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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1919 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1920

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 —
ANNUAL REPORT
of
THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN
OF   THE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1919
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY   OF   THE   LEGISLATIVE   ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by William H. Cullin, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1020.  To Colonel the Honourable Edavard Gawler Prior,
A Member of the King's Privy Council for Canada,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Eeport of Provincial Game
Warden for the year ending December 31st, 1919.
-T. W. de B. FAEEIS,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., February 11th, 1920.
o 3 Provincial Game Warden's Office,
Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1920.
Honourable J. W. de B. F arris, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report for the year which ended
December 31st, 1919.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Wm. G. McMYNN,
Provincial Game Warden.
O 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Letter of Transmittal   3
Report—■
Summary    7
Convictions under the " Game Act"   8
Accidents  8
Game Associations    8
Regulations and Bounties   9
Pheasant-farm at Colquitz   9
Fur-farming     9
Appendix A.—Reports of Members of the Game Conservation Board—■
Report of Dr. A. R. Baker, Chairman  11
Report of Mr. F. H. Mobley, Member  12
Report of Mr. F. A. Dunn, Member   12
Appendix B.—Financial—
Revenue from Resident Firearms Licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1919  13
Revenue from Non-resident Firearms Licences from January 1st to May 31st, 1919  13
Revenue from Resident Firearms Licences from June 1st to December 31st, 1919  14
Revenue from Non-resident Firearms Licences from June 1st to December 31st, 1919.... 15
Destruction of AVolves, Cougars, Coyotes, Owls, etc., Game Office Salaries and Expenses,
Travelling Expenses of the Game Conservation Board, and Upkeep of Pheasant-farm 16
Appendix C—Enforcement of the " Game Act"—
Prosecutions     18
Confiscation of Firearms    20
Confiscation of Furs  20
Accidents with Firearms    21
Appendix D.—Officers, Game Associations, and Guides—
List of Provincial Police Officers   22
List of Game Associations   25
List of Guides    25
Appendix E.—Game Propagation—■
Report of Provincial Government Pheasant-farm at Colquitz  27
Fur-farming     28
Appendix F.—Regulations and Game killed—
Game Regulations, 1919   28
Bounties  29
Big Game killed (Non-resident and Resident)    30
Fur-bearing Animals killed   30
O 5  REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1919.
Summary.
The Superintendent of Provincial Police being ex-officio Provincial Game Warden of tbe
Province, and all Provincial constables being Game Wardens under tbe " Game Act," the
enforcement of the " Game Act" during the year 1919 has been carried out by the Provincial
Police as a part of their regular duties.
I am glad to report that the revenue from game licences during the year 1919 has been the
greatest in any year since the organization of the Game Department, reaching a total of $116,135,
and that the total number of convictions for infractions of the " Game Act" numbered 235,
being 13S more than in the year 1917.
The duties of the Provincial Police are extremely varied. These duties include, in addition
to the general policing of the whole Province, the work of Sanitary Inspectors for the Health
Department (in connection with which work 282 written reports were made during the year) ;
Weed Inspectors and Brand Inspectors for the Agriculture Department (the latter inspections
frequently necessitating special trips at all seasons and hours to avoid delaying the shipment
of cattle) ; making investigations for the Prohibition Commissioner, as well as collecting about
half a million dollars in revenue for the Finance Department during the year under the " Game
Act," the " Motor-traffic Regulation Act," the " Amusements Tax Act," the " Sheep Protection
Act," the "Trade Licences Act," the "Pool-rooms Act," and the "Poll-tax Act"; reporting on
fires for the Fire Insurance Department, etc. As all of these duties are carried out simultaneously with the enforcement of the " Game Act" and other Provincial Acts, it Is practically
impossible to segregate expenses incurred in the carrying-out of these different duties and
charge them to the department for whom such services have been performed.
On this account all expenses which have been incurred in the enforcement of the " Game
Act" during the present fiscal year, other than those included in Appendix B, page 13, of this
report, have been charged directly to the general police vote.
I approve of these ever-increasing duties being taken over by the Provincial Police, as this
policy is undoubtedly an economical one for the Government, although it also means a slightly
Increased number of Provincial Police officers being employed to take care of the very much
increased volume of work.
The present Provincial Police Force consists of about 145 officers, who are Game Wardens,
and during the last open game season about fifteen additional special constables were employed
for game-protection purposes. This number, however, compares very favourably with conditions
in 1917, when there were separate staffs of Provincial Police, Game Wardens, Brand Inspectors,
AVeed Inspectors, etc., in these different departments.
The success in the administration of the " Game Act" by the Provincial Police during the
year 1919 is more marked than in any previous year, and in this regard the following table
giving a comparison of statistics for the years 1917, 1918, and 1919 is interesting:—
Calendar Year.
s~
If
w a
en as
031
a) g
$ £
Oo
a &
p9'
E.S
£ ^ _ c3 S3
&*&& OH
1917
1918
1919
111
194
267
97
159
235
10
13
25
5
36
$1,763 50
3,341 00
6,024 50
? 65,487 50
75,537 00
116,135 00
In Appendix D, page 22, of this report is given a list of Provincial Police officers as of
December 31st, 1919, together with an analysis of the sources of revenue derived from the sale
of game licences for the year 1919. Convictions under the " Game Act."
A detailed statement in tabular form of the 235 convictions which were obtained for
infringements of the " Game Act " is shown in Appendix C, page IS, of this report. The following
cases are of particular interest:—■
Poaching.—There has always been considerable difficulty in the enforcement of the " Game
Act" in the easterly and south-easterly portions of the Province, where, owing to the direction
of the watercourses and other topographical conditions, access is more readily obtained from
Alberta and the United States than from passes in the Province of British Columbia.
In order to counteract illegal trapping in these outlying sections it was necessary in March
last for Deputy Inspector Owen, of Fernie, to organize an expedition into the Flathead country.
Through Mr. Benjamin Lawton, Chief Game Guardian of Alberta, the co-operation of the Alberta
Game Department was secured, and their representatives, Messrs. Riviere and Bowers, together
with Mr. F. E. Maunders, Superintendent of the Dominion Parks Branch, Waterton Park, Alberta,
rendered every possible assistance in making the expedition a success.
This trip was very successful, resulting in eight convictions, together with the confiscation
of two revolvers, three rifles, 540 rounds of ammunition, fifty-three traps, three marten-skins,
seven weasel-skins, and one goat-skin.
These convictions have had a most discouraging effect upon poachers in that section, and
Deputy Inspector Owen deserves credit for his energetic action therein.
Running Deer with Dogs.—On informations laid by Provincial Constable John A. Hird, of the
police boat " Watla," John McKee, Esq., Police Magistrate at Ladner, on November 27th last,
convicted six men of unlawfully hunting deer with dogs on November 23rd near Ladner. Five of
these men were each fined $100 and costs and the sixth man was fined $50 and costs. Three rifles
and two shotguns which were found in possession of these men were confiscated.
Pit-lamping.—Pit-lamping is one of the most difficult offences about which to secure sufficient
evidence to justify a conviction under the " Game Act." On November 15th last four well-known
men of Cumberland were convicted by C. H. Bevor-Potts, Esq., Stipendiary Magistrate of
Nanaimo, on information laid by Provincial Constables H. B. Dawley and G. A. Mortimer, of
being unlawfully in possession of firearms and head-lights near Union Bay during the night of
November 15th, 1919. The accused were each sentenced to sixty days' imprisonment in the
Oakalla Prison Farm, and two rifles and two shotguns found in possession of these men were
confiscated.
Accidents due to Careless Handling of Firearms.
I regret to report that during the year 1919, owing to the careless handling of firearms, nine
men were killed and twelve were injured.
Cause. Killed.        Injured.
Mistaken for a moose      1
Mistaken for a deer      2 1
Shot by grouse-hunter      1
Other accidental discharges of firearms     5 11
In the case of the killing of Herbert Blakely on December 17th last by Pierre Legace in
mistake for a deer, Legace has been committed for trial on the charge of manslaughter, and his
case will come up for trial at the next spring assizes.
Further particulars of these hunting accidents are shown in Appendix C, page 18, of this
report.
Game Associations.
The game laws are primarily intended to afford protection to the game, fur-bearing animals,
and other wild life within the Province, and if we are to continue to enjoy them the " Game Act"
and other enabling Acts must be strictly enforced.
Every good citizen should be willing to aid the Game Wardens in the carrying-out of their
work and to give them at all times any necessary information within their power to prosecute
the man who illegally hunts out of season, the pit-lamper, and the game-hog.
The Department is therefore particularly anxious to secure the full support of the public
in the enforcement of the " Game Act." With this end in view and with the energetic co-operation
of Dr. A. R. Baker and Mr. R. E. Hose, respectively Chairman and Secretary of the Game Con- 10 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
O 9
servation Board, no less than fifteen new game associations have been formed throughout the
Province. A list of all the game associations in the Province is shown in Appendix D, page
22, of this report.
Regulations and Bounties.
During the year very little money was paid out by the Department in the form of bounties.
This was due to the bounty regulations stipulating that all coyote-pelts had to be surrendered
to the Government in order to collect the bounty thereon, and the present high price of furs
made it more profitable to sell most of the pelts obtained to the fur-buyers.
As wolves and panthers appear to be rapidly increasing in some parts of the Province, the
bounty for the destruction of these animals was increased on September 1st, 1919, from $10 to
$15 on each mature wolf killed and from $15 to $25 on each mature panther killed within the
Province. Bounties are also paid for the killing of the young of these animals at half of the
above rates.
In the Game Regulations, 1919, a synopsis of which is given in Appendix F, page 28, of this
report, no open season is allowed on beaver throughout the Province. This step was deemed
necessary on account of the rapidly decreasing numbers of these important fur-bearing animals.
In this connection the following notice was published in the British Columbia Gazette, as well
as widely distributed throughout the Province by the police, as a preliminary step to the
enforcement of a close season:—
Notice re Beaver under Section 33 of the " Game Act."
As the Game Regulations of 1919 do not provide any open season for beaver, no person shall now
have in his possession within the Province of British Columbia any part of any beaver or any
undressed beaver-pelts without the permission in writing of the Provincial Game Warden, and the
burden of proof as to the time of killing or taking of any such beaver shall be upon the person found
in possession thereof.
Any person who now believes that he is rightfully in possession of any undressed beaver-pelt in
the Province of British Columbia should forthwith furnish particulars thereof to the Provincial Game
Warden and apply to him for a permit to legally retain possession of the same.
Wm. G. McMynn,
Provincial Game Warden.
Victoria, B.C.,
November 20th, 1919.
There was also instituted a system by which every undressed beaver-pelt legally in possession
might be numbered and marked for identification by a representative of this Department.
Pheasant-farm at Colquitz.
A^ery satisfactory results were obtained at the Provincial Government pheasant-farm at
Colquitz during the year 1919 by Provincial Constable A. P. Cummins.
In this period 91 old pheasants and 1,225 young pheasants were distributed in different parts
of the Province. One hundred young pheasants were added to the stock of the farm. The
details of the operations are shown in Mr. Cummins's statement which is printed on page 27
of this report.
Fur-farming.
During the year all permits which were issued to applicants for the purpose of fur-farming
were made to terminate at the end of the current year, and applications for renewals of such
permits were required to he made on the following form. The object of this is twofold—first to
secure reliable information regarding the results being obtained by fur-farmers in the Province,
and also an undertaking from all fur-farmers that the flesh of game animals or birds will not
be used in the business of fur-farming. Whenever these conditions have been complied with
permits have been renewed.
In the Matter of the " Game Act," and in the Matter of Fur-farming under said Act.
The undersigned hereby makes application to the Provincial Game Warden at Victoria, B.C for
a renewal of Permit No. for the year ending December 31st, 19        , and in support thereof "now
gives full and correct answers to the following questions, namely:—
1. Official description of the farm on which a fur-farming business is now carried on under said
Permit No.        , with the name and address of owner of said farm O 10
British Columbia.
1920
2. Particulars of pens, buildings, and other facilities now on said farm and used in said business,
with values thereof respectively
3. Number and description of fur-bearing animals now on said farm, where and when obtained,
and individual values thereof
4. Gross proceeds of the business during 1919, with detailed particulars how such proceeds were
obtained
5. To the date hereof, has the flesh of any game animals or birds been fed to any fur-bearing
animals on the said farm during the current year?
6. Does the applicant now hereby undertake that the flesh of game_ animals or birds will not be
fed to any fur-bearing animals on said farm if this application for renewal of Permit No. is
granted ?
In testimony whereof the said applicant has hereunto set his hand this day of
19        , at , B.C.
(Signature of Applicant in full.)
A list of fur-farms, showing particulars of animals in captivity as of August 1st, 1919, is
shown in Appendix E, page 27, of this report.
Immediately following will be found interesting reports by Dr. A. R. Baker, Chairman, and
Messrs. F. H. Mobley and F. A. Dunn, members of the Game Conservation Board.   These reports
deal concisely with the game conditions in the different sections of the Province which have come
particularly under their observation during the past year. 10 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
O 11
APPENDICES TO GAME REPORT.
APPENDIX A.
REPORTS OF MEMBERS OF THE GAME CONSERVATION BOARD.
Report of Dr. A. R. Bakee, Chairman of the Game
Conservation Board. ,
Grouse.—During the open season for grouse on the Mainland from September 13th to
Septemher 28th, 1919, I visited nearly all that.territory lying to the south of the Fraser River,
from the Delta to the Chilliwack District, and found that willow-grouse were not very plentiful,
except in small areas, principally that portion of Chilliwack District that is traversed by the.
Vedder River from its source (Kultus Lake) to Sumas Lake. There were very few willow-grouse
to be found elsewhere, and from my observation it would be well if these birds were protected
for a year or more in order that they may be allowed to increase.
I also visited nearly all sections north of the Fraser River, including Nicomen Island, Hatzic
Prairie, and Pitt Meadows District. In these districts I found willow-grouse to be more plentiful,
and also found that there were considerable number of blue grouse, although not in sufficient
quantities to warrant any long open season.
Pheasants.—During the open season I visited all those parts of the Fraser A'alley where
pheasants are found, also Saanich, Duncan, and Saltspring Island, and at that time from reports
received from hunters it would have appeared that these birds were scarce.
I have investigated since the closing of the season, and find that the pheasants are quite
plentiful; in fact, very much more so than they were at this season a year ago, especially in
Surrey and Chilliwack and also on Saltspring Island.
The apparent scarcity during the open season, to my mind, was due to the increased number
of hunters who were out continually, causing the birds to seek cover in the wooded districts
instead of feeding in the fields, as they do when they are not disturbed too much.
I find that there is not a shortage of hen pheasants; in fact, I consider that there are too
many for the proper proportion for breeding purposes.
Migratory Birds (Ducks, Geese, Brant, Snipe, etc.).—To my mind this has been the best
season for these birds that we have had for several years, as they have been very plentiful
throughout the entire valley of the Fraser.
The opening of the season at a later date as we did this year has shown quite conclusively
that the local-bred birds do not leave for the south until after they have been disturbed on their
resting-grounds, which proves to my mind that some action should be taken to provide for
migratory-bird sanctuaries, so that the Fraser Valley will become the breeding-grounds for large
quantities of ducks, snipe, etc.
Deer.—Deer have been quite plentiful on the portions of the Lower Mainland, also on many
of the Gulf Islands; our chief difficulty being lack of adequate means for the prevention of the
use of dogs and pit-lamps.
Noxious Animals.—There seems to be quite a migration of coyotes into the Fraser Valley
this year; in fact, we find these animals in places where they have not been seen for years
previously in the eastern portion of the Chilliwack District and Agassiz. In fact, coyotes have
formed a great amount of destruction among our game birds in all that territory adjacent to
Rosedale, and at this season of the year some provision should be made for their destruction by
the constables of their districts.
That portion of the Chilliwack District known as the Camp Slough, and surrounding
territory, two years ago was one of the best pheasant territories. I am sorry to report that
owing to the coyotes there are very few of these birds left, and if some means are not employed
for their destruction they will probably be exterminated before the next breeding season.
Cats.—Domestic cats that are abandoned by the campers and logging camps are one of the
worst pests we have in this section of the country, and although there is nothing on the Statutes
giving us the right to destroy these animals, something should be done in this matter in order
to protect the birds. O 12
British Columbia.
1920
Crows.—The bounty provided for by Order in Council last spring has to my mind been
very beneficial, although I do not believe that there has been a very large amount of money
expended on bounties, but the fact being known that it was the desire of the authorities to try
to do away with these pests has been a great inducement to the hunters to destroy them, and a,
great many have been killed for which no bounty has been asked.
Quail.—About a year ago we liberated quail from Vancouver Island and the highlands back
of North A'ancouver at Oakalla Farm and in Point Grey, and am pleased to inform you that these
birds have done remarkably well. It is my intention to liberate as many of these birds as
possible in the higher lands around Vancouver this spring, also some at Agassiz, where I believe
they will do well.
The pheasants shipped here from the pheasant-farm in Arictoria were liberated at various
points—namly, Chilliwack, Delta, Lulu Island, Pitt Meadows, Nicomen Island, Matsqui, North
Vancouver, and also a few on the Gulf Islands. From all reports they have been beneficial in
improving the stock already there.
Report of Mr. F. H. Mobley, M.P.P., Member of Game Conservation Board.
The big-game conditions throughout the northern part of the Province are about as follows:—
Moose.—Moose are on the increase and are more plentiful, both in the Atlin country and
along the. line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, including all the country north of the
Cariboo, than they have been for years.
Caribou.—Caribou are very scarce, and with the exception of the section in the vicinity
of the head of the Stikine River, very few are to be found.
Sheep.—Sheep are exceedingly scarce throughout the whole of the north.
Deer.—Deer on the Coast are more plentiful than they have been for years past, and they
are in much better condition than usual owing to pasturage conditions.
Bear.—Bear are about holding their own, which I consider good in view of the large number
that are being taken in some sections.
Game Birds.—Geese, ducks, and in fact all water-fowl are about as they were last year.
Grouse.—Both willow and Franklin grouse are much more numerous than they have been
for some time all along the Coast; blue grouse are scarce both on the Coast and in the Interior.
Ptarmigan are slowly coming back, but are scarce yet.
Fur-bearing Animals.—Fur-bearing animals are none too plentiful in any section, but owing
to the extremely high price being paid for furs I anticipate a big catch.
Report of Mr. F. A. Dunn, Member of Game Conservation Board.
Following is the report of investigating tour from Windermere, B.C., through Taggart's Pass,
crossing the Kootenay, Palliser, White River, Fenwick, Blackfoot, White Tail, and Mud Creeks,
to Sheep Creek:—
August 14th, 1919. Sent Special Constable E. A. Powers to AVindermere to round up horses
and shipped provisions and tent by freight.
August 17th.    Special Constable Grangers took his horses from Canai Flats to "Windermere.
August ISth. I went to Windermere by motor-car with camping outfit, blankets, etc.; ninety
miles.
August 19th. Chief Fire Ranger Geo. Watson assigned Fire Warden Oscar Eekstrum to go
with our party as he was familiar with the trails, as it was in his territory. Left Windermere
at 2 p.m. with four saddle-horses and three pack-horses. Made Twin Lakes for camp about nine
miles from Windermere.    Saw quite a number of blue and willow grouse, but no big game.
August 20th. Started from Twin Lakes at 8.30 a.m.; went over Taggart's Pass, 4,470 feet
elevation; arrived at Gooseberry Meadows about 3 p.m.; distance about twelve miles. Found
good camping-place with plenty of feed for the horses; saw one or two white-tail deer and plenty
of grouse, also found a moose-trail through the meadow with fresh signs.
August 21st. Left Gooseberry Meadows about 9 a.m.; forded the Kootenay River about forty
miles above Canal Flats; went up the Kootenay about twelve miles to Salt Lick ; here we found
a trapper's cabin recently erected and camped in it. There is a meadow at this point of probably
between 200 and 300 acres, with a lake of 20 or 30 acres. The water is very "brackish and not
fit to use without boiling. Saw a few goat and sheep on the side-hills, but owing to the very
smoky condition of the atmosphere from fires burning near Skookumchuck was unable to get ■
10 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
O 13
much satisfaction with the glasses. Saw plenty of moose signs, some very large tracks, evidently
two or three different bands of from three to five in each band; found two sets of tepee-poles
where the Indians had been camped early in the spring, and from the hair and bones which lay
around these tepees I am satisfied they had been killing moose or elk. I found that Game Warden
Dawson, of Athalmer, had registered at this camp on August 12th.
August 22nd. Left Salt Lick at 8.30 a.m.; crossed the Palliser River, Fenwick and Cedar
Creeks, and arrived at White River about 5 p.m., about fifteen miles; saw a few white-tail deer
and lots of grouse and fresh bear signs, but could not do any good with the glasses as the smoke
was getting worse. We did not break camp the next day as it looked very much like rain, which
we hoped would come to clear up the smoke. We were disappointed as no rain came, still very
smoky. Caught some very fine trout at this camp from 1 to 1% lb. Saw plenty of moose signs
in this vicinity, a band of at least five having gone up White River, their tracks very plain in
the sand along the bank of the river.
August 23rd.    In camp at White River.
August 24th. Left White River Camp at 8 a.m. and forded White River; stopped at Black-
foot Creek for lunch; made White Tail Creek at 6.30 p.m., seventeen miles. Jumped several
white-tail deer and several coveys of blue and willow grouse, from six to eight in each covey.
August 25th. Left White Tail Creek camp at 8 a.m. for Sheep Creek; crossed the head of
Mud Creek, where we took lunch. This was the only day's travel without a trail. We found
but very little bad going and had to do some cutting of thick windfalls. Arrived at Sheep Creek
about 2 p.m.; thence up Sheep Creek for about three miles; found this trail in bad shape, and
owing to the very smoky condition could not see for one-half mile with glasses. I decided that
it would be a waste of time to continue on to White Swan Lake, so turned hack and camped at
Mud Creek.    Saw more deer on this day's travel than on any other (eighteen miles).
August 26th. Broke camp at Mud Creek at 8.30 a.m. for Canal Flats; arrived there about
1 p.m., fourteen miles; saw six white-tail deer, several large flocks of mallard ducks on the small
lakes along the trail, some golden eagles and porcupines, plenty of grouse. Met Inspector AV. L.
Fernie at Canal Flats, who was returning from a trip to Golden.
August 27th. Sent Special Constable Powers and Fire AVarden Eckstrum to Windermere
with horses and came to Cranbrook by auto.
Summary.—There are plenty of deer and grouse of all kinds in that territory, and between
the Upper Kootenay and Palliser Rivers several bands of moose, as many as five in one band;
did not see any elk or signs of them; it was so smoky could locate but few sheep and goats on
the mountains. The trails were located so that specials will be able to patrol that part of the
country east of the Kootenay River easily.
APPENDIX B.
FINANCIAL.
Revenue derived from the Sale of Resident Firearms Licences, January 1st, 1919,
to May 31st, 1919.
No. Amount.
O.F.L     1,059 $2,647 50
G.F.L        166 830 00
S.F.L        356 3,560 00
Guides             1 5 00
F.F.L        453 	
P.F.L        177 	
Total amount  $7,042 50
Revenue derived from the Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Anglers' Licences,
January 1st, 1919, to May 31st, 1919.
No. Amount.
Season anglers' licences           20 $  100 00
Daily anglers' licences           17 17 00
Total amount     $  117 00 ttish Columbia.
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British Columbia.
1920
Statement of Expenditure foe Period Apbil 1st, 1919, to December 31st, 1919.
Overhead Charges.
Office-
Salaries   $2,689 9S
Stationery     1,30S 62
Advertising        422 15
Rent          300 00
Furnishing and decorating          222 85
Postage        193 26
Stenography         115 05
Telephones           110 74
Telegrams    78 00
Janitor   60 80
Freight and expressage  30 88
Maps     32 20
Sundries  23 40
Light     7 89
  $5,595 82
Travelling expenses—
Chief Game Inspector   $   451 70
Inspection of Elk River Reserve        138 36
Office staff    19 21
Auto-hire         23 00
       632 27
Operating expenses—
Repairs and upkeep, gasolene and garage-rent of
auto used by Chairman   $  221 03
Operating expenses of moving pictures        166 80
       387 83
Radges—
Cost of firearms licence badges for 1919-20        819 95
 $ 7,435 S7
Propagation.
Colquitz Game Farm—
Wages and expenses   $2,287 15
Feed        1,132 31
Rent          315 00
Broody hens        286 75
Coal           108 14
Equipment           102 59
Telephone     2S 40
Light     22 01
Water     11 20
Sundries     2 50
 $4,296 05
Distribution—
Freight on birds    $    45 20
Feed at Oakalla          35 15
Feeding pheasants    6 10
 86 45
      4,382 50 10 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
O 17
Game Conservation Board.
Travelling expenses—
Chairman, expenses to Ottawa   $   535 75
Chairman, local        424 91
  $   960 66
Members, local         438 64
Secretary, local          199 35
 $ 1,598 65
Equipment purchased.
Purchase price of auto for Chairman    $1,523 00
Purchase price of moving pictures        694 50
Purchase price of De Vry projector and accessories ."      352 40
 2,569 90
Claims paid.
For damage by liberated elk  20 00
Total expenditure from April 1st, 1919, to Dec. 31st, 1919 ..  $16,006 92
Recapitulation.
Appropriation for fiscal year 1919-20 as per Vote No. 68    $35,000 00
Less—
Expenditure to December 31st, 1919—
Overhead charges   $ 7,435 87
Propagation         4,3S2 50
Game Conservation Board        1,598 65
Equipment         2,569 90
Claims   20 00
$16,006 92
Bounties paid to December 31st, 1919     2,977 10
 $18,984 02
Balance on hand   $16,015 98 0 18
British Columbia.
1920
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British Columbia.
1920
List of Fibeabms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," Januaey 1st, 1919,
to December 31st, 1919.
Confiscated from.
Magistrate.
Date of
Confiscation.
Place  of
Confiscation.
Kind
confiscated.
Sim, Aleck  	
Brown,  Fred   	
Ardas. Victor	
Bell, H. P	
Campbell, 6	
Allen, W	
Harada,. E.  ............... ,......... ..
Matthews, Ed	
Martin,  D	
Nesbitt, G	
Kamachi, T	
Hiayam, T	
Yamamoto, S	
Hopcott, J. S	
Quong, C	
Pearson, P	
Peyto, K.	
Galium, W	
Morrow, L	
Anderson, C	
Dean, E	
Mossey. Wm	
Conn, T	
Lewis, J	
Izatt, R	
Wilms, R	
Fillinger, F	
Peterson, A	
Johnnie, S	
Gardner, A. P	
Eight convictions obtained by
Deputy Inspector Owen, Fernie.
on his expedition into the Flathead country
C. H. Beevor-Potts. .
J. A. P. Crompton. ..
C. H. Beevor-Potts. .
R. Hewat	
John McKee .......
N.  Binns   	
1919.
Jan.    22
H. Wright
J. McKee .
G.  Rosoman   	
G. Jay  	
J. A. P. Crompton. ,
April
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
July
Aug.
Oct.
Nov.
J. R. Hunnex	
C. H. Beevor-Potts.
J. McKee
G.  Jay  	
C. E. Darling
Dec.
Nov.
28
28
24
11
25
25
25
22
1
1
1
22
27
22
10
26
18
18
8
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
5
29
Nanaimo
Creston .
Nanaimo
Waldo . .
Ladner .
Trail  ...
Ladner
Trail . .
Victoria
Creston .
Salmo   	
Cumberland
Ladner   ..
Vancouver
Victoria   .
Vancouver
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifles.
rifle.
rifle.
shotgun.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
pump-gun.
pump-gun.
pump-gun.
pump-gun.
pump-gun.
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shotgun.
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shotgun.
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and 3 rifles.
List of Pelts confiscated, or teapped undee Permit, disposed of and on Hand.
How obtained.
Purchased by.
Description.
Amount
sold for.
Confiscated
Surrendered for bounty....
Trapped under permit (half
proceeds to Government)
Total	
Hudson's Bay Co.
Hudson's Bay Co.
F. Foster & Co. . ,
3 beaver, 2 musk-rat, 1 mink, 1 bear, 1
goat, 3 marten, 7 weasel
4 coyotes 	
5 beaver  	
$103 70.
15 00
34 50
S153 20
On Hand.—Confiscated, pelts:   3 weasel, 1 mink, 6 musk-rat, 1 bear-skin (mounted) in office
of Provincial Game Warden. 10 Geo. 5
Report op Provincial Game Warden.
O 21
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M»J APPENDIX D.
OFFICERS, GAME ASSOCIATIONS, AND GUIDES.
List of Peovincial Police Officees.
Headquarters, Victoria.
Superintendent's Office—
Superintendent    Wm. G. McMynn   Victoria.
Inspector    F. R. Murray           „
Clerk and Constable D. G. Cox          „
Chief Detective G. A. Hood           „
Clerk    H. H. Clarke 	
Clerk    C. Clark  	
Clerk and Constable T. Conly          „
Provincial Game Warden's Office—
Acting Chief Game Inspector .. R. E. Hose  Victoria.
Clerk and Constable F. R. Butler	
Provincial Motor Licence Office—
Clerk and Constable C. A. Booth  Victoria.
Clerk and Constable W. H. Handley 	
Clerk and Constable  G. H. Jennings          „
Victoria Police District—
Constable   R. Gidley■ -. .Victoria.
„  R. Owens           „
„ A. P. Cummins  Colquitz.
„  S.W. Long         „
„  W. Kier    Duncan.
„  J. N. Rogers   Ganges.
„  H. Bishop   Sidney.
Boundary District.      ,
Chief Constable   J. A. Fraser   Greenwood.
Constable    G. Stanfield  Grand Forks.
 A. E. Spall   Hedley.
„  F. G. Brown   Keremeos.
 W. B. Stewart Midway.
Senior Constable   C. F. Evans  Princeton.
Constable    A. Arden         „
Fort George District.
Deputy Inspector T. W. S. Parsons  South Fort George.
Chief Constable   J. Bourne   „ „
Constable    H Avison  „
 G. E. Ashton   „
 M. H. Mansell 	
„  F. W. Gallagher  Lucerne.
 H. J. McDougall  McBride.
„  W. R. Henley   Vanderhoof.
Fort St. John District.
Chief Constable Harry Taylor  Fort St. John.
Constable    J- A. Freeman         „        „
„  G. J. Duncan  Pouce Coupe. 10 Geo. 5
Report op Provincial Game Warden.
O 23
Hazelton District.
. Smithers.
Chief Constable   J. Kelly   	
Constable    W. J. Service         „
„  S. G. Robinson  Francois Lake.
. „  Sperry Cline   Hazelton.
„  A. Fairbairn  Telkwa.
Kamloops District.
Deputy Inspector W. R. Dunwoody  Kamloops.
Acting Chief Constable Geo. H. Adam   „
Constable and Gaoler A. Noble «  „
Constable    R. Pritchard    „
 P. W. Jupp  Chase.
, F. N. Emmott  Ducks.
„  Alex. Dunbar    Falkland.
„  H. H. Vickers  Mount Olie.
„  J.  Eggleshaw    Savona.
„  J. J. McConnell Sicamous.
North-east Kootenay District.
Chief Constable   R. J. Sutherland Golden.
Constable   F. H. Butwell 	
 B.E.Drew 	
 R. F. Mills  Athalmer.
„  W. H. Dawson           „
 A. E.- Farey  Field.
 J. Mead Revelstoke.
South-east Kootenay District.
Deputy Inspector W. L. Fernie  Fernie.
Acting Chief Constable   W. E. V. Spiller 	
Constable    S. J. McNally  	
„  C. H. Martin  Bull River.
 A. W. Collins Coal Creek.
„  G. W. Shipman Corbin.
 C. Kerr  Cranbrook.
„  M. Gorman Elko.
 J. Walsh Fort Steele.
 R. King  Kimberley.
 H. D. Hughes  Michel.
,.  H. Hughes   Natal.
 A. Dryden   Waldo.
 W. H. Laird Yank.
West Kootenay District.
Chief Constable    Ernest Gammon   Nelson.
Constable   H. W. King 	
, E. A. Vachon Creston.
„  J. W. Chadwick  Kaslo.
,.  ■• A. M. Pearman  Nakusp.
»  Geo. M. Gunn  New Denver.
 Harvey McLaren   Salmo.
,.  J. F. Johnston Trail. O 24
British Columbia.
1920
Lillooet District.
Chief Constable   F. E. Aiken 	
Constable    F. Hekmiller 	
 Walter Bell 	
. Clinton.
 Geo.  Bell   	
„  Geo. H. Greenwood
Nanaimo District.
Chief Constable   A. T. Stephenson 	
Constable    A. D. I. Mustart 	
 F. J.» Fryer  	
 H. N. Wood	
 J. A. Williams	
 H. B. Dawley 	
 G. C. Mortimer	
 J. Russell	
 F. Varney	
Prince Rupert District.
Chief Constable   A. C. Minty 	
Constable    Alexander Saint	
 J. P. Scarlett 	
„  Robert Webster  	
„  Frank Broughton	
 P. Carr 	
„  Russell P. Ponder 	
„  R. A. Beavan  	
„  Robert Gibson	
 A. W. Stone	
 P. S. Jack  	
 H. W. Dodd	
Vancouver District.
Deputy Inspector  W.  Owen   	
Chief Constable   F. Cruickshank	
Senior Constable       . S. North 	
Clerk and Constable J. S. Craig 	
Clerk, Constable, and Cashier .. J. G. Cook 	
Clerk and Constable E. McArthur  	
Constable    H. C. Pyke	
 W. A. Wisley	
 S. S. Saunders 	
 J. A. Thomas	
 J. G. Cunningham  	
 J. A. Hird  	
 R. L. Matthews  	
 T. G. Mason	
 H. A. Laughlan  	
 W. V. Fenton	
 James Callander   	
 J. Macdonald	
 W, J. Voisey	
 W. H. Hadley	
 S. Marshall 	
 W. II. Cameron	
 F. French	
 T. M. Forknall  	
 J. Renner 	
. Hanceville.
. Lillooet.
. 150-Mile House.
. Quesnel.
. Nanaimo.
. Alberni.
. Clayoquot.
. Courtenay.
. Cumberland.
.Ladysmith.
. Quatsino.
. Prince Rupert.
. Alice Arm.
. Atlin.
.Bella Coola.
. Granby Bay.
. Masset.
. Ocean Falls.
.Port Essington.
.Rivers Inlet.
. Stewart.
.Telegraph Creek.
. Vancouver.
. (Launch "Watla.")
.Alert Bay.
.Britannia Beach.
. Chilliwack.
. Ladner.
.Mission City.
.New Westminster.
• . "
. Powell River.
.Quathiaski Cove.
. Rosedale.
. Sechelt.
. Squamish.
. Abbotsford. 10 Geo. 5
Report op Provincial Game Warden.
O 25
Vernon District.
Chief Constable   Geo. A. Carter Vernon.
Constable    J. M. Smith        „
 G. A. Johnson  Enderby.
 J. Rankin  Kelowna.
 E. C. Graham          „
 C. F. Oland Lumby.
 Alex. King  Penticton.
Yale District.
Acting Chief Constable R. W. Bowen Ashcroft.
Constable    W.  Greenwood    Hope.
 T. Smith Lytton.
„  P.  C.  Badman    Merritt.
„  Q. Lodwick   Nicola.
„  A. Strang  North Bend.
December 31st, 1919.
List of Game and Fish Associations.
Northern British Columbia.
Rupert Rod & Gun Association  Prince Rupert.
Omineca District Rod & Gun Club  Smithers.
Fort George District Game Protective Association Prince George.
Central British Columbia.
Harpers Camp Trappers' Association  Harpers Camp.
Kamloops Game & Fish Protective Association  Kamloops.
Salmon Arm Sportsmen's Association Salmon Arm.
North Okanagan Game & Fish Association  Vernon.
South Okanagan Game & Angling Association  Kelowna.
Penticton Fish, Game & Forest Protective Association Penticton.
Kootenay District.
Windermere District Rod & Gun Club  Invermere.
Fernie District Rod & Gun Club  Fernie.
Cranbrook District Rod & Gun Club  Cranbrook.
Nelson District Rod & Gun Club  Nelson.
Creston Game & Fish Association   Creston.
Lower Mainland.
Vancouver Angling & Game Association Vancouver.
Chilliwack Game Protective Association Chilliwack.
North Shore Fish, Game & Forest Protective Society North Vancouver.
Vancouver Island.
Victoria & Island Fish & Game Association  Victoria.
Saltspring Island Rod & Gun Club  Ganges.
Denman Island Fish & Game Protective Association Denman Island.
Comox Fish & Game Protective Association  Courtenay.
List of Guides, Season 1919-20.
Atlin District.
Jack,  Taku    Atlin.
Peace River District.
Taylor, Martin B Pouce Coupe. Cassiar District,
Conover, A. B Clearwater.
Williams, Geo Telegraph Creek.
McClusky, Mike  	
Abesta, Bob   „
Bear Lake Billy   „
Colbert, John     ,,
Frank,  Bennie     ,,
Hyland,  Dennis     „
Inash,  Charlie  „
McKlusky, Pat  	
Dick, Little  . .:	
Johnnie,   Packer     „
Reid, Bob 	
Dougan    „
Decker,  Lou     „
Dick, Lame    „
Martin, Larrie     „
Hengu, Pete  „
Fann, Billy    „
Dunstan, Tom   „
Fort George District.
McPauline, J Rush Valley.
McPauline, F  „
Nelson,  C Dunster.
Bittian, H Grant Brook.
Dennison, Geo. M  „
Hargreaves, Geo. E Tete Jaune Cache.
Renshaw, J. R McBride.
McMillan, Robt Shere.
Hartsell,  C Penny.
Noeboe, J.  R      „
Hartman, M. G      „
Sykes, B. S ,
Plutchison,  J McBride.
Barkerville District.
Kibbee, Frank D Barkerville.
Wendle, Jos	
Mason, Harold  	
Reed, F. de W	
Cochran, J. D	
Foulk, W. A	
Lillooet District.
Manson, W. M Lillooet.
Manson, W. G. C	
Gott, Francis         „
Kootenay District.
Sheek, Wesley    Field.
McCorkell, Bert       „
Townsend, C. S     „
Lawrence, C. G Golden.
Lagace, Pete   Durien.
Lagace, Ray          ., 10 Geo. 5
Report op Provincial Game Warden.
O 27
Kootenay District—Continued.
Stewart, C Galena.
Nixon, W. J.   Brisco.
Hope, J. A ,
Schofield, Bert 	
Lum,  Geo Fort Steele.
White, James    „
Stevens, Earl    Howser.
Woods, Oswald  Natal.
De Clara, John       „
Harmer,  F Elk Valley.
Cork, T	
Lewis, C. J Fernie.
Nicol, Arthur          „
McQuarrie, Neil         „
Dawson, E. J Athalmer.
Kain,  Conrad    Wilmer.
Mawdsley, H Crawford Bay.
APPENDIX E.
GAME PROPAGATION.
Repoet feom Provincial Constable A. P. Cummins on the Opeeations at the Colquetz
Pheasant-farm, Apeil 1st to December 31st, 1919.
Pheasant-rearing Season.
The pheasants started to lay April 19th and some 3,000 eggs were laid during the months of
May and June. The great difficulty in getting suitable broody hens was the cause of a number
of eggs being spoilt.    There were 1,600 young birds hatched.
Vermin destroyed a number of young chicks; for instance, when the first one hundred young
birds were doing well, a cat killed fifteen out of a brood of sixteen in an hour and a half, and
was trapped in the long grass when coming back for the last bird. Then, again, hawks, both
sparrow and sharp-shinned, were constantly taking birds, and sixteen hawks were shot in the
rearing-fields when in the act of or attempting to take birds. Cats were taking birds off and
one was shot after killing a half-grown bird.
A dry spell from May 24th to the middle of August, with exceptionally cold nights, made
insect food, the mainstay of young pheasants, hard to obtain.
List of Birds turned out, Season 1919-20.
Previous to breeding season: 40 birds turned out at Wilkinson Road Gaol and at Elk Lake
Reserve; 18 cock birds turned put on Gulf Islands; 3 Chinese cock birds sent to Mainland;
10 Chinese hen birds turned out locally.
After the breeding season: 16 old Mongolian hen birds and 4 old Mongolian cock birds sent
to Cranbrook.
Breeding stock in pens:  130 Mongolian hen birds and 30 Mongolian cock birds.
Young Pheasants distributed, 1919.
July    7.      50 birds at Rithet's Farm, Saanich.    Aug.   5.     25 birds at Cobble Hill.
60
on Gulf Islands.
Aug.
10.
140    ,
on Mainland.
16.
100    ,
on Mainland.
22.
200    ,
on Mainland.
29.
1C0    ,
on Mainland.
29.
25     ,
at Comox (Mr
5.
50    ,
at Saanichton.
Higgins).
5.
25     ,
at Somenos.
5.
25    ,
at Westholme.
5.
50    ,
vicinity of Victoria.
8.
25     ,
at Duncan  (Mr. Pember
ton).
!3.
100    ,
on Mainland.
250 stray birds from field (local). O 28
British Columbia.
1920
30 young Mongolian cocks.
25 Chinese hens.
13 Chinese cocks.
Young Birds kept for Stock.
100 young birds kept for stock at Colquitz Farm.
Number of Birds in Pens at Present Time.
70 second-year Mongolian hens.
20 second-year Mongolian cocks.
70 young Mongolian hens.
Vermin killed in Neighbourhood of the Colquitz Farm.
140 rats (trapped). 3 crows (shot).
250 blue jays (trapped). 39 cats (trapped).
36 hawks (trapped and shot).
Vermin trapped at Elk Lake Reserve.
9 cats. 1 weasel. 6 hawks.
150 blue jays. 14 rats. 11 racoon.
FOX-FARMERS'   RETUBNS   TO   AUGUST  31ST,   1919.
Address.
Olo Foxes.
Pops bred in
Captivity.
"3
o
H
Additional Foxes lost
0e disposed of.
Name.
CJ
m
ji
o
V
•a
CO
M
CD
>
02
02
O
5
OJ
•a
o
5
-a
CJ
M
2
0
w
Atlin	
1
8*
■5
24
2
1
5
4
2
14
o<
'3
4
2
1
5
6
4
8
a
2
4
14
3
2
1
5
5
2
12
18
13
44
4
5
10
19
11
25
'2
1
'3
10
'4
'4
White & Murphy	
Homfray & Axten	
Atlin	
&
Atlin  	
Bella Coola   	
Sointula   	
Bella Coola   	
Bickle   	
Landry & Demorest  	
D. Laiti  	
B.  D.  Tanton   	
T. W. White  	
Atlin	
Telegraph Creek..
Stikine Pox Farm   	
1
* Not described.
APPENDIX F.
REGULATIONS AND  GAME KILLED.
Schedule of open Seasons.
Moose Sept.  1-Dec.
Caribou Sept.  1-Dec.
Wapiti Oct.    1-Oct.
Mountain-sheep   { j-^f Jg£'
Mountain-goat   Sept.  1-Dec.
Bear Sept. 1-June
15.
15.
15.
15.
15.
15.
30.
Deer Sept. 13-Dec. 15.
Northern.
Duck, snipe, and plover Sept. 6-Dec. 20 .
In Atlin, Fort George, Omineca, and Cariboo Electoral
Districts.
Throughout the Province, except south and east of the
main line of C.N.R. and in Queen Charlotte Islands.
In Columbia, Fernie, and Cranbrook Electoral Districts.
North of the main line of the G.T.P.
In Columbia, Fernie, and Cranbrook Electoral Districts.
Throughout the Province.
Throughout the Province.
Throughout the Province, except in Queen Charlotte Islds.
Eastern.
Sept. 6-Dec. 20
Geese and brant    Sept. 6-Dec. 20    Sept. 6-Dec. 20
Blue grouse*
Sept. 6-Nov. 6 north of Sept. 6-Sept. 21
56th   parallel;    Sept.
6-Sept.   21   south   of
56th parallel
Western.
Sept.  13-Dec.  27  north
of 51st parallel; Oct.
18-Jan   31   south   of
51st parallel.
Sept.  13-Dec.  27  north
of 51st parallel; Nov.
15-Feb.   28   south   of
51st parallel.
Sept. 13-Oct. 17. 10 Geo. 5
Report of Provincial Game Warden.
O 29
Northern.
Willow     grouse*      and Sept. 6-Nov. 6 north of
Franklin 56th   parallel;    Sept.
6-Sept.   21   south   of
56th parallel
Ptarmigan    Sept. 6-Dec. 31
Prairie-chicken   	
Eastern.
Sept. 6-Sept. 21 .
Western.
Sept. 13-Sept. 28.
Pheasantsf
Quail
Sept.    21-Sept.    28,    in
Kamloops Electoral
District
Oct. 27-Nov. 1 in South Oct. 18-Nov. 16.
Okanagan Electoral
District; Oct. 27-Nov.
8 in Similkameen Electoral District
Oct. 27-Nov. 8 in Simil- Oct. 18-Nov. 23 in Cow-
kameen    and    South      ichan,    Esquimalt,
Okanagan Electoral
Districts
European partridges
Saanich   and   Islands
Electoral Districts.
Nov. 21-Nov. 23 in Delta
and Saanich Electoral
Districts.
Foxes    Nov. 1-Mar. 15
All    other    fur - bearing Nov. 1-Apr. 30 .
animals, except beaver
Throughout the Province.
Throughout the Province.
* Except in Delta Electoral District.
t Except in Alberni and Comox Electoral Districts.
Statement of Bounties paid dueing 1919.
Government Agency.
Wolves.
Cougars.    Coyotes. |   Crows.
B.H. Owls.
Mainland.
Atlin   •	
Ashcroft  	
Clinton   	
Cranbrook   	
Fairview	
Fernie	
Fort George	
Fort Fraser 	
Fort St. John  	
Golden 	
Grand Forks 	
Greenwood   	
150-Mile House	
Smithers	
Kamloops  	
Kaslo	
Lillooet	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
Nicola  	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton   	
Quesnel	
Revelstoke   	
Rossland	
Telegraph Creek	
Vernon   	
Vancouver   	
Vancouver Island
Alberni 	
Cumberland  	
Duncan	
Nanaimo	
Victoria   	
Totals  	
47
53
124
6
7
ii
4
i
13
4
13
11
22
5
22
160
32
51
48
14
15
2
4
ii
7
16
34
1
1
5
12
3
24
5
15
301
163
53
144
268
140
173
941
11
16
3
2
19
51 O 30
British Columbia.
1920
Recapitulation.
Wolves     120 mature,    4 youug.
Cougar     151 mature,    9 young.
Coyotes  215 mature, 96 young.
Crows     941
Owls  51
Statement of Big Game killed by Holders of Non-eesident Game Licences, Season 1919-20.
.a "i
w.j2
District.
CM
a a
1
23
12
3
81
5
2
2
12
18
2
Atlin	
Cassiar	
Fort George   	
Lillooet   	
Kootenay*   	
Barkerville    	
Bella Coola	
Clintonf  	
New Westminsterf
Vancouver?   	
Victoria   	
1
16
3
31
2
i
3
3
10
i
28
2
1
43
1
43
23
i
4
* Returns incomplete. f Hunting game birds only. •
Retuens feom 1,364 Holders of Teappees' Licences, showing the Big Game and
Noxious Animals killed.
Big Game.
Moose     200
Mountain-sheep          7
Mountain-goat   157
Caribou     92
Bear     935
Deer   750
Noxious Animals.
Wolves     49
Cougars        24
Coyotes      370
Fur-bearing Animals teapped during Season 191S-19—Returns feom 1,364 Holders
of Trappers' Licences.
Beaver    8,854
Marten    6,846
Otter  258
Mink  3,954
Racoon    986
Fox    158
Musk-rat    33,877
Lynx     1,880
Wild-cat     69
Weasel    22,204
Wolverine    256
Fisher     502
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by William H.  Cullin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent  Majesty.
1020.

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