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NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF INSURANCE FOR THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 1920 (BUSINESS… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1920

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 NINTH ANNUAL REPORT
SUPERINTENDENT OF INSURANCE
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLOMBIA
1920
(BUSINESS TRANSACTED IN 1919)
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY  OF  THE  LEGISLATIVE  ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by William H.  Cullin,  Printer to the King's  Most Excellent Majesty.  To Colonel the Honourable Edward Gawler Prior,
A Member of the King's Privy Council for Canada,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned Las the honour to present the Ninth Annual Keport of the
Superintendent of Insurance for the year ended Decemher 31st, 1919.
J. W. de B. PAEEIS,
Attorney-General.
Victoria, B.C., October 11th, 1920.  REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF INSURANCE.
Department of Insurance,
Victoria, B.C., October 11th, 1920.
The Honourable J. W. de B. Farris,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—The Ninth Annual Report of the Department, covering the year ended December 31st,
1919, is herewith submitted in accordance with the " British Columbia Fire Insurance Act" and
the " Insurance Act."
I. " BRITISH COLUMBIA FIRE INSURANCE ACT."
(1.)  FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES.
At the end of 1919, 118 companies held licences for the business of fire insurance, an increase
of nine during the year.    All are also licensed by the Dominion.    It will be seen by the list
printed on page 25 that four were restricted to the insurance of automobiles.   The origin of
the different companies is as follows:—
Dominion of Canada    25
Provinces of Canada   5
Great Britain     33
Australia     1
Hong Kong    4
United  States     46
France     4
Total      118
The list shows increases of four Canadian companies, one from Great Britain, two from
Hong Kong, and two American companies, as compared with 1918.
Ten companies obtained licences during 1919, namely:—■
American Equitable Assurance Company of New York, United States.
China Fire Insurance Company, Limited, Hong Kong.
Girard Fire & Marine Insurance Company, United States.
Scottish Metropolitan Assurance Company, Limited, Great Britain.
United States Fire Insurance Company, United States.
Canadian Surety Company, Canada.
General Accident Assurance Company of Canada, Canada.
Guardian Insurance Company of Canada, Canada.
London & Lancashire Guarantee & Accident Company of Canada, Canada.
Yang-tsze Insurance Association, Limited, Hong Kong.
The last five having been prior to 1919 licensed under the " Insurance Act."
The Rhode Island Insurance Company withdrew from the Province.
The figures for premiums and losses of the year will be found on pages 29 and 30, Table I.
The total premiums record an increase, while the losses are a trifle less than in 1918, and the
business of the year was quite profitable. Other statistics are shown in Tables II., III., and IV.
It will be observed that this Province again took a high place among the different Provinces of
the Dominion in respect of the ratio of losses. Table IV., however, is perhaps a fallacious
criterion of losses, as the premiums paid may, for instance, be higher in British Columbia tl*an
they are in Ontario, while the values insured and destroyed may be the same.
(2.)  FIRES.
The statistics concerning the fires which occurred during 1919 are set forth in detail in
Tables V. to IX., pages 31 to 39. The losses are again large—too large when the value of property
destroyed per capita of the population of the Province is borne in mind. It cannot be urged too
vehemently that more carefulness, closer inspection, and better equipment, kept constantly in
order, are needed in order to reduce these losses and save to the community their excessive
annual cost. X 6 Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1920
The work of the Department in the field of advice, inspection, and inquiry has been actively
prosecuted by my able and enthusiastic officer, Mr. J. A. Thomas. He has met with rebuffs and
disappointments, but it becomes clearer every day that the great silent public has been impressed
by and is attentively watching his labours. The effect will be observed in those quarters which
are responsible for providing proper protection and safeguards to the lives and property of their
fellow-citizens. In work of this character one cannot look for speedy results. It is a case of
education by degrees, which must filter through public opinion until it grows into a habit, so
that an individual will as naturally take precaution against fire as he will in crossing a street
against being run down by a motor.
Mr. Thomas has visited nearly all the important towns of the Province and carried out
systematic inspections. In order to indicate the work that lies before us to improve the present
state of affairs, I quote some extracts from his report to me:—
" From the standpoint of fire-prevention, the conditions I have found are exceedfhgly grave.
A number of cities have good fire-prevention by-laws, but in no case are they properly enforced
by the local authorities. The recommendations of fire chiefs and building inspectors are being
ignored, and conditions are allowed to exist that are a menace to the whole community. A result
of this is seen in the high rates charged for insurance. I have found a universal demand for a
lower rate of insurance, but in almost every case I have been compelled to point out that under
existing conditions it cannot be expected that the rates will he reduced.    .    .    .
" The fundamental principle of fire-prevention is good housekeeping. The conditions in this
regard are simply criminal. Business blocks, apartment-houses, and industrial plants were found
with basements and back rooms filled with inflammable trash of all kinds, waiting for a spark
to ignite it. Dray-loads of ashes, the accumulation of years, were found on wood floors and in
boxes and barrels. Metal stove-pipes through wood partitions and floors are common. There
is hardly any regular system of inspection by the authorities. In addition to the above hazards,
we have in many of our cities a number of deserted buildings on lanes and streets. As a rule
these ' conflagration-breeders ' are full of inflammable trash and are open to tramps and children.
They are a constant menace to surrounding property and add greatly to the cost of insurance.
In the industrial plants throughout the Province the same conditions obtain. In plants representing a capital of hundreds of thousands of dollars we find rotten hose on the stand-pipes, stand-
pipes blocked with lumber or debris, fire-extinguishers empty, and generally dirty housekeeping
conditions.    .    .    .
" One of the outstanding fire hazards in connection with our sawmills is the refuse-burner.
These burners are a great source of trouble and have undoubtedly been the source of a number
of destructive fires.    .    .    .
" Another serious hazard is the public garage. Owing to the development in the automobile
business these have sprung up all over the Province. As a result we have old and unsuitable
buildings, with oil-soaked floors, open stairways and elevator-shafts in the midst of a range of
wooden buildings, both in the residence and business sections. The storage of gasolene and oils
in the smaller towns and municipalities is not properly controlled.    .    .    .
" The extensive use of electricity for light, heat, and power throughout the country has
brought to the front the question of electrical hazards. In many buildings the hazard due to
defective wiring on both inside and outside work is a serious one. The most serious cases found
by this Department have been reported on by the Inspector of Electrical Energy. The recommendations of the Inspector have in every case been placed in the hands of the proper civic
authorities, but have not in all cases been carried out.    .    .    .
" In a number of towns the water system is inadequate to cope with a serious fire, and in
many places plans of the systems are not available; the only knowledge as to the locations of
valves and intakes is under the hat of some one man.    .    .    ."
It can easily be realized that unless the matter of fire-prevention is taken seriously in hand
not only by the municipal authorities, but also by the general public, high losses and high
insurance rates will continue.
It must be admitted that often where there is a desire on the part of municipalities to do
what they should, great difficulty is experienced. Even to obtain expert advice is costly, and
fire-protection is a technical subject, involving as it does such questions as water-supply and
adequate modern equipment. This fact has impressed me on several occasions after Mr. Thomas
has visited some small town.    It is not properly his business to act as,  or the duty of the 10 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
X 7
Government to furnish, an expert; but it has occurred to me that possibly some method might
be devised by which a public body could secure technical advice at a reasonable fee. So far as
his time, fully occupied as it is, permitted, Mr. Thomas's services were placed at the disposal
of the municipalities, schools, and hospitals, and in many instances were welcomed.
The Dominion Government last year proclaimed October 9th as " Fire-prevention Day " in
emulation of the course adopted in the United States, and through its Fire Commissioner, Mr.
J. Grove-Smith, endeavoured to interest public bodies throughout the country. Our Department
gave every assistance in its power, and steps were taken to emphasize the importance of the
occasion hy communicating with Mayors, editors, school authorities, Boards of Trade, and others.
There is here, I think, a good field for advancing the cause of fire-prevention.
Dealing in detail with the figures contained in Tables V. to VIII., it is satisfactory to note
that the loss from fires reported to the Department is smaller, but the number of fires considerably greater, the larger cities mainly accounting for the increase.    Fires involving a loss of more
than $30,000 occurred as follows:—
1919—
January:   Vancouver;  warehouse;  cause, ashes against wood   $ 82,832
March:   Vancouver ;   metal-works;   cause unknown        56,849
September:  Mission District;  dwelling;  cause, spark from locomotive     30,000
September:   Point Grey ;   hospital;   cause unknown         30,000
September:   Vancouver-New Westminster District;   sawmill;   cause,
sparks from boiler       55,000
October:  Vancouver;  lumber-mill;  cause unknown      246,235
November :  West Kootenay ;  mining property;  cause unknown       39,954
December:  Victoria ;   sawmill;  cause, hot bearing       40,989
Total     $581,859
It will be observed that these eight fires alone are responsible for more than 25 per cent,
of the total loss. There cannot be too much inspection or too many precautions in the case of
industrial premises and buildings of a public character. We can only be thankful in the present
state of fire-protection, and with the habits of the people as they are, when a year passes without
some kind of conflagration. The increase in the number of fires appears principally under the
headings of dwellings, hotels, laundries, and stores. A superficial analysis of the causes in the
first class alone indicates how many fires could be prevented, being due either to gross negligence
or to structural defects. The proportion of fires for which a cause could not be assigned shows
a decrease.
A great amount of investigation was carried on by Mr. Thomas and in several cases formal
inquiries were held under the provisions of the amendments of 1918. The valuable effect of
holding an inquiry or making a close investigation into a fire is becoming recognized. A desirable
measure of publicity attaches to it, and important results often follow. In three cases the fire
was demonstrated to be of an incendiary origin.
II. " INSURANCE ACT."
At the close of 1919, 130 companies held licences under this Act to transact various classes
of insurance.    The data will be found on pages 27 and 28.    A summary is here set out:—
Where incorporated.
Dominion
Licensees.
Provincial
Licensees.
Total.
British Columbia  	
Canada  	
Other Provinces of Canada
Great Britain  	
Australia   	
New  Zealand   	
Hong Kong  	
Japan   	
United States   	
Totals	
37
3
24
1
2
43
110
2
10
i
2
1
2
20
2
37
5
34
1
1
4
1
45
130 X 8 Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1920
The new companies licensed numbered twenty-three, namely:—
Aetna Life Insurance Company, United States.
American Alliance Insurance Company, United States.
Alliance Insurance Company of Philadelphia, United States.
Canadian Fire Insurance Company, Canada.
Continental Insurance Company, United States.
Fidelity-Phenix Fire Insurance Company, United States.
Firemen's Insurance Company of Newark, N.J., United States.
General Accident Fire & Life Assurance Corporation, Limited, Great Britain.
Glens Falls Insurance Company, United States.
Globe & Rutgers Fire Insurance Company, United States.
Hartford Fire Insurance Company, United States.
Liverpool-Manitoba Assurance Company, Canada.
National Benefit Assurance Company, Limited, Great Britain.
Newark Fire Insurance Company, United States.
New Zealand Insurance Company, Limited, New Zealand.
Northern Assurance Company, Limited, Great Britain.
Northwestern Mutual Fire Association, United States.
Occidental Fire Insurance Company, Canada.
Scottish Metropolitan Assurance Company, Limited, Great Britain.
United States Fire Insurance Company, United States.
United States Lloyds, Inc., United States.
Western Casualty Company, United States.
Westchester Fire Insurance Company, United States.
Of these, seventeen had previously been licensed under the " Fire Insurance Act," and their
object was to secure authority to write automobile or marine insurance or insurance against
civil commotion. The demand for the last kind of protection was quite temporary and arose at
the time when strikes were prevalent last year. It is evident from the premiums received, as
shown by Table XIIL, page 43, that a considerable volume of business was done. All the new
licensees held licences under the Federal " Insurance Act," except the New Zealand Insurance
Company and the United States Lloyds, Inc.
The Gresham Life Assurance Society, Limited, withdrew from the Province during 1919.
During the year under review the Canada Accident Assurance Company changed its name
to " The Canada Accident and Fire Assurance Company," and the London & Lancashire Life &
General Assurance Association, Limited, took the new name of " London and Scottish Assurance
Corporation, Limited."
Four companies were issued supplementary licences, as follows:—
Aetna Insurance Company (tornado and inland transportation).
The Canada Accident and Fire Assurance Company (burglary and automobile).
Great American Insurance Company (explosion, including riot and civil commotion).
London Assurance Corporation (automobile).
The general statements of companies holding no Federal licence appear on pages 11 to 23.
A large amount of new life insurance was again written, and the publicity which the business
has received, directly and indirectly, during the past few years is bearing fruit. The companies
have been energetic in pressing home the manifold advantages of their various policies, and
improved salesmanship on the part of the agents has contributed. Other factors have played
an important part. The epidemic of influenza, the depreciated value of existing life insurance
due to the general rise in prices, the increased death duties, and high wages may be mentioned
as principal causes why life insurance has so grown in popularity. It is to be hoped that there
will be no aftermath of numerous lapsed policies. The statistics are given in Tables XL and
XII., pages 41 and 42.
Life insurance has been regarded as a stable form of insurance, almost incapable of much
further development. But two kinds, novel in their application, have been much in evidence.
The one is "group insurance," which is now being written subject to certain conditions by
companies licensed in Canada. The definition laid down by the Insurance Commissioners of
the United States is as follows:— 10 Geo. 5 British Columbia. X 9
" Group life insurance is that form of life insurance covering not less than fifty employees,
with or without medical examination, written under a policy issued to the employer, the premium
on which is to be paid by the employer or by the employer and employees jointly, and insuring
only all of his employees, or all of any class or classes thereof determined by conditions pertaining to the employment, for amounts of insurance based upon some plan which will preclude
individual selection, for the benefit of persons other than the employer; provided, however,
that when the premium is to be paid by the employer and employee jointly and the benefits of
the policy are offered to all eligible employees, not less than 75 per cent, of such employees may
be so insured."
It is still in an experimental stage and it is difficult to say whether it will survive or not.
It may prove too costly for the companies or the employers, or it may not yield the employer
the results he anticipates. I believe that proper precautions have been taken, so that, should
loss ensue, it will not fall on the shoulders of the general policyholder.
The other form is a policy which pays not only a principal sum, but also regular sums
in the case of permanent disability. These contracts differ in their terms, but the new feature
seems to lead logically to a combined policy including insurance against sickness and accident,
as well as life insurance. Under proper safeguards the evolution of life insurance in this way
is quite reasonable.
Owing to the effect of losses incurred through deaths from influenza some companies did
not deem it wise to pay " dividends" or " bonuses," or paid a smaller dividend than usual.
While the policyholders were disappointed, the course adopted is manifestly prudent, and the
companies will be all the stronger to meet any new emergency.
The figures for premiums and losses in the miscellaneous fields of insurance are printed in
Tables XIII. and XIV., pages 43 and 44, and indicate a considerable growth of business. The total
percentage of losses is, however, heavier.
An increase in the volume of accident and health insurance has taken place, and will
continue if the form of policy is developed along natural lines. There is a tendency towards
uniformity in rates and conditions, and a contract simple and intelligible in its terms and
giving general protection, to the exclusion of merely attractive " benefits." The payment of
the premiums monthly will, it is hoped, disappear. Its expense, owing to the work entailed,
can only add to the cost of the insurance.
Automobile insurance has made a further big stride and was second only to marine insurance
in the amount of premiums collected. It may be said to be still in a tentative stage, and the
policies and rates have varied considerably. One may anticipate that a settled basis for rates
and a more or less uniform type of policy, furnishing coverage against all the risks incident to
the ownership and operation of an automobile, will soon be evolved. The general public is
vitally interested in this form of insurance owing to the ever-growing list of accidents. The
liability for damages may be very large and adequate insurance should be carried. It is evident
that, while a policy protects the car-owner or other person liable, it also secures compensation
for injuries inflicted. The time may come when every owner of an automobile will have to carry
a policy in the same way as he has to hold a licence,
III. LEGISLATION.
Although it does not strictly fall within the purview of this report, I feel it desirable to
add the amendments to the "Life-insurance Policies Act" passed by the Legislature this year.
The new provisions legalize insurance by and on the lives of minors, with certain restrictions,
and are similar in substance to legislation existing in other Provinces.
There exists a certain demand for an Act requiring insurance agents to hold a licence.
The insurance laws of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan already contain
provisions of this character, and I am informed that they have proved highly beneficial in their
operation not only to the public, but also to the insurance fraternity. The business of insurance-
life, fire, or any other—grows more technical each year and demands knowledge as well as good
personal qualifications. In fact, the business is becoming a profession, and as such an agent
should be educated in its principles and practice, like a lawyer or a doctor has to be, and the
public is entitled to be safeguarded against the incompetent or dishonest agent.
Agents for fire insurance have been much discussed since the Masten Commission and Report,
owing to the high commissions which it is alleged they receive and the peculiar and paradoxical X 10 Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1920
position they occupy. While they could and should do a great deal to prevent fires occurring,
any step taken to that end is directly opposed to their own interests—their incomes are in direct
proportion to the premiums they can secure. It must be remembered that it is only within
recent times that fire insurance companies have felt it incumbent on them to co-operate in
measures designed to reduce fire-waste. Their view was that their contract was merely with the
individual insured and did not affect the community. To-day they are classed among public
services or utilities and regarded as owing a duty to the public. The agents have not yet come
to be looked upon in the same light. It is obvious, however, that that day cannot be far distant.
I owe an apology for the delay in submitting this report, but owing to my absence on leave
and the office staff being very fully occupied, it has not been possible to produce it earlier.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. G. GARRETT,
Superintendent of Insurance. 10 Geo. 5 British Columbia. X 11
APPENDIX.
INSURANCE OTHER THAN FIRE INSURANCE.
Annual Statements of Provincial Licensees for the Year ended
December 31st, 1919.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PLATE GLASS INSURANCE COMPANY.
Head Office—Vancouver, B.C.
Directors.
Walter E. Graveley. A. G. Thynne.
A. F. Beasley. H. W.  Chamberlin.
F. M. Chaldecott.
Alfred Farmer, Secretary.
Amount deposited with the Government of British Columbia: British Columbia Inscribed
Stock, £200; Township of Richmond bonds, $5,000; Dominion of Canada War Loan bonds,
$1,000;   total  (par), $6,972.22.
Authorized capital     $25,000 00
Amount subscribed       9,600 00
Amount paid up       3,840 00
Statement for the Year endeo December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
Cash value (excluding interest and dividends) of stock, shares, bonds, debentures, etc. $15,138 18
Cash on deposit to the Company's credit and not drawn against on December 31st, 1919 2,503 34
Premiums uncollected (net commissions deducted)    3,309 93
Interest due or accrued and unpaid  83 73
Total assets  ,  $21,035 18
Liabilities.
Total reserve of unearned premiums, $20,110.99;  carried out at 80 per cent, thereof.. $16,088 79
Total amount of liabilities    $16,088 79
Capital stock paid up   3,840 00
Total of liabilities and paid-up capital  $19,928 79
Excess of assets over such total   $ 1,106 39
Receipts.
Net cash received for premiums   $17,968 56
Cash received for interest   759 80
Cash received for debentures, mortgages, etc.  (not extended), $1,061.50.
Cash from all other sources  ,  659 42
Total receipts    $19,387 78 X 12
Report of the Superintendent of Insurance,
1920
Expenditure.
Cash paid to agents for commission, salaries, and bonus
for statutory assessment and licence fees  ...
rent and taxes 	
salaries, directors' and auditors' fees  ...
printing, stationery, and advertising ....
postage, telegrams, and express  	
other expenses  	
Total expenses of management 	
Amount paid for losses occurring during the year	
Cash paid for dividends  	
Cash paid for debentures, mortgages, etc. (not extended), $2,000.
$ 6,288
99
251
67
IIS
70
510
00
22
00
15
00
27
75
$ 7,234
11
8,302
25
960 00
Total expenditures     $16,496 36
List of Shareholders.
Name.
Residence.
No. of
Shares.
Amount
subscribed.
Amount
paid,
H.  Bell-Irving   	
W. E. Graveley   	
A. McC. Creery  	
A. F. Beasley  	
T. O. Richards  	
H.  W.  Chamberlin   	
H. O. Ackroyd  	
D. B. Charleson  	
W. J. Albutt   	
R.  Martin   	
J.   Rogers    	
A.   G.   Thynne   	
F.  M. Chaldecott   	
0. E. Hope  	
T. A. Blythe (estate of)
P.  W.  Charleson   	
Vancouver
Victoria   ..
Vancouver
5
5
1
7
1
5
1
1
17
1
2
35
5
2
3
5
96
$ 500
500
100
700
100
500
100
100
1,700
100
200
3,500
500
200
300
500
$9,600
$ 200
200
40
280
40
200
40
40
680
40
80
1,400
200
80
120
200
S3,S10 10 Geo. 5 British Columbia. X 13
CANTON INSURANCE OFFICE, LIMITED.
Head Office—Victoria, Hong Kong.
Consulting Committee.
The Hon. Mr. John Johnstone, Chairman. Sir Robert Ho Tung.
G. W. Barton. F. Maitland.
The Hon. Sir Paul Chater, C.M.G. T. E. Pearce.
C. S. Gubbay. A. H. Compton.
General Agents.
Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co., Limited, Hong Kong.
Capital authorized and subscribed   $2,500,000 00
Amount paid up       1,000,000 00
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
Cash in hand, in transit, and on current account and fixed deposits with banks.... $1,273,194 69
Gold investments—
British, Indian, and Colonial Government bonds and stocks   2,595,927 93
Foreign Government loans   340,971 56
British, Colonial, and Foreign railway and port trust bonds and stocks  156,058 87
Silver investments—
Hong Kong Government 6% War Loan of 1916   100,000 00
Mortgages, loans, and debentures    1,678,812 56
Other investments    407,241 02
Agency balances  302,166 70
Accounts receivable    157,09S 47
Total assets  $7,011,471 80
Liabilities.
Capital, 10,000 shares of $250 each = $2,500,000, of which $100 per share has been
paid up     $1,000,000 00
Reserve Fund     801,282 05
Reinsurance Fund     1,176,228 27
Investment and Exchange Fluctuation Account    443,056 99
Underwriting Suspense Account ....'.  313.2S0 00
Uncollected dividends     29,666 OO
Accounts payable     130,019 09
Working Account, 1918    $1,476,175 S8
Less interim dividend at $18 per share paid on May 21st, 1919..       180,000 00
  1,296,175 88
Working Account, 1919   1,815,763 52
Total liabilities    $7,011,471 80
Note.—Dollars in Hong Kong currency, with sterling exchange at 4s. 10%d. X 14 Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1920
THE GREAT NORTH INSURANCE COMPANY.
Head Office—Calgary, Alberta.
Directors.
W. J. Walker, President. Lieut. F. A. Walker.
Col. the Hon. A. C. Rutherford, Edward J. Fream.
K.C., B.A., LL.D., B.C.L. J. K. Mclnnis.
Hon. P. E. Lessard. Geo. H. Ross, K.C., LL.B.
J. T. North, Secretary.
Amount deposited with the Government of British Columbia:  $5,000 in cash.
Authorized capital    $500,000 00
Amount  subscribed        221,200 00
Amount paid up in cash     103,443 51
Statement for the Yeae ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
Cash value of mortgages, exclusive of interest    $ 18,000 00
Cash value (excluding interest and dividends) of stock, shares, bonds, debentures, etc. 37,1S1 17
Cash on hand at Head Office   5,614 95
Cash on deposit to the Company's credit and not drawn against on December 31st,
1919     9,672 25
Agents' balances and premiums uncollected  14,314 59
Bills receivable  33,453 10
Premium notes in course of collection   12,435 76
Calls on capital stock outstanding in course of collection  18,666 49
Reinsurance collectable on unpaid and unadjusted losses   7,522 88
Due from other companies for reinsurance on losses already paid   9,316 20
Amount of all other assets  386 OS
Office furniture, etc.   (not extended), $4,684.
Total assets    $166,563 47
Liabilities.
Claims or losses adjusted .   $    6,275 74
Claims or losses resisted  •         3,852 00
Claims or losses in suspense, or supposed, or reported       10,675 00
Total amount of losses or claims unpaid    $ 20,S02 74
Live-stock reserve, 50 per cent, of premiums in force  11,012 00
Amount of unpaid loans ,  5,100 00
Amount borrowed on security of any of its legally pledgable assets  20,000 00
Total reserve of unearned premiums for all outstanding risks  31,171 60
Amount of all other liabilities   20,985 66
Total amount of liabilities   $109,072 00
Capital stock paid up in cash      103.443 51
Total of liabilities and paid-up capital    $212,515 51
Excess of assets over such total  $ 45,952 04
Receipts. ,
Net cash received for premiums     $182,915 78
Cash received for interest          3,877 01
Cash received for calls on capital stock        12,356 50
Total receipts  $199,149 89 10 Geo. 5 British Columbia. X 15
Expenditure.
Cash paid to agents for commission, salaries, and bonus   $ 45,429 95
for law  costs     140 06
„    fuel and light  3S 75
,,           „    investigation and adjustment of claims    1,956 49
,,           ..    interest, discount, and exchange   223 24
„           „    statutory assessment and licence fees  '  3,539 25
„           „    travelling expenses     8,575 03
,,           „    rent and taxes    993 12
„    salaries, directors' and auditors' fees  24,115 25
,,           „    printing, stationery, and advertising   3,983 69
„           „    postage, telegrams, and express    1,5S7 05
„           „    other expenses   5,805 01
Total expenses of management   $ 96,386 89
Net amount paid for losses occurring prior to 1919  5,510 71
Net amount paid for losses occurring during 1919   173,234 41
Cash paid for dividends   1,399 41
Total  expenditure     $276,531 42
Returns for British Columbia.
Deposit with Government, cash   $    5,000 00
Other assets   112 00
Liabilities   "  468 25
Premiums written, less return premiums   936 50
Losses incurred, net    	
Losses paid, net    	
Net amount at risk  ■ 10,425 00
LONDON & PROVINCIAL MARINE & GENERAL INSURANCE  COMPANY, LIMITED.
Head Office—London, England.
Directors.
Edwin Gray, Chairman. Richard De Neufville.
James W. Arbuthnot. Herbert E.  Secretan.
James Hamilton. William M. Strachan.
Irving G. Cortazzi, Secretary.
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
£          s. d.
By Investments valued at December 31st, 1919   1,303,344    6 2
Interest accrued    11,462    1 2
Cash on deposit and at bankers   56,619 15 0
Outstanding accounts due at home and abroad  81,866 19 8
Policy stamps      406 17 11
Total assets    £1,453,699 19 11 X 16                         Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1920
Liabilities.
£ s.   d.
To Authorized capital, 100,000 shares of £10 each = $1,000,000.
Paid-up capital, 100,000 shares of £10, £1 paid   100,000    0    0
Reserve Fund     200,000   0   0
Sundry creditors   9S,093 17 10
Investment reserve   25,000   0   0
Underwriting Suspense Account to meet all claims and other liabilities on
1918 and previous years     415,844    5   4
Balance of Underwriting Account, 1919   432,800   0    7
Balance of Profit and Loss Account  181,961 16   2
Total liabilities   £1,453,699 19 11
MARITIME INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED.
Head Office—Liverpool, England.
Directors.
Edward Hatton Cookson, Chairman. James Allan Cook.
Johan Frederick Caroe. Harold Sumner.
William C. Aikman. Jasper Muirhead Wood.
John Crosby Nicholson, Secretary.
Authorized capital   '   £1,000,000
Amount subscribed         500,000
Amount paid up          100,000
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
£ s.   d.
By Investments     1,340,458 16   9
Sundry debtors         131,075 10    4
Interest and dividends accrued, but not payable until after December 31st, 1919        5,696 10    8
Cash on deposit, in hand, and on current account         69,796    5 10
Total assets   £1,547,027    3    7
Liabilities.
£ s. d.
To Shareholders' capital paid up        100.000 0 0
General Reserve Fund      200.000 0 0
Underwriting Fund         699,518 7 8
Profit and Loss Account       196.249 1 6
£1,195,767   9    2
Sundry creditors  .'      351,259 14    5
Total liabilities   £1,547,027    3   7
NATIONAL PLATE GLASS INSURANCE COMPANY.
Head Office—Winnipeg, Man.
Amount deposited with the Government of British Columbia:   City of Salmon Arm bonds,
$5,000;   City of Nelson bonds, $300;   City of Alberni bonds, $210;   total (par), .$5,510.
Authorized  capital      $30,000 00
Amount subscribed     15,000 00
Amount paid up      10,200 00 10 Geo. 5 British Columbia. X 17
THE OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED.
Head Office—London, England.
Directors.
Hon. Charles Napier, Lawrence, Chairman. Phillip Moritz Deneke.
Sir Alex Drake Kleinwort, Bt. Maurice Ruffer.
Herbert Robinson Arbuthnot. Philip Secretan.
Harry Cunningham Brodie. David Nairn Shaw.
James Blyth Currie.
H. T. Russell Ross, Secretary.
Capital authorized and subscribed    £1,000,000
Amount paid up   :         100,000
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
£          s. d.
British Government securities    475,169   2 6
Public Boards, United Kingdom ,  27,725    0 0
Municipal and county securities, United Kingdom   17,937 10 0
Indian and Colonial Government securities   71,602 10 0
Foreign Government securities   166,577    1 5
Colonial municipal securities    22,125   0 0
Foreign municipal securities   80,583    8 3
Guaranteed and other Indian railway stock   31,645    0 0
Indian Government railway annuities   11,375   0 0
Railway and other debentures, home and foreign   153,417   4 4
Railway preference and guaranteed stocks    9,029   0 10
Railway and ordinary stocks    21,718 16 0
Loans on stocks and shares  227,812 10 O
: £1,316,717    3    4
Freehold premises         125,000    0   0
£1,441,717    3 4
Agents' balances  138,598 11 9
Outstanding premiums, etc  103,589    5 9
Bills receivable    606    6 0
Interest accrued but not yet payable  11,S19 17 4
Policy stamps on hand   231 14 0
Cash—■
On  deposit     160,991    5 0
In hand and on current account  6,252    4 6
Total assets    .. .. £1,863,806    7    8
Liabilities. .
£ s.   d.
Capital, 40,000 shares of £25, paid up £2 10s. per share (now vested in the North
British and Mercantile Insurance Company)         100,000   0   0
Marine Fund—■
Reserve    £500,000   0   0
Profit and loss      304,701   4   1
 804,701   4    1
Underwriting reserve         139,210   4   6
Balance of Underwriting Account, 1919        397,235 15    5
Sundry creditors       422,659   3   8
Total liabilities   £1,863,806    7   8 X 18 Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1920
THE RELIANCE MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED.
Head Office—Liverpool, England.
Directors.
Gilbert W. Fox, Chairman. The Hon. Evelyn Hubbard.
J. U. Hodgson." R. A. Love.
George Atherton. J. J. Ritchie.
Lieut.-Col. F. R. S. Balfour. R. W. Sharpies.
Oswald Dobell.
F. R. Edwards, Secretary.
Authorized  capital     £500,000
Amount subscribed       500,000
Amount paid up        100,000
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
'   £          s. d.
By Investments at market value    £524,566    4    1
Less loans on war stock       30,000   0   0
  494,566    4 1
Policy stamps     134 12 11
Cash at bankers and in hand   37,121    3 1
Interest accrued but not received   4.091    6 7
Accounts due to the Company for premiums, salvages, etc  135,356 11 5
Total assets       £671,269 18    1
Liabilities.
£ s.   d.
To Capital, 50,000 shares at £10 per share, £500,000;  paid up, £2 per share      100,000    0   O
Reserve Fund   . .      200,000    O    0
Balance of Profit and Loss Account   £63,218 16   6
Less interim dividend paid July 1st, 1919     10,500   0   0
I  52.718 16    6
Balance of Marine Account, 1919      134,501 16   3
Fire Insurance Fund        55,458    5 10
Suspense and Special Reinsurance Accounts         49.86S 12    5
Accounts due by the Company         78,699 15    4
Dividends unpaid    22 11   9
Total liabilities      £671,269 18    1 10 Geo. 5 British Columbia. X 19
 . .—.—_ . „_ _ ■■   —■ -■	
ROYAL PLATE GLASS INSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA.
Head Office—Vancouver, B.C.
Directors.
Dr. D. H. Wilson. R. W. Harris.
J. P. Nicolls. A. P. Bogardus.
AV. H. Malkin.
C. A. Wickens, Secretary-Treasurer.
Amount deposited with the Government of British Columbia:   Deposit receipt of Canadian
Bank of Commerce, $125; Dominion War Loan bonds   (par), $5,000;  total, $5,125.
Authorized capital    $25,000
Amount subscribed     10,000
Amount paid up        2,750
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
Cash value of mortgages, exclusive of interest   $ 2,250 00
Cash value (excluding interest and dividends) of stock, shares, bonds, debentures, etc. 7,000 00
Cash deposited with Government   125 00
Cash on deposit to the Company's credit and not drawn against on December 31st,
1919     118 55
Agents' balances and premiums uncollected   919 86
Interest due or accrued and unpaid  89 96
Commissions paid in advance  890 61
Amount of all other assets   137 50
Total assets   $11,531 4S
Liabilities.
Reserve of unearned premiums    $ 2,968 74
Amount of all other liabilities         895 61
Total amount of liabilities   $ 3,864 35
Capital stock paid up        2,750 00
Total amount of liabilities and paid-up capital   $ 6,614 35
Excess of assets over such total    $ 4,917 13
Receipts.
m
Net cash received for premiums   $ 2,310 35
Cash received for interest   539 87
Total receipts      $ 2,850 22
Expenditure.
Cash paid to agents for commission, salaries, and bonus   $    709 82
„         for interest, discount, and exchange   5 55
„           „   statutory assessment and licence fees   5 15
„           „   rent and taxes  ,  106 30
„           „   other expenses    133 96
Total expenses of management    $    960 7S
Amount paid for losses occurring prior to 1919 '.  247 57
Amount paid for losses occurring during 1919   1,317 S5
Cash paid for other expenditure   335 00
Total expenditure   $ 2,861 20 X 20
Report op the Superintendent of Insurance,
1920
List of Shareholders.
Name.
Residence.
No. of
Shares.
Amount
subscribed.
Amount
paid.
A. P. Bogardus
D. H. Wilson . .
R. W. Harris . .
W. H. Malkin .
C. A. Wickens .
P. G. Mason . ..
J. P. Nicolls . . .
I. Douglas
M. Douglas
R. D. Douglas .
N. S. Douglas  .
Vancouver
Boston, U.S.A.
Binghampton, U.S.A
10
14
14
14
8
8
5
12
5
5
5
100
$ 1,000
1,400
1,400
1.400
800
800
500
1,200
500
500
500
275 00
385 00
385 00
385 00
220 00
220 00
137 50
330 00
137 50
137 50
137 50
$10,000        $2,750 00
STANDARD MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED.
Head Office—Liverpool, England.
Directors.
F. W. Pascoe Rutter, Chairman. Walter B. Duckworth.
Jas. W. Alsop. A. Percy Eccles.
John H. Clayton. James G. Nicholson.
N. B. Barnes, Secretary.
Capital authorized and subscribed   £500,000
Amount paid up      100,000
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
£          s. d.
Investments and loans    958,584    3 7
Cash at bankers and in hand   104,839 16 0
Bills receivable    801   4 3
Sundry debtors     438,823    2 2
Accrued interest    13,460 13 4
Stamps in hand   916   4 7
Total assets   £1,517,425   3 11
Liabilities,
£          s. d.
Capital, 25,000 shares of £20 each, £4 per share paid  100,000   0 0
Reserve Fund    • • • 500,000   0 0
Reserve for unexpired risks   s  141,193   O 0
Provision for income-tax, 1919, and excess-profits duty, 1917 and 1918  130,599 15 0
Balance, Profit and Loss Account   59,593 10 8
Dividend for the year 1919   42,000   0 0
Bills payable  4,018 10 2
Claims outstanding      194,312    0 0
Sundry creditors   345,708   8 1
Total liabilities   £1,517,425    3 11 10 Geo. 5 British Columbia. X 21
THE TOKIO MARINE & FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED.
Head Office—Tokio, Japan.
Directors.
M. Suyenobu, Chairman. S. Sasaki.
T. Abe. H. Shoda.*
S. Komuro. Baron K.  Sonoda.
Baron R. Kondo.
Capital authorized and subscribed   Y. 15,000,000
Amount paid up   7,500,000
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
Yen     sen.
Capital unpaid     7,500,000 00
Office premises, etc     1,600,000 00
Japanese Government securities        5,320,279 78
British Government securities       3,676,681 25
United States Government securities      2,230,100 00
French Government securities          580,000 00
Canadian Government securities    90,000 00
Anglo-French 5% External Loan Bonds  90,000 00
Japanese and foreign municipal bonds      1,472,828 00
United States railway and other bonds and shares     l,S28,40O 00
Bonds and debentures of various companies       4,865,420 00
Shares in various companies    10,152,575 00
Loans on mortgage, etc  21,179,380 16
Accounts due to the Company       1,641,324 25
Account clue by Government under " War Risk Indemnity Act"  4,358 71
Amount due by Government under " War Risk Reinsurance Act"         118,915 46
Cash at bankers, on deposit and current account, and in hand  20,145,601 47
Total assets      82,405,864 08
Liabilities.
Yen     sen.
Share capital     15,000,000 00
Legal Reserve Fund       3,000,000 00
Underwriting Fund—
Underwriting Reserve     Y. 40,000,000 00
Suspense     9,600,758 43
 — 49,600,758 43
Staff Pension Fund         527,666 90
Accounts due by the Company      6,332,285 96
Premium due Government under " War Risk Reinsurance Act"   2,416 65
Profit and Loss Account       8,032,736 14
Total liabilities     82,495,864 08 X 22 Report op the Superintendent of Insurance, 1920
THE WESTERN EMPIRE LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY.
Head Office—Winnipeg, Man.
Directors.
William Smith, President. F. D. Bryers.
R. W. Craig. G. N., Broateh.
W. P. Rundle. S. D. Hannah.
A. J. Fraser, M.D. G. E. Graham.
F. C. O'Brien, Secretary.
Amount deposited with the Government of British Columbia:   27 Dominion Victory Loan
bonds  (par), $27,000.
Authorized capital     $1,000,000 O0
Amount subscribed .'.        736,100 00
Called capital  •        184,025 00
Amount paid up in cash         153,689 20
Statement for the Year ended December 31st, 1919.
Assets.
Cash value of real estate, less encumbrances   $   15,319 60
Cash value of mortgages, exclusive of interest   90,980 65
Policy loans    20,415 70
Cash value (excluding interest and dividends) of stock, shares, bonds, debentures, etc. 162,270 50
Actual cash on hand at Head Office  3,140 27
Cash on deposit to the Company's credit and not drawn against on December 31st,
1919     12,848 9S
Agents' balances    8,840 57
Premiums uncollected (net commissions deducted)     59,088 36
Bills receivable    19,617 20
Bills receivable on premiums on capital stock   93.412 80
Interest due or accrued and unpaid   10,839 93
Office furniture   (not extended),  $3,929.70.
Total assets       $496,774 56
Liabilities.
Claims or losses adjusted  $    1,393 88
Claims or losses in suspense or reported   9,500 00
Reinsurance reserve for life-insurance contracts in force  251,887 00
Amount of unpaid loans   42,000 00
Amount paid for advertising    ".  1,316 28
Amount of all other liabilities   6,001 60
Total amount of liabilities     $312,098 76
Capital stock paid up        153,689 20
Total of liabilities and paid-up capital     $465,787 96
Excess of assets over such total    $ 31,986 60
Receipts.
Net premiums received in cash  $115,723 92
Cash received for interest   "•  21,176 03
Cash received for calls on capital stock   26,911 80
Cash from all other sources   ,  22,802 82
Cash  received  for debentures,  mortgages,  and  other  securities   (not  extended),
$3,873.94. 	
Total receipts  •' •   $186,614 57 10 Geo. 5 British Columbia. X 23
Expenditure.
Cash paid to Agents for commission, salaries, and bonus  $ 34,557 21
for law costs    1,321 22
„           ,,    medical examiners' fees  4,886 25
„           „    interest, discount, and exchange   3,954 66
,,           „    statutory assessment and licence fees   1,680 18
„           „   travelling expenses   S61 70
„           „    rent and taxes   1,432 50
„           „    salaries, directors' and auditors' fees  15,446 10
„           ,,    printing, stationery, and advertising    3,240 41
„    postage, telegrams, and express   1,424 29
„           „    other expenses   9,715 70
Total expenses of management   $ 7S,520 22
Net amount paid for losses   37,420 85
Cash paid for debentures, mortgages, or other securities (not extended), $76,139.18.
Cash paid for dividends to policyholders  290 40
Cash paid for other expenditure   2,181 30
Total expenditure   $118,412 77
Returns fob British Columbia.
Deposit with Government, Victory Loan bonds (par)     $ 27,000 00
Assets (real estate, $15,319;  mortgages, $13,000;   loans, $1,411.95;   cash, $1,628.31;
agents' balances, $7,376.68;  interest, $634.15)     39,370 69
Liabilities  14,094 40
Premiums received   7,432 64
Losses incurred, net  4,674 75
Losses paid, net   ■..,,  2.174 75
Net amount at risk    300,650 00
THE WORLD MARINE & GENERAL INSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED.
Head Office—London, England.
Directors.
Sir Ivor Phillips, K.C.B., D.S.O., M.P., Chairman.
Herbert Ballard. John Robertson.
Norman S. Douglass. Hon. J. C. Maxwell Scott.
John Godwin. Sir John B. Wimble, K.B.E.
A. R. Marshall.
Irving H. Cortazzi, Secretary.
Capital authorized and subscribed    £250,000
Amount paid up     100,000
Statement for the Year ended December 31st. 1919.
Assets
£ s.   d.
By Investments at cost   £1,046,088   4   4
Less special reserve against depreciation in value         43,000   0   0
— 1,003,088 4    4
Sundry debtors        137,457 7, 7
Interest and dividends accrued          7,366 17    0
Cash on deposit, at bankers, and in hand         68,635 3 10
Policy  stamps              221 18 11
Total assets    £1,216,769 11    8 X 24 Report of the Superintendent of Insurance, 1920
Liabilities.
£          s. d.
To Capital authorized, 50,000 shares of £5 each = £250,000.
Capital issued, 50,000 shares of £5 each, £2 paid  100,000   0 0
Sundry creditors  193,149    8 10
Reserve Fund     200,000   0 O
Underwriting Suspense Account to meet all claims, excess-profits duty, and
other liabilities on 1918 and previous years   300,000   0 0
Profit and Loss Account balance   37,933 12 8
Underwriting Account balance   385,686 10 2
Total liabilities £1,216,769 11 10 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
X 25
LIST OF COMPANIES  LICENSED  UNDER THE  "BRITISH  COLUMBIA FIRE
INSURANCE ACT," DECEMBER 31st, 1919.
Name of the Company and Head Office.
Attorney to receive Process in British
Columbia.
(Corrected to October 11th, 1920.)
The Acadia Fire Insurance Company, Halifax, N.S	
Aetna Insurance Company,  Hartford, Conn	
Agricultural Insurance Company, Watertown, N.Y	
Alliance Assurance Company, Limited,  London, England.
Alliance Insurance Company of Philadelphia	
American Alliance  Insurance  Company,  New  York,  N.Y.
American Central Insurance Company, St. Louis, Missouri
American Equitable Assurance Company of New York, N.
Atlas Assurance Company, Limited, London, England....
Beaver Fire Insurance Company, Winnipeg, Man	
Boston Insurance Company, Boston, Mass	
British America Assurance Company, Toronto, Ontario...
British Colonial Fire Insurance Company, Montreal, Que..
British Crown Assurance Corporation, Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland
British North Western Fire Insurance Company, Toronto, Ont.  .. .
British Traders' Insurance Company, Ltd., Victoria,  Hong Kong. .
Caledonian Insurance Company, Edinburgh, Scotland	
California Insurance Company, San Francisco, Cai	
Canada Accident and Fire Assurance Co., Montreal,  Que	
Canada National Fire Insurance Company, Winnipeg, Man	
Canadian Fire Insurance Company, Winnipeg, Man	
tThe Canadian  Surety Company, Toronto, Ontario   	
Car & General Insurance Corporation, Limited, [London, Eng	
The Century Insurance Company, Limited, Edinburgh, Scotland...
The China Fire Insurance Company, Ltd., Victoria, Hong Kong..
Citizens Insurance Company of Missouri, St. Louis, Mo	
Commercial Union Assurance Company, Limited, London, England
Commercial Union Fire Insurance Company of New York	
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn	
Continental Insurance Company, New York, N.Y	
Dominion Fire Insurance Company, Toronto, Ontario	
The Dominion of Canada  Guarantee & Accident  Insurance  Company, Toronto, Ont.
The Eagle, Star & British Dominions Insurance Co., Ltd., London,
England
Employers Liability Assurance Corporation, Limited, London, Eng.
Equitable Fire & Marine Insurance Company, Providence, R.I	
Fidelity Phenix Fire Insurance Company, New York, N.Y	
Fire Association of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa	
The Fire Insurance Company of Canada, Montreal, Quebec	
Fireman's B7und Insurance Company, San Francisco,  Cal	
Firemen's Insurance Company of Newark, New Jersey	
General Accident Assurance Company of Canada, Toronto, Ont...
General   Accident   Fire   &   Life   Assurance   Corporation,   Limited,
Perth, Scotland
General Fire Assurance Company, Paris, France	
Girard Fire & Marine Insurance Company, Philadelphia, Pa	
Glens Falls Insurance Company, Glens Falls, N.Y	
Globe & Rutgers Fire Insurance Company, New York, N.Y	
Globe Indemnity Co. of Canada, Montreal, Que	
Great American Insurance Company, New York, N.Y	
Guardian Assurance Company, Limited, London, England	
Guardian  Insurance Company of Canada, Montreal,  Quebec   ....
Hartford Fire Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn	
Home Insurance Company, New York, N.Y	
Hudson Bay Insurance Company, Montreal,  Que	
tlmperial   Guarantee   &   Accident   Insurance   Company   of   Canada,
Toronto, Ont.
Imperial Underwriters Corporation of Canada, Toronto	
Insurance Company of North America, Philadelphia, Pa	
The  Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania,   Philadelphia, Pa.
Law, Union & Rock Insurance Company, Limited, London, England
Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Company,  Limited, Liverpool, England
Liverpool-Manitoba Assurance Company, Montreal, Quebec	
London Assurance Corporation, London, England	
London   &   Lancashire   Fire   Insurance   Company,   Ltd.,   Liverpool,
England
tLondon & Lancashire Guarantee & Accident Company of Canada,
Toronto, Ontario
London Guarantee & Accident Co., Ltd., London, England	
London Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Canada, Toronto, Ont..
Marine  Insurance  Company,  Limited,  London,  England   	
Mechanics & Traders Insurance Company, New Orleans, La	
Mercantile Fire Insurance Company, Waterloo, Ontario	
Merchants Fire Assurance Corporation of New York, N.Y	
Millers National Insurance Company,  Chicago,  111	
Mount Royal Assurance Company, Montreal, Quebec	
National Ben Franklin Fire Insurance Company, Pittsburgh, Pa..
National Benefit Assurance Co., Ltd., London, Eng	
National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Hartford, Conn...
The Nationale Fire Insurance Company, Paris, France	
F. W. Rounsefell, Vancouver.
J. E. Kinsman, Victoria.
J. J. Banfield, Vancouver.
W. A. Anderson and H. Miskin, Vancou-
G. F. Rennie, Vancouver. [ver.
O. D. Lampman, Vancouver.
D. W, Campbell, Victoria.
C. G. Hobson, Vancouver.
■Tohn S. Gall, Vancouver.
Waghorn, Gwynn & Co., Ltd., Vancouver.
A. Z. DeLong, Vancouver.
P. R. Brown, Victoria.
E. B. McDermid, Vancouver.
A. S. Matthew, Vancouver.
VV. A. Wand, Vancouver.
C. R. Elderton, Vancouver.
j'red  Burgess.  Vancouver.
A. W. Ross, Vancouver.
A. W. Ross, Vancouver.
R. W. Perry, Victoria.
F. C. Paterson, Victoria.
Wm. Savage, Vancouver.
J. H. Lawson, Vancouver.
Thos. W. Greer, Vancouver.
C. R. Elderton, Vancouver.
Chas. H. Macaulay, Vancouver.
A. W. Ross, Vancouver.
A.  W. Ross, Vancouver.
Robt. H. Swinerton, Victoria.
W. A.  Lawson, Vancouver.
G. H. L. Hobson, Vancouver.
E. P. Withrow, Vancouver.
R. J. Loewen and R. G. Harvey, Vancouver.
Jas. A. Young.
A. M. Pound, Vancouver.
Arthur Coles, Victoria.
Leeming Bros., Ltd., Victoria.
C. G. Hobson, Vancouver.
E. D. Todd, Victoria.
C. B. Whitney, Vancouver.
George Rorie, Vancouver.
E.J. Enthoven, Vancouver.
A. W. McLeod, Vancouver.
Richard R. Smitn, Vancouver.
J. W. Stewart, Vancouver.
A.  McC.  Creery,  Vancouver.
F. W. Rounsefell, Vancouver.
W. A. Wand, Vancouver.
R. S. Day, Victoria.
R. G. Heddle, Vancouver.
George Allan Kirk, Victoria.
II. W. Dyson, Vancouver.
F. W. Walker, Vancouver.
Donald Cramer, Vancouver.
A. Waring Giles, Vernon.
G. F. Rennie, Vancouver.
H. A. Robertson, Vancouver.
t
Wm.  Thompson,  Vancouver.
R. C. Hall, Victoria.
L. U. Conyers, Victoria.
Harold B. Girdwood, Victoria.
Wm. Thompson, Vancouver.
Wm. Thompson, Vancouver.
J. H. Watson, Vancouver.
Christopher G. Hobson, Vancouver.
W. W. Johnston, Vancouver.
W. S. Holland, Vancouver.
Wm. Thompson,  Vancouver.
C. G. Hobson, Vancouver.
C.  G. Hobson, Vancouver.
C. G. Hobson, Vancouver.
J. H. Johnston, Victoria.
J. T. Summerfield, Vancouver.
H. T. Barnes, Victoria.
C. G. Hobson, Vancouver. X 26
Report op the Superintendent op Insurance,
1920
LIST  OF  COMPANIES  LICENSED  UNDER  THE
INSURANCE ACT," DECEMBER  31st,
'BRITISH   COLUMBIA   FIRE
1919—Continued,
Name of the Company and Head Office.
Attorney to receive Process in British
Columbia.
(Corrected to October 11th, 1920.)
National Union Fire Insurance Company, Pittsburgh, Pa	
Newark Fire Insurance Company, Newark, N.J	
New Hampshire Fire Insurance Co., Manchester, N.H	
New Jersey Insurance Company, Newark, N.J	
Niagara Fire Insurance Company, New York, N.Y	
Northern Assurance Company, Limited, London. England	
§The North American Accident Insurance Co., Montreal, Quebec...
North British & Mercantile Insurance Company, London, Eng	
North Empire Fire Insurance Company, Winnipeg, Manitoba	
North West Fire Insurance Company, Winnipeg, Manitoba	
Northwestern Mutual Fire Association, Seattle, Washington	
Northwestern National Insurance Company, Milwaukee, Wis	
Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society, Limited, Norwich, England
Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corporation, Limited, London, England
Occidental Fire Insurance Company, Winnipeg, Manitoba	
Pacific Coast Fire Insurance Company, Vancouver, B.C	
Palatine Insurance Company, Limited, London, England	
The Phenix Fire Insurance Company of Paris, France	
Phoenix Assurance Company, Limited, London, England	
The Phoenix Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn	
Providence Washington Insurance Company, Providence, R.I	
Provincial Insurance Co., Ltd., Bolton, England	
Quebec Fire Assurance Company, Quebec, Que	
Queen Insurance Company of America, New York	
Queensland Insurance Company, Limited, Sydney, Australia	
Royal Exchange Assurance, London, England	
Royal Insurance Company, Limited, Liverpool, England. .	
St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, St. Paul, Minn	
Scottish Metropolitan Assurance Co., Ltd., Edinburgh, Scotland..
Scottish Union & National Insurance Company, Edinburgh, Scotland
Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Company, Springfield, Mass.
Stuyvesant Insurance Company, New York, N.Y	
Sun Insurance Office, London, England	
Union Assurance Society, Limited, London, England	
The Union Fire Insurance Company, Paris, France	
Union Insurance Society of Canton, Ltd., Victoria, Hong Kong.
Union Marine Insurance Company. Limited, Liverpool, England
United  States Fire Insurance Company,  New York,  N.Y	
Vulcan Fire Insurance Company of Oakland, Cal	
Western Assurance Company, Toronto, Ontario	
Westchester Fire Insurance Company, New York. N.Y	
The Yang-tsze Insurance Association, Limited. Shanghai, China
Yorkshire Insurance Company, Limited. York. England	
E. E. Rand, Vancouver.
F. W. Walker, Vancouver.
A. Z. DeLong, Vancouver.
H. A. Robertson, Vancouver.
D. Leeming, Victoria.
Bernard C. Mess, Victoria.
J. Edward Sears, Vancouver.
R. IT. Budd, Vancouver.
John W. Wilson, Vancouver.
Chas. H. C. Payne, Victoria.
N. B. Whitley, Vancouver.
W. B. Blane, Vancouver.
B. S. Heisterman, Victoria.
John R, Hannah, Vancouver.
A. E. Short, Vancouver.
Thos. W. Greer, Vancouver.
A. W.  Ross, Vancouver.
J. A. Griffith, Victoria.
P. W. Rounsefell, Vancouver.
Arthur E. Haynes, Victoria.
Richard W. Douglas, Vancouver.
W. B. Blane, Vancouver.
Wm. Thompson, Vancouver.
R. P. Rithet & Co., Ltd., Victoria.
C. Gardner-Johnson, Vancouver.
IT. G. Lawson, Jr., Victoria.
P. W. Walker, Vancouver.
B. S. Heisterman, Victoria.
Lawrence W. Peel, Vancouver.
Pemberton & Son,  Victoria.
Chas. H. Macaulay,  Vancouver.
H. A. Robertson, Vancouver.
P. B. Pemberton, Victoria.
D. C. McGregor, Vancouver.
Franco-Canadian Trust & Mortgage Co..
Vancouver.
C. R. Elderton,  Vancouver.
C. H. Macaulay, Vancouver.
H. A. Robertson, Vancouver.
T. W. Greer. Vancouver.
R. W. Douglas, Vancouver.
R. N. Ferguson. Victoria.
B. G. D. Phillips, Vancouver.
H. W. Dyson, Vancouver.
.t Licence under "B.C. Fire Insurance Act" limited to insurance of autombiles against fire; also
licensed under the " Insurance Act " to transact guarantee, burglary, plate glass, and automobile insurance.
f Licence under " B.C. Fire Insurance Act," limited to insurance of automobiles against fire ; also
licensed under the " Insurance Act" to transact guarantee, accident, sickness, automobile, and plate-glass
insurance.
§ Licence under " B.C. Fire Insurance Act," limited to insuring automobiles against loss or damage by
fire; also licensed under the " Insurance Act" to transact automobile, burglary, accident, sickness, and
plate-glass insurance.
Note.—Licensed since December 31st,  1919 :—
The British General Insurance Co., Ltd.. London. England ; J.  H. Gillespie, Victoria.
Caledonian American Insurance Co., New York, N.Y. : Fred Burgess, Vancouver.
Canada Security Assurance Co., Toronto, Ont. ;   J.   J.   Banfield,   Vancouver.     (This   company  took
over the company of same name incorporated  in Alberta, which was licensed  earlier in the
year.)
The Canadian Indemnity Co., Winnipeg ; A. McC. Creery, Vancouver.
Columbia Insurance Co..  Jersey City,  N.J. ;  P. W.  Rounsefell.  Vancouver.
Essex & Suffolk Equitable Insurance Society, Ltd., London, England ; John G. Elliott, Victoria.
The Motor Union Insurance Co., Ltd., London.  England :  W. W. Johnston. Vancouver.
The Pacific Marine Insurance Co.. Vancouver, B.C. ; Leslie H. Wright, Vancouver.
Railwav Passengers Assurance Co., London, England;  P. H. Grant. Vancouver.
The Roval Scottish Insurance Co.. Ltd., Glasgow. Scotland : J. II. Watson. Vancouver.
The Sterling Fire Insurance Company of Indiana. U.S.A. ; H. R. Budd, Vancouver.
The Traders & General Insurance Association. Ltd.. London. England ; C. D. J. Christie, Vancouver.
The   Wawanesa   Mutual   Insurance   Co.,   Wawanesa,   Manitoba   (deposit,  $25,000  War  bonds) ;  A.
Quesnel,   Lumby. Oj CJ
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British Columbia.
X 29
TABLE I.—NET FIRE INSURANCE  PREMIUMS AND NET LOSSES, 1919.
Name of Company.
Acadia Fire Insurance Co	
Aetna Fire Insurance Co	
Agricultural Insurance Co    	
Alliance Assurance Co., Ltd	
Alliance Insurance Co. of Philadelphia	
American Alliance Insurance Co	
American Central Insurance Co	
Atlas Assurance Co., Ltd	
Beaver Fire Insurance Co	
Boston Insurance Co	
British America Assurance Co	
British Colonial Fire Insurance Co	
British Crown Assurance Corporation, Ltd	
British Northwestern Fire Insurance Co    	
British Traders Insurance Co., Ltd	
Caledonian Insurance Co	
California Insurance Co   .   ..  	
Canada Accident & Fire Assurance Co	
Canada National Fire Insurance Co	
Canadian Fire Insurance Co	
Canadian Surety Co	
Car & General Insurance Corporation, Ltd	
Century Insurance Co., Ltd	
China Fire Insurance Co., Ltd	
Citizens Insurance Co. of Missouri	
Commercial Union Assurance Co., Ltd	
Commercial Union Fire Insurance Co. of N.Y	
Connecticut Fire Insurance Co	
Continental Insurance Co	
Dominion Fire Insurance Co	
Dominion of Canada Guarantee & Accident Insurance Co .
Eagle Star & British Dominions Insurance Co., Ltd	
Employers Liability Assurance Corporation, Ltd	
Equitable Fire & Marine Insurance Co	
Fidelity Phenix Fire Insurance Co '....
Fire Association of Philadelphia	
Fire Insurance Co. of Canada	
Fireman's Fund Insurance Co 	
Firemen's Insurance Co. of Newark	
General Accident Assurance Co. of Canada 	
General Accident Fire & Life Assurance Corporation, Ltd...
General Fire Assurance Co. of Paris	
Girard Fire & Marine Insurance Co	
Glens Falls Insurance Co	
Globe cfc Rutgers Fire Insurance Co	
Globe Indemnity Co. of Canada	
Great American Insurance Co	
Guardian Assurance Co., Ltd	
Guardian Insurance Co. of Canada	
Hartford Fire Insurance Co	
Home Insurance Co	
Hudson Bay Insurance Co	
Imperial Guarantee & Accident Insurance Co. of Canada...
Imperial Underwriters Corporation of Canada	
Insurance Co. of North America	
Insurance Co. of State of Pennsylvania	
Law-, Union & Rock Insurance Co., Ltd  	
Liverpool & I.otcdon & Globe Insurance Co	
Liverpool-Manitoba Assurance Co	
London Assurance Corporation	
London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co., Ltd	
London & Lancashire Guarantee & Accident Co. of Canada.
London Guarantee & Accident Co., Ltd	
London Mutual Fire Insurance Co. of Canada	
Marine Insurance Co., Ltd	
Mechanics & Traders Insurance Co	
Mercantile Fire Insurance Co	
Merchants Fire Assurance Corporation of N.Y	
Millers National Insurance Co	
Mount Royal Assurance Co...	
National Ben Franklin Fire Insurance Co	
National Benefit Assurance Co., Ltd	
National Fire Insurance Co. of Hartford	
The Nationale Fire Insurance Co., Paris	
National Union Fire Insurance Co ,
Newark Fire Insurance Co	
New Hampshire Fire Insurance Co	
New Jersey Insurance Co	
Niagara Fire Insurance Co	
Northern Assurance Co., Ltd	
North American Accident Insurance Co	
North British & Mercantile Insurance Co	
North Empire Fire Insurance Co	
North West Fire Insurance Co	
Carried forward.
Net Premiums.
S 29.
67.
17
22.
27
5
14
26!
74
16.
92.
i.
29l
38.
29
26
29.
26:
10.
30;
4.
39;
112.
7.
43;
45.
15;
3.
31.
55.
6.
54!
22.
16.
31.
1*:
15.
41.
13.
33.
96,
12,
121.
&■>.
39.
3.
48!
91;
43.
13.
150.
45,
82,
103.
1.
29.
6i;
7,
27.
27;
29.
4.
52.
19,
9,
77,
41,
IV,
12,
12,
29,
49,
95,
71,
16,
11,
ns
Net Amount of
Losses incurred.
S 15,019 76
11,878 45
6,212 4z
3,252 56
8,819 90
1,665 66
1,388 76
1,630 69
170 00
17,490 71
30,887 35
8,693 08
42,148 46
1,165 36
2,421 24
7,226 72
6,305 25
3,646 14
5,996 16
5,406 49
Nil.
7,430 46
5,639 06
Nil.
3,858 38
20,657 99
552 64
8,794 98
14,692 31
3,252 83'
367 51
8,987 12
9,103 88
688 65
9.639 39
4,815 50
469 46
30,799 65
1,935 67
12 50
9,299 31
9,807 87
2,665 00
5,650 36
17,981 97
3,702 62
12,007 67
45,187 27
8 40
20,535 39
43,511 74
5,910 28
1,494 17
10,918 08
26,673 65
8,169 05
1,350 08
50,891 86
11,507 52
15.131 94
21,133 63
Ml.
17,703 33
12,627 66
2,690 69
16,844 22
4,775 70
3,341 77
328 64
12,668 18
2,312 32
2,215 55
26,415 75
4,026 85
5,443 00
6,812 02
10,462 15
1,905 90
18,001 53
31,729 00
29 30
19,293 88
4,462 43
1,377 61
$842,128 :
Net Amount of
Losses paid.
$ 12,725 07
9,226 48
6,159 31
3,252 56
5,128 49
1,671 66
1,281 26
1,610 69
302 23
10,161 28
28,851 35
8,693 08
37,271 48
1,165 36
2,421 24
6,804 50
9,603 48
8,515 62
6,996 16
4,851 49
Nil.
7,405 46
4,850 81
Nil.
3,708 78
27,154 32
444 36
8,651 16
7.525 78
3,252 83
485 82
8,883 04
7,270 83
1,887 65
6,904 59
2,758 77
105 15
35,834 63
5,136 11
12 50
9,938 89
9,020 87
39 00
5,165 56
24,568 38
3,362 62
9.526 67
44,147 27
8 40
26,433 74
17,253 93
5,930 i!S
2,084 48
9,922 99
25,100 12
6,831 35
2,501 70
43,231 96
13,760 64
8,016 48
23,295 93
Nil.
21,038 30 "
8,233 79
2,955 00
19,537 59
5,075 70
2,441 77
296 30
12,665 97
2,312 32
2.215 55
28,734 25
4,171 72
2,243 95
6,732 02
3.216 95
2,061 93
18,166 53
32,116 00
29 30
18,216 13
4,462 43
1,417 97
$787,447 81 X 30
Report of the Superintendent of Insurance.
1920
TABLE I.—NET FIRE INSURANCE, ETC.—Continued.
Company.
Brought forward..
Northwestern Mutual Fire Association	
Northwestern National Insurance Co 	
Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society, Ltd....
Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corporation, Ltd.
Occidental Fire Insurance Co	
Pacific Coast. Fire Insurance Co	
Palatine Insurance Co	
Phenix Fire Insurance Co. of Paris	
Phoenix Assurance Co., Ltd	
Phoenix Insurance Co. of Hartford	
Providence Washington Insurance Co	
Provincial Insurance Co., Ltd	
Quebec Fire Assurance Co.	
Queen Insurance Co. of America.	
Queensland Insurance Co., Ltd	
Royal Exchange Assurance	
Royal Insurance Co., Ltd	
St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Co	
Scottish Metropolitan Assurance Co., Ltd	
Scottish Union & National Insurance Co	
Springfield Farm &l Marine Insurance Co	
Stuyvesant Insurance Co	
Sun Insurance Office	
Union Assurance Society, Ltd 	
Union Fire Insurance Co. of Paris	
Union Insui-ance Society of Canton, Ltd	
Union Marine Insurance Co., Ltd	
United States Fire Insurance Co	
Vulcan Fire Insurance Co. of Oakland	
Western Assurance Co	
Westchester Fire Insurance Co	
Yang Tsze Insurance Association, Ltd	
Yorkshire Insurance Co., Ltd	
Total.
Net Premiums.
$2,981,986 01
34,429 59
37,718 41
82,986 01
14,639 84
7,625 30
31,323 57
41,744 09
12,554 24
256,742 35
48,214 79
28,002 17
6,669 73
19,376 18
78,382 04
12,886 89
37,102 64
119,953 34
29,112 86
12,482 99
55,156 33
61,053 06
19,470 80
66,317 68
51,559 63
21,559 48
37,684 63
4,801 90
10,731 03
8,892 98
75,777 10
32,527,60
2,278 93
28,688 19
$4,370,432 (
Net Amount of
Losses incurred.
$842,128 38
100 04
2,480 21
38,744 52
1,292 35
2,260 78
4,679 91
16,270 62
2,549 52
109,990 41
10,482 91
11,062 65
814 96
1,816 59
16,633 67
14,157 41
13,502 37
48,829 45
10,714 76
Nil.
7,612 41
10,450 47
4,110 09
10,436 83
9,705 62
9,342 92
7,423 33
233 59
Nil.
414 93
26,773 21
19,853 10
Nil.
5,115 27
.,259,983 28
Net Amount of
Losses paid.
S7S7,447 81
100 04
836 01
35,601 04
1,297 35
2,142 63
4,651 75
20,770 29
2,442 52
95,414 00
13,533 91
10,471 94
914 96
1,816 59
16,478 67
15,157 41
12,750 07
48,737 45
10,926 56
Nil.-
7,753 41
11,824 56
24 10
9,568 56
11,030 36
9,360 42
7,238 33
233 59
Nil.
280 53
26,373 82
11,450 50
Nil.
4,566 99
$ 1,181,196 47
TABLE II.—FIRE INSURANCE SUMMARY.
Year.
Net Premiums.
Net Amount of
Losses incurred.
Net Amount of
Losses paid.
$3,180,168  66
3,121,S85   87
3,609,442   65
4,085,219 68
4,370,432 98
$1,176,835   11
1,378,764   79
887,639' 01
1.214,162   65
1,259,983 28
$1,313,759 23
1.290,641   50
1917    .                        	
958,460 60
1,120,475   80
1,181,196 47
$8,367,149  84
$5,917,384   84
$5,864,533  60
TABLE III.—DISPOSITION OF PREMIUMS RECEIVED.
1917.
1918.
1919.
Rate of losses paid per cent, of premiums received	
Rate of dividend or bonus to stockholders per  cent, of premiums received
(Canadian companies only)
Rate of general expenses per cent, of premiums received  	
Rate of premiums charged per cent, of risks taken 	
52.42
7.90
32.94
1.07
53.84
2.79
3.5.61
1.06
41.67
4.74
36.56
1.06
Note.—The figures are taken from the reports of the Superintendent of Insurance for the Dominion for
191S-19-20, and cover the business throughout Canada of the companies to which they refer. 10 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
X 31
TABLE IV.—RATIO OF LOSSES INCURRED TO PREMIUMS WRITTEN IN THE
VARIOUS PROVINCES.
Provinces.
1919.
1918.
1917.
1916.
34.60
29.84
25.25
52.48
50.32
40.S9
46.S7
50.54
39.23
44.64
29.79
62.38
42.89
28.40
59.47
20.55
52.69
48.74
5.86
32.87
25.40
5.9.15
59.54
69.29
62.77
48.52
60.98
44.44
5.26
47 90'
British   Columbia   	
45.00
52.09
60.50
50.16
77.46
210.13
49.18
39.72
Totals   	
41.10
50.76
55.62
58.78
Note.—The figures are abstracted from the report for 1919 of the Superintendent of Insurance for the
Dominion.
TABLE V.—FIRES REPORTED.
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of Loss.
City Municipalities  (35).
"io
3
3
3
1
1
13
■5
1
16
.    2
9
2
1
22
21
40
28
3
3
2
3
S
10
8
18
2
"3
11
423
8
163
$     33,815
8,301
26,500
32,580
550
9
484
8,081
2,600
900
30,418
1,593
14,004
98
Merritt   	
85
8,941
22,290
10,989
18,944
2,054
771
90O
3,133
9,225
7 713
6 721
12,904
2,909
11,594
10,497
609,739
89,182
Totals   . . .
853
14
9
"2
2
9
1
7
6
7
1
10
3
3
6
1
11
'23
1,013,890
12,099
31,555
District Municipalities  (28).
3,274
Delta	
2,481
5,168
642
3,285
29,292.
8,156
2,656
40,304
10,91.9.
10,638
.      691
Oak  Bay   	
2,275
Pitt  Meadows   	
35,235 X 32
Report of the Superintendent of Insurance,
1920
TABLE V.—FIRES REPORTED—Continued.
Districts reporting.
Number.
Amount of Loss.
District Municipalities—Continued.
Richmond    	
Saanich   	
Salmon  Arm
South Vancouver
Spallumcheen   . . .
Sumas    	
Summerland
Surrey   	
West Vancouver  .
Totals    .
Insurance Districts  (15).
Boundary   	
Fort George  	
Fort   St.   John   	
Hazelton   	
Kamloops    	
Kootenay,   North-east   	
Kootenay,  South-east   	
Kootenay,   West   	
Lillooet    	
Nanaimo, West Coast  	
Prince   Rupert   	
Vancouver-New   Westminster
Vernon   	
Victoria     	
Yale   	
Totals   	
Grand Totals
20
17
1
34
1
'   i
4
S
204
147.117
20,3S9
38
13.998
2,800
11,832
6,435
11,537
$413,266
s
34,003
6
18,307
7 '
14.528
3
4,682
7
29,213
24
101,291
29
109,948
6
8,522
19
38.920
10
22,675
20
79,038
5
2,090
9
17,576
11
19,943
164
$ 500,736
1,221
$1,927,892
Note.—Construction of buildings—
Fire-resisting    	
Brick   	
Frame   	
0, loss $     92.392
94,     „ 69,824
1,121,     „      1.765,676
Average loss per diem $5,281.89.
Loss per capita—
The Province, estimated population, 425,000   	
City of Vancouver, estimated population, 130,000	
City of Victoria, estimated population, 55,00 0	
City of New Westminster, estimated population,  16,500.
City of Fernie, estimated population, 5,000   	
City  of  Nelson,   estimated  population,   6,000	
1,221,
$1,027,!
$4 50
4 60
1 70
60
1 60
3 70 ' 10 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
X 33
TABLE VI.—CAUSES OF FIRES.
Causes of Fires.
Number.
Amount of Loss.
10
$  83,325
1
400
1
35
1
419
1
46
1
15
1
56
1
273
11
4,884
10
2,000
1
50
1
15
20
5,295
3
441
1
452
1
7,450
3
910
68
83,554
24
5,719
1
45
0
11,355
1
40
2
1,086
22
36,862
11
12,064
1
2,200
1
10
31
9,764
97
98,036
1
50
4
US
1
1,150
1
15
1
20
4
2,878
1
300
2
335
14
13,388
4
89
2
41,531
20
48,712
0
4,641
10
4,458
6
12,524
4
145
30
20,033
22
6.111
9
3,715
9
2,275
1
10
1
828
12
1,740
1
1,330
1
15
g
210
1
35
1
12
1
2
1
10
24
14,940
61
19,343
6
64,116
12
66,348
7
12,327
18
28,047
' 278
102,170
21
367
3
805
1
103
7
35,207
4
46,046
14
15,131
1
550
23
67,317
1
250
1
50
63
37,560
4
3,178
1
10
2
280
8
314
1
100
1
30
158
878,438
1
135
3
1,251
1,221
-$1,927,892
Ashes against wood	
Ashes thrown overboard set lire to oil on water	
Back-draught from furnace   	
Barrel of oil under burner upset  	
Bottle of alcohol exploding  	
Bottle of patent stove-polish upset on stove	
Brooder insufficiently protected	
Caldron for cement boiled over	
Candle carelessness	
Carburettor back-firing	
Children playing with lighted paper	
Child playing before fireplace with celluloid comb  . . .
Clothes too near stove   	
Coal-oil carelessness   	
Coffee-urn upset	
Converter-flue insufficiently protected	
Curtain from lamp or stove	
Defective chimney   	
Defective fireplace	
Defective forge	
Defective furnace or furnace-pipes  	
Defective lamp	
Defective oven   	
Defective stove or stove-pipes	
Defective wiring	
Drying wood in stove	
Duster from gas-jet	
Electrical appliances	
Exposure   	
Fire built by workmen on concrete floor set fire to joist;
Fire-crackers  .. . ~.	
Friction in felting-machine	
Fumigation   	
Furnace explosion  	
Furnace or furnace-pipes insufficiently protected  ....
Gas escaping from still   	
Gas explosion	
Gasolene  carelessness   . ;	
Grease on stove or range  	
Hot bearing	
Incendiary   	
Lamp explosion	
Lamp upset	
Lightning	
Live coals   	
Match carelessness	
Matches, children with	
Mattress against chimney or furnace	
Mosquito-smudge   	
Motor setting fire to ceiling	
Oil-burners back-firing	
Oil-stove explosion	
Oil-tank overheated	
Overresistance   	
Paper too close to stove	
Phosphorus in cupboard  	
Pumpkin-lantern upset	
Purse fell  into fire   	
Screen too close to stove	
Short circuit	
Smokers' carelessness    ,
Sparks from boiler	
Sparks from burner	
Sparks from burning rubbish	
Sparks from bush fire	
Sparks from chimney   	
Sparks from fireplace   	
Sparks from forge	
Sparks from friction	
Sparks from furnace ,
Sparks from locomotive  	
Sparks from stove	
Sparks from tractor    ,
Spontaneous combustion	
Static electricity   	
Stove explosion   	
Stove or stove-pipe insufficiently protected	
Tar boiling over	
Thawing pipes	
Torch explosion    ■	
Torch ignited woodwork	
Torch near overfiooded oil-burner  	
Trolly-wire   	
Unknown  	
Wood on furnace  . .	
Wood too close to stove  	
Totals	 X 34
Keport of the Superintendent of Insurance.
1920
TABLE VII.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Doss.
Apartments
Automobiles
17
Banks         2
Bakeries  .        3
Barns         12
Barber-shops         2
Barracks         1
Blacksmith-shops            8
Boarding-houses    1
Boats     3
Boat-houses  6
Boiler-houses  2
Breweries  1
Bridges  2
Bunk-houses  5
Canneries  2
Car-barns   1
Carpenter-shops     2
Chicken-houses  1
Churches    4
Clubs     8
Clothes too near stove	
Defective fireplace	
Defective stove	
Electric appliances	
Live coals  	
Match carelessness	
Matches, children with	
Smokers, carelessness	
Sparks from chimney  	
Sparks from furnace	
Stove-pipe insufficiently protected
Unknown	
Carburettor back-firing	
Defective wiring	
Exposure	
Gasolene carelessness   	
Unknown    	
Short circuit	
Defective fireplace	
Exposure   	
Oven insufficiently protected   	
Short  circuit   	
Unknown    	
Coal-oil carelessness  	
Exposure    	
Incendiary    	
Lamp  upset   	
Lightning   	
Matches, children with	
Sparks from bush fire   	
Unknown    	
Defective  stove   	
Incendiary   	
Sparks from chimney   	
Ashes against wood	
Barrel of oil under burner upset  .
Oil-tempering tank overheated   . . .
Smokers' carelessness	
Sparks from forge	
Unknown    	
Sparks from fireplace  	
Gasolene carelessness   	
Torch near overflooded oil-burner
Unknown    	
Exposure   	
Gasolene carelessness   	
Match carelessness	
Defective chimney  	
Sparks from boiler  	
Unknown	
Smokers'   carelessness   -.
Sparks from friction	
Smokers'   carelessness  	
Stove insufficiently protected   ....
Unknown  	
Exposure  	
Spontaneous combustion	
Spontaneous combustion	
Exposure   	
Sparks from stove   	
Stove insufficiently protected	
Matches against wood	
Defective furnace   	
Furnace insufficiently protected   . .
Incendiary	
Exposure 	
Smokers' carelessness  	
Sparks from chimney	
Thawing pipes  	
Unknown  	
1
656
1
10
2
35
1
8
1
550
1
13
2
26
■>
2,475
1
75
1
SO
2
518
i
$
1,790
4,448
1
11
1
55
u
413
9
1,475
3
916
4,660
1
$
12
1
3,813
3,825
1
$
1,011
I
125
1
650
1,786
1
$
300
1
500
1
750
1
500
1
681
1
1,000
1
125
0
23.S54
27,710
1
$
415
1
7,775
8,190
1
$
20
1
10
1
419
1
1,330
1
3,825
3
845
1
484
6,913
1
$
10
1
1,100
1
100
1
700
. 1,900
4
$
4,040
1
4,500
1
25
8,565
1
$
25
1
698
723
25
1
$
1
6
1
103
109
1
.$
5.826
3
6,054
1
9,000
20,880
1
$
2, .500
1
13,854
16,354
1
$
410
1
200
1
1,855
2,055
50
1
$
1
50
1
11,000
1
9
1
0
11,064
2
•$
3,550
9
20
1
37
1
10
2
1,950
5.5,67 10 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
X 35
TABLE VII.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Creameries
Derricks  .. .
Dredges   . .
Dry-kilns   .
Dwellings .
Dye-works  	
Engine-houses	
Factories (broom-handle)
Factories  (carriage)
Factories (fertilizer)   ....
Factories (fruit-packing)
Factories (fur-cleaning)   .
Factories (mattress)   ....
Factories (oil)   	
Factories (paper-box)   . . .
Factories (rubber-roofing)
Factories (sash and door)
Exposure     1
Matches, children with    1
Ashes thrown overboard ignited oil on water 1
Sparks from burner     1
Ashes against wood  8
Back-draught from furnace    1
Bottle of patent stove-polish upset on stove 1
Brooder  insufficiently protected     1
Candle carelessness    9
Child playing before fireplace with celluloid 1
comb
Clothes  too  near  stove     15
Coal-oil carelessness     2
Coffee-urn upset  1
Curtain from lamp     2
Defective chimney    52
Defective fireplace    21
Defective furnace-pipe  3
Defective lamp  1
Defective stove-pipe  12
Defective  wiring    .'  5
Duster from gas-.jet     1
Electric appliances     25
Exposure   ....'.  47
Fire-crackers  3
Furnace explosion     1
Furnace insufficiently protected     2
Fumigation     1
Gas explosion    2
Gasolene carelessness     3
Grease on stove or range    4
Incendiary      5
Lamp explosion     3
Lamp  upset     8
Lightning     3
Live coals    3
Match carelessness     19
Matches,  children  with     16
Mattress against furnace  1
Mosquito-smudge     2
Oil-stove explosion  6
Oil-stove upset    2
Papers too close to stove     2
Pumpkin-lantern upset    1
Purse fell into fire     1
Smokers' carelessness    18
Sparks from burner  4
Sparks from burning rubbish     4
Sparks from bush  fire     6
Sparks from chimney     235
Sparks from fireplace    '20
Sparks from locomotive    f 1
Sparks from stove  12
Spontaneous combustion  2
Stove  explosion  . 1
Stove insufficiently protected  42
Tar boiling over  2
Torch ignited woodwork  8
Unknown    76
Wood on furnace    1
Wood too near stove     2
Match carelessness  1
Unknow-n -. . . . 1
Sparks from boiler     1
Sparks from chimney    1
Hot bearing  1
Sparks from forge    1
Unknown  1
Unknown     3
Gasolene carelessness    1
Friction in felting-machine     1
Unknown     1
Oil-burners back-firing  1
Unknown   1
Stove insufficiently protected  1
Caldron for cement boiled over    1
Gas escaping from still    1
Sparks from burner  1
Exposure   1
Unknown     2
214
35
15
56
1,741
15
4,084
141
452
900
60,342
5,046
260
40
8,582
4,771
10
2,511
40,833
106
20
2,819
15
335
2,295
67
10,765
4,556
3,991
11,812
137
984
3,702
15
2,275
822
106
60
12
2
653
5,085
4,244
1,885
73,662
357
30,000
5,276
5',125
50
15,969
3,110
314
99,180
135
475
42
137
542
$    1,150
828
11,800
273
300
35
10
26,530
627
100
400
50
420,464
179
1,010
10
547
3,500
20,815
4,200
1,175
12,628
608
26,540 X 3G
Report of the Superintendent of Insurance.
1920
TABLE VII.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND  6AUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of Loss.
Factories (soap)  1
Fences     1
Fish-curing plants  2
Flumes    1
Foundries     3
Gaols     1
Garages    13
Gas-works     1
Halls  2
Haystacks     1
Hospitals  13
Hotels
Laundries
Logs   	
Lumber-mills
32
Machine-shops
Mess-houses  ..
Metal-works  ..
Spontaneous combustion	
Spontaneous combustion	
Defective  wiring   	
Incendiary 	
Sparks from bush fire  	
Defective oven   	
Torch explosion   	
Unknown   	
Unknown  	
Furnace insufficiently protected   	
Gasolene carelessness   	
Incendiary 	
Short circuit	
Smokers' carelessness 	
Spontaneous combustion	
Static electricity	
Torch explosion	
Unknown	
Spontaneous combustion |	
Defective stove-pipe	
Stove insufficiently protected	
Smokers'  carelessness	
Defective chimney   	
Match   carelessness   	
Short circuit	
Smokers'  carelessness   	
Sparks from burning rubbish   	
Sparks from chimney    '....'	
Sparks  from  furnace    ;	
Unknown	
Defective chimney	
Electric  appliances	
Exposure     	
Lamp  explosion	
Matches, children with	
Mattress too near chimney	
Oil-stove  explosion   	
Smokers' carelessness  	
Sparks from chimney	
Stove  insufficiently protected   	
Unknown   	
Clothes too near stove	
Defective chimney   	
Defective  stove-pipe	
Electric  appliances   	
Exposure   	
Fire built by workmen on concrete Door set
fire to .ioists  	
Incendiary	
Sparks from chimney   	
Spontaneous   combustion   	
Stove insufficiently protected	
Unknown   	
Sparks from bush fire	
Defective wiring	
Exposure	
Incendiary   	
Sparks from bush fire  	
Sparks from locomotive   	
Spontaneous combustion  	
Unknown   	
Unknown 	
.Sparks from bush fire   	
Sparks from chimney  	
Unknown   	
Spontaneous combustion	
Unknown   	
2,544
3,601
75
250
360
50
670
1,125
850
100
115
250
30
1,190
1,300
35
1,350
321
46
115
65
11,028
15
30,000
650
24
12,138
25
421
3,700
132
528
8,268
200
43,849
325
1,100
25
7,000
140
50
14
325
3,500
1,240
2,650
$ 689
2,100
3,117
1,500
9,154
11,000
246,235
1,400
14
8,907
698
56>,S49
50
6,145
1,050
685
4,300
4,380
100
1,335
3,178
42,940
69,935
16,174
3,000
273,795
2,000
10,321
57,547 10 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
X 37
TABLE VII.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Causes.
Amount of
Doss.
9
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
9
1
6
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
6
1
1
1
1
3
•1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
3
9
1
$
3,118
7,450
3,900
5,519
1,005
41,510
$
3
Converter-flue  insufficiently  protected   . . .
Carburettor back-firing ....'	
02 5S9
$
$•
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
]
85
10
g
95
125
365
0
490
5
8
150
40
19
375
4,730
2
5,327
6,010
1
27,000
9
25
65
175
9,035
1
9,300
5,123
9
1
106
800
20
6,67'5
7,315
15
23
16
14,048
10
7'5
900
62
1,517
352
4,753
1,500
14
Sparks from chimney   	
Stove-pipe  insufficiently protected   	
Defective  stove-pipe   	
9,169
4,098
3,115
40,9'8'9
63
55,887
8,000
2,500
55,000
100
11,232
7
1
180,984
3,100
840
35
10
299
4,284
700
Sheds   	
15
14
182
770
75
600
10
5
10
550
216
•
Incendiary	
2,418
Shingle-mills   .'	
2,000
5,448
350
27,352:
642
1,000
22,350
Unknown   	
159,142 X 38
Report of the Superintendent of Insurance;
1920
TABLE VII.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED AND CAUSES—-Continued.
Property.
Amount of Loss.
Ship-Chandleries
Slaughter-houses
Stables    	
Steel-works
Stores
Stores and dwellings over
Stores and offices over
Stores and rooms over
1.1
IT
Street-cars      7
Tents     2
Theatres  (moving-picture)   ... 1
Transformers      2
Undertaking parlors      1
Vulcanizing  plant     1
Warehouses     14;
Spontaneous combustion	
Unknown   	
Matches, children with	
Short   circuit   	
Sparks from chimney	
Sparks from locomotive  	
Spontaneous combustion	
Unknown   	
Short circuit  . . ..	
Bottle of alcohol exploding	
Children playing with lighted paper   ....
Defective chimney  	
Defective   furnace   	
Defective  stove-pipe   	
Defective wiring	
Eleetric  appliances	
Exposure           11
Fire-crackers     	
Gasolene carelessness   	
Grease  on  range   	
Incendiary	
Lamp   upset   	
Lightning    	
Match   carelessness   	
Matches, children with	
Oil-stove   explosion   	
Short circuit	
Smokers'  carelessness   	
Sparks from bush fire	
Sparks from chimney   	
Spontaneous combustion  	
Stove insufficiently protected	
Tar boiling over .'	
Unknown   	
Wood too near stove	
Clothes too near stove  	
Defective chimney   	
Drying wood in stove   	
Exposure   	
Smokers'  carelessness   	
Sparks from chimney   	
Unknown	
Exposure   	
Incendiary   	
Smokers'  carelessness   	
Unknown   	
Ashes against wood	
Defective chimney   	
Electric  appliances   	
Smokers'  carelessness   	
Sparks from chimney   	
Spontaneous   combustion    	
Stove-pipe  insufficiently  protected   	
Unknown   	
Overresistances    	
Short circuit	
Trolly-wire    	
Candle carelessness   	
Sparks from bush fire	
Unknown   	
Exposure   	
Short circuit	
Defective   furnace   	
Sparks from chimney   	
Ashes  against wood   	
Clothes too near stove  	
Exposure   	
Matches, children with	
Smokers' carelessness   	
Sparks from burner	
Sparks from burning rubbish	
Sparks  from  stove   	
Unknown   	
1
1
o
8,000
1
$
600
1
10,700
1
0
1
0.250
1
1.513
■>
276
19,344
1
1,540
1
$
46
1
50
2,660
1
15
1
13,651
1
34
1
IS
7
8,903
1
10
1
200
1
67
3
16,703
1
10
2
31
4
18,038
1
25
•i
80
1
85
'.I
3,163
1
1,897
i
2,369
it
11,404
1
6,966
1
23
-
39,555
1
776
126,779
1
$
10
2
15,069
1
2,200
2
11,517
2
120
1
5
2
8,335
37,256
1
$
3,500
1
1,242
1
25
1
2,550
5,317
1
$
37
2
138
1
118
4
142
4
2,058
1
17,096
2
1,285
2
3,027
23,901
1
$
15
O'
73
1
30
118
1
$
25
1
125
150
3,500
1
1
$
150
1
25
175
80
1
$
1
18
1
82,832
1
824
2
610
1
250
1
10
1
1,241
1
18
1
8. OOO
■a
2,516
Qfl fcOl 10 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
X 39
TABLE VII.—CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY BURNED  AND  CAUSES—Continued.
Property.
Watch-houses            1
Water-towers         1
Wharves           4
Wood            1
Totals   1,221
Sparks from chimney     1
Defective  stove-pipe     1
Motor setting fire to ceiling   1
Sparks from chimney    1
Spontaneous combustion    1
Stove  insufficiently  protected     1
Unknown     1
1,221
Amount of Loss.
10
500
50
70
10
2,000
630
35
$1,927,892
TABLE VIII.—SUMMARY.
Fires Reported.
Amount of Loss.
t/i taio
f-JpCTri
1919.
January  	
February   	
March    	
April    	
May   	
June  	
July   	
August   	
September   	
October   	
November  	
December	
Totals, 1919
Totals, 1918
Totals, 1917
Totals, 1916
Totals, 1915:
Grand totals
57
48
63
58
113
80
87
60
65
66
52
104
13
14
27
32
18
14
27
8
12
20
14
9
21
15
14
15
18
9
8
27
63
90
81
161
127
119
89
110
83
72
151
131,5(50
23,871
95,525
35,524
62,323
51,967
71,318
33,477
77,028
284,218
37,601
109,488
4,318
11,316
8,798
35(,063
20,480
3»,6&6
44,836
18,406
195,481
3,960
7,865
23,087
■8,556
7,463
34,406
16,433
38,147
77,131
38,595
36,707
101,084
14,204
53,242
74,708
144,424
42,650
138,729
87,020
120,950
168,754
154,749
88,590
373,503.
302,382
98,708
207,343
853
619
422
496
409
204
220
123
172
240
164
105
117
1,221
944
662
668
703
$1,013,890
800,668
756,427
1,041,440
865,093
413,266
'863,306
227,442
339,512
365,717
500,736
431,252
5Q8.009
$1,927,S92
2,095,226
1,541,878
1,380,952
1,230,810
959
386
4,204
$4,477,518
$2,209,243
$1,489,997
$8,176
TABLE IX.—LOSS OF LIFE, 1916-19.
Occupancy..
Cause of Fire.
(Loss or Life.
Adults.
Children.
'i
1
1
Store and Rooms. . . .
2
4
8
6
-
Totals   1918
Totals, 1917
Totals, 1910
9 X 40
Report of the Superintendent of Insurance,
1920
TABLE   X.—INVESTMENTS   IN  BRITISH   COLUMBIA   OF   COMPANIES   OTHER   THAN
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES.
(For British Columbia investments of Life Insurance Companies see Abstract of Returns of
Life Insurance Companies, post.)
Name of Company.
Mortgages.
In other
Securities.
American Central insurance Co	
Boiler Inspection & Insurance Co. of Canada	
Boston Insurance Co	
British America Assurance Co	
British Columbia Plate Glass Insurance uo	
British Colonial Fire Insurance Co	
British Crown Assurance Corporation, Ltd	
British Northwestern Fire Insurance Co	
Caledonian Insurance Co., Ltd	
California Insurance Co	
Canada Accident and Fire Assurance Co	
Canada National Fire Insurance Co	
Canadian Surety Co	
Century Insurance Co., Ltd	
Commercial Union Assurance Co., Ltd	
Dominion Fire Insurance Co	
Dominion of Canada Guarantee and Accident Insurance Co.
General Accident Assurance Co. of Canada	
General Accident Fire & Life Assurance Co., Ltd	
Glens Falls Insurance Co	
Globe & Rutgers Fire Insurance Co	
Globe Indemnity Co. of Canada	
Guardian Insurance Co. of Canada	
Hartford Fire Insurance Co	
Home Insurance Co	
Hudson Bay Insurance Co	
Imperial Guarantee & Accident Insurance Co	
Imperial Underwriters Corporation of Canada	
Insurance Co. of the State of Pennsylvania	
Law Union & Rock Insurance Co., Ltd	
Liverpool-Manitoba Assurance Co	
London & Scottish Assurance Corporation, Ltd	
London Assurance Corporation  	
London Mutual Fire Insurance Co. of Canada	
Loyal Protective Insurance Co	
Maritime Insurance Co., Ltd	
Maryland  Casualty  Co	
National Ben Franklin Fire Insurance Co	
National Fire Insurance Co. of Hartford	
National Union Fire Insurance Co	
North American Accident Insurance Co	
North British & Mercantile Insurance Co	
North Empire Fire Insurance Co	
Northern Assurance Co.. Ltd	
Northwestern National Insurance Co	
Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society, Ltd	
Pacific Coast Fire Insurance Co	
Phoenix Insurance Co	
Queen Insurance Co. of America	
Royal Insurance Co., Ltd	
Royal Plate Glass Insurance Co. of Canada	
Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Co	
Union Marine Insurance Co., Ltd	
The Yorkshire Insurance Co., Ltd	
Totals   	
%   .  10,248 OO
1,056,716 33
■70,070 91
391,035 12
13,500 00
2-8,503 60
' 94,366'66
'415,704 '66
'9,700'66
389,500 OO
123,003 58
2SO,OOO 0O
2,250 00
16,922 29
30,660 00*
44,000 00*
23,750 OO
160,866 66*
5,973 33
3,000 O0
25.219 86*
'l'5'4,869'3S
21,200 00f
19,000 00
' '25,733'33*
16,000 00*
"80,353' 33
103,911 50*
32,998 16*
44,137 54*
19,000 00
48,180 00*
5,000 00
39,333 33
76,000 00*
50,000 00*
116,250 OO
29,676 501
30,434 75T
53,200 00*
' '30,666' 66*
1.54,480 50
35>,200 00
42,519 23
100,000 00
37,500 00
62,719 65
35.220 00
22,984 75
35,000 00*
4,937 50t
147,000 00*
45,000 00
250,000 OO
43,000 271
75,200 00
629,213 92
18,600 00
32,000 00*
214,850 67*
' '37,656'66f
22,212 92
$2,901,519 83 I $3,334,007 08
Par value.
Market value.
JBook value. 10 Geo. 5
British Columbia.
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Eepoict of the Superintendent of Insurance.
1920
TABUS XII.—LIFE INSURANCE SUMMARY.
1015'.
1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
Premiums for year	
Net amount in force	
$  2,761,000
83,204,000
1,021,000
$  2,906,000
87,983,000
1,034,000
$  3,313,000
95,309,000
1,302,000
$    4,026,000
112,978,000
1,558,000
$     4,766,713
141,549,458
1,850,673
TABLE XIV.—MISCELLANEOUS INSURANCE SUMMARY.
1915.
1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
Accident, P.  . . .
L.  . . .
Sickness, P.   . . .
L.  . . .
Liability, P.   ...
L. . . .
Automobile,   P.
L.
Marine, P	
„      L	
Other forms,  P.
L.
$139,000
62,000
68,000
32,000
279,000
153,000
57,000
33,000
130,000
68,000
73,000
26,000
126,000
1197,000
47,000
111,000
100,000
50,000
43,000
21,000
282,000
68,000
191,000
103,000
93,000
13 o,000
28,000
50.000
200,000
283,000
120,000
152,000
69,000
74,-000
28,000
22,000
$221,000
'78,000
73,000
41,000
31,000
14,000
230,000'
65,000
404,000
125,000
79,000
21.000
$249,000
113,000
106,000
65,000
42,000
34,000
423,000
142,000
472,000
210,000
134,000
35,000
-Premiums.
-Losses. TABLE XIII.-
-MISCELLANEOUS  BUSINESS:   NET PREMIUMS AND LOSSES, 1019.
X
43
NAME OF COMPANY.
Accident.
Sickness.
Liability.
Automobile.
Burglary.
G UARANTEE.
Plate Glass.
Marine.
Live Stock, Steam-boiler,
Sprinkler Leakage,
Inland Transportation
and Explosion.
(Indicated by Initial
letters.)
Total
Premiums.
Total
Losses.
Unsettled
Claims.
$ 10,824 28
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
530 00
Nil.
3,404 23
Nil.
8,860 00
Nil.
125 00
10,000 00
Nil.
6,690 76
Nil.
mi.
1,167 00
8,375 94
3,147 00
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
1,603 60
Nil.
1,080 00
640 12
Nil.
50 00
5,942 92
1,521 67
2,430 00
Nil.
Nil.
1,422 30
Nil.
Nil.
2,760 00
2,870 00
'     1,985 71
100 00
Premiums.
Losses.
Premiums.
Losses.
Premiums.
Losses.
Premiums.
Losses.
Premiums.
Losses.
Premiums.
Losses.
Premiums.
Losses.
Premiums.
Losses.
Premiums.
Losses.
1
$    4,869 41
4,022 59
184 30
212 87
$       748 83
402 58
Nil
Nil.
$ 44,107 93
7,380 60
6,674 70
$ 25,389 56
187 70
975 27
$ 48,477 34
12,399 54
6,921 60
212 87
1,152 66
11,622 34
8,066 27
8,003 18
17,968 56
25.508 08
10,189 65
31,324 35
104 60
6,512 48
39,266 59
1,859 76
67,284 11
302 42
80,241 66
23,025 35
24,284 05
42,642 99
133 81
10,031 80
468 24
56,407 75
635 21
17,427 00
3,010 08
771 85
1,406 71
39,642 44
24,459 78
51,874 66
936 60
5,132 38
7,678 88
7,120 60
10,041 90
21,995 82
62.741 27
5,996 00
2,568 62
9.294 92
57,918 95
89,647 66
3,138 33
3,562 00
1,600 24
182 57
3,113 30
7,751 67
34,297 55
1,562 91
2,164 00
761 61
3,372 43
2,290 71
1,582 27
2,873 88
6,614 75
133 40
8,308 49
-27,904 58
30,124 02
2,237 40
32,916 04
9,429 45
10,222 S3
4,928 08
30.509 78
2,289 77
16,600 00
18,337 53
3,421 60
27,831 61
5,790 13
8,219 85
17,780 94
4,294 44
8,914 10
11,525 67
32,630 62
5,969 05
25,504 46
55 85
11,484 06
64,398 68
9,522 05
9,231 31
17,646 73
1,120 55
$ 26,138 89
709 88
975 27
Nil.
Nil.
1,251 00
361 65
3,057 42
8,302 25
12,948 64
3,213 62
14,711 14
Nil.
818 90
2,950 02
20 01
33,589 72
Nil.
27,445 07
4,519 30
16,309 53
18,108 07
8 32
1,276 28
Nil.
24,482 71
126 19
17,051 68
636 80
240 00
191 49
35,428 95
10,098 19
14,477 55
Nil.
Nil.
6,433 43
1,012 31
1,431 96
23,066 77
25,922 92
1,159 43
1,099 80
2,173 38
26,183 95
14,035 81
331 11
1,960 01
Nil.
Nil.
1,745 03
1,175 75
14,680 11
1,035 18
2,859 50
Nil.
134 05
2,294 32
1,000 00
2,029 70
1,275 72
Nil.
2,291 39
13,324 33
5,760 20
331 12
19,095 18
7,677 60
1,718 59
1,955 06
11,675 55
1,753 10
280 00
8,838 86
2,170 79
3,680 48
290 00
1,904 76
19,579 26
4,874 17
4,874 09
711 50
29,186 07
3,957 99
4,309 53
Nil.
4,470 29
11,215 19
732 30
10,920 77
11,434 29
220 31
1
fl
$       201 75
Nil.
$         68 50
$      119 60
$       494 55
Nil.
$       231 65
mi.
?,
s
I.T. $  62 50
Nil.
3
4
S.B. 1,152 66
Nil.
5
fl
ir,622 34
8,066 27
1,251 00
361 65
6
7
7
8
8,003 18
3,057 42
'
8
ft
$ 17,968 56
$    8,302 25
9
in
25,608 08
883 63
10,254 59
104 50
857 31
12,948 64
22 05
4,231 89
Nil.
818 90
10
ii
9,306 12
3,191 57
11
is
4,599 12
$       964 07
3,046 11
3,047 68
11,964 84
S    5,226 97
$       145 44
$       419 37
250 02
$         86 25
1,064 23
784 91
1?
13
ii
188 54
Nil.
5,466 63
Nil.
i    39,266 59
14
15
2,950 02
15
1,859 76
9,352 82
26 oi
1,328 75
16
17
37,974 87
16,457 56
19,434 68
15,803 41
521 74
Nil.
17
is
E.        302 42
Nil.
$   2 32
IS
19
35,476 54
4,982 20
7,382 35
864 95
18,894 14
6,599 69
7,417 71
2,107 43
22,331 94
10,882 55
9,082 52
1,544 60
160 06
56 89
415 63
1,339 09
Nil.
Nil.
2,097 88
246 67
2,813 19
Nil.
1,291 10
749 80
......
19
W
157 45
Nil.
I.T.     100 00
20
"1
24,281 05
16,309 53
21
09
8,090 84
1,398 05
4,615 76
1,679 75
3,379 68
2,137 44
23,800 81
133 81
2,017 40
9,866 23
8 82
115 10
Nil.
2,340 27
3,026 60
22
9S
23
9-1
759 37
312 50
779 63
466 42
2,029 09
- 276 03
19 00
636 02
639 29
S.B. 3,071 20
E.        468 24
Nil.
Nil.
24
25
9fi
7,473 34
1,625 45
48,934 41
535 21
22,857 26
126 19
26
97
27
fW
2,639 76
386 41
1,110 40
561 42
4,167 87
12,486 45
7,831 61
3,010 08
3,617 30
636 80
1,228 12
Nil.
S.B.    449 30
Kit.
28
29
L.S.    771 85
E.        861 26
240 00
Nil.
SO
'.1
545 45
9,089 16
191 49
4,591 08
31
15,167 21
20,250 04
12,282 95
10,079 43
1,858 28
505 95
124 05
Nil.
1,120 79
-2 65
32
11,981 50
[    23,727 70
10,098 19
5,916 79
E.  12,478 28
Nil.
33
S4
28,146 96
8,560 76
34
LS.     936 50
Nil.
5,132 38
271 25
Nil.
3,314 55
36
^7
954 81
270 86
2,443 57
1,912 01
1,089 11
197 10
2,381 73
691 35
330 14
Nil.
208 27
47 56
37
4,127 49
1,012 31
1 S.L.    575 00
\ E.    2,418 11
E.    6,643 98
Nil.   )
,     Nil.   f
Nil.
38
3,397 92
7,644 90
25,488 16
1,431 96
3,482 35
8,314 66
39
8,369 26
15,247 68
4,622 13
4,278 24
82 25
Nil.
983 00
Nil.
294 28
58 50
40
]    37.0S5 62
17,585 01
I.T.     167 50
23 25
*1,551 00
279 98
4,445 00
879 45
2,568 62
1,099 80
1,683 86
31,379 95
25,300 74
Nil.
9,336 38
8,637 88
7,611 06
2,173 38
13,026 39
4,243 74
11,946 57
589 33
2,319 84
2,465 65
612 00
1,556 40
4,141 24
1   1,511 21
4,289 00
1,649 01
7,051 53
3,567 09
1,603 19
29,920 00
3,042 00
Nil.
2,559 22
3,138 33
331 11
47
48
*3,562 00
1,960 01
336 00
Nil.
Nil.
225 85
900 00
3,380 28
Nil.
391 11
516 24
346 90
729 22
Nil.
100 00
1,005 00
Nil.
485 60
1,890 60
7,130 00
Nil.
2,113 00
Nil.
575 00
1,031 97
2,545 00
39 00
1,600 24
Nil.
::::::::::.
182 57
Nil.
1,374 42
Ml.
•34,297 55
585 00
15 00
14,680 11
1,738 88
1,160 03
*>9
468 78
Nil.
3,585 54
1,160 75
295 07
Nil.
1,447 92
Nil.
1,396 55
Nil.
I S.L.    448 50
'(S.B.    109 31
Nil.     \
Nil.    f
1,562 91
1,035 18
2,164 00
2,859 50
Rfi
761 51
Nil.
*S7
3,372 43
134 05
5ft
2,290 71
2,294 32
1,582 27
1,000 00
2,619 88
1,137 95
133 40
8,308 49
6,339 46
10,089 24
2,029 70
223 35
Nil.
2,291 39
1,820 23
1,295 88
E.        254 00
61
3,211 67
417 85
599 11
178 54
566 69
50 00
36 00
Nil.
1,063 33
405 98
1
11,279 25
10,100 91
8,232 64
1,073 63
8,832 55
4,386 60
3,644 30
1,956 94
549 63
2,648 09
4,376 94
464 51
903 69
2,672 18
250 22
919 24
227 00
50 00
2,237 40
6,595 52
331 12
7,339 47
26,307 56
12,355 71
E.         12 96
Nil.
*9,429 45
7,677 60
10,222 83
1,718 59
4,928 08
1,955 06
71
9,513 32
*2,289 77
3,906 05
1,753 10
4,479 52
3,239 27
j   1,372 37
467 05
13,579 05
3,870 90
80 50
Nil.
788 23
9 20
696 79
183 08
79
7S
16,600 00
280 00
"I
685 95
Nil.
415 00
469 96
- 717 02
368 10
18,053 60
8,000 80
618 59
Nil.
9,607 70
200 00
3,180 00
Nil.
7 44
Nil.
Nil.
Nil.
365 00
8,000 00
Nil.
590 10
19,623 00
323 85
Nil.
1,077 15
135 00
3,421 60
2,170 79
1,801 90
1,650 12
8,219 85
309 88
290 0?
1,904 76
25,930 53
3,371 10
I.T.       99 18
Nil
307 25
Nil.
225 00
Nil.
3,607 76
Nil.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
17,730 94
4,294 44
19,579 20
4,374 17
79
80
81
82
83
84
456 43
711 50
6,048 99
2,865 11
11,525 67
4,417 66
5,125 75
5,665 05
1,776 17
55 85
579 25
2,666 34
616 90
Nil.
27,504 87
304 00
28,606 82
1,291 65
1,402 45
15 00
955 50
•242 50
1,624 16
1,527 50
2,095 14
714 00
15,693 69
515 85
1,957 35
677 78
86.
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
11,484 06
37,652 10
4,470 29
4,703 89
88.
89.
15,296 84
5,982 10
I.T. 1,449 74
529 20
9,522 05
732 30
9,231 31
17,646 73
10,920 77
11,434 29
112 96
92.
304 05
$249,607 73
20 35
290 80
87 00
94 50
$42,674 51
Nil.
356 48
L.S.      74 72
Nil.
$1,202 37
$472,516 25
$113,586 92
$106,429 80
$65,037 70
$34,349 44
$423,094 50
$142,563 38
$5,483 55
$53,688 78
$12,572 59
$42,911 89
$21,334 35
$210,374 43
$32,907 21
\
8794 77
81,429,314 22
$601,815 95
$175,767 03
* Accident and sickness. INDEX.
ANNUAL STATEMENTS.
Page.
British Columbia Plate Glass Insurance Co  11
Canton Insurance Office, Ltd  13
Great North Insurance Co  14
London & Provincial Marine & General Insurance Co., Ltd  15
Maritime Insurance Co., Ltd  16
National Plate Glass Insurance Co  16
Ocean Marine Insurance Co., Ltd  17
Reliance Marine Insurance Co., Ltd  18
Royal Plate Glass Insurance Co. of Canada  ."  19
Standard Marine Insurance Co., Ltd  20
ToMo Marine & Fire Insurance Co., Ltd  21
Western Empire Life Assurance Co  22
World Marine & General Insurance Co., Ltd  23
TABLES.
Fire Insurance—
Companies licensed, List of December 31st, 1919  25
Companies admitted during 1919  ■  5
Companies which withdrew during 1919   5
Premiums and Losses (net), 1919   29
Summary for 1915-19   30
Statement as to Disposition of Premiums received  30
Ratio of Losses incurred to Premiums written  31
Fires—■
Districts reporting    31
Causes     33
Classification of Property burned and Causes     34
Summary,  1915-19     39
Loss of Life, 1916-19   30
Life Insurance—
Companies licensed, List of December 31st, 1919  27
Premiums, etc., 1919  41
Summary for 1915-19   42
Miscellaneous Insurance—
Companies licensed, List of December 31st, 1919  27
Companies admitted, 1919  8
Companies which withdrew, 1919  8
Provincial Licensees—Assets, Liabilities, etc  45
Premiums and Losses, 1919   43
Summary for 1915-19  42
Investments in British Columbia—
Life Companies    41
Other Companies   40
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by William H.  Cullin, Printer to the King's  Most Excellent Majesty.
1920. 1    Geo. 5
British Columbia.
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