends       3
Serious leakage in rivet-joints .■     1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   26
Defective water-gauges       2
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  -.     5
Water-columns without blow-outs       1
Cases of broken test-cocks  35
Connections to water-columns without valves     1
Neutral sheets not stayed     1
Boilers without fusible plugs     1
Boilers low at front end   16
Cases of serious leakage of fittings     8
Number of hand-holes, doors having bolts and dogs burned off     6 2
Boilers without hand-holes        1
Cases of defective steam-pipes     S 1
Unclassified defects      8 1
Totals  501 26
John D. Kay,
A. S. Bennett,
J. B. Tait,
Jas. Davidson,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, Districts A and E.
Senior Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peek, Esq., *
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report of work done during the past twelve months
in this district.
The general details of examinations of candidates for engineers' certificates apply to the
district inspectorate as a whole, while the appended summary relates to my personal work
outside of the office duties devolving upon me.
During the year some sixty-nine applications for examination were made direct, eleven being
for re-examination; of these, fifty-five were accepted, from whom we collected $160 as examination fees.   The total number examined in this district was 167, of whom 131 passed and thirty-six ,
11 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. D 127
failed. Examinations were held at Victoria monthly, at Nanaimo tri-monthly, and as opportunity
presented itself at the following points: Prince Rupert, Anyox, sundry points along the Grand
Trunk Pacific line, Cumberland, Courtenay, Headquarters, and Comox.
In addition to the inspection of steam plants, I made 1S1 visits to various plants for consultation with the engineers and as a check on the upkeep and efficiency of the steam plants in
question.    My inspections and tests were 230.
There have been few accidents at the steam plants under our jurisdiction, which shows not
alone the care exercised by the Inspectors, but also the satisfactory supervision and care of the
engineers in charge. I will enumerate some of the more serious defects which I observed during
my inspections.
Steam Plant No. lkGh-—The steel pillar supporting the cross-beams to which the boilers were
suspended was overheated and bent, inclining the boilers to one side and straining the steam
connections, etc. The boilers were immediately taken out of service, efficient supports provided
for the beams, the boilers relevelled, and the alignment of pipes checked off. Fortunately nothing
was carried away and no further damage was done.
Boiler No. 1180b.—This boiler was damaged by low water as a result of the malicious act
of some unknown party who opened the blow-off valve in the temporary absence of the engineer;
this was reported to the police, but the culprit has not yet been detected. Fortunately the
engineer returned in time to save the boiler from being completely ruined by overheating.
I reported previously a fatal accident at No. 41915b-c, which is a log-haul. It was
unwittingly pulled against a high-tension wiring carrying 60,000 volts; the current struck the
stack and electrified the "whole engine and was transmitted to the hauling-cable. A logger
coming in contact with same was instantly killed; this, of course, is really not a boiler accident.
Steam Plant No. 20537.—An explosion took place from an air-tank used for compressed air.
The pressure-card showed prior ito the explosion an average pressure of 100 lb., but at the time
of the explosion the red line on the card shot up to an unknown amount; I therefore inferred
that lubrication-oil generated gas and the heat of compression caused the explosion. The result
was the tearing asunder of gusset-stays at one head, distorting the head and causing some rivets
to fly out at such a velocity that a safety-valve was broken off adjacent to air-tank, but no
personal injury resulted.
A gas-explosion took place at steam plant No. 21733b-c Oil-fuel was being used. The
fuel-pump stopped and the flame died out, after which the pump starting again projected oil
on the heating surfaces and an explosion of gas followed. The engineer was in front of the
boiler and was burned on hands and face.
Steam Plant No. 190b.—At this plant the stop-valve was found to be very leaky, and on
examination it was found that the brass seat which screwed into the valve-casing had worked
out with the turning of the valve, thus preventing proper flow of steam and also preventing
valve being efficiently closed. Heavy leakage under the Inspector's hydrostatic test led to this
discovery.
An accident to an engine occurred at plant No. 20639, where the forked end of connecting-
rod gave way, permitting the piston to knock off cylinder-head and crack the cylinder.
Fortunately no one was hurt.
Steam Plant No. 1975b.—An accident occurred to a blower-engine, air-discharge. The pipe
fractured and blew off from the cylinder attachment.    No one injured.
In addition to the fees earned at the inspection of commercial steam plants, I also inspected
and tested some boilers for the Provincial Government, the horse-power of which was 1,290 and
the inspection fees $120.40.
Considerable additional time and work has been incurred by the surveys devolving upon
us on behalf of the Workmen's Compensation Board. During the past fiscal year I made thirty-
nine surveys and pointed out 202 places or parts of machinery requiring guards for the protection
of the employees.
Some time was also taken up by the supervision of the building of the new Mission ferry-boat
at Yarrows, Limited, which, when completed, I saw successfully launched.
During the last few months very considerable activity has taken place in the starting-up of
industrial plants, sawmills especially increasing in numbers owing to a greater demand for our
lumber products. D 128
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
In conclusion I would thank the various Inspectors at the head office and other district
offices for prompt and courteous information and reports concerning boilers moved from their
districts to this district, also for the efficient assistance of my colleagues in this district, during
the past year.
All of which I respectfully submit. I have, etc.,
S. Baxter,
Senior Inspector, District B.
Summary of Work done in District B for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   81
boiler-plates rejected  .., :  3
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  13
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   2
new boilers inspected  (total)     8
first inspections    3
inspections, external and internal   230
external inspections only  4
special inspections after repairs   5
visits in addition to inspections   181
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  236
boilers on which pressure was reduced  10
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs '.... '       4
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    22
boilers considered unfit for further use  2
accidents to engines and boilers   7
accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)     1
accidents resulting in personal injury  (fatal)     1
investigations     6
inspections completed  230
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  17,513
Number of defects observed as per summary   164
Number of defects considered dangerous   27
Inspection fees earned    $2,339.30
Inspection fees collected '    $2,416.50
Miles travelled by the Inspector   6,649
Letters inward  2,924
Letters outward  3,508
Telegrams inward   42
Telegrams outward   30
Boilers taken out of service  9
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction   2 1
Pressure-gauges inoperative   1
Pressure-gauges defective   28
Cases of broken stays or braces   1 1
Boilers damaged by low water   2 2
Defective settings    15 3
Boilers with fractured plates  5
Boilers with burned plates   1 1
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   5
Cases of internal corrosion  1
Cases of scale or encrustation  8 1
Cases of external corrosion  3 1
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement  2 1
Cases of broken feed-valves   3 1 •
11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 129
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Serious leakage around tube-ends    18 2
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks     7 1
Cases of broken test-cocks  42
Connections to water-columns without valves     1
Boilers without fusible plugs     7
Boilers low at front end      1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings      3 1
Defects in engines     3 3
Boilers without stop-valves     3 3
Cases of defective steam-pipes     2 t
Unclassified defects     1
Totals 165 22
S. Baxter,
Senior Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending March 31st, 1920.
During this year I have visited many parts of the district, including the Queen Charlotte
Islands, and have also done considerable work for the Workmen's Compensation Board. In
general I found most plants in good condition and well cared for. I also found that the
management of the various plants had no objection to installing " safety devices" which
I recommended.
Trusting my report will meet with your approval,
I have, etc.,
L. Duckitt,
Inspector, District B.
Summary of Work done in District B for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   30
„         boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  1
„          boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)     2
„          first inspections    5
,,         inspections, external and internal    299
„         external inspections only  19
„         special inspections after repairs   1
„         visits in addition to inspections   72
„         boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   262
„         boilers on which pressure was reduced   5
„         boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    3
„         boilers considered unfit for further use    5
„         inspections completed  318
Total horse-power of boilers inspected        34,306
Number of defects observed as per summary   192 D 130
JUBLIC
ORKS   KEPORT
Summary of Work done in District B—Continued.
Number of defects considered dangerous   54
Inspection fees earned   $3,837.00
Inspection fees collected  $3,776.30
Miles travelled by the Inspector  7,160
Boilers taken out of service   5
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction -  3                   2
Pressure-gauges inoperative   9                   9
Pressure-gauges defective   59
Cases of defective riveting  2
Cases of broken stays or braces  17                 10
Cases of loose stays or braces   1
Defective settings    13                   3
Boilers with fractured plates   S                   1
Cases of internal corrosion   4
Cases of scale or encrustation   IS                 12
Cases of external corrosion  7
Cases of defective tubes  0
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement   3                   1
Serious leakage around tube-ends  4                   4
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   9                   5
Defective water-gauges    11                   2
Water-columns without blow-outs   2
Cases of broken test-cocks   3
Boilers without fusible plugs   1
Boilers low at front end  5
Cases of serious leakage of fittings  1                   1
Cases of defective steam-pipes  6                   4
Totals    192 54
L. Duckitt,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B.
Inspector's Report, District B.
Victoria, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peek, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my report for the past year.
The past twelve months has been a very busy period indeed. The work of inspection has
taken me all over Vancouver Island and the northern part of the Province.
In addition to the usual boiler inspection, I have made very many reports for the Workmen's
Compensation Board. This is a new addition to our work which presents a very wide field for
most important and useful work, and I trust that by our close attention to this widened field we
will succeed in materially reducing the number of personal accidents.
I have, etc.,
John Clark,
Inspector, District B. 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 131
Summary of Work done in District B for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection 	
new boilers inspected  (total)   	
inspections, external and internal	
special inspections after repairs   	
visits in addition to inspections 	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test	
boilers on which pressure was reduced 	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs 	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions 	
boilers considered unfit for further use 	
accidents to engines and boilers 	
investigations   	
inspections completed	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected 	
Number of defects observed as per summary 	
Number of defects considered dangerous 	
Inspection fees earned	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector 	
2
2
324
5
159
316
11
22
O
o
1
4
12
322
23,245
294
20
$3,857.44
$3,937.90
8.674
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded     1
Pressure-gauges inoperative      1
Pressure-gauges defective    72
Cases of defective stays      2
Cases of defective riveting     1
Cases of broken stays or braces    14 3
Cases of loose stays or braces      1
Defective settings       8 1
Boilers with fractured plates     6
Boilers with burned plates      3
Boilers with blistered plates  42 5
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   14 5
Cases of internal corrosion     4
Cases of scale or encrustation    18 1
Cases of internal grooving  .'      2
Cases of external corrosion     S
Cases of defective tubes    11
Serious leakage around tube-ends   12
Serious leakage in rivet-joints      2
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks      1
Defective water-gauges       9
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks     1
Cases of broken test-cocks    43
Furnaces out of shape     1
Boilers low at front end      7
Defects in engines     7 2
Cases of defective steam-pipes      3 2
Totals  294 20
Remarks.
The aWve is a report of my year's work which I trust will meet with your approval.
John Clark,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District B. D 132
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
SUMMARY  OF TOTAL WORK DONE  IN  DISTRICT B  FOR YEAR  ENDING
MARCH 31st. 1920.
Results of Examinations.
Class.
No.
examined.
4
..    28
Second	
Third 	
Fourth  69
Special logging-donkey   17
Special heating  14
Temporary   40
Passed.
1
16
49
14
14
40
Failed.
3
12
20
3
Totals    172
Summary of Work done.
134
38
Number of boiler-plates inspected   117
„         boiler-plates rejected   '.  3
„         boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia    13
„       . boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  2
„         new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  2
„         new boilers inspected  (total)     10
„          boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)     2
„          first inspections  8
„         inspections, external and internal    853
„         external inspections only  23
„         special inspections after repairs   11
„         visits in addition to inspections  412
„         boilers subjected to hydrostatic test :  S14
„         boilers on wThich pressure was reduced   26
„          boilers unsafe without extensive repairs    26
„         boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  28
„         boilers considered unfit for further use   8
„          accidents to engines and boilers   11
„          accidents resulting in personal injury  (not fatal)     1
„          accidents resulting in personal injury (fatal)    1
„          investigations     18
„         inspections completed  870
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   75,064
Number of defects observed as per summary   650
Number of defects considered dangerous   101
Inspection fees earned  , $10,035.74
Inspection fees collected  $10,130.70
Miles travelled by the Inspector  22.4S3
Letters inward   2,924
Letters outward  3,50S
Telegrams inward   42
Telegrams outward   30
Boilers taken out of service  14
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded      1
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction      5
Pressure-gauges inoperative    11
Pressure-gauges defective  • 159
Cases of defective stays       2
Cases of defective riveting     3
Dangerous.
3
»        9 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
Dangerous.
14
SuMMi\.RY of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Cases of broken stays or braces  32
Cases of loose stays or braces     2
Boilers damaged by low water      2
Defective settings     36
Boilers with fractured plates   19
Boilers with burned plates ■     4
Boilers with blistered plates   42
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   19
Cases of internal corrosion     9
Cases of scale or encrustation '.  44
Cases of internal grooving      2
Cases of external corrosion    18
Cases of defective tubes   17
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement      5
Cases of broken feed-valves      3
Serious leakage around tube-ends •  34
Serious leakage in rivet-joints     2
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks    17
Defective water-gauges  20
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks  ;     1
Water-columns without blow-outs     2
Cases of broken test-cocks    SS
Connections to water-columns without valves     1
Furnaces out of shape      1
Boilers without fusible plugs   :     8
Boilers low at front end   13
Cases of serious leakage of fittings     4
Defects in engines   10
Boilers without stop-valves     3
Cases of defective steam-pipes   11
Unclassified defects        1
14
Totals
 651 96
S. Baxter,
L. Duckitt,
John Clark,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, District B.
Inspector's Report, District C
Nelson, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report for the year ending March 31st,
1920 :—
During the year engineers' examinations were held in the different centres in the district,
but many of the candidates who had applications on file and were notified to come up for
examination failed to do so. In some cases the excuse was that, they did not think the
examinations would be held so soon, and in other cases the candidates had moved to new parts
of the country and did not get their notices in time.
No new boilers were shipped into this district during the year and only seven boilers were
inspected for the first time. Most of the boilers that had been lying idle for years at the mines
were put into use during the two preceding years, and very few idle boilers that are of any
use are left. D 134
Public Works Report  (1919-20)
The usual number of defects were found on  the boilers inspected, but the number of
immediately dangerous defects were few.    Scale and mud accounted for several damaged plates,
and advice' was given in a number of cases where compound was being used.
Appended you will find tabulated statement for the year.
I have, etc.,
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector, District C.
Results of ExiiMiNATioNs.
Class.
No.
examined.
6
Third 	
Fourth  16
Special Doukhobor    1
Temporary   3
Passed.
Failed
4
2
11
5
1
3
Totals       26
19
Summary of Work done in District C for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)   	
first inspections  	
inspections, external and internal  	
special inspections aft^r repairs   	
visits in addition to inspections	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
boilers on which pressure was reduced 	
boilers unsafe without extensive repairs	
boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  	
boilers considered unfit for further use 	
accidents to engines and boilers 	
inspections completed 	
Total horse-power of boilers inspected 	
Number of defects observed as per summary 	
Number of defects considered dangerous  	
Inspection fees earned 	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector  	
Letters inward  ;	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward 	
Telegrams outward	
Boilers taken out of service 	
7
1S6
11
156
*    181
15
1
10
1
3
1S7
19,393
370
11
$2,381.66
$2,078.32
5,904
43S
405
20
15
2
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Pressure-gauges defective   34
Cases of insufficient staying or bracing   4
Cases of defective stays    7
Cases of broken rivets   1
Cases of broken stays or braces   1
Cases of loose stays or braces   19                  1
Defective settings    27
Boilers with fractured plates  5                   2
Boilers with burned plates   2                   1
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets   37                  1
Cases of internal corrosion  6                   1
Cases of scale or encrustation   40                   1
Cases of external corrosion   11
Cases of defective tubes   9                  1 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 135
Dangerous.
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement     6
Cases of broken feed-valves .•     5
Serious leakage around tube-ends.  IS
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks   10
Defective water-gauges      3
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks      2
Water-columns without blow-outs       1
Cases of broken test-cocks  64
Connections to water-columns without valves     1
Neutral sheets not stayed     1
Furnaces out of shape      7
Boilers without fusible plugs      5
Boilers low at front end   28
Cases of serious leakage of fittings      4
Defects in engines      4
Boilers without stop-valves     5
Cases of defective steam-pipes     3
Totals
 370 11
Andrew Sutherland,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District C.
Senior Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver. B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report for the year ending March
31st, 1920.
During the year there have been two fatal accidents in this district. On April 11th, 1919,
the fly-wheel of main engine at Robertson & Hackett's mill burst, killing the oiler, Jas. Bogle,
who had run to the wheel of throttle-valve to shut it off when he noticed the engine racing;
the throttle-valve was between the two engines and in line with the fly-wheel.
The other accident occurred at the Peerless Steam Laundry on May 3rd, caused by the
trunnion of the mangle breaking off, liberating the hot water and steam, and two of the female
employees were unable to escape and were scalded to death. These were the only accidents
reported.
Owing to Inspector Goepel leaving the service in April, we were short-handed during the
summer and were able to inspect but few logging-donkeys, and as these boilers have had very
little inspection since 1917, would ask you to make provision for more help this year, so that
they can be all inspected before stormy weather in the fall. After Mr. Davidson's appointment
in September we were able to inspect nearly all the heating plants.
The Workmen's Compensation Board inspections make a lot of extra work for our Inspectors,
who, owing to the loss of one Inspector, feel the extra duties rather onerous. Would again
impress on you the necessity for additional help if the past standard of efficiency is to be
maintained.
It will require at least one man for general work and one for Workmen's Compensation
duties to keep up with the work.
I am attaching herewith tabulated report.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have, etc.,
George O. Madigan,
Senior Inspector, District D. D 136
Public Works Report (1919-20).
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1920. .
Number of boiler-plates inspected    5
„         new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   4
„         inspections, external and internal   S
„         visits in addition to inspections   79
„         boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   1
„          boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    1
„         accidents resulting in personal injury  (fatal)     2
„         investigations     2
„         inspections completed   12
Total horse-power of boilers inspected  .'  459
Number of defects observed as per summary   11
Number of defects considered dangerous   2
Inspection fees earned   $102.60
Inspection fees collected    $9,875.45
Miles travelled by the Inspector  SI
Letters Inward   2,633
Letters outward  3,482
Telegrams inward   1
Telegrams outward   1
Boilers taken out of service  1
George O. Madigan,
Senior Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Inspector's Report, District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peck, Esq.,
Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to forward you my annual report for the year 1919, which I trust
you will find satisfactory.
During the year nothing of special importance has come before my notice, boilers and steam
plants, almost without exception, being found in an efficient condition.
I have, etc.,
F. Bath,
Inspector, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of boiler-plates inspected 	
boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia
boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection
new boilers inspected built in United States 	
new boilers inspected built in British Columbia 	
new boilers inspected (total)   '.	
boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)   	
boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)   	
boilers unclassified  	
first inspections   :	
inspections, external and internal  	
internal inspections only 	
external inspections only 	
visits in addition to inspections 	
boilers subjected to hydrostatic test 	
29
4
2
4
2
12
1
3
9
25
338
2
28
IS
299 11 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. D 137
Summary of Work done in District D—Continued.
Number of boilers on which pressure was reduced  5
,-, boilers unsafe without extensive repairs  2
„ boilers repaired under Inspector's directions   3
inspections completed     369
Total horse-power of boilers inspected         25,939
Inspection fees earned   $3,897.19
Inspection fees collected    $3,717.34
Miles travelled by the Inspector    2,030
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded  1
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  1
Pressure-gauges defective   27
Cases of broken stays or braces  2
Defective settings  3
Boilers with fractured plates  2
Boilers with burned plates  _  5 2
Cases of internal corrosion   9
Cases of scale or encrustation  2
Cases of external corrosion    7
Cases of defective tubes  9
Serious leakage around tube-ends    11
Serious leakage in rivet-joints   1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks  14
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks   1
Water-columns without blow-outs  1
Cases of serious leakage of fittings   1
Unclassified defects     4 1
Totals 101 3
F. B2VTH,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Inspector's Report,  District D.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1920.
John Peek, Esq.,
. Chief Inspector of Machinery, New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—1 have the honour to submit my annual report. It covers the period from April, 1919,
to March, 1920, inclusive. The tabulated statement shows in detail the work done and number
of defects met with during the year under review.
In regard to boiler inspection, there is not very much to distinguish the ins and outs of the
work from that of previous years. It should be recorded, however, that one case of faulty
lap-seam came under my notice. This was of the usual elusive character. Briefly the circumstances were as follows :—
Boiler No. 40100bc at Robertson & Hackett Company's sawmill was inspected and tested by
Mr. Goepel on January 17th, 1919. Its condition was reported as satisfactory. It also appears
that on this occasion slots were cut in front and rear seams midway in their lengths. On October
14th, 1919, the engineer in charge, W. H. Paddon, reported what seemed to him a crack in the
rear longitudinal seam 12 inches from the head; Mr. Paddon's. attention having been arrested
by the issuance of a thin film of steam over a distance of 8 inches in the longitudinal direction
at the place indicated. Upon investigation I found the plate cracked in the overlap along a
line coinciding with the edge of the underlapping plate.    This condition was only made clear D 138
Public Works Report (1919-20).
when the boiler was subjected to city water-pressure of about 100 lb. The boiler was accordingly
put out of use as a pressure-vessel.
The points worthy of emphasis in this regard appear to be: (1.) The probable invisibility of a crack even were the naked eye assisted by a fairly good magnifying-glass. (2.) The
futility of cutting a slot in the longitudinal seam unless it be known precisely the point at which
the crack must develop. To cut a slot midway in the seam's length is just supporting the great
fallacy that circumferential seams are strengthening features. (3.) The only way to deal with
a lap-seam boiler is to strongly support and act accordingly when the number of its days approach
the one-score years.    It has then served its day and generation.
Except for a mishap to the launch " Adanac," I have nothing further to report. In regard
to the motor-boat I presume it is unnecessary to do more than mention the accident; the man
in charge, I understand, handed in a statement covering the whole regrettable incident.
I have, etc.,
F. Biggam,
Inspector, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D for Year ending March 31st, 1920.
Number of boiler-plates inspected   198
„         boiler-plates rejected    4
„         boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  28
„         new boilers inspected built in United States   5
„         new boilers inspected  (total)     33
„         boilers unclassified    6
„         first inspection    8
„         inspections, external and internal    206
„         internal inspections only  '  6
,,         external inspections only  77
„          special inspections after repairs   4
„         visits in addition to inspections   118
„          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   237
„         boilers on which pressure was reduced   2
„         boilers unsafe without extensive repairs ...  1
„          boilers repaired under Inspector's directions    5
„         boilers considered unfit for further use  1
„         accidents to engines and boilers   3
„         accidents resulting in personal injury  (not fatal)     1
„          accidents resulting in personal injury (fatal)  2
„         investigations     2
„         inspections completed  278
Total horse-power of boilers inspected    26,323.27
Number of defects observed as per summary  419
Number of defects considered dangerous   13
Inspection fees earned   $3,561.12
Inspection fees collected  $3,499.14
Miles travelled by the Inspector  2,251
Boilers taken out of service  1
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded  1                   1
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction  10
Pressure-gauges inoperative   2                   2
Pressure-gauges defective  28                   4
Cases of defective stays    8
Cases of defective riveting   2
Cases of broken stays or braces   7
Cases of loose stays or braces  5 11 Geo. 5 Chief Inspector of Machinery. D 139
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Boilers damaged by low water     2
Defective settings       2
Boilers with fractured plates '.   13
Boilers with laminated plates      2
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets      6 1
Cases of internal corrosion     10
Cases of scale or encrustation  31
Cases of external corrosion      3
Cases of defective tubes    17
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement   51 1
Serious leakage around tube-ends    15
Serious leakage iu rivet-joints   23 1
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks      2 1
Defective water-gauges       1
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks      4 1
Cases of broken test-cocks   S3
Boilers low at front end      7
Cases of serious leakage of fittings    20
Defects in engines      1 1
Unclassified  defects    :   63
Totals 419 13
Fred Biggam,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
Summary of Work done in District D from September Sth, 1919, to January, 1920.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers   17
„         boiler-plates inspected    40
„         boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  4
„         new boilers inspected built in British Columbia  5
„         new boilers inspected  (total)     7
„         boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)     4
„         boilers imported from United States (second-hand)    1
„         first inspections    9
„           inspections, external and internal    .244
„         boilers subjected to hydrostatic test   253
„         boilers on which pressure was reduced  2
„         boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   12
„         boilers repaired under Inspector's directions  11
„         accidents to engines and boilers   1
„         inspections completed   274
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   17,891
Number of defects observed as per summary   35
Number of defects considered dangerous  6
Inspection fees earned  $2,437.00
Inspection fees collected   $2,373.60
Miles travelled by the Inspector  1,049
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects. Number.      Dangerous.
Pressure-gauges inoperative     1
Pressure-gauges defective      7
Cases of defective riveting      2 2
Boilers with fractured plates     4
Cases of internal corrosion     4 D 140
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Summary of Defects observed—Continued.
Nature of Defects. Number.
Cases of external corrosion  2
Cases of defective tubes    6
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement :  1
Serious leakage around tube-ends   5
Serious leakage in rivet-joints  2
Defective water-gauges     1
Dangerous.
Totals
J. Davidson,
Inspector of Steam-boilers, District D.
SUMMARY OF TOTAL WORK DONE IN DISTRICT D FOR YEAR ENDING
MARCH 31st, 1920.
Results of Examinations.
No.
examined.
Class.
Second     17
Third     70
Fourth   147
Special logging-donkey   38
Special heating  32
Temporary    57
Passed.
10
39
109
21
26
57
Failed.
7
31
38
17
6
Totals      361
262
99
Summary of Work done.
Number of drawings and specifications calculated for new boilers   17
„         boiler-plates inspected    272
„         boiler-plates rejected    4
„         boilers built under Inspector's supervision in British Columbia  36
„         boilers inspected built in Eastern Canada not under inspection  2
new boilers inspected built in United States   9
„         -new boilers inspected built in British Columbia   11
„         new boilers inspected (total)     52
„         boilers imported from Eastern Canada  (second-hand)     5
„          boilers imported from United States  (second-hand)     4
„         boilers unclassified     15
„         first inspections    42
„         inspections, external and internal    796
„          internal  inspections only     S
„         external inspections only     105
„         special inspections after repairs  4
„         visits in addition to inspections   215
„          boilers subjected to hydrostatic test  789
- „         boilers on which pressure was reduced   9
„         boilers unsafe without extensive repairs   16
„          boilers repaired under Inspector's directions      ' 20
„         boilers considered unfit for further use   1
„         accidents to engines and boilers   4
„         accidents resulting in personal injury (not fatal)    1
„         accidents resulting in personal injury (fatal)     3
„       ' investigations     3
„         inspections completed  933
Total horse-power of boilers inspected   70,612.27 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 141
Summary of Work done—Continued.
Number of defects observed as per summary
Number of defects considered dangerous
Inspection fees earned 	
Inspection fees collected 	
Miles travelled by the Inspector  	
Letters inward 	
Letters outward	
Telegrams inward 	
Telegrams outward 	
Boilers taken out of service 	
Summary of Defects observed.
Nature of Defects.
Boilers with safety-valves overloaded  	
Boilers with safety-valves defective in construction
Pressure-gauges  inoperative   	
Pressure-gauges defective  	
Cases of defective stays  	
Cases of defective riveting 	
Cases of broken stays or braces 	
Cases of loose stays or braces	
Boilers damaged by low water 	
Defective settings  	
Boilers with fractured plates  	
Boilers with laminated plates 	
Boilers with burned plates 	
Cases of sediment on fire-sheets 	
Cases of internal corrosion  	
Cases of scale or encrustation 	
Cases of external corrosion 	
Cases of defective tubes	
Cases of defective feed-water arrangement	
Serious leakage around tube-ends  2	
Serious leakage in rivet-joints 	
Defective blow-off pipes or cocks 	
Defective water-gauges   	
Broken blow-off pipes or cocks ,	
Water-columns without blow-outs 	
Cases of broken test-cocks 	
Boilers low at front end	
Cases of serious leakage of fittings 	
Defects in engines	
Unclassified defects   	
•sumber.
2
11
3
62
8
4
9
5
2
5
19
2
5
6
23
33
12
32
52
31
26
16
2
5
1
S3
7
21
1
67
566
24
$9,997.91
$9,875.45
5,411
2,633
3,482
1
1
2
Dangerous.
1
2
4
Totals 555
22
J. Davidson,
Geo. O. Madigan,
F. Bath,
F. Biggam,
Inspectors of Steam-boilers, District D. D 142 Public Works Report  (1919-20).
LIST QF' REGISTERED DESIGNS.
List of Boiler Manufacturers, with their Number of Approved and Registered  Designs.
Alley & McLellan, Glasgow, Scotland   1
Allbright-Nell Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
American Radiator Co. of Canada, Toronto, Ont  30
American Hoist & Derrick Co., St. Paul, Minn., U.S.A  26
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A.    6
Ames Iron Works, Oswego, N.Y., U.S.A •  5
Atlas Engine Works, Indianapolis, U.S.A  1
Averting & Porter, Rochester, England   1
Avery Co., Peoria, 111., U.S.A  2
Babcock & Wilcos, Renfrew, Scotland   23
Badenhausen Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  4
Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia, U.S.A  20
B.C. Marine Railway Co., Vancouver and Victoria, B.C  5
Beatty, M., & Sons, Ltd., Welland, Ont  15
Berg Machinery Manufacturing Co., Toronto, Ont  1
Bell, Robert, Engine & Threshing Co., Ltd., Seaforth, Ont  6
Brown Hoisting Co., Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A  2
Bros., William, Minneapolis, U.S.A  7
Broderick Boiler Co., Uncre, Ind., U.S.A  1
Brownell Co., The, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A  3
Browning Engineering Co., Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Bucyrus Co., South Milwaukee, U.S.A  21
Buffalo Steam Roller Co., Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A  1
Canadian Allis-Chalmers, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
Canada Foundry Co., Toronto, Ont  22
Canadian Collieries, Ltd., Union Bay, B.C  1
Canada Iron Corporation, Ltd., Midland, Ont  6
Canadian Northern Railway, Winnipeg, Man  3
Canadian Talbot Boiler Co., Vancouver, B.C  1
Case, J. 1., Threshing Co., Racine, Wis., U.S.A  22
Casey-Hedges Co., Ltd., Chattanooga, Tenn., U.S.A  1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont  5
Canadian Western Manufacturing & Supply Co., Calgary, Alta  1
Clyde Iron Works, Duluth, Minn., U.S.A  9
Climax Manufacturing Co., Corry, Pa., U.S.A  6
Clayton, Son & Co.. Leeds, England   1
Columbiana Boiler Works Co., Ltd., Ohio, U.S.A  4
Continental Iron Works, New York, U.S.A  1
Cochrane & Co., Annan, Scotland  " 1
Davenport Locomotive Works, Davenport, Iowa, U.S.A  13
Decarie Safety Boiler Co., Vancouver, B.C  4
Diamond Boiler Works, Minneapolis, U.S.A  1
Doty. Engine Works, Goderich, Ont  6
Dutton Co., C. H, Kalamazoo, Mich., U.S.A  7
Engineering & Machine Co. of Canada, St. Catharines, Ont  94
Empire Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C  9
Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  5
Farquhar Co., A. B., York, Pa., U.S.A  7
Foden, Ltd., Sandback, England   2
Frost Manufacturing Co., Galesburgh, 111., U.S.A  36 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 143
List of Boiler Manufacturers—Continued.
Garr, Scott & Co., Richmond, Ind., U.S.A  1
Gem City Boiler Works, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Georgian Bay Engine Works, Midland, Ont  1
Goldie-McCulloch Co., Gait., Ont  49
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Co  2
Gray, Andrew, Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C  S
Great Northern Railway, Winnipeg, Man  2
Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto, Out  17
Hamilton Manufacturing Co., W., Peterboro, Ont  1
Heaps Engineering Co., Ltd., New Westminster, B.C  4
Heisler Locomotive Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  7
Holt Manufacturing Co., Stockton, Cal., U.S.A  2
Houston, Stanwood & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Imperial Oil Co., Sarnia, Out  6
International Engineering Works, Amherst, N.S  34
Inglis Co., John, Toronto, Out  8
Industrial Works, Bay City, Mich., U.S.A  3
Johnston Bros., Ferrysburg, Pa., U.S.A  1
Keeler, E., Co., Williamsport, Pa., U.S.A '  1
Kelly Springfield Road Roller Co., Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Kewanee Boiler Co., Kewanee, 111., U.S.A  15
Keystone Driller Co., Beaver Falls, Pa., U.S.A  3
Leonard & Sons, E., London, Ont  36
Leffell & Co., James, Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Lidgerwood Manufacturing Co., Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.A  4
Lima Locomotive & Machine Co., Lima, Ohio, U.S.A  20
Lyons Boiler Works, DePere, Wis., U.S.A  2
Manitowoc Iron Works, Manitowoc, Wis., U.S.A  2
Mann's Patent Steam Cart & Wagon, Leeds, England  3
Marine Iron Works, Victoria, B.C  8
Marion Steam Shovel Co., Marion, Ohio, U.S.A  36
Marion Osgood Co., Marion, Ohio, U.S.A  6
Marsh & Henthorne, Belleville, Ont  10
Matheson & Co., J., Ltd., New Glasgow, N.S  10
Marshall & Sons Co., Ltd., Gainsborough, England   1
Mainland Iron Works, Vancouver, B.C  1
Macdougall Co., John, Caledonian Iron ^Vorks, Montreal, Que  3
Mechanical Manufacturing Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que.  ... ,  9
Murray-Latta Machine Works, Vancouver, B.C  1
Nagle Engine and Boiler Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
Nicol Boiler Works, Vancouver, B.C  2
Napanee Iron, Works, Napanee, Ont  1
North Shore Iron Works, North Vancouver, B.C  41
Northern Aluminium Co., Toronto, Ont  3
Oil City Boiler Works, Oil City, Pa., U.S.A  1
Orr & Sembower, Reading, Pa., U.S.A  19
Pennsylvania Boiler Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  3
Porter Co., H. K., Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A  10
Poison Iron Works, Toronto, Ont  1
Puget Sound Iron & Steel Works, Tacoma, Wash., U.S.A  2
Risdon Locomotive & Iron Co., San Francisco, Cal., U.S.A  1
Robey & Co., Lincoln, England   2
Ross & Howard Iron Works, Vancouver, B.C  32
Ruston-Proctor Co., Lincoln, England   7
Sawyer-Massey Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ont  15
<*<• D 144
Public Works Report (1919-20).
List of Boiler Manufacturers—Continued.
Seattle-Astoria Iron Works, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A  1
Standard Iron Works, A'ancouver, B.C  1
Stems Co., Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
Schwal-Lezotte Boiler Co., Milwaukee, U.S.A  1
Sumner Iron Works, Everett, Wash., U.S.A  1
Swift & Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Taylor, Forbes & Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C  30
Thew Automatic Shovel Co., Lorraine, Ohio, U.S.A  5
Toronto Iron Works, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  1
Twohy Bros. Co., Portland, Ore., U.S.A  1
Union Iron Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  48
Vancouver Engineering Works, Vancouver, B.C  88
Victoria Machinery Depot Co., Victoria, B.C  33
Vulcan Iron Works, Vancouver, B.C  46
Vulcan Iron Works, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A  '   1
Vulcan Iron Works, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., U.S.A  1
Vulcan Iron Works, Winnipeg, Man  2
Waterous Engine Works, Brantford, Ont  65
Washington Iron Works, Seattle, Wash., U.S.A  40
Western Dry Dock & Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Port Arthur, Ont. "  2
Wickes Boiler Co., Saginaw, Mich., U.S.A  5
Willamette Iron & Steel AVorks, Portland, Ore., U.S.A  8
List of Makers who have Registered and Approved Boiler Accessory Designs.
Spring Safety-valves.
e
in.
1
1
5
in.
1
1
4
in.
1
1
4
in.
1
3
1
2
3i
in.
"2
"i"
3
in.
2
"fl
1
2
1
1
2£
In.
5
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
in.
5
1|
in.
3
H
in.
3
1
in.
2
3
in.
2
i
in.
American Steam Gauge & Valve Co., Boston, U.S. A	
Crane Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A	
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
3
2
2
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont...
1
1
1
1
1
1
T. McAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B      	
1
1
3
1
3
6
1
4
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
• •■
1
1
Main Stop-valves.
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A	
Canadian Locomotive Co., Ltd., Kingston, Ont	
Crane Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  8
Empire Manufacturing Co., London, Ont  ■ 6
Heisler Locomotive Works, Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
G. M. Favis Regulator Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  1
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  16
Lagonda Manufacturing Co., Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati. Ohio, U.S.A.  13
Montreal Locomotive Works, Ltd., Montreal, Que  3
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  2
Steam-gauges.
Ashcroft Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  5
Rooke, W. M., & Co., Vancouver, B.C  1
United States Gauge Co., New York, U.S.A :  2 11 Geo.
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 145
List of Makers of Boiler Accessories—Continued.
Blow-off Cocks and Valves.
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A , 1
Babcock & Wilcox, Montreal, Que  1
Crane Co., Chicago, 111., U.S.A  4
Cadman Manufacturing Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A  1
Elliott Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A  1
Engineering Specialties Co., Toronto, Ont  4
Homestead Valve Manufacturing, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S.A  2
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  3
Lunkenheimer Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A  6
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  1
Safety Apparatus.
Kilkenny Automatic Safety Appliance Co., Walla Walla, Wash., U.S.A  1
Water-gauge Fittings.
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Jenkins Bros., Ltd., Montreal, Que  1
McAvity & Sons, T., St. John, N.B  1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont  1
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing, Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  1
Peniberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  4
Huyette, Paul B., Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  1
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Edna Brass Manufacturing Co., Cincinnati, U.S.A  1
Test-cocks (or Valves).
American Locomotive Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Babcock & Wilcox, Montreal, Que  1
Canadian Locomotive Co., Kingston, Ont  1
J. I. Case Threshing Machine Co., Racine, Wis., U.S.A  1
Montreal Locomotive Works, Montreal, Que  1
James Morrison Brass Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont  2
T. McAvity & Sons, St. John, N.B  2
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  1
Pemberthy Injector Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont  2
Huyette, Paul B., Co., Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A  1
Superheaters.
C. C. Moore & Co., Seattle, Wash., U.S.A  1
Power Specialty Co., New York, U.S.A  3
Economizers.
Green Economizer Co., Toronto, Ont  3
B. F. Sturtevant Co., Boston, Mass., U.S.A  1
Combined Check and Feed Valves.    ..
Lagondo Manufacturing Co., Springfield, Ohio, U.S.A  1
Lytte Manufacturing Co., Montreal, Que  2
Nathan Manufacturing Co., New York, U.S.A  3
Retorts, Digesters, etc.
Alaska-Copper Co., Vancouver, B.C  Copper kettle 1
Letson & Burpee, Ltd., Vancouver, B.C Retort 1
Schaake, Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C Retort 1
Vulcan Iron Works, Vancouver, B.C Digester 3
10 D 146 Public Works Report  (1919-20).
List of Makers of Boiler Accessories—Continued.
Retorts, Digesters, etc.—Continued.
Booth Coulter, Toronto, Ont Copper kettle 1
Barrett & Co., Marpole, B.C Tube still 1
Barrett & Co., Marpole, B.C Retort 1
Canadian Laundry- Machinery Co., Toronto  Body-ironer 1
Canadian Laundry Machinery Co., Toronto Flat-ironer 1
City Welders, Vancouver, B.C Copper kettle 1
_ Pacific Copper Co., Vancouver, B.C Copper kettle 1
Patterson Boiler Works, Vancouver, B.C Fish-tank 1
Sverson Evaporating Co., Chicago, 111 Evaporator 1
Vancouver Engineering Co., Vancouver, B.C Digester 1
Vancouver Engineering Co., Vancouver, B.C Nitrate-drier 1
Willamette Iron & Steel Co., Portland, Ore Digester 1
Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt, B.C Copper kettle 2
Feed-water Regulators.
Northern Equipment Co., Erie, Pa., U.S.A  1
Oil-burners.
Willamette Iron & Steel Co., Portland, Ore., U.S.A -  1 11 Geo. 5
	
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 147
ENGINEERS WHO OBTAINED CERTIFICATES.
(Year ending March 31st, 1920.)
First Class.
Davidson, James   13173 Shaw, O. E   13234
Faulkner, J. W   13379 Shackleton, T. A   13446
Montador, Andrew     13381 Shillito, B. C   13665
Second Class.
Cartwright, Frank    13722
Clouston, Thomas   13792
Collic-utt, C. 0  13256
Dolgner, P. A  13377
Frew, Robert  13637
Green, E. J  13578
Gibson, W. R.  . ".  13S70
Harrop, John  13336
Henderson, John  135S0
Howard, A. F  13348
Langstrotk, Alfred    13129
Lennox, D. J  13267
Moore, Jabez   13589
Sandwitt, Melbourne    13664
Scanlon, H. J  13360
Spencer, J. J  13871
Strangman, H. H  13747
Taylor,  D.  J  13275
Wilson,  J.  F  13449
Wood, James   13812
Woodward. Chancie   13858
Young, J. D  13282
Third Class.
Abeam.  Nicholas    13786
Allen,  Harold     13614
Appleton, J. W  13231
Armstrong,  J.   W  13755
Asman, I.  H  . 13877
Baird, S. M  13475
Bennett, Wm  13081
Blackwood, Wm  13681
Brawn, H. G  13083
Brown, E. H  13163
Brown, N. L  13164
Bradley, Harold    13389
Bruce, J.  C  13821
Burke, Peter    13084
Bullock, W. G  13477
Burton, L. J  13686
Bucknam, A. V  13878
Byers, J.  B  13339
Capell, H. C. G. A  13166
Calverley, Walter   13480
Cathro, R. H  13862
Clugston, M. T  13532
Clark,  Lewis    13426
Collett,  E.  K  13823
Cooke.  E. J  13910
Cresor,  G.  S  13171
Crook, James  13428
Dayfoot, W. P  13486
Desford,  Charles  13039
Dixon,  G. W  13175
Donald, T. A.  13378
Doughty, H. E  13628
Duff,  Alexander     13089
Dunlop, J.  S  13629
Eakes, W. A  13091
Eaton, R. B  13395
Ellis, Ralph   13726
Fox,  John     13093
Franklin,  John     13094
Froggatt, Willis    13487
Georgeson, A. R  13827
Gilbody, J. F  13343
Grandy, G. F  13528
Harrison,  George    13764
Hann,»E. H  13934
Hetzler, CD  13266
Hills, W. E  13100
Higket,  Robert     13347
Hunter, W. S  13101
Hutchinson, H. B  13102
Jemson, M.  G  13884
Johnston,  R.  A  13797
Kelly, W. J  13317
Keith,  W. A  13915
Kirkwood,  Wm  13618
Kirk, R. B  13867
Lochtie,  James     13768
Mowry, A.  V  13109
Moore,  Jnbez   13353
MacDonald, N. P  13702
McEwen, A. A  13701
MacKenzie, C, E  13889
McLeod, Neil  13226
McLean, C. N  13805
Newman,  H.  P  13591
O'Flynn.  J.  P  13740
Parker,  V.  L  13869
Perry, A.  L  13657
Potter,  J. C  13116
Rhodes,  Edgar  13893
Richards,  T.  E.   .  13271
Roach, J. L  13359
Robinson, J. R  13707
Ross, Wm  13709
Russell, G. A  13663
Sargeant, F. R. R  13508
Scott, Robert   13118
Seaton, G. N  13361
Shaw, J. G  13509
Sherreitt, R. B  13710
Skellett, W. H  13860
Smeeth, B. S  13120
Smith, Donald  13550
Smith, S. W  13551
Sorenson, N. M  13898
Sparks, G. A  13273
Stinson, W. J  13124
Strangman, H. H  13667
Tait, Robert  13669
Thomson,  J.  N  13276
Tod, J. A. M  13600
Trainer, W. J  13671 D 148
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Third Class—Continued.
Van Marriott, John
Waugh, W. A	
Walker, R. G. R.  .
West, AV. G	
Winter, E. W	
Wilkinson, W. A.
Williams, Henry
Wicker, H. F.
AVright, R. B.
Abeam, Nicholas
Akins, Ray	
Alexander, Samuel  ...
Alexander, James
Alexander, H. F	
Alexander,  AArilliam   ..
Anthony, Robert	
Anthony, Arthur	
Arbeau, A. M	
Ashton, J. J	
Ayling,  John   	
Bassett, F. S	
Benjamin, Melvin ....
Beddington. Frederick
Besig, G. A	
Bennett, J. P.  	
Berentsen, S. P	
Beck, L. O	
Birtoia, J. W	
Boetes, Cornelius	
Bohill, J. H	
Bodys, J.  S	
Brown, Arthur   	
Broad, A. C	
Bruce,  J.  C	
Briggs, J. T	
Bugbee, W. H	
Button, G. H	
Button, AV. J	
Byers, Robert   	
Byrnell,  H.  B	
Calverley,  Joseph
Carmichael, Malcolm  .
Campbell, W. G	
Cheyne,  L.  L	
Chandler.   W.   P	
Chamberlain, Wm.   . ..
Clarke, A. C	
Clark, Harry 	
Cliffe.  Harrv   	
Oolwell, H. W	
Cooper, A.  B	
Coulthard, J. O	
Cocker, Percy   	
Cooper, A. E	
Collett, E. A	
Cook, J. K	
Cowie. Anthony	
Cox, S. J	
Conant, L. B	
Collingwood. Peter ...
Copeland, W. N	
■Corder. C. B. A	
Combatley, W. R	
Crook, Jas	
Crate. Percy	
Daniels. W. J	
Davis,  Clifford   	
Derry, W. H	
Devitt, M. J	
Donahue, AVm	
Drybrough, Robt	
13326
13375
13955
13218
13373
Fourth Class.
13473 , Drinkwater, J. G.
13876 Dumaresq, A. L. S.  .
13136 Duff, Samuel	
13221 Dunne, W. J	
13474 Dunigh, D. D	
13613 Eagle, Jack  	
13327 Edmondson, H. M.  . ,
13861 Edwards, W. R	
13969 Ellis, AVm	
13158 Evans, Samuel	
13616 Evans, O. AV	
13079 Evans, W. J ,
13080 Evans, I. J	
13419 Faulkner, J. W	
13564 Ferguson, W. G.	
13618 Flanagan, Herbert  . ,
13683 Fotheringbam, A. W.
13908 Galloway, G. H	
13306 Gandv, AVm	
13082 Garner, Llewelyn  . . .
13161 Gilfillan, C. H	
13619 Giberson. L. O	
13421 Gillard, H. G	
13620 Gillis, W. M	
13621 Gilbert.  R. F	
13685 Gould, Williamson  ..
13422 Gosse, C. E	
13788 Graham, Robt	
13789 Griffin,  A. E	
13340 Grimm, C. E	
13479 Graham, 0. F	
13254 Granger, Jas	
13622 Gregory, J. W	
13790 Groundwater, J. A.  ,
13167 Gary, Wm	
13370 Hall. J. T	
13909 Hansen. Edward	
13623 Hand. H. S	
13624 Halkett, D. W	
13673 Hnlliwell, Peter ....
130S6 Hackwood, Clarence
13168 Heath, Mark  	
13170 Henderson, Jas	
13255 Hope, Donald '.	
13308 Holt, M. L	
13427 Hopwood. G. AV. ...
13483 Holmes, D. G	
13484 Home,  F. H	
13569 Howden, W. H.   ...
13758 Hubble, Grover	
13793 Isherwood, Henry ..
13822 Jack, J. E	
13824    Jackson, Jas	
13879    Jagger. G. N	
13140 Jackson. Richard ...
13172. Jacobson, R. A. V. .
13223 Johnston, R. W. ...
13535    Jones. A. C	
13310 Johnson, Thorstein .
13392 Jyssum, LA	
13627 Kentland, John	
13429    Kelly, R. A	
13516
13605
13856
13813
13760
13090
13394
13430
13826
13552
13630
13794
13070
13536
13574
13633
13912
13761
13634
13762
13342
13312
13434
13727
13179
13259
13435
134<88
13828
13096
13260
13097
13182
13183
13215
13261
13262
13345
13401
13263
13314
13490
13795
13381
13933
13224
13436
13328
13437
13695
13833
13864
13883
13315
13767
13235
13494
13642
13830
13866
13643
13645
13646
13346
13143
" 13329 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 149
Fourth Class—Continued.
Kennedy, D. F	
Kennedy, Alex	
Kennedy, H.  E	
King, Archibald	
Kingscote, J. P	
Kirk, R. B	
Kilby, E. C	
Kirkham, Edwin ....
Knott, Ronald	
Kolthammer, Harry .
Langill, L. 0	
Laird, Marshall	
Laurie, LA	
Lackey, H. A	
- Le Claire, J. O	
Lea, Frank	
Livingstone, T. E. ...
Light, S. E	
Linwood, Chas	
Lloyd, Donald	
Lovell, M. AV	
Lorden, H. H	
I.oc-hhead, Archie ....
Louie, Wm	
Macauley, R. G	
Manson, M. G	
Mahoney, Francis ...
Martin, George  	
Miarquette, J. A	
Morning. Edward . ..
Millar, Jas	
Aliller, John	
Milne, A. A	
Morrison, John  	
Moye, E. W	
Morgan, E. S	
Mussett, Frederick  ..
AfcCord, W. R	
McCoss, D. B	
McDonald,  Geo	
AlcDonald, John  	
AlcDonald, J. A	
AIcFarland, Frank ..
McGarrigle, Thos. ...
McGregor, John  ....
McHugh, Wm	
Mclntyre, O. M	
AlacKenzie.  J. A.   ...
AIcLeod,   Neil   	
MacLeod, Alex	
AIcLean, W. E	
AlcAlurtrie, Wm	
AleAlullen, Wm	
McNeil. W. J	
JlacNeil, M. AI	
McNeil, Donald	
MacPherson, Alex. -..
Nelson, P. L	
Noal, Louis  	
Nugent, Patrick  ....
O'Connell. Roy  	
Olds, C H	
O'Neil,  J.  H	
Owen, Alexander ....
Owens, A. E	
Parr,  Robt	
Parham. R. N	
Parker-Toulson, J. >G.
Patterson. W. G	
Peterson, Herman
13495
13617
13940
13191
13192
13497
13734
13836
13885
13144
13146
13649
13800
13837
13318
13587
13351
13801
13886
13735
13225
13243
13769
13838
13403
13438
13770
13802
13887
13916
13440
13542
13772
13232
13699
13773
13700
13071
13105
13195
13330
13888
13319
13245
13501
13244
13320
13868
13108
1319S
13774
13703
13890
13199
13545
13590
13cS91
13355
13739
13654
13112
13322
13806
13113
13383
13114
13201
13356
13656
13115
Peters,  G. W	
Phillips, S. G	
Pickering, Edward . .
Plumi-idge, AV. G.  . ..
Powers, W. G	
Price,  Wm	
Pryde, David	
Quinn, E. L	
Quvist, Edvin	
Radford,  A. H	
Randle, J. A. B.   ...
Reid, J. A	
Richardson, Nicholas
Richardson, A. C. ...
Rock,  Harry   	
Roberts, Wm	
Roberts, Thomas ....
Robertson, Wm	
Robson, J. L	
Seivewright, Chas. ...
Sheridan, M. E	
Shantz, G. G	
Shaw,  S.  P	
Simmonds, F. H.  ...
Sime, Thos	
Skellet, W. H	
Smith, CO	
Smith, H. J	
Smith, Donald	
Smith, M. S	
Smith, D. AI	
Sorenson, N. M	
Spence, Harold	
Spears, Albert	
Stevens, AV. J	
Stark, Russel	
Stady, J. E	
Stevenson, W. J.  ...
Stewart, Thos	
Stewart, Thos	
Steedsman, Chas.  . ..
Storey, Francis	
Sutton,  E.  S	
Sullivan, Wm	
Taylor, J. A	
Taylor, 0. F	
Thompson, H.  C   ...
Thompson, AVm	
Thomas, Gordon ....
Thornton, Harry ....
Thibault, Patrick ...
Thoi-rougood, J. J.
Trickett, F.  G	
Trussler, A. H	
Tunstall, Redvers  . ..
Tyler, W. E	
Araughan, V. C	
Venn, J. T	
A'erstegen, H. M.  . . .
Walker, J. R	
Walton, H. B	
Waugh, W. A	
Ward. Geo	
Walker, J. AI	
Ward, A. A	
Whittey, Thos.   	
Wilson, John	
Wilibert, Guss	
Wilson, A. H	
AVilson, Allan	
13843
13659
13547
13203
13592
13358
13505
13506
13743
13661
13845
13782
13775
13846
13548
13594
13708
13745
13996
13951
13149
13895
13896
13406
13999
13666
13206
13325
13451
13850
13897
13122
13511
13512
13123
13274
13779
13809
13852
13853
13S99
13900
13668
13901
13126
13210
13277
1327S
13372
13599
13670
13919
13150
13601
13127
13515
13711
13407
13810
13229
13279
13280
13603
13604
13749
13903
13128
13213
13219
13335 D 150
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Fourth Class—Continued.
Wixon, Arthur
Willing, R. A	
Wilson,  R.  W.   . ..
AAllkenson, Arnold
13447
13450
13517
13672
AVilson, Wm.
Wilcox, A. S.
Youngs, B. E.
Special Logging-donkey.
Aitken, John   	
Biggs,  F.  G	
Boyd. Jas	
Campbell, C W	
Campbell, Jas	
Chalmers, AV. R	
Cooke, J. A	
Cowie, W. A	
Copeland, Harry ....
Coulter,  C. J	
Coulter, G. A	
Dawson, D. R	
Dickie, R. AV	
Doyle, John	
Dwyer, Dennis  	
Elrick, E. E	
Freeman, George ....
Gieschon, S. H	
Harrington, Ira	
Halliday, AV. R	
Harris.  AV.  D	
Hodgson.  George  ....
Homecker, A. A.   ...
Hughes, H. R	
James, D. F	
Jamieson. Gordon  . ..
Jordan, R. L	
Kellington, Frederick
Lilley, A. A	
13820
13160
13566
13481
13723
13531
13087
13533
13724
13725
13S25
136S9
13690
13572
13243
13631
13141
13178
13099
13694
13832
13766
13938
13732
13190
13796
13697
13835
13214
Aliner, John	
AleBurnie, Jas	
AIcGillivary, D. A.
Alclsaac, Alex	
AIcLean, C. AI	
McMillan-, G. H	
Alc-Phalen, AV. A. . . .
McQuillan, T. G. ...
O'Connor, Stephen  ..
Orwig, R. E	
Peck. H. F	
Percent, E. J	
Robinson,  Harvey .. .
Rock.  Harry  	
Roberts, G. AV	
Rousseau, Alexander
Schmarje, G. F	
Scott, J. C	
Shaughnessy. H. R. .
Shimonsky,  John   . . .
Smith, G. E	
Veratyden, A. C	
Watson, G. P	
White, S. O	
Williams, Joseph
Winberg, C.  W	
Wiltse, C. T	
Yeatman, S. G	
Yurkin. Tom   	
13713
13811
13220
13771
13216
13737
13197
13S05
13945
13147
13371
133S2
13200
13741
13742
13384
13549
13744
13776
13778
13848
13236
13237
13851
13854
13151
13365
13230
13367
13857
13067
13859
Abbey, Samuel 	
Acker, John ........
Aikenhead, Thomas  .
Allan, D. J	
Allen,  H.  E	
Anderson. Alexander
Armour, W. P	
Armstrong, AVm	
Ayr.es, R. J	
Baker, L. A	
Barry,  E.  J	
Berg, Don	
Bloom, A. C	
Bohlin, John	
Brown, Herschel
Bucknam, A. V	
Burnell, G. F	
Burnett, B. B	
Byers.  J.  B	
Campbell, W. G	
Oalder, C B	
Cave, C. C, B	
Carmichael, Wm.   . ..
Carson. James	
Campbell, J. D	
Clason, Edward	
Cook, Harold	
Corbett, G. C	
Cox, Joseph  	
Crick, W. A	
Cruttendon, J. H.
Crabtree, Henry
Temporaries.
13872 Craddick. Ray	
13417 Dawkins. J. F.
13518 Dalton, A. T	
13299 Donald, T. A	
13607 Downing, A. G.
13519 Edwards, G. L.
13284 Edwards, Wm	
13409 Edwards, W. P.
13785 Emmett, AY. H. . . .
13455 Erickson, G. A.
13557 Evans,   Samuel   . . .
13610 Evans, Edward  . ..
13418 Farmer, Hugh
13285 Faulkner, O. W.
13130 Fritts, H. C	
13286 -Fraser, G. L	
13410 Fullerton, E. V.  ..
136SO Gilbert. Charles ...
13056 Gray, Robert	
13153 Griffin, Frank	
13249 Gregg, A. E	
13452 Grubs, Bern-hard ..
13464 Gurney, Samuel .. .
13554 Hagen, Wm	
13676 Hardy, A. W	
13555 Haner, J. M	
13608 Halliday, Wm	
13753    Harris, T. W	
13816 Hastings, T. H. E.
13456 Halliday, Wm. . ..
13674    Harper. H. J	
13818 Henderson, M. R. .
14053
13555
13559
13134
13287
13523
13875
13924
137S3
13457
13387
13524
13288
13904
13289
13535
13411
13152
13290
13925
13560
13715
13677
13291
13412
13458
13459
13526
13609
13678
13873
13248 11 Geo. 5
Chief Inspector of Machinery.
D 151
Temporaries—Continued.
Herbert, D. E.  .....
Hyslop, J. W	
Howard, H. F	
Holton,  Edward   ....
Howard, A.  C	
How, J. H	
Howden, W. H	
Holman, Thomas ....
Johnston, W. S	
Kanes,  F. J	
Keefe, F. R	
Lake, Edward  	
Lake. Edward  	
Lea.sk, John  	
Lewis, AVm	
Lochhead, Archie ....
Lowden. V. H	
Long, W. J	
Alarshall, Robert ....
Martinson, Alfred  . . .
Alatthews, T. M	
Alilholm. J. C	
' Aiorre, R. H	
Aloorland. H. G	
Morgan, G. W	
Moeran, C. B	
Murdoch-, W, J	
McOaull, A. A	
AfcDonnell, Frank . ..
McDonald, G. H.
AtcGoran, Andrew .. .
McGillivray, James ..
Alclntyre, H. A	
AlcKean, Robert
McLay, Robert 	
AloLean, Seymour ...
A!cLelland, James . . .
AIcNaughton, J. E. . .
Naud, Daniel	
Nairn, George  	
13520 Osbaldeston, Gilbert . .
13716 Owen,  E. T	
13075 Perry, O. H	
13292 Pinchbeck, James	
13471 Pophan, F. J	
13675 Pollard, G. A	
13679 Polehampton, Guy  ...
13719 Price, G. F	
13293 Pyrah, E. D	
13239 Rankin, Robert	
13465 Riddle, G. W	
13154 Robertson, E. A	
13413 Rowley, D	
13414 Roach, Wm	
13817 Shevlock. Wm	
13466 Silver, AV. H.   ...	
13470 Sinclair, R. C	
13717 Smith, G. L	
13076 Smith, Joseph  	
13386 Strappazzon, John  ...
13453 Stone, J.' A	
13750 Sutherland, Frederick
13135 Tai-drew,  H. P	
13681 Thibault, Patrick  	
13714 Townsend, -George ....
13906 Topham, A. W	
13460 Vallance, Dixon	
13467 Vollners, Harry	
13461 Wardle, AV. A	
13468 AVarren, A. C	
13462 Walters. W. H	
13527 Watt, G. J	
13561 AValker, AVm.	
13922 West, J. G	
13131 Whiteside, Robert	
13469 . White, W. A	
13754 Willoughby, F. E	
13454 Wilson, J. G	
13240 Wild, Arthur	
13780 Wilkins, James  	
13415
13521
13562
13300
13294
13301
13322
13784
13155
13556
13610
13283
13528
13905
13718
13529
13907
13295
13338
13302
13463
13296
13472
13156
13132
13241
13611
13297
13074
13133
13416
13752
13815
13157
13250
13751
13298
13814
13874
13923
Special Doukhobor.
Kalesnikoff, Walisy   13189
Special Heating.
Adamson, Peter	
Allen,  G.  H	
Anderson, Hogan ...
Armstrong.  Wm	
Bailey. J. W	
Bartholomew, John .,
Blackwood, Wm	
Brewer, J. C	
Bradner, J. W.
Cook, Richard  	
Dawes, H. L	
Deane. James	
Dial. W. H	
Drvsdale. W. F	
Fell. K. M	
Firth, George	
Foster, J. R	
Freeman, Harry	
Fraser, John   	
Gilbert, Charles	
Grafton, AV. A	
Hall. Joseph	
Hirst, G. V	
Hickey, John	
Humphreys, Edward
13819
13376
13563
13927
13530
13756
13476
13138
13390
13687
13571
13393
13759
13692
13537
13397
13636
13433
13763
13577
13489
13402
13581
13765
13185
Hunt, H. E	
Jones, J. P	
Kerfoot, W. L.   ...
Kruse, Frederick ..
La Rose, Wm	
Liscumbe, Chas. .. .
Moyes, E. C	
AldComb, R. C ...
AlcKerracher, Wm.
Nelson, Samuel ...
Nixon, Joseph
Payne, Arthur ....
Prudom, Charles . .
Price, C. J	
Redwood.  Sidney   .
Roy, James	
Rollins, J. G	
Rosman, Louis
Sayers, Arthur
Skinner, W. D.
West, J. G	
Wetherell, George .
Wheeler, A. B.
Whittaker. John . .
Williams, F.  G.   . .
13493
13583
13585
13145
13380-
13499
13543
13442
13404
13443
13503
13704
13444
13844
13593
13445
13507
13602
13148
13323
13553
13855
13073
133S5
13408 152
Public Works Report  (1919-20).
Special Creamery.
Burmeister, John .. .
Haggerty, Laurence
Karnagel, F. R.  ...
Day, Ernest	
Gourlay, Andrew
13478
13142
13733
Aralentin, H. B. N.
Valentine, G. J. AV.
Special Road-roller.
13174
13344
Jordon, F. H.   .
Ronquist, P. O.
13238
13902
13350
13217 11 Geo. 5
Inspector of Electrical Energy.
D 153
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY.
Provincial Inspector of Electrical Energy,
Vancouver, B.C., October 1st, 1920.
J. E. Griffith, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit this report on the work of this office for the year ending
March 31st, 1920.
Generating Plants.
The electrical generating plants operating in the Province during the year numbered ninety-
five and totalled approximately 240,000 k.v.a. of generator capacity. Of these plants, sixty have
been engaged entirely or in part in giving a public supply of electrical energy, and thirty-five are
in operation for use solely in connection with factories, mills, pulp plants, etc. There are forty-
one plants operated by water-power, forty-five by steam-power, and nine by internal-combustion
engines. All the larger plants are run by water-power, and this class of plant has 77 per cent,
of the total installed k.v.a. generator capacity. The development of several other water-powers
throughout the Province is under consideration and construction on some of these is likely to be
commenced at an early date. The pulp and paper industry in the Province is responsible for
the construction of a number of electrical generating plants of modern design, the total capacity
of these plants being approximately 25,000 k.v.a.
During the year most of the generating-stations have had a margin of power and little
additional generating equipment has been added, although additions to a few plants are
contemplated during the coming year.
The electrical equipment in the various power plants is generally in a satisfactory condition
and few accidents have occurred. A number of changes have been made in conformity with
regulations, although in several of the smaller and older types of power-houses difficulty has
been experienced in making alterations which would give the standards of safety obtainable in
new plants.   A new set of safety rules for power plants is at present under preparation.
Transmission and Distribution.
The new 110,000-volt transmission-line of the AVest Kootenay Light and Power Company
from Greenwood to Allenby, as mentioned in last year's report, is still under construction, but
will be completed at an early date. It is proposed that electrical energy be taken from this line
for furnishing the supply to the town of Princeton, in which case the present generating plant
there, which is owned and operated by the Princeton Coal and Land Company, Limited, will be
removed. There is also the possibility of power being taken from this transmission-line at
Joints en route for town lighting or for industrial purposes.
During the year a set of regulations governing the construction of overhead lines has been
prepared. We have at various times during the past year been in correspondence regarding this
matter with the Hydro-Electric Commission of the Province of Ontario, and also with the Bureau
of Standards regarding the corresponding rules being issued as part of the National Electric
Safety Code. The Hydro-Electric Commission, we found, had not reached finality in their rules,
and also the National Electric Safety Code, although it had passed through several editions
which had been widely circulated amongst power companies and others for comment, had not
been finally decided upon. This Code, when issued, will form the most detailed set of regulations
yet prepared. Due to the delay in issuing this Code, however, we have proceeded with our own
rules and have prepared a set of regulations which will govern all the usual types of construction
in use in this Province. Copies of these rules were circulated amongst the power companies and
municipalities, as well as amongst employees' organizations. Some difficulty was experienced in
getting the rules into final form, due to different conditions existing with the smaller companies and municipalities throughout the Province, and with the larger power companies. Several of
the rules have been amended to provide for these varying conditions, and they generally now
cover all the different classes of overhead lines in use. The intention is that all new work shall
be in accordance with these rules, and existing overhead lines brought into conformity with
same at times to be determined in individual cases by the condition of the lines and the hazards
which attend their use and operation.
There continues to be a fair amount of pole-line construction throughout the Province, and
the system in vogue in past years for the granting of approval and issuing of permits for
construction of such lines on Provincial highways has been continued, co-operation in this matter
being obtained with the various District Engineers. In this connection the pole-lines of the
Dominion Telegraph Service in the Interior are at present being inspected, previous to approval
of these lines also being given. This approval has been sought by the Dominion Government
officials for all their existing lines in the Interior, and as many of these lines have been constructed for a considerable number of years, approval has been withheld until such time as an
inspection can be completed. For all new lines proposed by the Dominion Government on
Provincial highways, our system of approval and permits as adopted for private corporations
and municipalities will be applied. Attention during the year has been given to the question
of obtaining co-operation between the various public utilities owning pole-lines in the rural
districts in order to further the matter of joint pole-line construction wherever possible, as_ it
has been considered advisable to discourage unnecessary duplication of pole-lines on Provincial
highways in order that right-of-way may be conserved for future transmission and distribution
lines.
Utilization Equipment.
A record has been made during the year of the total installed capacity of electric motors
throughout the Province, and a complete file is being maintained by recording all new power-
installations. The total installed capacity of electric motors in the Province amounts to
approximately 1S8,0C0 horse-power.
A set of Electrical Safety Regulations has been prepared during the year as part of the
Accident-prevention Regulations under the Workmen's Compensation Board. These regulations
were duly read over at public meetings in A'aucouver and Arictoria, and also published in the
Gazette in accordance with the requirements of the Act, and went into force on January 10th,
1920. All new electrical equipment in industrial plants is being installed in accordance with
these rules, and such electrical equipment which had been previously installed and which
constituted electrical hazards is being changed in accordance with the requirements. A part
of this work which has received special attention has been the replacing of open 500-volt direct-
current switches and fuses by externally operated safety switch-boxes as called for in the rules.
A regular survey was made of this equipment as used throughout the City of Arancouver in
connection with the operation of elevators from the commercial power-circuit of the British
Columbia Electric Railway Company. Alost of the defective switches have been removed and
satisfactory progress towards the entire elimination of open-type switch-gear of this class is
proceeding.
Throughout the period under review increased effort has been made to get in touch with
all electrical installations in the outlying parts of the Province at the time of installation, so
that the new requirements of our rules could be embodied in the equipment provided. We
propose to adopt a system whereby all persons who intend to install electrically operated
machinery will notify this office, and obtain permit authorizing them to proceed with the
installation. Such a permit system will be applicable to all parts of the Province, outside of
cities and municipalities where no form of local permit system is in force. The details of the
system have not yet been finally determined, but in the meantime, through the medium of the
power companies, we are endeavouring to get in touch with all those who are applying for a
supply of electrical energy to new installations. —
11 Geo.
Inspector of Electrical Energy.
D 15?.
Accidents.
The following accidents were reported and investigated during the year:-
Occupation.
Place.
uate.
Cause  and   Remarks.
Sub-station operator
Vancouver Island  . .
Trail	
New Westminster  . .
Vancouver   	
Trail  	
1919.
Feb.        1	
April    25	
Mav       6	
12	
July     16	
Aug.     15	
IT	
Sept.    IT	
25	
Oct.      31	
Nov.     13	
13	
18	
1920.
Jan.     13	
31	
Mar.     18	
Adjusting controller;  flash  in eyes.
Opening field-switch ;  band burnt.
Came in contact with  high-voltage wire;  fatal.
Electric operator ...
Burns from high-voltage rectifier.
Sub-station operator
fatal.
Operating     2.300-volt     disconnecting     switches;
burns to face and arm.
Testing fuses  with  lamps ;  burns  on  band  and
Boy	
Elevator operator ..
face.
Came in contact with wire of series street-lamp ;
fatal.
Short   circuit  in   switch-cables;   burns  on  hands
and  face.
Ditto.
Electric shock on  pole  and fall;  fatal.
Testing  elevator-motor;   burns  on  hand.
Experimenting  on  switches;  burns.
General.
In order to provide for satisfactory systems of illumination in factories and industrial
plants generally, a Lighting Code has been prepared during the year. This Code sets forth the
rules governing the amounts of artificial illumination which should be provided for different
kinds of work and different manufacturing processes. The function of the rules is to ensure
that in the design of new installations sufficient capacity in the wiring system is allowed for,
and also to provide such lighting in factories as will tend to reduce the number of accidents
which are known to occur, due to inferior illumination. Statistics have shown that the number
of accidents in industrial plants and around moving machinery generally is greater under
conditions of defective lighting and also during the hours of artificial illumination than under
natural lighting conditions. The Lighting Code is only tentative in the meantime and to a great
extent educative, but at a later date it is anticipated that it will definitely be adopted and
subject to enforcement in all factories in the Province. The co-operation of the Factory Inspector
is being obtained in this matter.
In response to a request which was presented to us by the Arancouver Association of Electrical
Contractors, some attention has been given to the matter of the licensing of electrical contractors
in the Province.. AVe have investigated corresponding legislation elsewhere and have prepared
a draft for a proposed Bill.
In accordance with an arrangement which was made with the Fire Investigation Branch
of the Department of Insurance, and following on instructions received for co-operating with
the Provincial Fire Investigation Officer, we have made inspections from time to time of
electrical wiring which had been considered as constituting fire hazards. Reports were made
on conditions found and instructions issued in each case for remedying the defective wiring.
Following on instructions received and arrangements made with the Public Utilities Commissioner, this office carried out a certain amount of work during the year in an advisory capacity
to the Commission on various electrical matters which arose from time to time in connection
with the work of the Commission.
The usual amount of advisory work on electrical matters was done for other offices and
departments of the Government.
I have, etc.,
J.  MUIBHEAD,
Inspector of Electrical Energy. 13 15G Public Works Report (1919-20).
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF FACTORIES.
Arancouver, B.C., March 31st, 1920.
Hon. J. II.
Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In presenting the annual report of this Department for the fiscal year ending March
31st, 1920, it is somewhat difficult to give an entire resume of the work performed during that
period. As stated in my previous annual report, Mr. Douglas and myself have been appointed
Inspectors under the Workmen's Compensation Board, which means that we have jurisdiction
over innumerable smaller plants which do not come within the province of the " Factories Act"
owing to their not having the requisite number of employees as defined by the Act. The
investigation of accidents and the reporting of same also combine to take up activities that
cannot very well be recorded in a report of this nature. However, speaking generally, a vast
improvement is noticeable in the safety, sanitary, and lighting conditions of the plants coming
under our jurisdiction.
The major portion of our duties naturally consists of issuing orders for the safety and
welfare of the employees of the Province where such, after inspection, are deemed necessary,
and also to see that all orders issued are complied with.
Child-labour.
The law prohibiting the employment of child-labour has been well adhered to during the
past year, only a few violations being discovered.
Hours of Labour.
Owing to the vigorous enforcement of the forty-eight-hour law for female employees we have
found this provision of the Act well complied with, as in the previous year, only one prosecution
being necessary during the year.
This Department has a complete record of all industries coming under our jurisdiction which
employ this class of help, and those concerned realize from past experience that this office w.ill
not countenance the employment of young girls and women for a longer period than specified
in the Act.
Provision is made, under section 13, whereby the Inspector may, subject to certain limitations, give permission to operate a factory for a longer period, and this permission is requested
and granted occasionally, providing sufficient reasons are given for the necessity thereof.
A'ENTILATION.
The ventilation of factories seems to be a never-ending problem, caused a great deal by the
installing of new equipment which emits noxious fumes and dust, and which is connected to
, the main trunk line of a blower system equipped with a fan that is already removing its
maximum amount of impure air.
When a mechanical ventilating system is being installed, it is most important that the future
requirements of the industry should be considered, and provision made for the Installation of
additional machines should occasion require.
We have in mind some work-rooms in which we had a ventilating system installed, and
which upon completion was subjected to a test and found to measure up to requirements, but
on later inspection being made we found that the efficiency of the system had been greatly
impaired owing to additional branch lines being connected to the main trunk suction-pipe and
a fan of the same capacity and horse-power still in use.
Amendments.
The two amendments to the " Factories Act" which were passed at the 1919 session of the
Legislature have added considerably to our work, particularly the amendment to section 43,
which now gives us jurisdiction over all elevators used for the carriage of passengers.   The 11 Geo. 5
Inspector of Factories.
D 157
amendment regarding the operation of laundries has also taken a great deal of attention,
especially with Police Court prosecutions.
Reference was made in my previous report to the unfair competition to which the white
laundries were subjected through the inability of this Department to limit the hours of employment in Oriental laundries. In order to overcome this competition section 3 of the Act was
amended, bringing all laundries operated for profit within the scope of the " Factories Act."
Letters were mailed to the licensees of this class of laundries, notifying them of the amendment.
Upon inspection being made, it was found that practically all the Oriental laundries
throughout the Province were ignoring the law, which specifies that the hours of employment
in laundries shall be between 7 in the morning and 7 in the evening. Following the noting
of this non-compliance with the Act, information was laid against twenty-one offenders in the
City of Victoria, which resulted in prosecutions and followed by observance of the Act in
that city.
Information was then laid against the proprietors of fifty-two Oriental laundries in the
City of Vancouver, and after considerable argument on the construction that could be placed
on the amendment, proceedings in the form of a test case were taken against one of the offenders.
A conviction was secured and a fine imposed. This case was appealed on the following grounds:
First, because the laundry was used as a dwelling; and, second, because no person was employed
therein; that is, it was operated entirely by the owners. The Judge reserved his decision, which
is still pending.
To overcome this difficulty the following amendment in the form of a Bill is now before
<the Legislature:—
" Section 3 of the ' Factories Act,' being chapter 81 of the ' Revised Statutes of British
Columbia, 1911,' is amended by striking out the words ' whether three or more persons, or less
than three persons, or any persons are employed' in the third and fourth lines of subsection (2),
as enacted by section 2 of the-'Factories Act Amendment Act, 1919,' and substituting therefor
the words ' whether or not any person is employed.'
" Section 66 of said chapter 81 is amended by striking out the word ' employer' in the fourth
line, and substituting therefor the word ' person.' " •
Previous to the passing of the amendment regarding elevators, our jurisdiction extended only
to those elevators in factories, hotels, and shops of more than two stories in height. Section 43
as now amended stipulates that no person shall operate, nor shall any employer permit any
person to operate, any elevator used for the carriage of passengers unless that person is the
holder of a licence issued by the Inspector or by a person authorized in that behalf by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council. The amendment further stipulates that all applicants for
licences must be 18 years of age or over, and must also be British subjects.
Following the placing of this amendment on the statute-books, it became necessary for this
Department to draft a set of rules and regulations governing the operation of passenger-
elevators for the purpose of submitting same to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council for approval.
Upon this being received, notices were sent to all owners or managers of buildings containing
passenger-elevators, instructing them to have their operators present themselves at this office
for the purpose of undergoing an examination as to their competency. This procedure took a
great deal of the time of the entire staff. In order not to interfere with the elevator service,
examinations were also conducted at night for those operators who found in inconvenient to
attend the day sittings.
Previous to this legislation being passed, accidents, fatal and otherwise, were happening all
too frequently, and our records show that the majority of accidents were caused by the employment of inexperienced and careless operators. However, we are now pleased to report that no
fatal accidents have occurred to passengers in the Province during the year, and only one has
been injured.
It is important to safeguard elevators, particularly passenger-elevators, by any method
which has proven useful and reliable, but the best safeguard of all is a good, careful, cool-headed
operator. Operators who perform their duties faithfully and conscientiously are under considerable strain while running passenger-elevators. This Department at all times impresses upon the
owners and operators of elevators the seriousness of their responsibility, and endeavours to
assist them in safeguarding the public by thorough, periodical inspections and by rigid examina- tion of operators in order to assure ourselves that they are acquainted with the hazards of an
elevator.
Statistics and our past experience show that the majority of accidents occur at the elevator
landings, caused by the elevator being moved before the doors or gates are closed, and also by
the shaftway doors being left open when the elevator is away from the landing. The most
effective way of preventing these accidents is shaftway door interlocking devices. These have
for their object the interlocking of the car and the shaftway door, and prevent the opening of the
doors unless the car is.opposite the landing and stationary. They also prevent the car from
being moved until all doors are closed.
Reference was made in my previous report to the shaftway hazard, and the measures that
were being taken by us to eliminate the unnecessary suffering caused by persons being crushed
between the car platform and projections in the shaftway. I am now pleased to be able to
report that all passenger-elevators have been inspected, and, where juts were found in shaftways
facing the entrance to the car, orders have been issued to either install a collapsible gate on
the car or fill in the recesses so as to form a firm, smooth, flush surface.
Any orders issued by this Department which have not been fully complied with in connection
with alterations and improvements to existing elevator installations cannot rightfully be charged
to the owners. Upon receipt of the orders they are handed to the elevator contractors for
completion of same, and any delay in this respect has been due largely to the fact that the
elevator contractors, owing to the large number of orders specified by this Department, have been
unable to supply the equipment and carry out the work.
The safety of an elevator is seldom questioned by the public using it. If it is there to be
used, one has the right to assume that it is safe. The public demand and are invited to use it,
and its convenience is held out as an inducement for patronage.
It is remarkable to note with what childlike simplicity the public put their trust in the
safety of vehicles for rapid transit. In entering railway-trains, street-cars, and elevators they
do so with as much unconcern as though they were passing from one room to another in their
own homes, being entirely oblivious to the danger to life and limb with which they are
surrounded. No form of conveyance better exemplifies this than the passenger elevator. Few
persons realize the situation they are in when a car is ascending or descending in a tall building,
suspended in air by ropes with many stories of space beneath them. What might occur in the
event of the breaking of the hoisting-cables or the disarrangement of some vital part of the
elevator-machine can easily be imagined. It seems to be almost impossible to educate the public
to a full realization of the dangers and hazards of an elevator, and the operators are constantly
called upon to protect the passengers from their own carelessness.
One cannot have the old maxim more clearly exemplified, " familiarity breeds contempt,"
than by taking a few trips on a passenger-elevator and observing the free aud apparent thoughtless manner in which the people in general make use of our passenger-elevators.
In concluding this report, I again desire to record my appreciation of the courtesy I have
received from yourself and the Deputy Alinister, Mr. Griffith, with whom it was necessary to
consult from time to time.
Yours obediently, "
R. J. Stewart,
Inspector of Factories. 11 Geo. 5
Inspector of Dykes.
D 159
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF DYKES.
Office of Inspector of Dykes,
Victoria, B.C., November 30th, 1920.
Hon. J. H. King,
Minister of Public Works, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the following report with reference to the maintenance
and management of the several dyking districts and the Matsqui Drainage District for the
year 1919-20:—
In the following table of the maximum freshet heights in the Fraser River (the elevations
shown refer to low water at Pitt River, the datum of which is 6.81 below that of the Department
of Public Works and the second column of gauge elevations for Matsqui, which are referred to
mean sea-level) it will be seen that the freshet of 1920 is the greatest since 1903:—
High-water Levels.
Matsqui.
Pitt River.
Year.
Date.
Local
Gauge.
Above Mean *
Sea-level.
Date.
Local
Gauge.
1894..
26.37
22.85
20.90
19.00
23.65
18.80
17.35
14.55
18.85
21.45
19.25
16.95
20.75
17.35
20.35
18.45
12.75
20.70
19.90
21.40
18.80
22.35
25.01
21.49
19.54
17.64
22.29
17.44
15.99
13.19
17.49
20.09
17.89
15.59
19.39
16.99
18.99
17.09
11.39
19.34
IS. 54
20.04
17.44
20.99
14.75
1900..
„     27	
„    28 	
„      3	
12.00
„ »   3	
10.75
9.75
12.75
,,     11	
„     12    .                        	
„    12	
9.82
„    12 *	
8.75
July   13	
July 12 ,	
7.40
9.70
ii      16- .
„     15	
11.50
"     17
„     18	
10.20
Mav   31...
,,       1	
8.90
„     19	
10.70
1912
,,i     26	
„      15	
,,      22	
i,     27	
ii     16	
9.20
11.00
„     23	
10.10
2Mav 29..
7 90
1917	
1918	
„      12	
„     23 ,	
i,     11	
10.70
11.80
,,      27	
„     28 	
10.10
1920	
July   18	
July 18	
12.00
* Datum, Canadian Geodetic Survey.
The run-off of the Fraser River this year has been of an exceptional character; as the dates
show, the crest of the flood was reached later than at any recorded time. The low temperature
ruling over the higher watershed of the Fraser and Thompson Rivers till late in June brought
the waters of these streams off very gently, but increasing temperature throughout the Province
during July produced a higher and more prolonged run-off than usual, conditions being graphically
told in the hydrograph-line for 1920, and the temperature-line (daily maximum) at Barkerville,
the point generally regarded as indicative of conditions in the snowfields feeding the Fraser,
shows in a general way how a spell of high temperature brings up the river.
Pumping Season. Matsqui Maple R.Qge
Gates closed   May  16 June 3
Gates opened    Aug. 26 Sept. 3
The diagram may be of interest as to the very variable character of the freshet and will give
those concerned a better idea of how prairie-level and the sluices are related to flood heights. D 160                                  Public Works Report  (1919-20).
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* 11 Geo. 5
Inspector of Dykes.
D 161
The  following  is  a   detailed  statement  of  maintenance  and  funded  debt   account  from
October 1st, 1919, to September 30th, 1920:—
Dyking District.
Service.
Matsqui.
Maple
Ridge.
Coquitlam.
Pitt Meadows.
Tract No. 1.
Tract No. 2.
Pumping Service.
$   651 74
2,877 08
1,178 53
205 90
110 87
51 61
3 75
211 10
$   381 13
2,131 28
560 81
39 10
272 07
41 26
30 00
70 00
$  185 75
968 38
655 57
48 96
60 51
34 81
45 00
35 00
$   91 32
428 32
11 16
77 63
87 08
37 00
$     92 63
674 53
497 29
32 90
14 30
13 48
17 60
17 50
$5,320 58
644 25
159 15
21 00
204 70
$3,525 65
927 07
$2,033 98
356 21
$ 750 01
139 82
$1,342 63
Maintenance and Management.
129 71
253 44
123 49
43 99
85 00
12 92
18 98
65 67
3 47
4 04
582 00
71 43
36 02
610 00
20 41
7 86
42
21 69
1 85
213 47
67 74
56 20
18 07
159 88
53 84
20 70
66 55
12 47
63 30
2 52
1,216 93
981 50
68 21
91 13
6 55
5 08
7 48
8 64
17 79
13 20
I 64
Plant   	
97
467 29
377 00
70 27
19 97
2 52
35
. 171 39
138 25
9 61
11 27
92
34
1,480 60
1,194 00
82 90
76 24
7 97
160 18
129 25
9 01
16 18
89
$4,608 02
$3,742 08
$1,651 79
$1,387 28
$ 735 68
$1,765 00
891 18
$   150 80
$     85 00
S 165 00
$2,666 18
$   150 80
$     85 00
$ 165 00
Total	
$1,951 84
460 55
199 11
490 96
332 59
$3,591 28
876 70
385 55
$1,566 79
900 80
393 20
$1,387 28
288 25
124 00
$ 570 68
Funded Debt Service.
167 66
666 95
64 30
547 75
49 94
126 30
13 83
115 10
12 58
193 23
59 32
Sinking-fund,     h     	
Interest, Mc Kinney Creek diversion 	
121 31
53 55
Sinking-fund,              n              M        	
1,688 95
1,807 58
421 44
6,250 00
$11,903 73
Maintenance fund,          u           i,
Serial bond refund, Matsqui wash-out.  ..           	
6,369 80
2,899 40
890 77
852 63
Total	
$8,438 16
$4,791 09
$1,443 15
$1,666 82
$21,832 33
$15,795 89
8,476 86
3,580 44
3,745 13
Payments on account of wash-out at Matsqui to September 30th, 1920, $5,708.77.
11 D 162
Public Works Beport (1919-20).
Statement showing the annual assessment on Capital Account, and the Assessment on
Maintenance Account for the year ending September 30th, 1920, including the amount levied
on lands assessable on an acreage basis and the amount assessed under " Minimum Assessment"
charges;   also the rate per acre.
Matsqui.
Maple Ridge.
Coquitlam
Pitt Meadows.
Dyking.
Drainage
So. 1.
High
Land.
Low
Land.
Tract
No. 1.
Tract
No. 2.
Capital service:
Capital charge per aere..
$125,000 00
12.2241
$69,865 61»
20.71416
10.35708
5.17854
1,688 95t
(varies)
1,807 58t
(varies)
1,616 16
106 28
85 16
1,807 58
Acres.
$26,980 80
10.3206
$100,415  20
17.3712
$57,988 00
17.9227
$17,815 32
15.165
$17,052 62
15.3318
Totaldyked districts.
$345,251 94
Total capital assessment.
$18,951 55
Annual assessment	
Funded debt and maintenance service :
On   land   assessable   on
On land subject to mini-
6,260 00
11,660 79
3 57
1,349 04
1,958 59
18 28
5,020 76
7,339 44
19 78
2,899 40
5,208 63
368 83
890 77
2,689 67
852 63
2,892 50
On land assessed for variable benefit:
Total   funded   debt
Assessment,  30th Sept.,
1920 	
Acreages .-
Assessable    on    acreage
11,664 36
Acres.
10,224.98
0.72
1,976 87
Acres.
2,605.48
8.79
7,359 22
Acres.
5,773.15
7.40
5,577 46
Acres.
3,171.31
64.14
2,689 67
Acres.
1,174.78
•
2.S92 50
Acres.
1,112.22
assessment.
$33,976 66
Subject to minimum rate
Assessed  for   variable
benefit:
3,015.71
396.78
634.95
4,047.45
28,190.42 acres -
10,225.70
$0.611205
1.14042
2,614.27
$0.51603
0.75172
1.03667
-
0.51834
0.25917,
SI.26775
02
IS
33
33.
02
22
~?.
O
H
5,780.55
$0.86842
1.2713
$2.13972
3,235.45
$0.89613
1.64242
1,174.78
$0.75824
2.28951
1,112.22
$ 0.7666
2.60066
Hates per acre:
$0.500736
0.5359
0.25037
0.26797
0.12518
0.13398
Total rate per acre..
$1.751626
$2.53855
$3.04775
$3.36726
1 As at 30th September, 1920.
t For year 1920. 11 Geo. 5
Inspector of Dykes.
D 163
Funded Debt Assets.—To illustrate the considerable advances that have been made by the
Government during the last fifteen years, a table of expenditure subsidiary to capital is attached,
where it will'be seen what a large proportion of annual assessments have to be made on funded
debt account.
Expenditure on account of
Concrete sluices.
Electrical pumping plant.
ii it
Drainage.
Installation
Complete.
1913
1913
1913
1920
1913
1913
1914
1914
1914
1920
1919
1920
Pitt No. 1
Pitt No. 2
Coquitlam
Maple Ridge
Matsqui
Pitt No. 2
Pitt No. 1
Coquitlam
Maple Ridge
Matsqui
Matsqui
Maple Ridge
Matsqui
Total...
$ 2,301 85
2,526 37
11,338 95
14,685 49
10,373 10
5,764 46
18,016 04
17,536 73
9,211 24
39,141 49
9,704 50
69,865 61
$221,419 65
Rate of
Interest
per Cent.
Particulars.
No. of
Openings.
feet x 6 feet.
6
5
5
6
6
5
5
5
5
Length.
34 feet 0 inches.
No. of Pumps.
! (old)
Imp. gallons per min.
24,000
12,000
12,000
15,000
15,000
24,000
40,000
35,000
McKinney Creek Diversion.
Drainage No. 1, 30th September, 1920.
Data and Operation.
I append a small table showing the general technical details of the dyking districts, which
will perhaps serve to illustrate the scope of this Department's work, and bring to one place the
more salient features now administered.
Data.
Matsqui.
Maple Ridge.
Coquitlam.
Pitt No. 1.
Pitt No. 2.
Total.
Dyking.
10,225.7
200
7.21
675
4
2,216
313,920
Drainage.
4,047.45
186
4.89
8.78
8,394.82
274
14.39
300
2
616
42,340
3,235.45
499
8.41
175
2
729
49,161"
1,124.78
3
6.084
75
No pumping
1,112.22
66
5.456
75
1
149
9,709
28,190.47
Parcels on roll	
1,228
41.55
Ditches dug—miles  	
1,300
Employees during pumping season...
9
3,710
415,130
Rainfall.
An exceptionally heavy rainfall was experienced in the middle of November, 1919, when an
average of 1.58 inches per day fell for five days, the peak of the storm being on the 15th, when
4.2 inches precipitation took place; heavy rain occurred again in January and again early in
March, when a fall at the rate of 1 inch per day for six days occurred.
Such heavy rain just at the time the land should start to dry out demands the most adequate
drainage,, in order that the water may be got away and permit the earliest possible working of
the land.
A very heavy rain-storm occurred again September 9th to the 15th, so large a rainfall as
to necessitate the use of the pumps in the districts north of the Fraser; the increased capacity
of the new lateral ditching at Matsqui avoided this, so that areas that in the spring had been
covered with water could be crossed dryshod. D 164
Public Works Beport (1919-20).
Run-off.
This is an equally important element entering the question of drainage, as during the winter
and early spring every effort should be made to promote the maximum quantity of precipitation
to appear at the outfall; as this is principally affected by the amount of rainfall modified by
percolation, which again is modified by the character of the soil, it is a difficult quantity to
gauge, but it is very patent that the more quickly this can be disposed of the sooner will the
land respond to air temperatures. Fortunately for the pumping account, the freshet season
was remarkably free from land floods, with which the great amount of seepage would have been
an embarrassment.
Drainage,
Seepage.—During the freshet of this year it was noticed that seepage at Matsqui was
excessive, and that owners had in general refrained from planting areas liable to this effect.
Strengthening Dyke.—As land values are closely following the cost of foodstuffs, it is
economic waste to leave so much good land out of cultivation, and the drainage of these areas
should be promoted; as precedent to this and in light of the breach in the dyke, an increase of
cross-section at all low points would be a sound investment and should be undertaken at once,
as it is my opinion that at many points the dyke was in an unstable condition during the
freshet, and had the Fraser level been raised a couple of feet or even remained at flood height
for a rather longer period, other and more serious damage would have been done.
These remarks do not apply to the dykes north of the Fraser, where the peat content in
the soil acts as a filler to the silt material, and where, owing to the character of the natural
formation, wash-outs from seepage are not liable to occur; besides this, the fact that the dyke-
ditch is inside the dyked area precludes the practical provision of a banquette.
Matsqui Drainage No. 1.—Realizing the impossibility of materially improving their lands
without drainage, certain land-owners in the Matsqui District petitioned under the " Drainage,
Dyking, and Development Act, 1918," to have a comprehensive drainage system constructed, and
an actual start was made in January this year, the work being approximately 60 per cent,
complete as at September 30th, 1920.
As the work gives -material reduction in the grade of the water, slope being changed from
1 foot per mile to 0.4 foot per mile, great benefit was immediately given to the lands remote from
the Fraser, but as the outlets had to be executed first the lateral system was not in in time to
judge of the whole of its effects.
The estimated cost of the work proper was $35,000, with an estimated cost of $4,000 for
preliminary expenses, surveys, fees, etc., imposing a capital charge of $10 per acre over all,
which is to be refunded on an assessment based on 100 per cent., 50 per cent., and 25 per cent,
benefit.
As it was found impracticable to finance the project by the sale of bonds on the market,
an amendment was made to the "Dyking Assessments Adjustment Act," and the work made one
of those on which the Government may make advances of cost; the refunding of these will be
spread over the next twenty-seven years, the yearly contribution being as shown in paragraph
at top of following page.
Matsqui Drainage No. 1.
Contractors, Northern Construction Co.; contract made November 4th, 1919; to terminate
April 15th, 1920; time extended to .September 15th, 1920. Cost of work as at September 30th,
1920 :—
Plant charges     $ 5,135 49
Plant rental     10,149 21
Oil and fuel        6,221 95
Materials and supplies      10,486 38
Labour, teams, field office expenses      28,441 32
Engineering expenses         7,912 08
Land  damages     275 88
Fees and administration    991 18
Interest on loans    252 13
Total  .•   $69,S05 01 11 Geo. 5
Inspector op Dykes.
D 165
Refund is on a serial-bond basis commencing at $96 per $1,000 of capital cost at December
31st, 1921, ending with $38 per $1,000 of capital cost on December 31st, 1947; the contribution
to amortization for 1920 is closely approximate to one-quarter of that for 1921.
The work as at September 30th, 1920, consists of: Miles of A type ditch—(1) 5.01 on
highways and (2) 3.77 on private property; miles of slough and creeks excavated, 4.19; miles
of slough cleared and improved, 0.7; 9 culverts under roads; 17 culverts of an average length
of 22 feet were placed to give access to private property.
An unfortunate combination of circumstances characterized the execution of this work.
The plant, of which a great shortage exists, did not arrive on the ground till the beginning of
the year 1920, and right along until the middle of June wet weather kept the ground too sodden
for expeditious work by such heavy units; the heavy going very severely strained the undergear
of the machines, and each item has been laid up from time to time for repairs; better progress
was made on the substitution of crawlers for the pads, but time was necessarily lost in moving
the machines to points where the proper sequence of work called for it.
Another great difficulty and a source of much criticism has been the apparent neglect to
clean up the job as the machine passed away, but it Is significant of the contractor's troubles
to state that for a normal requirement of eighteen men the pay-roll shows that 148 have been
engaged on the job, and illustrates the difficulty of organizing on scattered work such as this.
McKinney Creek Dwersion.—During 1918 and 1919 a channel was dug to take the flow of
McKinney Creek direct to the South Lillooet River. From various causes the interest in this
to the Alaple Ridge Dyking District could not be established, but the cost as at September 30th,
1920, is now available and amounts to $9,704.50; this amount was advanced in the usual way
by the Government, and is to be refunded during the next twenty-five years, the contribution
for 1920 being shown in the forty-first and forty-second line of statement of expenses. Costs
were:—
In respect to works  $9,030 00
Land and damages          659 10
Fees and administration    15 40
Total     $9,704 50
AVith a small item of work and purchase of right-of-way to complete.
Sluices.
Matsqui.—During the year a contract was let for the construction of concrete sluices in the
two sloughs at Alatsqui, the contract being made with J. A. Alackenzie, who was the lowest of
eight bidders, whose figures ranged from some $11,000 to $29,000.
Owing to the conditions of the labour field and material market a very late start was made
on the work, and bad weather commencing in November and continuing into the spring made it
doubtful whether the contractor would be able to get a single culvert in shape to withstand a
high freshet; the rising cost of material added to a low estimate compelled the contractor to
throw up the job and it had to be completed on a force-account basis. The net cost to the
district amounts to $13,192.91, which is spread over a term ending December 31st, 1947.
Later in the year bids on the construction of the second sluice were asked, but figures were
so high that it was deemed expedient to defer work for the year.
Arising out of the inability to proceed with the No. 1 Sluice, an opportunity has been given
to study the character of the run-off under the new drainage conditions, and a material alteration
in the design has been made, and I hope construction may be started in the coming year.
Pumps.
Maple Ridge.—As the old pumps at Maple Ridge have been in service since 1896, and are,
so far as the timber-work of the framework, well, and flume are concerned, in a bad way, the
question of replacement was taken up early in the year, but on account of the ruling high price
of machinery, etc., it was thought expedient to refer any action to the assessed owners, and
they, at a meeting on April 7th, resolved that replacement should not be undertaken; as this
entailed the pumps' operation through the freshet seasons of 1920 and 1921, a measure of repair
was made, and it is hoped that within their capacity they may give service till conditions change. D 166 Public Works Beport  (1919-20).
Matsqui.—At Matsqui the recurrence of partial flooding due to land flood during freshet
conditions, and the undertaking of the drainage-work which will produce quicker concentration
of the water at the pumps has called for an enlargement of the pumping capacity, in connection
with which the following may be of interest:—
Capacity of No. 1, 20,100 i.g.p.m.; capacity of No. 2, 15,000 i.g.p.m. Contractors, Vancouver
Alachinery Depot; contract made December 19th, 1919; to terminate April 15th, 1920; work
completed August 14th, 1920.    The costs were as follows:—
Prime cost of pumps and motors    $14,331 36
Prime cost of auxiliary machinery   901 31
Materials        12,849 58
Teaming     163 45
Freight     476 81
Labour        5,447 36
Overheads, rent of plant, administration, etc       4,671 62
Total      $39,141 49
With a small adjustment of cost of electrical apparatus still to be made.
As the motors, pumps, and stave pipe have different useful lives, the annuity to refund will
vary and amount to: $151.05, 1921-28; $50.22, 1928-40; $20.48, 1940-45, per $1,000 of capital
cost.
On account of the lateness of the contractors starting the work the intake-well at No. 2
could not be completed before the freshet was well on, but it is hoped that it will be in order
for another season.
Power.
Arising from a. material modification of the method of charging for power, the contract
for the supply of which came up for renewal in the spring of 1919, the cost of pumping shows
a material advance; while the actual cost of energy has been reduced to half its former value,
a rent-charge to recoup itself for the installation of machinery to the different pumping-stations
to give a limited service and as rental for the pole-lines has been imposed by the power company.
The operation of the " Electrical Energy Inspection Act, 1910," has imposed much more
stringent requirements on the use of high-tension current, and in view of the greater attention
being paid to the matter the inspection by the power compauy was much more condemnatory
than in former years; fire and life hazards were enlarged on and considerable expense has
had to be incurred to remove the latter, but rearrangement of fixtures to conform to requirements for caring for the former have been deferred till another year.
Power charge at old rate   lc. per k.w.h.
Power charge at new rate   0.4c. per k.w.h.
Demand charge per k.w. installed per month—
Winter     $0.14
Summer      $1.37
Pumping.
It would appear to be a moot point as to whether there is any obligation to pump the dyking
districts except at freshet stages in the Fraser River, such operation being of the nature of
drainage. In wet springs demands have been made to operate the pumps and complaint is
general as to the slowness with which the land dries out. The opinion that the subsoil water
should be kept low during the winter is growing, and it would appear desirable to ascertain the
opinion of the land-owners as to their views in the matter in order that the districts may be
operated with the maximum of benefit, and to institute some form of report by owners, as is
irrigation practice, of the extent and time of cultivation contemplated which would lead up
to improvement of the land.
Tabular data under caption " Data and Operation " shows the general data of the pumping
season 1920;  besides this, pumping was carried on for fifteen days in September.
Brushing.
During the year little brushing has been done, though extensive work on Maple Ridge Dyke
is very much required.   This work was neglected very much during the war on account of lack
of labour, and now material expense must be incurred as the brush has become very heavy. 	
11 Geo. 5
Inspector of Dykes.
D 167
It is perhaps not very evident that the brush on a dyke is a source of weakness, but as the
roots open up the soil flow-lines for the passage of water are created.
On account of this brush, inspection is almost impossible, as in places it is a veritable
jungle, and particularly so at points where inspection is most needed. Brush should be close
cut to the dyke-ditch, and where no ditch exists at least a distance of half a chain from the
toe of the dyke, so that the ground can be closely scrutinized, and, in the event of a boil,
measures taken on a clear foundation.
In view of existing labour conditions it has appeared impolitic to tackle the problem this
year, but the question will have to be faced in 1921; in the meantime the question of promoting
access to the dyke by the cattle of adjacent owners is being considered, and it is to be hoped
that after a thorough examination of the pros and cons of the situation it may be found possible
to reduce the work to the mere cutting of the most persistent brush.
Protection-work.
Matsqui.—Up to date no action has been taken on the recommendation of the Inspector of
Dykes of 1918, but something must be done shortly. Near the western end of this district a
measure of protection of some 600 feet near the No. 2 Pumping Station is urgently required,
and the work just east of the Glenmore Road needs enlargement and rehabilitation within the
next twelve months.
CoqUitlam.—The wash action, said to be due chiefly to traffic on the Pitt River, has
seriously eroded its western bank; at this point the dyke is built of silty clay, is a considerable
height, and has a deep ditch behind it; provision of protection from further wash is required;
some 600 feet of boom at the point where the old protection-fence has become ineffective and the
river has reached the foot of the dyke is a pressing need; surveys of points of erosion have
been completed, and as the dyking districts have no existence beyond the dyke, and in all cases
the damages exist in navigable waters, it would appear appropriate to ask the Dominion Government to undertake the work, or at least to participate in the cost.
Arrears.
On account of the financial situation the liability of recent delinquent assessments to go to
tax sale has been suspended for two years, and the following is a statement showing the
approximate position of outstanding obligations:—
Municipal
Private.
Arrears in Respect to Years.
Capital.
Funded
Debt.
Maintenance.
Capital.
Funded
Debt.
Maintenance.
Total.
Matsqui :
$420 59
1,203 95
166 99
166 99
$ 44 41
127 20
"l7 66
17 64
1918                    	
$   420 69
1,225 69
1914-17, inclusive (0. A.S.)	
1918(O.A.S.)	
1919 (O.A.S.)	
167 66
166 12
$14 05
124 57
$0 23
"268
$1,958 52
$   940 31
1,446 53
12 18
26 93
26 93
$206 91
District
$129 00
381 31
19
13
14
$1,979 50
$4,144 93
1920 tax sale	
Maple Ridge:
$10 32
total	
$4,144 93
1918              	
$742 05
1,298 12
9 59
24 81
29 57
1919	
134 70
1914-17 (O.A.S.).	
1918.	
1919	
$138 62
$2 91
$145 02
$2,452 88
$610 77
District
$2,104 14
1,112 44
27 67
$5,354 34
$6,494 45 ■
D 168
Public Works Eeport (1919-20).
Arrears—Continued.
Municipal.
Private.
Arrears in Respect to Years.
Capital.
Funded
Debt.
Maintenance.
Capital.
Funded
Debt.
Maintenance.
Total.
Coquitlam:
$1,511 09
400 63
400 63
$261 40
87 SO
86 72
$1,663 56
543 01
540 82
$    0 22
646 24
717 77
256 03
94 48
94 73
$   0 02
421 00
469 00
167 00
61 64
61 80
$   0 76
611 41
710 06
214 53
106 67
111 64
1918	
1919	
1914-17 inclusive (O.A.S.)	
19IS	
1919	
$2,312 35
$17 80
$46 72
$435 42
$11 04
$44 62
$2,747 39
$1,808 47
$233 07
468 59
48 81
16 27
16 27
$1,180 46
District
District
$222 50
447 40
46 59
15 50
15 50
$1,755 08
634 24
294 00
$10,240 17
928 24
$29 04
Pitt No. 1:
1919	
$11,168 41
67 88
total 	
Pitt No. 2:
$57 88
1918	
$296 34
64 21
55 44
20 98
20 98
1914-17 inclusive (O.A.S.)	
1918	
$60 86
1919..            	
$46 72
$44 62
$60 86
$783 01
$747 49
District
$1,004 95
$2,687 65
74 66
total 	
$2,762 31
Municipal.
Private.
O.A.S.
Capital.
Funded Debt.
Maintenance.
Capital.
Funded Debt.
Maintenance.
Capital.
Funded Debt.
Maintenance.
$2,515 50
$493 99
$2,982 31
$6,076 27
$2,241 84
$5,916 34
$926 61
$403 79
$927 33
Capital.
Funded Debt.
Maintenance.
$9,518 38
$3,139 62
$9,825 98
Total roll arrear  $22,483 98
Total tax sales..  2,143 01
Approximate interest accrued  5,509 00
Total outstanding-  $30,135 99
Land Sales.
A tax sale of land on which assessments for the years 1917, 1918, and 1919 were delinquent
took place on September 20th, 1920, when fifty-four parcels were offered and only one bid at the
upset price made.
General.
Pitt Dyke Breach.—Due to the flood in the South Lillooet River in the middle of November,
1919, a breach was made in the Pitt Meadows No. 1 Dyke, and as it was impracticable to close
it owing to the wet weather which ruled all winter, a certain further erosion took place during
the high water in January. Cultivation of this district was suspended for this year and pumping
not undertaken, but as it was feared that the freshet might enlarge the breach repairs were
made, which are reflected in the assessments for this district.
Repairs.—On account of high costs ruling, as little as possible was done in the way of
repairs, and much that needs a thorough overhaul has been left for a more favourable time.
Legislation.—Du April 17th an amendment of the " Dyking Assessment Adjustment Act"
became operative, changing the working of the Act in several minor respects and bringing the
Matsqui Drainage No. 1 into being as a work in the dyking district. J.:
■
Pr*.'l
j
■•-
":"f -    ■ :
>*
-.:.."; ;.V/   ;
*
Closing  Breach  in  Dyke,  Matsqui,  July  20th, 1920.  ^ssm^sfT^w^
Closing  Breach  in  Dyke,  AIatsqui,  July  20tii, 1920.  11 Geo. 5
Inspector of Dykes.
D 169
Matsqui Dyke Breach.—The high stage in the Fraser this year, greater than any since 1903,
when the Matsqui Dyke was new and the 1894 conditions fresh in memory, was maintained for
an abnormal period, with the result that the structure at low points became thoroughly sodden,
permitting excessive seepage and resulting in a breach at Wells Corner on July 20th.
The breach might have been serious but for the ready response of the surrounding country,
and a closure was effected with but minor damage to crops, though at considerable expense, due
to lack of plant. As the supply of sacks, supplies, etc., for the work was such as it was
impossible for me to check, I asked a small committee of owners in the district to act as an
audit committee to pass on claims which on approval were to be met by advances by the
Government; by executive authority the work, temporary and permanent, was made one under
the " Dyking Assessment Adjustment Act," with costs to be refunded over a five-year term.
A note of expenditures is added to the usual accounts.
The work of closing the breach, shown in the photographs, may have a practical interest,
and perhaps reassure those who discount dyked lands of the feasibility of holding a river in
the freshet stage.
Maple Ridge.—This district, in which a certain amount of drainage has been effected in
making roads, etc., shows signs of choking, and before the pumping plants can give their
maximum of benefit a comprehensive system of drainage must be carried out. As surveys
for drainage purposes have to.be very thorough, and should precede the actual work a season
or two, during which rainfall and run-off conditions can be observed, I trust that a mode may
be found to make this.area far and away more productive than it can ever be in its present state.
Funded Debt Contributions.—It will be noted that the year's contribution to the sinking
funds and retirement of the serial-bond advance in respect to Matsqui pumps, sluice, and
drainage are relatively low, which is accounted for by only figuring the benefit for the quarter
ending December, 1920, as all of these improvements will only demonstrate their efficacy in
the future years.
Land Values.—It had been hoped to give a brief reference to the current value of lands in
the different dyking districts, and an approximate idea of the areas under crop, that practically
ready for the plough, and that still under timber, but this information will not be available till
the end of the year;  this I trust to be able to refer to in a future report.
I regret to have to refer to the death of E. A. Wilinot, M.Can.Soc.C.E., which occurred on
September 4th, 1920, after twenty years' service in connection with dyking-works and fifteen
years as Inspector of Dykes.
Respectfully submitted.
John A. Wilson, A.M.E.I.C.,
Acting Inspector of Dykes.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1921. 

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