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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1921

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL EEPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS
FOR   THE
TEAR ENDING" DECEMBER 31ST
1920
PRINTED by
AUTHORITY  OF  THE   LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William H.  Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
'
1921.  To His 'Honour Walter Cameron Nichol,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I have the honour to present hereAvith the Annual Beport of the operations and
activities of the Railway Department of the Government of British Columbia for
the year ending December 31st, 1920.
JOHN OLIVER,
Minister of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., February 1th, 1921.  Report of Department of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1920.
Hon. John Oliver,
Minister of Railways, Victoria, B.C.
Sib,—I have the honour to submit a report dealing with the principal activities of the
Railway Department during the year ending December 31st, 1920.
The staff of the Railway Department consists of Chief Engineer, Assistant Engineer, Chief
Inspector of Rolling-stock and Equipment, two Assistant Inspectors, clerk, and two stenographers.
In addition to railways, the Department has control over the Songhees terminal improvemeut-
works and the maintenance and operation of the combined railway and highway bridge over the
Fraser River at New Westminster, with its railway and highway approaches.
The principal activities are set forth hereunder.
(1.)  CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY TERMINALS.
Construction of the above terminals has been continued throughout the year at Arancouver
and Victoria, and estimates have been approved by the Department for payment in accordance
with the provisions of section 7 of the " Canadian Northern Pacific Railway Terminals Act,
1917," from December, 1919, to December, 1920, inclusive, as under:—
December, 1919   $ 49,800 32
January, 1920        63,621 17
February, 1920       17,692 72
March, 1920        83,16S 79
April, 1920         35,486 40
May,  1920          38,058 71
June, 1920          36,481 68
July, 1920         6,371 78
August, 1920         78,606 9S
September, 1920        78,631 74
October,  1920           11,272 31
November,  1920          14,951 83
December, 1920       28,688 26
Total     $542,832 69
As noted in last year's report, the Arancouver terminal was opened for public business in
November, although considerable work had then and has still to be carried out.
As far as the Victoria terminals are concerned, the operations are at present confined to the
area north of the Point Ellice Bridge, where a five-stall engine-house, machine-shop, coaling-
station, turntable, and a temporary station and freight-shed have been erected. In addition
to the Victoria terminal works noted above, temporary use was granted in December to the
Canadian National Railways of a strip of land about 500 feet long by 30 feet wide running
south-easterly from Point Ellice Bridge. This strip of land is to be used as a right-of-way
for a spur line and a two-track car-transfer apron to permit transfer of cars to the Ogden
Point slip.
The position of the terminals is as follows:—
Terminal.
Estimated
Total Cost ol
each Terminal.
Proportion
of Estimated
Cost.
Total Cash
available
each Terminal.
Proportion
of Total
Work no\V
done.
Amount
now-
earned.
Retentions.
Amount
payable.
$4,308,455 10
2,202,601 50
1,213,424 62
353,988 89
209,908 29
863,125 00
0.4713
0.24095
0.13275
0.0387
0.0230
0.0933
$4,262,363 21
2,170,113 97
1,200,570 16
349,996 73
208,008 39
843,790 66
0.8508
0.83633
0.97881
0.8197
0.9846
0.2823
233,626,418 44
1,822,458 41
1,175,129 92
286,892 54
204.S04 68
238,202 20
S   492 65
83,507 69
"'260'66
$3,625,925 79
1,738,950 72
1,175,129 92
286,892 54
204,804 68
237,952 20
Totals	
89,141,503 40
1.00C0
$9,043,843 12
$7,353,906 19
$84,250 34
$7,269,655 85 (2.)   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILAVAY CONSTRUCTION.
(a.) On Vancouver Island, Mile 0-Mile 100.—Construction has been continued throughout
the year, and track has been advanced from the Koksilah River. Crossing, 52.5 miles from
Victoria, to Alile 74.0, a distance of 21.5 miles. This brings the line practically to the south
end of Cowichan Lake. Construction is proceeding and it is expected it will be continued
throughout 1921 towards Alberni.
(6.) Kamloops-Kelowna Line.—The Kamloops-Kelowna line leaves Kamloops and follows
up the South Thompson River, using the Canadian Pacific tracks for a distance of about 11 miles
to Campbell Creek Crossing. At this point the line leaves the Canadian Pacific Railway and is
graded for a distance of 58% miles to the vicinity of Armstrong, where there is still, however,
over a mile of line to be constructed to connect with the Okanagan Aralley branch line of the
Canadian Pacific Railway. It is very probable the latter company's tracks will be used from
this junction as far as Arernon, a distance of about 15 miles.
From Vernon to Kelowna, a distance of about 36 miles, the line is graded, and the 15-mile
branch, Arernon Junction to Lumby, with the exception of 1 mile, is also graded.
No track-laying or bridging has as yet been done on any of the lines.
The total expenditure to December 31st on these lines amounts to $4,127,028.17, and the
whole of the balance at the credit of this branch line account, amounting to $800,652.31, has been
released to the Canadian National Railways.
The total release made by this Department on this branch line account amounts to
$1,670,571.87.
(3.)  WESTAIINSTER BRIDGE.
In addition to the usual maintenance and repair-work carried out during the 'year, the
following special work was done:—
The work of rebuilding thirty-two framed bents on south trestle approach, commenced by
the Nickson Construction Company in November, 1919, was completed on Alarch 20th, 1920, when
the contractor moved his plant over to the east (Port Alann) railway trestle, with instructions
to renew all unsound ties and stringers in the thirty-nine pile-bents running east from the span
at highway under-crossing, a distance of 550 feet.
Arrangements for train-filling the remaining easterly 600 feet of this trestle were made with
the Construction Department of the Canadian National Railways in April, whereby the material
being excavated along the branch line into New AVestminster (at north end of bridge) was hauled
across the bridge and used for filling in trestle. As the yardage, however, fell short of requirements to connect up with the renewed portion of trestle, further arrangements were concluded
with the Operating Department of the Canadian National Railways for several train-loads of
ballast from their Rosedale gravel-pit, and the fill was finally completed in December. The
decking of the trestle above referred to had been in place for sixteen years, except for the
renewal of every third tie and the addition of two extra stringers in 1914.
Train-filling will eventually replace this trestle up to the highway under-crossing.
The construction of the new sidewalk, commenced by Cox <& A7erge during November, 1919,
was completed and opened for public use on Alarch 18th of the present year.
The new painting-machine, which arrived in December, 1919, was put to work in April, 1920,
with most satisfactory results, covering the major area of steelwork most urgently in need of
repainting and showing a vast improvement over the old method of brush hand-work.
During July tenders were called for the repair and partial renewal of the timber protection-
crib at swing-span pier, and the contract, which was awarded to the Fraser River Pile Driving
Company for this work on August 16th, was completed on November 24th following.
This structure has a length of 416 feet and contains 223 piles, from 75 to 90 feet in length,
which examination showed to be sound beneath low-water level, but badly rotted from that point
up to the top, a distance of 10 feet. It was decided, therefore, to remove the entire top portion,
using a 10-foot cut-off below pile-top elevation, and to rebuild the original superstructure with
dimension timber, including existing buildings, braces, sheeting, and sidewalk, all of which were
in a state of decay.
To guard against any " lifting " action from river-boats scraping along the sides of the pier-
protection crib, a W.I. strap was bolted to each outside pile and connected with the 12- by 12-inch
post above in a similar maimer. 11 Geo. 5
DEPARTAIENT   OF   RAILWAYS.
E 7
Two new piles were driven at point of up-stream nosing to replace a couple of the original
piles which had been broken off below water.
The tool-house and adjoining buildings have been rebuilt and roofed with fire-proof material
and the old stairway connecting crib-protection pier with railway deck of bridge has been
renewed.
The operator's platform in bridge tower has been widened and lengthened, relieving the
cramped- conditions hitherto existing and also giving towerinan access to south window, from
which the working of highway gates or approaching traffic on the river can -now be checked up
more conveniently.
The 2- by 4-inch edge-grain flooring laid during 1919 on the south trestle highway approach
is giving good results and wearing well under traffic, only requiring a periodic coating of hot tar
and sand for maintenance purposes.
The highway flooring carried by steel trusses consists of 4-inch wood blocks resting on
3-inch planking which is rapidly decaying, and a considerable amount of patchwork has been
necessary during the past year to keep the roadway safe for traffic. This flooring will have to be
completely renewed during the coming year.
The existing gates which protect highway traffic against opening of swing-span have not
proved efficient for this purpose on account of slowness in operation and inability to resist impact
of a moving vehicle without " buckling." Specifications for new gates were drafted and tenders
called for on July 30th, the contract being let to Frew & Fraser in September, but owing to
difficulties encountered in securing delivery of certain sections of the mechanism before the end
of the present year the new gates will not be installed before January, 1921.
The work of extending the signal-protection system on the east approach, south end, has
not yet been carried out. Negotiations as to this extension, however, are under way with the
railway companies interested.
The railroad traffic across the bridge for the year 1920 was as follows:—
Great Northern Railway Co	
Canadian Northern Pacific	
B.C. Electric Railway	
Canadian Pacific Railway	
-Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul
Northern Pacific Railway	
Totals	
Passenger.
Freight.
Mix
Trains.
Cars.
Trains.
Cars.
Trains.
2,361
1,482
3,257
7,100
17,666
10,078
9,019
883
1,574
1,595
19,813
24,198
14,378
3,732
96
122
62,339
158
1,618
750
36,763
4,052
2,526
Cars.
787
7,198
*2,116
* Dairy cars.
(4.)   SONGHEES RESERA'E.
The areas of the above reserve referred-to in last year's report as being leased to the
Cholberg Ship Company and the Harbor Alarine Company are still occupied by these companies.
Additional leases have been made as follows: (1) Sidney Roofing and Paper Company for
a term of twenty years at the rate of $450 per aere per annum; (2) B.C. Yacht and Boat
Builders' Company for ten years at the same rate as above; (3) Berquist Shipyard, temporary
lease, same terms.
In November of this year grading operations on the Johnson Street Extension, on Alston
Street, and on new roads running along west boundary of Canadian National terminal areas
were started. Inquiries are reaching the Department from time to time for sites for industrial
purposes. A large part of the area at present available is now under lease, and when the above-
mentioned roads are completed new valuable industrial sites will be open for lease.
(5.)  JOHNSON STREET BRIDGE.
After fruitless negotiations, extending over some years, a method of crossing the Inner
Harbour by a bridge at the foot of Johnson Street satisfactory to the City of Victoria, the
Provincial and Dominion Governments, and the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway was arrived at
last year, and a by-law was passed by the electorate of the City of Victoria on January loth last E 8 British Columbia. 1921
authorizing the borrowing of $420,000 towards the construction cost of the bridge. The total
cost of the bridge is estimated at $720,000, and towards this amount the Provincial Government
will contribute $200,000 and the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway Company $100,000.
The bridge, briefly, consists of two 73-foot deck-plate girders, one 110-foot deck-plate girder,
and one 150-foot Strauss-type bascule span which, when open, will leave a clear channel 120 feet
wide with 20 feet depth at low water. These spans will be carried on four concrete piers and
two concrete abutments.
Preliminary operations are under way to make an immediate start on the construction of
the substructure. No release of funds has as yet been made by the Government to the city on
this account.
(6.)  EQUIPA1ENT INSPECTION.
The following report from Chief Inspector Rae indicates what has been accomplished under
this heading:—■
Since the last annual report the volume of work has considerably increased. Several companies which had suspended operations during the war have resumed, thus making a careful
inspection of all their equipment extremely urgent, while many of the larger railways have added
materially to their former equipment.
Nine new logging-railways have been opened and the necessary equipment put in operation.
Sixty-nine railways have been inspected during the year, having a total mileage of S79 miles
and equipment consisting of 447 logging-trucks, 6S box cars, 649 coal-ears, and 149 locomotives;
this is exclusive of the equipment owned by the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, which is also
subject to inspection by this Department.
The expenses incidental to inspections in many cases have exceeded the fees charged for
inspection, but this seems unavoidable, as the work often entails several trips to the same
locality.
A great deal of time has been devoted to instructing and assisting railway companies to
equip their rolling-stock with automatic air-brake, M.C.B. couplers, and other safety appliances,
as demanded by the Department's regulations. Considerable progress has been made in this
respect notwithstanding the trouble experienced in getting the necessary supplies, but present
indications point to less trouble during the coming year, as larger stocks are now being carried
by local jobbers.
There has been a total of 105 locomotives inspected and tested during the year; seven being
found to be in an extremely dangerous condition. It was found necessary to condemn three of
these, as the age of the boiler prohibited the repairs necessary to make the locomotive safe for
operation.
I regret to report the failure of one locomotive boiler during the year, but this was directly
due to the negligence of the engineer and fireman in failing to maintain the proper water-level
and allowing the crown-sheet to become " red-hot." An investigation of the occurrence showed
all stays and stay-bolts to be perfectly sound, no defect of any kind being found in either the
material or workmanship of the boiler.
During the present year twelve new locomotives have been admitted into the Province, six
of which were constructed from designs previously approved under the " Boilers Inspection Act"
and six of which were constructed in conformity with the regulations of this Department. In
addition to the above, three second-hand locomotives (not built for use in this Province) were
secured from the United States, hut in each case an Inspector from this Department made a
rigid examination and determined a safe working-pressure at which the locomotive could be
operated before being transferred to the Province.
In compliance with articles 5 and 6, section 8, of the Department's rules and regulations, we
have insisted on the systematic removal of tubes to permit of a thorough internal inspection of
the boiler. Thirty-nine such inspections have been made in addition to the annual hydrostatic
tests, and many defects found which could not otherwise have been discovered. In five cases
these were of a very serious nature and rendered the boiler unsafe for operation until extensive
repairs had been made.
I regret that there are still a number of locomotives operating under the jurisdiction of this
Department which have not yet been inspected, but arrangements are being made whereby an
Inspector can visit isolated camps at the earliest opportunity. .    ' '7      ■'.'■',''■. ■
11 Geo. 5 Department op Railways! E 9
The wide territory to be covered (without being divided into districts) makes systematic
inspections of some small railways exceedingly difficult and expensive.
When the locomotives of such companies are operated by engineers holding certificates from
this Department, and if the monthly reports forwarded by these engineers contain information
which would justify an immediate inspection, arrangements are at once made to have an
Inspector make a special trip; but in general the aim is to have as many inspections as possible
made in the same locality at the same time.
During the year 177 applications have been received from candidates for locomotive
engineers' certificates. One hundred and sixty-two were successful in the necessary examinations, and these have been granted certificates conditional on their reporting all defects on the
equipment under their care on their monthly reports and all flagrant breaches of the rules and
regulations of this Department immediately to the Chief Inspector.
In addition to the work outlined above, twenty-eight drawings for locomotive boilers have
been examined, calculated, and corrected to conform to the regulations of the Department.
These drawings have been registered under a separate design number designated by the letter
" L " and marked with an approval stamp limiting the working-pressure of the boiler to that
found by our calculations. Each drawing has been accompanied by the manufacturer's affidavit
of construction (in triplicate), one copy of which is kept on the Department's file for comparison
with the completed boiler at the time of its initial test.
The following list shows a number of designs registered by the various companies manufacturing locomotives for use in the Province:—
Union Iron,Works (Climax Locomotive), Erie, Pa     11
Heisler Locomotive AVorks, Erie, Pa     11
Lima Locomotive Works, Lima, Ohio       3
Canadian Locomotive AVorks, Kingston, Ont       1
A'ictoria Alachinery Depot, Arietoria, B.C       1
A'ancouver Engineering Works, Vancouver, B.C       1
In addition to this, seventeen drawings and sketches for extensive repairs to locomotive
boilers have been approved, periodic inspections being made by an Inspector of the Department
during the time work was in progress.
A very great percentage of the above work has been carried out by two Inspectors, as a
considerable portion of my time during the year has been devoted to the equipment of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway.    This has occasioned several lengthy trips to Eastern trade centres at
a time when the demands for inspections by this office were extremely urgent.
The receipts for the year have been as follows:—
Engineers' examination fees    $   795 00
Inspection fees       3,143 05
Fees for calculating and registering boiler designs        593 00
Total     $4,531 05
(7.)  PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY.
(a.) North Shore Division—Maintenance.
River-protection work at the Capilano Crossing was continued by bringing in a steam-shovel
to excavate a channel through the gravel-bar lying immediately above the 'bridge, and after some
delays occasioned by frost, high water, etc., this work was completed in the middle of January,
giving the river-current a direct line of flow beneath the bridge.
In addition to excavating through the above-mentioned gravel-bar, a flexible timber dam
was built across the original river-bed to divert the low-water discharge of the Capilano into the
new channel, with most satisfactory results. The original protection-cribs have been improved
and extended with the object of filling in the area along the east bank eroded by floods during
previous years. This reclamation-work (carried out entirely by section-hands under supervision
of the Assistant Roadmaster) has so far successfully solved our most serious problem on this
division—viz., that of river-flood control with economic outlay.
The shovel was also used to clean out the slides which were blocking the line at Dundarave
Cut, Mile 5.5, and material excavated was hauled to Trestle No. 9 (at west end of cut) as train-
fill for this structure. E 10                                                  British Columbia.    . 1921
 I	
Bridges.
In January a bridge crew started work between North Vancouver and Aiahon Avenue,
renewing the bracing on pile-trestle bents and driving a few piles where most needed, as this
' section of the trestle is badly infested with teredos.
Upon completion of the above work instructions were issued for the renewal of the car-ferry
slip superstructure, including towers, apron, stringers, and ties, the latter being also renewed
along west leg of wye.
After the completion of above work at North A'ancouver the bridge crew carried out the
following repairs and renewals farther west, viz.: Repairs to westerly portion of North Aran-
couver trestle between car-ferry slip and Bewicke Avenue (Lyall's), where several caps bad to
be renewed owing to dry-rot at pile-heads.
Mile 2.85, Bridge 5.— (Capilano Bridge.) Two 100-foot through Howe-truss spans. Truss-
rods tightened;  general overhaul.
Mile 6.2, Bridge 10.— (Alarine Drive Crossing.) Fifty-six-foot D.P.G. steel span with framed-
trestle approaches on mud-sills.    Mud-sills renewed in eight bents ;  new sway-bracing to one bent.
Mile 7.8, Bridge 13.— (Great Northern Canneries.) Framed trestle on mud-sills and piles.
Foundation piling in eighteen bents uncovered and tops sawn off to sound-timber level, from
which framed pony cripple-bents were built up; mud-sills renewed beneath three bents, one new
post, and two sway-braces.
Mile 8.0, Bridge 14-—(Cypress Creek.) Framed trestle on piles with two 30-foot spans on
crib-work. Foundation piling in ten bents uncovered, sawn off, and built up as at Bridge 13;
sway-bracing renewed on three bents and mud-sill renewed at west bulk-head; crib piers in
creek riprapped and mattressed.
Mile 8.3, Bridge 15.— (Cypress Park Station.) Framed trestle on mud-sills and piles.
Foundation piling in seventeen bents uncovered, sawn off, and built up as at Bridge 13;
diagonal braces put in at 30-foot span above highway;   sway-bracing and sill renewed.
Mile 10.4, Bridge 17.— (Eagle Harbour AVest.) Framed trestle on mud-sills and piles.
Foundation piling in seventeen bents uncovered, sawn off, and built up as at Bridge 13; mudsills renewed under two bents, one new post, and sway-bracing.
Mile 10.7, Bridge 18.—Framed trestle on mud-sills and piles. Foundation piling in twelve
bents uncovered, sawn off, and built up as at Bridge 13; cedar blocking beneath sill renewed
at one bent.
Mile 11.0, Bridge 19.— (Nelson Creek.) Framed trestle on mud-sills and piles. Foundation
piling in thirteen bents uncovered, sawn off, and built up as at Bridge 13; wing-dam built at
up-stream end of west crib pier in creek and mattressing put in at 30-foot span.
Alile 11.36, Bridge 20.—Framed trestle on mud-sills and piles. Foundation piling in three
bents uncovered, sawn off, and built up as at Bridge 13.
In addition to the above work, .all bolts and nuts were gone over and tightened up, all new
timber treated with tar at the joints and track lined on each structure by the bridge crew;
drainage-ditches were also dug wherever surface water showed signs of collecting at the foundations of bents and undergrowth of brush cleared out. Between August and November, without
any delay to the heavy passenger traffic passing over the bridges, fourteen mud-sill and ninety-
pile foundations were renewed, a tribute to the efficiency of the foreman and small crew
employed.
The work above referred to was carried out under the direction of Assistant Engineer
Maciiityre.
The pile trestle between North A'ancouver Station and Bewicke Avenue, 3,C00 feet long,
should be'filled at as early a date as possible.
(b.)  Squamish to AVilliams Lake—AIaintenance.
Resident Engineer Livingstone reports as follows:—
The engineering services performed group themselves under three general headings—those
undertaken at the request of your office, those requested by the operating department, and those
of a routine nature in connection with ordinary maintenance. In the majority of cases those of
the last two classes, unless they were unusual or involved capital expenditure, were not reported
upon to your office. 11 Geo. 5 Department of Railways. E 11
On January 1st, 1920, a large fall of rock from outside of the right-of-way at Bridge 18.1
carried away 150 feet of the bridge, together with about 50 feet of track. The height of the
destroyed portion ranged from 3 to 55 feet. This portion of the bridge was rebuilt immediately.
Following this some uncompleted work on the new bridge across the Cheakamus River at Mile
19.1 was cleaned up.
Just prior to Christmas, 1919, arrangements had been made with the Northern Construction
Company to repair and reline Tunnel No. 3, in the Cheakamus Canyon, which had a short time
before caved in. This work was begun on January ISth, 1920, and completed on April 30th
under very trying and dangerous conditions.
Recurring slides at Aliles 1.7 and 3.5 north of East Lillooet, which had been a source of
constant trouble, were remedied by the construction of log cribbing. The mud-slides and settling
road-bed at Aiile 11.5, Lillooet Subdivision, were done away with by the installation of a system
of box drains of about 900 lineal feet in extent.    No trouble has occurred at that point since.
In February the car-washing plant at Squamish was completed and put in operation. This
wound up the work of Robertson & Partners, with the exception of the maintenance period, in
connection with the Squamish Hydro-electric, which expired June 15th, at which time that
plant was taken over in its entirety.
During the last spring and early summer 63 miles of track-chainage from Clinton north was
done. Beside the actual chainage and the marking of same on the rails, all structures, buildings,
etc., along the right-of-way were tied in and all mile-boards put up. The same was done in
connection with the chainage from Squamish Dock to Jlile-board 5.
Seven logging and mill spurs, one wye, and one siding were located and one spur was
extended, as follows: Green River Lumber Co., Mile 47.8, 180 feet; Spetch Sawmill, Mile 64,
180 feet; Sagimura Spur, Mile 24.3, 800 feet; Atina Ram Mill, Mile 68.8, 500 feet; Day Logging
Co., Mile 7.3, 1,800 feet; Lyon Lumber Co., Alile 30.3, 1,000 feet; and the Ross & Gordon Spur
at Mile 38.0. All of the foregoing have been constructed except the Spetch Alill and Lyon Lumber
Co. spurs. The wye was located on Birken Summit, Mile 75.2, and a sixteen-car siding at Aiile
62. The Stuart & Lake Shingle-mill extended their spur by a trestle across the mill-pond to
facilitate dumping bolts.    All of the foregoing spurs, etc., are on the Squamish Subdivision.
Surveys and plans were made of the Spetch road diversion, the Thurston & Flavelle
booming-grounds, an industrial site at Squamish for AJ. Carse, the ditches and flumes at
Lillooet Station grounds, the proposed diversion of the Middle Branch of the Squamish River,
and.in connection with correcting the drainage from the septic tanks at the company houses,
Squamish. In connection with the latter the changes proposed were carried out, since which
time there has been little or no trouble from these tanks.
A pole-line for a metallic circuit was staked from Squamish to the north end of the new
yards, and the following right-of-way fencing was also staked: Both sides, where necessary,
from the north bank of the Lillooet River at Pemberton to the south side of the Birkenhead
River at Alile 65.3; likewise from Alile 72.3 to Mile SO; and in connection with enclosing the
right-of-way and eating-house grounds at D'Arcy. Three-quarters of a mile of fencing was also
staked at the north end of the Short Portage.
Reports were made and extensive repairs carried out in connection with the damage done
to the Squamish Dock in June and again in August. Other reports and investigations at various
points on the line covered tie inspections at Cheakamus, Green Lake, Lough Raymond, etc.;
warehouse-site and road crossing at Pemberton; road crossings between Kelly Lake and Clinton;
flumes and fencing at Fountain Indian Reserve No. 3; the old trestle at the Gill booming-ground;
the Squamish dykes—in connection with which repairs are now under way; the Harbottle fence-
post cutting at Spetch Siding; water-shortages at D'Arcy and East Lillooet; the Cayoosh Creek
Trail; the Dickey-Jones Crossing, Atma.Rams Crossing; the proposed fencing from Alile 98.4
to Mile 100.6; the iron-ore spur; the proposed diversion of the Lillooet River; the pipe-line
crossing at the Green River Mill, etc. Reports accompanied by plans were also got out in
connection with the safety of the Gill building at Squamish for the Public Works; the valuation
of the Dixon residence, Squamish, for the Forest Branch; the car, Lillooet; the location of
the water-right and tank-gravity system, Pemberton; the tank-gravity system, D'Arcy; the
warehouse-site for Smedley & Sharpe at Squamish, etc.
In the latter part of September that portion of the road from Lone Butte to \ATilliams Lake
was taken over for operation.   In connection with getting out the new schedule, it had been E 12
JRITISH   (JOLUMBIA.
1921
noted that there were many errors in mileage on the old schedule. All stations, yard limits,
sidings, spurs, wyes, water-tanks, tunnels, etc., between Squamish and Clinton were checked
for the Operating Department for correct mileage as indicated by the track-chainage on the rails.
The annual fall bridge inspections were begun in October at Williams Lake and carried
southward to Squamish as the opportunity and weather permitted. This inspection has been
much more thorough than it was possible to make in previous years. A full detailed report on
bridges and on cribbing between Squamish and AVilliams Lake is submitted.
Bridges between Squamish and Lillooet.
Bridge 0.0.—Squamish Dock. Pile-bents. Approximate size: Length, east side, 183 feet;
west side, 243 feet; width, 96 feet; loading-track and coal-bunker on west, 16 by 240 feet
additional. Pier shed and office, 57 by 108 feet. Building, deck, floor, timbers, braces, etc., O.K.
Dock badly damaged twice during year by piles scouring out. Sufficient piles redriven to make
structure safe. Now in fair shape, although two or three piles have since washed out and about
the same number have settled. Two old piles and a drift-log have lodged underneath and should
be removed.    Some shimming to be done.    Some settlement under coal-bunker.
Bridge 0.15.—Loading-track, Squamish Dock. Pile-bent trestle spur off dock approach.
Length, 735 feet; height, 20-30 feet (about 3 feet above high tide); number of spans, 49.
Braces on Bents Nos. 7 and 21 broken and one pile in Bent No. 41 split; foregoing to be replaced.
Several piles have settled, especially.at and near dock; should be shimmed. Line and surface
poor, especially near dock and main line; needs shimming and lining. Piles are of good size
and appear sound. B. & B. to make test borings for teredos. A few bolts are loose; others all
tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 0.2.—Ferry-slip at Squamish Dock. Pile-bent trestle with apron and tower at outer
end. Length, 1,020 feet, and apron ; number of spans, 66; height 20-25 feet (about 6 feet above
high tide). Trestle is spur off main line dock approach. Out of line and surface at Bent No. 15
needs shimming and lining. A few other piles here and there have settled and need shims.
Same notes re piles apply as in Bridge 0.15. Towers are in fair shape and the same applies to
the two protecting towers. Only two guide and mooring dolphins left. Dolphins and towers
were reinforced during past year. Other features O.K., but slip itself is of poor design and
difficult and dangerous to operate.    BrMge in general is tight.
Bridge 0.3.—Approach to Squamish Dock. Pile-bent trestle, 3,275 feet long; height 5-30
feet; number of spans, 218. Bents Nos. 12, 11, and 13 need'shims. Alignment between Nos: 39
and 40. Loading-track joins at Bent No. 47 and the ferry-slip at Bent No. 52. Out of line and
surface at Bent No. 63 and at a number of points between that bent and the shore bulk-head;
needs lining and shimming. One pile in Bent No. 174 damaged by rot; to be replaced. Other
notes re piles apply as in Bridge 0.15. Guard-rail bolts and a few bolts in deck loose; others
O.K. No check-rails on any of foregoing structures. Other features O.K. During past season
new piles were driven where required, the deck surfaced, the track lined, bolts tightened, and
general repairs effected.    Now in poor general condition as noted above.    Safe at slow speeds.
Note.—Loading-track, ferry-slip, and dock approach are, in general, in poor condition, but
safe to operate under slow orders. They cannot be maintained in proper condition until the
Middle Branch of the Squamish River is turned.
Bridge 0.97.—Old Howe Sound & Northern trestle; now filled in and no longer considered
as a bridge.    Length, 240 feet.
Bridge.—Newport Sawmill spur at Alile 1. Pile-bent trestle, consisting of log-dumping track
and spur-loading track off main spur. All repaired during past summer. Engines do not go
beyond head -block of loading-track. Length of main spur trestle, 635 feet (last 60 feet damaged
by fire which destroyed mill); height, 12 feet. Length of loading-track trestle, 270-feet;
height. 6 feet. Number of bents in former, 43; in latter, 18. AVaterway, mill-pond, O.K.
Timbers, braces, bolts, and other features O.K. for the purpose for which bridge is used.
Bridge.—Stuart & Lake Shingle-mill spur, opposite Alile 1.15. Framed-bent trestle on mud-
blocks. Length, 135 feet; height, 6 feet Standard P.G.E. construction, except ties and guardrails. Waterway, mill-pond, O.K. Number of spans, 9. Outside footing of Bent No. 5 washed
out and bridge settling at that point. Mill not operating, but owners have been notified to make
repairs, otherwise operation not allowed.    Other features O.K. 11 Geo. 5
DEPARTAIENT   OP   RAILWAYS.
E 13
Bridge 2.5.—Pile-bent trestle across slough between Squamish and Mamquam Rivers.
Length, 5S5 feet; number of spans, 39; height, 17 feet. Waterway, tidal, some drift to remove,
otherwise O.K. Width, 450. feet at high tide. Piles, barked fir, 14-17 inches, with up to 2 inches
of rot in those on dry land; those in water sound. All timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is
tight except for a few scattered loose bolts. Alignment (tangent) out from Bents Nos. 8 to 10,
and out slightly near north end. No check-rails or flanger sign-boards. Track off south end
fair;   off north end low.    Other features O.K.    Bridge in general in fair condition.
Bridge 3.6,—Pile-bent trestle over drainage-slough. Length, 45 feet; height, 15 feet;
number of spans, 3. Alignment (curve) O.K. Surface fair. No check-rails or flanger-signs.
Piles, 14-10 inches; some sound; others have iy2-2 inches rot; O.K. Timbers, braces, etc., O.K.
Bridge appears tight. Track on and off, low. Other.features O.K. Bridge in general in good
condition.
Bridge 4.2.—Pile-bent trestle over stream 2 feet wide (12 feet wide in flood). Length, 60
feet; height, 15 feet; number of spans, 4. AVaterway subject to scour. Riprap (south side
only) O.K. Piles, 14-18 inches. Alost are sound; others have rot to 2 inches; O.K. Bents Nos. 2
and 3 have had original ground surface scoured away to depth of 4 feet. Dirt at right side,
south end, and left side, north end, causing rot. To be cleared away and timbers bored for
soundness. One guard-rail damaged; to be replaced. Rot in- two or three ties; not serious.
Other than as noted, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment (tangent) O.K. Track on and off,
low.    Surface good.    No check-rails or flanger-signs.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 4.3.—Pile-bent trestle over dry waterway (during floods subject to violent flow from
Mamquam River). Length, 30 feet; height, 8 feet; number of spans, 2. Piles, 14-16 inches,
with iy2 inches of rot; O.K. Aliddle bent has had earth scoured away to depth of 4 feet.
Riprap is O.K.; more would help. This stream should be blocked off by fill on old main line
at gravel spur and by 60 feet crib on Alamquam River. All timbers, braces, etc., sound and O.K.
Bridge needs general tightening. Alignment (tangent) fair; surface good. Track on and off,
low.    No check-rails or flanger-signs.
Bridge J/.6.—Pile-bent trestle. Waterway, 6 feet wide, drainage-creek, O.K. Piles, 14-16
inches, with up to 1 inch sap-rot; O.K. Length, 30 feet; number of spans, 2; height, 6 feet
above water. Piles in water all sound. Bridge needs general tightening. Timbers, braces, etc.,
sound and O.K. Alignment (tangent) O.K. Surface O.K. Track on and off, low. No check-
rails.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 4.8.—Framed-bent trestle on pile footings in water and wet ground, except bulk-head
bents, which were originally of piles, now rotted and replaced by M.B. and new caps. Deck is
old Howe Sound & Northern standard (six 8 by 16 and two 6 byi 16 jack stringers, with 6 by 8
ties on 16 inches centres). Stringers and ties deteriorating rapidly. Posts, sills, caps, braces,
etc. (renewals not part of original structure), O.K. Alignment (tangent) poor. Surface good.
No check-rails. Track on and off slightly low. Bridge is in poor condition and being operated
under slow orders. Entire deck now (January, 1921) being renewed by one of P.G.E. standard.
Length, 45 feet;  3 spans, 7 feet high.    Piles O.K.
Bridge 5.4-—Framed-bent trestle on pile footings over slow-moving stream 16 feet wide and
3 feet deep, and which runs lengthwise of the bridge for ISO feet. Length, 195 feet; number of
spans, 13; height, 10 feet above the water. Originally all pile^bents as in the case with Bridge
4.8. Like that bridge, piles were cut off at water-surface for footings for new framed bents.
Piles large and sound. Timbers, etc., of bents sound, except three caps, which show signs of
rot. These are being replaced. Deck is old Howe Sound & Northern, and the same remarks
as to its condition apply as to that of Bridge 4.8. Alignment (tangent) poor; surf ace.poor.
No flanger-signs. Track on and off, fair. Bridge is in poor condition and being operated under
slow orders. Entire new deck of P.G.E. standard is now (January, 1921) being put on by
B. and B. gang.
Bridge 9.7.—Six 30-foot spans on log crib piers across Chee Kye River. Length, 180 feet;
height, 15 feet. AVaterway, 30 feet wide (150 feet wide in flood) ; swift mountain stream with
boulder bottom. Stream carries drift when in flood. Needs more heavy riprap against north
face of third pier from south, which is developing sap-rot. AVill be taken care of by auxiliary
sill. Bridge needs general tightening. Cribs still safe, but ends of logs showing rot. To be
repaired and made good by B. and B. One cross-tie in Pier No. 4 crushed, causing slight settlement and misalignment of deck; not dangerous; to be renewed. Ends of stringers at bulkheads appear sound, but will be bore-tested by B. and B.    Alignment (tangent) and surface fair, except as noted above. Track on and off, low. No check-rails. Other features O.K. Some of
bridge-seat sills replaced during year; others will be renewed when other work at this bridge
is under way.
Bridge 9.8.—Pile-bent trestle over dry waterway. Length, 45 feet; height, 15 feet; number
of spans, 3. Piles, barked cedar and fir of good size, with sap-rot to 1 inch; O.K. Both bulkhead caps need replacing. Other timber, braces, etc., sound. Ends of stringers at bulk-heads
will be bored for soundness by B. and B. gang to check visual test. Some bolts loose. Bridge
needs general tightening. Alignment (tangent) and surface fair. Some light shimming needed.
Track on and off, low.    No check-rails.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 11.6.—Pile-bent trestle across Tenderfoot Creek. Length, 45 feet; number of spans,
3; height, 12 feet. AVaterway, creek 10 feet wide, O.K. Riprap O.K. South bulk-head on M.B.
and shimmed; poor job; to be properly blocked. Timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Needs some retight-
ening. Piles, 14-16 inches. Those in north bulk-head have rot to 1 inch; others in water and
sound. Alignment (spiral) and surface O.K. No tie-plates or check-rails. No Hanger-sign at
north end.    Track on and off, low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 13.0.—Pile-bent trestle over dry swale. Length, CO feet; number of spans, 4 ; height,
9 feet. Piles, 12-14 inches, barked fir, with sap-rot of %-l inch; O.K. Rot setting in in
stringers at south bulk-head; same at end of one stringer at right side of bulk-head. Auxiliary
caps and ALB. needed at those points. Cap on Bent No. 2 needs renewing on account of rot.
Other timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Ties, 16 inches on centres. Alignment (spiral) fair.
Surface, low at right side of both south bulk-head and Bent No. 1. Bridge is tight. Track on
and off, low.    No tie-plates or check-rails.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 15.J/.—Across. Swift Creek Canyon. Deck Howe truss, 100 feet, with sixteen trestle
approach spans at south end and thirteen trestle approach spans at north end. Total length, 535
feet; number of spans, 30. Highest approach bent at south, 2% stories; at north, 1% stories.
North approach composed of framed bents on ALB. south as follows : First four are pile-bents,
next five are framed bents on pile footings, and last eight are framed bents on ALB. Towers
are framed on M.B. ALB. all O.K. Height of rail above water, approximately 80 feet. Waterway, Swift Creek, O.K. Track off south end, fair; off north, low. Alignment (curve) fair;
surface, fair. All timbers, ties, braces, posts, sills, caps, etc., in approaches and truss O.K. ■
Piles, 12-14 feet, with some rotted up to 3 inches (one completely gone, but sound pile alongside).
Some of these piles will have to be replaced this year by posts, M.B., etc. Bridge fairly tight.
Some tension members need adjusting. Compression members O.K. Castings, gib-plates, keys,
clamps, etc., O.K. Line and camber good. Some bottom chord-joints open. Other features,
including lateral connections, O.K.    Bridge needs routine overhaul.
Bridge.—Two 30-foot spans and log approaches across Swift Creek on Day's logging-spur,
and other log structures on same spur. These were inspected and found to be O.K. for the
purpose for which they are being used. This spur is now (January, 1921) about to be taken
up on account of completion of logging operations in that vicinity.
Bridge 17.3.—Framed trestle on AI.B. Length, 405 feet; number of spans, 26; height, up
to 2y2 stories. All spans are 15 feet, except one over old road, which is 30 feet. Waterway,
small creek through culvert, O.K. Timbers, braces, ties, guard-rails, etc., O.K. Alignment (tangent and curve) only fair. Surface, slight settlement in north half; needs shimming. Bridge
in general appears tight, but with loose bolt here and there. Track on and off, low. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 17.6.—Framed trestle on ALB. AI.B.'s hewed fir and cedar and O.K. Length, 345
feet; height, up to 2 stories; number of spans, 23. No waterway (dry gulch). Alignment
(tangent and curve) good, except at south end, where it is out. Surface good, except at south
end, where it-is low; to be remedied this spring. All timbers, braces, ties, etc., O.K. Bridge
is tight except for a few scattered bolts. Track off north, low; at south, high. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 17.83.—Framed-bent trestle at south portal of Tunnel No. 2. On ALB., which are O.K.
Length, 165 feet; height, 40 feet; number of spans, 11. Waterway, none (rock gulch).
Timbering, guard-rails, ties, etc., O.K. Alignment (curve) fair. Surface fair; has been
damaged at various times by falling rocks from overhanging basalt dyke. Bent No. 2 blocked
and shimmed on account of same and slutting of rock under old footings. Should be watched.
Now in fair shape.    Bridge appears tight.    Track on and off, low.    Other features O.K. 11 Geo. 5
Department op Railways.
E 15
Bridge 17.9.—Framed-bent trestle over rock gulch between Tunnels Nos. 2 and 3. Footings,
ALB., O.K. Length, 45 feet; height, 15 feet; number of spans, 3. Waterway, none. Timbers,
guard-rails, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface good. Track on and off,
fair.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.    General condition good.
Bridge 18.0.—A framed-bent trestle on M.B. across rock gulch at north portal of Tunnel
No. 3. AVaterway, none. Length, 225 feet; number of spans, 15; height, up to 2 stories.
Footings O.K. Timbers, braces, ties, etc., O.K., except two sway-braces and one diagonal broken.
South end partially filled with rock from caved-in tunnel and knocked out of line by same; needs
relining.    Surface O.K.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 18.1.—Framed-bent trestle on M.B. over rock gulch and rock-slide. Length, 615 feet;
number of spans, 41; height, up to 3 stories. Waterway, none. Footings O.K. Near centre
footings are on rock-fill supported by log cribs, now showing age, but still apparently safe.
This portion of bridge knocked out a few years ago by large rock-slide; still danger from same.
One hundred and fifty feet of south end destroyed on January 1st, 1920, by large rock-fall from
outside right-of-way; a few rocks have fallen recently, breaking 4 diagonals and splitting one
girt at from 150 to 175 feet from south end. Cripple batter-post, upper side of Bent No. 22, -
partly displaced by rock-ipressure. Above damage not dangerous, but will be repaired as soon as
possible. A couple of bents each way from No. 18 are low; will be shimmed. All timbers, ties,
braces, etc., except as mentioned, O.K. Many footings buried in rock. Bridge tightened eleven
months ago. Some bolts now loose. Alignment (curve) good. Surface low at centre. Track
on and off, little low.
Bridge 18.2.—Deck Howe truss, 60 feet., with six framed-bent trestle approach spans at
south end and one framed-bent trestle approach span at north end, all on ALB., across rock gulch.
Length over all, 170 feet; height of approaches, up to 1 story; number of spans, 8. Waterway,
none. Footings, posts, sills, caps, and braces O.K. Tension members good. End plumb-post
rods loose. Line and camber good. Braces and counters O.K. All other timbers in approaches
and truss O.K. Bridge-seats O.K. Lateral system O.K. Upper and lower chords O.K. Floor-
beams O.K. Stringers O.K. Bridge in general appears tight. Castings, gib-plates, etc., O.K.
Compression members O.K.    Track on and off, fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 18.3.—Framed-bent trestle on M.B. across rock gulch. Length, 150 feet; height, up
to 2 stories; number of spans, 10. Waterway, none. Posts, sills, caps, braces, ties, stringers,
etc., O.K. Footings O.K. Track on and off, low. Alignment and surface fair. Whole bridge
appears tight.    Other features O.K.    Bridge in general in good condition.
Bridge I8.4.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB. across rock gulch. No waterway. Length, 240
feet; number of spans, 16; height, up to 1 story and cripple. No waterway. Footings O.K.
One diagonal split and one broken near south end. Middle plumb-post in Bent No. 4 damaged.
All to be repaired. Other timbers, braces, ties, etc., O.K. Line and surface good. Track off
north end good;   off south end low.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 19.1.—Deck Howe truss, 130 feet, with nine framed-bent trestle approach spans on
M.B. at south end and five framed-bent trestle approach spans on M.B. at north end. Length over
all, 340 feet. Waterway, Cheakamus River (in canyon). O.K. Framed towers; short one on north
on rock shelf; three-story one at south on rock-filled timber abutment O.K. Highest approach
bent, 3 stories. Riprap O.K. All timbers, braces, etc., in approaches and truss O.K. Bridge
tightened and adjusted twice during year and in good condition. Alignment (curves) O.K.
Surface O.K. Bridge is 1 year old. Original bridge destroyed by forest fire. Tension members
need some adjusting. Lateral system O.K. Compression members O.K. Chords O.K. Castings,
gib-plates, keys, clamps, etc., O.K. Bridge appears tight and in general in.good condition. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 21.5.—Combined framed- and pile-bent trestle across stream. Length, 60 feet; height,
12 feet; number of spans, 3 (two of 15 feet and one of 30 feet). Waterway needs riprap at
upper side, south end of bridge, where bank is subject to scour. Timbers, braces, ties, etc., O.K.
Piles and footings O.K. Track on and off, fair. Alignment and surface fair. Bridge appears
tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 21.7.—Pile-bent trestle over mountain stream. Length, 60 feet; height, 12 feet;
number of spans, 4. Was damaged, but now repaired by thirteen new piles, one set of posts,'
and ALB. Timbers, braces, piles, etc., O.K. Bridge appears tight and in good condition. Line
and surface good.    Track on and off, fair.    Other features O.K. Bridge 24-1.—Over Cypress Creek. Deck Howe truss, 100 feet, with two trestle approach
spans at south end and three trestle approach spans at north end, all on ALB., which are O.K.
Length over all, ISO feet; height, about 40 feet above stream; number of spans, 6. AVaterway,
large stream, O.K. Track on and off, low. Ties, guard-rails, caps, stringers, posts, timbers,
braces, etc., in truss and approaches O.K. Bench and wing-walls O.K. Riprap O.K. Castings,
gib-plates, keys, clamps, etc., O.K. Floor-beams and bearings O.K. Tension members good.
Bottom chords O.K. Compression members O.K. Lateral connections O.K. Line and camber
good. Alignment (curve) good. Surface good. AVater-barrels, check-rails, etc., O.K. Bridge
appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 25:2.—At water-tank across small slough stream. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 30 feet;
height, about 5 feet. Original two spans, then four 7%-foot spans and blocked and shimmed;
poor job. Now repaired by the driving of fifteen new piles and the replacing of three caps.
Now in good condition. Waterway, small creek, O.K. New guard-rails on. Bridge is tight.
Piles O.K. Alignment (tangent) O.K. Surface good. Track on and off, low. No cheek-rails
or sign-boards.
Bridge 26.6.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB. and pile footings across low ground. Length, 405
feet; number of spans, 27. Fourteen bents on M.B. and fourteen bents on pile footings. Height,
up to iy2 stories full. Footings O.K. Piles of good size, some with sap-rot up to 1 inch; O.K.
Waterway, small brook, O.K. Track on and off, fair. Timbers, braces, ties, etc., O.K. Alignment (curve) good.    Surface good.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 27.0.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB. across Olive Creek. One skew span of 30 feet
rests on double-bent towers supported on rock-filled squared-timber cribs. Length, 315 feet;
number of spans, 20; height, up to 2 full stories. Footings O.K. Waterway, large stream
subject to floods, O.K. Track on and off, fair. Alignment (curve) fair. Surface fair. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Footings O.K. Bench and wing-walls O.K. Bridge appears tight.
Other features O.K.    Bridge in general in good condition.
Bridge 28.2.—Across top of Brandywine Falls and river. Deck Howe truss, 60 feet, with
three framed trestle approach spans at each end on ALB. Length over all, 150 feet; number of
spans, 7; height above river, about 60 feet. AVaterway, Brandywine River, about 30 feet wide,
O.K. Framed towers on cribs and sills O.K. Footings O.K. Track on and off, low. Ties, caps,
sills, posts, stringers, braces, timbers, etc., in truss and approaches O.K. Floor-beams, bearings,
etc., O.K. Riprap, bench, and wing-walls, etc., O.K. Castings, gib-plates, etc., O.K. Packing-
bolts O.K. Tension members O.K. Chords O.K. Compression members O.K. Line and camber
good.    Alignment (tangent) good.    Surface good.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 30.5.—Across North Fork of Cheakamus River; 125-foot through Howe truss, without
approach spans. Length over all, 125 feet; height, 15 feet; number of spans, 1. Waterway,
SO feet wide, O.K. Track on and off, low. Ties, guard-rails, caps, sills, posts, stringers, braces,
etc., O.K. Castings, gib-plates, keys, clamps, etc., O.K. Bottom chords O.K. Bottom chord-
joints, some open. Packing-bolts O.K. Floor-beams, stringers, and bearings, O.K. Tension
members loose; need tightening. Compression members O.K. Lateral connections O.K. Line
and camber fair. Bridge, except truss-rods, appears tight. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface
fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 32.5.—Framed-bent trestle, all on ALB., except eight centre bents, which are on large
cedar pile footings. Length, 300 feet; height, up to 2 stories and pile-bent cripple; number of
spans, 20. AVaterway, none, dry gulch. M.B. O.K. Piles have rot to 1% inches; O.K. A
number of bents on south half of bridge have 2-inch shims on M.B. Apparently original construction O.K. Paving and riprap O.K. Timbers, braces, ties, etc., O.K. Bridge appears tight.
Track on and off, slightly low. Alignment good. Surface fair. Other features O.K. Bridge in
general in good condition.
Bridge 33.75.—Pile-bent trestle across stream. Length, 60 feet; height, 9 feet; number of
spans, 4. Waterway, creek (30 feet wide in flood), O.K. Both bulk-heads are on ALB. and
both are low. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Riprap O.K. Track on and off, low. Alignment
(tangent) O.K.    Surface low at each end.   Other features, including tightness, O.K.
Bridge 33.8.—Across Aliller Creek. Pile-bent trestle (except south bulk-head on ALB.).
Length, 120 feet; height, 7 feet; number of spans, 8. AVaterway, large stream, O.K. Riprap
O.K. Piles large and O.K. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge appears tight. Track on
and off, low.    Alignment (tangent) O.K.    Surface good.    Other features O.K. 11 Geo. 5 Department of Railways. .    E 17
Bridge 34.3.—Across Miller Creek. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 135 feet; number of spans, 9 ;
height above water, 8 feet. AA'aterway, stream (20 feet wide and 5 feet deep when in flood), O.K.
Riprap O.K. Piles large and O.K. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge appears tight.
Alignment (tangent)  O.K.    Surface good.    Track off north end low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 38.1.—Across large slow stream at Rainbow Lodge. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 75
feet; number of spans, 5 ; height, 7 feet. AA'aterway, 35-foot stream to Alta Lake. Piles large
and sound. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge appears tight. Track on and off, low.
Alignment (curve) good.    Surface good.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 38.5.—Pile-bent trestle across dead slough. Length, 30 feet; number of spans, 2;
height, 7 feet. Waterway O.K. Piles large and O.K. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K- Bridge
appears tight. Track on and off, low. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface good. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 38.6.—Pile-bent trestle over dead-water slough. Length, 120 feet; number of spans,
S; height, 4 feet. Piles large and sound. Waterway O.K. Timbers, ties, etc., O.K. Track
on and off, low. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface good. Bridge appears tight. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 38.8.—Pile-bent trestle across dead-water slough. Length, 75 feet; number of spans,
5; height above water, 5 feet. Waterway O.K. Piles good size and O.K. Timbers, ties, etc.,
O.K. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface good. Bridge appears tight. Track on and off, low.
Other features O.K.
Bridge 38.9.—Pile-bent trestle over outflow from Alta Lake to Green Lake. Length, 90 feet;
number of spans, 6; height above water, 5 feet. AVaterway, stream 75 feet wide, O.K. Piles
good size and O.K. Ties, timbers, etc., O.K. Bridge appears tight. Track on and off, low.
Alignment (tangent) good.    Surface good.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 39.7.—Pile-bent trestle over swale. Length, 60 feet; height, 5 feet; number of spans,
4. Waterway, wet swale, O.K. Piles good size, % inch rot, O.K. Ties, timbers, etc., O.K.
Bridge appears tight. Track on and off, low. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface O.K. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 39.8.—Pile-bent trestle over swale. Length, 60 feet; height, 5 feet; number of
spans, 4. Waterway, wet swale, O.K. Piles good size, 14 inch rot, O.K. Ties, timbers, etc., O.K.
Bridge appears tight. Track on and off, low. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface O.K. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 40.0.—Pile-bent trestle over swale. Length, 60 feet; height, 5 feet; number of
spans, 4. Waterway, wet swale, O.K. Piles good size, 14 inch rot, O.K. Ties, timber, etc., O.K.
Bridge appears tight. Track on and off, low. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface O.K. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 40.5.—Pile-bent trestle across Fitzsimmons Creek. Length, 135 feet; number of
spans, 9; height, 6 feet above water. AVaterway, double, O.K. Piles large, some with % inch
rot; those in water sound. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Track on and off, low. Alignment
(tangent)  good.    Surface good.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 42-3.—Pile-bent trestle over portion of Green Lake. Length, 270 feet; height above
water, 6 feet; number of spans, IS. Piles of good size and sap-rot only in those in dry land;
those in water sound. Waterway O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Track on and off, low.
Surface O.K.    Alignment (tangent) good.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 43.5.—Across Wedge Alountain Creek. Pile-bent and log-pier trestle. Length, 90
feet; number of spans, 3 (30 feet each) ; stringers, 12 by 24; height, 10 feet. Bulk-heads are
pile-bents. Two log cribs, with bridge-seats, in midstream; same appear sound and O.K. Piles
are large and sound, showing sap-rot only. Timbers, ties, etc., O.K. Alignment good. Surface
O.K.    Bridge appears tight.    AAraterway O.K.    Track on and off, low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 43.7.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 30 feet; height, 10 feet; number of spans, 2.
AVaterway, creek 10 feet wide, O.K. Track on and off, low. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K.
Piles large and 1% inches sap-rot in end bents. Bridge appears tight. Alignment good. Surface
good.    Other points O.K.
Bridge 44-1-—Through Howe truss, 125 feet, over Green River.    No approaches.    Height, 10
feet;  number of spans, 1.    Waterway O.K.    Track on and off, fair.    Ties, guard-rails, stringers,
floor-beams, bearings, braces, and timbers in general O.K.   Castings, gib plates, keys, clamps,
etc., O.K.    Lower chord-joints O.K.    Tension members fair;   some need adjusting.    Floor-beam
2 E 18    _ British Columbia. 1921
anchor-bolts loose. Other than noted, bridge is tight. Laterals and compression members O.K.
Line and camber fair.    Tangent.    Surface O.K.    Other points O.K.
Bridge 48.4-—Across Soo River. Through Howe truss, 150 feet, with twenty-one framed-bent
spans on M.B. and thirty framed-bent spans on piles in south approach, and three framed-bent
spans on M.B. and one framed-bent span on piles in north approach. Total number of spans, 56.
Length over all, 980 feet. Alignment (curve and tangent) good. Surface good. Height above
w7ater, 30 feet. Height of approaches, up to 1 story and cripple. Piles large and sap-rot only
in those in dry ground. AVaterway O.K. Track on and off, fair. Ties, guard-rails, caps,
stringers, sills, posts, floor-beams, bearings, and timbers generally O.K. Pile towers O.K. Truss-
rods, some loose. Anchor-bolts of floor-beams loose. Except as noted, bridge appears tight.
Lateral connections O.K. Chords O.K. Compression members O.K. Bridge-seats O.K. Camber
fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 52.3.—Across 6-AIile Creek. Through Howe truss, 125 feet, without approach spans.
Length, 125 feet; height above water, 16 feet; number of spans, 1. Waterway O.K. Track at
south end fair; low off north end. Ties, timbers, floor-beams, bridge-seats, braces, stringers,
etc., O.K. Framed towers on M.B. O.K. Riprap O.K. Castings, gib-plates, keys, clamps, etc.,
O.K. Bottom chord-joints O.K. Chords O.K. Tension members, some loose; need tightening
and adjusting. Lateral connections O.K., but some poorly framed. Alignment (tangent) O.K.
Surface good. Compression members O.K. Bridge, except as noted, appears tight. Line and
camber good.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 53.6.—Pile-bent trestle over dry gulch. Length, 75 feet; number of spans, 5 ; height,
15 feet. Track on and off, low. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Piles, large cedar, sap-rot only,
O.K.    Alignment (tangent) O.K.    Surface good.    Bridge appears tight.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 57.1.—Pile-bent trestle over 1-Mile Creek (Pemberton). Length, 135 feet; height,
12 feet; number of spans, 9. Waterway, mountain stream subject to violent flood (120 feet
wide in flood) ; now flowing at south end of bridge; needs more riprap at that point. Stream
now 25 feet wide. Piles, 12-16 inches, all sound except in south bulk-head, where there is rot
up to 2y2 inches ; needs four new piles this summer. Bridge is tight. All timbers, ties, braces,
etc., sound. Track on and off, low. Alignment (curve and tangent) gobd. Surface good. All
other features O.K.
Bridge 58.0.—Across the Lillooet River at Pemberton. One 60-foot pony Howe truss, one
150-foot through Howe truss, and one 100-foot through Howe truss, with 189 pile-bent approach
spans at the south and five pile-bent approach spans at the north. Length over all, 3,220 feet;
total number of spans, 197; height, 17 feet. Track on and off, very low. Ties, guard-rails,
stringers, floor-beams, bridge-seats, caps, posts, braces, and timbers in general O.K. Towers are
of piles, sheated to protect against drift and ice; O.K. Piles, 14-18 inches, barked cedair. In
south approach piles are in wet ground, some with % to % inch of sap-rot. South bulk-head
low and needs one new pile in spring. In north approach bulk-head is on ALB. and is low, and
last pile-bent is temporarily blocked and needs new piles. Piles in north approach have rot to
iy2 inches. Piles in general in good condition. AA'aterway O.K.; 300 feet wide (350 feet wide
in flood). Riprap O.K. Trusses all tightened during year; now need a little adjusting. Many-
loose bolts in approaches; need a general tightening. Floor-beam anchor and packing-bolts
loose. Floor-beam anchor and packing-bolts in compression members. Four packing-washers
missing in lower chord, down-stream side, middle truss, third panel from south. Castings, gib-
plates, keys, clamps, etc., O.K. Lateral and compression members O.K. Some lower chord-joints
open. Chamber fair. Alignment (tangent and curve) good. Surface good, except as noted.
All other features O.K.
Bridge 58.8.—Pile-bent trestle over slough. Length, 60 feet; height, 16 feet; number of
spans, 4. Waterway O.K. All timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Some bolts loose. Bridge needs
general tightening. Piles are barked fir, 14-16 inches, with rot to 2% inches in end bents;
others sound. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface good. Track on and off, a little low. All
other features O.K., except no check-rails or plates.
Bridge 64-3.—Across Owl Creek. One 100-foot through Howe truss, with one pile-bent
approach span at each end. Truss on pile towers. Length over all, 130 feet; height, 15 feet;
number of spans, 3. Piles in towers, in riprap, and creek, and from such examination as could
be made, appear sound. Piles are 12-14 inches and in bulk-heads have rot to 2y2 inches. Track
on and off, slightly low.    Ties, guard-rails, caps, stringers, floor-beams, braces, bearings, and all 11 Geo. 5 Department op Railways. E 19
other timbers O.K. Wing-walls, cribs, and riprap O.K. Alignment (curve) and surface good.
Castings, gib-plates, keys, clamps, etc., O.K. Bottom chord-joints, many open, yM to % inches.
Chord packing-bolts tight. Trussed and adjusted during year. Some tension members need
readjusting. Needs general tightening, except as noted. Lateral connections O.K. Compression
members O.K.    Line O.K.    Camber fair, but a little uneven in spots.* All other features O.K.
Bridge 65.3.—Over Birkenhead River. Through Howe truss, 130 feet, with two pile-bent
trestle approach spans at each end. Length over all, 190 feet; height, 15 feet; number of spans,
5. Waterway, 110 feet wide, O.K. Track on and off, a little low. All on piles. Pile towers.
Piles in towers in riprap. Those that could be examined appear to have sap-rot only. Barked
fir, 12-16 inches. In approach piles rot to 3 inches. Need six new piles in spring, also ALB.
under north bulk-head. Ties, guard-rails, stringers, floor-beams, bearings, braces, caps, and all
timbers in general O.K. Riprap O.K. Castings, packing-bolts, gib-plates, keys, clamps, etc., O.K.
Bottom chord-joints tight. Tension members fair; need a little adjusting. Bottom chords, compression members, upper and lower laterals O.K. Alignment (tangent) slightly out on north
approach. Line and camber good. No tie-plates. Some stringer, guard-rails, and floor-beam
bolts loose.    All other features O.K.
Bridge 69.6.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 75 feet; height, 8 feet; number of spans, 5. Waterway, mountain stream subject to flood, scattered stream 70 feet wide. South bulk-head needs
riprap under bridge and wing-crib above before spring floods; this is important. Piles, 12-13
inches, all sound. Bridge tightened seven months ago; needs it again. All timbers and braces
O.K. Alignment (spiral) and surface good. No tie-plates. Track on and off, low. All other
features O.K.
Bridge 70.3.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 45 feet; height, 7 feet; number of spans, 3. \Arater-
way, scattered mountain stream 20 feet wide, O.K. Riprap O.K. Piles, 12-13 inches, iy2 inches
sap-rot in bulk-head bents. Good for one and a half years yet. Others sound. All timbers, ties,
braces, etc., O.K. Bridge needs tightening. Alignment (tangent) and surface good. Track on
and off, low.    No tie-plates or check-rails.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 71.3.—Pile-bent trestle across Pool Creek. Length, 45 feet; number of spans, 3;
height, 8 feet. AVaterway, stream 10 feet wide, 2 feet deep, O.K. Riprap O.K. All timbers,
braces, etc., O.K. Track on and off, low. Alignment (tangent) and surface O.K. Piles, 12-14
inches; in south bulk-head 2 inches rot; last two bents at north 3 inches rot. Bent in midstream sound. Needs three new bents driven this summer. No tie-plates or check-rails. Bridge
needs tightening.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 74-5.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 45 feet; height, 6 feet; number of spans, 3. Waterway, mountain streams 5 feet wide (40 feet wide in flood). . Needs riprap under bridge at north
bulk-head. Timbers, braces, etc., all O.K., except upper end of north bulk-head, cap, some rot
(not bad), and guard-rail at south end, right side split. Bridge is loose and needs general
tightening. Alignment (tangent) O.K. Surface a little low at centre. Track on and off, fair.
No tie-plates or check-rails. Crib O.K. Piles 12-13 inches; in bulk-heads to 2 inches rot;
others all sound.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 78.4-—Gates Ranch. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 60 feet; number of spans, 4; height,
6 feet. Piles, 12-14 inches; all sound except in bulk-heads, where there is 2 to 3 inches rot.
These should be replaced in spring. All timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Waterway, dry wash the
width of bridge-length, subject to violent floods, carrying great quantities of broken-rock debris.
Riprap and cribs now O.K., but need constant watching. Bridge is tight. Track on and off, low.
Alignment  (curve)   O.K.    Surface good.    Other features O.K.
Bridge'79.1.—Combined frame- and pile-bent-trestle. Originally all on pile footings. Length,
135 feet; number of spans, 9; height, to 1 story. Waterway, none, dry gulch. First two bents
at south and last three at north (including bulk-heads) are pile-bents, although south bulk-head
has M.B. also. All framed bents are on pile footings with auxiliary M.B. Piles on light side,
11-12 inches; rot setting in and new pile-bents should be driven in the spring. Bridge tightened
about eight months ago ; now working loose; needs general tightening. All timbers, ties, braces,
etc., O.K. Alignment (curve) O.K. Surface low at Bent No. 3. Track very low on and off.
Other features O.K.
Bridge 81.3.—Pile-bent.trestle across Anderson Creek. Length, 60 feet; number of spans, 4;
height, 7 feet above water. Waterway, slow-moving stream 30 feet wide and 3 feet deep, O.K.
Piles in bulk-heads good size, but with 3 inches of rot;  should be redriven in spring.    Others in E 20
British Columbia.
1921
water all sound. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment (tangent) and surface O.K. Track
on and off, very low. Bridge needs general tightening. No tie-plates or check-rails. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 82.4-—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 30 feet; number of spans, 2 ; height, 7 feet. AVaterway, stream 6 feet wide (•) feet in flood), O.K. Riprap O.K. Piles very small in bulk-heads
and badly rotted to 2y2 to 3 inches; needs new ones. In meantime B. and B. to put in temporary
blocks. Piles in water O.K. Bridge is tight. All timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment
(tangent) out. Surface O.K. Track on and off, very low. No tie-plates or check-rails. Other
features O.K.
Note.—All bridges between Bridge 82.4 and Lillooet were gone over by the B. and B. gang
after these inspections were made and the most urgent needs of each attended to. Vide B. and
B. report.
Bridge 83.1.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 45 feet; number of spans, 3; height, 5 feet. Waterway, mountain stream 40 feet wide. Riprap O.K. Cribs O.K. All timbers, ties, etc., sound and
O.K. Piles, 11-13 Inches, all in water except bulk-heads; sound. Those in north bulk-head are
new and sound; those in south bulk-head have rot to 2 inches. Track on and off, very low.
Alignment (tangent) and surface O.K. No check-rails or tie-plates. Bridge is tight. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 84-7.—Across Anderson Creek. Through Howe truss, 100 feet, with one trestle
approach span at south end and two trestle approach spans at north end. All on piles. Length
over all, 145 feet; number of spans, 4; height, 12 feet. Waterway, 30 feet wide (100 feet in
flood), O.K. Riprap, crib, and wing-walls O.K. Pile towers; piles in same sound. Piles, 12-13
inches. Those in bents and bulk-heads (in dry ground) have rot to 2% inches; should be
replaced in spring. All timbers throughout sound and O.K. Braces O.K. Line and camber
good. Alignment (tangent) out slightly on north approach. All chord-bolts are tight. Floor-
beam and stringer-bolts loose. Some tension members and lateral rods loose. Except as noted,
whole bridge needs tightening, which will be done within the next two weeks (November). No
tie-plates. Castings, plates, splices, bearings, etc., O.K. Lower chord-joints fairly tight. Compression members O.K.    Track on and off, fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 87.8.—Framed-bent trestle. Original bridge here carried out by slide. Bridge is
comparatively new. Round posts, most 14-16-inch cedars, on combined M.B. and pile footings.
Needs four or five more ALB. Length, 60 feet; number of spans, 4 ; height, 16 feet. Waterway,
mountain stream 4 feet wide, O.K. First bent out from each end have one batter-pile each.
Piles have rot to 2y2 inches. All timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Rail next
hillside is shimmed. N.G. shims should be taken out and deck shimmed as follows: At centre
bent, % inch; next north, 1% inches; and north bulk-head, 2 inches. Alignment (curve) good.
Surface out as noted.    No tie-plates or check-rails.    Track on and off, low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge S8.4I.—Deck Howe truss, 60 feet, with one 15-foot approach span at south end and
one 12-foot approach span at north end. Whole bridge on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 87 feet;
number of spans, 3; height, about 25 feet above water. Waterway, rock gap, and portion of
Anderson Lake O.K. All timbers, ties, braces, etc., throughout, sound and O.K., except south
end of lower chord, next hillside, which is covered by dirt-slide and in which skin-rot has taken
place; not dangerous. Section gang instructed to clear away debris. All packing-bolts in truss
are tight. Floor-beam, stringer, and guard-rail bolts loose. Two or three truss-rods on slack
side. Span needs trussing up. Compression members O.K. Castings, plates, etc., O.K.
Bearings O.K. Lateral connections O.K. South end bulk-head rests on log crib, which is O.K.
Line and camber good. Surface O.K. Alignment (curve) O.K. Track on and off, low. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 88.46.—Framed-bent trestle on M.B., which are O.K. Length, 120 feet; number of
spans, 8; height, 30 feet. Waterway, none. Danger here from falling rocks. Alignment (curve)
and surface good. One diagonal broken. All other timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Few bolts loose,
otherwise bridge tight. Track on and off, low. North bulk-head on log crib O.K. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 88.9.—Should be 88.93. Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 150
feet; number of spans, 10; height, 1 story- AVaterway, none. Alignment (curve) and surface
O.K.    Track on and off, fair.    Two sway-braces split, not serious, but should be replaced.    Other 11 Geo. 5
Department op Railways.
E 21
timbers, ties, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. North bulk-head rests on rock-filled crib, which is O.K.
Except as noted, bridge is in good condition.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 89.77.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K., except couple which were buried
at north bulk-head and are rotting. Outer end of cap at same point rotting. Neither dangerous
nor urgent, but should have new blocks and cap in near future. Some footings at south end
covered by slide. Length, 135 feet; number of spans, 9; height, 30 feet. Waterway, small
mountain stream 3 feet wide, O.K. Timbers, ties, etc., other than as noted, O.K. Bridge is tight.
Track off south end low.    Alignment (tangent) and surface good.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 89.1.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 285 feet; number of
spans, 19; height, 1% stories. Waterway, none, rock gap. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K.
Bridge is tight. Signs, water-barrels, check-rails, and other features O.K. No tie-plates on
tangent portion. Alignment (tangent and curve) and surface O.K. Track on and off, low.
Bridge in general in good condition.
Bridge 89.5.—Framed-bent trestle on M.B., which are O.K. North bulk-head is on log rock-
filled crib, which is O.K. Length, 210 feet; number of spans, 14; height, 1 story and cripple.
Waterway, none. Some dry-rot in cap and M.B. at north bulk-head; not serious, but should
have new cap and two or three M.B. in near future. Danger here from falling rock. Couple
of bents partly removed and some rock shot down during past summer; should be watched.
Timbers, ties, braces, etc., other than as noted, O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) and
surface good. Track on and off, low. Other features O.K. Other than as noted, bridge is in
good condition.
Bridge 89.9.—Should be 89.96. Framed-bent trestle on M.B., which are O.K. Grasshopper
bents. Length, 120 feet; number of spans, 8; height, 25 feet. No waterway. Track high at
south and low off north end. One guard-rail with short piece of dry-rot. All other timber, ties,
etc., O.K. and sound. Alignment (tangent) and surface good. South bulk-head on rock-filled
crib O.K.    Bridge tight.    Condition O.K.    Other points O.K.
Bridge 90.2.—Framed-bent trestle on M.B., which are O.K. Length, 225 feet; number of
spans, 15; height, 2 stories and cripple. No waterway, rock gap. Track on and off, good.
Alignment (tangent) and surface good. Alany footings next to hillside covered by rock-slide.
Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Other features O.K. General condition of
bridge is good.
Bridge 91.5.—Pile-bent trestle across AleGilvary Creek. Length, 120 feet; number of spans,
8; height, 15 feet. Waterway, stream 30 feet wide, badly jammed with drift, which should be
cleaned out. Track on and off, low. Alignment (curve) and surface good. Ties, timbers, braces,
etc., good. Piles, 12-17 inches; those in dry ground on south side have rot to 3 inches; those
on north to 1 inch. Bent No. 2 needs new piles and for present two posts and M.B. Embankment under north end stuffing. Needs three 3 by 10 planks as sheeting on next to last bent to
hold toe of fill, then small three-log crib at bulk-head and sheet bulk-head piles to hold embankment (this now done). Piles in water sound. Bridge is tight and, other than as noted, is in
good shape.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 93.5.—Over Roaring Creek. Pony Howe truss, 60 feet, with one pile-bent trestle
approach span at each end. Length, 90 feet; number of spans, 3; length over all, 90 feet;
height, 12 feet. Waterway, 30 feet wide, mountain stream, O.K. Track on and off, low.
Alignment (curve) and surface good. Ties, guard-rails, stringers, floor-beams, bearings, caps,
braces, and all timbers in general O.K. Piles, 12-16 inches; 2 to 3 inches rot in bulk-head and
south tower idles, others (north tower) sound. New piles should be put in bulk-heads and ALB.
under south tower this season. Bridge in general is tight and superstructure O.K. Tension
and compression members O.K. Lateral connections O.K. Camber fair. Castings, gib-plates,
etc., O.K.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 93.9.—Should be 93.94. Framed-bent trestle on M.B., which are O.K. Length, 210
feet; number of spans, 14; height, 1 story and cripple. No waterway. One girt shattered and
one rotteii tie. Posts and M.B. in five bents covered by rock-slide. Except as noted, all timbers,
ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface good, except at
south bulk-head, which is low and should be shimmed.    Track oil and off, low.    Other points O.K.
Bridge 94-0.—Should be 94.05. Framed-bent trestle on M.B., which are O.K. Length, 150
feet;  number of spans, 10;  height, up to 1% stories.    Waterway, none.    Track on and off, low. E 22 British Columbia. .1921
Alignment (curve and tangent) good.    Surface good.    All ties, timber, braces, etc., O.K.    South-
bulk-head on crib, which is O.K.    Bridge in good condition.    Other points O.K.
Bridge 94.02.—Should be 94.1. Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 90
feet; number of spans, 6; height, up to 1 story and cripple. No waterway. All timbers, ties,
braces, etc., O.K., although some timbers are scarred by falling rock and others sun-checked and
warped. Bridge is tight. Alignment (reverse spirals) fair. No tie-plates. Track on and off,
fair.    Surface fair.    Bridge in general in good condition.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 94.6.—Framed trestle on M.B., which are O.K. Length, 90 feet; number of spans, 6;
height, up to 1 story and cripple. AVaterway, none; small springs. Track on and off, a little
low. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K., although a light skin-rot appears at bottom of a few
batter-posts. Alignment (tangent) poor. Surface fair. Bridge in general in good condition
and tight, although a few bolts are loose.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 95.0.—Should be 95.03. Pony Howe truss, 60 feet, with two pile-bent approach spans
at each end. Across Lake Creek. Length, 120 feet; number of spans, 5; height, 15 feet.
AVaterway, mountain stream 6 feet wide, O.K. Track and approaches O.K. Alignment (tangent
and curve) and surface O.K. Tension members tight. Castings, gib-plates, etc., O.K. Laterals
O.K. Compression members O.K. Ties, guard-rails, stringers, floor-beams, bridge-seats, caps,
posts, braces, and timbers in general O.K. Water-barrels, cheek-rails, etc., O.K. Piles, 10-16
inches; some with sap-rot to 3 inches. Some new posts and blocks needed soon to replace piles
in south tower. One bent in north approach is framed on piles, had settled, and is blocked
and shimmed. Work done by section-gang. Temporary job and should be properly blocked by
B. and B. (Later: Both of above jobs done by B. and B.) Bridge is tight. Line and camber
good.   All other features O.K.
Bridge 98.0.—Should be 98.04. One 20,foot span on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 20 feet;
number of spans, 1; height, 8 feet. Waterway, edge of Anderson Lake, O.K. Alignment
(curve) and surface O.K. All timbers, ties, etc., O.K. Track on and off, fair. No check-rails.
Bolts loose (now tight).    Bridge in-good condition.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 99.4-—One 30-foot span on M.B. Length, 30 feet; number of spans, 1; height, 3
feet. Waterway, edge of Anderson Lake, O.K. All ties, timbers, ALB., etc., O.K. Bolts loose.
Alignment (curve) fair (of track at north end poor). Surface good. No check-rails. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 100.6.—Pile-bent trestle across outlet, lower end of Anderson Lake (Portage River).
Length, ISO feet; number of spans, 10 (two are 30 feet each) ; height, 12 feet. Waterway,' 120
feet wide, O.K., although considerable trouble here at times with drift. All timbers, ties, braces,
etc., O.K. Bolts loose. (Later: Tightened.) Alignment (curve) can be improved, especially
at north end. Surface deck needs shimming in several places. Track on and off, low. One
broken tie. Piles, 12-16 inches ; those in water sound. Some in bulk-heads have rot to 3 inches.
Need new ones this year.    All other features O.K.
Bridge 101.3.—Over Portage River at Seton. Slow prder on this bridge. Leave same on
until repaired. Pile-bent trestle with one 30-foot span at centre. Length, 225 feet; number
of spans, 14; height, 22 feet. Waterway, 50 feet wide (100 feet in flood). Stream hits bridge
at angle and drift inclined to lodge and damage structure. Has done so in past (should have
been 100-foot truss here). Original bent at north end of 30-foot span damaged. Repaired by
new piles; very poor job. Poorly shimmed and blocked. New pile tower to be put in this year
and whole bridge put in good condition. Piles, 10-14 inches. Those in dry ground have rot to
2 inches; others sound. Eight new piles required in north tower and two in next bent north
(40-footers). Ties, timbers, etc., O.K. Bridge is loose. (Later: Bridge tightened and track
lined.) Alignment (tangent) only fair. Surface only fair. No tie-plates. Log crib just above
bridge would help.   Track on and off, low.   Other features O.K.
Bridge 103.1.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 75 feet; number of
spans, 5; height, 2 stories. Waterway, none; dry rock gap subject to rock-falls. Both bulkhead caps on rock-filled cribs, which are O.K. Both bulk-heads have been shimmed up, but are
still low. (Later: Bridge tightened and bulk-heads reshimmed.) Ties, braces, timbers, etc.,
O.K., but some being scarred and chewed by rock-falls. Track on and off, low. Bridge-bolts
loose (see above). Alignment (curve) O.K. Surface low at ends (see above). All other
features O.K.   Track on and off, low. 11 Geo. 5 Department op Railways. E 23
Bridge 103.43.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 30 feet; number of
spans, 2; height, 15 feet. Waterway, none. North bulk-head rests on log crib, which is O.K.
Timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is loose. (Later: Tightened.) Needs proper shimming.
Alignment (tangent) O.K. Surface good. No tie-plates or check-rails. All other features are
O.K.    Track on and off, low.
Bridge 103.47.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K., except outside M.B. in Bent
No. 10, which needs blocking. Both bulk-heads rest on rock-filled log cribs, which are O.K.
South bulk-head rests on same crib that supports north bulk-head of Bridge 103.43. Bulk-heads
have settled and need blocking up. (Later: Done.) All ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K., except
one tie broken and one sway-brace split. No tie-plates except at south end. Alignment (tangent
with curves at both ends) only fair. Surface good, except low bulk-heads (see above). Bridge
is loose.    (Later:   Lined and tightened.)    All other features O.K.    Track on and off, low.
Bridge 107.2.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 60 feet; number of spans, 4; height, 7 feet.
Waterway, dry wash, subject to floods, carrying quantities of broken rock, O.K. Piles, 14-16
inches, barked fir, which in bulk-heads have rot to 3 inches. To be redriven this spring.
Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment (spiral) O.K. Surface good. Bridge loose. (Later:
Tightened.)    No check-rails or tie-plates.    Track on and off, low.    All other features O.K.
Bridge 108.0.—Should be 108.1. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 60 feet; number of spans, 4;
height, 15 feet. Waterway, stream iy2 feet wide, O.K. Piles, 13-16 inches. Aliddle bent in
water sound. Other piles have to 2% inches of rot. New piles should be driven next year.
Ties, timbers, etc., except one stringer at south end on left and right end of cap at north
bulk-head, which shows some rot, but not to degree of needing immediate replacement. Bridge
is loose. (Later: Tight.) Alignment (tangent) and surface O.K. No tie-plates or check-rails.
Track on and off, low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 108.7.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 30 feet; height, 8 feet; number of spans, 2.
AA^aterway, 4-foot stream, O.K. Piles, 12-16 inches. Centre bent in water; piles sound. Other
piles rotted up to 3 inches; still safe. Timbers, braces, etc., O.K. No check-rails. Track on
and off, low.    All other features O.K.    .
Bridge 109:9.—Framed trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 195 feet; number of spans,
13; height, up to 1 story and cripple. Waterway, none. Subject to damage by recurring rock-
slides. Many footings and lower ends of posts buried in rock-slide. Bridge was repaired and
tightened during past year. Now appears tight and in good condition. Alignment (curve and
tangent) only fair. Surface fair. Track on and off, low. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. All
other features O.K.
Bridge 110.1.—Framed-bent trestle on M.B., which are O.K., except as noted below. Length,
135 feet; number of spans, 9; height, up to 1 short story and cripple. Waterway, none; dry
gulch subject to rock falls and slides. Two diagonals broken and one sway-brace split. Bridge
tightened about five months ago and a few bolts now loose. South bulk-head bent and Bent
No. 1 low and shimmed. Need new ALB. and proper blocking and shimming. (Later: Reported
that bridge tightened and above repairs effected.) Some of footings and posts buried in rock-
slide. Alignment (curve), except at south end, fair. Surface good. Track low on and oft,
especially south end, which is bad. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K., except as noted. All other
features O.K.
Bridge 111.1.—Framed-bent trestle On ALB., which are O.K., except last three bents at north,
which are pile-bents. Length, 240 feet; number of spans, 16; height, 1 story and 8-foot cripple.
AA'aterway, none. Piles, 12-16 inches, barked fir, with l1^ to 1% inches sap-rot. In first pile-
bent at north one pile damaged. Should have two posts in this bent. Some footings along upper
side covered by slide, O.K. Two sway-braces split and dry-rot in end of one girt. Otherwise
all timbers, ties, etc., O.K. Bridge is loose. (Later: Reported tight.) Alignment (tangent)
slightly out at centre. Surface fair. Track on and off, low. No flanger-sign at north. No tie-
plates.    All other features O.K.
Bridge 115.08.—Trestle pile-bent (?). Length, about 60 feet; height and number of
spans ('!)■ Waterway completely filled up by' slide and only signs of bridge left are portions
of chewed-up guard-rails and flanger-signs. Alignment (tangent) very poor. Surface very poor.
Track on and off, low.    Structure not now considered as bridge.
Bridge 118.0.—Across Seton River. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 150 feet; number of spans, 9
(one of which is 30 feet) ; height, 18 feet.   Waterway, 100 feet wide and about 3 feet deep, O.K., 	
E 24 British Columbia. 1921
although some drift lodged and should be removed. Alignment (curve and tangent) out. Out of
surface. These defects probably due to effects of drift. (Later : Reported lined and shimmed.)
Two piles near north settled. North bulk-head dirt has caved out. Has been cribbed; poor job.
To be corrected by inserting plank at bottom and refilling. Piles, 12-14 inches, barked and in
good condition. All timbers, ties, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Track on and off, low. Other
points O.K.    This bridge should have had 100-foot truss.
Bridge 118.1.—Across Cayoosh Creek. Through Howe truss, 100 feet, with one pile-bent
trestle approach span at each end. Length, 130 feet; number of spans, 3; height, 10 feet.
Waterway, 80 feet wide and 3 feet deep; O.K. except at south pile tower, which needs more
riprap. Towers are pile. Piles, 14 inches, barked. Skin-rot in some. New bulk-head driven at
south last summer. Some rot in north bulk-head. Track on and off, good, but new ties needed
in track north and south. Ties, guard-rails, stringers, floor-beams, seats, caps, braces, truss-
timbers, etc., O.K. Castings, gib-plates, keys, clamps, etc., O.K. Some truss-timbers warped.
All bolts, except floor-beam anchors, tight. Tension-rods -tight, except two slack. Lower chord-
joints, two or three open a knife-blade thickness. Line O.K. Camber fair, but a little uneven.
B. and B. report cannot improve. Lateral connections O.K. Compression members O.K.' Alignment  (tangent) and surface good.    All other features O.K.
Bridge 120.6.—Across the Fraser River at Lillooet. Two 130-foot and four 150-foot deck
Howe trusses, with seventy-five trestle approach spans at south end and forty-three trestle
approach spans at north end. Length over all, 2,630 feet; number of spans, 124; height, about
60 feet above river; height of south approach, up to 2 stories; height of north approach, up to
1 story and eripple. Waterway, river about 800 feet wide at low; O.K. except at north abutment
(see below). Approaches originally all framed bents on pile-bents or pile footings, many of
which have been replaced during year by M.B. and sills and posts on account of rot in piles.
Those on north shore, in chocolate soil, are the worst. Some piles went at ground surface;
others settled and crushed at depth of about 6 feet below surface. Afore now showing signs of
same trdxible. Piles all sizes, with varying degrees of rot. During past year following renewals
put in: 270 ALB., eighty-seven pieces for sills, pony-bent at north bulk-head. At same time
following routine work and repairs effected; Ave bents jacked up and blocked, track-lined
and shimmed three times, and all bolts, truss-rods, etc., in trusses and approaches tightened and
adjusted. Whole bridge now tight and well adjusted and in good condition as to superstructure,
and not dangerous at present as to footings. These old footings, however, should all be replaced
this year. Bridge will then be in first-class shape throughout. Alaterial needed for footing
renewals, 18,500 B.M. of stock from East Lillooet, 100,324 B.AL new timber (a total of 118,824
B.AL), 1,100 drift-bolts, 400 bolts and nuts, 750 O.G. washers, 2,000 8-inch spikes, 2,300 12-inch
spikes, and 4,500 6-inch wire nails. Labour, two carpenters and two labourers. Can be handled
by B. and B. Estimated cost, $5,000, including labour, material, and loading and unloading.
Trusses supported on framed towers on piles in rock-filled timber cribs, except north tower,
which is of piles in crib. Cribs and piles at towers apparently O.K. More riprap and log crib-
toe wall urgently needed at north abutment. Alore riprap will also probably be needed at Pier
No. 6, which is subject to scour. All ties, stringers, floor-beams, bearings, caps, posts, sills,
braces, truss-timbers, and all timbers in general O.K. Upper and lower chords, lateral connections, tension and compression members, castings, plates, keys, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight and
in good adjustment. Line and camber good. Alignment (tangent with curve off north approach)
fair, except out slightly at Truss No. 6 and at fifth bent north of north abutment. Surface fair;
except at latter point, low; (Later: Reported corrected.) Track on and off, low. All other
features O.K.
Bridges on the Lillooet Subdivision (East Lillooet to Williams Lake).
Bridge 1.7.—Pile-bent trestle over dry sand-slide. Length, 150 feet; number of spans, 10;
height (on lower side), 12 feet. Piles, 12-14 inches, barked fir, with dry-rot to 2y2 inches. On
lower side ground has slid away to depth of 3 feet. To prevent further sliding there are now
four retaining-walls below bridge. All O.K. except lowest one, where recent cave-under threatens
those above. To be repaired by log wall 20 feet long and 4 feet high. Material on ground.
Eighteen new piles needed this year. Timber, ties, etc., O.K., except one broken diagonal.
Waterway, none. Water-barrels, guard-rails, check-rails, flanger-signs, etc., O.K. Alignment
(reverse spirals) and surface good.    Track on and off, low.    All other features O.K. 11 Geo. 5
Department op Railways.
E 25
Bridge 4.7'—Combined pile- and framed-bent trestle across moving slide. Length, 330 feet;
number of spans, 22; height, up to 1 story and cripple. First three and last three bents are
pile-bents; others are framed bents on pile footings. Waterway, none. Piles, 12-16 inches,
unbarked cedar, with % to 1% inches sap-rot; O.K. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K., except
one broken diagonal. (Many posts along bottom at upper side have corners chewed off by
rocks, now protected by fenders; O.K.) Bridge is tight. Alignment (tangent and curve) and
surface good. Track on and off, a little low. Flanger-sign at south end broken down. Other
features O.K. '
Bridge 9.3.—Combined framed- and pile-bent trestle across Fountain Creek. Length, 480
feet; number of spans, 31 (including one of 30 feet over the Cariboo Road) ; height, up to
4 stories. Waterway, stream 6 feet wide, O.K. Cribbing O.K. Piles, 12-14 inches, barked fir,
with iy2 to 2y2 inches of rot. Beginning at south, first two bents are pile-bents, next six are
framed on pile footings, next eight are framed on ALB., next two are framed on combined pile
and M.B. footings, next seven are framed on pile footings, and the last seven at north are pile-
bents. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) and surface good.
Track of north end low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 10.0.—Originally combined pile-bent and framed-bent trestle on pile footings. Length,
255 feet; number of spans, 17; height, up to 2 stories and cripple. Waterway, dry gulch. First
two bents at south were pile-bents. These and last five at north were sinking; now repaired by
posts, blocks, and ALB., aiid are O.K. Piles are barked fir and cedar of good size, with 1% to
2 inches of sap-rot. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. (three long girts badly warped). Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track on and off, low. Bridge in general in good condition.
Other features O.K.
Bridge 10.6.—Framed-bent trestle on pile footings, except pile-bent bulk-heads and one-half
of one bent at centre, which is on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 255 feet; number of spans, 17;
height, up to 3 stories. Waterway, none. Piles, 11-16 inches; some with dry-rot to 2 inches;
others sound; barked and unbarked fir and cedar. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment
(curve and tangent) and surface good. Bridge is tight. Tie-plates under curve only. Some
brush to cut.    Other features O.K.    Bridge in general in good condition.
Bridge 10.8.—Across 11-AIile Creek and Cariboo Road. Framed-bent trestle on pile footings,
except bulk-head bents and first bent out from south end, which are pile-bents. Length, 300 feet;
number of spans, 19 (one of which is 30 feet) ; height, up to 2 stories and cripple. Waterway,
stream 5 feet wide, O.K. Piles, 11-16 inches. Those in creek sound; others have from iy2 to
2% inches rot, and one near north end, which is badly rotted and should be replaced soon.
Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track
on and off, low.    Other features O.K.    Brush to cut.
Bridge 13.7.—Framed-bent trestle across 14-Alile Creek. (Highest wooden bridge on
system.) Length, 915 feet; number of spans, 61; height, up to iy2 stories. AVaterway, stream
4 feet wide, O.K. Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track ou and off, good. Timbers, ties,
braces, etc., throughout O.K., except one broken sway-brace near creek at bottom. Piles, barked
and unbarked, large and small, mixed fir and cedar; some sound especially; others with \y2 to
2y2 inches of dry-rot. One pile in Bent No. 5 rotten, but carrying no load. Bridge is tight.
(About half a dozen bolts found loose; frozen). All other features O.K. Bridge in general in
good condition.
Bridge 14.0.—Across Cariboo Road. Originally pile-bent trestle. Length, 90 feet; number
of spans, 5 (one being 30 feet) ; height, about 17 feet. AVaterway, culvert, O.K. Now has M.B.
under bulk-heads, two new pile-bents, and two new framed bents on ALB. All O.K. Piles new
and O.K., 12-inch unbarked fir. Bridge all tight except guard-rails. Timbers, ties, braces, etc.,
O.K. Alignment (tangent) and surface fair. Track on and off, low. Bridge is practically new.
Other points O.K.
Bridge 14.4.—Framed-bent trestle on pile footings, except second bent and bulk-heads, which
are pile-bents. Length, 705 feet; number of spans, 47 ; height, up to 5 stories. Waterway, small
creek, now dry. Some scouring has taken place. Alajority of piles are 14-16 inches, cedar, with
y2 to iy2 inches rot. A few piles, especially near watercourse, have rot to 2 inches. Some
scattered small fir piles. Centre pile in each bulk-head low and needs shims. Timbers, ties,
braces, etc., O.K.    Bridge is tight, except guard-rails.    Other features O.K.    Bridge is O.K. British Columbia.
1921
Bridge 14.8.—Framed-bent trestle on pile footings, except first two and last three bents, which
are pile-bents. Length, 375 feet; number of spans, 26; height, up to 3 stories and cripple.
Waterway, dry and should be repaired and riprapped. Piles mostly of good size, but some small
fir which are badly rotted in a few cases. Recent cloudburst washed out two piles at centre;
replaced by posts and blocks. Another sill and three posts should be placed in same bent.
Diagonals in seven spans of upper story missing; never had been on, but should be put on.
Ties, timbers, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (tangent) and surface good. Track on
and off, fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 17.7.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 495 feet; number of
spans, 33; height, 4 full stories. AVaterway, stream 2 feet wide, O.K. Riprap O.K. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., except three ties, which need renewing (not urgent), O.K. Bridge is tight,
except guard-rails. Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track on and off, low. Other
features O.K. Bridge in general in good condition. Should be watched for damage from rocks;
important.
Bridge 18.3.—Framed-bent trestle on piles, except bulk-heads and first bent out from each
end, which are pile-bents. Length, 345 feet; number of spans, 23; height, up to 3 stories and
cripple on pile-bents. Piles, 12-16 inches, mostly 14's, with % to l1/! inches dry-rot. Waterway,
dry, shows signs of heavy run off during some of the violent rain-storms. No damage. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track on and
off, a little low.    Other features O.K.    Bridge in general in good condition.
Bridge 20.3.—At Pavilion. Framed-bent trestle on piles. Length, 390 feet; number of
spans, 26; height, 1 full story. AVaterway, Pavilion Creek, 4 feet wide, O.K. Piles, unbarked,
12-16 inches, mostly the latter, 1 to 1% inches rot. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is
tight. Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track on and off, fair. Brush should be cut under
and around bridge.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 31.6.—Framed-bent and pile-bent trestle on ALB. and piles. Length, 450 feet; number
of spans, 30; height, up to 4 stories and cripple. AVaterway, none. South bulk-head and Bent
No. 1 are pile-bents, next nine bents are framed on pile footings, and remainder are framed on
ALB., which are O.K. Piles, 11-16 inches, barked and unbarked, a few cedar, and with y2 to
1% inches of rot. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K., except sill of Bent No. 3, which is cracked,
not dangerous, and should be scabbed both sides with 3 by 12's. Bridge is tight. Alignment
(curve) and surface good. Track on and off, good. Other features O.K. General condition
is good.
Bridge 23.5.—Framed trestle on ALB., except bulk-heads and Bents Nos. 2 and 32, which are
pile-bents, and Bent No. 27, which is framed on pile footings. Al.B. are O.K. Length, 4S0 feet;
number of spans, 32; height, 3 stories and cripple. No waterway. Ties, timbers, braces, etc.,
O.K. Bridge is tight. One nut and washer missing on packing-bolt. Alignment (curve) and
surface good. Track on and off, low. Piles, 14 inches and up, with 1% to 2 inches of rot. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 23.9.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 405 feet; number of
spans, 27; height, iy2 stories. No waterway. Split stringer at north bulk-head blocked up;
O.K. One long girt smashed. Otherwise ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight.
Alignment (curve) and surface good.    Track on and off, fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 24.0.—Framed-bent trestle ou ALB., which are O.K. Length, 75 feet; number of
spans, 5; height, 1 story over 15 feet. No waterway. One diagonal broken. Otherwise ties,
timbers, braces, etc.. O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (tangent) good. Surface slightly low
at centre.    No tie-plates.    Track on and off, low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 24.6.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 450 feet; number of
spans, 30; height, 2 stories and cripple. No waterway. Centre post of Bent No. 11, top story,
badly sun-checked and cracked; should be replaced. One diagonal and one long girt at Bent
No. 10 broken. Otherwise ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Track on and off, good. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 24-9.—Framed-bent trestle on M.B., which are O.K. Length, 450 feet; number of
spans, 30; height, 3 stories. No waterway. One sway-brace near centre and at top of first
story split and pulled away from post. On upper side near centre is rock-slide which has covered
posts and sills of five bents, broken two sway-braees which cannot be replaced on account of 11 Geo. 5
DEPARTAIENT   OF   RAILWAYS.
E 27
slide, and has also cracked one diagonal. Otherwise ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is
tight.    Alignment (curve) and surface good.    Track on and off, low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 26.0.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 210 feet; number of
spans, 24; height, 1 story and short cripple. No waterway. One diagonal split. Otherwise
ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve and tangent) and surface
good.    Track on and off, fair.    Some footings covered by slide.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 26.3.—Framed-bent trestle on piles. Length, 150 feet; number of spans, 10; height,
y2 story. No waterway. Piles, unbarked fir, 14-16 inches, with 1 to iy2 inches of rot. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (reverse spirals) and surface good.
Track on and off, fair.    No water-barrel at south end.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 26.7.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB. and piles. Some footings and lower parts of posts
buried. Last three bents at north completely filled up. Length, 240 feet; number of spans, 26;
height, 2 stories. No waterway. Last three bents at north had settled; now shimmed and
lined and O.K. ALB. O.K. Last thirteen bents at north have pile footings (five are grasshoppers). Piles, unbarked fir, 12-16 inches, with 1 to Xy2 inches of rot. Ties, timbers, braces,
etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track on and off, fair. Other
points O.K.
Bridge 27.3.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB. and pile footings. M.B. are O.K. Length, 300
feet; number of spans, 20; height, 2 stories. No waterway. Some footings covered by slide.
Piles, 14-16 inches, unbarked fir, with 1 to 1% inches of rot. Piles in last three bents at north
end had settled; now shimmed 2 inches and O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. With exception of a very few bolts, bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) and surface fair. Track off north
end low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 27.7.—Framed-bent trestle on M.B., except two pile-bents at north end. Length, 225
feet; height, 1 story and cripple; number of spans, 15. No waterway. ALB. footings O.K.
(some buried in slide). Piles, 12 inches, unbarked fir, with 1 inch sap-rot. Two girts broken.
Otherwise ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge, except for a few bolts, is tight. Alignment
(curve) and surface good.    Track on and off, fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 28.2.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB. Length, 420 feet; number of spans, 28; height,
2 stories and cripple. No waterway. Footings O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is
tight. Alignment (tangent with curve at both ends) and surface fair. Track on and off, fair.
Other points O.K.
Bridge 28.38.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. (some covered, slide). Length,
120 feet; number of spans, 8 ; height, 1 story. North bulk-head shimmed 2 inches; O.K. One
diagonal recently broken. Otherwise ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment
(tangent) and surface O.K.    Track on and off, fair.    Other feature's O.K.
Bridge 28Jf.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB., which are O.K. Length, 135 feet; number of
spans, 9; height, up to 2 stories. No waterway. Some footings buried. North bulk-head
shimmed 2 inches and rests on log crib, which is O.K. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge
is tight.    Alignment (curve) and surface O.K,    Track on and off, fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 32.5.—Across Kelly Creek. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 60 feet; number of spans, 4;
height, 10 feet. Waterway, creek 4 feet wide, O.K. Piles, 14-16 inches, unbarked fir, with y2
to 1 inch of rot. Two piles need shims. Hewed caps. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge
is tight. Alignment (tangent) and surface good. No check-rails or tie-plates. Track on and
off, low.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 32.8.—Across Kelly Creek. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 60 feet; number of spans, 4;
height, 12 feet. Piles, 14-16 Inches, unbarked fir. Those in water sound; others have % to
% inch of rot. Some shims needed on centre bent piles. Hewed caps. Ties, timbers, braces,
etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track on and off, low.
AVaterway, 3 feet wide, O.K.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 34-8.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 30 feet; number of spans, 2; height, 6 feet.
AVaterway, small stream, O.K. Piles. 14-16 inches, unbarked fir, O.K. Hewed caps. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (tangent) and surface good. Track on
and off, low.    Other features O.K.    No check-rails or tie-plates.
Bridge 35.3.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 45 feet; number of spans, 3; height 7 feet.
Waterway, small stream, O.K.   Piles, unbarked fir, 14-16 inches, O.K.   Hewed caps.   Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (tangent) and surface good. Track on and
off, very low.    Other features O.K.    No check-rails.
Bridge 35.6.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 30 feet; number of spans, 2; height, 5 feet.
Waterway, small stream, O.K. Piles, unbarked fir, 16-17 inches, O.K. Ties, timbers, etc., O.K.
Alignment (curve) and surface good. No check-rails. Hewed caps. Bridge is tight. Track on
and off, low.    Bridge O.K.
Bridge 40.1.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, CO feet; number of spans, 4; height, 12 feet.
AVaterway, small creek, O.K. Piles, 14—16 inches, unbarked fir, O.K. Hewed caps. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment (tangent) only fair. Surface O.K. Bridge is tight.
Track on and off, low.    No check-rails or tie-plates.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 44-5-—Framed trestle on pile footings, except bulk-head, bents and first ones out
from each end, which are pile-bents. Length, 255 feet; number of spans, 17; height, 2y2 stories.
Waterway, small creek, O.K. Piles, 10-14 inches, unbarked fir, with light sap-rot only. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment (curve) and surface fair. Track on and off, fair. Bridge
is tight.    Other features good.    Bridge in general in good condition.
Bridge 44.8.—At Clinton. Framed trestle on pile footings, except bulk-head bents and first
ones out from each end, which are pile-bents. Length, 315 feet; height, 3 stories; number of
spans, 21. Waterway, stream 8 feet wide, O.K. Piles, 10-14 inches, unbarked fir, with light
sap-rot only. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment (tangent and curve) fair. Surface
low at centre (or change of grade?). Bridge is tight. Track low off north end. Other features
O.K.    General condition of bridge good.
Bridge 4&-0-—Framed-bent trestle, all on ALB., except two bents at creek on piles, which are
O.K. M.B. are O.K. Length, 855 feet; number of spans, 57; height, up to 5% stories. AVaterway, small creek, O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Some guard-rail bolts and one or two
brace-bolts loose, otherwise bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) fair. Surface low between
second and third water-barrels from south end and same distance also from north end. Track
on and off, fair.    No water-barrel at north end.    Other features O.K., except no flanger-signs.
Bridge 49.5.—Framed-bent trestle on pile footings. Across Cariboo Road. Length, 460 feet;
number of spans, 30 (one of which is 25 feet) ; height, up to 2% stories on 5-foot pile-bents.
Waterway, none. Piles, 12-16 inches, fir, O.K., although some badly driven. Ties, timbers,
braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (tangent) and surface fair. Track low off north
end. No Sanger sign-boards or bulk-head water-barrels. Other features O.K. Bridge generally
in good condition.
Bridge 50.5.—Framed-bent trestle on pile footings. Number of spans, 27; height, 3 stories.
Waterway, dry gulch. Piles, barked fir of good size, O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K.
Bridge is tight. At about two-thirds of length from south end some bents with upper story out
of plumb; built that way; now braced and O.K. Alignment (curve and tangent) fair. Surface
slightly wavy. Track on and off, a little low. No flanger-signs or bulk-head barrels. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 53.8.—Framed-bent trestle on ALB. and pile footings. Length, 750 feet; number of
spans, 50; height, 6 stories. Waterway, stream 10 feet wide, O.K. Riprap O.K. Nine bents
near centre and last five at north are on pile footings; others are on M.B. Piles and ALB. are
O.K. Piles, 12-17 inches, barked, and some badly driven. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K.
Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve) good. Out of surface slightly near centre. Track on and
off, fair.    Check-rail noses poor type, but well set.    Other features O.K.    Bridge very good.
Bridge 56.5.—At Chasm. Pile-bent trestle. Length, 165 feet; number of spans, 11; height,
about 8 to 10 feet (not noted). Waterway, swamp and small stream, O.K. Piles, barked cedar
and fir, 12-17 inches, O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Alignment (curve)
and surface good. No flanger-signs. No water-barrel at south end. Track on and off, low.
Other features O.K.    Bridge is in good shape.
Bridge 57.6.—Over upper end of the chasm and Cariboo Road. Framed-bent trestle,»n M.B.,
except five centre bents and bulk-head bents, which are on piles. Piles good size and O.K.
Waterway, small creek, O.K. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is tight. Length, 343
feet; number of spans, 23 (two are 11 feet each and one of 23 feet) ; height, up to 2 stories.
Alignment (curve) good, except near south end. Surface good (shimmed during past season).
Check-rail ends in dangerous condition. Track on and off, fair. Flanger-signs at south end
down.    Other points O.K. ;
11 Geo. 5
DEPARTAIENT   OP   RAILWAYS.
E 29
Bridge 71.5.—Pile-bent trestle across shallow lake. Length, 300 feet; number of spans, 20;
height, 16 feet above water. Waterway O.K. Piles, barked fir, 10-16 inches, O.K. Timbers,
ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bolts loose throughout, many nuts and washers missing, and some
anchor-bolts too.short. Bridge needs general tightening. Alignment (curve) and surface good.
Track low off south end.    Check-rail noses N.G. (one at north broken).    Other features O.K.
Bridge 72.0.—Pile-bent trestle across shallow lake. Length, 345 feet; number of spans, 23;
height, 16 feet above water. AVaterway, 280 feet wide, O.K. Piles, 10-14 inches, barked fir, O.K.
Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is loose and needs general tightening. Has no proper
anchor-bolts (some driven bolts instead). Alignment (curve) and surface good. Track on and
off, good.    Check-rail noses, plank makeshift.    Other points O.K.
Bridge 74-5.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 645 feet; number of spans, 43; height, up to IS
' feet. AVaterway, small creek, O.K. Piles, 10-14 inches, barked fir and a few cedars, O.K. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is loose and needs a general tightening. Alignment (curve)
none too good. Surface good. No tie-plates. No bulk-head water-barrels. Check-rail noses,
Wood block makeshifts. No anchor-bolts at bents. Rails spiked only at every other tie. Track
on and off, fair.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 99.8.—Little Bridge Creek. Framed-bent trestle on piles. Length, 900 feet; number
of spans, 60; height, up to 3 stories on 6 pile-bents 10 to 12 feet high at creek. Waterway O.K.
Piles, 10-14 inches, barked fir, O.K. Timbers, ties, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is loose and needs
general tightening. Alignment (curve) good. Surface good. Track on and off, fair. Rails
spiked only every second tie and need redriving. Check-rail noses N.G. Bulk-head retaining-
walls have only two planks and not holding embankment. No water-barrels at bulk-heads.
Other features O.K.
Note.—B. and B. gang had not been over the bridges from Lone Butte to Williams Lake up
to time of this inspection. Have been over same since and report defects corrected and bridges
tightened.    These notes read as bridges were at time of inspection.
Bridge 138.0.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 150 feet; number of spans, 10; height, 17 feet.
AVaterway, stream 16 feet wide, O.K. Piles, barked fir, O.K. Ties, braces, timbers, etc., O.K.
Bridge needs general tightening. Alignment good. Surface one-third way from north end, low.
Track on and off, good. Bulk-head fill at south end poor. No water-barrels. Check-rail noses
N.G.    Other features O.K.
Length, 60 feet; number of spans, 4; height, 7 feet.
Piles O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is
Alignment and surface good. Track on and off, low.
No water-barrels. Other features O.K.
Length, 75 feet; number of spans, 5; height, 16 feet.
Piles O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is
loose and needs general tightening. Alignment (tangent) and surface O.K. Track on and off,
low.    Check-rails very short and noses N.G.    No water-barrels.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 138.48.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 90 feet; number of spans, 6; height, IS feet.
Waterway, stream 18 feet wide, O.K. Piles, barked fir, O.K., but some on small side. Ties,
timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Alignment good and surface out. Track on and off, low. Check-
rails very short and noses N.G. No water-barrels. Other features O.K. (Bridge is loose and
needs general tightening.)
Bridge 140.0 — (Or 139.99.) Framed-bent trestle on pile footings. Length, 480 feet; number
of spans, 32; height, 3 stories. Waterway, small creek, O.K. Piles, barked fir, O.K., but many
are on the small size and poorly driven. Some of pile footings are bents 8 feet high. Ties,
braces, timbers, etc., O.K. Bridge is loose and needs general tightening. Alignment (tangent)
and surface both out.    Track on and off, low.    Check-rail noses N.G.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 144-39.—Pile-bent trestle over roadway. Length, 57 feet; number of spans, 5;
height, 18 feet. Piles, barked fir, but light, being 9 to 10 inches sound. Timbers, braces, etc.,
O.K. Alignment (tangent) and surface O.K. Track on and off, low. Ties are of poor material.
No water-barrels. Check-rail noses N.G. Bridge is loose and needs a general tightening. Other
features O.K.
Bridge 145.75.—Pile-bent trestle. Length, 90 feet; number of spans, 6; height, 15 feet.
Waterway, dry.    Piles, 10-14 inches, barked fir, O.K.    Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K.    Bridge is
Bridge 138.34.—Pile-bent trestle.
Waterway, stream 20 feet wide, O.K.
loose and needs  general  tightening.
Check-rail very short and noses N.G.
Bridge 138.41.—Pile-bent trestle.
Waterway, stream 18 feet wide, O.K. E 30 British Columbia. 1921
loose and needs general tightening.    Line and surface 'good.    Track on and off, very low.    Check-
rail noses N.G.    No wTater-barrels.    Other features O.K.
Bridge 155.28.—At material-yard, AVllliams Lake. Framed-bent trestle on pile footings.
Length, 345 feet; number of spans, 23; height, 1 story. Pile footings O.K. AVaterway, Williams
Lake Creek, 100 feet wide, O.K. Ties, timbers, braces, etc., O.K. Bridge is loose and needs
general tightening. Out of line and surface. No flanger-signs up. Track on and off, low.
Other features O.K.
Cribbing.
An inspection coincident with that of the bridges was made of the log-crib retainlng-walls,
river-protection cribs, etc., by myself and B. and B. Alaster Dillon between Squamish and
Williams Lake.
These cribs, walls, etc., are for the most part rock-filled, and in no instance where that is
the case did w7e find signs of distress or rot worth mentioning in the timbers. This is particularly
the case along Anderson and Seton Lakes, with the exception of the one just north of the 110-Alile
board, and along the Fraser A'alley north of Lillooet, with the exception of -those between Alile 1.7
and Alile 6.
Re these exceptions, the crib at Mile 110, Squamish Subdivision, was built a few years ago
to replace the original one, whicli failed or was knocked out. This crib is dirt-filled, is aging
rapidly, and the rock in which it is none too well toed appears to be soft and inclined to crumble.
Special instructions have been given to .Section Foremen to watch this crib. In the group
referred to between Miles 1.7 and 6, there are nineteen crib-walls filled with dirt for the most
part, and all are either badly aged, rotting, or showing signs of distress from other causes.
At Mile 1.7 there are four walls, built oue above the other in a dry slide, to protect the bridge
at that point. These are comparatively new structures. The lowest one has had the dirt cave
out from under the centre. The wall itself is intact, but in order to protect it and the ones
above a new one 4 feet high and 20 feet long, rock and brush filled, will have to be built, material
for which is on the site.    The upper walls need some bracing.
From the above point to Mile 4 the tie-timbers are badly dry-rotted in the dirt. The road-bed
for the most part is well back from these cribs and not bearing directly upon them, they being
in some instances intended only to keep the slopes from wearing down by sliding. Between
Aliles 4 and 6 the cribs are of a mixed rock and dirt fill and are suffering from age and dry-rot.
None of the cribs mentioned in this paragraph have, however, shown any signs of stress or the
appearance of going out, but Section Foreman and Roadmaster have been advised to keep a close
watch on the situation.
The dimensions of these walls are as follows :—
First, north of Alile 1.7, 120 feet long, 17 feet high (13 logs), and 75 ties.
Second, 110 feet by 12 feet high  (9 logs) and 47 ties.
Third, at Mile 2, 150 feet long by 17 feet high (15 logs) and 141 ties.
Fourth, fifth, and sixth, between Aliles 2 and 3, are respectively, the order of dimensions
being as above, 50 by 10 (9) and 20;   60 by 8 (7) and 18;  50 by 8 (6) and 16.
Seventh,  eighth, ninth, tenth, and eleventh,  between Aliles 3 and 4,  are  respectively
50 by -5 (4) and 6;  50 by 7 (6) and 13;  100 by 10 (9) and 36.
' Tenth put in last year and O.K.
Eleventh, 65 by 13  (10)  and 34.
Twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth, between Aliles 4 and 5, are respectively 165 by 15
(11) and 120; 125 by 16 (11) and 65; and 100 by 8% (6) and 30.
Fifteenth and last is 90 by 15 (4) and 14.
These walls should be reinforced, preferably by face-walls constructed about a foot in front
of the existing walls and braced with outside posts and struts to a well-buried sill or parallel
deadman, and the intervening 1-foot space filled with rock. A considerable saving could be made
by putting only post, strut, and sill construction against the present walls, but would be of
doubtful economy.
The river-protection cribs are working satisfactorily and are in good condition. The one at
Alile 85, near D'Arcy, has been undermined, but the method of construction has, as intended,
allowed the crib to settle and block the wash-out. Although badly settled and tilted at the centre,
it is, except in appearance, as efficient as when first built.   A short low toe-wall should be 11 Geo. 5
DEPARTAIENT   OP   RAILWAYS.
E 31
built on the lower side of the north abutment of Fraser River Bridge to save the bank-slopes.
Protection-cribs should be built above the south end of Bridge 69.9, Squamish Subdivision, on
the Birkenhead River, in the vicinity of Alile 68, and a small crib just above the bridge at Seton
would help the situation at that point.
Much of the renewal work mentioned above can be done by the B. and B. extra gang or one
of the floating gangs.    Material will be the principal item to provide for.
Alany trips of inspection, aggregating some thousands of miles, have been made by speeder
during the year, at which times the more important bridges, river-protection works, damaged
bridges, points of danger, the action of floods, and the track and road-bed in general have been
examined and such action taken or remedy applied as the situation seemed to warrant.
In connection with these trips it is of interest to note that without the speeder the covering
of the AVilliams Lake-Squamish Division would be hopeless. The car assigned to my use, a
Aiudge E-6, has been in constant service, summer and winter, since October, 1919, and with the
exception of two minor worn parts and a broken valve-stem has had no shop repairs in that
time. The mileage per gallon of gasolene runs from 60 to 64 miles, and a continuous trip of
200 miles in nine and a half hours produced no signs of distress. Under favourable conditions
the trip from Squamish to AVilliams Lake can be made in about thirteen hours.
Before closing I wish to make some comments on the maintenance-work in general during
the past year, and also call attention to the needs during the coining year.
Labour, both skilled and unskilled, during the past year has been very hard to obtain at
the time it was most needed. This was particularly the case during the spring seeding and
late summer and fall harvest seasons. At many points, such as Pemberton, D'Arcy, Shallalth,
Lillooet, AIcKinnon, Pavilion, and Kelly Lake, the only source of labour upon which we are
able to draw for sectionmen is the Indians, who in many cases are neither efficient nor steady,
although paid the same wages as the white men receive.
The sections are long, averaging from 12 to 14 miles; the section gangs are composed of
from five to eight men during the working season. There were times during the past season
when some of these gangs were reduced to one or two men only, it being hard to obtain men to
fill the places of those who quit to work on the ranches. Between patrolling track, cutting weeds
and brush, ditching sliding cuts, etc., they had in many cases but little time for track-work. In
the case of heavy work and extensive tie renewals they were assisted by the extra gang, varying
from eight to twenty men. Two small floating gangs, one on the Squamish and one on the
Lillooet Subdivisions, also assisted. Before winter set in the ditcher went over the line and
cleaned out the worst cuts.
Under the foregoing conditions it is surprising that the track is in as good condition as it is.
Between Squamish and Lillooet the track does not appear to have its final lift; many embankments have settled, or were never brought to their proper height, and ballast at many places is
very thin; in fact, almost non-existent. The shortage of funds under which you are labouring,,
is realized to the fullest extent, and this situation has been kept in mind in connection with all
work. I trust, however, that some means of providing ballast may be found for the worst places;
also for the approaches to bridges, the great majority of which are low, the ties mentioned in
the following paragraph, and the unusual renewals for bridges, as noted below.
Roadmasters' and Section Foremen's reports for the year are not yet complete and tabulated
in connection with tie renewals. From such reports as are in and from other sources of
information the following estimate of tie renewals during the past year has been made. It is
probably sufficiently accurate for the purpose, but will be subject to revision when the final
reports are in. Old seconds and culls from the stock-piles at East Lillooet, some twenty odd
thousand; new ties obtained along the line at various times, about 5,500; and new ties from
the north this fall, about 14,000, making the total number of renewals about 40,000. Of the
total ties received from the north we have about 10,000 on hand. For the coming season we
should have 75,000 more.
In the matter of river-protection, etc., the cribs installed in 1919 are still in place and have
given splendid service, as our freedom from wash-outs indicates. There are, however, two
additional cribs needed before the floods of early summer, one above Bridge 69.6 and one in
the Birkenhead River in the vicinity of Mile 68. There is also some riprapping required at a
few points. Rock and other slides still occur from time to time, but with apparently diminishing
frequency. E 32
British Columbia.
1921
The B. and B. gang, which has been composed of from eight to twelve men, has made a very
creditable showing in work done during the past year. They have been over all bridges between
Squamish and AVilliams Lake and have taken care of the most urgent needs of each. The bridges
in general are in such condition that, with the renewals contemplated and the usual routine work,
they can be put into first-class shape during the coming year.
The biggest renewal item, absolutely required, will be footings for the Fraser River Bridge.
Eighty-seven were renewed this year and the remainder will have to be renewed in the spring.
The estimated cost of this work is $5,000 and can be handled by the B. and B. gang. Other
renewals-are in the way of new piles here and there in pile-bent trestles, piers, etc., and wiil
not be a heavy item. All superstructures are in good condition, with the exception of the decks
on Bridges 4.8 and 5.4, which are rapidly approaching a dangerous condition. These are now
being redecked with material on hand.
Besides the bridge-work, this gang has also done a large amount of work in connection with
section bunk-houses, stations, water-tanks, dock repairs, etc. Credit is due B. and B. Master
Dillon for the foresight displayed in laying out and handling his work, as otherwise there would
have been many slow-order bridges on the line.
(c.)  Construction—Clinton to Prince George.
It was not possible to carry out the construction programme projected for 1920 as planned,
as the whole scheme of the projected work depended on being able to get across Deep Creek
A'iaduct by the middle of July at the very latest.
The Canadian Bridge Company advised at the beginning of March that they expected to
begin erection of the bridge by April 10th. Strikes, freight congestion, and other contingencies
arose, however, later in the spring (entirely beyond the control of the Bridge Company), which
indicated clearly that it would be impossible for it to commence and be able to continuously
carry ou the erection much before July, and the programme, of construction was therefore
changed to:—■
(a.)  Regrading and bridge-building on the first 20 miles south from Prince George.
(b.) The construction of 22y2 miles of nSw line north and south of Quesnel.
(c.)  The regrading,  bridge-building, and track-laying on  the 55  miles between Deep
Creek and Quesnel, with the intention of reaching Quesnel early in December.
It was not possible, however, to get a train across Deep Creek Bridge before November 3rd,
when a start was made on the season's track-laying.
After laying 36 miles of main-line track to a point 19 miles south of Quesnel, or 329 miles
north of Squamish, it was considered advisable to halt operations at that point till spring, as the
adverse weather conditions would not permit of economical work being done.
The Canadian Bridge Company made an excellent record in erecting Deep Creek Bridge.
The first sixteen car-loads of bridge material arrived at the bridge-site on July 3rd, and the first,
train crossed the structure on November 3rd.
This viaduct is of considerable importance, being 1,192 feet 11 inches in length between
parapet walls, and the central portion being 285 feet in height from foundation to base of rail.
It contains 2,000 tons of steel and there are 4,200 cubic yards of concrete in the foundations.
The foundation-wor»k and the erection-work presented difficult problems, but the whole
structure was completed without a mishap of any kind. The instrumental work in the field,
the field erection, and the shop fabrication were particularly well executed.
Programme remaining to complete Squamish to Prince George.
There are still 98 miles of main-line track to be laid from present rail-head to a connection
with the Grand Trunk Pacific at Prince George, and of this mileage 51 miles of the grade are
ready for track, leaving only 46.5 miles of regrading of the old line to be done next year to
complete the grading on the whole line.
In addition to the 98 miles of main-line track-laying and the 46.5 miles of regrading above
referred to, thirty-six timber bridges and one steel viaduct have yet to be built, as well as the
construction of 118 miles of telephone-lines, about 50 miles of fencing, the necessary station
buildings, water-supply stations, a small engine-house at Quesnel, and the ballasting and
surfacing between Deep Creek and Prince George. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Railways.
E 33
Remarks on the Construction so ear carried out.
The work involved in completing the Pacific Great Eastern Railway from Squamish to Prince
George at the time the line was taken over by the Province involved the construction of 43 miles
of entirely new railway, the regrading of 203 miles of the old road-bed, the construction of 73
bridges, 2 steel viaducts, and 246 miles of main-line track-laying (passing and terminal trackage
in addition) ; surfacing and ballasting the above-mentioned trackage, the necessary telephone-
line, fencing, station buildings, water-stations, fuel-stations, roundhouses, machine-shops, turntables, and other terminal facilities.
This very considerable programme of construction was started in September, 1918, and has
been to date carried out under conditions extremely unstable, making it nearly impossible to
estimate with any degree of accuracy what any particular item of construction would cost,
particularly if the carrying-out of its construction would extend over any considerable period of
time. In connection with this difficulty of estimating closely in these abnormal times through
which we have passed and are passing, I beg to cite just two examples, although I could bring
others to your attention:—
(1.) On Alarch 10th, 1918, I advised you by letter of the letting by contract-of a large piece
of railway-work by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company to one of the best-known and efficient
railway contractors in British Columbia. The terms of this contract are practically identical
with the terms of the contract under which the Pacific Great Eastern is being completed by the
Northern Construction Company.
The cost of this particular piece of work was estimated by the Railway Company's Chief
Engineer, probably one of the best railway-construction men in Canada. This work is now
finished, and I am officially advised that the actual cost exceeded the estimate by 54 per cent,
due to abnormal conditions—conditions quite impossible of being foreseen by the most careful
and experienced estimator.
(2.) The Canadian Northern Pacific Company furnished the Department of Railways with
a statement showing the estimated cost of completing the Kamloops-Kelowna lines, 141 miles, as
being $4,908,252.
The construction of about 121 miles of the above line is under way, the pro rata estimated
cost of which is $4,212,045. The actual cost of construction to date is $4,127,026, and the work
done to date consists practically only of the clearing, grubbing, and grading, the last mentioned
not even being completed, so that when the 121 miles are finished and ready for operation they
will cost somewhere between $6,000,000 and $7,000,000.
In constructing an entirely new line of railway in normal times, unforeseen contingencies are
provided for by adding a reasonable percentage to an estimated cost, but the finishing of an
abandoned line like the Pacific Great Eastern Railway in abnormal times presents a problem, as
far as estimating closely its cost is concerned, which is nearly insoluble.
The cost of carrying out the work in 1920 was estimated by me in 1919 and was based on
prices of labour and commodities prevailing then. The actual cost of the work has exceeded the
-estimated cost, and I beg to set forth just a few of the many valid reasons for the increase:	
(1.)   On June 18th, 1919, I advised you in connection with the Alay statement that the work
was then being carried out at practically the unit prices quoted.    The price of labour  and
commodities  had, however,  by early in  1920 increased over  that prevailing in 1919  by the
following percentages:—
, Per Cent.
Labour         37%
Bridge-timber           gQ,
Bridge-stringers          43
Bridge-iron   16-30
Hay         35
Oats  22
General supplies, etc         24
(2.) Additional slides, settlements, and wash-outs on the old line between the time measurements were taken on the old line in August, 1919, and the fall of 1920.    A few of these additional
slides and settlements are noted as follows:—
Cubic Yards.
(a.) From Prince George to M.P. 20     92980
(b.) From ALP. 20 to AI.P. 40 (not yet out)    14o!o00
3
- E ,34 British Columbia. 1921
(c.)  Removal of rotted crib-work and moving the line into side-hill at M.P. 53,
near Pichard's, and bad slide at Mileage 50, and having to throw line into
rock-cut to save cribs      51,620
(d.) Banks entirely washed out at big ravine at Alileage S and Alileage 10,
Quesnel south, and cuts filled in at both points     60,905
(e.)  Additional slides, Soda Creek      24,192
(/.)  Cleaning out heaving, Kaolin Cut, south of Williams Lake     51,229
(g.)  Slide on south slope, Deep Creek, necessitating lengthening of viaduct     76,639
(h.)  Construction of deviation at ALP. 137 owing to collapse of old line along
San Jose River      14,525
(j.)   Additional settlements on muskegs between Aliles 130 and 140       9,351
I have only cited a few examples as to slides and settlements, but some idea of the magnitude
of this class of work involved may be formed wThen it is realized that the regrading of the old
line handled covered 157 miles.
I had expected that some additional slides and settlements would occur, but did not expect
conditions to be so serious as they turned out to be.
We have had more rain in the Cariboo than for years past. The ground was absolutely
saturated with moisture when the freeze-up came, and there will likely be heavy additional
slides next spring on some sections.
I do not anticipate any trouble on the new lines (22y2 miles) north and south of Quesnel.
In connection with these lines, Assistant Engineer Bridge reports to me under date of October
27th as follows :—
" The heavy rains of the past two months are responsible for a lot of extra work both on
the old grade and the new work, but I am pleased to say that both on the Cottonwood and
Quesnel new lines any slides which we have had are just local and what you would get in any
country after such heavy and continuous rains as we have had since September 1st, and shows
pretty conclusively that our line is in the right place."
Many other items of unforeseen expenditures also arose, such as increase in train-crew rates
(authorized by the Dominion Board), thus affecting the cost of operating the construction swing-
train service, Deep Creek to Williams Lake, additional costs due to irrigation seepage, increase
in both length and height of bridges over the original plans due to bad ground, etc.
(8.) REPORT OF RECONNAISSANCE SURVEY FROM A^ANDERHOOF, B.C., NORTHERLY
AND EASTERLY TO INTERPROATNCIAL BOUNDARY ArIA PEACE RIArER PASS,
SUALAfER  OF  1920.
By X. H. Williams, OE.
Railway Possibilities.
The route covered was that part of Central British Columbia to the north of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway main line near the 124th meridian to the junction of the Peace, Finlay,
and Parsnip Rivers; thence through the Peace River Aralley and connecting with the projected
location of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway near the junction of the Jliddle Fork and the
South Pine River.
The result of my reconnaissance is that it is quite practical to build a standard-gauge railway
through this section of British Columbia, and in no case will any serious difficulties be encountered. Construction for the most part will be extremely light; a gradient not exceeding 1 per
cent, can be obtained; very little solid rock exists; good crossings of all rivers and streams
were found; and an abundance of gravel for both ballast and concrete-work is to be had
practically throughout the entire line. Timber for piling, culverts, and ties is for the most part,
however, scarce.
Leaving the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway at ATanderhoof, the Nechako River is crossed about
Mileage 1 to the mouth of Clear Creek. Following Clear Creek for about half a mile, the line
would come out on a large plateau known as " 24 Prairie." This extends for about 10 miles and
is quite flat. A range of hills extends generally east and west at this point, separating the
Nechako and Stuart River Aralleys. The summit is reached in about 6 miles on a maximum
grade of 1 per cent, and being 170 feet above the plateau.* From this summit to the crossing
of the Stuart River there is a fall of 95 feet in a distance of 20 miles.    Fort St. James lies 11 Geo. 5
Department of Railways.
E 35
about iy2 miles to the north, being Alileage 30.5, elevation 2,225 feet. Leaving Fort St. James,
the line would run in a north-easterly direction, passing the east of Mount Murray, crossing the
Ocock River at M.P. 49, elevation 2,425 feet. It would now continue in a northerly direction
and to the east of Lookout Mountain, crossing the Tsilcoh River at M.P. 59, elevation 2,535
feet, and continuing northerly to Poison Creek, M.P. 67, elevation 2,530 feet. From this point it
would be necessary to follow Poison Creek to Horseshoe Lake, which is on the summit of the
- Pacific-Arctic Divide. Summit ALP. 92, elevation 3,150 feet. Now following along Horseshoe
Lake and Sheshe Nadji Lake to Suschona Creek and Suschona River to the Nation River, M.P.
108, and crossing the latter river at elevation 2,800 feet.
The greatest difficulty to be encountered thus far lies in crossing 12-Mile Mountain and
getting from the Nation River Aralley to the Alanson River Aralley. This is done by following
along the north shore of the Nation River to a point near the 124th meridian; thence northerly
and north-westerly to the head of Gaffney Creek, and following this creek to the Manson River.
Head of the Gaffney Creek, M.P. 128.5, elevation 3,400 feet; junction of Gaffney Creek and
Manson River, ALP. 147.5, elevation 3,000 feet. From this point the Alanson River Aralley is
followed into the Parsnip River ATalley, and thence to Finlay Forks, M.P. 1SS, elevation 2,000
feet. The Parsnip River is crossed at this point, and two alternative routes present themselves
from this point along the Peace River to Rocky Alountain Canyon. By crossing to the north side
ofthe Peace River advantage is taken of being on a southerly slope, thus eliminating the necessity
of protection against snow-slides; however, two bridges over the Peace River would be required.
By following the south shore these bridges would be eliminated; several snow-sheds would be
required around Mount Selwyn and to the east, but a series of benches, practically natural railroad embankments, extend the entire length of the river as far as the canyon. Canyon AI.P. 273,
elevation 1,800 feet. Passing through the canyon fairly heavy rock-work is encountered, and the
main bench above the Peace River is reached at M.P. 296, elevation 2,400 feet, at Alaurice Creek,
opposite Hudson Hope. From this point junction is made with the projected location of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway on the Pine River by following easterly by Sucker Lakes, crossing
the Moberly River to MacEwan Creek; thence to the Pine River, and following up the Pine
River to. the above-mentioned projected location, M.P. 344, about 82 miles from Swan Lake.
It will be noted that a very low gradient is obtained through the Peace River Pass, which
is really the Rocky Alountain Canyon, although it lies considerably to the east of the Rocky
Mountains. A most peculiar feature will also be noted in connection with this pass—namely, that
the controlling point is lower than the country to either the east or west. In other words, a
descending grade is encountered in coming from either direction.
Line No. 1— Miles.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway projection, Prince George to Swan Lake via
Pine Pass   316
Line No. 2— 	
Reconnaissance from Aranderhoof via Peace River Pass to Hudson Hope.... 296
Hudson Hope to Pacific Great Eastern Railway projection     48
Thence to Swan Lake     82
Total      426
Estimate of Cost. Miles
Vanderhoof to Hudson Hope  296
Hudson Hope to Pine River     48
Pine River to Swan Lake     82
Total     426
296 miles at $37,500  $11,100,000 00
48        „ 46,000       2,208,000 00
82        „ 57,000       4,674,000 00
Total    ,  $17,982,000 00
Prince George via Pine Pass to Swan Lake— 	
Construction   $18,000,000 00 E 36
British Columbia.
1921
In route via Pine Pass there are no waterways that can be used for the purpose of bringing
in supplies or equipment. The route from Prince George via the Parsnip River and Peace River
follows navigable waterways practically the entire distance, while the route from ATanderhoof
via the Nation River has the advantage of both roads which are already built for a distance of
about 65 miles, which could be extended at a small cost, and river navigation used for balance
of way.
Two alternatives might be considered in connection with a line running into the Peace River
country. One from Prince George following the present projected location via Crooked River
and Summit Lake; thence down the Parsnip River to Finlay Forks. In connection with this
line, however, it would leave the Nechako Valley and the large areas around Stuart River and
Stuart Lake and Big Prairie to the north without railway transportation, which is a larger and
more fertile tract than that around the Crooked River.
The other alternative would be to continue down the Nation River to the Parsnip; thence
following the Parsnip to Finlay Forks instead of turning north near the 124th meridian to
Gaffney Creek and the Manson River. This route would be practically the same distance and
construction about the same. In this connection, however, it would be necessary to run trial
lines over both routes before it would be possible to determine the most advantageous one.
Owing to the small revenue that will be obtained from a railway between Hudson Hope and
Swan Lake for many years to come, I would suggest that a line only to the former place *8e
considered at the present time, and arrangements made with the Edmonton, Dunvegan & British
Columbia Railway or Canadian National Railways for extension into the Pouce Coupe Prairie
for a few miles. At any future time it would then be possible to extend either in this direction
or in a north-easterly direction by the Halfway River in the direction of Arermilion Chutes.
TOWNSITES  AND   TERMINAL  FACILITIES.
Townsites and terminal facilities would be required at or near the Nation River, at Finlay
Forks, and at Hudson Hope. At the two latter places ample level ground is to be found, and
at the former, where only a small terminal would be needed, this could also be done at very small
expense. Excellent and abundant supplies of water are to be found all along the line for boiler
purposes.
Land.
Vanderhoof, which is in the Nechako A7alley, is the centre of a vast agricultural tract which
is only beginning to be settled. This valley is covered for the most part with small poplar,
averaging not over 6 inches in diameter. Excellent hay-crops are grown here and it is gradually
developing into a dairying district. A creamery has this year been established at ATanderhoof.
The Nechako Aralley extends north of the Nechako River about 15 miles. From this point,
crossing a range of hills lying between the Nechako and Stuart Valleys, the land is of little or
no value for agricultural purposes, being covered with small jack-pine. From about 7 miles
south of the Stuart-River excellent agricultural land extends along the Stuart and Necoslie
Rivers, Stuart Lake, and north to what is known as " Big Prairie." This section comprises
many thousands of acres of good agricultural land, with a large percentage of it open.
Along Poison Creek and into the Nation Valley and Manson Valley only isolated sections of
agricultural land are to be encountered, and then they are of small extent. The lower reaches
of the Alanson River Valley are, however, of a decidedly different nature. The land here merges
with that of the Lower Parsnip Aralley, and a conservative estimate of the available good agricultural land of the Parsnip, Alanson, and Finlay Valleys places the amount at over 500,000 acres.
Very few settlers have settled in this district, but excellent results have been attained in a small
way by the few who have located here. The lack of transportation has made it impossible to
bring in the necessary farming implements, and no market exists, as yet, for the produce. Hay,
particularly, attains a very luxuriant growth in all parts of these valleys.
Following down the Peace River from the confluence of the Parsnip and Finlay Rivers to-
Hudson Hope, the agricultural possibilities are rather limited on account of the narrowness of
the bench land on either side of the river. Only four settlers were encountered, but the results
which these had obtained would come up to the expectations of even the most optimistic. At
Beattie's ranch, which is located on the north side of the Peace River, 20 miles above Rocky
Mountain Portage, tomatoes were ripened on the vines out-of-doors from seed sown outside. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Railways.
E 37
The vegetables and fruits grown at Hudson Hope would compare most favourably with those
grown on Arancouver Island.
Following in a south and easterly direction from Hudson Hope via Moberly Lake to the
South Pine River, very few have as yet come in, and practically all of those who filed on homesteads have since left, claiming that farming in this district was unsuccessful on account of
summer frosts. This section contains a fairly large quantity of commercial timber, which is
dealt with under that heading.
From the upper bench at Hudson Hope on the north side of the Peace River, at elevation
about 2,400 feet, practically all the land in a north-easterly direction to Vermilion Chutes is good
land for mixed farming.
The land north from Fort George is reported to be of rather poor quality, especially along the
Crooked River, and crops suffer from summer frosts. The land Improves along the Parsnip River
and the best is found around the Finlay Forks. This tract, however, is tapped by the line from
Vanderhoof through the Peace River Pass.
Timber and Gravel.
Timber.—Fairly large timber limits exist around the head of Stuart Lake and Trembleur
Lake. With railway facilities at Fort St. James, this timber could all be brought down by water
to the latter place. Small areas of spruce and jack-pine are to be found scattered along the line
as far as Finlay Forks, but in no place in large quantities. This timber would be suitable for
ties and piling. Nearly all this country has been burnt over and the majority of the timber is
second growth and small. No timber of consequence is to be found between Finlay Forks and
Hudson Hope. South-east of Hudson Hope are very large stretches of commercial timber, this
being the only section which has escaped being burnt.
Gravel.—Extensive gravel-pits containing excellent gravel for both ballasting and concrete-
work are to be found in large numbers.
Coalfields of the Peace.
With the development of this section of British Columbia, valuable and extensive coal areas
will be opened. At Hudson Hope and Carbon River samples of both bituminous and anthracite
coal can be seen, having very high heat units, as will be seen from the following assayer's report.
With the provision of railroad communication, these coal-deposits will be of great importance to
the development of the district. "Hie high quality of the coal will enable it to compete far afield
for railway and steamship consumption.
From a few miles west of the Carbon River to the east of Hudson Hope the coalfields exist,
and good measures are found at and near both the Carbon River and the Rocky Mountain Canyon.
This is for a distance of over 40 miles in an east-and-west direction. Coal has been known for
many years to exist along the South Pine River, and it is supposed that these are a continuation
of the same deposits which are found on the Peace River. This coal is equal to a high grade
of steam-coal from the Welsh fields, and compares favourably with the best West Virginia coals,
being altogether of an exceptional high quality for Western America. The regularity of the
measures and their freedom from disturbance is remarkable, and the low ash content in the
samples taken as they were from outcrops shows the exceptionally clean nature of the seams.
The Johnson and Gething interests, who are operating the claims at the Rocky Mountain
Canyon, report that they will be in a position to ship 1,000 tons per day as soon as transportation
is provided. The claims at Carbon River were sold recently to the American International
Corporation for $230,000, and these interests should be in a position to ship an equal amount
daily.
It will be noted that there is apparently an almost inexhaustible supply of coal in this section
of British Columbia. E 38
British Columbia.
The following is a report of the analysis of samples of coal taken from the Carbon River
and the Rocky Mountain Canyon, and made by E. Stansfield, Chief Engineering Chemist of the
Division of Fuels and Fuel Testiug of the Mines Branch of the Department of Alines, Ottawa,
Ont. :—
" Ottawa, January 7th, 1918.
" Sample mark        ' Gethings.' ' Carbon.'
Laboratory sample number (see remarks)... 1212 1213
Moisture condition of sample  (see note) ... .      R. D. R. D.
Approximate analyses—
Aloisture  (per cent.)          1.6 ... 1.5
Ash (per cent.)          2.9 3.0 2.1 2.1
A'olatile matter  (percent.)    '..    25.1       25.5 20.5       20.8
Fixed carbon (by difference)   (per cent.)    70.4       71.6 75.9       77.1
Fuel ratio, fixed carbon-volatile matter..      2.8 2.8 3.7 3.7
Coking properties    Forms fair coke. Barely agglomerates.
" Remarks :   1212 taken from Rocky Alountain Canyon;  1213 taken from Carbon River.
" Note.—Figures  in Column  ' R'. refer to fuel  as received,  and in  Column  ' D '  to fuel
dried at 105° C.    The analyses were made on the fuel as received, and other results calculated
therefrom."
Other Minerals.
Galena and sulphide ore is found from the Peace south beyond Pine Pass. Aiica with large
clear sheets and fine cleavage is found in various places, especially near the low-grade ore-body
at Alount Selwyn. Platinum Is reported to exist in the tributaries of the Finlay River, and the
writer was shown a small quantity said to be worth $300 and which was supposed to have come
from this district.
At present placer-gold mining is being carried on at Alanson and Germansen Creeks. The
Ingenika Gold Alining Company is at present engaged in development-work at the mouth of the
Ingenika River. This is a dredging proposition, but owing to the lack of transportation very
little progress has been made. Another dredging outfit is at work on the north side of the Peace
River at Brennan's Flats, about 7 miles below Carbon River, but very, little progress has been
made here.
Large copper-deposits are reported to exist to the north of the Peace River, but as yet they
are only in the prospecting stage, but present indications are favourable for satisfactory results.
Oil.
In the Peace River District of British Columbia oil has not as yet been discovered. A report
by the late Professor J. C. Gwlllim was made in 1919, which recommended further explorations
along this line, and indications are that oil will be discovered here in the near future. The
Imperial Oil Company is doing a great deal of work towards this end in Alberta, adjoining the
British Columbia District.
Power.
In regard to power, the following report prepared by A. C. Attwood, of the Dominion Water-
power Branch, explains the situation as well as can be done without extensive investigation along
this particular line:—
Alany misleading statements have been published relating to the vast amount of power
available on the Peace River. This river, from the canyon in British Columbia to A7ermilion
Chutes in Alberta, a distance of approximately 500 miles, is a wide, swift river flowing over
a sand or gravel bed, generally shallow, and through a deep valley, with gently sloping sides.
The river is a mountain stream, as are many of its tributaries, and as a result the flow is very
irregular, varying as much as 50 to 1 between high and low wTater, with the floods occurring
during the summer months and the low flow during the winter.
On the Peace River there are two possible power-sites—one in the headwaters at the canyon
and the other at Arermilion Chutes.
The canyon site has not yet been investigated by the Department's Power Engineers, and
while the total fall through the canyon, which is about 18 miles in length, is reported to be
between 225 and 275 feet, it is not known how much of the total head can be developed.    In any 11 Geo. 5
Department op Railways.
E 39
event  a  power-development at this  site will be  an expensive undertaking,  and can only  be
accomplished when a market for the power is available close at hand.
The possibility of developing small blocks of power on the tributaries of the Peace River
has not been definitely investigated, but these tributaries are quite numerous, but are fed by the
melting snows in the mountains and foot-hills during the summer months and have only a small
run-off during the winter. Further investigations may, however, reveal the possibility of storing
and conserving the flood-waters on many of these streams, thus producing sufficient power to
operate small mills and possibly supply the demands of a small municipality.
The inherent disadvantages of the Peace River and its tributaries as a source of power at
the present time are: (1) The irregularity of flow; (2) high cost of development; (3) absence
of market.
These disadvantages may, however, be overcome by: (1) The creation of storage-reservoirs
to regulate the flow; (2) by settlement in the district. As the district becomes thickly populated
and towns spring up transportation facilities will be greatly improved and a market created for
the power.
Lines of Communication.
The section of British Columbia covered by this reconnaissance is greatly lacking in the
•matter of lines of communication. Little or no work has been done for many years on the trail
from Fort St. James to Alanson Creek. There was no trail in a -northerly and easterly direction
towards Finlay Forks, but what had grown up to such extent and blocked by numerous windfalls
that it was necessary to cut a trail for many miles in order to get through. It cannot be
considered that this work has built a trail, as our objective was to get through to Finlay Forks
and only the work that was absolutely necessary was done. From a point about 11 miles southwest of Finlay Forks a fairly good trail exists into this point. There is no trail whatever along
the Peace River as far down as the Ottertail River. This means that all that section of British
Columbia west of the Ottertail River and north of Finlay Forks is isolated from the closing
of navigation about October 15th until about January 15th of each year, when it is then possible
to travel on the ice. It also frequently happens that mild spells occur during the winter, making
it extremely dangerous to travel in this way. Another two months of isolation frequently takes
place in the spring during the break-up. A trail or sleigh-road should be built from Finlay Forks
along the north side of the Peace River at as early date as possible.
(9.)  EDAIONTON, DUNVEGAN & BRITISH COLUMBIA RAILWAY.
It was reported in August that the Alberta Government was to arrange to have 18 miles
of steel laid on the Edmonton, Dunvegan & British Columbia Railway from Spirit River westward towards the British Columbia boundary to get at tie-timber. Information reached the
Department also that good gravel for ballast existed about 40 miles west of Spirit River, and
it was considered likely, if the existence of this gravel could be proved, that the Alberta Government would cause additional trackage to be laid to this point so as to get the gravel for ballasting
purposes.
In order to get reliable data on which to formulate a proposition to be made to the Alberta
Government and the Edmonton, Dunvegan & British Columbia Railway Company to induce them
to lay steel and operate the road as far as the British Columbia boundary, R. Brunton, C.E., was
sent on the ground to report.    His report follows:—
With reference to your memo, to me dated the 24th ultimo, giving me instructions to examine
the Edmonton, Dunvegan & British Columbia Railway and get the information as set forth in
the memorandum from the Hon. the Premier to yourself: I left Arictoria on the 27th ultimo and
arrived at Spirit River on AA7ednesday, the 1st instant, leaving there on the afternoon of the
same day on horseback, arriving in Pouce Coupe on the afternoon of the 2nd instant.
I inspected the right-of-way of the Edmonton, Dunvegan & British Columbia Railway to
where the line has been constructed, a point near the boundary-line between Alberta and British
Columbia. I found the construction-work of this railway of a light nature and must have been
built cheaply; there are few bridges and none of any consequence. The Canadian Pacific Railway
Company has prepared the road-bed and has completed the bridges in a temporary manner, and at
an early date will lay steel for about 15 miles from Spirit River.    The foregoing has and will be E 40
British Columbia.
1921
done for the purpose of hauling ties from the tie camps, where a considerable number of ties are
being got out for other parts of the Edmonton, Dunvegan & British Columbia Railway.
Ties are also being cut in this vicinity for the Canadian National system. There are a great
number of ties lying along the right-of-way which were put there by J. D. McArthur & Co. four
years ago; very few of these ties could be used now, as the majority of them would not hold
spikes.
To complete this line from Spirit River to the British Columbia boundary would cost about
$20,000 per mile for the distance of 54 miles, say   $1,080,000
In addition to this there would be an expenditure for—
Water-stations            11,000
Station buildings   6,000
Terminal facilities  .  35,000
$1,132,000
Contingencies, 10 per cent        113,200
Total    $1,245,200
With reference to the question of ballast, I spent two days on the examination of the ground
where George Hart and Charles AIcLean believed that there was a whole mountain of good
gravel. I would say that this was a general belief and originated during the construction of
the line. I found that this ground was only covered with between 9 inches to 1 foot of clayey
sand and gravel lying on top of clay, and a place described to me as a face of gravel 50 feet
high was just a shale-slide about 1 foot deep.
I took with me on this examination A. R. Hamilton, of Pouce Coupe, and this man has had
a wide experience on steam-shovel work in gravel-pits. When we found that there was not any
gravel, I engaged him to make further search in the vicinity of the railway, because from my
observations of the country I thought that there was reasonable hope that a body of gravel
sufficient for the purpose required could be found. As I was very ill with dysentery I left
Pouce Coupe on the 6th instant vfii Grande Prairie for Edmonton, arriving there on the 8th,
and was unable to travel until the 11th, when I left for A7ictoria. On the 15th instant A. R.
Hamilton wired to state that he had located No. 1 gravel 40 to 50 feet deep. Trace for half a
mile, easy to tap within 2 miles of Pouce Coupe. It would seem from this discovery that the
ballast question has been solved.
To extend the Edmonton, Dunvegan & British Columbia Railway to Pouce Coupe would cost
about $360,000. This line would be about 12 miles long at an average cost of $30,000 per mile,
and it would be possible to connect this line at Pouce Coupe with the Pacific Great Eastern
projected location from the west.
Between Spirit River and the Provincial boundary there are long stretches of barren
country and there are few settlers; there is very little good land until Pouce Coupe is reached.
A greater number of settlers would be served and consequently there would be more business
for the railway if the Edmonton, Dunvegan & British Columbia Railway were extended from
Grande Prairie, connecting up with the Pacific Great Eastern at Swan Lake, and a branch line
built into Pouce Coupe District. The Canadian Northern Railway located a line through this
country, and this line, including the branch line to Pouce Coupe, would be about 90 miles in
length, entailing a capital expenditure of $2,250,000.
Examinations of the Dolly Varden Alines Railway, the Copper Mountain branch of the
Kettle Valley Railway, and other lines of railway and of their power and equipment have also
been made during the year.
Applications for extension of time in which to complete their undertakings made by various
railway-companies have been dealt with. A list of certificates issued during the year is given
in Appendix A.
Accidents which have occurred on railways under the jurisdiction of this Department and
reported as required by the Act are stated in Appendix B.
A list of the railways incorporated under Acts of the Legislature of British Columbia since
1883 is given in Appendix C.
A list of the companies operating logging and industrial railways, with their mileages, etc.,
is given in Appendix D. 11 Geo. 5 Department of Railways. E 41
Balance-sheets, in accordance with the provisions of the " Railway Act," have been filed
by the following railway companies:—
British Columbia & Yukon Railway Company.
Crow's Nest Southern Railway.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
Victoria & Sidney Railway Company.
Victoria Terminal Railway and Ferry Company.
I have the honour to be,
Sir, .
Your obedient servant,
A. F. PROCTOR,
Chief Engineer. ■
E 42
British Columbia.
1921
APPENDICES.
APPENDIX A.
Certificates, 1920.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.—
Minister's approval to operate from Lone Butte to Williams Lake
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.—
Approval of Telephone and Telegraph Tariff 	
Cert. No.
.  452
453
APPENDIX B.
Accident Report, 1920.
Persons injured.
Result.
Cause.
Comox Logging &
Rly. Co.
Samuel Willoughby   . .
Frank   Davison   	
Wilbur  Watson   	
Canadian  Western
Fuel Co., Ltd.
John Barbori   	
Thomas  W.   Harris   . .
Crow's Nest Southern.
W.  M.   Callin   	
Edward C.  Rolette .. .
Clause  Eidstue   	
Ralph  Lotito  	
Dan  Houcher   	
William Farrow	
Mike Pisoney   	
John Kaspei-	
B.  Semenza 	
Earl Slavton  	
Fred Pelletier 	
Tom Dolan   	
Joe Smith  	
George Johns 	
Fatal;  died in  20 minutes   	
Fatal ; lived 20 hours	
Bad scalds on hands, legs, and neck,
but  not  serious    •.
Cut and bruised legs	
Killed instantly  	
Sprained right ankle	
Contused side, fractured rib   	
Injured  spine   	
Fractured  eighth  rib   	
Slight laceration second finger of right
hand    	
Palm festered  	
Ankle twisted  	
Second finger of right hand, soft parts
torn from bone, terminal phalanx..
Finger lacerated 	
Strained ankle  	
Incised wound below inner ankle ...
Contused wound and fracture of middle finger	
Fractured ankle  	
Sprained right wrist	
Locomotive boiler exploded.
Caught between  cars whilst switching.
Fell  between  cars  on  moving train.
Slipped on ice.
Was on  side of car  and struck by  lumber
piled too close to track.
Scaffold broke.
Pell  against push-car when  lifting it from
track.
Scratched finger.
Cot sliver in palm of hand.
Starting motor-car, caught foot between ties.
Finger caught in machinery while starting
speeder.
Shaker-bar   slipped   off  post  while   shaking
grates.
Stepped from car to ground and turned ankle.
Pointing  piling  for  removal  of bridge,  axe
glanced off.
While   raising   bridge   hoisting-jack   slipped
and fell on finger.
Slinped on car floor.
Fell from bridge. .
11 Geo. 5
Department of Railways.
E 43
APPENDIX C.
Railways incorporated under Acts of the Legislature of British Columbia since 1883.
Name of Railway.
Cap.
Year.
Remarks.
30
1903
Lapsed.
46
40
60
52
1898
IS 90
1890
1891
..
ii                  i,
"
52
1896
)»                                                             *
Ashcroft,   Barkerville,   &   Fort
49
1906
„
George  Rly
Arrowhead & Kootenay Rly.  ..
47
65
79
1898
1901
1S99
"
Atlin  Short -Line  Rly.  & Navi
gation   Co.
80
1897
,,
Barkerville,   Ashcroft   &   Kamloops   Rly.
Bedlington & Nelson Rly	
46
1S97
..
47
1897
Declared for public benefit, c. 53, 1899.
Bedlington   &   West   Kootenay
Rly.
Bentinck  Arm  &  Quesnel   Rly
46
1803
Lapsed.
48
1907
"
Bella   Coola   &   Fraser   Lake..
50
1906
,,
British Columbia & Alaska 'Rly.
56
1910
,,
British Columbia & Northern. .
32
1903
,,
Alackenzie Valley  Rly	
53
1906
,,
British  Columbia  Central   ....
51
1906
ii
ii                      i          ....
57
1910
British   Columbia   Northern   &
52
1906
,,
Alaska   Rly.
V
British   Columbia   Southern   ..
36
1893
ji.mended, c. 47, 1893 ; repealed, c. 53, 1894 ; c. 39. 1894 ;
c. 4, 1896 ; c. 53, 1896; c. 33, 1897.    Declared for public benefit, c. 36. 1897.
British Columbia Electric Rly. .
Vancouver   Street   Rly   ...
31
1SS6
Lapsed.
ii                  i.
38
1S89
Incorporation.
Vancouver  Electric  Rly  &
51
1890
Amendment.
& Light Co.
National Electric Tramway
39
1889
Victoria Electric Rly. & Light Co., c. 62, 1894.
& Light Co.
Ditto    	
52
65
1890
1890
Amendment.
Westminster Street Rly.  . .
Westminster   &   Vancouver
67
1890
Amended.
Tramway   Co.
British   Columbia   Electric
49
1890
A
Co.
(Act to amalgamate Westminster Street Rly. & Westmin-
Ditto   	
71
si
1891
18 9 4
J      ster & Vancouver Tramway Co.
Amended.     Land grant.
Incorporation.
Consolidated  Rly.  &  Light
Co.
Ditto    	
56
1894
55
1896
Amendment.
Victoria    Electric    Rly.    &
63
1894
City of Victoria to supply light and power.
Light   Co.
Victoria & British Columbia
81
1897
Supply electric  light and  power in  and around  City of
Klec.  Rly. Co. Agreement
Victoria.
British Columbia Yukon Rly. Co.
49
1897
Operating.
Burrard  Inlet & Fraser Valley
Rly.
Burrard Inlet Rly. & Ferry Co...
54
1891
Amended, c. 48, 1893, and c.  59, 1895.     Lapsed.
53
1891
Lapsed.
Canadian North-eastern Rly.  . .
74
1911
48
1892
,
3
1910
Main Lines.—Agreement.
Canadian Northern Pacific Rly.
4
1910
(a.)  Yellowhead Pass to Vancouver, completed:   (6.)  Victoria to Barclay Sound, time extended to July 1st. 1917.
,2
32
1912
Barclay Sound to Nootka Sound, time extended to July 1st,
1917.
Branch   Lines.— (a.)   Westminster   Bridge   to   Vancouver,
„
57
1913
time   extended  to   July   1st.   1917 ;   (ft.l   Westminster
Bridge to Steveston. time extended to July 1st,  1917 ;
(c.)   Victoria to  Patricia Bay, completed.
,,             ,,             ,,
58
1913
Amendment to e. 4. 1910.
"
59
1913
Terminals.—Port   Mann,   New   Westminster,   Vancouver,
Victoria. Steveston, and Patricia Bay.
21                           11                           1,
61
1914
Further aid towards construction.
"
62
1914
Amendment to  c.   57.   1913.     Declared for public benefit,
Order in Council, February 20th, 1917.
Canadian  Pacific Rly	
11
1880
Land grant.
Canadian Western Central Rly.
20
1889
Land subsidy.
i.
34
1889
Incorporation.     Amended, c. 40, 1890; c. 36, 1892; c. 39,
1893 ; c. 4, 1895; c. 35. 1897.    Lapsed.
50
1898
Lapsed.
Cariboo,   Barkerville  &  Willow
62
1910
River  Rly.
Cariboo Rly. (Ashcroft&Cariboo)
55
1897
Amendment, c. 50, 1897.    Lapsed.
Cassiar  Central  Rly	
35
1S97
Crown grant.
	
52
1897
Incorporation.     Lapsed. E 44
British Columbia.
1921
APPENDIX C—Continued.
Railways incorporated under Acts of the Legislature of British Columbia—Continued.
Name of Railway.
Cap.
Year.
68
1901
55
61
1891
1890
21
62
1889
1890
25
1883
8
54
1896
1S96
69
1901
58
71
63
59
1904
1901
1910
1904
72
44
1901
1888
72
58
.  73
57
1888
1908
1901
1894
34
52
52
61
53
60
13
1887
1898
1907
1897
1898
1908
1875
26
33
1903
1912
33
52
63
26
54
65
19
1903
1909
1905
1883
1909
1910
1908
66
1911
59
55
.1894
1909
68
53
1891
1907
67
1910
61
77
68
83
48
78
58
1908
1901
1910
1899
1900
1901
1906
58
37
52
1897
1892
1892
52
26
35
53
54
55
63
1893
1910
1912
1912
1898
1898
1893
25
35
34
1887
1887
1903
Remarks.
Chilkat & Klehine Rly. & Navigation   Co.
Chilliwack  Rly	
Columbia & Carbonate Mountain
Rly.
Columbia & Kootenay Rly	
Columbia   &   Kootenay   Rly.   &
Transportation Co.
Columbia & Western  Rly	
Coast-Kootenay   Rly	
Coast-Yukon Rly	
Comox & Cape Scott Rly	
Comox ILogging & Rly. Co.   . . .
Cowichan, Alberni&Port Rupert
Rly.
Crawford Bay Rly	
Crow's  Nest  &  Kootenay (Lake
Rly-,
Ditto.  . 	
Crow's Nest & Northern Rly. . .
Crow's Nest Southern Rly	
Delta,    New    Westminster,    &
Eastern Rly.
Dolly  Varden  Mines  Rly	
Delta Rly	
Downie Creek  Rly	
East Kootenay Logging Rly.  . .
East Kootenay  Rly	
East Kootenay Valley Rly. . . .
Eastern British Columbia Rly
Esquimalt & Nanaimo Rly.   . . .
Flathead Valley Rly.   .*	
Fording Valley Rly	
Fraser River Rly	
Graham Island Rly	
Grand Trunk Pacific Ely'.   ..'.'.
Grouse Mountain Scenic Incline
Rly.
Hall, Mines, Ltd., Tramway Act
Hardy   Bay  &   Quatsino   Sound
Rly.
Harrison Hot Springs Tramwaj
Howe Sound, Pemberton Valley
& Northern Rly.
Howe Sound & Northern Rly...
Hudson Bay Pacific Rly	
Imperial Pacific Rly	
Island Valley  Rly	
Kamloops & Atlin Rly	
Kamloops   &   Yellowhead   Pass
Rly.
Kaslo & Lardo-Duncan Rly.   ..
Kaslo  & Slocan   Rly	
Kaslo & Slocan Tramway Co.
Kettle  River Valley  Rly.   ..
Kitimat   Rly	
Kootenay'& North-west Rly.
Kootenay Lake  Shore & Lardo
Rly.
Kootenay & Athabasca Rly.  ..
Kootenay, Cariboo & Pacific Rly.
Lapsed.
Declared for public benefit, c. 43, 1893.    Not built.
Lapsed.
Land subsidy.
Amended, c. 49,  1892 ; c.  60, 1895.    Declared for public
benefit, c. 80, 1890.
Amended, c. 24, 1884 ; c. 21, 1889 ; c. 41, 1890.    Lapsed.
Subsidy Act.    Repealed, c. 8. 1903.
Incorporation.    Amended, c. 12, 1898; c. 14, 1899; c. 4,
1900 ; c. 70, 1901 ; c. 9, 1903 ; c. 9, 1906.    Declared for
public benefit, c. 61, 1898.
Amended c. 9, i902.    Declared for public benefit, c. 199,
1903.
Lapsed.
Operating.
Amended, c. 54, 1906.    Lapsed.
Lapsed.
Incorporation. Amended, c. 63,1890 ; c. 56, 1891. Repealed,
c.53, 1894.    Lapsed.
Land grant.
Amended, c. 64, 1911.     Lapsed.
Operating (G.N.R. or V.V. & E. Rly.).
Amended, c. 54, 1897.    Lapsed.
Act,   1917.    Time   to   complete,   December   31st,   1918;
amended,  c.   22,   1919.    Vested in  Taylor  Engineering
Co., Ltd., c. 92, 1920.
Lapsed.
Operating.
Lapsed.
Operating.
Land grant.   Repealed, c. 16, 1882.  Amended, c. 28, 188S ;
c. 45, 1888.
Settlers' Rights Act.
Agreement.     Amended,  c.  60,  1913.    Declared for  public
benefit, c. 90, 1909.
Lapsed.
Amendment.    Time extended to 1919.
Crown grant.    Amended, c. 22, 1909 ; c. 34, 1912.    Operating.
Time extended to April 1st, 1921.
Lapsed.
$5,000 deposit with Minister o£ Finance.
Amendment   to   c.
Great Eastern.
Lapsed.
53,   1907.    Amalgamated  with  Pacific
Land grant.
Incorporation. Amended, c. 41, 1894 ; c. 61. 1894 ; c. 36,
1897 ; C P.R. was paid $100,000 for reconstructing Kaslo
& Slocan Rly.  (c. 37, 1912.)    Now operating.
Lapsed.
Agreement.
Ratify Agreement. Jan. 12th, 1912. !- Leased to C.P.R.
By-law operating. J
Amended, c. 84, 1899.    Lapsed.
Amended, e. 85, 1899.    Lapsed.
Lapsed.
Land grant.     Lapsed.
Incorporation.    Lapsed.
Lapsed. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Railways.
E 45
APPENDIX C—Continued.
Railways incorporated under Acts of the Legislature of British Columbia—Continued.
Name of Railway.
Cap.
Year.
Remarks.
Kootenay   Central   Rly	
79
1901
Lapsed.
35
1903
Declared for the public benefit.
Kootenay Rly. & Navigation Co.
29
1888
Land grant.     Lapsed.
,,                    ,,
46
1888
Change of title.     Lapsed.
Columbia   &   Kootenay   Rly.   &
35
1889
Lapsed.
Navigation  Co.
Ladysmith  Lumber Co. Rly.   . .
62
1908
Operating.
80
1901
Lapsed.
Lardeau & Kootenay Rly	
54
1893
64
57
1897
1891
Liverpool & Canoe Pass Rly.  . .
„
56
1909
Lapsed, $5,000 deposited with Minister of Finance.
69
1910
Time extended to March 28th, 1919.
Mid-Provincial & Nechako Rly.
81
1901
Amended, c. 45, 1902. Repealed, c. 45, 1902. Amended,
c. 36, 1904 ; c. 60, 1906.    Lapsed.
44
1899
Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Rly
37
1903
Mountain  Tramway  &  Electric
Rly.
Mount Tolmie Park & Cordova
Bay Rly.
Naas & Skeena Rivers Rly.   . . .
56
1S98
Lapsed.
55
1893
"
69
1911
Amended, c. 79, 1916.    Extension of time to May 31st, 1920.
Nakusp & Slocan Rly	
56
1S93
Amended, c. 43, 1894. Taken over by C.P.R., under c. 64,
1919.                                                                             *
66
1897
Lapsed.
Nanaimo Electric Tramway Co.
69
1891
Nanaimo  Railway Act   	
25
1881
Nelson & Port Sheppard Rly.. .
58
1891
Amended, c. 42. 1894 ; c. 37, 1837.
38
1892
Land grant.    Declared for the public benefit, c. 57, 1893.
42
1894
Amended, c. 42, 1894 ; c. 37, 1897.
New  Westminster  Port - Moody
Rly.
14
1882
Amended, c. 25', 1884.     Lapsed.
57
IS 93
Lapsed.
New Westminster & Vancouver
37
1889
Amended, c. 67, 1892 ; c. -60, 1896.    Lapsed.
Short Line Rly.
New Westminster   Southern Rly.
27
1883
Lapsed.
"     .        "             "
36
18S7
Amended, c. 36, 1889. Operating. G.N.P. purchased from
Port Kells to Bridge, New Westminster. Since sold to
Canadian Northern.
Nicola,    Kamloops    &   Similka
47
1S91
Amended, c. 3S, 1903.    Declared for public benefit, c. 164,
meen Coal & Rly. Co.
1903.
Nicola Valley Rly	
59
1891
Declared for the public benefit.
Chap. 50, 1892.
Amended, c. 86, 1899.    Lapsed.
37
1893
North  Star & Arrow Lake Rly.
58
1898
Northern Vancouver Island Rly.
71
1910
I_>                                          21                     •"   ,2
70
1911
Time extended to March 28th, 1919. $5,000 deposited
with Minister of Finance.
Okanagan & Kootenay Rly.   . ..
40
1890
Lapsed.
ii                    ;i               • • •
64
1890
59
1893
34
1913
Amended, c. 61. 1913 ; c. 62, 1913 ; c. 65, 1914.
„                    ,,                ....
36
1912
Under construction.
Pacific Northern & Eastern Rly.
39
1903
Lapsed.
Pacific Northern & Omineca Rly.
50
1900
Amended, c. 55, 1902 ; c. 77. 1'902 ; c. 40. 1903; c. 67,.
1905 ; c. 58, 1909. Lapsed. Security deposited with
Minister of Finance.
73
1910
Lapsed.
73
1911
74
1910
Portland & Stickine Rly	
59
1898
Portland Canal Short .Line  . . .
59
1909
Amended, c. 74, 1911. Now called Canadian North-eastern.
Rly.    Abandoned.
Portland   Canal   Rly	
56
1907
Lapsed.
Port   Moody,    Indian   River   &
75
1910
Northern  Rly.
Prince Rupert & North Simpson
60
1909
ii
Rly.
42
1903
1(
Queen   Charlotte   Island   Rly.. .
83
1901
Amended, c. 57, 1907.
,,                    ,,
63
1905
Lapsed.                                      .   .
76
1910
58
1907
61
1893
Declared for public benefit, c. 60, 1895.
Revelstoke & Cassiar Rly	
61
1898
Lapsed.
Rock Bay & Salmon River Rly
51
1900
St. Mary's & Cherry Creek Rly.
64
1906
St. Mary's Valley Rly	
65
1906
Shuswap & Okanagan Rly.   . . .
26
1887
Amended, c. 30, 1888 ; c. 42, 1890 ; c. 37, 1891.
Skeena River & Eastern Rly.. .
62
1898
Lapsed.
Skeena River Rly. Colonization
63
1898
& Exploration  Co.
South-east Kootenay Rly	
64
1898
63
1906
Amended, c. 61, 1909.    Time extended to May 27th, 1919..
South  Kootenay Rly	
SS
1898
Lapsed.
South Okanagan Rly	
66
1906
•• E 46
British Columbia.
1921
APPENDIX C—Continued.
Railways incorporated under Acts of the Legislature of British Columbia—Continued.
Name of Railway.
Cap.
Year.
Remarks.
Stave Valley  Rly	
70
1905
Lapsed.
Stiekeen & Teslin Rly.  Naviga
71
1897
>f
tion & Colonization Co.
Toad Mountain & Nelson Tram
70
1891
Amended, c. 44, 1898 ; c. 40, 1900.
way Incorporation
Ditto   	
185
189i7
Chap.   58,  1901.  an  Act  respecting  the  Incorporation   of
Tramway, Telephone, and Telegraph Companies.
Tramway   Inspection    	
50
1910
Amended, c. 51, 1911.
Upper   Columbia   Navigation   &
50
1891
Tramway Co.    .
Vancouver & Grand Forks Rly.
84
1901
Lapsed.
Vancouver & Lulu Island Elec
61
1891
tric Rly. & Improvement Co.
Vancouver .&  Lulu  Island  Rly.
60
1891
Amended, c.  73,  1897 ;  c.  52,  1900.    Declared for
benefit, c. 86, 1901.
public
Vancouver & Nicola Valley Rly
63
1908
Amended, c. 80, 1910.     Lapsed.
Vancouver & Northern Rly.   . . .
64
1909
Lapsed.
Vancouver & Westminster  Rly.
■53
1900
Amended, c. 78, 1902.
Vancouver Island Hydro-electric
Incorporated, joint-stock company, November 12th,
1912.
& Tramway Co., Ltd.
Lapsed.
Vancouver Land & Rly.  Co.   . .
15
1882
Lapsed.
Vancouver-Nanaimo Rlv. Trans-
74
1897
fer Co.#
Vancouver,   Northern   &   Yukon
Rly.
Vancouver,      Northern,      Peace
89
1899
Amended, e. 55, 1900.    Lapsed.
62
1891
Lapsed.
River & Alaska Rly. & Navi
gation  Co.
Vancouver.   Victoria  & Eastern
75
1897
Declared for public benefit, c. 172, 1905.
Rly. & Navigation Co.
Vernon  &  Okanagan   Rly	
63
189(1
Lapsed.
Victoria & Barkley  Sound  Rly.
65
1909
,,
Victoria   &   Northern   America
Rly.
Victoria & Saanich Rly	
64
1891
>.
16
1886
29
1886
„
Victoria    &    Seymour    Narrows
Rly.
Victoria & Sidney Rly	
79
1902
39
66
1892
1892
fncm-poi-ation.   } Operated by G.N.R.
Victoria    &    Yellowhead    Pass
70
190-2
Lapsed.
Rly.  Aid
Victoria Terminal Rly. & Ferry
Co.
85
1901
AlByni1aew. °' 34' 1M5' } Operated by G.N.R.
Ditto    	
86
64
1901
18:94
Amended, c. 76, 1897.    Lapsed.     "•                           ,
Victoria,    Vancouver   &    West
minster
Victoria Harbour Rly. Co	
44
1911
Lapsed.
Wellington Colliery Rly	
28
18S3
„
44
1911
Operating.
87
1901
Lapsed.
Yukon    Mining    &    Trading    &
38
1897
Transportation   Co.
Ditto   	
77
1897
Lapsed. 11 Geo. 5
Department of Railways.
E 47
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British Columbia.
1921
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